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Sample records for bankart lesions heal

  1. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Methods Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. Results The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Conclusions Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27904726

  2. A biomechanical study of bankart lesion fixation - biodegradable ArthroRivet tack vs. suture repair.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kevin J; Mukherjee, Debi P; Ogden, Alan L; Sadasivan, Kalia K; Albright, James A; Pietrzak, William S

    2007-01-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation is commonly used in soft tissue procedures performed in the shoulder. ArthroRivettrade mark tacks (referred to as rivets here), made from a copolymer of 82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid, were developed for the Bankart procedure. Although a previous in vivo study demonstrated favorable comparison of the fixation strength and absorption characteristics of this device with that of polyglyconate bioabsorbable tacks, there have been no published biomechanical studies of this rivet in the shoulder. Fourteen shoulders were harvested from fresh-frozen cadavers of average age 74 years (46-89). Biomechanical testing was performed by measuring the energy, or work, required to anteriorly displace the humeral head 6 mm from the glenoid. Each shoulder was tested intact, vented, and before and after repair of a simulated Bankart lesion at 0, 45, and 90 degrees of abduction with and without maximal external rotation. Overall, the average work required ranged from 54.7 N-mm to 178.27 N-mm. Although the biomechanical performance of the rivet, based on resistance to anterior displacement of the humeral head, was indistinguishable from that of the suture repair, the statistical power of the test was low due to the large variance in the cadaver specimens. The results, in general, correlated well with those of previously published studies, suggesting the suitability of the bioabsorbable rivet for use in Bankart repair.

  3. Traumatic shoulder dislocation with combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament in a professional basketball player: three-year follow-up of surgical stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aakash A; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability has been well documented to have associated lesions such as a Bankart tear, humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL), Hill-Sachs lesion, fracture, and nerve injury. To our knowledge, the combined Bankart and HAGL injury in a single acute anterior shoulder dislocation has not yet been reported. We describe a traumatic first-time anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation in a professional basketball player with a combined Bankart and HAGL lesion. The patient underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair followed by open repair of the HAGL lesion with an open capsular shift reconstruction. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient had returned to an elite level of play, with an excellent outcome.

  4. The Bony Bankart Lesion: How to Measure the Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Skupiński, Jarosław; Piechota, Małgorzata Zofia; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Maczuch, Jarosław; Babińska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Summary An osseous Bankart lesion is commonly seen in patients with an anterior shoulder dislocation. It is defined as a detachment of the anteroinferior labrum associated with a glenoid rim fracture. Radiological studies are crucial not only for detecting glenoid bone defects but also for measuring the amount of bone loss. The precise quantification of the bony defect is crucial for the therapeutic desicion-making and clinical outcomes. Although we know that major glenoid bone loss requires surgical intervention, none of the studies performed so far answered the question what size of the defect should be an indication for open surgery procedures. Moreover, there is still no consensus on the exact percentage of glenoid loss that results in a higher risk of re-dislocations. In our opinion, there is a strong need for a consensus on universally accepted measuring techniques of the glenoid defect as well as on algorithms with validated glenoid bone loss threshold values for therapeutic decision-making. In this study, we review the techniques described so far in the literature and try to assess if any of these techniques should be treated as a leading method of detecting and quantifying osseous glenoid lesions. PMID:28243338

  5. Anterior dislocation of the shoulder associated with Bankart lesion in a patient with Poland's syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, P; Schnurr, C; Hackenbroch, M; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2010-02-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital entity characterized by unilateral partial or total hypoplasia of the major pectoralis muscle, breast and/or ipsilateral hand abnormalities. It has been reported in association with various structural and functional abnormalities. We report about a 23-year-old male kick-boxer with Poland's syndrome who presented in our department the history of two traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations due to boxing and self-reductions. Physical examination showed an instability of the left shoulder, and the MRI scans demonstrated a Bankart lesion. The patient had been treated with an arthroscopic Bankart repair; reattachment of the detached antero-inferior labrum down to the glenoid and repairing of the inferior gleno-humeral ligament complex. To our knowledge this is a first case report of a patient presenting with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations due to kick-boxing associated with Poland's syndrome.

  6. Critical reflection of the advanced rehabilitation of an elite rugby league player sustaining a posterior Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Andrew; Funk, Lennard

    2013-02-01

    The following is a critical description and discussion of the successful assessment and rehabilitation of a right shoulder posterior Bankart repair in an elite rugby league player. The rehabilitation follows accelerated, goal based guidelines, widely adopted in current sports practice but not well documented in the literature (Funk & Snow, 2007; Park, Lin, Yokota, & McFarland, 2004). The study serves to be the first critical discussion of such a regime.

  7. Risk of motion loss with combined Bankart and SLAP repairs.

    PubMed

    Takase, Katsumi

    2009-08-01

    We have performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures using absorbable or metallic suture anchors for traumatic anterior shoulder instability for over a decade. This article describes the frequency, pathology, and therapeutic results of patients treated for superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions concomitant with Bankart lesions. Twenty patients (Group A) had a mean age of 33.8 years at the time of surgery. On arthroscopic findings, SLAP lesions were classified type 2 in 15 patients and type 4 in 5, based on Snyder's criteria. In addition, intra-articular free bodies were present in 2 SLAP lesions, and a capsular tear was present in 1. We performed debridement (Group A1) or reattachment (Group A2) to the superior glenoid edge of these lesions, considering whether they communicated to Bankart lesions. The therapeutic results were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Japan Shoulder Society (JSS) shoulder instability score. Mean JOA and JSS shoulder instability scores were 95.1 and 90.8 points, respectively. All Group A patients remained pain free, and no instability recurred in any patient. Meanwhile, mean JSS shoulder instability function and range of motion scores were 18.9 and 15.1 points, respectively, in Group A1, and 17.5 and 10.1 points, respectively, in Group A2. A significant correlation in range of motion was observed in Groups A1 and A2 (P=.04). Regarding postoperative limitation in external rotation with the arm at the side, the difference in range from that on the healthy side was 9.8 degrees in Group A (7.0 degrees in Group A1 and 12.6 degrees in Group A2). When SLAP lesions communicated to Bankart lesions, we had satisfactory results without SLAP repair; therefore, unnecessary repairs for the concomitant pathology should be avoided, and different postoperative care should be performed for patients with Bankart repair with reattachment of a SLAP lesion.

  8. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. Material/Methods We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). Results According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25–100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12–35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. Conclusions With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex. PMID:26256225

  9. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  10. Revision of Failed Artroscopic Bankart Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To present our functional outcomes from patients treated arthroscopically for a failed Bankart repair, using suture anchors and capsulolabral tissue only. Methods: Series of 22 patients presented with a recurrence of instability after a previous stabilization surgery (3 Latarjet, Bankart 19). We treated them by a an all-arthroscopic procedure, avoiding bone grafts, when glenoid track was found to be enough to proceed. The failure was associated with trauma in 11 patients, a non-anatomic repair in 6 patients, capsular laxity in 4 patients and a non-union of the coracoid graft in 1 patient. Revision surgery included: Bankart repair with anchors in 17 cases, a posterior-inferior capsulo-labral plication in one case, and 5 remplissages. In 4 cases subscapularis augmentation was used because of poor capsular quality. Screw removal was necessary when treating the non-union case. Patients were followed-up by a minimum of 23 months (range 23-26), and evaluated by the UCLA Test, SS test and Rowe score. Results: Thirteen patients had an excellent result, 6 good, 2 satisfactory and one bad result, according to UCLA score. The mean Rowe score was 90.4, at final follow up. The Simple Shoulder Test went from an 8 preoperative to an 11 postoperative, mean scores. 19 of 22 patients returned to the same level of activity prior to the injury. Complications: recurrence in 2 cases, subluxation in 2 and one shoulder stiffness that required an arthrolysis. Conclusion: An arthroscopic revision surgery, after a failed Bankart repair, presents satisfactory results in selected patients. Arthroscopic vision allows a correct diagnosis of injuries as possible causes of failure and subsequent treatment.

  11. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  12. Evaluation of vernier acuity near healed retinal laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    Seven Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in own eye 6 years previously were evaluated for their vernier acuity by electrophysiologic recording techniques. In these experiments, 95 percent contrast vernier acuity targets were presented at high luminance levels to anesthetized primates. Visual evoked potentials were recorded by conventional means form scalp electrodes through hospital grade amplifiers. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses form a neodymium-YAG laser had produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, 'white dot' lesions and 'red dot' lesions in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. Vernier recording proved somewhat successful in smaller animals with less than contained retinal hemorrhage lesions in the fovea. Initial analyses demonstrated a significant decrease of the pattern response signal/noise in the experimental eye overall, and an apparent relative loss of vernier signal in some lesioned eyes. Animals with the more severe lesions have somewhat degraded small patten responses and no recordable vernier response. Apparent lesser losses produced less effect.

  13. Secondary Syphilid Developing Over Healed Lesions of Varicella: Wolf's Isotopic Response?

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Tirthankar; Shome, Koushik; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Roy, Sudipta; Gharami, Ramesh C

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic response is a distinctive phenomenon in which a new skin disorder occurs at the site of another, unrelated, and already healed skin disease. Most of the cases documented in the literature were associated with herpes zoster as primary disease while the list of “second” diseases is quite long. We report here a hitherto unreported occurrence of isotopic response in which secondary syphilis occurred on the healed lesions of varicella. PMID:25814712

  14. Spontaneous Healing of Mycobacterium ulcerans Lesions in the Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Rita; Marcq, Elly; Trigo, Gabriela; Gonçalves, Carine M.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Castro, António G.; Pedrosa, Jorge; Fraga, Alexandra G.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. BU is characterized by a wide range of clinical forms, including non-ulcerative cutaneous lesions that can evolve into severe ulcers if left untreated. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing has been reported to occur, although knowledge on this process is scarce both in naturally infected humans and experimental models of infection. Animal models are useful since they mimic different spectrums of human BU disease and have the potential to elucidate the pathogenic/protective pathway(s) involved in disease/healing. In this time-lapsed study, we characterized the guinea pig, an animal model of resistance to M. ulcerans, focusing on the macroscopic, microbiological and histological evolution throughout the entire experimental infectious process. Subcutaneous infection of guinea pigs with a virulent strain of M. ulcerans led to early localized swelling, which evolved into small well defined ulcers. These macroscopic observations correlated with the presence of necrosis, acute inflammatory infiltrate and an abundant bacterial load. By the end of the infectious process when ulcerative lesions healed, M. ulcerans viability decreased and the subcutaneous tissue organization returned to its normal state after a process of continuous healing characterized by tissue granulation and reepethelialization. In conclusion, we show that the experimental M. ulcerans infection of the guinea pig mimics the process of spontaneous healing described in BU patients, displaying the potential to uncover correlates of protection against BU, which can ultimately contribute to the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26625302

  15. Skeletal Lesions in Human Tuberculosis May Sometimes Heal: An Aid to Palaeopathological Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Kara L.; Link, Karl; Rühli, Frank; Henneberg, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    In three to five percent of active cases of tuberculosis, skeletal lesions develop. Typically, these occur on the vertebrae and are destructive in nature. In this paper, we examined cases of skeletal tuberculosis from a skeletal collection (Galler Collection) with focus on the manifestation of bony changes due to tuberculosis in various body regions in association with antibiotic introduction. This skeletal collection was created in 1925–1977 by a pathologist at the University Hospital in Zürich, Ernst Galler. It includes the remains of 2426 individuals with documented clinical histories as well as autopsies. It contained 29 cases of skeletal tuberculosis lesions. We observed natural healing of vertebral lesions through several processes including fusion of vertebrae, bone deposition and fusion of posterior elements. In these cases, we observed a higher frequency and proportion of bone deposition and fusion of posterior vertebral elements where pharmacological agents were used. There were also four cases of artificial healing through surgically induced posterior spinal fusion. With the introduction of pharmaceutical treatments, the number of individuals with multiple tuberculous foci decreased from 80% to 25% when compared to individuals who did not receive any drug therapy. Investigation of comorbidities showed that pneumonia, pleuritis and being underweight were consistently present, even with pharmaceutical treatment. Our results have applications in palaeopathological diagnoses where healing and consequent bone deposition may complicate differential diagnoses. PMID:23638146

  16. Solcoseryl in prevention of stress-induced gastric lesions and healing of chronic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Drozdowicz, D; Pytko-Polonczyk, J; Brzozowski, T; Bielański, W

    1991-03-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract of calf blood, protects the gastric mucosa against various topical irritants and enhances the healing of chronic gastric ulcerations but the mechanisms of these effects have been little studied. This study was designed to elucidate the active principle in Solcoseryl and to determine the role of prostaglandins (PG) and polyamines in the antiulcer properties of this agent. Using both, the radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay, EGF-like material was detected in Solcoseryl preparation. Solcoseryl given s.c. prevented the formation of stress-induced gastric lesions and this was accompanied by an increase in the generation of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa. Similar effects were obtained with EGF. Pretreatment with indomethacin, to suppress mucosal generation of prostaglandins (PG), greatly augmented stress-induced gastric ulcerations and antagonized the protection exerted by both Solcoseryl and EGF. Solcoseryl, like EGF, enhanced the healing of chronic gastro-duodenal ulcerations. This effect was abolished by the pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines. The healing effects of Solcoseryl and EGF was also reduced by prednisolone which decreased the angiogenesis in the granulation tissue in the ulcer area. These results indicate that Solcoseryl 1. contains EGF-like material, 2. displays the protective and ulcer healing effects similar to those of EGF and involving both PG and polyamines and 3. acts via similar mechanism as does EGF.

  17. Healing of a cyst-like lesion involving an implant with nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Bill

    2015-05-01

    Numerous reports primarily in the implant literature outline the loss of an implant claimed to be as a consequence of endodontic pathosis from an adjacent tooth. This case report outlines the resolution of a large cyst-like periapical lesion that resolved with nonsurgical management when the canal was dressed with calcium hydroxide on 4 occasions because of persistent intracanal exudate. A favorable healing outcome was achieved for the affected tooth and the implant. This report adds to a growing body of evidence to suggest that implant retained crowns are not vulnerable when an endodontic infection occurs in an adjacent tooth.

  18. Botulinum toxin type A in the healing of chronic lesion following bilateral spasticity of gluteus muscle.

    PubMed

    Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Fanelli, Benedetta; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2014-08-01

    Use of botulinum toxin is expanding as the clinical studies demonstrate new potential therapeutic applications. In rehabilitation, botulinum toxin is above all used as adjunct therapy for the treatment of spasticity, but it may prove useful for other atypical clinical situations. A 17-year-old man had a sub-arachnoid haemorrhage following the rupture of cerebral aneurism. The patient presented gluteus maximus and medius bilaterally spasticity that produced a chronic lesion in the intergluteal cleft, a flexed wrist and a flexed elbow. As treatment for this spasticity, a total of 100 U botulinum toxin type A were injected into the glutei muscles. This treatment allowed for application of topical medication and subsequently, chronic lesion healing. Botulinum toxin A may be an important therapeutic aid for clinicians faced with treating persistent pathological conditions caused by spasticity.

  19. Strontium ranelate improves delayed healing of osteolytic lesions of the jaw in a man with chronic osteomyelitis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Fragkou, Archondoula N.; Zoubos, Aristides B.; Papaggelopoulos, Panagiotis J.; Skarantavos, Grigoris

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a man with osteolytic lesions of the right mandible due to chronic osteomyelitis, with delayed healing after six months of antibiotic therapy. The patient received off-label therapy with strontium ranelate, with significant radiological improvement of his condition after 3 months. PMID:25002884

  20. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels

  1. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others. The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases. Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical-pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions. The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique. Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles.

  2. Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William B.

    2016-01-01

    My personal ethos of healing is an expression of the belief that I can and do act to heal patients while I attend to the traditional goals of medicine. The 7 supporting principles that inform my ethos are dignity, authenticity, integrity, transparency, solidarity, generosity, and resiliency. I invite others, including medical students, residents, and practicing physicians, to reflect and discover their own ethos of healing and the principles that guide their professional growth. A short digital documentary accompanies this essay for use as a reflective prompt to encourage personal and professional development. PMID:26755787

  3. Sports ability after Bankart procedure in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, A; Csépai, D; Hidas, P; Bánóczy, A

    1996-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability and the restoration of sports ability after surgery are common problems, especially among professional athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate, level and time of returning to sports activity activity after Bankart procedure in anterior shoulder instability in high level athletes. From 1992-1994 61 patients suffering from recurrent anterior shoulder instability were operated on open Bankart procedure, 44 out of 61 were professional athletes. There were 7 handball, 7 basketball, 6 football, 2 waterpolo and 1 baseball player and 4 wrestlers, 2 weight-lifters, 2 boxers, 3 bicyclists, 2 motorists, 2 swimmers, 2 sailors, 2 kayakers and 2 skiers. The mean duration of instability was 19.1 months (3-72) before operation. 29 patients had posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocation and 15 patients had posttraumatic anterior subluxations. The average number of redislocations was 4.4, ranging from 2 to 11. At the follow-up examination the patients were tested clinically for instability using the special score created by Walch and Duplay and the Constant functional score. We measured the strength of the rotator cuff by Kintrex isokinetic device from the 10th postoperative week. 35 out of 44 professional athletes could be followed-up. The average follow-up period was 14.2 months, from 6 to 31. 88% of the patients were able to return to sports participation, 66% on the previous level and 22% on a lower level. 12% of the patients finished their professional sports career. The mean rehabilitation period was 5.8 months, the average period of full restoration of sports ability was 9.3 months. Similar results were documented with the Constant score and the Walch-Duplay test (88% excellent or good, 12% fair). The main reason for the inability to continue sports activity was some pain during extreme abduction and external rotation of the arm and recurrent sensations of subluxation (3 cases). Based on the results of the follow

  4. Healing Process of Osteonecrotic Lesions of the Femoral Head Following Transtrochanteric Rotational Osteotomy: A Computed Tomography-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Devendra; Swaminathan, Siva; Oh, Jong Keon; Moon, Jun Gyu; Dwivedi, Chirayu; Hong, Suk Joo

    2017-01-01

    Background Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is a controversial hip-preserving procedure with a variable success rate. The healing process of femoral head osteonecrosis after TRO has been poorly explained till now. This study aimed to evaluate the healing process of previously transposed necrotic lesion after a TRO for nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head using computed tomography (CT). Methods Among 52 patients (58 hips) who had preserved original femoral head after TRO, we retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (28 hips) who had undergone sequential CT scans and had no major complication following TRO. The average age was 34 years (range, 18 to 59 years). The mean follow-up period was 9.1 years. We evaluated the reparative process of the transposed osteonecrotic lesion with CT scans. Results Plain radiographs of the osteonecrotic lesion revealed sclerotic and lucent changes in 14 hips (50%) and normal bony architecture in the other 14 hips (50%) at the final follow-up. CT scans of the osteonecrotic lesions showed cystic changes with heterogeneous sclerosis in 13 hips (46%), normal trabecular bone with or without small cysts in 9 hips (32%), and fragmentation of the necrotic lesion in 6 hips (22%). Seventeen hips (60%) showed minimal (13 hips) to mild (4 hips) nonprogressive collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area. The collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area on the CT scan was significantly associated with the healing pattern (p = 0.009), as all 6 patients (6 hips) with fragmentation of the necrotic lesion had minimal (5 hips) to mild (1 hip) collapse. Furthermore, a significant association was found between the collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area on the CT scan of 17 hips (60%) and postoperative Harris hip score (p = 0.021). We observed no differences among the healing patterns on CT scans with regard to age, gender, etiology, staging, preoperative lesion type, preoperative intact area, percentage of necrotic area

  5. The transcriptional activation program of human neutrophils in skin lesions supports their important role in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim; Knudsen, Steen; Follin, Per; Borregaard, Niels

    2004-06-15

    To investigate the cellular fate and function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) attracted to skin wounds, we used a human skin-wounding model and microarray technology to define differentially expressed genes in PMNs from peripheral blood, and PMNs that had transmigrated to skin lesions. After migration to skin lesions, PMNs demonstrated a significant transcriptional response including genes from several different functional categories. The up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes concomitant with the down-regulation of proapoptotic genes suggested a transient anti-apoptotic priming of PMNs. Among the up-regulated genes were cytokines and chemokines critical for chemotaxis of macrophages, T cells, and PMNs, and for the modulation of their inflammatory responses. PMNs in skin lesions down-regulated receptors mediating chemotaxis and anti-microbial activity, but up-regulated other receptors involved in inflammatory responses. These findings indicate a change of responsiveness to chemotactic and immunoregulatory mediators once PMNs have migrated to skin lesions and have been activated. Other effects of the up-regulated cytokines/chemokines/enzymes were critical for wound healing. These included the breakdown of fibrin clots and degradation of extracellular matrix, the promotion of angiogenesis, the migration and proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, the adhesion of keratinocytes to the dermal layer, and finally, the induction of anti-microbial gene expression in keratinocytes. Notably, the up-regulation of genes, which activate lysosomal proteases, indicate a priming of skin lesion-PMNs for degradation of phagocytosed material. These findings demonstrate that migration of PMNs to skin lesions induces a transcriptional activation program, which regulates cellular fate and function, and promotes wound healing.

  6. Effects of low intensity laser irradiation during healing of infected skin lesions in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Lilge, Lothar; Mazzulli, Tony; Pritzker, Kenneth P.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) on healing of infected skin wounds in the rat. Methods: Wounds on the dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats (14 per group) were inoculated or sham-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. Wounds were irradiated or sham-irradiated three times weekly from Day 1-19 using 635nm or 808nm diode lasers at radiant exposure of 1 or 20 J/cm2 delivered in continuous wave (CW) or at an intensity modulation frequency of 3800Hz. Wound area and bacterial growth were evaluated three times weekly. Results: CW 808 nm (1 and 20 J/cm2) irradiation generally delayed healing in acute wounds. However, from Day 10 onwards CW 808 nm (1 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2) and 808 nm 3800 Hz (1 J/cm2) irradiation improved healing in inoculated wounds. Healing in acute wounds improved using 635 nm irradiation at low radiant exposure (1 J/cm2); however, using 635 nm irradiation at high radiant exposure (20 J/cm2) delayed healing. Bacterial balance in wounds was significantly altered using 635 nm (20 J/cm2) and CW 808 nm irradiation (1 and 20 J/cm2). Conclusion: Clearing wounds of normal flora was not associated with improved healing. Proliferation of staphylococcal species in wounds was associated with delayed healing.

  7. Biomechanics of open Bankart and coracoid abutment procedures in a human cadaveric shoulder model.

    PubMed

    Clavert, Philippe; Kempf, Jean-François; Kahn, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The specific aims of this experiment were (1) to develop a clinically relevant model of anteroinferior shoulder dislocation in the apprehension position to compare the biomechanics of the intact anterior capsuloligamentous structures, and (2) to evaluate the initial strength of an open Bankart and of a coracoid abutment procedure. Fifteen shoulders from deceased donors were used. For the intact shoulders, mean peak load was 486 N, and stiffness was 26,7 N/mm. For the Bankart repair, the mean peak load was 264 N, and mean stiffness was 14.1 N/mm. Transosseous repairs failed by suture pullout through soft tissues. For the coracoid abutment repair, the mean peak load was 607 N and stiffness was 25.57 N/mm. This study reveals that the biomechanical performance of the Bankart and coracoid abutment repairs fails to reproduce the properties of the natural intact state.

  8. Outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair in collision versus noncollision athletes.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Massimo; Dwyer, Tim; Tsuji, Matthew R S; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the recurrence rate of arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors in collision vs noncollision athletes. Sixty-four patients who underwent arthroscopic shoulder stabilization using suture anchors for recurrent anterior dislocation were identified. Forty-three patients (22 collision and 21 noncollision) were evaluated at a minimum 24-month follow-up. The recurrence rate was reported, and functional outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Society, Western Ontario Shoulder Index, and Short Form 12) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and Student's t test with a 95% confidence interval and a significance level set at a P value less than .05. The overall dislocation recurrence rate was 4.6% (2 of 43 patients); the dislocation recurrence rate in collision athletes was 9% (2 of 22 patients), and no redislocations occurred in noncollision athletes. No statistical differences existed in Western Ontario Shoulder Index score (73.5% in collision and 73.4% in noncollision athletes; P=.831), American Shoulder and Elbow Society score (91.2 in collision and 80.7 in noncollision athletes; P=.228), and Short Form 12 score (108.5 in collision and 101.2 in noncollision athletes; P=.083). Average external rotation loss was 6.8° in collision and 5.5° in noncollision athletes (P=.864). Ninety percent of collision athletes vs 95% of noncollision athletes were satisfied. Seventy-three percent of collision and 81% of noncollision athletes were able to return to sport at their preinjury levels. Collision athletes had higher recurrence rates after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization compared with noncollision athletes, but no statistical difference was found. Functional outcomes according to American Shoulder and Elbow Society, Western Ontario Shoulder Index, and Short Form 12 were similar.

  9. The use of acupuncture-like electrical stimulation for wound healing of lesions unresponsive to conventional treatment.

    PubMed

    Sumano, H; Mateos, G

    1999-01-01

    Based on previous experimental evidence suggesting improved healing of wounds treated with electrical stimulation, we conducted a clinical trial with patients seeking alternative medicine after unsuccessful conventional medical treatment. Electricity was delivered in two forms: (1) For wounds with extensive loss of tissue and/or those that had failed to heal spontaneously, electrical stimulation was delivered via subcutaneously inserted needles surrounding the wound edges and applying a dose charge of 0.6 coulombs/cm2/day; (2) in second degree burn injuries, lesions were covered with gauze soaked in a 10% (w/v) sterile saline solution and the same dose of electricity was applied as for (1). Forty-four patients were treated with electrical stimulation of the skin; 34 in group (1) and 10 in group (2). Following electrostimulation in all patients in both groups healing proceeded in a thoroughly organized manner, almost regardless of the severity of the type of wound or burn treated. Advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed.

  10. [The effect of Solcoseryl eye gel in combination with neomycin and bacitracin on the healing of corneal lesions after foreign body removal].

    PubMed

    Haydon, P

    1983-09-01

    The effect of Solcoseryl on the healing rate of corneal lesions after foreign body removal was assessed in a double-blind study. Solcoseryl is a protein-free hemodialysate which is widely used to stimulate tissue repair processes. The healing rate was determined by means of photodocumentation which was complete in 82 out of 92 cases. The Solcoseryl group showed in significantly faster healing rate and a lower tendency to development of corneal opacities than the control group. No side-effects were observed which could be attributed to either of the drugs used in the study.

  11. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Zarezade, Abolghasem; Dehghani, Mohammad; Rozati, Ali Reza; Banadaki, Hossein Saeid; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22%) had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75); of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78). Nine patients (24.32%) had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67). Finally, 22 patients (59.46%) showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56). According to Fisher's exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method. PMID:25590034

  12. Platelet lysate and chondroitin sulfate loaded contact lenses to heal corneal lesions.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Delfino, Alessio; Riva, Federica; Icaro Cornaglia, Antonia; Marrubini, Giorgio; Musitelli, Giorgio; Del Fante, Claudia; Perotti, Cesare; Caramella, Carla; Ferrari, Franca

    2016-07-25

    Hemoderivative tear substitutes contain various ephiteliotrophic factors, such as growth factors (GF), involved in ocular surface homeostasis without immunogenic properties. The aim of the present work was the loading of platelet lysate into contact lenses to improve the precorneal permanence of platelet lysate growth factors on the ocular surface to enhance the treatment of corneal lesions. To this purpose, chondroitin sulfate, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, which is normally present in the extracellular matrix, was associated with platelet lysate. In fact, chondroitin sulfate is capable of electrostatic interaction with positively charged growth factors, in particular, with bFGF, IGF, VEGF, PDGF and TGF-β, resulting in their stabilization and reduced degradation in solution. In the present work, various types of commercially available contact lenses have been loaded with chondroitin sulfate or chondroitin sulfate in association with platelet lysate to achieve a release of growth factors directly onto the corneal surface lesions. One type of contact lenses (PureVision(®)) showed in vitro good proliferation properties towards corneal cells and were able to enhance cut closure in cornea constructs.

  13. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 cream improves burn-wound healing and attenuates burn-gastric lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mikus, D; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Petricevic, A; Aralica, G; Druzijancic, N; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Pigac, B; Perovic, D; Kolombo, M; Kokic, N; Mikus, S; Duplancic, B; Fattorini, I; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Prkacin, I; Konjevoda, P; Stambuk, N; Anic, T

    2001-12-01

    The effects of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were investigated when administered topically or systemically in burned mice. This agent is known to have a beneficial effect in a variety of models of gastrointestinal lesions, as well as on wound or fracture healing. Deep partial skin thickness burns (1.5x1.5 cm) covering 20% of total body area, were induced under anesthesia on the back of mice by controlled burning and gastric lesions were assessed 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days following injury. The first application of BPC 157 was immediately following burning, and thereafter, once daily, until 24 h before sacrifice. In the initial experiments, exposure to direct flame for 5 s, the BPC 157 was applied at 10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w. intraperitoneally (i.p.) by injection or alternatively, topically, at the burn, as a thin layer of cream (50 microg of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream (also used as local vehicle-control)), while silver sulfadiazine 1% cream was a standard agent acting locally. Others received no local medication: they were treated i.p. by injection of distilled water (distilled water-control) or left without any medication (control). In subsequent experiments involving deeper burns (direct flame for 7 s), BPC 157 creams (50 microg, 5 microg, 500 ng, 50 ng or 5 ng of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream), or vehicle as a thin layer of cream, were applied topically, at the burn. Compared with untreated controls, in both experiments, in the BPC 157 cream-treated mice all parameters of burn healing were improved throughout the experiment: less edema was observed and inflammatory cell numbers decreased. Less necrosis was seen with an increased number of capillaries along with an advanced formation of dermal reticulin and collagen fibers. An increased number of preserved follicles were observed. Two weeks after injury, BPC 157 cream

  14. Human papilloma virus lesions of the oral cavity: healing and relapse after treatment with 810-980 nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Angiero, Francesca; Buccianti, Alberto; Parma, Luisa; Crippa, Rolando

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of laser therapy in treating oral human papilloma virus (HPV) lesions. In particular, mode of action, healing, postoperative patient compliance, visual numeric scale (VNS) pain index, and recurrence were analyzed. During 2001-2012, in 170 patients (80 women and 90 men), 174 intraoral and lip HPV lesions were detected and excised by diode laser of different wavelengths (810-980 nm), with an average power of 2.1 W, in continuous wave mode, using 300 to 320 μm optical fibers. In most cases (95.4%), complete healing occurred in the first 30 days. There were no adverse effects and all patients were carefully followed up until complete healing occurred, documenting any complications. There was only one recurrence, which was later treated successfully; the mean VNS pain score was below one. In treating HPV lesions, the diode laser is not only a valuable tool for their eradication but especially it reduces relapses, thanks to the characteristics of the laser light.

  15. A comparison of the effect of triamcinolone ointment and mouthwash with or without zinc on the healing process of aphthous stomatitis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenooz, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Gholizadeh, Narges; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Definitive etiology of RAS has not been conclusively established. There is no certain treatment for aphthous stomatitis but some drugs such as steroids are commonly used for the treatment of RAS. Regarding the effect of zinc on the healing process of epithelial layer and cell division, in this research the effect of triamcinolone (with orabase) in combination with a zinc-containing mouthwash and triamcinolone alone on the healing process of RAS lesions was assessed. Methods. The present study consisted of 20 patients diagnosed with RAS. The patients were instructed to rinse the mouth-wash or placebo three times a day and triamcinolone ointment twice a day for two weeks. The largest dimension of the ulcer was measured by a digital caliper and the severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Number, size, duration, ulcer-free period and pain of the lesions were evaluated twice a week for twomonths. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Mann-Whitney U test and t-test. Results. A decrease was seen in the mean pain severity score (P = 0.631) and the size of the lesions but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.739). Also the difference between the number of lesions (P = 0.739), duration and ulcer-free period (P = 0.873) were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Zinc mouthwash seems to be as effective on wound healing process as typical treatment modalities for RAS. PMID:27429724

  16. A comparison of the effect of triamcinolone ointment and mouthwash with or without zinc on the healing process of aphthous stomatitis lesions.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenooz, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Gholizadeh, Narges; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Definitive etiology of RAS has not been conclusively established. There is no certain treatment for aphthous stomatitis but some drugs such as steroids are commonly used for the treatment of RAS. Regarding the effect of zinc on the healing process of epithelial layer and cell division, in this research the effect of triamcinolone (with orabase) in combination with a zinc-containing mouthwash and triamcinolone alone on the healing process of RAS lesions was assessed. Methods. The present study consisted of 20 patients diagnosed with RAS. The patients were instructed to rinse the mouth-wash or placebo three times a day and triamcinolone ointment twice a day for two weeks. The largest dimension of the ulcer was measured by a digital caliper and the severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Number, size, duration, ulcer-free period and pain of the lesions were evaluated twice a week for twomonths. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Mann-Whitney U test and t-test. Results . A decrease was seen in the mean pain severity score (P = 0.631) and the size of the lesions but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.739). Also the difference between the number of lesions (P = 0.739), duration and ulcer-free period (P = 0.873) were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Zinc mouthwash seems to be as effective on wound healing process as typical treatment modalities for RAS.

  17. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  18. Superior Labrum Anterior Posterior Lesions and Associated Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin; Circi, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions often cause shoulder pain, dysfunction, and instability. Professional athletes require a high level of shoulder function for competition and overhead activities. Purpose: To evaluate elite athletes who had arthroscopic surgery for common shoulder pathologies and SLAP lesions with a follow-up of more than 3 years. The associated intra-articular pathologies and return to play were documented. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Thirty-five shoulders in 34 elite athletes (4 women and 30 men; mean age, 25 years [range, 18-32 years]) had arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions and accompanying Bankart or rotator cuff tears between January 2008 and November 2011. The documentation included patient symptoms, physical examination, radiological analysis with radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging. Shoulder function was evaluated preoperatively and at follow-up using American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) scores. The mean follow-up was 52 months. Results: Isolated SLAP lesions were seen in 17.1% of patients, SLAP lesions and partial cuff tear occurred in 25.7%, associated Bankart lesions in 37.1%, full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 8.6%, Bankart and posterior labrum lesions in 8.6%, and Bankart and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 2.9%. Return to play was a mean 6.4 ± 1.5 months. The mean postoperative ASES and KJOC scores were 89.6 ± 4.6 and 80.9 ± 6.8, respectively, compared with preoperative scores of 64.0 ± 7.2 and 50.5 ± 10.3 (t test, P < .01). Conclusion: The majority (88.2%) of professional athletes returned to their preinjury levels. SLAP lesions may frequently occur with Bankart lesions and rotator cuff tears. A high rate of return to sport at the same level of athletic performance can be achieved by anatomic repair and effective rehabilitation. PMID:26665050

  19. The antero-inferior (transmuscular) approach for arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion: an anatomic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Resch, H; Wykypiel, H F; Maurer, H; Wambacher, M

    1996-06-01

    In order to find a direct approach to the antero-inferior third of the glenoid rim, an anatomic study was performed on a total of 89 shoulders (48 cadavers). To obtain defined reference points for the anterior inferior third of the glenoid cavity, it was compared with the hour markings on a clock face. The 4:30 position on the right shoulder and the 7:30 position on the left shoulder were defined as the relevant reference points. The average distance between the palpable end of the coracoid process and the 4:30 and 7:30 positions was 19 mm. The average distance to the point of intersection of the musculocutaneous nerve with the medial margin of the conjoined tendon was more than 5 cm, and was never less than 2 cm. The average distance of the axillary nerve from the 4:30 position was 2.5 cm in the horizontal plane, with a minimum of 1.5 cm. Radially, the average distance of the axillary nerve was 1.7 cm, with a minimum of 1.3 cm. The anatomic study was followed by a clinical study of 264 patients. An antero-inferior portal located maximum 2 cm distal from the palpable coracoid tip was selected for the introduction of a trocar sheath and blunt trocar, passing through the subscapularis muscle to access the antero-inferior area of the glenoid rim. As additional protection for the musculocutaneous nerve, the direction of the trocar was adjusted during introduction. Reattachment of the labrum-capsule complex was performed extra-articularly. In all cases, at least one implant was located inferior to the 4:30 or 7:30 position. No neurovascular complications arose out of the choice of portal. Out of the 264 patients, the first 100 shoulders (98 patients) were followed-up after an average time of 35 months (18 to 62 months). The recurrence rate was 9%. Excluding the first 30 shoulders (30 patients) from the development phase of the technique, the recurrence rate is only 5.7%. The rate of return to overhead sports activities was 62% and to collision sports activities 70%.

  20. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures.

  1. Healing or Not Healing.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Sabino; Sanchez, Mikel; Padilla, Ione; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Healing process might be considered as a byproduct of the mechanisms underlying the biological defense system consisting of hemostasis and clotting, the innate immune system, and fibrogenesis. But there is no biological process that does not potentially entail high costs through trade-offs with other life-history parameters and that might be seen as collateral damage. Depending on the balance among the robust and flexible modular defense system, which will be deployed in many different arrays, the structural outcome of the healing process will not resolve with a unitary outcome. Drawing on the regenerative potential of platelets, plasma biomolecules and fibrin matrix, several systems of producing autologous platelets-and plasma derived products (APPDPs) have been developed and aimed at enhancing the natural in vivo tissue regenerative capacity of damaged tissues. Despite the care with which the medical staff elaborate and apply autologous platelets-and plasma derived products, some pitfalls arise regarding the composition of autologous plasma-and platelet derived products, the modalities of their application, and the in vitro versus in vivo evaluations, all of which can deeply influence tissue healing - a process which is already unpredictable, without a unitary mechanism that might be deployed in many different structural and functional arrays which culminate in the tissue repair. A biological approach to the application of autologous platelets-and plasma derived products is crucial to obtaining optimum functional healing outcomes in addition to avoiding poor clinical results and reaching misleading conclusions.

  2. Arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels and skin lesions, arsenic metabolism, neurological functions, and biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: Review of recent findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Gamble, Mary; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2009-09-01

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35-75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (> 300 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10-300 {mu}g/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominately at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 {mu}g/L, mean 99 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention.

  3. Intra-lesional injections of recombinant human epidermal growth factor promote granulation and healing in advanced diabetic foot ulcers: multicenter, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montequín, José I; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen M; Díaz, Odalys González; Savigne, William; Sancho-Soutelo, Natasha; Rivero-Fernández, Fidel; Sánchez-Penton, Pablo; Morejón-Vega, Lourdes; Artaza-Sanz, Heriberto; García-Herrera, Arístides; González-Benavides, Cecilio; Hernández-Cañete, Carlos M; Vázquez-Proenza, Alberto; Berlanga-Acosta, Jorge; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2009-12-01

    A multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out to evaluate the intra-lesional infiltration of recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) in Wagner's grade 3 or 4 diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Subjects (149) were randomised to receive EGF (75 or 25 microg) or placebo, three times per week for 8 weeks and standard good wound care. The main endpoint was granulation tissue covering > or = 50% of the ulcer at 2 weeks. It was achieved by 19/48 controls versus 44/53 in the 75 microg group [odds ratio (OR): 7.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9-18.9] and 34/48 in the 25 microg group (OR: 3.7; 1.6-8.7). Secondary outcome variables such as end-of-treatment complete granulation response (28/48 controls, 46/53 with 75 microg and 34/48 with 25 microg EGF), time-to-complete response (controls: 5 weeks; both EGF dose groups: 3 weeks), and wound closure after follow-up (25/48 controls, 40/53 with 75 microg and 25/48 with 25 microg EGF) were also treatment dependent. Multivariate analyses yielded that they were significantly enhanced by 75 microg EGF treatment and neuropathic versus ischemic ulcers. Most adverse events were mild and no drug-related severe adverse reactions were reported. It was concluded that recombinant human EGF (rhEGF) local injections offer a favourable risk-benefit balance in patients with advanced DFU.

  4. Labral Healing

    PubMed Central

    Catan, Agustín; Vilaseca, Tomas; Arroquy, Damián; Carboni, Martín; Guiñazú, Jorge Eduardo; Orlowsky, Belén; Irigoitia, Nicolas; Chahla, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpouse of this study was to evaluate MRI images of labral repair after one year, trying to stablish MRI images as a reliable tool for the diagnosis of labral healing. Methods: One hundred and sixty-two patients presenting with femoroacetabular impingement that underwent an arthroscopic surgery were treated between 2012 and 2015. Of these, 124 met the selection criteria and were included in this study. Only patients with 12 months of follow up and labral repair were included. Patients with previous hip surgery were excluded. Coronal, sagittal and axial MRI cuts were evaluated by three independent observers, an arthroscopic hip surgery, a fellow in hip arthroscopic surgery and a musculoeskeletal radiologist. Results: on regard of our statistics 68% of the patients had labral healing images, 16% had no healing signals and 16% unsatisfactory images. Just in the 47% the observers had a 100% of agreement. Interobserver variation was: intraobserver agreement was 94% ( arthroscopic surgeon), 72 % (radiologist), 67 % (fellow). Conclusion: The main finding of this study was that a high inter and intraobserver variability was found when analysing the healing status of hip repaired labrums. Assessment of labrum healing after an arthroscopic repair should not only rely on imaging methods and therefore should be concurrently performed with a comprehensive physical examination.

  5. The meniscal healing process

    PubMed Central

    de Albornoz, Pilar Martínez; Forriol, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Summary Meniscus is a difficult structure to repair and replace. An injured or degenerative meniscus promotes osteoarthritic joint changes that should be avoided. Research focused on promoting healing or replacement must cover three different working lines: biology, mechanics and surgical technique. Biology research line looks for specific factors able to develop a collagen tissue in a matrix with cells that joins the edges of the lesion and also looks for factors able to keep the elasticity and able to regenerate the damaged meniscus fibres. On the other side, scaffolds need the adequate viscoelasticity to allow the penetration of vessels and cells to avoid reabsorption. PMID:23738268

  6. Investigation into the microbial flora of healing and non-healing decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Daltrey, D C; Rhodes, B; Chattwood, J G

    1981-01-01

    Seventy-four pressure lesions in fifty-three geriatric patients were observed at weekly intervals to determine the bacterial flora and the healing index of each lesion, expressed as initial area of lesion (cm2) - final area of lesion (cm2) divided by time in days. The micro-organisms which caused infection included Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus. Many lesions contained a mixed flora. P mirabilis and Ps aeruginosa were associated with necrotic (p less than 0.005) and enlarging (p less than 5 x 10(-7)) lesions. Bacteroides spp were associated with necrotic lesions (p less than 0.05). The presence of S aureus in a lesion was not associated with any particular trend in healing index. The implications of the microbiological findings are discussed. PMID:6790579

  7. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... care to prevent infection. Continue Reading Stages of Wound Healing Wounds heal in stages. The smaller the wound, ... How lacerations heal References Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound healing. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox ...

  8. Self-Healing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Regina; Serugendo, Giovanna Di Marzo

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Self-Awareness as an Aspect of Self-Healing * A Working Taxonomy for Software Self-Healing * Failures, errors and faults * Approaches to Software Self-Healing * Self-healing at code level * Self-healing through self-organisation * Self-healing based on policies * Architectures for self-healing * Model-based solutions for self-healing * Discussion and Conclusion

  9. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  10. Automated Estimation Of Lesion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Webber, Richard L.; Groenhuis, Roelf A. J.; Troullos, Emanuel; Rethman, Michael T.

    1985-06-01

    Two methods were studied of estimating automatically the relative volume of local lesions in digital subtractions radiographs. The first method approximates the projected, lesion area by an equivalent circular area, and the second by an equivalent polygonal area. Lesion volume is estimated in both methods as equivalent area times the average gray-level difference between the detected area and the surrounding background. Regression results of the estimated relative volume versus the calibrated size of lesions induced in dry human mandibles showed the polygonal approximation to be superior. This method also permitted successful monitoring of bone remodelling during the healing process of surgically induced lesions in dogs. The quantitative results, as well as the examples from in vivo lesions demonstrate feasibility and clinically relavance of the methodology.

  11. Identification and management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of an MRA-confirmed humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Arif; McLeod, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present the assessment and conservative management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of a humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion in an active individual. Clinical Features: A 47 year-old female office-worker with constant, deep, right shoulder pain with occasional clicking and catching claimed to have “tore something” in her right shoulder five years ago while performing reverse bicep curls. A physical exam led to differential diagnoses of a Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) lesion, Bankart lesion, and bicipital tendinopathy. A Magnetic Resonance Arthrogram revealed a HAGL lesion. Intervention and Outcome: A conservative chiropractic treatment plan in addition to physical therapy was initiated. The patient reported 75% improvement in symptoms after 4 treatments over a four-week duration. Summary: This case demonstrates the successful implementation of a conservative plan of management suggesting that the treatment provided to this patient should be considered and attempted prior to arthroscopic surgery. PMID:27385837

  12. Superior labral anterior posterior lesions of the shoulder: Current diagnostic and therapeutic standards

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Dominik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion becomes more and more frequent which is the consequence of evolving progress in both, imaging and surgical technique as well as implants. The first classification of SLAP lesions was described in 1990, a subdivision in four types existed. The rising comprehension of pathology and pathophysiology in SLAP lesions contributed to increase the types in SLAP classification to ten. Concerning the causative mechanism of SLAP lesions, acute trauma has to be differed from chronic degeneration. Overhead athletes tend to develop a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit which forms the basis for two controversial discussed potential mechanisms of pathophysiology in SLAP lesions: Internal impingement and peel-back mechanism. Clinical examination often remains unspecific whereas soft tissue imaging such as direct or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography has technically improved and is regarded to be indispensable in detection of SLAP lesions. Concomitant pathologies as Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears or perilabral cysts should be taken into consideration when planning a personalized therapeutic strategy. In addition, normal variants such as sublabral recess, sublabral hole, Buford complex and other less common variants have to be distinguished. The most frequent SLAP type II needs a sophisticated approach when surgical teatment comes into consideration. While SLAP repair is considered to be the standard operative option, overhead athletes benefit from a biceps tenodesis because improved patient-reported satisfaction and higher rate of return to pre-injury level of sports has been reported. PMID:26495243

  13. Wound healing: an overview of acute, fibrotic and delayed healing.

    PubMed

    Diegelmann, Robert F; Evans, Melissa C

    2004-01-01

    excessive matrix deposition and reduced remodeling. Often fibrotic lesions are associated with increased densities of mast cells. By understanding the functional relationships of these biological processes of normal compared to abnormal wound healing, hopefully new strategies can be designed to treat the pathological conditions.

  14. Arthroscopic Repair of Inferior Labrum From Anterior to Posterior Lesions Associated With Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder may arise spontaneously; however, recent evidence suggests that traumatic events may play a role in this syndrome. Variable degrees of injury around the circumference of the glenoid have been reported, ranging from Bankart and Kim lesions to 270° of injury and even 360° of injury. Hyperabduction injury may cause inferior subluxation of the shoulder and result in traumatic isolated injury to the inferior labrum from anterior to posterior. This particular lesion spans approximately 180° of the inferior hemisphere and may lead to symptomatic MDI. In contrast to open or arthroscopic plication procedures for atraumatic MDI without labral injury, the goal in these cases is anatomic arthroscopic repair of the inferior labrum tear without the need for capsular plication, volume reduction, or rotator interval closure. PMID:25685683

  15. Comparison of pro-inflammatory cytokines of non-healing and healing cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Moafi, M; Rezvan, H; Sherkat, R; Taleban, R; Asilian, A; Hamid Zarkesh-Esfahani, S; Nilforoushzadeh, M A; Jaffary, F; Mansourian, M; Sokhanvari, F; Ansari, N

    2017-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) heals spontaneously within several weeks or months, but, in rare cases, CL-active lesions last for many years. In this study, we assessed cell-mediated immunity in non-healing CL through the measurement of three pro-inflammatory cytokines: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-17a and CXCL-11. For this, 32 patients afflicted with healing or non-healing CL were recruited in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of every patient were treated with three antigens: purified protein derivative (PPD), soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Cytokine quantification was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results of our study showed that neither cytokine produced in the presence of a PPD stimulator (as an irrelevant antigen) significantly differed between the healing and non-healing groups (P-value ≥0.05 for all of them). However, IFN-γ, CXCL-11 and IL-17a levels produced in the presence of PHA or SLA were significantly higher within the healing than in the non-healing group (P-value <0.01 for all of them). It seems that appropriate levels of IFN-γ, as well as IL-17a and CXCL-11, contribute to the control of Leishmania infection.

  16. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing and Care Print A A A What's in ... mouth, or sunken eyes. There's good news about wound healing when you're a teen: Age is on ...

  17. Gene therapy for bone healing.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2010-06-23

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, spinal fusions, and the nonunion and delayed union of fractures. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment.

  18. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  19. Brain Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don't look like normal brain tissue. Usually, a brain lesion is an incidental finding unrelated to the condition or symptom that led to the imaging test in the first place. ...

  20. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  1. Effects of omeprazole on healing of naturally-occurring gastric ulcers in thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Murray, M J; Haven, M L; Eichorn, E S; Zhang, D; Eagleson, J; Hickey, G J

    1997-11-01

    Seventeen Thoroughbred horses with moderate to severe gastric ulceration were purchased from a race track within 10 days of racing and were treated once daily with either omeprazole (9 horses) or vehicle (8 horses) and evaluated gastroscopically for ulcer healing. Horses were administered omeprazole (1.5 mg/kg bwt/day) or vehicle by nasogastric tube once daily. Gastroscopic examination was performed on Days 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28, until lesions healed completely. Selected images of gastric lesions were captured by computer at each endoscopic examination, with a measuring caliper included in captured images. The area and perimeter of lesions were measured by computer and healing rates of specific lesions were determined by calculating the rate of linear advance of the margins toward the centre of the lesion. Additionally, the number of days to complete healing of the entire gastric squamous mucosa was compared between treatment groups. Gastric lesions healed at a significantly faster rate in horses receiving omeprazole than in vehicle-treated horses (P < 0.001). Complete healing of the entire stomach occurred in 10-21 days in omeprazole-treated horses, and 14-28 days in 3 of 8 vehicle-treated horses, with the remaining vehicle-treated horses having unhealed lesions on Day 28. In addition, 5 vehicle-treated horses developed new lesions in the squamous epithelial mucosa during the trial; no new lesions were observed in the omeprazole-treated group.

  2. The healing Buddha.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas S N; Chen, Peter S Y

    2004-11-01

    The iconography of the healing Buddha embraces two healing traditions, symbolized by the healing stone lapis lazuli from Central Asia and by the myrobalan fruit from the ayurvedic medicine of ancient India. The first mention of the healing Buddha is in Buddhist texts of the first century BC, and the earliest extant icons date from the fourth century AD. This suggests the cult of the healing Buddha was a relatively late development in the history of Buddhism. Worshippers sought his help in alleviating spiritual, mental and physical suffering, as well as for medical cures. In China followers believed he was also a cosmic Buddha, to whom one appealed for longevity and protection from disasters. This form of faith-based healing remains vibrant in China, Japan and Tibet to this day.

  3. Self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Hager, Martin D; Greil, Peter; Leyens, Christoph; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2010-12-14

    Self-healing materials are able to partially or completely heal damage inflicted on them, e.g., crack formation; it is anticipated that the original functionality can be restored. This article covers the design and generic principles of self-healing materials through a wide range of different material classes including metals, ceramics, concrete, and polymers. Recent key developments and future challenges in the field of self-healing materials are summarised, and generic, fundamental material-independent principles and mechanism are discussed and evaluated.

  4. Effects of hyperparathyroidism and dietary calcium supplementation on bone healing.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, G B; Schmidt, R E; Gleiser, C A; MacKenzie, W F

    1979-02-01

    Effects of nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism and dietary calcium supplementation on bone healing were determined. Groups (n = 4) of 5 mature male dogs each were fed the following diets: group 1, control diet (0.48% Ca, 0.43% P); group 2, test diet (0.12% Ca, 1.14% P): group 3, control diet plus calcium; group 4, test diet plus calcium. The dietary calcium supplementation was calcium gluconate. Lesions were induced in the right tibial cortex by trephinization. Within the time limitations of this study, it was determined that nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism does not inhibit bone healing and that dietary calcium supplementation does not aid bone healing.

  5. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  6. Self Healing Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. Self-healing is a crucial in implementing the next generation of smart grids allowing to ensure a high quality of service to the users. We then map our self-healing procedure in a percolation problem and analyse the interplay between redundancies and topology in improving the resilience of networked infrastructures to multiple failures. We find exact results both for planar lattices and for random lattices, hinting the role of duality in the design of resilient networks. Finally, we introduce a cavity method approach to study the recovery of connectivity after damage in self-healing networks. CNR-PNR National Project ``Crisis-Lab,'' EU HOME/2013/CIPS/AG/4000005013 project CI2C and EU FET project MULTIPLEX nr.317532.

  7. Wound healing - A literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; Costa, Tila Fortuna; Andrade, Zilton de Araújo; Medrado, Alena Ribeiro Alves Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration and tissue repair processes consist of a sequence of molecular and cellular events which occur after the onset of a tissue lesion in order to restore the damaged tissue. The exsudative, proliferative, and extracellular matrix remodeling phases are sequential events that occur through the integration of dynamic processes involving soluble mediators, blood cells, and parenchymal cells. Exsudative phenomena that take place after injury contribute to the development of tissue edema. The proliferative stage seeks to reduce the area of tissue injury by contracting myofibroblasts and fibroplasia. At this stage, angiogenesis and reepithelialization processes can still be observed. Endothelial cells are able to differentiate into mesenchymal components, and this difference appears to be finely orchestrated by a set of signaling proteins that have been studied in the literature. This pathway is known as Hedgehog. The purpose of this review is to describe the various cellular and molecular aspects involved in the skin healing process. PMID:27828635

  8. Contrasting Lesion Dynamics of White Syndrome among the scleractinian corals Porites spp

    PubMed Central

    Lozada-Misa, Paula; Kerr, Alexander; Raymundo, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    White syndrome (WS) is currently the most prevalent disease of scleractinian corals in the Indo-Pacific region, with an ability to exist in both epizootic and enzootic states. Here, we present results of an examination of WS lesion dynamics and show that potentially associated traits of host morphology (i.e., branching vs. massive), lesion size, and tissue deposition rate influence disease severity and recovery. Lesion healing rate was positively correlated with initial lesion size in both morphologies, but the rate at which lesions healed differed between morphologies. New lesions in branching Porites cylindrica appeared less frequently, were smaller and healed more quickly, but were more abundant than in closely-related massive Porites sp(p). The positive association between lesion size and healing rate was partly explained by geometry; branching limited lesion maximum size, and larger lesion margins contained more polyps producing new tissue, resulting in faster healing. However, massive colonies deposited tissue more slowly than branching colonies, resulting in slower recovery and more persistent lesions. Corallite size and density did not differ between species and did not, therefore, influence healing rate. We demonstrated multiple modes of pathogen transmission, which may be influenced by the greater potential for pathogen entrainment in branching vs. massive morphologies. We suggest that attributes such as colony morphology and species-specific growth rates require consideration as we expand our understanding of disease dynamics in colonial organisms such as coral. PMID:26120844

  9. Stress and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I

    1979-01-01

    An experiment was performed to compare the effects of stressors--cold, heat and noise--on primary wound activity (i.e., wound closure in the first 24 h after wound infliction) and on rate of healing in mice. A significant correlation was found between reduced primary wound activity and a faster rate of healing. Conversely, a correlation was found between relatively greater primary wound activity and a slower rate of healing. A possible explanation of this correlation is a compensatory mechanism inherent to the skin healing process. This mechanism is visualized as (1) stress exposure affecting the skin by (a) causing it to become thinner and tauter and (b) causing it to have less elastic recoil; therefore, (2) when a square wound is produced in stressed skin, (a) the wound does not recoil readily or gapes soon after cutting and (b) a longer wound perimeter results. Because there is evidence that rate of healing is governed by cells on the wound perimeter, the greater the perimeter, the greater the number of cells that will undergo rapid mitosis and the faster will be the rate of healing. Therefore, stressed skin will heal at a faster rate, compensating for the loss of elasticity and cellular depletion caused by stress. This study is of interest to anthropology because it deals with dynamic adaptation, trying to grasp the meaning of the elusive endocrine interface between environmental stimulation and a measurable physical entity like healing. This work may have revealed a functional complex that is common to the healing of all mammalian skin, whereby retarding effects of stress on the healing process are obviated.

  10. Microorganisms in closed periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Abou-Rass, M; Bogen, G

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the microorganisms of strictly selected closed periapical lesions associated with both refractory endodontic therapy and pulpal calcification. Definitive criteria were established that assured complete clinical isolation of the periapical lesion from the oral and periodontal environment. A total of 13 criteria-referenced lesions were selected from 70 patients with endodontic surgical indications. A well controlled culturing method was used in all cases and samples were taken by one clinician at three separate sites during each surgery. Samples taken at the surgical window and within the body of the lesion served as controls, whilst a third sample was taken at the apex. In all 13 cases, samples taken from the apex yielded microorganisms comprising 63.6% obligate anaerobes and 36.4% facultative anaerobes. Prevalence of the isolated species was 31.8% for Actinomyces sp., 22.7% Propionibacterium sp., 18.2% Streptococcus sp., 13.6% Staphlyococcus sp., 4.6% Porphyromonas gingivalis, 4.6% Peptostreptococcus micros and 4.6% Gram-negative enterics. The results of this investigation indicate that closed periapical lesions associated with calcified teeth or those resistant to root canal treatment harbour bacteria. The inability to eradicate all root canal microorganisms during root canal treatment, along with anatomical factors, may allow further bacterial colonization of the root apex and surrounding periapical tissues, and consequently prevent healing.

  11. Healing Childhood Trauma Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuban, Caelan

    2012-01-01

    Millions of the world's children are exposed to traumatic events and relationships every day. Whatever the cause, this overwhelming stress produces a host of unsettling symptoms and reactions. The author highlights six practical principles that undergird healing interventions.

  12. Studies on Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    therapy on wound repair have been amply demonstrated. Increased oxygen supply promotes wound healing whereas decreased oxygen supply retards repair...appmarn as early as 6 hms afte the a~ddton of DMF (Figl. 2). The increase was linea during the 24 hrs period of observaumoe in order toconfimn if the...Examine the effect of superoxide on collagen synthesis in vivo, * Examine the effect of increased superoxide levels on wound healing , and * Develop strategies to administer superoxide to wounds.

  13. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  14. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  15. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

  16. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn–soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0–30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0–13 and without paper sheets during d 14–30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1–5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually

  17. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn-soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0-30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0-13 and without paper sheets during d 14-30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1-5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually or rapidly

  18. Bone healing in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Buza, John A.; Einhorn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Delayed fracture healing and nonunion occurs in up to 5–10% of all fractures, and can present a challenging clinical scenario for the treating physician. Methods for the enhancement of skeletal repair may benefit patients that are at risk of, or have experienced, delayed healing or nonunion. These methods can be categorized into either physical stimulation therapies or biological therapies. Physical stimulation therapies include electrical stimulation, low-intensity pulsed ultrasonography, or extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Biological therapies can be further classified into local or systemic therapy based on the method of delivery. Local methods include autologous bone marrow, autologous bone graft, fibroblast growth factor-2, platelet-rich plasma, platelet-derived growth factor, and bone morphogenetic proteins. Systemic therapies include parathyroid hormone and bisphosphonates. This article reviews the current applications and supporting evidence for the use of these therapies in the enhancement of fracture healing. PMID:27920804

  19. Biomimetic Self-Healing.

    PubMed

    Diesendruck, Charles E; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S; White, Scott R

    2015-09-01

    Self-healing is a natural process common to all living organisms which provides increased longevity and the ability to adapt to changes in the environment. Inspired by this fitness-enhancing functionality, which was tuned by billions of years of evolution, scientists and engineers have been incorporating self-healing capabilities into synthetic materials. By mimicking mechanically triggered chemistry as well as the storage and delivery of liquid reagents, new materials have been developed with extended longevity that are capable of restoring mechanical integrity and additional functions after being damaged. This Review describes the fundamental steps in this new field of science, which combines chemistry, physics, materials science, and mechanical engineering.

  20. Spirituality, healing and medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, D

    1991-01-01

    The natural science base of modern medicine influences the way in which medicine is delivered and may ignore the spiritual factors associated with illness. The history of spirituality in healing presented here reflects the growth of scientific knowledge, demands for religious renewal, and the shift in the understanding of the concept of health within a broader cultural context. General practitioners have been willing to entertain the idea of spiritual healing and include it in their daily practice, or referral network. Recognizing patients' beliefs in the face of suffering is an important factor in health care practice. PMID:1777299

  1. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-07-01

    Fracture healing is a complex process, and a significant number of fractures are complicated by impaired healing and non-union. Impaired healing is prevalent in certain risk groups, such as the elderly, osteoporotics, people with malnutrition, and women after menopause. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial in the treatment of fractures and could thus be a potentially new treatment option for induction of fracture healing in humans. Furthermore, fractures in animals with experimental conditions of impaired healing such as aging, estrogen withdrawal, and malnutrition can heal in an expedited manner after PTH treatment. Interestingly, fractures occurring at both cancellous and cortical sites can be treated successfully, indicating that both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic fractures can be the target of PTH-induced healing. Finally, the data suggest that PTH partly prevents the delay in fracture healing caused by aging. Recently, the first randomized, controlled clinical trial investigating the effect of PTH on fracture healing was published, indicating a possible clinical benefit of PTH treatment in inducing fracture healing. The aim of this article is therefore to review the evidence for the potential of PTH in bone healing, including the underlying mechanisms for this, and to provide recommendations for the clinical testing and use of PTH in the treatment of impaired fracture healing in humans.

  2. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  3. Indigenous Healing Legacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliman, Valerie

    2001-01-01

    On a tour of Cuba, Native scholars from North and South America reconnected with the "extinct" Taino people and shared their knowledge of traditional healing herbs. Western science is just beginning to validate the tremendous knowledge base that indigenous healers have developed--most indigenous medicinal knowledge is useful for finding…

  4. Fetal skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Edward P; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2009-01-01

    The developing fetus has the ability to heal wounds by regenerating normal epidermis and dermis with restoration of the extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture, strength, and function. In contrast, adult wounds heal with fibrosis and scar. Scar tissue remains weaker than normal skin with an altered ECM composition. Despite extensive investigation, the mechanism of fetal wound healing remains largely unknown. We do know that early in gestation, fetal skin is developing at a rapid pace and the ECM is a loose network facilitating cellular migration. Wounding in this unique environment triggers a complex cascade of tightly controlled events culminating in a scarless wound phenotype of fine reticular collagen and abundant hyaluronic acid. Comparison between postnatal and fetal wound healing has revealed differences in inflammatory response, cellular mediators, cytokines, growth factors, and ECM modulators. Investigation into cell signaling pathways and transcription factors has demonstrated differences in secondary messenger phosphorylation patterns and homeobox gene expression. Further research may reveal novel genes essential to scarless repair that can be manipulated in the adult wound and thus ameliorate scar.

  5. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  6. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of collagen. So they're tougher and less flexible than the skin around them. Caring for Serious Wounds at Home Serious wounds don't heal overnight. It can take weeks for the body to build new tissue. So after you leave ...

  7. Bruise healing - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Indications URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100207.htm Bruise healing - series—Indications To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 3 Go to slide 2 ...

  8. Educators Healing Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quisenberry, Nancy L., Ed.; McIntyre, D. John, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays on racism and the role of teachers in healing racism. There are three sections with nine papers. After an "Introduction" (D. John McIntyre), Section 1, "Historical Perspectives," includes: (1) "Racism in Education" (Gwendolyn Duhon Boudreaux, Rose Duhon-Sells, Alice Duhon-Ross, and Halloway C. Sells); and…

  9. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  10. Fibronectin and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Grinnell, F

    1984-01-01

    I have tried to briefly review the evidence (summarized in Table II) indicating that fibronectin is important in cutaneous wound healing. Fibronectin appears to be an important factor throughout this process. It promotes the spreading of platelets at the site of injury, the adhesion and migration of neutrophils, monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells into the wound region, and the migration of epidermal cells through the granulation tissue. At the level of matrix synthesis, fibronectin appears to be involved both in the organization of the granulation tissue and basement membrane. In terms of tissue remodeling, fibronectin functions as a nonimmune opsonin for phagocytosis of debris by fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and under some circumstances, macrophages. Fibronectin also enhances the phagocytosis of immune-opsonized particles by monocytes, but whether this includes phagocytosis of bacteria remains to be determined. In general, phagocytosis of bacteria has not appeared to involve fibronectin. On the contrary, the presence of fibronectin in the wound bed may promote bacterial attachment and infection. Because of the ease of experimental manipulations, wound healing experiments have been carried out on skin more frequently than other tissues. As a result, the possible role of fibronectin has not been investigated thoroughly in the repair of internal organs and tissues. Nevertheless, it seems reasonable to speculate that fibronectin plays a central role in all wound healing situations. Finally, the wound healing problems of patients with severe factor XIII deficiencies may occur because of their inability to incorporate fibronectin into blood clots.

  11. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  12. Healing Magazine, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBiase, Miriam H., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newly designed volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue shares information on guiding children through times of trauma, particularly after the events of September 11th. Two articles provide information on debriefing after trauma…

  13. Healing Racism: Education's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutstein, Nathan, Ed.; Morgan, Michael, Ed.

    The 16 essays in this collection address how to lessen the effects of racism through classroom education by emphasizing the oneness of humanity and the relatedness of all human beings. These selections offer advice about healing racism from the early grades through secondary education. The essays are: (1) "Racism as a Disease" (John Woodall); (2)…

  14. Femoral Strength after Induced Lesions in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Belill, Kathryn A; Settle, Timothy L; Angel, C Roselina; Kim, Seon-Woo; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Rats are a common model for the study of bone healing, with the cranium, femur, and tibia being the bones studied most frequently. This study examines noncritical-sized lesions that would allow rats to continue to bear weight without the need for fixation but that are sufficiently large to enable characterization of the healing process. We compared the femoral bone strength associated with 3 lesion sizes selected for use in future studies. Sprague–Dawley rats (age, 10 to 16 wk) were used to assess the ultimate breaking strength, stress, and break force of normal, unmanipulated femurs. We then created lesions of 3 different sizes in the mid- to distal diaphysis of the left and right femurs and characterized the associated decreases in bone strength. Femurs (n= 85) for this study were collected through tissue sharing from rats used in other acute surgical procedures and were tested by using a 3-point bending flexural materials-testing machine. Our hypothesis was that, as a model for bone healing, 3 induced lesions of different sizes would show incremental and proportional decreases in femoral strength, with the intermediate-sized (1.5-mm) lesion demonstrating a decrease of 20% to 40%. A lesion of 1.5 mm yielded a decrease in strength of 17% for both the left and right femurs. The strength of left femurs carrying intermediate lesions was significantly less than that of control, uninjured femur bones. In addition to providing validation for our own future bone-healing project, these data are a useful baseline for other investigators studying bone healing in a rat femur model. PMID:24956210

  15. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  16. [Chastity and healing power].

    PubMed

    Kudlien, F

    1984-01-01

    The idea of a connection between chastity and healing power is to be found as well in primitive cultures as in ethnomedicine and in the medicine of Antiquity. What is meant in the Hippocratic Oath, though, is not the sexual restraint of the physician himself, but moreover in the attitude towards his patient and all the people living in the same house with the patient. This is different, though, in ethnomedicine, where the healer is demanded to live sexually abstinent for a certain time and the persons assisting him are often expected to stay untouched, i.e. chaste. "Chastity", however, as conceived by the Ancient Greek and Roman meant the integrity of marital faith. The urine of women who were chaste in this sense was believed to have healing powers. Furthermore mention is made of an African tribe, of which it was said that its members originating definitely from this tribe only, were immune against the bite of snakes and therefore had a special capacity of healing bitten persons. Ethnomedicine, on the other side, attributes great power to those who lead an unchaste life as well as to illegitimately born children. We are here confronted with an ambiguity inherent in popular imagination of disease and healing. A figure of German poetry of the Middle Ages "Der Arme Heinrich" by Hartmann von Aue, f.i., is in search of the heartblood from a young, freeborn maiden which is to cure him from leprosy. In many cases objects used by virgins or unmarried men were believed to have healing powers. Especially the imagination of epilepsy and orgasm being related to each other, lead to the claim for sexual abstinence of the patient, yes, even for his castration. On the other hand, however, epileptics were recommended to have sexual intercourse. Fasting, sometimes together with sexual abstinence, was considered to be important for the healer and as well for the patient to be cured. Plants were given in order to lead to sexual abstinence. In primitive cultures the imagination of

  17. Understanding traditional African healing

    PubMed Central

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists. PMID:26594664

  18. The Fragility of Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lawlor, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This article explores a paradox—the simultaneous cultivation and suppression of “healing dramas” by pediatric rehabilitation therapists. Dramatic moments are defined as ones in which the routine exercises and treatment activities of therapeutic practice are transformed into narrative plots. These improvisational plots involve multiple characters, risks, suspense, and above all, a heightened sense that something is at stake. Experience itself becomes the focus of attention for the patient. Based upon ethnographic research in Chicago and Los Angeles, this article offers an anatomy of two such moments, investigating not only how healing dramas are constructed between patients and healers but how and why institutional discourses and practices invite their abandonment. PMID:20930950

  19. Wound healing: immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Tsirogianni, Afrodite K; Moutsopoulos, Niki Maria; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2006-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process, comprised of a series of a sequential events aiming to repair injured tissue. The role of the immune system in this process is not only to recognise and combat the newly presented antigens at the site of injury, but also to participate in the debridement of the damaged area and to contribute to the process of healing. In this review, we discuss the molecules and cells of the immune system that participate in tissue repair. We describe the mechanisms of immune recognition during initial insult and the innate and adaptive immune responses to injury. Finally, we address the role of the immune system in regeneration and repair.

  20. Wound healing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tisi, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases (CuAO) and flavin-containing amine oxidases (PAO) are hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of polyamines. Currently, a key role has been ascribed to apoplastic amine oxidases in plants, i.e., to behave as H2O2-delivering systems in the cell wall during cell growth and differentiation as well as in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Indeed, H2O2 is the co-substrate for the peroxidase-driven reactions during cell-wall maturation and a key signalling molecule in defence mechanisms. We recently demonstrated the involvement of an apoplastic PAO in the wound-healing process of the Zea mays mesocotyl. Experimental evidence indicated a similar role for an apoplastic PAO in Nicotiana tabacum. In this addendum we suggest that a CuAO activity is also involved in this healing event. PMID:19704660

  1. Self-healing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional structure fabricated from a self-healing polymeric material, comprising poly(ester amides) obtained from ethylene glycol, azelaic acid and 1,1-aminoundecanoic acid, wherein polymeric material has a melt index above 2.5 g/10 min. as determined by ASTM D1238 at 190.degree. C. and 2.16kg, impact resistance and ductility sufficient to resist cracking and brittle fracture upon impact by a 9 mm bullet fired at a temperature of about 29.degree. C. at subsonic speed in a range from about 800 feet/sec to about 1000 feet/sec. It has been determined that the important factors necessary for self-healing behavior of polymers include sufficient impact strength, control of the degree of crystallinity, low melting point and the ability to instantly melt at impacted area.

  2. Oesophageal function before, during, and after healing of erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F; Ferrarini, F; Longanesi, A; Angeloni, M; Ragazzini, M; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between oesophageal motor abnormalities and oesophagitis, we carried out four hour studies of oesophageal motility and 24 hour pH measurements in fasting and fed conditions in eight patients before, during (pH only), and after medical healing of erosive oesophagitis. Gastrooesophageal acid reflux decreased (ns) during the treatment, but tended to return to basal values at the end. Oesophageal body motility was unchanged after healing, while the lower oesophageal sphincter basal tone was significantly increased at the end of the study in the postcibal period. The results suggest that the impairment of the sphincter tone in reflux oesophagitis is secondary to the presence of the oesophageal lesions. Macroscopic healing is not paralleled by improved major pathogenic factors of the disease, however--that is, acid reflux and oesophageal body motility. PMID:3345925

  3. The isolation of Phoma eupyrena from a human lesion.

    PubMed

    Bakerspigel, A; Lowe, D; Rostas, A

    1981-06-01

    A strain of the soil-borne fungus Phoma eupyrena was isolated from the skin of an 18-month-old boy who had a crusting, erythematous, perioral eruption of one month's duration. Treatment with clotrimazole, 15% zinc oxide paste, and dimethicone resulted in eradication of the fungus and in complete healing of the lesions in eight weeks.

  4. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  5. Biomimetic Self-Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-21

    ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...soundness; to cure (of a disease or wound).”[1] Self-healing provides an important evolutionary advantage,[2] since living organisms are affected both

  6. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  7. Crack Healing in Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-17

    have shown experimentally and theoretically that Y - t°m° (24) YM ,. No (25) such that Y remains constant during healing and fracture. The number of...chains per unit volume, Nv., is Nv W (26) where p is the density and Na is Avogadros number. The strain energy density per chain, Uc, is therefore...force f = ol dl/dt, from the integral of fdl, as dlUp= I PoI(’i)dl (30) 4. where io is the monomer friction coefficient and dl/dt is a constant pull-out

  8. Bioglass Activated Skin Tissue Engineering Constructs for Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongfei; Peng, Jinliang; Xu, Yuhong; Chang, Jiang; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-13

    Wound healing is a complicated process, and fibroblast is a major cell type that participates in the process. Recent studies have shown that bioglass (BG) can stimulate fibroblasts to secrete a multitude of growth factors that are critical for wound healing. Therefore, we hypothesize that BG can stimulate fibroblasts to have a higher bioactivity by secreting more bioactive growth factors and proteins as compared to untreated fibroblasts, and we aim to construct a bioactive skin tissue engineering graft for wound healing by using BG activated fibroblast sheet. Thus, the effects of BG on fibroblast behaviors were studied, and the bioactive skin tissue engineering grafts containing BG activated fibroblasts were applied to repair the full skin lesions on nude mouse. Results showed that BG stimulated fibroblasts to express some critical growth factors and important proteins including vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, collagen I, and fibronectin. In vivo results revealed that fibroblasts in the bioactive skin tissue engineering grafts migrated into wound bed, and the migration ability of fibroblasts was stimulated by BG. In addition, the bioactive BG activated fibroblast skin tissue engineering grafts could largely increase the blood vessel formation, enhance the production of collagen I, and stimulate the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts in the wound site, which would finally accelerate wound healing. This study demonstrates that the BG activated skin tissue engineering grafts contain more critical growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that are beneficial for wound healing as compared to untreated fibroblast cell sheets.

  9. Humor's healing potential.

    PubMed

    Seaward, B L

    1992-04-01

    In the past three decades the medical world has begun to take more serious notice of the healing power of humor and the positive emotions associated with it. Humor and laughter are currently being employed by psychotherapists and other care givers as tools to promote and maintain health, as well as intervention and rehabilitation tools for a host of maladies and illnesses related to stress and life-style. Although this empirical medical approach is relatively new, the study of humor has revealed a complex psychological phenomenon. Senses of humor have been categorized in types associated with personality. Humor has many styles and can be found in almost any situation, on any occasion. Theories of humor include the superiority theory, the incongruity theory, the release/relief theory, and the divinity theory. Laughter has many clinical benefits, promoting beneficial physiological changes and an overall sense of well-being. Humor even has long-term effects that strengthen the effectiveness of the immune system. In healthcare, humor therapy can help relieve stress associated with disease and illness. It serves as a diversionary tactic, a therapeutic tool for disorders such as depression, and a coping mechanism. It also is a natural healing component for care givers trying to cope with the stress and personal demands of their occupations.

  10. Platelets and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita; Sanchez, Mikel; Andia, Isabel; Anitua, Eduardo

    2008-05-01

    Platelets help prevent blood loss at sites of vascular injury. To do this, they adhere, aggregate and form a procoagulant surface favoring thrombin generation and fibrin formation. In addition, platelets express and release substances that promote tissue repair and influence processes such as angiogenesis, inflammation and the immune response. They contain large secretable pools of biologically active proteins, while newly synthesized active metabolites are also released. Although anucleate, activated platelets possess a spliceosome and can synthesize tissue factor and interleukin-1beta. The binding of secreted proteins within a developing fibrin mesh or to the extracellular matrix can create chemotactic gradients favoring the recruitment of stem cells, stimulating cell migration and differentiation, and promoting repair. The therapeutic use of platelets in a fibrin clot has a positive influence in clinical situations requiring rapid healing. Dental implant surgery, orthopaedic surgery, muscle and tendon repair, skin ulcers, hole repair in eye surgery and cardiac surgery are situations where the use of autologous platelets accelerates healing. We now review the ways in which platelets participate in these processes.

  11. Adapting traditional healing practices.

    PubMed

    Weiser, J

    1999-01-01

    The Aboriginal people in Canada have been noted to have low self-esteem, subsequently increasing their risk of HIV. To this effect, two traditional healing practices are being used to help these people avoid HIV infection, and to live more healthily and positively if they are infected. The first method is the Medicine Wheel, which is a traditional model used to represent the complex interrelationship among all living things and show how their immune system is physically affected by their emotions and worries. Many Aboriginal AIDS Organizations, counselors and others are now using this AIDS teaching Wheel model. Meanwhile, the second method is the Sharing Circles, which provide an environment where people feel safe to talk about HIV and give participants a sense of support and a means for expression without stigma or judgement. As a result, many people who attend HIV circles begin to take better care of themselves and of others. Overall, it is emphasized that these traditional healing practices can be effectively adapted for use in HIV counseling and education.

  12. Prevention of ulcerative lesions by episodic treatment of recurrent herpes labialis: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Harmenberg, Johan; Oberg, Bo; Spruance, Spotwood

    2010-03-01

    There are substantial difficulties involved in carrying out clinical studies of recurrent herpes labialis, since the disease has a rapid onset, short-lasting viral shedding period and is rapidly self-healing. The aim of this paper was to critically assess published reports of episodic treatment of herpes labialis and to review biological and methodological problems involved in such studies. Limited, but statistically significant, results have been shown with topical antivirals, such as acyclovir and penciclovir, improving healing times by approximately 10%. Orally administrated antivirals, such as valaciclovir and famciclovir, have subsequently found clinical use. However, these two oral medications have different profiles in phase 3 studies. Famciclovir showed additional improvement of efficacy in terms of lesion healing time, but no effect on prevention of ulcerative lesions, while valaciclovir appeared to have similar efficacy to that of acyclovir cream on lesion healing, but some additional efficacy with respect to prevention of ulcerative lesions. A formulation of acyclovir/hydrocortisone showed further improvement in prevention of ulcerative lesions, while retaining efficacy with respect to lesion healing.

  13. How Stitches Help Kids Heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? How Stitches Help Kids Heal KidsHealth > For Kids > How Stitches Help Kids Heal A A A What's in this ... the directions carefully with your mom's or dad's help. Different kinds of materials — sutures, glue, and butterflies — ...

  14. Self-healing biomaterials(3)

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Craig, Stephen L.; Reichert, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be considered zeroth generation self-healing materials, then taxonomically-speaking, first generation self-healing materials describe approaches that “halt” and “fill” damage, whereas second generation self-healing materials strive to “fully restore” the pre-failed material structure. In spite of limited commercial use to date, primarily because the technical details have not been suitably optimized, it is likely from a practical standpoint that first generation approaches will be the first to be employed commercially, whereas second generation approaches may take longer to implement. For self-healing biomaterials the optimization of technical considerations is further compounded by the additional constraints of toxicity and biocompatibility, necessitating inclusion of separate discussions of design criteria for self-healing biomaterials. PMID:21171168

  15. The Healing Power of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Anthos, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    This teacher believes that art has the power to heal, or at least aid in the healing process. After the terrorist attacks on 9/11, her students needed some way to express the injustice they felt. They discussed the attacks, and had some free drawing to release it from their system. They even did some patriotic-themed projects to boost their…

  16. Our Pathway toward Healing Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honour, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Robert Honour, Training and Staff Development Manager, at the Fairfax, Virginia, Department of Family Services (DFS), reports on the outcome of "Healing Racism" training at his organization. Participants in "Healing Racism Institutes" are transforming relationships and creating an organizational culture that…

  17. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  18. Self-Healing Laminate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiermann, Brett A. (Inventor); Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A laminate material may include a first flexible layer, and a self-healing composite layer in contact with the first flexible layer. The composite layer includes an elastomer matrix, a plurality of first capsules including a polymerizer, and a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The laminate material may self-heal when subjected to a puncture or a tear.

  19. Nonsurgical Management of an Extensive Endodontic Periapical Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; EsnaAshari, Ehsan; Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Long-term success of endodontic treatment is dependent on adequate and appropriate cleaning and shaping of the root canal along with proper and correct obturation of the entire prepared space. This article aims to report an exceptional non-surgical and orthograde endodontic treatment of maxillary right central incisor with an extensive radiolucent lesion in a 17-year-old male. Six and 20-month follow-ups showed significant changes, including bone formation and periapical healing within the lesion. The patient was asymptomatic. After 20 months, complete radiographic and clinical healing of the periapical lesion was observed. PMID:28179937

  20. AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting as delayed healing of an extraction wound.

    PubMed

    Nittayananta, W; Chungpanich, S; Pongpanich, S; Mitarnun, W

    1996-08-10

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the oral cavity frequently occurs in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This report describes a lesion presenting as delayed healing of an extraction wound with hyperaemic swollen gingivae and ulceration in an apparently healthy 34-year-old Thai fisherman. The lesion was the first evidence of his HIV-positivity. It is, therefore, imperative that clinicians should consider a diagnosis of HIV infection in cases of non-healing extraction wounds in patients in high risk categories.

  1. Synthetic Self-Healing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie

    2014-06-02

    Given enough time, pressure, temperature fluctuation, and stress any material will fail. Currently, synthesized materials make up a large part of our everyday lives, and are used in a number of important applications such as; space travel, under water devices, precise instrumentation, transportation, and infrastructure. Structural failure of these material scan lead to expensive and dangerous consequences. In an attempt to prolong the life spans of specific materials and reduce efforts put into repairing them, biologically inspired, self-healing systems have been extensively investigated. The current review explores recent advances in three methods of synthesized self-healing: capsule based, vascular, and intrinsic. Ideally, self-healing materials require no human intervention to promote healing, are capable of surviving all the steps of polymer processing, and heal the same location repeatedly. Only the vascular method holds up to all of these idealities.

  2. Scar formation and ligament healing.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, K A; Frank, C B

    1998-12-01

    Ligaments are highly organized, dense, fibrous connective-tissue structures that provide stability to joints and participate in joint proprioception. Injuries to ligaments induce a healing response that is characterized by the formation of a scar. The scar tissue is weaker, larger and creeps more than normal ligament and is associated with an increased amount of minor collagens (types III, V and VI), decreased collagen cross-links and an increased amount of glycosaminoglycans. Studies have shown that certain surgical variables alter the healing of ligaments. Such factors include the size of gap between the healing ligament, ends, the use of motion in a stable joint and the presence of multiple ligamentous injuries. Research on ligament healing includes studies on low-load and failure-load properties, alterations in the expression of matrix molecules, cytokine modulation of healing and gene therapy as a method to alter matrix protein and cytokine production.

  3. The Flexibility Hypothesis of Healing.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2017-03-01

    Theories of healing have attempted to identify general mechanisms that may work across different modalities. These include altering expectations, remoralization, and instilling hope. In this paper, we argue that many forms of healing and psychotherapy may work by inducing positive psychological states marked by flexibility or an enhanced ability to shift cognitive sets. Healing practices may induce these states of cognitive and emotional flexibility through specific symbolic interventions we term "flexibility primers" that can include images, metaphors, music, and other media. The flexibility hypothesis suggests that cognitive and emotional flexibility is represented, elicited, and enacted through multiple modalities in healing rituals. Identifying psychological processes and cultural forms that evoke and support cognitive and emotional flexibility provides a way to understand the cultural specificity and potential efficacy of particular healing practices and can guide the design of interventions that promote resilience and well-being.

  4. Accelerated healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis in non-healing BALB/c mice using water soluble amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Corware, Karina; Harris, Debra; Teo, Ian; Rogers, Matthew; Naresh, Kikkeri; Müller, Ingrid; Shaunak, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease that causes prominent skin scaring. No water soluble, non-toxic, short course and low cost treatment exists. We developed a new water soluble amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid (AmB-PMA) using established and scalable chemistries. AmB-PMA was stable for 9 months during storage. In vitro, it was effective against Leishmania spp. promastigotes and amastigote infected macrophages. It was also less toxic and more effective than deoxycholate-AmB, and similar to liposomal AmB. Its in vivo activity was determined in both early and established CL lesion models of Leishmania major infection in genetically susceptible non-healing BALB/c mice. Intradermal AmB-PMA at a total dose of 18 mg of AmB/kg body weight led to rapid parasite killing and lesion healing. No toxicity was seen. No parasite relapse occurred after 80 days follow-up. Histological studies confirmed rapid parasite clearance from macrophages followed by accelerated fibroblast mediated tissue repair, regeneration and cure of the infection. Quantitative mRNA studies of the CL lesions showed that accelerated healing was associated with increased Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interferon-γ, and reduced Interleukin-10. These results suggest that a cost-effective AmB-PMA could be used to pharmacologically treat and immunotherapeutically accelerate the healing of CL lesions. PMID:21807409

  5. Urethral healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Scherz, H C; Kaplan, G W; Boychuk, D I; Landa, H M; Haghighi, P

    1992-08-01

    We studied urethral healing in New Zealand white rabbits by histological examination after insult (urethral catheter) or injury (urethrotomy) specifically for acute and chronic inflammation, fibrosis, fistulas, squamous metaplasia, foreign body giant cells and urethral dilatation. Urethral catheterization resulted in increased inflammation and fibrosis compared to noncatheterized animals. Skin closure techniques and materials resulted in an inflammatory response that may extend to and involve the urethra. Minor differences in suture size were not an important variable but the persistence of suture material may have a role in the degree of inflammation and the formation of foreign body giant cells. Transepithelial closure techniques drag epithelial cells into subcutaneous tissues and may predispose to fistula formation.

  6. Occipital lesions: a possible cost of cradleboards.

    PubMed

    Holliday, D Y

    1993-03-01

    This examination of a Mimbres-Mogollon pueblo skeletal sample reveals a surprising percentage of individuals with occipital lesions. Each lesion is located in the approximate center of the squama immediately superior to the external occipital protuberance. Notably, no child over the age of 1 year exhibits a lesion that would have been active at the time of death, but a number of older children and adults exhibit evidence of healed lesions in this same area on the occipital. The restricted nature of these lesions, in terms of both their locations and ages of those actively affected, suggests that the use of cradleboards may have been at least a contributing, if not initiatory, factor in their creation. Specifically, this study suggests that the pressure and friction of an infant's head against a cradleboard may have 1) produced ischemic ulcers, 2) produced the conditions favorable for bacterial infections such as impetigo or carbuncles, or 3) complicated the treatment of other infections appearing on the back of the scalp.

  7. The effect of hyaluronic acid (Cicatridine) on healing and regeneration of the uterine cervix and vagina and vulvar dystrophy therapy.

    PubMed

    Markowska, J; Madry, R; Markowska, A

    2011-01-01

    Procedures aimed at the treatment of precancerous lesions and ectopia on the uterine cervix are frequently linked to lesions of anatomical structures. The application of hyaluronic acid (Cicatridine vaginal ovules) promotes accelerated healing of the uterine cervix and acquisition of a normal shape in the uterine cervix canal. Local application of hyaluronic acid in the vagina following radiotherapy due to cancer in the uterine cervix or endometrium favourably affects the healing of post-irradiation lesions in the vagina and improves quality of life. Over 90% of patients responded positively to the application of hyaluronic acid in the form of a cream on dystrophic lesions in the vulva. Hyaluronic acid aids the healing process of post-procedural wounds in the uterine cervix, following radiotherapy applied due to cancer of the uterine cervix, endometrium and in vulvar dystrophy.

  8. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  9. Periapical healing outcome following single visit endodontic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Moksha; Babshet, Medha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of apical periodontitis in diabetes mellitus patients is high. The altered immunity in diabetes affects the healing process of periapical tissue. Single visit endodontic treatment has shown to increase the periapical healing rate with better patient compliance. Hence the present study aims at evaluating the clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic treatment, in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with periapical disease. Material and Methods Eighty patients with periapical disease were divided into 2 groups of 40 each: Group I, Control subjects and Group II, Type 2 diabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were assessed preoperatively and at follow up intervals in diabetics. Pre-operative assessment of periapical status was done using CPDR (Clinical periapical diagnosis of root), QLDR (Qualitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) and QTDR (Quantitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) criteria. Postoperative healing was evaluated following single-visit endodontic treatment by Strindberg criteria. Results Group 2 subjects had chronic and exacerbating lesions with significantly larger lesions (p=0.029). 100 % clinical healing outcome in diabetic group was seen in two months. Group 2 showed 85% success in one year on radiographic evaluation. Poor controlled diabetics showed failure compared to fair and good controlled. Conclusions Type 2 diabetics had chronic and larger sized lesions when compared to control subjects. The periapical lesions in patients with poor diabetic control showed failure. The clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic therapy was delayed in diabetic patients. Key words:Apical periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 2, endodontics, periapical lesion, strindberg criteria. PMID:27957260

  10. Progress in corneal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  11. Methyl methacrylate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tittelboom, K.; Adesanya, K.; Dubruel, P.; Van Puyvelde, P.; De Belie, N.

    2011-12-01

    Different types of healing agents have already been tested on their efficiency for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Generally, commercial healing agents are used while their properties are adjusted for manual crack repair and not for autonomous crack healing. Consequently, the amount of regain in properties due to self-healing of cracks is limited. In this research, a methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based healing agent was developed specifically for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Various parameters were optimized including the viscosity, curing time, strength, etc. After the desired properties were obtained, the healing agent was encapsulated and screened for its self-healing efficiency. The decrease in water permeability due to autonomous crack healing using MMA as a healing agent was similar to the results obtained for manually healed cracks. First results seem promising: however, further research needs to be undertaken in order to obtain an optimal healing agent ready for use in practice.

  12. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  13. Wound healing after laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, D A; Meyers, A

    1995-10-01

    Compared with scalpel wounds, CO2 laser wounds show delays in inflammation, collagen production, reepithelialization, and tensile strength in the early stages of healing. Some of these delays are similar to those seen with electrocautery and burn wounds. Later stages compensate for these early deficiencies, because scalpel and laser wounds become more similar in epithelialization and wound strength over time. Healed CO2 laser wounds tend to have less scar contraction than scalpel wounds. Débridement of initial laser wound char, tissue cooling techniques during lasering, and pulsed modes of laser delivery all seem to result in more rapid, favorable healing. Similar wound healing trends have been seen with the CO2 laser in bone, with other lasers, and with laser vascular and neural anastomosis. Biostimulation with low-level laser energy is a complex subject of ongoing investigations.

  14. Dressings and healing with honey.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Judy

    Two milestones have revolutionised the management of wounds. First, the introduction of antibiotics, and second, the work carried out by Winter in 1962, introducing the concept that a warm moist environment encouraged healing.

  15. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  16. Use of ethnoveterinary remedies in the management of foot and mouth disease lesions in a diary herd.

    PubMed

    Gakuya, D W; Mulei, C M; Wekesa, S B

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) affecting 95 (57.2%) out of 166 cattle occurred in a medium-scale dairy farm in Kikuyu district, Kenya. Ethnoveterinary remedies of natural Soda ash solution (97% sodium bicarbonate), honey and finger millet flour were used to manage the FMD lesions. The lesions were washed with soda ash solution to remove the necrotic tissue after which raw honey and finger millet flour were applied to the cleaned lesions. The lesions were examined daily and those with necrotic material washed again with the Soda ash solution. Honey and finger millet flour were applied daily for three days. There was rapid healing of the lesions with the animals resuming feeding after three days. The fast healing of the lesions vindicates the use of these cheap, locally available and easy to apply products in the management of FMD lesions. However, more studies are needed to evaluate further their potencies.

  17. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome.

  18. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon.

  19. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway.

  20. Gonadal hormones differently modulate cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Assis de Brito, Thatiana L; Pereira, Gabriela R; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Gonadal hormones influence physiological responses to stress and cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gonadal hormones on cutaneous wound healing in chronically stressed mice. Male and female mice were gonadectomized, and after 25 days, they were spun daily at 115 rpm for 15 min every hour until euthanasia. Twenty-eight days after the gonadectomy, an excisional lesion was created. The animals were killed 7 or 14 days after wounding, and the lesions were collected. Myofibroblast density, macrophage number, catecholamine level, collagen deposition, and blood vessel number were evaluated. In the intact and gonadectomized groups, stress increased the plasma catecholamine levels in both genders. In intact groups, stress impaired wound contraction and re-epithelialization and increased the macrophage number in males but not in females. In addition, stress compromised myofibroblastic differentiation and blood vessel formation and decreased collagen deposition in males but not in females. In contrast to intact mice, wound healing in ovariectomized female mice was affected by stress, while wound healing in castrated male mice was not. In conclusion, gender differences contribute to the cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. In addition, androgens contribute to the stress-induced impairment of the healing of cutaneous wounds but estrogens inhibit it.

  1. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  2. Management of a large periapical lesion using Biodentine™ as retrograde restoration with eighteen months evident follow up

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ajinkya M; Kokate, Sharad R; Shah, Reema A

    2013-01-01

    Injury to anterior teeth is a common event. It requires a treatment approach that assures the complete biologic healing and functional restoration of the tooth or teeth involved. A cystic lesion, which is unable to heal nonsurgically, heals well with surgical intervention and use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as retrograde filling has been reported in literature. Another material with largely improved handling properties; Biodentine™ (Septodont, St. Maurdes Fossés, France) was introduced in 2011. It is a calcium silicate based material and manufacturers claim that it can be used for crown and root dentin repair treatment, repair of perforations or resorptions, apexification, and root end fillings. This article presents a case report of surgical management of a large cystic lesion using Biodentine™ as retrograde filling material which has not been reported in literature so far. Eighteen months radiographic follow-up exhibited completely healed cystic lesion. PMID:24347897

  3. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  4. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rúben F; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-05-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  5. [Wound healing and wound dressing].

    PubMed

    Eitel, F; Sklarek, J

    1988-01-01

    This review article intends to discuss the clinical management of wounds in respect to a pathophysiological background. Recent results of research in the field of wound healing are demonstrated. Wound healing can be seen as aseptic inflammatory response to a traumatic stimulus. The activation of the clotting cascade by the trauma induces a sequence of humoral and cellular reactions. Platelets, granulocytes and macrophages are activated stepwisely. In the first phase of wound healing the wounded tissue area will be prepared for phagocytosis by enzymatic degradation of ground substance and depolymerisation of protein macromolecules (wound edema). Following the phagocytic microdebridement mesenchymal cells proliferate and produce matrix substance. Microcirculation within the traumatized area will be restored by angiogenesis, macroscopically observed as new formed granulation tissue. This leads to the wound healing phase of scar tissue formation. In this complexity of reactions naturally many possibilities of impairment are given. The most common complication during wound healing is the infection. It can be seen as self reinforcing process. The therapy of the impairment of wound healing consists in the disruption of the specific vicious circle, in the case of an osseus infection that would be a macrodebridement (that is necrectomy) and biomechanical stabilization. The surgical management of wounds principally consists in ensuring an undisturbed sequence of the healing process. This can be done by the wound excision that supports the phagocytic microdebridement. A further possibility is to avoid overwhelming formation of edema by eliminating the traumatic stimulus, by immobilization of the injured region and by ensuring a physiological microenvironment with a primary suture if possible. There are up to the present no drugs available to enhance cell proliferation and to regulate wound healing but it seems that experimental research is successful in characterizing

  6. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  7. Raves, psychosis, and spirit healing.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2010-07-01

    This paper reflects the intersection of three cultures: the rave (all night dance party and use of the drug, Ecstasy) culture; the ward culture of an inpatient psychiatric program for First Episode Psychosis; the spirit healing culture of the Philippines. All three intersected in Toronto, Canada in the mid 1990s, as illustrated by the clinical case of a 19-year-old university student who was hospitalized with symptoms of drug-induced psychosis. Her initial treatment was not successful and presented dilemmas for the treating staff. Transfer to a second psychiatric facility that permitted attendance at a traditional Filipino healing ceremony resulted in a cure, with no recurrence 10 years later. According to James Dow's 1986 formulation, the components of the key spiritual healing session paralleled the very elements the young woman had sought by participating in raves, an activity that was problematic because it led to family displeasure. Whereas attendance at a rave triggered illness, the healing session, sanctioned by her family and taking place in their midst, resulted in healing.

  8. Amyloidogenesis in Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ken; Brownstein, Martin H.

    1972-01-01

    Clinically and histologically typical skin lesions of macular and lichenoid amyloidoses were biopsied. Rebiopsies were performed after 2 to 16 weeks, and the sequence of amyloid reproduction in granulation tissue was followed. Initially, medium electron-dense proteinaceous substance with fine filaments was produced within or in close relation to the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum of fibroblasts and subsequently discharged. Typical amyloid filaments emerged within and in the vicinity of this substance. A significant number of collagen fibrils were admixed in the centers of some amyloid islands. Predominantly amorphous amyloid substance was seen in contact with the basal laminae. No plasma cells were observed in foci of amyloid. Nonepithelialized wounds did not contain amyloid. It was suggested that, in the primary skin amyloidoses, abnormal dermal fibroblasts produce amyloid precursors under the influence of the epidermis. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 4Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 8Fig 3 PMID:5049430

  9. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects.

  10. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  11. Laser Biostimulation Of Wound Healing In Arteriopatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallarida, G.; Baldoni, F.; Raimondi, G.; Massaro, M.; Peruzzi, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Ferrari, A.; Scudieri, F.

    1981-05-01

    Low-power laser irradiation has been employed in the attempt to accelerate the wound-healing of ischemic cutaneous ulcerations with threatening or manifest gangrene due to arteriosclerosis obliterans of the lower limbs. Irradiation was performed by using a low-power He-Ne gas laser of 6328 Å wavelength and was concentrated at the peripheral zone of the lesions. The preliminary results of the study indicate that laser stimulation might be new approach in the conservative menagement of the ischemic ulcers in patients with severe peripheral obstructive arteriopaties not suited for arterial reconstruction.

  12. High Temperature Self-Healing Metallic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutelia, E. R.; Bakhtiyarov, S. I.; Tsurtsumia, O. O.; Bakhtiyarov, A. S.; Eristavi, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the possibility to realize the self healing mechanisms for heterogeneous architectural metal/ceramic high temperature sandwich thermal barrier coating systems on the surfaces refractory metals by analogy of wound healing in the skin.

  13. Self Healing Coating/Film Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Calle, Luz; Williams, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing self healing materials and technologies. This project seeks to further develop self healing functionality in thin films for applications such as corrosion protective coatings, inflatable structures, space suit materials, and electrical wire insulation.

  14. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall ... HEAL is seeking ways to reduce the nation's childhood asthma challenge. Even before Hurricane Katrina swept through ...

  15. Clinton Foundation - Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL) provides the infrastructure that allows employers to offer Energy Upgrades in a turnkey manner. This document will breakdown the different models of HEAL, financing, etc.

  16. Multiple keratoacanthomas developing in healing plaques of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Vineet; Sinha, Surabhi; Khurana, Nita; Garg, Vijay K.

    2013-01-01

    A 22 year old male psoriatic patient presented with multiple reddish scaly plaques all over body. After hematological and biochemical investigations the patient was started on oral methotrexate 15 mg weekly. PASI score at the start of treatment was 26.2. After 3 months PASI dropped to 11.5, the dose of methotrexate was tapered to 7.5mg weekly and the patient was maintained on this dose and kept under monthly follow up. Four months later, the patient presented with reddish to hyperpigmented raised firm nodules having a central crater over the healing plaques of psoriasis. Few lesions showed self resolution over a period of 6-12 weeks. Histopathology of the lesion confirmed it to be Keratoacanthoma. We believe the most likely etiologic factors for the multiple KAs in our patient could be a genetic susceptibility stimulated by multiple causes. PMID:23984234

  17. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  18. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  19. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  20. VAC therapy to promote wound healing after surgical revascularisation for critical lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Pipitò, Narayana; Spinelli, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new emerging non-invasive system in wound care, which speeds up wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates, and facilitating the removal of bacteria from the wound. The application of sub-atmospheric pressure on the lesions seems to alter the cytoskeleton of the cells on the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increase the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The aim of this study is to analyse the results of VAC therapy used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of foot wounds in patients affected by critical limb ischaemia (CLI) (Rutherford 6 class) after distal surgical revascularisation, to promote and accelerate the healing of ulcers. Twenty-nine patients (20 males, 9 females; mean age 68·4) affected by CLI of Rutherford 6 class, after surgical revascularisation of the lower limb, underwent VAC therapy in order to speed up wound healing. Complete wound healing was achieved in 19 patients (65·51%), in an average period of 45·4 ± 25·6 days. VAC therapy is a valid aid, after surgical revascularisation, to achieve rapid healing of foot lesions in patients with CLI.

  1. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  2. Multifunctional Self-Healing and Morphing Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    move freely Fig. 1 Depiction of self-healing ionomers Other materials have been shown to heal when punctured where energy in the form of heating...is attributed to the resealing of ionomeric membranes after bullet penetration [Fall, 2001; Kalista, 2003]. Figure 1 depicts the self-healing of... ionomers in terms of ionic group re-attachment. These ionomers have been demonstrated to self-heal using embedded magnetic particles in a related

  3. Revascularization in Maxillofacial Bone Healing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-21

    administration of cortisone or acetylsalicylic acid did not affect giant cell or capsule formation around the particles. Therefore, this reparative granuloma was...other aspects of healing have special requirements. Thus sulfur-containing amino acids are important for granulation tissue formation (Edwards and...Dunphy, 1957). Capillary endothelium and collagen fibril formation, essential to revascularization, are decreased by ascorbic acid deficiency; the latter

  4. Autonomic healing of polymer composites.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Sottos, N R; Geubelle, P H; Moore, J S; Kessler, M R; Sriram, S R; Brown, E N; Viswanathan, S

    2001-02-15

    Structural polymers are susceptible to damage in the form of cracks, which form deep within the structure where detection is difficult and repair is almost impossible. Cracking leads to mechanical degradation of fibre-reinforced polymer composites; in microelectronic polymeric components it can also lead to electrical failure. Microcracking induced by thermal and mechanical fatigue is also a long-standing problem in polymer adhesives. Regardless of the application, once cracks have formed within polymeric materials, the integrity of the structure is significantly compromised. Experiments exploring the concept of self-repair have been previously reported, but the only successful crack-healing methods that have been reported so far require some form of manual intervention. Here we report a structural polymeric material with the ability to autonomically heal cracks. The material incorporates a microencapsulated healing agent that is released upon crack intrusion. Polymerization of the healing agent is then triggered by contact with an embedded catalyst, bonding the crack faces. Our fracture experiments yield as much as 75% recovery in toughness, and we expect that our approach will be applicable to other brittle materials systems (including ceramics and glasses).

  5. Healing Magazine, Volume 8, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue contains articles on intervention for self-injurious behavior, providing school-based grief groups, effectively using time-out as a parenting tool, and KidsPeace's suicide prevention…

  6. Comparative study of laser and LED systems of low intensity applied to tendon healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, J. L. N.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Parizotto, N. A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Low-intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) and Light Emitting Diode Therapy (LEDT) of low intensity on the treatment of lesioned Achilles tendon of rats. The experimental model consisted of a partial mechanical lesion on the right Achilles tendon deep portion of 90 rats. One hour after the lesion, the injured animals received applications of laser/LED (685, 830/630, 880 nm), and the same procedure was repeated at 24-h intervals, for 10 days. The healing process and deposition of collagen were evaluated based on a polarization microscopy analysis of the alignment and organization of collagen bundles, through the birefringence (optical retardation-OR). The results showed a real efficiency of treatments based on LEDT and confirmed that LILT seems to be effective on healing process. Although absence of coherence of LED light, tendon healing treatment with this feature was satisfactory and can certainly replace treatments based on laser light applications. Applications of infrared laser at 830 nm and LED 880 nm were more efficient when the aim is a good organization, aggregation, and alignment of the collagen bundles on tendon healing. However, more research is needed for a safety and more efficient determination of a protocol with LED.

  7. Wound Healing Problems in the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Politis, Constantinus; Schoenaers, Joseph; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Agbaje, Jimoh O.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a primary survival mechanism that is largely taken for granted. The literature includes relatively little information about disturbed wound healing, and there is no acceptable classification describing wound healing process in the oral region. Wound healing comprises a sequence of complex biological processes. All tissues follow an essentially identical pattern to complete the healing process with minimal scar formation. The oral cavity is a remarkable environment in which wound healing occurs in warm oral fluid containing millions of microorganisms. The present review provides a basic overview of the wound healing process and with a discussion of the local and general factors that play roles in achieving efficient would healing. Results of oral cavity wound healing can vary from a clinically healed wound without scar formation and with histologically normal connective tissue under epithelial cells to extreme forms of trismus caused by fibrosis. Many local and general factors affect oral wound healing, and an improved understanding of these factors will help to address issues that lead to poor oral wound healing. PMID:27853435

  8. New therapeutic strategy for amino acid medicine: prophylactic and healing promoting effect of monosodium glutamate against NSAID-induced enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Amagase, Kikuko; Ochi, Akimu; Kojo, Azusa; Mizunoe, Ami; Taue, Masaya; Kinoshita, Naoya; Nakamura, Eiji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the development and healing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal lesions in rats. Loxoprofen (60 mg/kg, p.o.) induced lesions in the small intestine within 24 h, accompanied by a decrease of Muc2 expression and an increase in enterobacterial invasion and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. These lesions were prevented when MSG was given as a mixture of powdered food for 5 days before the loxoprofen treatment. This effect of MSG was accompanied by an increase in Muc2 expression / mucus secretion as well as the suppression of bacterial invasion and iNOS expression. These intestinal lesions healed spontaneously within 6 days, but the process was impaired by the repeated administration of low-dose loxoprofen (30 mg/kg) for 5 days after the ulceration, with the decrease of vascular endothelial derived growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis. The healing-impairing effect of loxoprofen was prevented by feeding 5% MSG for 5 days after the ulceration. These results suggest that MSG not only prevents loxoprofen-induced small intestinal damage but also promotes a healing of these lesions; the former is functionally associated with the increase in Muc2 expression / mucus secretion and the suppression of bacterial invasion and iNOS expression, while the latter is associated with the stimulation of VEGF expression/angiogenesis.

  9. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  10. [Treatment of american cutaneous leishmaniasis, with lesions in the mucosa, using pentamidine isethionate].

    PubMed

    Amato, V S; de Paula, J G; Imamura, R; Amato Neto, V; Duarte, M I; Boulos, M I; Boulos, M; Nicodemo, A C; de Mendonca, J S

    1996-01-01

    Ten patients with mucosal lesions caused by American tegumental leishmaniasis were treated with pentamidine isethionate at the dose 4 mg/kg on alternate days by the intravenous route. The mean posology was 2,140 mg. Healing of the lesions occurred in 9 (90%) of the patients who completed treatment. There was no recurrence during a follow-up time of 1 to 24 months (mean, 7,7 months). One patient discontinued treatment before healing of the lesion because be developed diabetes mellitus. In 3 (30%) patients, blood exams showed increased urea and creatinine levels and leucopenia, which were corrected by increasing the interval between administrations of the drug. Pentamidine isethionate is efficient in bringing about cicatrization of the lesions but needs further evaluation in terms of its value in preventing recurrence.

  11. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  12. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; ... can remove: Benign or pre-malignant skin lesions Warts Moles Sunspots Hair Small blood vessels in the ...

  13. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  14. Epidermal Smad4 deletion results in aberrant wound healing.

    PubMed

    Owens, Philip; Engelking, Erin; Han, Gangwen; Haeger, Sarah M; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the role of Smad4, a component of the transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway, in cutaneous wound repair. Interestingly, when Smad4 was deleted in the epidermis, several defects in wound healing were observed in non-keratinocyte compartments. In comparison with wounded wild-type mouse skin, Smad4-deficient wounds had delayed wound closure and remodeling. Increased angiogenesis and inflammation were found in Smad4-deficient skin; these effects were exacerbated throughout the entire wound healing process. In addition, increased numbers of myofibroblasts but reduced collagen levels were found in Smad4-deficient wounds in comparison with wild-type wounds. Since Smad4 is not a secreted protein, we assessed if the above non-cell autonomous alterations were the result of molecular alterations in Smad4-deficient keratinocytes, which exert paracrine effects on wound stroma. Smad4-deficient skin and wounds had elevated levels of transforming growth factor-beta1, which have been shown to induce similar phenotypes, as well as of several transforming growth factor-beta1 target genes, such as matrix metalloproteinases, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5. Furthermore, the above pathological and molecular alterations were exacerbated in skin cancer lesions that spontaneously developed from Smad4-deficient skin. Therefore, loss of Smad4 in the epidermis appears to significantly affect the microenvironment during wound healing and carcinogenesis.

  15. Inflammatory choroidal neovascular membrane after healed tuberculous choroidal granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Sikander A. K.; Saifuddin, Khadija; Devulapally, Santhosh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of choroidal granuloma masquerading as intraocular tumor that healed on anti-tuberculous treatment but led to the development of inflammatory choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM). Method: A 42-year-old female patient with past history of hysterectomy presented with diminution of vision in the right eye. Fundus examination in the right eye showed a yellowish white choroidal mass with associated bullous retinal detachment superotemporal to fovea. Left eye fundus was normal. Fundus flourescein angiography showed early and late hyperflourescence with late pooling in serous detachments. Complete systemic evaluation did not yield a clue to diagnosis. Positron emission tomography scan (PET scan) showed enlarged lymph nodes in cervical, mediastinal and peritoneal regions. Lymph node biopsy showed caseating granulomas. Results: The granuloma subsided and a scar formed 5 months after starting anti-tuberculous treatment with improvement in vision. Six months later, the vision deteriorated again with the development of a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) at the margin of the scar. The CNVM resolved and all the signs of activity subsided after giving intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections. Conclusions: Making a diagnosis of tuberculous granuloma in a case of choroidal mass lesion is a challenge. PET scan helps in identifying metabolically active lymph nodes appropriate for biopsy. Healed scars of tuberculous choroid lesions should be followed closely to detect the development of CNVM. PMID:28293535

  16. The self-healing composite anticorrosion coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhao; Wei, Zhang; Le-ping, Liao; Hong-mei, Wang; Wu-jun, Li

    Self-healing coatings, which autonomically repair and prevent corrosion of the underlying substrate, are of particular interest for the researchers. In the article, effectiveness of epoxy resin filled microcapsules was investigated for healing of cracks generated in coatings. Microcapsules were prepared by in situ polymerization of urea-formaldehyde resin to form shell over epoxy resindroplets. Characteristics of these capsules were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and particle size analyzer. The model system of self-healing antisepsis coating consists of an epoxy resin matrix, 10 wt% microencapsulated healing agent, 2wt% catalyst solution. The self-healing function of this coating system is evaluated through corrosion testing of damaged and healed coated steel samples compared to control samples. Electrochemical testing provides further evidence of passivation of the substrate by self-healing coatings.

  17. The natural history of osteochondral lesions in the ankle.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-01-01

    Most osteochondral lesions (defects) of the talar dome are caused by trauma, which may be a single event or repeated, less intense events (microtrauma). A lesion may heal, remain asymptomatic, or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing, prolonged joint swelling, and the formation of subchondral bone cysts. During loading, compression of the cartilage forces water into the microfractured subchondral bone. The increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone can cause osteolysis and the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion but most likely is caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking and a concomitant decrease in pH produced by osteoclasts, which sensitize the highly innervated subchondral bone. Prevention of further degeneration depends on several factors, including the repair of the subchondral bone plate and the correct alignment of the ankle joint.

  18. Interrelationship between Periapical Lesion and Systemic Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hajime; Hirai, Kimito; Martins, Christine Men; Furusho, Hisako; Battaglino, Ricardo; Hashimoto, Koshi

    2016-01-01

    Periapical periodontitis, also known as periapical lesion, is a common dental disease, along with periodontitis (gum disease). Periapical periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, caused by endodontic infection, and its development is regulated by the host immune/inflammatory response. Metabolic disorders, which are largely dependent on life style such as eating habits, have been interpreted as a “metabolically-triggered” low-grade systemic inflammation and may interact with periapical periodontitis by triggering immune modulation. The host immune system is therefore considered the common fundamental mechanism of both disease conditions. An elevated inflammatory state caused by metabolic disorders can impact the clinical outcome of periapical lesions and interfere with wound healing after endodontic treatment. Although additional well-designed clinical studies are needed, periapical lesions appear to affect insulin sensitivity and exacerbate non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Immune regulatory cytokines produced by various cell types, including immune cells and adipose tissue, play an important role in this interrelationship. PMID:26881444

  19. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  20. Fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing Hoi; Miclau, Theodore; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Yang, Frank F; Alt, Volker

    2016-06-01

    As the world population rises, osteoporotic fracture is an emerging global threat to the well-being of elderly patients. The process of fracture healing by intramembranous ossification or/and endochondral ossification involve many well-orchestrated events including the signaling, recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during the early phase; formation of a hard callus and extracellular matrix, angiogenesis and revascularization during the mid-phase; and finally callus remodeling at the late phase of fracture healing. Through clinical and animal research, many of these factors are shown to be impaired in osteoporotic bone. Animal studies related to post-menopausal estrogen deficient osteoporosis (type I) have shown healing to be prolonged with decreased levels of MSCs and decreased levels of angiogenesis. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) was shown to be delayed in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture. This might be related to the observed difference in mechanical sensitivity between normal and osteoporotic bones, which requires further experiments to elucidate. In mice fracture models related to senile osteoporosis (type II), it was observed that chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation were impaired; and that transplantation of juvenile bone marrow would result in enhanced callus formation. Other factors related to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have also been noted to be impaired in aged models, affecting the degradation of cartilaginous matrixes and vascular invasion; the result is changes in matrix composition and growth factors concentrations that ultimately impairs healing during age-related osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic related fractures occur at metaphyseal sites clinically, and reports have indicated that differences exist between diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. An animal model that satisfies three main criteria (metaphyseal region, plate fixation, osteoporosis) is suggested for future research for

  1. Self-healing fuse development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, N. D.; Kinsinger, R. E.; Harris, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    The mercury-filled self-healing fuses developed for this program afford very good protection from circuit faults with rapid reclosure. Fuse performance and design parameters have been characterized. Life tests indicate a capability of 500 fuse operations. Fuse ratings are 150 v at 5, 15, 25 and 50 circuit A. A series of sample fuses using alumina and beryllia insulation have been furnished to NASA for circuit evaluation.

  2. Fibrin structure and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Laurens, N; Koolwijk, P; de Maat, M P M

    2006-05-01

    Fibrinogen and fibrin play an important role in blood clotting, fibrinolysis, cellular and matrix interactions, inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis, and neoplasia. The contribution of fibrin(ogen) to these processes largely depends not only on the characteristics of the fibrin(ogen) itself, but also on interactions between specific-binding sites on fibrin(ogen), pro-enzymes, clotting factors, enzyme inhibitors, and cell receptors. In this review, the molecular and cellular biology of fibrin(ogen) is reviewed in the context of cutaneous wound repair. The outcome of wound healing depends largely on the fibrin structure, such as the thickness of the fibers, the number of branch points, the porosity, and the permeability. The binding of fibrin(ogen) to hemostasis proteins and platelets as well as to several different cells such as endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, leukocytes, and keratinocytes is indispensable during the process of wound repair. High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fibrinogen, two naturally occurring variants of fibrin, are important determinants of angiogenesis and differ in their cell growth stimulation, clotting rate, and fibrin polymerization characteristics. Fibrin sealants have been investigated as matrices to promote wound healing. These sealants may also be an ideal delivery vehicle to deliver extra cells for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  3. Influence of the location of nonischemic diabetic forefoot osteomyelitis on time to healing after undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Cecilia-Matilla, Almudena; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Chana-Valero, Pedro; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2013-09-01

    The forefoot has been reported as the most frequent location of osteomyelitis in the feet of patients with diabetes. The forefoot includes toes and metatarsal heads as common locations of bone infections, but the anatomy of these bones is quite different. As a result, such differences in anatomy may have an impact on the outcomes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether different locations of osteomyelitis in the forefoot have any influence on time to healing after undergoing surgery in a prospective series including 195 patients without peripheral arterial disease and osteomyelitis confirmed by histopathology. Location of the lesion was classified into 4 groups: hallux, first metatarsal head, lesser metatarsal heads, and lesser toes. The time required to achieve healing and the cumulative rate of wounds healed and likelihood of healing were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Time of healing (mean ± SD) in the whole series was 10.7 ± 8.4 weeks. Osteomyelitis located in the lesser toes has a higher probability of healing by the fourth week (odds ratio [OR] = 5.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8-11.6, P < .001), eighth week (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.6-6.4, P < .001), or twelfth week (OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.3-7.0, P = .008) than other osteomyelitis locations. Osteomyelitis located in the first metatarsal joint was less likely to heal by the eighth week (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.9, P = .037) and 12th week (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-1.0, P = .040). In conclusion, time to healing is significantly different according to the location of the bone infection in the forefoot.

  4. The local immune response in ulcerative lesions of Buruli disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiszewski, A E; Becerril, E; Aguilar, L D; Kader, I T A; Myers, W; Portaels, F; Hernàndez Pando, R

    2006-01-01

    Buruli disease (BU) is a progressive necrotic and ulcerative disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. Three clinical stages of the cutaneous lesions have been described in BU: pre-ulcerative, ulcerative and healed lesions. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and automated morphometry to determine the percentage of macrophages and of CD4/CD8 lymphocytes and their expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Expression of these cytokines was correlated with the inflammatory response evaluated by histopathology. All the studied BU ulcerative cases showed extensive necrosis and chronic inflammation. The most important feature was the presence or absence of granulomas co-existing with a mixed pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. When granulomas were present significantly higher expression of IFN-γ was seen, whereas in ulcerative lesions without granulomas there was increased expression of IL-10 and significantly higher bacillary counts. These features correlated with the chronicity of the lesions; longer-lasting lesions showed granulomas. Thus, granulomas were absent from relatively early ulcerative lesions, which contained more bacilli and little IFN-γ, suggesting that at this stage of the disease strong suppression of the protective cellular immune response facilitates proliferation of bacilli. PMID:16487243

  5. Intraventricular mass lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.; Sobel, D.F.; Kelley, W.M.; Norman, D.

    1984-11-01

    Determining the precise etiology of an intraventricular mass can be a difficult diagnostic problem. CT and angiographic findings were reviewed in a series of 73 patients who had intraventricular masses. The histologic diagnosis can be suggested preoperatively by an analysis of the frequency of lesions occurring at a given ventricular location, lesion density before and after administration of contrast material, age, and sex of the patient, morphologic appearance of the mass, and presence or absence of hydrocephalus. Angiography is useful when meningioma, choroid plexus papilloma and carcinoma, or arteriovenous malformation are considered.

  6. Electrical Activation of Wound-Healing Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Penninger, Josef; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective wound healing has been a lasting and challenging topic in health care. Various strategies have been used to accelerate and perfect the healing process. One such strategy has involved the application of an exogenous electrical stimulus to chronic wounds with the aim of stimulating healing responses. The Problem The biology of electric stimulation to instigate healing, however, is very poorly understood. How does electric stimulation induce healing responses? Basic/Clinical Science Advances Recent research shows that the electric fields (EFs) activate multiple signaling pathways that are critical for wound healing. Importantly, the EFs provide a powerful, sometimes an overriding, directional signal for cell migration in wound healing. Unlike other stimuli, EFs have the intrinsic property of being directional. The EF-directed cell migration (electrotaxis/galvanotaxis) appears to be a consequence of EF-induced polarized signaling of epidermal growth factor receptors, integrins, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Pten, and may be mediated by protein kinase C, intracellular Ca2+, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Because directional cell migration is a key component in wound healing, galvanotaxis may represent an important mechanism of wound healing. Clinical Care Relevance With the constantly enlarging diabetic and aging population, chronic or nonhealing wounds pose increasing health and economic problems, and currently there is no effective therapy available. Electric stimulation activates important intracellular signaling pathways that are polarized in the EF direction, resulting in enhanced and stimulated directional cell migration. Electric stimulation offers a novel approach to achieve better and accelerated wound healing. Conclusion Experimental evidence suggests a significant role of endogenous EFs in cell migration in wound healing. Most importantly, EFs are a very powerful signal to direct cell migration. Electric stimulation therefore

  7. Healed Depressed Parasagittal Skull Fractures-A Feature of Archaic Australian Aboriginal Remains.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Keryn; Brophy, Brian; Cornish, Brian; Byard, Roger W

    2016-11-01

    The skeletal remains of eight Australian Aboriginals with healed depressed skull fractures were examined. Male:female ratio 5:3; age range 20-60 yrs. Burial dates by (14) C dating in three cases were 500 years BP (n = 2) and 1300 BP. There were 13 healed depressed skull fractures manifested by shallow indentations of cortical bone and thinning of diploe, with no significant disturbance of the inner skull tables. Nine (69%) were located within 35 mm of the sagittal suture/midline. These lesions represent another acquired feature that might be helpful in suggesting that a skull is from a tribal Aboriginal individual and may be particularly useful if the remains are represented by only fragments of calvarium. While obviously not a finding specific to this population, these healed injuries would be consistent with the possible results of certain types of conflict behavior reported in traditional Aboriginal groups that involved formalized inflicted blunt head trauma.

  8. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in healing necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum ulcers.

    PubMed

    Motolese, A; Vignati, F; Antelmi, A; Saturni, V

    2015-01-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD) is a chronic condition, which is characterized by single or multiple lesions on the legs, and occurs in 0.3% of patients with diabetes. Recently, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used in several clinical settings to promote sustained healing and better outcome. We propose the use of PRP for the treatment of NLD-associated recalcitrant wounds. In this study, 15 patients were treated with homologous PRP; all showed marked enhancement in wound healing without any adverse effects. After PRP application, advanced dressings were used until closure of the lesion was obtained, which was complete for all our patients. We therefore propose the use of PRP for recalcitrant wounds in patients with NLD.

  9. Rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen: Gastroprotective and Ulcer Healing Properties in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; Cabrini, Daniela de Almeida; Nascimento, Adamara Machado; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; de Paula Werner, Maria Fernanda; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2014-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan (RGal) isolated from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen administered by oral route showed gastroprotective activity against acute lesions induced by ethanol. In this study, we investigated the gastric ulcer healing effect of RGal and its mechanisms of action. Intraperitoneal treatment of animals with RGal protected the gastric mucosa against acute lesions induced by ethanol, with participation of gastric mucus. Furthermore, in the chronic ulcer model, oral administration of RGal accelerates the gastric ulcer healing, accompanied by increasing of cellular proliferation and gastric mucus content, reducing inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress. In addition, the repeated 7 days-treatment of animals with RGal did not show alterations of clinical and behavioral symptoms, body and organs weights or plasmatic biochemical parameters. Collectively, these results showed that RGal has an interesting antiulcerogenic activity and could constitute an attractive molecule of interest for the development of new antiulcer agents. PMID:24416280

  10. Rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen: gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties in rats.

    PubMed

    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; Cabrini, Daniela de Almeida; Nascimento, Adamara Machado; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2014-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan (RGal) isolated from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen administered by oral route showed gastroprotective activity against acute lesions induced by ethanol. In this study, we investigated the gastric ulcer healing effect of RGal and its mechanisms of action. Intraperitoneal treatment of animals with RGal protected the gastric mucosa against acute lesions induced by ethanol, with participation of gastric mucus. Furthermore, in the chronic ulcer model, oral administration of RGal accelerates the gastric ulcer healing, accompanied by increasing of cellular proliferation and gastric mucus content, reducing inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress. In addition, the repeated 7 days-treatment of animals with RGal did not show alterations of clinical and behavioral symptoms, body and organs weights or plasmatic biochemical parameters. Collectively, these results showed that RGal has an interesting antiulcerogenic activity and could constitute an attractive molecule of interest for the development of new antiulcer agents.

  11. New objective criterion for determining, noninvasively, the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Wagner, W.; Sakimura, I.

    1981-02-01

    Peripheral vascular perfusion studies using intravenously administered thallium-201 were performed on 13 patients suffering from ischemic ulcer of the lower extermities. Scintillation camera views and point counting over the lesion and adjacent region were utilized to define qualitatively and quantitatively the relative hyperemia of the lesion. The preliminary findings demonstrate that when the relative hyperemia was equal to or greater than 1.5, 100% (seven of seven) went on to heal their ulcer with conservative management. Of those without this degree of hyperemia, 83% (five of six) will require amputation. Based on this limited series, noninvasive assessment of the relative hyperemia of an ischemic ulcer using thallium-201 is a new, useful, and objective indicator of the healing potential of a so-called ischemic ulcer.

  12. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  13. Clinical and Histopathologic Investigation of Periapical Actinomycosis with Cutaneous Lesion: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Davood; Moazami, Fariborz; Sobhnamayan, Fereshteh; Taheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Management of an extra-radicular infection is a challenging procedure that requires surgical intervention. This report describes a patient with discharging cutaneous lesion that required apical surgery. A 40-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Endodontics, Shiraz Dental School with chief complaint of a cutaneous sinus tract. She had been treated by a dermatologist and an otolaryngologist. The patient had also received orthograde root canal treatment of tooth #16. Yet, the lesion was still discharging and the patient was scheduled for surgery. Histopathologic analysis of the lesion showed actinomycosis infection. A 36-month follow-up revealed clinical and radiographic healing. PMID:26535411

  14. Wound healing in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Schreml, Stephan; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Prantl, Lukas; Landthaler, Michael; Babilas, Philipp

    2010-11-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major therapeutic and economic issues in medicine today. Cutaneous wound healing is an extremely well-regulated and complex process basically divided into 3 phases: inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling. Unfortunately, we still do not understand this process precisely enough to give direction effectively to impaired healing processes. There have been many new developments in wound healing that provide fascinating insights and may improve our ability to manage clinical problems. Our goal is to acquaint the reader with selected major novel findings about cutaneous wound healing that have been published since the beginning of the new millennium. We discuss advances in areas such as genetics, proteases, cytokines, chemokines, and regulatory peptides, as well as therapeutic strategies, all set in the framework of the different phases of wound healing.

  15. Translating 'Asian' Modes of Healing and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses the 'translation of Asian modes of healing and medicine' in six recently published books by raising seven questions. They serve both to review the volumes and to ask how we have moved from understanding systems of healing in terms of tradition and modernity, science and nonscience, globalization and locality, innovation and cultural heritage, to translating them in terms of assemblages, products, modes of resistance, social (dis-)harmony, and ecological balance. The questions span subjects ranging from the meaning of 'Asian' in Asian modes of healing, the object of healing and classifications of systems of healing to their relation with 'biomedicine,' modernization and the state, the extents to which communities share healing tradition, and their existential meaning in context.

  16. [Wound-healing effect of carbopol hydrogels in rats with alloxan diabetes model].

    PubMed

    Zinov'ev, E V; Ivakhniuk, G K; Dadaian, K A; Lagvilava, T O

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 0.5% hydrogels of acrylic polymers (carbopol), antibiotic ointment based on polyethylene oxides (levomekol), silver-containing creams (dermazin and argosulfan), silver sulfadiazine ointment with epidermal growth factor (ebermin), and wound-covering fabric of antibacterial cellulose with poviargol and zero-valent silver (aquacell-Ag) on skin repair processes have been evaluated in comparative experiments on rats. The wound-healing effects were characterized by the time of cleansing and epithelization, rate of suppuration, index of healing, and skin impedance under conditions of necrotic skin lesions on the background of diabetes. It is established that local application of carbopol hydrogels modified by electric (frequency-modulated) signal with antiseptics (poviargol) and nanostructural components (natural fullerene complex) shortens the period of wound cleansing from detritus on the background of decompensated diabetes by 3.6 days (p > 0.05), accelerates healing by 8.4 days (p < 0.05), reduces the frequency of suppuration by 23.3% (p < 0.05), exhibits strong bactericidal effect against wound infections by pathogens, and restores tissue impedance. Thus, hydrogels based on low-crosslinked acrylic polymers are a promising basis of wound-healing formulations for the treatment of necrotic lesions on the background of diabetic foot syndrome.

  17. Phases of the wound healing process.

    PubMed

    Brown, Annemarie

    This is the first in a six-part series on wound management. It describes the stages of the wound healing process and explains how they relate to nursing practice. Nurses need to know how to recognise and understand the different phases so they can identify whether wounds are healing normally and apply the appropriate treatments to remove the barriers to healing. Part 2 (page 14) focuses on wound assessment.

  18. Current management of talar osteochondral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gianakos, Arianna L; Yasui, Youichi; Hannon, Charles P; Kennedy, John G

    2017-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) occur in up to 70% of acute ankle sprains and fractures. OLT have become increasingly recognized with the advancements in cartilage-sensitive diagnostic imaging modalities. Although OLT may be treated nonoperatively, a number of surgical techniques have been described for patients whom surgery is indicated. Traditionally, treatment of symptomatic OLT have included either reparative procedures, such as bone marrow stimulation (BMS), or replacement procedures, such as autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT). Reparative procedures are generally indicated for OLT < 150 mm2 in area. Replacement strategies are used for large lesions or after failed primary repair procedures. Although short- and medium-term results have been reported, long-term studies on OLT treatment strategies are lacking. Biological augmentation including platelet-rich plasma and concentrated bone marrow aspirate is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of OLT to enhance the biological environment during healing. In this review, we describe the most up-to-date clinical evidence of surgical outcomes, as well as both the mechanical and biological concerns associated with BMS and AOT. In addition, we will review the recent evidence for biological adjunct therapies that aim to improve outcomes and longevity of both BMS and AOT procedures. PMID:28144574

  19. Therapeutic effects of Zataria Multiflora essential oil on recurrent oral aphthous lesion

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Neda; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Hossein; Nooribayat, Shaghayegh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aphthous lesions are one of the most common diseases of the oral cavity. They can cause severe pain, and there is no definite treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Zataria multiflora (ZM, a thyme-like plant) essential oil for the control and treatment of aphthous lesions. Materials and Methods: This Triple blind clinical trial study was performed on 28 patients who were divided into two groups (eight men and six women in each group) and given ZM or placebo (control). The healing time, pain intensity, and aphthous zone diameter were recorded for each patient and followed for 6-month. Data were analyzed using Mann–Whitney and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: After 6-month of follow-up, 4 patients in the placebo group and 6 patients in the ZM group suffered from recurrent aphthous lesions. The average complete healing time and duration of burning sensation were significantly lower in the ZM group (P < 0.05). Significant difference was observed between the two groups with regard to the diameter of lesions and halo of the lesions (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, ZM shortened the healing period compared to placebo. PMID:26604960

  20. Influence of oxygen on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yip, Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen has an important role in normal wound healing. This article reviews the evidence concerning the role of oxygen in wound healing and its influence on the different stages of wound healing. The evidence reviewed has demonstrated that improving oxygenation may be helpful in limiting wound infection, although there is a lack of good quality studies on the role of oxygen in the proliferative phase and in reepithelialisation. Overall, the relationship between oxygen and wound healing is complex. Knowledge of this aspect is important as many treatment modalities for refractory wounds are based on these principles.

  1. The Role of Oxygen during Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chuanyong; Saless, Neema; Wang, Xiaodong; Sinha, Arjun; Decker, Sebastian; Kazakia, Galateia; Hou, Huagang; Williams, Benjamin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen affects the activity of multiple skeletogenic cells and is involved in many processes that are important for fracture healing. However, the role of oxygen in fracture healing has not been fully studied. Here we systematically examine the effects of oxygen tension on fracture healing and test the ability of hyperoxia to rescue healing defects in a mouse model of ischemic fracture healing. Mice with tibia fracture were housed in custom-built gas chambers and groups breathed a constant atmosphere of 13% oxygen (hypoxia), 21% oxygen (normoxia), or 50% oxygen (hyperoxia). The influx of inflammatory cells to the fracture site, stem cell differentiation, tissue vascularization, and fracture healing were analyzed. In addition, the efficacy of hyperoxia (50% breathing oxygen) as a treatment regimen for fracture nonunion was tested. Hypoxic animals had decreased tissue vascularity, decreased bone formation, and delayed callus remodeling. Hyperoxia increased tissue vascularization, altered fracture healing in un-complicated fractures, and improved bone repair in ischemia-induced delayed fracture union. However, neither hypoxia nor hyperoxia significantly altered chondrogenesis or osteogenesis during early stages of fracture healing, and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils was not affected by environmental oxygen after bone injury. In conclusion, our results indicate that environmental oxygen levels affect tissue vascularization and fracture healing, and that providing oxygen to patients with fractures accompanied by ischemia may be beneficial. PMID:23063782

  2. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  3. Chronic cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, Richard M; Judson, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis involvement of the skin is common. The skin lesions of sarcoidosis may be nonspecific, showing a nondiagnostic inflammatory reaction pattern on histologic evaluation. Nonspecific skin lesions are often associated with an acute presentation of sarcoidosis and, in general, portend a good prognosis. Specific sarcoidosis skin lesions reveal typical sarcoid granulomas on histologic examination. These lesions tend to be chronic and require therapy for resolution. This article will review the epidemiology, diagnostic evaluation, and description of the various chronic skin lesions of sarcoidosis. Various images of these skin lesions will be demonstrated.

  4. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  5. Yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) accelerated the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimiko; Kurakazu, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We have reported that LG21 yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) inhibits the formation of HCl-induced acute gastric lesions through the generation of prostaglandin E₂. This study aimed to determine the role of viable Lactobacillus in the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer. LG21 yogurt or γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt was administered orally twice a day for 10 d at a dose of 5 ml/kg. LG21 yogurt significantly accelerated the healing of the ulcer, but γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt did not. However, both yogurts significantly inhibited HCl-induced gastric erosive lesions and enhanced the generation of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E₂. From the above results, it was found that viable bacteria are needed to accelerate the healing of chronic gastric ulcer, but not to inhibit gastric lesions.

  6. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N.; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Moran, Corey S.; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  7. Processing of CXCL12 impedes the recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells in diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang; Hao, Daifeng; Chai, Jiake

    2014-11-01

    High blood sugar levels result in defective wound healing processes in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in vasculogenesis, and thereby contribute to reconstitution of the microcirculation and healing. This study aimed to determine the possible mechanism by which the numbers of circulating EPCs are regulated in response to tissue wounding. In the streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model, we found that phagocytes activated by local inflammatory cytokines in the wound interfere with the mobilization and recruitment of EPCs to the lesion area. Specifically, the activated macrophages inactivate CXCL12, the major chemokine for EPC recruitment, via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and thereby prevent local chemotaxis and subsequent homing of EPCs to the wound. The wound healing process is delayed by local administration of inflammatory cytokines, and its rate is increased by MMP inhibitors. This study indicates that local inhibition of MMPs is beneficial for regeneration of damaged vessels, and may explain poor wound healing in diabetic patients, thus demonstrating its potential utility as a local treatment therapy to promote diabetic wound healing.

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Vishwanath, Guruswamy

    2012-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier's gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon. PMID:23162231

  9. Bioinspired Self-Healing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksay, Ilhan

    2005-03-01

    Synthetic materials are designed to satisfy only one or two functions, but biologically produced ones are multifunctional and have properties (e.g., self-replicating, self-healing) that have yet to be introduced into man-made materials. The objective of this lecture will be to provide an understanding of the important processes for controlling materials properties through nano- and microstructural design and processing with the goal of attaining multifunctionality. A case study will be on the possibility of producing structural materials with self-healing characteristics. In an effort to mimic self-repair functions of living systems, we have been working with self-assembling complex fluids that respond to fields generated by the defects and deposit materials at the site of the defect. Presently, the techniques are limited to certain materials systems as coatings or thin films. We partially mimic the process of blood clotting as a process of colloidal aggregation at a defect site. We show that under the influence of an electrical field, colloidal particles detect a defect and aggregate at the defect site to form a protective layer. The basis of this process is the electrohdrodynamic flow generated by the inhomogeneities. We then make this a permanent protective layer through the electrodeposition of a metal binder in the interstitials of the colloidal aggregate.

  10. Biologic adjuvants for fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue has an exceptional quality to regenerate to native tissue in response to injury. However, the fracture repair process requires mechanical stability or a viable biological microenvironment or both to ensure successful healing to native tissue. An improved understanding of the molecular and cellular events that occur during bone repair and remodeling has led to the development of biologic agents that can augment the biological microenvironment and enhance bone repair. Orthobiologics, including stem cells, osteoinductive growth factors, osteoconductive matrices, and anabolic agents, are available clinically for accelerating fracture repair and treatment of compromised bone repair situations like delayed unions and nonunions. Preclinical and clinical studies using biologic agents like recombinant bone morphogenetic proteins have demonstrated an efficacy similar or better than that of autologous bone graft in acute fracture healing. A lack of standardized outcome measures for comparison of biologic agents in clinical fracture repair trials, frequent off-label use, and a limited understanding of the biological activity of these agents at the bone repair site have limited their efficacy in clinical applications. PMID:23198865

  11. Histological study of wound healing in rats following He-Ne and GaAlAs laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Martha S.; Zezell, Denise M.; Maldonado, Edison P.; Viera, Nilson D., Jr.; Carbone, Karin; Pellegrini, Cleusa M. R.; Zorn, Telma M. T.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of low-intensity linearly polarized visible ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm) and near infrared ((lambda) equals 797 nm) laser radiation on healing of skin wounds was compared histologically. Three round lesions measuring about 6 mm in diameter were created at the end of the spinal column of 20 rats divided in two groups of 10 animals by burning the rat back skin with liquid nitrogen. Lesions #1 and #2 were illuminated using He-Ne or GaAlAs laser radiation. The laser polarization was aligned with the rat spinal direction in lesion #1, lesion #2 with the perpendicular relative orientation and lesion #3 was not irradiated (control). The animals were irradiated with a total dose of 1 J/cm2 on day 3, 8, 11 and 14. After each irradiation, two rats from each group were killed to obtain morphological information. On day 17 the last rats were killed. The irradiated lesions presented a significant acceleration on the wound repair compared to the control. The results showed that the relative orientation of the electric field has an essential role on the healing process if exposure is visible light. On the other hand, no morphological difference was observed between illuminated lesions by near infrared radiation with respect to polarization orientation.

  12. Epidemiologic survey in Swiss group-housed breeding rabbits: extent of lesions and potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Andrist, Claude A; van den Borne, Bart H P; Bigler, Lotti M; Buchwalder, Theres; Roth, Beatrice A

    2013-02-01

    In Switzerland, group-housing for breeding rabbit does is not explicitly required by law, but label programmes, as well as the general public and animal welfare groups, are advocating it. Although group-housing is of great benefit to the gregariously living rabbits, the establishment of a social hierarchy within the group might lead to stress and lesions. In the present epidemiological study, lesions were scored twice on 30% of the breeding does on all 28 commercial Swiss farms with group-housed breeding does. Additionally, a detailed questionnaire was filled out with all producers to determine risk factors potentially associated with lesions. Data were analysed using hierarchical proportional odds models. About 33% of the does examined had lesions, including wounds that were almost healed and small scratches. Severe lesions were counted on 9% of the animals. Differences between seasons in lesions score were identified, with the extent of lesions being higher in summer than in spring. Fewer lesions occurred on farms on which mastitis was more common. More lesions were found on farms where the does were isolated between littering and artificial insemination than on farms without isolation. According to the producers, most of the aggression occurred directly after the isolation phase when the does were regrouped again. We conclude that lesions in group-housed breeding does might be reduced by appropriate reproductive management.

  13. Corneal wound healing after superficial foreign body injury: vitamin A and dexpanthenol versus a calf blood extract. A randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Egger, S F; Huber-Spitzy, V; Alzner, E; Scholda, C; Vecsei, V P

    1999-01-01

    A prospective randomized double-blind clinical study was performed to investigate corneal wound healing after treatment either with an eye gel containing calf blood extract or an eye ointment containing vitamin A and dexpanthenol. A total of 54 outpatients were included in this study, all treated for corneal foreign body injury. The size of the corneal lesions was measured by planimetry on days 0, 1, and on the following days until complete epithelial healing occurred. Results showed the calf blood extract eye gel to be statistically more effective in promoting corneal wound healing, especially in patients with wound areas larger than 6 mm(2).

  14. Active implant peri-apical lesion: a case report treated via guided bone regeneration with a 5-year clinical and radiographic follow-up.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Alessandro; Andreana, Sebastiano; Pompa, Giorgio; Procaccini, Maurizio

    2014-06-01

    Implant peri-apical lesion (IPL) is a periapical lesion, usually asymptomatic, in which the coronal portion of the implant achieves a normal bone to implant interface. A case of IPL following immediate implant placement and treated with guided bone regeneration (GBR) principles is described. Five-year clinical and radiographic follow-up with cone-beam assessment showed complete healing of the bone. GBR principles applied to IPL could completely solve the lesion.

  15. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Skin lesion gram stain Images Viral lesion culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  16. "Healing is a Done Deal": Temporality and Metabolic Healing Among Evangelical Christians in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in independent Samoa, in this article, I analyze the temporal dimensions of evangelical Christian healing of metabolic disorders. I explore how those suffering with metabolic disorders draw from multiple time-based notions of healing, drawing attention to the limits of biomedicine in contrast with the effectiveness of Divine healing. By simultaneously engaging evangelical and biomedical temporalities, I argue that evangelical Christians create wellness despite sickness and, in turn, re-signify chronic suffering as a long-term process of Christian healing. Positioning biomedical temporality and evangelical temporality as parallel yet distinctive ways of practicing healing, therefore, influences health care choices.

  17. The Meaning Of Healing: Transcending Suffering

    PubMed Central

    Egnew, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Medicine is traditionally considered a healing profession, but it has neither an operational definition of healing nor an explanation of its mechanisms beyond the physiological processes related to curing. The objective of this study was to determine a definition of healing that operationalizes its mechanisms and thereby identifies those repeatable actions that reliably assist physicians to promote holistic healing. METHODS This study was a qualitative inquiry consisting of in-depth, open-ended, semistructured interviews with Drs. Eric J. Cassell, Carl A. Hammerschlag, Thomas S. Inui, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Cicely Saunders, Bernard S. Siegel, and G. Gayle Stephens. Their perceptions regarding the definition and mechanisms of healing were subjected to grounded theory content analysis. RESULTS Healing was associated with themes of wholeness, narrative, and spirituality. Healing is an intensely personal, subjective experience involving a reconciliation of the meaning an individual ascribes to distressing events with his or her perception of wholeness as a person. CONCLUSIONS Healing may be operationally defined as the personal experience of the transcendence of suffering. Physicians can enhance their abilities as healers by recognizing, diagnosing, minimizing, and relieving suffering, as well as helping patients transcend suffering. PMID:15928230

  18. Self-healing composites and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Tee, Chee Keong; Wang, Chao; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-11-08

    A battery electrode includes an electrochemically active material and a binder covering the electrochemically active material. The binder includes a self-healing polymer and conductive additives dispersed in the self-healing polymer to provide an electrical pathway across at least a portion of the binder.

  19. Self-healing cable for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Dryver R. (Inventor); Tolmie, Bernard R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Self-healing cable apparatus and methods disclosed. The self-healing cable has a central core surrounded by an adaptive cover that can extend over the entire length of the self-healing cable or just one or more portions of the self-healing cable. The adaptive cover includes an axially and/or radially compressible-expandable (C/E) foam layer that maintains its properties over a wide range of environmental conditions. A tape layer surrounds the C/E layer and is applied so that it surrounds and axially and/or radially compresses the C/E layer. When the self-healing cable is subjected to a damaging force that causes a breach in the outer jacket and the tape layer, the corresponding localized axially and/or radially compressed portion of the C/E foam layer expands into the breach to form a corresponding localized self-healed region. The self-healing cable is manufacturable with present-day commercial self-healing cable manufacturing tools.

  20. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Laura E; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered.

  1. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  2. Aboriginal Healing Foundation Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboriginal Healing Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Aboriginal Healing Foundation (AHF) is a nonprofit organization established in 1998 with funding from the Canadian Government. Its mission is to support Aboriginal people in building sustainable healing processes that address the legacy of physical and sexual abuse in the residential school system, including intergenerational impacts. AHF…

  3. [Traumatic and degenerative tendon lesions of the hand].

    PubMed

    Schöffl, V; Winkelmann, H-P

    2010-12-01

    Tendon lesions are the second most common injury in the hand and therefore an important factor in orthopedic patients. Most injuries are open injuries to the flexor or extensor tendons; nevertheless, also less frequent injuries such as damage to the functional system of tendon sheath and pulley or dull avulsions need to be considered. Besides the clinical examination, ultrasound and MRI have proven to be important diagnostic tools. In the postoperative course of flexor tendon injuries, the principle of early passive movement is important to trigger "intrinsic" tendon healing to guarantee a good outcome.

  4. Use of the wound healing trajectory as an outcome determinant for acute wound healing.

    PubMed

    Franz, M G; Kuhn, M A; Wright, T E; Wachtel, T L; Robson, M C

    2000-01-01

    Accurate and clinically practical methods for measuring the progress of acute wound healing is necessary before interventions designed to optimize and even accelerate acute wound healing can be applied. Complete wound closure rates and operative wound closure severity are irrelevant to most acute wounds since most are closed at the time of primary tissue repair and remain closed throughout healing. Analogous to chronic wound closure, the rate of increase of incision tensile strength progressively decreases as time passes and 100% unwounded tissue strength is never achieved making the endpoint definition of "healed" vague. Conceptualizing acute wound healing in terms of its design elements with reintegration into a final outcome lends itself to the description of acute wound healing as a mathematical trajectory. Frequently such an equation is a rate expressing the change in an acute healing parameter, most often tensile strength, over time. Such an approach also normalizes misinterpretations in analysis or errors in theory developed by measuring healing parameters at fixed points in time. Distributions of fractional strength gain times (e.g., 85% normal strength) can be determined using statistical methodology similar that used for failure time of survival analysis. Preclinical studies show that acute wound healing trajectories can be shifted to the left from a "normal" or "impaired" curve to an accelerated or more "ideal" curve. A useful method for measuring acute wound healing outcomes is therefore required before the basic science of acute wound healing is inevitably applied to the problem of acute surgical wounds.

  5. In silico design of treatment strategies in wound healing and bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Geris, L; Schugart, R; Van Oosterwyck, H

    2010-06-13

    Wound and bone fracture healing are natural repair processes initiated by trauma. Over the last decade, many mathematical models have been established to investigate the healing processes in silico, in addition to ongoing experimental work. In recent days, the focus of the mathematical models has shifted from simulation of the healing process towards simulation of the impaired healing process and the in silico design of treatment strategies. This review describes the most important causes of failure of the wound and bone fracture healing processes and the experimental models and methods used to investigate and treat these impaired healing cases. Furthermore, the mathematical models that are described address these impaired healing cases and investigate various therapeutic scenarios in silico. Examples are provided to illustrate the potential of these in silico experiments. Finally, limitations of the models and the need for and ability of these models to capture patient specificity and variability are discussed.

  6. Effect of using miscible and immiscible healing agent on solid state self-healing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenan, Siti Mastura; Jamil, Mohd Suzeren Md.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using various healing agent which are miscible; poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), and immiscible; poly(ethylene-co-acetate) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid), on self-healing resin system. The specimens were analysed by Fourier-transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and izod test. Optical image of the sample morphology was observed using optical microscope. Healing efficiencies (HE) were evaluated using izod test. The concept of healing recovery was proved based on the use of miscible and immiscible healing agent. From the results, it can be concluded that the healable resin with miscible healing agent has the highest HE within the third healing cycle.

  7. Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing.

    PubMed

    Suhami, Norhasmilia; Muhamad, Mazanah Bt; Krauss, Steven Eric

    2016-10-01

    Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients' healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The findings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing and (3) the perceived ineffectiveness and dissatisfaction with conventional treatments. Islamic healing will likely continue to be popular complementary cancer treatment in Malaysia as it is grounded in strong cultural and religious beliefs.

  8. Self Healing Composite for Aircraft's Structural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, H. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Nasyitah, A. J. N.; Luqman, H. B. S. M.; Nurhidayah, S.; Tan, Willy. C. K.

    When one cuts himself, it is amazing to watch how quickly the body acts to mend the wound. Immediately, the body works to pull the skin around the cut back together. The concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents serves as the biomimetic inspiration of synthetic self repair systems. Such synthetic self repair systems are based on advancement in polymeric materials; the process of human thrombosis is the inspiration for the application of self healing fibres within the composite materials. Results based on flexural 3 point bend test on the prepared samples have shown that the doubled layer healed hollow fibre laminate subjected to a healing regime of 3 weeks has a healed strength increase of 27% compared to the damaged baseline laminate. These results gave us confidence that there is a great potential to adopt such self healing mechanism on actual composite parts like in aircraft's composite structures.

  9. Hyperoxia, Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization, and Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic foot disease is a major health problem, which affects 15% of the 200 million patients with diabetes worldwide. Diminished peripheral blood flow and decreased local neovascularization are critical factors that contribute to the delayed or nonhealing wounds in these patients. The correction of impaired local angiogenesis may be a key component in developing therapeutic protocols for treating chronic wounds of the lower extremity and diabetic foot ulcers. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are the key cellular effectors of postnatal neovascularization and play a central role in wound healing, but their circulating and wound-level numbers are decreased in diabetes, implicating an abnormality in EPC mobilization and homing mechanisms. The deficiency in EPC mobilization is presumably due to impairment of eNOS-NO cascade in bone marrow (BM). Hyperoxia, induced by a clinically relevant hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) protocol, can significantly enhance the mobilization of EPCs from the BM into peripheral blood. However, increased circulating EPCs failed to reach to wound tissues. This is partly a result of downregulated production of SDF-1α in local wound lesions with diabetes. Administration of exogenous SDF-1α into wounds reversed the EPC homing impairment and, with hyperoxia, synergistically enhanced EPC mobilization, homing, neovascularization, and wound healing. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 1869–1882. PMID:18627349

  10. Benefits of oral and topical administration of ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. on skin inflammation and wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lucas, Sophie; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Duffaud, Anais; Nejdi, Amine; Guerin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Baert, Blandine; Saniez-Degrave, Marie-Helene; Rozan, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to the risk of traumatic lesions. Chlorella is a green microalgae enriched with nutrients, vitamins, minerals and chlorophyll. In some communities, Chlorella is a traditional medicinal plant used for the management of inflammation-related diseases. ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. (RCs) was investigated by oral administration (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and cutaneous application (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0%) to evaluate its impact in two dermatological disorder models in mice: skin inflammation and wound healing. For skin inflammation, it was administered during 14 days starting one week before the induction of chronic skin inflammation by repeated cutaneous application of 12-Otetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). For wound healing the microalgae was administered by topical application after scarification of the skin until complete wound healing. Results indicated that oral and topical administrations of the two higher doses of RCs had significant effects on macroscopic score of skin inflammation with an efficient effect on microscopic score with cutaneous application. The microalgae had also efficient effect on healing process and duration of wound healing for both administration routes and particularly at the two highest doses of RCs. These findings suggest that administration of RCs by both oral and topical routes appeared to have beneficial effects on skin lesions.

  11. Current management of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-06-01

    While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved.

  12. Klatskin-Like Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Senthil Kumar, M. P.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2012-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma, also known as Klatskin tumour, is the commonest type of cholangiocarcinoma. It poses unique problems in the diagnosis and management because of its anatomical location. Curative surgery in the form of major hepatic resection entails significant morbidity. About 5–15% of specimens resected for presumed Klatskin tumour prove not to be cholangiocarcinomas. There are a number of inflammatory, infective, vascular, and other pathologies, which have overlapping clinical and radiological features with a Klatskin tumour, leading to misinterpretation. This paper aims to summarise the features of such Klatskin-like lesions that have been reported in surgical literature. PMID:22811587

  13. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses.

  14. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  15. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 promotes corneal epithelial defects healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Lazić, Ratimir; Gabrić, Nikica; Dekaris, Iva; Bosnar, Damir; Boban-Blagaić, Alenka; Sikirić, Predrag

    2005-06-01

    We evaluated the role of human gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in corneal epithelial defects healing in rats. 48 rats, in 4 groups (N=12). Total debridement of corneal epithelium preformed unilaterally and lesions stained and photographed. Animals medicated as follows: distilled water (control group) or BPC 157 2 pg/ml, 2 ng/ml, 2 microg/ml, 2 drops/rat eye started immediately after injury induction, every 8 hours up to 40 hours (i.e., at 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40 h). Lesions were photographed before application or sacrifice (at 48 h). Defect area was analyzed using a special program. Through 48 hour period a steady recovery is noted in controls. Recovery was markedly accelerated in eyes on microg- or ng-topical regimen of BPC 157 (p < 0.05). Of note, unlike control lesion present also after 48 h, these lesions disappeared already following 40 h (microg) or 48 h (ng) post-injury. BPC 157 was shown to be effective in promoting corneal defects healing in rats. Results were dose dependent.

  16. Rotational stress-induced increase in epinephrine levels delays cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Otranto, Marcela; Vieira, Andreza M; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Fierro, Iolanda M; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2010-03-01

    Stress impairs wound healing of cutaneous lesions; however, the mechanism is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rotational stress on cutaneous wound healing in mice and propose a mechanism. Male mice were spun at 45 rpm for 15 min every hour beginning 3 days before wounding until euthanasia. Control animals were not subjected to stress. To confirm that catecholamines participate in stress-induced delay of wound healing, mice were treated daily with propranolol. An excisional lesion was created and measured. Seven and 14 days later, animals were killed and lesions collected. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostained for alpha-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 activity, nitrite levels, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were measured in the wounds. In addition, murine skin fibroblast cultures were treated with high levels of epinephrine and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Stressed mice exhibited reduced locomotor activity and increased normetanephrine plasma levels. Rotational stress was associated with decreased wound contraction, reduced re-epithelialization, reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation, but with strongly increased nitrite levels. Furthermore, inflammatory cell infiltration, TNF-alpha expression, myofibroblastic differentiation, and angiogenesis were all delayed in the stress group. Propranolol administration reversed the deleterious effects of stress on wound contraction and re-epithelialization. High epinephrine concentrations increased murine skin fibroblast proliferation and nitric oxide synthesis, and strongly inhibited skin fibroblast migration and both pro- and active MMP-2. In conclusion, rotational stress impairs cutaneous wound healing due to epinephrine increased levels.

  17. Propranolol improves cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Nascimento, Adriana P; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2009-06-02

    Sympathetic nerve failure has been proposed as a contributing factor in impaired cutaneous wound healing in diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, no studies have shown whether beta-adrenoceptor blockade through beta-blocker (e.g., propranolol) administration may alter healing of diabetic cutaneous lesions. This study evaluated macro- and microscopically the effects of propranolol administration on cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Acute diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin 14 days before wounding. Animals were treated with propranolol (50 mg/kg) dissolved in drinking water; controls received water only. Administration of beta-receptor antagonist began 1 day before wounding and was continued daily until euthanasia. A full-thickness excisional lesion (1 cm(2)) was created. The wound area was measured weekly and the animals were killed 14 days after wounding. Lesions and adjacent skin were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Sirius red, and toluidine blue, and immunostained for CD-68, alpha-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. The wound area was significantly smaller in the propranolol-treated group than in the control group 7 and 14 days after wounding. Inflammatory cell numbers and metalloproteinase-9 levels were reduced in the propranolol-treated group compared to the control group 14 days after wounding. Cell proliferation, mast cell number, collagen deposition, blood vessel density, and nitric oxide levels were increased in the propranolol-treated group compared to the control group 14 days after wounding. Propranolol administration improves cutaneous wound healing of hyperglycemic diabetic rats by reducing the local inflammatory response and improving subsequent phases of the repair process.

  18. Comparison of Two Base Materials Regarding Their Effect on Root Canal Treatment Success in Primary Molars with Furcation Lesions.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Volkan; Sonmez, Hayriye; Sari, Saziye

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare MTA with another base material, IRM, which is generally used on pulpal floor after root canal treatment, regarding their effect on the success of root canal treatment of primary teeth with furcation lesions. Materials and Methods. Fifty primary teeth with furcation lesions were divided into 2 groups. Following root canal treatment, the pulpal floor was coated with MTA in the experimental group and with IRM in the control group. Teeth were followed up considering clinical (pain, pathological mobility, tenderness to percussion and palpation, and any soft tissue pathology and sinus tract) and radiographical (pathological root resorption, reduced size or healing of existing lesion, and absence of new lesions at the interradicular or periapical area) criteria for 18 months. For the statistical analysis, Fisher's exact test and Pearson's chi-square tests were used and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results. Although there were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of treatment success, lesions healed significantly faster in the MTA group. Conclusion. In primary teeth with furcation lesions, usage of MTA on the pulpal floor following root canal treatment can be a better alternative since it induced faster healing.

  19. Comparison of Two Base Materials Regarding Their Effect on Root Canal Treatment Success in Primary Molars with Furcation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Hayriye; Sari, Saziye

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare MTA with another base material, IRM, which is generally used on pulpal floor after root canal treatment, regarding their effect on the success of root canal treatment of primary teeth with furcation lesions. Materials and Methods. Fifty primary teeth with furcation lesions were divided into 2 groups. Following root canal treatment, the pulpal floor was coated with MTA in the experimental group and with IRM in the control group. Teeth were followed up considering clinical (pain, pathological mobility, tenderness to percussion and palpation, and any soft tissue pathology and sinus tract) and radiographical (pathological root resorption, reduced size or healing of existing lesion, and absence of new lesions at the interradicular or periapical area) criteria for 18 months. For the statistical analysis, Fisher's exact test and Pearson's chi-square tests were used and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results. Although there were no statistically significant differences between two groups in terms of treatment success, lesions healed significantly faster in the MTA group. Conclusion. In primary teeth with furcation lesions, usage of MTA on the pulpal floor following root canal treatment can be a better alternative since it induced faster healing. PMID:27957486

  20. Development of a Mechanistic-Based Healing Model for Self-Healing Glass Seals

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2012-10-01

    Self-healing glass, a recent development of hermetic sealant materials, has the ability to effectively repair damage when heated to elevated temperatures; thus, able to extend its service life. Since crack healing morphological changes in the glass material are usually temperature and stress dependent, quantitative studies to determine the effects of thermo-mechanical conditions on the healing behavior of the self-healing glass sealants are extremely useful to accommodate the design and optimization of the sealing systems within SOFCs. The goal of this task is to develop a mechanistic-based healing model to quantify the stress and temperature dependent healing behavior. A two-step healing mechanism was developed and implemented into finite element (FE) models through user-subroutines. Integrated experimental/kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulation methodology was taken to calibrate the model parameters. The crack healing model is able to investigate the effects of various thermo-mechanical factors; therefore, able to determine the critical conditions under which the healing mechanism will be activated. Furthermore, the predicted results can be used to formulate the continuum damage-healing model and to assist the SOFC stack level simulations in predicting and evaluating the effectiveness and the performance of various engineering seal designs.

  1. Self-Healing of Polyethylene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipara, Dorina Magdalena; Flores, Maritza; Puente, Nancy; Lozano, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Autonomic self-healing is expected to enhance the lifetime of polymeric materials, resins, and composites subjected to long term mechanical stresses. The self-healing process is initiated by the rupture of some polyurea-formaldehyde microcapsules filled with monomer. The self-healing polymer is actually a compound containing microcapsules filled with monomer and catalyst particles. The monomer released from these broken microcapsules is diffusing within the polymer, reacting with the catalyst and starting a polymerization reaction. This new polymer, growing within the propagating crack, stops the mechanical failure. While the process is pretty slow (timescale of the order of 10 to 100 s), there are many important technological applications that would benefit from the availability of self-healing polymers. We report about the addition of self-healing capabilities to polyethylene oxide by using polyurea formaldehyde microcapsules filled with dicyclopentadiene and first generation Grubbs catalysts. Details regarding the physical and chemical steps used to add self-healing capabilities to polyethylene oxide will be presented. Self-healing efficiency was assessed by fatigues tests.

  2. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing.

  3. Biological strategies to enhance rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rizzello, Giacomo; Berton, Alessandra; Maltese, Ludovica; Fumo, Caterina; Khan, Wasim S; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    Rotator cuff tear causes a high rate of morbidity. After surgical repair, the presence of a scar tissue reduces tendon biomechanical properties. Emerging strategies for enhancing tendon healing are growth factors, cytokines, gene therapy and tissue engineering. However their efficacy has to be proved. Growth factors help the process of tendon healing by aiding cells chemotaxis, differentiation and proliferation. Numerous growth factors, including the bone morphogenetic proteins and platelet-derived growth factor can be found during the early healing process of a rotator cuff repair. Growth factors are delivered to the repair site using tissue-engineered scaffolding, coated sutures, or dissolved in a fibrin sealant. Platelet-rich plasma is an autologous concentration of platelets and contains an high density of growth factors. There is some evidence that platelet-rich plasma may improve pain and recovery of function in a short time period, but it does not improve healing rates in rotator cuff. Thus the routine use of platelet-rich plasma in rotator cuff repair is not recommended. The addition of mesenchymal stem cells to scaffolds can lead to the production of a better quality healing tissue. Gene therapy is a gene transfer from a cell into another, in order to over-express the gene required. In this way, cultures of stem cells can over-express growth factors. Better understanding of the mechanisms of physiological tendon healing can promote the correct use of these new biological therapies for a better healing tissue.

  4. Characterization of self-healing composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kevin John

    Damage occurs in almost every composite material in the form of microcracks that develop in the epoxy matrix that binds the fibers together. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign have recently developed a method to reverse the effects of, or heal, damage in the epoxy matrix. Their in-situ self-healing system uses embedded microcapsules and a catalyst that trigger a romp reaction in an effort to rebond the microcracks. Several models have been developed in an effort to predict how a composite laminate damages. One model in particular, the Continuous Damage Mechanics model, CDM that has been developed at West Virginia University uses material properties that are easily obtained from standard ASTM and ISO testing methods. The CDM model has been extended at West Virginia University to incorporate the effects of a self-healing system to develop a Continuous Damage and Healing Mechanics model, CDHM. In this work, a testing procedure to characterize the autonomic healing of polymer matrix composites is outlined, as well as the regenerative effects of the self-healing system. The capability of the CDHM model to predict the material properties of the self-healing system is also addressed. The CDHM model is validated with experimental results for various laminates fabricated out of E-glass/epoxy.

  5. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  6. The Biology of Bone and Ligament Healing.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jessica A; Turner, Jessica Cardenas; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston; O'Connor, J Patrick

    2016-12-01

    This review describes the normal healing process for bone, ligaments, and tendons, including primary and secondary healing as well as bone-to-bone fusion. It depicts the important mediators and cell types involved in the inflammatory, reparative, and remodeling stages of each healing process. It also describes the main challenges for clinicians when trying to repair bone, ligaments, and tendons with a specific emphasis on Charcot neuropathy, fifth metatarsal fractures, arthrodesis, and tendon sheath and adhesions. Current treatment options and research areas are also reviewed.

  7. Overview of Wound Healing and Management.

    PubMed

    Childs, Dylan R; Murthy, Ananth S

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is a highly complex chain of events, and although it may never be possible to eliminate the risk of experiencing a wound, clinicians' armamentarium continues to expand with methods to manage it. The phases of wound healing are the inflammatory phase, the proliferative phase, and the maturation phase. The pathway of healing is determined by characteristics of the wound on initial presentation, and it is vital to select the appropriate method to treat the wound based on its ability to avoid hypoxia, infection, excessive edema, and foreign bodies.

  8. Healing of a mechano-responsive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, A.; Sander, O.; Duda, G. N.; Weinkamer, R.

    2013-12-01

    While contribution of physics to model fracture of materials is significant, the “reversed” process of healing is hardly investigated. Inspired by fracture healing that occurs as a self-repair process in nature, e.g. in bone, we computationally study the conditions under which a material can repair itself. In our model the material around a fracture is assumed mechano-responsive: it processes the information of i) local stiffness and ii) local strain and responds by local stiffening. Depending on how information i) and ii) is processed, healing evolves via fundamentally different paths.

  9. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  10. Light attenuation in rat skin following low level laser therapy on burn healing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira Silva, Daniela Fátima; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to accelerate wound healing. Besides, the technique of imaging the light distribution inside biological tissues permits us to understand several effects about light-tissue interaction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative attenuation coefficient of the light intensity in healthy and burned skin rats during cutaneous repair following LLLT or not. Two burns about 6mm in diameter were cryogenerated using liquid N2 on the back of 15 rats. Lesion L was irradiated by a He-Ne laser (λ= 632.8nm) and fluence 1.0J/cm2; Lesion C was control and received sham irradiation. A healthy skin area (H) was also analyzed. The lesions were irradiated at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-burning. The animals were euthanized at days 3, 10 and 31 and skin samples were carefully removed and placed between two microscope slides, spaced by z= 1mm. A laser beam irradiated the sandwiched tissue from epidermis to dermis. A CCD camera was placed orthogonal to the beam path and it photographed the distribution of the scattered light. The light decay occurred according to the Beer's Law. Significance was accepted at p <0.01 by using t-Student test. Our results show that the light decay along any direction was close to an exponential. Burned skin samples presented decay significantly faster than healthy skin samples. Besides, attenuation coefficient changed during burning healing comparing treated and control lesions. These findings suggest that the relative attenuation coefficient is a suitable parameter to optimize LLLT during wound healing.

  11. Successful apexification with resolution of the periapical lesion using mineral trioxide aggregate and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Singbal, Kiran P; Kamat, Sharad

    2010-01-01

    Immature teeth with necrotic pulp and large periapical lesion are difficult to treat via conventional endodontic therapy. The role of materials such as calcium hydroxide and mineral trioxide aggregate in apexification is indispensable. This case report presents the successful healing and apexification with combined use of white mineral trioxide aggregate and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft. PMID:20859486

  12. 42 CFR 60.61 - Responsibilities of a HEAL school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The School § 60.61 Responsibilities of a HEAL school. (a) A HEAL school is... responsibilities under a HEAL loan, including the consequences for noncompliance with those responsibilities, and... her rights and responsibilities under each HEAL loan, including the consequences for...

  13. 42 CFR 60.61 - Responsibilities of a HEAL school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The School § 60.61 Responsibilities of a HEAL school. (a) A HEAL school is... responsibilities under a HEAL loan, including the consequences for noncompliance with those responsibilities, and... her rights and responsibilities under each HEAL loan, including the consequences for...

  14. 42 CFR 60.61 - Responsibilities of a HEAL school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The School § 60.61 Responsibilities of a HEAL school. (a) A HEAL school is... responsibilities under a HEAL loan, including the consequences for noncompliance with those responsibilities, and... her rights and responsibilities under each HEAL loan, including the consequences for...

  15. Monitoring diabetic wound healing by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Zubkov, Leonid; Zhu, Linda; Weingarten, Michael S; Tyagi, Som; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Lack of quantitative assessment of healing progress makes diabetic wound management a clinical challenge. We constructed an optical device based on near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and monitored the change in wound optical properties during healing. A single source, four detector frequency domain instrument with multiple wavelengths was employed in a streptozotocin induced diabetic rat animal model. Optical properties including absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were measured. Our results show that there is significant difference in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient of the wounds between diabetic and controls rats, and such difference persists throughout the healing period. Our technique would be highly useful in monitoring and quantifying the wound healing process.

  16. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  17. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. However, new imaging methods can be used to assess biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. We review molecular imaging techniques for evaluating the biology of infarct healing and repair. Specifically, we cover recent advances in imaging the various phases of MI and infarct healing such as apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition, and scar formation. Significant progress has been made in preclinical molecular imaging, and future challenges include translation of these methods to clinical practice. PMID:21869911

  18. Self-healing networks: redundancy and structure.

    PubMed

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns-from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks-on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic) scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems.

  19. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  20. Self-healing cable apparatus and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Dryver (Inventor); Esser, Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Self-healing cable apparatus and methods are disclosed. The cable has a central core surrounded by an adaptive cover that can extend over the entire length of the cable or just one or more portions of the cable. The adaptive cover includes a protective layer having an initial damage resistance, and a reactive layer. When the cable is subjected to a localized damaging force, the reactive layer responds by creating a corresponding localized self-healed region. The self-healed region provides the cable with enhanced damage resistance as compared to the cable's initial damage resistance. Embodiments of the invention utilize conventional epoxies or foaming materials in the reactive layer that are released to form the self-healed region when the damaging force reaches the reactive layer.

  1. Self-Healing of biocompatible polymeric nanocomposities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Chipara, Dorina

    2014-03-01

    Polymers are vulnerable to damage in form of cracks deep within the structure, where detection is difficult and repair is near to impossible. These cracks lead to mechanical degradation of the polymer. A method has been created to solve this problem named polymeric self healing. Self healing capabilities implies the dispersion within the polymeric matrix of microcapsules filled with a monomer and of catalyst. Poly urea-formaldehyde microcapsules used in this method are filled with dicyclopentadiene that is liberated after being ruptured by the crack propagation in the material. Polymerization is assisted by a catalyst FGGC that ignites the self healing process. Nanocomposites, such as titanium oxide, will be used as an integration of these polymers that will be tested by rupturing mechanically slowly. In order to prove the self healing process, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR, and SEM are used.

  2. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  3. Microgravity and the implications for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Ramin Mostofizadeh; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2008-10-01

    Wound healing is a sophisticated response ubiquitous to various traumatic stimuli leading to an anatomical/functional disruption. The aim of present article was to review the current evidence regarding the effects of microgravity on wound healing dynamics. Modulation of haemostatic phase because of alteration of platelet quantity and function seems probable. Furthermore, production of growth factors that are released from activated platelets and infiltration/function of inflammatory cells seem to be impaired by microgravity. Proliferation of damaged structures is dependent on orchestrated function of various growth factors, for example transforming growth factors, platelet-derived growth factor and epidermal growth factor, all of which are affected by microgravitational status. Moreover, gravity-induced alterations of gap junction, neural inputs, and cell populations have been reported. It may be concluded that different cellular and extracellular element involved in the healing response are modified through effect of microgravity which may lead to impairment in healing dynamics.

  4. Epidermal T cells and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Havran, Wendy L; Jameson, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    The murine epidermis contains resident T cells that express a canonical gammadelta TCR. These cells arise from fetal thymic precursors and use a TCR that is restricted to the skin in adult animals. These cells assume a dendritic morphology in normal skin and constitutively produce low levels of cytokines that contribute to epidermal homeostasis. When skin is wounded, an unknown Ag is expressed on damaged keratinocytes. Neighboring gammadelta T cells then round up and contribute to wound healing by local production of epithelial growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. In the absence of skin gammadelta T cells, wound healing is impaired. Similarly, epidermal T cells from patients with healing wounds are activated and secreting growth factors. Patients with nonhealing wounds have a defective epidermal T cell response. Information gained on the role of epidermal-resident T cells in the mouse may provide information for development of new therapeutic approaches to wound healing.

  5. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  6. Self-Healing Networks: Redundancy and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns—from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks—on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic) scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems. PMID:24533065

  7. Self-healing at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2009-10-01

    The design of self-healing materials is a very important but challenging topic in nanotechnology. Self-healing strategies, also inspired by natural processes, allow the fabrication of auto-repairing systems, and in recent years, materials engineering at the nanoscale has allowed further advances in this emerging field. In this mini review, we recall some interesting self-healing systems found in natural processes and others created by man-made activity with special emphasis on the role played in this field by nanostructures. Finally, the self-healing of gold nanoparticles during laser irradiation is considered in more detail since it is a rare example of a functional nanomaterial with self-repairing properties.

  8. Healing efficiency and dynamic mechanical properties of self-healing epoxy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Naddeo, Carlo; Longo, Pasquale; Mariconda, Annaluisa; Binder, Wolfgang H.

    2014-03-01

    Several systems to develop self-repairing epoxy resins have recently been formulated. In this paper the effect of matrix nature and curing cycle on the healing efficiency and dynamic mechanical properties of self-healing epoxy resins were investigated. We discuss several aspects by transferring self-healing systems from the laboratory scale to real applications in the aeronautic field, such as the possibility to choose systems with increased glass transition temperature, high storage modulus and high values in the healing functionality under real working conditions.

  9. Effects of programming and healing temperatures on the healing efficiency of a confined healable polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yougoubare, Y. Quentin; Pang, Su-Seng

    2014-02-01

    In previous work, a biomimetic close-then-heal (CTH) healing mechanism was proposed and validated to repeatedly heal wide-open cracks in load carrying engineering structures by using constrained expansion of compression programmed thermoset shape memory polymers (SMPs). In this study, the effects on healing efficiencies of variation of temperature during both thermomechanical programming and shape recovery (healing) under three-dimensional (3D) confinement are evaluated. The polymer considered is a polystyrene shape memory polymer with 6% by volume of thermoplastic particle additives (copolyester) dispersed in the matrix. In addition to the programming and healing temperatures, some of the parameters investigated include the flexural strength, crack width and elemental composition at the crack interface. It is observed that while increase of the programming temperature is slightly beneficial to strength recovery, most of the strength recovered and damage repair are strongly dependent on the healing temperature. The best healing efficiency (63%) is achieved by a combination of a programming temperature above the glass transition temperature of the polymer and a healing temperature above the bonding point of the copolyester.

  10. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  11. Healing: the power of presence. A reflection.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Margaret B

    2011-03-01

    The focus of my work as a teacher and Episcopal priest has been pastoral. In my work of chaplaincy, spiritual director, and trainer of spiritual directors, I have been powerfully aware of the importance of presence. Furthermore, I have concentrated on the significance of healing-physical, emotional, and spiritual-as distinguished from curing. This article is a reflection, based on my decades of experience, as contrasted with an academic exploration of the history, various traditions, or the methodology of healing.

  12. The role of hyaluronan in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Joseph S

    2014-04-01

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) (synonyms - hyaluronic acid, hyaluronate) is a versatile, polymorphic, glycosoaminoglycan with vast biological functions. HA is found throughout the body, primarily residing in skin, thus playing an important role in wound healing. Research regarding HA's function has changed over the years, primarily focussing on a particular aspect or function. The contribution of HA in each stage of normal wound healing as well as its clinical wound dressing applications will be examined.

  13. Regeneration: the ultimate example of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Murawala, Prayag; Tanaka, Elly M; Currie, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    The outcome of wound repair in mammals is often characterized by fibrotic scaring. Vertebrates such as zebrafish, frogs, and salamanders not only heal scarlessly, but also can regenerate lost appendages. Decades of study on the process of animal regeneration has produced key insights into the mechanisms of how complex tissue is restored. By examining our current knowledge of regeneration, we can draw parallels with mammalian wound healing to identify the molecular determinants that produce such differing outcomes.

  14. Fuzzy description of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Ballerini, Lucia; Fisher, Robert B.; Aldridge, Ben; Rees, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We propose a system for describing skin lesions images based on a human perception model. Pigmented skin lesions including melanoma and other types of skin cancer as well as non-malignant lesions are used. Works on classification of skin lesions already exist but they mainly concentrate on melanoma. The novelty of our work is that our system gives to skin lesion images a semantic label in a manner similar to humans. This work consists of two parts: first we capture they way users perceive each lesion, second we train a machine learning system that simulates how people describe images. For the first part, we choose 5 attributes: colour (light to dark), colour uniformity (uniform to non-uniform), symmetry (symmetric to non-symmetric), border (regular to irregular), texture (smooth to rough). Using a web based form we asked people to pick a value of each attribute for each lesion. In the second part, we extract 93 features from each lesions and we trained a machine learning algorithm using such features as input and the values of the human attributes as output. Results are quite promising, especially for the colour related attributes, where our system classifies over 80% of the lesions into the same semantic classes as humans.

  15. Effect of Malnutrition on Colonic Healing

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Thomas T.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1974-01-01

    It has been suggested that colonic healing is impaired in malnourished subjects, but there have been no biochemical studies of the effect of malnutrition on colonic healing. The effects of malnutrition on the colon and the healing of colonic anastomoses were studied in rats fed a protein-free diet. Test animals were compared with control animals of similar age, and control animals of similar weight. There was a significant reduction in the body weight, total serum proteins and serum albumin of animals starved of protein. Malnutrition resulted in a reduction in the weight of the uninjured colon, and an increase in the colonic collagen concentration. There was a significant reduction in the collagen content of the colon in animals starved of protein for seven weeks, and the collagen content of anastomoses in these animals was significantly lower than the value in control animals. Anastomotic edema occurred during colon healing in animals starved for seven weeks. Measurements of colonic bursting pressure were an inaccurate guide to colonic healing. It is concluded that severe malnutrition resulting in 34% loss of body weight had an adverse effect on colonic healing. PMID:4418508

  16. Low level diode laser accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith S; Salman, Saif Dawood

    2013-05-01

    The effect of wound illumination time by pulsed diode laser on the wound healing process was studied in this paper. For this purpose, the original electronic drive circuit of a 650-nm wavelength CW diode laser was reconstructed to give pulsed output laser of 50 % duty cycle and 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Twenty male mice, 3 months old were used to follow up the laser photobiostimulation effect on the wound healing progress. They were subdivided into two groups and then the wounds were made on the bilateral back sides of each mouse. Two sessions of pulsed laser therapy were carried along 15 days. Each mice group wounds were illuminated by this pulsed laser for 12 or 18 min per session during these 12 days. The results of this study were compared with the results of our previous wound healing therapy study by using the same type of laser. The mice wounds in that study received only 5 min of illumination time therapy in the first and second days of healing process. In this study, we found that the wounds, which were illuminated for 12 min/session healed in about 3 days earlier than those which were illuminated for 18 min/session. Both of them were healed earlier in about 10-11 days than the control group did.

  17. Nutritional Aspects of Gastrointestinal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Kavalukas, Sandra L.; Barbul, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Although the wound healing cascade is similar in many tissues, in the gastrointestinal tract mucosal healing is critical for processes such as inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers and healing of the mucosa, submucosa, and serosal layers is needed for surgical anastomoses and for enterocutaneous fistula. Failure of wound healing can result in complications including infection, prolonged hospitalization, critical illness, organ failure, readmission, new or worsening enterocutaneous fistula, and even death. Recent Advances: Recent advances are relevant for the role of specific micronutrients, such as vitamin D, trace elements, and the interplay between molecules with pro- and antioxidant properties. Our understanding of the role of other small molecules, genes, proteins, and macronutrients is also rapidly changing. Recent work has elucidated relationships between oxidative stress, nutritional supplementation, and glucose metabolism. Thresholds have also been established to define adequate preoperative nutritional status. Critical Issues: Further work is needed to establish standards and definitions for measuring the extent of wound healing, particularly for inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers. In addition, a mounting body of evidence has determined the need for adequate preoperative nutritional supplementation for elective surgical procedures. Future Directions: A large portion of current work is restricted to model systems in rodents. Therefore, additional clinical and translational research is needed in this area to promote gastrointestinal wound healing in humans, particularly those suffering from critical illness, patients with enterocutaneous fistula, inflammatory bowel disease, and ulcers, and those undergoing surgical procedures. PMID:27867755

  18. Basics in nutrition and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Rahbarnia, Arastoo; Kellner, Martina; Sobotka, Lubos; Eberlein, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Wound healing is a process that can be divided into three different phases (inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation). Each is characterized by certain events that require specific components. However, wound healing is not always a linear process; it can progress forward and backward through the phases depending on various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. If the wound-healing process is affected negatively, this can result in chronic wounds. Chronic wounds demand many resources in the clinical daily routine. Therefore, local wound management and good documentation of the wound is essential for non-delayed wound healing and prevention of the development of chronic wounds. During the wound-healing process much energy is needed. The energy for the building of new cells is usually released from body energy stores and protein reserves. This can be very challenging for undernourished and malnourished patients. Malnutrition is very common in geriatric patients and patients in catabolic phases of stress such as after injury or surgery. For that reason a close survey of the nutritional status of patients is necessary to start supplementation quickly, if applicable. Wound healing is indeed a very complex process that deserves special notice. There are some approaches to develop guidelines but thus far no golden standard has evolved. Because wounds, especially chronic wounds, cause also an increasing economic burden, the development of guidelines should be advanced.

  19. Wound Healing Effect of Curcumin: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Silvia; Manayi, Azadeh; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Gortzi, Olga; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-07-21

    Wound healing is a complex process that consists of several phases that range from coagulation, inflammation, accumulation of radical substances, to proliferation, formation of fibrous tissues and collagen, contraction of wound with formation of granulation tissue and scar. Since antiquity, vegetable substances have been used as phytotherapeutic agents for wound healing, and more recently natural substances of vegetable origin have been studied with the attempt to show their beneficial effect on wound treatment. Curcumin, the most active component of rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (common name: turmeric), has been studied for many years due to its bio-functional properties, especially antioxidant, radical scavenger, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, which play a crucial role in the wound healing process. Moreover, curcumin stimulated the production of the growth factors involved in the wound healing process, and so curcumin also accelerated the management of wound restoration. The aim of the present review is collecting and evaluating the literature data regarding curcumin properties potentially relevant for wound healing. Moreover, the investigations on the wound healing effects of curcumin are reported. In order to produce a more complete picture, the chemistry and sources of curcumin are also discussed.

  20. HOW DO BISPHOSPHONATES AFFECT FRACTURE HEALING?

    PubMed Central

    KATES, STEPHEN L.; ACKERT-BICKNELL, CHERYL L.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been in use for many years for the treatment of osteoporosis, multiple myeloma, Paget's disease, as well as a variety of other diseases in which there is reduced bone mineral density. Given that bisphosphonates inhibit bone resorption, an important stage of fracture healing; this class of compounds has been widely studied in preclinical models regarding their influence on fracture healing. In animal models, bisphosphonate treatment is associated with a larger fracture callus, coincident with a delay in remodeling from primary woven bone to lamellar bone, but there is no delay in formation of the fracture callus. In humans, de novo use of bisphosphonate therapy after fracture does not appear to have a significant effect on fracture healing. Rarely, patients with long term use of Bisphosphonates may develop an atypical fracture and delay in fracture healing has been observed. In summary, bisphosphonates appear safe for use in the setting of acute fracture management in the upper and lower extremity in humans. While much remains unknown about the effects on healing of long-term bisphosphonates, use prior to “typical” fracture, in the special case of atypical fracture, evidence suggests that bisphosphonates negatively influence healing. PMID:26768295

  1. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Philipp; Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C; Beckmann, Rainer; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C; Hildebrand, Frank; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  2. Clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of unicameral bone cysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unicameral bone cyst (UBC) is the most common benign lytic bone lesion seen in children. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of UBC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 155 UBC patients who consulted Nagoya musculoskeletal oncology group hospitals in Japan. Sixty of the 155 patients had pathological fracture at presentation. Of 141 patients with follow-up periods exceeding 6 months, 77 were followed conservatively and 64 treated by surgery. Results The fracture risk was significantly higher in the humerus than other bones. In multivariate analysis, ballooning of bone, cyst in long bone, male sex, thin cortical thickness and multilocular cyst were significant adverse prognostic factors for pathological fractures at presentation. The healing rates were 30% and 83% with observation and surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fracture at presentation and history of biopsy were good prognostic factors for healing of UBC in patients under observation. Conclusion The present results suggest that mechanical disruption of UBC such as fracture and biopsy promotes healing, and thus watchful waiting is indicated in these patients, whereas patients with poor prognostic factors for fractures should be considered for surgery. PMID:24884661

  3. Topical application of dressing with amino acids improves cutaneous wound healing in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Giovanni; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Francesco Saverio; Rezzani, Rita

    2010-09-01

    The principal goal in treating surgical and non-surgical wounds, in particular for aged skin, is the need for rapid closure of the lesion. Cutaneous wound healing processes involve four phases including an inflammatory response with the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. If inflammation develops in response to bacterial infection, it can create a problem for wound closure. Reduced inflammation accelerates wound closure with subsequent increased fibroblast function and collagen synthesis. On the contrary, prolonged chronic inflammation results in very limited wound healing. Using histological and immunohistochemical techniques, we investigated the effects of a new wound dressing called Vulnamin that contains four essential amino acids for collagen and elastin synthesis plus sodium ialuronate (Na-Ial), compared with Na-Ial alone, in closure of experimental cutaneous wounds of aged rats. Our results showed that the application of Vulnamin dressings modulated the inflammatory response with a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunolocalisation, while increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) immunolocalisation. Furthermore, the dressing increased the distribution density of fibroblasts and aided the synthesis of thin collagen fibers resulting in a reduction in healing time. The nutritive approach using this new wound dressing can provide an efficacious and safe strategy to accelerate wound healing in elderly subjects, simplifying therapeutic procedures and leading to an improved quality of life.

  4. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Wound Healing of the Septal Mucosa of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Trombitas, Veronica; Nagy, Alina; Berce, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Albu, Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis. Proper wound healing following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is influenced by several factors, like cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. This study aims to assess the influence of cigarette smoke on the healing of induced septal mucosal lesion in rats. Methods. Unilateral nasal wounds were created by means of the interdental brush in seventy-four-week-old male rats. Animals were randomly divided into two groups: control group and CS exposure group, each comprising 35 animals, divided into five groups (n = 7). Animals were sacrificed in groups of seven on day 2 and then on days 5, 14, and 28 and finally on day 42 following wound induction. Results. Histological analysis of mucosal specimens shows important changes at the CS exposure group. Starting with the infiltrates of neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes, the histological changes were continued with the Goblet cell proliferation, ciliated cells loss, fibrosis, and epithelial and subepithelial hypertrophy. Conclusion. In this experimental model of nasal wound healing we demonstrated the deleterious effects of chronic CS exposure. The adverse effects of CS exposure are firstly a postponement of the healing process and secondly the persistence of inflammation which becomes chronic. PMID:27042668

  5. The Analysis of Factors Associated with Progression of Isolated Terminal Ileal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fangbin, Zhang; Weiwei, Hao; Wugan, Zhao; Cong, Zheng; Yanjun, Chu; Feng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the factors associated with the progression of isolated terminal ileal lesions (ITILs) at colonoscopy in Chinese patients. Methods Patients diagnosed with ITILs were enrolled. The ileoscopy was performed by two experienced gastroenterologists every 52 weeks. A logistic regression analysis was used to elucidate the factors associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and mucosal healing. A log rank test was used to assess the differences of the cumulative proportion of CD and mucosal healing in different groups at different times. Results (1) A total of 34 patients were included and no patient had taken nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the last 6 months; eight (23.5%) patients had a clinical diagnosis of CD, 14 (41.2%) patients achieved mucosal healing, and 12 (35.3%) patients showed no significant changes in the lesions at last follow-up. (2) The logistic regression analysis showed that only abdominal pain was a factor in the ITIL disease outcomes. (3) The cumulative proportion of CD in the abdominal pain group after 3 years was statistically higher than that in the non-abdominal pain group (42.7% vs. 6.2%, χ2 = 10.129, P = 0.001). However, the cumulative proportion of mucosal healing in the non-abdominal pain group was statistically higher than that in the abdominal pain group (73.3% vs. 5.6%, χ2 = 5.225, P = 0.022). (4) The numbers of lesions observed on the initial colonoscopy exams and the initial histologic findings were not related to the ITIL disease outcomes. Conclusions Clinical symptoms may be related to ITIL disease outcomes. Patients with abdominal pain had a high likelihood of CD, whereas those without abdominal pain had a high likelihood of mucosal healing. PMID:24625578

  6. Effect of atorvastatin on wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Banhesse, Vanessa Ferraz; Azevedo, Flávia Figueiredo; Araujo, Eliana Pereira; do Amaral, Maria Esméria Corezola; Caricilli, Andrea Moro; Saad, Mario Jose Abdalla; Lima, Maria Helena Melo

    2015-03-01

    Skin-wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process involving inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Recent studies have shown that statins are new therapeutical options because of their actions, such as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, on vasodilation, endothelial dysfunction and neoangiogenesis, which are independent of their lipid-lowering action. Our aim was to investigate the effect of atorvastatin on tissue repair after acute injury in healthy animals. Rats were divided into four groups: placebo-treated (P), topical atorvastatin-treated (AT), oral atorvastatin-treated (AO), topical and oral atorvastatin-treated (ATO). Under anesthesia, rats were wounded with an 8-mm punch in the dorsal region. Lesions were photographed on Days 0, 1, 3, 7, 10, 12, and 14 post-injury and samples taken on Days 1, 3, 7, and 14 for protein-expression analysis of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), interleukin (IL)-10, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Upon macroscopic examination, we observed significant reductions of lesion areas in groups AT, AO, and ATO compared to the P group. Additionally, AT and AO groups showed increased expression of IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GSK-3, and IL-10 on Days 1 and 3 when compared with the P group. All atorvastatin-treated groups showed higher expression of IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GSK-3, IL-10, eNOS, VEGF, and ERK on Day 7. On Days 1, 3, and 7, all atorvastatin-treated groups showed lower expression of IL-6 and TNF-α when compared with the P group. We conclude that atorvastatin accelerated tissue repair of acute lesions in rats and modulated expressions of proteins and cytokines associated with cell-growth pathways.

  7. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  8. Effect of aloe vera gel to healing of burn wound a clinical and histologic study.

    PubMed

    Visuthikosol, V; Chowchuen, B; Sukwanarat, Y; Sriurairatana, S; Boonpucknavig, V

    1995-08-01

    In a study of twenty-seven patients with partial thickness burn wound, they were treated with aloe vera gel compared with vaseline gauze. It revealed the aloe vera gel treated lesion healed faster than the vaseline gauze area. The average time of healing in the aloe gel area was 11.89 days and 18.19 days for the vaseline gauze treated wound. Statistical analysis by using t-test and the value of P < 0.002 was statistically significant. In histologic study, it showed early epithelialization in the treated aloe vera gel area. Only some minor adverse effects, such as discomfort and pain were encountered in the 27 cases. This study showed the effectiveness of aloe vera gel on a partial thickness burn wound, and it might be beneficial to do further trials on burn wounds.

  9. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  10. Healing and the Arts: A Powerful Metaphor for Teaching about Healing and for Teaching Medical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirridge, Marjorie S.; Martin, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    For several years an interdisciplinary course called "Healing and the Arts" has been offered to undergraduates and medical students in a BA/MD program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Its stated purpose is to give students a theoretical and practical understanding of how the arts can be a healing force in people's lives.…

  11. Multimodal Composing as Healing: Toward a New Model for Writing as Healing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    The course the author describes here, WRTC 426: Rhetorical "Ethos" and Personal Disclosures: Explorations in Trauma Writing and Writing as Healing, asks students to explore the "writing as healing" movement in English studies and beyond in order to evaluate the efficacy of claims that writing personal narratives can heal…

  12. Rapid identification of slow healing wounds.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kenneth; Covington, Scott; Sen, Chandan K; Januszyk, Michael; Kirsner, Robert S; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds have a prevalence of 2% in the United States, and cost an estimated $50 billion annually. Accurate stratification of wounds for risk of slow healing may help guide treatment and referral decisions. We have applied modern machine learning methods and feature engineering to develop a predictive model for delayed wound healing that uses information collected during routine care in outpatient wound care centers. Patient and wound data was collected at 68 outpatient wound care centers operated by Healogics Inc. in 26 states between 2009 and 2013. The dataset included basic demographic information on 59,953 patients, as well as both quantitative and categorical information on 180,696 wounds. Wounds were split into training and test sets by randomly assigning patients to training and test sets. Wounds were considered delayed with respect to healing time if they took more than 15 weeks to heal after presentation at a wound care center. Eleven percent of wounds in this dataset met this criterion. Prognostic models were developed on training data available in the first week of care to predict delayed healing wounds. A held out subset of the training set was used for model selection, and the final model was evaluated on the test set to evaluate discriminative power and calibration. The model achieved an area under the curve of 0.842 (95% confidence interval 0.834-0.847) for the delayed healing outcome and a Brier reliability score of 0.00018. Early, accurate prediction of delayed healing wounds can improve patient care by allowing clinicians to increase the aggressiveness of intervention in patients most at risk.

  13. Wound Healing Activity of Silibinin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Rojalini; Pattnaik, Ashok K.; Pradhan, Kishanta K.; Mehta, Beena K.; Pattanayak, Shakti P.; Banerjee, Sugato

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silibinin is a semi-purified fraction of silymarin contained in milk thistle (Silybum marianum Asteraceae). Primarily known for its hepatoprotective actions, silymarin may also stimulate epithelialization and reduce inflammation in excision wound. Previous studies show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial actions of silibinin. However, wound healing property of silibinin is not well studied. Objective: This study investigates wound healing activity of silibinin topical formulation. Materials and Methods: Wound healing activity of 0.2% silibinin gel was assessed by incision and excision wound models in mice. Animals were divided into gel base, silibinin gel, and Mega Heal gel® treated groups with six animals in each group. Wound contraction, wound tissue tensile strength, and hydroxyproline content were measured, and histopathological evaluation of wound tissue of all the above treatment groups was carried out. Results: Application of 0.2% silibinin hydrogel for 8 days led to 56.3% wound contraction compared to 64.6% using standard Mega Heal gel with a subsequent increase in hydroxyproline content, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) over control animals showing 33.2% contraction. After 14 days, percentage of contraction reached 96.1%, 97.6%, and 86.7%, respectively. Wound tissue tensile strength with silibinin (223.55 ± 3.82 g) and standard (241.38 ± 2.49 g) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than control (174.06 ± 5.75 g). Histopathology of silibinin and standard gel treated wound tissue showed more fibroblasts, fewer macrophage infiltration, and well-formed collagen fibers. Conclusion: Here, we show potent wound healing activity of silibinin hydrogel formulation. SUMMARY 0.2% silibinin hydrogel showed potent wound healing activity in incision and excision wound models in mice. Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species PMID:27695272

  14. Comparative analysis between Chamomilla recutita and corticosteroids on wound healing. An in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Manoela Domingues; Marques, Márcia Martins; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Pavesi, Vanessa Christina Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos

    2009-02-01

    The comparison of chamomile and corticosteroids for treating ulcers was done in vitro and in vivo. The experimental groups were: control; chamomile recutita; triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate. For the in vitro study the cell viability of fibroblasts cultured for 24 h in media conditioned by the substances was obtained by the MTT reduction analysis. For the in vivo study, 125 male rats were submitted to experimental ulcers treated or not (control) by the substances tested. At 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days later 5 animals of each group were sacrificed. The lesions were analyzed by means of clinical observation and histological wound-healing grading. Data were compared by ANOVA (p healing 9 days before the other groups. Complete repaired lesions were observed after 5 days of treatment only in the chamomile group. Animals treated with chamomile presented significantly faster wound healing in comparison to those treated with corticosteroids. Based on the conditions of this study, we concluded that chamomile in comparison to corticosteroids promotes faster wound healing process.

  15. Corticosteroid-impairment of healing and gastric pentadecapeptide BPC-157 creams in burned mice.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Mise, S; Staresinic, M; Bedekovic, V; Zarkovic, N; Borovic, S; Gjurasin, M; Boban-Blagaic, A; Batelja, L; Rucman, R; Anic, T

    2003-06-01

    The amelioration of corticosteroid-impairment of healing by a stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC-157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M(w) 1419, currently in early clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease) was studied in thermally injured mice. Its effects on corticosteroid impaired healing of deep partial skin thickness burns, and burn-gastric lesions were investigated. Male NMRI-Hannover mice (sacrificed at 1-3,7,14 and 21 days following burning 20% of total burn area at the back (open flame for 7s) received intraperitoneally (per kg bw) 6alpha-methylprednisolone (Depo-medrol, 1.0 or 10.0mg), or an equal volume of saline (5.0 ml), once daily, first application 30 min after injury, last 24h before sacrifice. The injury was subsequently treated by topical application of a thin layer of pentadecapeptide BPC-157 cream at three different levels a neutral cream of no treatment. Pentadecapeptide BPC-157 consistently improved given burn healing (both microscopical and tensionmetry assessment), and counteracted corticosteroid-impairment of burn healing. In burn-gastric lesions investigation of the effects of BPC showed an anti-ulcer effect of its own in burned non-corticosteroid-treated mice and potentiated the anti-ulcer effect observed in 6alpha-methylprednisolone-treated mice. Pentadecapeptide BPC-157 inhibited corticosteroid immunosuppression. In vitro, in spleenic cells assessment, animals (sacrificed at day 21) treated with 6alpha-methylprednisolone 1mg showed decreased reactivity to nitrogen in comparison with control, healthy animals, while the addition of BPC-157 (1 microg/g cream) returned cell reactivity to values noted in control healthy animals.

  16. Trust and the healing encounter: an examination of an unorthodox healing performance.

    PubMed

    Bolton, J

    2000-01-01

    Just why a patient should trust a particular healer is a question that has not been adequately explored in the literature on healing. This ethnographic case-report examines the healing performance of a chiropractor and proposes that it contains four intrinsic claims to trustworthiness: he claims to be a qualified and sincere healer who is in possession of knowledge and techniques that derive their power from their truth content and which empower him to make beneficial changes in the patient. Taking each claim in turn I described the nature of the claim, how it might be adequately validated, ways in which his healing performance might validate it and how he might be assisted by the patient, and how their actual validation may be distorted by the healer and patient. It is suggested that while unusual in many regards, this unorthodox healing performance may be a foil by which to examine other more orthodox healing performances.

  17. American Muslim perceptions of healing: key agents in healing, and their roles.

    PubMed

    Padela, Aasim I; Killawi, Amal; Forman, Jane; DeMonner, Sonya; Heisler, Michele

    2012-06-01

    American Muslims represent a growing and diverse community. Efforts at promoting cultural competence, enhancing cross-cultural communication skills, and improving community health must account for the religio-cultural frame through which American Muslims view healing. Using a community-based participatory research model, we conducted 13 focus groups at area mosques in southeast Michigan to explore American Muslim views on healing and to identify the primary agents, and their roles, within the healing process. Participants shared a God-centric view of healing. Healing was accessed through direct means such as supplication and recitation of the Qur'an, or indirectly through human agents including imams, health care practitioners, family, friends, and community. Human agents served integral roles, influencing spiritual, psychological, and physical health. Additional research into how religiosity, health care systems, and community factors influence health-care-seeking behaviors is warranted.

  18. Pressurized vascular systems for self-healing materials

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, A. R.; Sottos, N. R.; White, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    An emerging strategy for creating self-healing materials relies on embedded vascular networks of microchannels to transport reactive fluids to regions of damage. Here we investigate the use of active pumping for the pressurized delivery of a two-part healing system, allowing a small vascular system to deliver large volumes of healing agent. Different pumping strategies are explored to improve the mixing and subsequent polymerization of healing agents in the damage zone. Significant improvements in the number of healing cycles and in the overall healing efficiency are achieved compared with prior passive schemes that use only capillary forces for the delivery of healing agents. At the same time, the volume of the vascular system required to achieve this superior healing performance is significantly reduced. In the best case, nearly full recovery of fracture toughness is attained throughout 15 cycles of damage and healing, with a vascular network constituting just 0.1 vol% of the specimen. PMID:21957119

  19. 808-nm diode lasers with and without exogenous chromophore in the treatment of benign facial pigmented and vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Ovidio; Magaton Rizzi, G.; Trevisan, G.

    2001-10-01

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an 808 nm diode laser for the treatment of benign facial pigmented and vascular lesions, with and without the use of an exogenous chromophore. Method: Thirty-eight patients were treated with an 808 nm diode laser (Eufoton, Italy), in some cases using a chromophore (1% methylene blue, SALF, Bergamo). Pigmented lesions: 21 patients, (15 pigmented keratoses, 6 melanoses). All the lesions were evaluated by dermatoscopy (Videocap 200, DS Medica, Italy) before the treatment. Fluence levels were 10 - 30 J/cmq; pulse lengths were 10 - 50 ms; spot size was 2 mm. Five hypopigmented keratoses were artificially pigmented using exogenous chromophore. Two melanoses required an additional laser session. Vascular lesions: 17 patients, (12 small angiomas, 5 teleangectasias). Fluences were 50 - 100 J/cmq; pulse lengths were 10 - 50 ms; spot size was 2 mm. Eight angiomas were pigmented with exogenous chromophore prior to the treatment. In all cases the areas surrounding the lesions were cooled. The patients were followed at 1, 4 and 8 weeks after the procedure. Results: The keratoses healed completely within two weeks. Four melanoses healed after four weeks. In the two melanoses that were re-treated after eight weeks there remained slight hypopigmentation of the area. All the vascular lesions healed after 15 days without any residual scarring. Considerations: The use of the 808 nm diode laser in the treatment of benign facial pigmented and vascular lesions appears to be justified on the grounds of efficacy and safety of the device, and good degree of acceptance by the patients. By increasing absorption of the 808 nm beam and reducing its penetration, the pigmentation of superficial lesions with exogenous chromophore allowed us to decrease fluences and reduce irradiation times.

  20. Effects of shear load on frictional healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2014-12-01

    During the seismic cycle of repeated earthquake failure, faults regain strength in a process known as frictional healing. Laboratory studies have played a central role in illuminating the processes of frictional healing and fault re-strengthening. These studies have also provided the foundation for laboratory-derived friction constitutive laws, which have been used extensively to model earthquake dynamics. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the affect of shear load on frictional healing. Frictional healing is quantified during slide-hold-slide (SHS) tests, which serve as a simple laboratory analog for the seismic cycle in which earthquakes (slide) are followed by interseismic quiescence (hold). We studied bare surfaces of Westerly granite and layers of Westerly granite gouge (thickness of 3 mm) at normal stresses from 4-25 MPa, relative humidity of 40-60%, and loading and unloading velocities of 10-300 μm/s. During the hold period of SHS tests, shear stress on the sample was partially removed to investigate the effects of shear load on frictional healing and to isolate time- and slip-dependent effects on fault healing. Preliminary results are consistent with existing works and indicate that frictional healing increases with the logarithm of hold time and decreases with normalized shear stress τ/τf during the hold. During SHS tests with hold periods of 100 seconds, healing values ranged from (0.013-0.014) for τ/τf = 1 to (0.059-0.063) for τ/τf = 0, where τ is the shear stress during the hold period and τf is the shear stress during steady frictional sliding. Experiments on bare rock surfaces and with natural and synthetic fault gouge materials are in progress. Conventional SHS tests (i.e. τ/τf = 1) are adequately described by the rate and state friction laws. However, previous experiments in granular quartz suggest that zero-stress SHS tests are not well characterized by either the Dieterich or Ruina state evolution laws. We are investigating

  1. Fracture and healing cycles in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Kendrick, Jackie; von Aulock, Felix

    2014-05-01

    The repeated occurrence of fracture and healing occurs in a variety of geological, biological, metallurgical and engineering processes. In geology, it is most common in active tectonic regions, earthquake settings and volcanic conduits, where healing is thought to be intrinsically related to diffusional processes, aided by catalytic fluids. In this study, cycles of compression, healing by contact and tension are performed on standard soda-lime silicate liquids at high temperatures (500 to 700 ° C; i.e., in the diffusive regime of the viscoelastic body). The flat ends of two cylinders are brought in contact at relatively low strain rates (10-3 s-1) until a target normal stress is reached (1, 2.5, 5 and 10 MPa). The specimens are then held in contact whilst the normal stress is left to viscously dissipate for a different portion of Maxwell's relaxation timescale for the liquid (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, 320) in order to achieve different degrees of fracture healing. Strength recovery is assessed by subjecting the healed sample to a rapid tension event at 10-1 s-1 (to ensure a purely brittle response). We note that healing becomes efficient when allowed to operate for at least 5 times the relaxation timescale of the material. From this point onward, we observe an exponential increase in strength as a function of healing time. A small component of heat is generated during failure, monitored using a high-speed infrared thermographic camera. We find that fracture-healing dynamics has similarities with sintering, whereby the kinetics of the process is viscosity and diffusion dependent. Here we aim to expand this definition with normal applied stress constraints and link fracture and healing cycles to seismic swarms. Seismicity is perceived as a first order constraint on the mechanics of magma ascent and facilitates assessment of the real-time rheological state of magma in conduits. The processes presented here may be equally applicable to the strength

  2. Nutrient support of the healing wound.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N A; Muller, M J; Herndon, D N

    1994-05-01

    Wound healing is a series of complex physicochemical interactions that require various micronutrients at every step. In the critically ill or severely injured patient, wound healing is impaired by the protein-catabolic, hypermetabolic response to stress. The hypothalamus responds to cytokine stimulation by increasing the thermoregulatory set-point and by augmenting elaboration of stress hormones (catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon). In turn, the stress hormones induce thermogenic futile substrate cycling, lipolysis, and proteolysis. Increased glucose production results at the expense of skeletal muscle degradation, producing amino acid substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nutritional support of the hypermetabolic state is an essential part of ensuring efficient wound healing in these patients. Protein catabolism cannot be reversed by increased amino acid availability alone, due partly to a defect in amino acid transport. This defect can be reversed by anabolic agents, such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Growth hormone treatment dramatically improves wound healing in severely burned children. Supplementation with protein and vitamins, specifically arginine and vitamins A, B, and C, provides optimum nutrient support of the healing wound.

  3. Self-healing sandwich composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugon, D.; Chen, C.; Peters, K.

    2012-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that a thin self-healing layer is effective in recovering partial sandwich composite performance after an impact event. Many studies have been conducted that show the possibility of using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to monitor the cure of a resin through strain and temperature monitoring. For this experiment, FBG sensors were used to monitor the curing process of a self-healing layer within a twelve-layer fiberglass laminate after impact. First, five self-healing sandwich composite specimens were manufactured. FBG sensors were embedded between the fiberglass and foam core. Then the fiberglass laminate was impacted with the use of a drop tower and the curing process was monitored. The collected data was used to compare the cure of the resin and fiberglass alone to the cure of the resin from a self-healing specimen. For the low viscosity resin system tested, these changes were not sufficiently large to identify different polymerization states in the resin as it cured. These results indicate that applying different resin systems might increase the efficiency of the self-healing in the sandwich composites.

  4. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  5. Computational Modeling of Inflammation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Mi, Qi; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inflammation is both central to proper wound healing and a key driver of chronic tissue injury via a positive-feedback loop incited by incidental cell damage. We seek to derive actionable insights into the role of inflammation in wound healing in order to improve outcomes for individual patients. Approach To date, dynamic computational models have been used to study the time evolution of inflammation in wound healing. Emerging clinical data on histo-pathological and macroscopic images of evolving wounds, as well as noninvasive measures of blood flow, suggested the need for tissue-realistic, agent-based, and hybrid mechanistic computational simulations of inflammation and wound healing. Innovation We developed a computational modeling system, Simple Platform for Agent-based Representation of Knowledge, to facilitate the construction of tissue-realistic models. Results A hybrid equation–agent-based model (ABM) of pressure ulcer formation in both spinal cord-injured and -uninjured patients was used to identify control points that reduce stress caused by tissue ischemia/reperfusion. An ABM of arterial restenosis revealed new dynamics of cell migration during neointimal hyperplasia that match histological features, but contradict the currently prevailing mechanistic hypothesis. ABMs of vocal fold inflammation were used to predict inflammatory trajectories in individuals, possibly allowing for personalized treatment. Conclusions The intertwined inflammatory and wound healing responses can be modeled computationally to make predictions in individuals, simulate therapies, and gain mechanistic insights. PMID:24527362

  6. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Taradaj, Jakub; Dymarek, Robert; Sopel, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study. PMID:27413744

  7. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials. PMID:26137471

  8. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Taradaj, Jakub; Dymarek, Robert; Sopel, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  9. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  10. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  11. No carious cervical lesions: abfraction.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-10-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5.

  12. Dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Soyer, H P; Argenziano, G; Chimenti, S; Ruocco, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts of dermoscopy, the various dermoscopic equipments and the standard criteria for diagnosing pigmented skin lesions. In assessing dermoscopic images, both global and local features can be recognized. These features will be systematically described and illustrated in Part I of this article. First, we will focus on 8 morphologically rather distinctive global features that allow a quick, preliminary categorization of a given pigmented skin lesion. Second, we will describe various local features representing the letters of the dermoscopic alphabet. The local features permit a more detailed assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  13. New developments in wound healing relevant to facial plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hom, David B

    2008-01-01

    To review new advances in wound healing over the last decade relevant to facial plastic surgery, recent studies in wound healing and its clinical implications were evaluated. New biological and clinical products in wound healing have implications in facial plastic surgery. These products will alter the method with which we approach normal and poorly healing wounds. The US Food and Drug Administration approval of growth factor products signifies the beginning of a new age for actively promoting the healing of wounds for the surgeon. Some of these recent discoveries in wound healing relevant to the facial plastic surgeon are described.

  14. Rubus imperialis (Rosaceae) extract and pure compound niga-ichigoside F1: wound healing and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Talita Dacroce; Thiesen, Liliani Carolini; de Oliveira Nunes, Maria Luisa; Broering, Milena Fronza; Donato, Marcos Paulo; Goss, Marina Jagielski; Petreanu, Marcel; Niero, Rivaldo; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Santin, José Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Here, we evaluate the anti-inflammatory and wound-healing effects of methanolic crude extract obtained from aerial parts (leaves and branches) of Rubus imperialis Chum. Schl. (Rosaceae) and the pure compound niga-ichigoside F1. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined in vivo and in vitro, and the healing effect was evaluated in surgical lesions in mice skin. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay and H2O2-induced oxidative stress were used to determine antioxidant activity. The efferocytosis activity was also determined. The data obtained show that the extract of R. imperialis promote reduction in the inflammatory process induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or carrageenan in the air pouch model; the effects could be reinforced by nitric oxide reduction in LPS-stimulated neutrophils, and an increase in the efferocytosis. The extract showed wound healing property in vitro and in vivo, scavenging activity for DPPH, and cytoprotection in the H2O2-induced oxidative stress in L929 cells. In addition, the compound niga-ichigoside F1 was able to reduce the NO secretion; however, it did not present wound-healing activity in vitro. Together, the data obtained point out the modulatory actions of R. imperialis extract on leukocyte migration to the inflamed tissue, the antioxidant, and the pro-resolutive activity. However, the R. imperialis anti-inflammatory activity may be mediated in parts by niga-ichigoside F1, and on wound healing do not correlated with niga-ichigoside F1.

  15. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field.

  16. [Magical and religious healing in Byzantium].

    PubMed

    Józsa, László

    2010-01-01

    Religious and magical ways of healing have been known and practiced since the very beginning of human history. In the present article, the Byzantine philosophical, cultural, historical and "methodological" aspects of this way of healing are discussed. The article outlines the development of magic healing in Byzantium from the 4th to the 15th century. During this period magical therapy included the cult of patron saints--listed by the author--and pleading for divine intervention as well. The activity of "anargyroi" and the use of magical objects and amulets is also discussed in detail. Exorcism was also a part of religious therapy both against psychical and somatical diseases. In early Christianity, and especially in Byzantium the devil or other demons were also supposed to cause various somatical or psychical illnesses by "intrusion" or "internalisation," i.e. by possession or obsession of their victims.

  17. Honey and Wound Healing: An Update.

    PubMed

    Saikaly, Sami K; Khachemoune, Amor

    2017-04-01

    For centuries, honey has been utilized for wound healing purposes. In recent times, this specific topic has become a field of interest, possibly due to the advent of antibiotic resistance in microbial pathogens. With constant technological advancement, the information regarding honey's mechanisms of action on wound healing has accumulated at a rapid pace. Similarly, clinical studies comparing honey with traditional wound care therapies are steadily emerging. As a follow-up to a previous review published in the journal in 2011, the current review article outlines publications regarding honey and wound healing that have been published between June 2010 and August 2016. Here we describe the most recent evidence regarding multiple types of honey and their mechanisms of action as antimicrobial agents, immunologic modulators, and physiologic mediators. In addition, outcomes of clinical studies involving a multitude of cutaneous wounds are also examined.

  18. Host Defense Peptides in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Koehler, Till; Jacobsen, Frank; Daigeler, Adrien; Goertz, Ole; Langer, Stefan; Kesting, Marco; Steinau, Hans; Eriksson, Elof; Hirsch, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Host defense peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system. They show broad antimicrobial action against gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and they likely play a key role in activating and mediating the innate as well as adaptive immune response in infection and inflammation. These features make them of high interest for wound healing research. Non-healing and infected wounds are a major problem in patient care and health care spending. Increasing infection rates, growing bacterial resistance to common antibiotics, and the lack of effective therapeutic options for the treatment of problematic wounds emphasize the need for new approaches in therapy and pathophysiologic understanding. This review focuses on the current knowledge of host defense peptides affecting wound healing and infection. We discuss the current data and highlight the potential future developments in this field of research. PMID:18385817

  19. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  20. Association between poor wound healing and the formation of Salzmann nodules.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jini; Cai, Rongrong; Zhang, Chaoran

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a gray-white nodular lesion located at the site of a clear corneal incision in her left eye. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography showed prominent endothelial gaping even 5 years after cataract surgery. Based on the features of clinical and histological examinations, Salzmann nodular degeneration was diagnosed. The formation of the Salzmann nodule was thought to be related to poor healing of the surgical wound. To our knowledge, this is the first case of Salzmann nodular degeneration associated with cataract surgery.

  1. Low regeneration of lesions produced by coring in Orbicella faveolata

    PubMed Central

    Jordán-Garza, Adán Guillermo; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of tissue-skeleton cores from coral colonies is a common procedure to study diverse aspects of their biology, water quality or to obtain environmental proxies. Coral species preferred for such studies in Caribbean reefs belong to the genera Orbicella. The long term effects of coring in the coral colony are seldom evaluated and in many Caribbean countries this practice is not regulated. We monitored 50 lesions produced on Orbicella faveolata colonies by the extraction of two centimeter-diameter cores to determine if they were able to heal after a four year period. At the end of the study 4% of the lesions underwent full regeneration, 52% underwent partial regeneration, 14% suffered additional tissue loss but remained surrounded by live tissue, and 30% merged with dead areas of the colonies. Given the low capacity of Orbicella faveolata to regenerate tissue-skeleton lesions, studies that use coring should be regulated and mitigation actions, such as using less destructive techniques and remediation measures after extraction, should be conducted to facilitate tissue regeneration. PMID:27004146

  2. Exogenous calreticulin improves diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Greives, Matthew R; Samra, Fares; Pavlides, Savvas C; Blechman, Keith M; Naylor, Sara-Megumi; Woodrell, Christopher D; Cadacio, Caprice; Levine, Jamie P; Bancroft, Tara A; Michalak, Marek; Warren, Stephen M; Gold, Leslie I

    2012-01-01

    A serious consequence of diabetes mellitus is impaired wound healing, which largely resists treatment. We previously reported that topical application of calreticulin (CRT), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, markedly enhanced the rate and quality of wound healing in an experimental porcine model of cutaneous repair. Consistent with these in vivo effects, in vitro CRT induced the migration and proliferation of normal human cells critical to the wound healing process. These functions are particularly deficient in poor healing diabetic wounds. Using a genetically engineered diabetic mouse (db/db) in a full-thickness excisional wound healing model, we now show that topical application of CRT induces a statistically significant decrease in the time to complete wound closure compared with untreated wounds by 5.6 days (17.6 vs. 23.2). Quantitative analysis of the wounds shows that CRT increases the rate of reepithelialization at days 7 and 10 and increases the amount of granulation tissue at day 7 persisting to day 14. Furthermore, CRT treatment induces the regrowth of pigmented hair follicles observed on day 28. In vitro, fibroblasts isolated from diabetic compared with wild-type mouse skin and human fibroblasts cultured under hyperglycemic compared with normal glucose conditions proliferate and strongly migrate in response to CRT compared with untreated controls. The in vitro effects of CRT on these functions are consistent with CRT's potent effects on wound healing in the diabetic mouse. These studies implicate CRT as a potential powerful topical therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetic and other chronic wounds.

  3. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jumaat Mohd. Yussof; Omar, Effat; Pai, Dinker R.; Sood, Suneet

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds. PMID:23162220

  4. Foxo1 inhibits diabetic mucosal wound healing but enhances healing of normoglycemic wounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fanxing; Othman, Badr; Lim, Jason; Batres, Angelika; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Zhang, Chenying; Yi, Leah; Liu, Jian; Tian, Chen; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Alsadun, Sarah; Tarapore, Rohinton; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is an important part in mucosal wound healing. Surprisingly little is known about the impact of diabetes on the molecular events of mucosal healing. We examined the role of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) in oral wounds of diabetic and normoglycemic mice with keratinocyte-specific Foxo1 deletion. Diabetic mucosal wounds had significantly delayed healing with reduced cell migration and proliferation. Foxo1 deletion rescued the negative impact of diabetes on healing but had the opposite effect in normoglycemic mice. Diabetes in vivo and in high glucose conditions in vitro enhanced expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and interleukin-36γ (IL-36γ) in a Foxo1-dependent manner. High glucose-stimulated Foxo1 binding to CCL20 and IL-36γ promoters and CCL20 and IL-36γ significantly inhibited migration of these cells in high glucose conditions. In normal healing, Foxo1 was needed for transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression, and in standard glucose conditions, TGF-β1 rescued the negative effect of Foxo1 silencing on migration in vitro. We propose that Foxo1 under diabetic or high glucose conditions impairs healing by promoting high levels of CCL20 and IL-36γ expression but under normal conditions, enhances it by inducing TGF-β1. This finding provides mechanistic insight into how Foxo1 mediates the impact of diabetes on mucosal wound healing.

  5. Treatment of Large Periapical Cyst Like Lesion: A Noninvasive Approach: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Neha; Gothi, Rajat; Sood, Niti

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. Periapical radiolucent areas are generally diagnosed either during routine dental radiographic examination or following acute toothache. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, lesion sterilization and repair therapy and the apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. The ultimate goal of endodontic therapy should be to return the involved teeth to a state of health and function without surgical intervention. All inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Surgical intervention is recommended only after nonsurgical techniques have failed. Besides, surgery has many drawbacks, which limit its use in the management of periapical lesions. How to cite this article: Sood N, Maheshwari N, Gothi R, Sood N. Treatment of Large Periapical Cyst Like Lesion: A Noninvasive Approach: A Report of Two Cases. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):133-137. PMID:26379382

  6. Multifunctional composites: Healing, heating and electromagnetic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisted, Thomas Anthony John

    2007-12-01

    Multifunctional materials, in the context of this research, integrate other functions into materials that foremost have outstanding structural integrity. Details of the integration of electromagnetic, heating, and healing functionalities into fiber-reinforced polymer composites are presented. As a result of fiber/wire integration through textile braiding and weaving, the dielectric constant of a composite may be tuned from negative to positive values. These wires are further leveraged to uniformly heat the composite through resistive heating. A healing functionality is introduced by utilizing a polymer matrix with the ability to heal internal cracking through thermally-reversible covalent bonds based on Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Double Cleavage Drilled Compression (DCDC) specimen is applied to study the fracture and healing characteristics of the neat polymer. This method allows for quantitative evaluation of incremental crack growth, and ensures that the cracked sample remains in one piece after the test, improving the ability to re-align the fracture surfaces prior to healing. Initially, the fracture strength of PMMA is studied with various DCDC geometries to develop a model of the propagation of a crack within this type of specimen. Applied to the healable polymer (2MEP4F), repeated fracture-healing cycles demonstrate that treatment at temperatures between 85 to 95°C results in full fracture toughness recovery and no dimensional changes due to creep. The fracture toughness after each fracturing and healing cycle has been calculated, using the model, to yield a fracture toughness of about 0.71 MPa·m1/2 for this material at room temperature. Glass and carbon fiber-reinforced composites have been fabricated with the 2MEP4F polymer, and the ability of this polymer to heal microcracks in fiber-reinforced composites is demonstrated. Microcracks have been introduced into the composites by cryogenic cycling in liquid nitrogen, causing a reduction in the storage

  7. [Perioperative hypothermia. Impact on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, A P; Lindenblatt, N; Klar, E

    2007-09-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery associated with several adverse effects including impaired wound healing and more frequently leads to wound infections. Perioperative hypothermia affects the hemostasis and various immune functions and therefore interferes with the initial phases of the wound healing process. Furthermore, perioperative hypothermia contributes to wound complications by inhibition of deposition of collagen and prolongation of postoperative catabolism. Wound complications prolong hospitalization and substantially increase medical costs. Thus, maintaining normothermia perioperatively is essential to reduce the number of wound complications.

  8. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.; Trauner, Kenneth

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  9. Healing burns using atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kanai, Takao; Mori, Akira

    2014-01-01

    An experiment testing the effects of plasma irradiation with an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) reactor on rats given burns showed no evidence of electric shock injuries upon pathology inspection of the irradiated skin surface. In fact, the observed evidence of healing and improvement of the burns suggested healing effects from plasma irradiation. The quantities of neovascular vessels in the living tissues at 7 days were 9.2 ± 0.77 mm-2 without treatment and 18.4 ± 2.9 mm-2 after plasma irradiation.

  10. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  11. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus; Herpes simplex virus culture Images Viral lesion culture References Costello M, Sabatini LM, Yungbluth M. Viral infections. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  12. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  13. Enhancement of the self-healing ability in oxidation induced self-healing ceramic by modifying the healing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Wataru; Abe, Shihomi

    2012-02-01

    The available temperature range of the self-healing induced by high temperature oxidation of SiC can be controlled by the particle size of the contained SiC particles. In this study, three types of alumina-SiC composites were prepared. The SiC particle sizes of the composites were 270, ˜30 nm, and less than 10 nm. The self-healing abilities were estimated by the strength recovery behavior at several temperatures. The use of nanometer-sized dispersed SiC particles as healing agent decreases the activation energy of the SiC oxidation obtained from the differential thermal analysis with several heating rates. This implies that smaller SiC particles can give rise to the oxidation at lower temperature. Moreover, the lowest temperature at which the cracked strength was completely recovered for 10 h was strongly affected by the SiC particle size. As the SiC particle size varied from 270 to ˜30 nm, the lowest temperature varied from 1300 to 950 °C. However, alumina composite containing SiC particles whose particle size is less than 10 nm cannot recover completely the cracked strength under every condition, because the space between crack walls cannot be filled with the formed oxide due to the small volume of SiC on the crack walls. Therefore, it was found that there is an optimal SiC particle size for endowing self-healing ability.

  14. The Effect of Combined Glenoid and Humeral Head Defects on Glenohumeral Translation

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Robert A.; Parrino, Anthony; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Obopilwe, Elifho; Cote, Mark P.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Provencher, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability has significant clinical implications and is responsible for surgical failure. Previous work has focused on glenoid and humeral head defects separately. There is no prior biomechanical work evaluating the combined effect of these lesions. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the combination of humeral head and glenoid bone loss on glenohumeral joint translation in a bipolar bone loss model with a Bankart lesion and after Bankart repair. Our hypothesis is that when both humeral head and glenoid defects occur together, the amount of bone loss required to compromise soft tissue Bankart repair is less than compared to when glenoid and humeral head lesions occur in isolation. Methods: Eight cadaveric shoulders were dissected to expose the intact capsule and glenohumeral joint. The set-up and testing was as described by Itoi ,Sekiya and Yamamoto1,2,3.The humeral shaft and scapula were potted and the shoulder mounted on a custom shoulder testing device permitting 6 degrees of freedom. The test positions were 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction and 60 degrees of external rotation. A 50N compressive load was applied to the glenohumeral joint. A MTS 858 Servohydraulic test system (MTS Systems, Eden Prairie, MN) was used to translate the humeral head anteriorly 10mm at a rate of 2.0mm/sec. The peak force required to translate the humeral head 10mm was recorded. Three trials were performed in each condition, and the mean value was used for data analysis. All Bankart lesions were made sharply from the 2 o’clock to 6 o’clock position for a right shoulder. Bankart repair was made with transosseous tunnels using high strength suture. A digital micrometer was used to measure and create glenoid defects with a saw parallel to the anterior glenoid. Hill-Sachs lesions were made from 3D models created from a clinical database of computerized tomographic images of 142 patients with shoulder instability

  15. Border preserving skin lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Mostafa; Samei, Golnoosh

    2008-03-01

    Melanoma is a fatal cancer with a growing incident rate. However it could be cured if diagnosed in early stages. The first step in detecting melanoma is the separation of skin lesion from healthy skin. There are particular features associated with a malignant lesion whose successful detection relies upon accurately extracted borders. We propose a two step approach. First, we apply K-means clustering method (to 3D RGB space) that extracts relatively accurate borders. In the second step we perform an extra refining step for detecting the fading area around some lesions as accurately as possible. Our method has a number of novelties. Firstly as the clustering method is directly applied to the 3D color space, we do not overlook the dependencies between different color channels. In addition, it is capable of extracting fine lesion borders up to pixel level in spite of the difficulties associated with fading areas around the lesion. Performing clustering in different color spaces reveals that 3D RGB color space is preferred. The application of the proposed algorithm to an extensive data-base of skin lesions shows that its performance is superior to that of existing methods both in terms of accuracy and computational complexity.

  16. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  17. Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances.

  18. Effect of low intensity helium-neon (HeNe) laser irradiation on experimental paracoccidioidomycotic wound healing dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Carolina; Gameiro, Jacy; Nagib, Patrícia Resende Alo; Brito, Vânia Nieto; Vasconcellos, Elza da Costa Cruz; Verinaud, Liana

    2009-01-01

    The effect of HeNe laser on the extracellular matrix deposition, chemokine expression and angiogenesis in experimental paracoccidioidomycotic lesions was investigated. At days 7, 8 and 9 postinfection the wound of each animal was treated with a 632.8 nm HeNe laser at a dose of 3 J cm(-2). At day 10 postinfection, the wounds were examined by using histologic and immunohistochemical methods. Results revealed that laser-treated lesions were lesser extensive than untreated ones, and composed mainly by macrophages and lymphocytes. High IL-1beta expression was shown in the untreated group whereas in laser-treated animals the expression was scarce. On the other hand, the expression of CXCL-10 was found to be reduced in untreated animals and quite intensive and well distributed in the laser-treated ones. Also, untreated lesions presented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a small area near the center of the lesion and high immunoreactivity for hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), whereas laser-treated lesions expressed VEGF surrounding blood vessels and little immunoreactivity for HIF-1. Laser-treated lesions presented much more reticular fibers and collagen deposition when compared with the untreated lesion. Our results show that laser was efficient in minimizing the local effects observed in paracoccidioidomycosis and can be an efficient tool in the treatment of this infection, accelerating the healing process.

  19. [Physiology and pathophysiology of wound healing of wound defects].

    PubMed

    Mutschler, W

    2012-09-01

    Understanding wound healing involves more than simply stating that there are the three phases of inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Wound healing is a complex series of actions, reactions and interactions among cells and mediators in a sequential and simultaneously ongoing temporal process within a spatial frame. At first this article will attempt to provide a concise summary of the events, cellular components and main influential mediators of wound healing over time. Secondly, the pathophysiology of chronic non-healing wounds is described where an imbalance of stimulating and inhibiting factors causes failure of healing. The most relevant extrinsic and intrinsic determinants are described and related to the cellular and molecular level of disturbed wound healing. A basic understanding of wound healing is a prerequisite for any prophylactic or therapeutic maneuver to maintain or re-establish wound equilibrium to give a satisfactory healing trajectory.

  20. HEALing Higher Education: An Innovative Approach to Preparing HSI Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is a case study of the Higher Education Administration and Leadership (HEAL) program at Adams State University. HEAL focuses on preparing the next generation of leaders at the nation's Hispanic-serving institutions.

  1. Multiphase design of autonomic self-healing thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulin; Kushner, Aaron M.; Williams, Gregory A.; Guan, Zhibin

    2012-06-01

    The development of polymers that can spontaneously repair themselves after mechanical damage would significantly improve the safety, lifetime, energy efficiency and environmental impact of man-made materials. Most approaches to self-healing materials require the input of external energy, healing agents, solvent or plasticizer. Despite intense research in this area, the synthesis of a stiff material with intrinsic self-healing ability remains a key challenge. Here, we show a design of multiphase supramolecular thermoplastic elastomers that combine high modulus and toughness with spontaneous healing capability. The designed hydrogen-bonding brush polymers self-assemble into a hard-soft microphase-separated system, combining the enhanced stiffness and toughness of nanocomposites with the self-healing capability of dynamic supramolecular assemblies. In contrast to previous self-healing polymers, this new system spontaneously self-heals as a single-component solid material at ambient conditions, without the need for any external stimulus, healing agent, plasticizer or solvent.

  2. Predictive value of intracutaneous xenon clearance for healing of amputation and cutaneous ulcer sites

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Thomas, S.; Cline, J.; Kempczinski, R.; Gottesman, L.

    1983-04-01

    A previously reported technique for the assessment of skin blood flow in the lower extremities of patients with ischemic lesions was evaluated using intracutaneous xenon clearance. The radioisotope was injected above and below both the ankle and the knee and flow was measured using a gamma camera with a low-energy collimator, 88-keV photopeak, and a 20% window. Healing was more frequent when skin blood flow was equal to or greater than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (38/39 patients) than when flow was less than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (4/7 patients). The authors conclude that this technique can be used to help determine the appropriate site for amputation in lower limb ischemic lesions.

  3. Predictive value of intracutaneous xenon clearance for healing of amputation and cutaneous ulcer sites

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Thomas, S.; Cline, J.; Kempczinski, R.; Gottesman, L.

    1983-04-01

    A previously reported technique for the assessment of skin blood flow in the lower extremities of patients with ischemic lesions was evaluated using intracutaeous xenon clearance. The radioisotope was injected above and below both the ankle and the knee and flow was measured using a gamma camera with a low-energy collimator, 88-keV photopeak, and a 20% window. Healing was more frequent when skin blood flow was equal to or greater than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (38/39 patients) than when flow was less than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (4/7 patients). The authors conclude that this technique can be used to help determine the appropriate site for amputation in lower limb ischemic lesions.

  4. High-power diode laser versus electrocautery surgery on human papillomavirus lesion treatment.

    PubMed

    Baeder, Fernando Martins; Santos, Maria Teresa Botti R; Pelino, Jose Eduardo Pelizon; Duarte, Danilo Antonio; Genovese, Walter Joao

    2012-05-01

    The use of high-power lasers has facilitated and improved human papillomavirus (HPV) treatment protocols and has also become very popular in recent years. This application has been more frequently used in hospitals, especially in gynecology. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of high-power diode laser to remove oral lesions caused by HPV and the consequent effects on virus load following the wound tissue healing process compared with one of the most conventional surgical techniques involving electrocautery. Surgeries were performed on 5 patients who had 2 distinct lesions caused by HPV. All patients were submitted to both electrocautery and high-power diode laser. Following a 20-day period, when the area was healed, sample material was collected through curettage for virus load quantitative analysis.Observation verified the presence of virus in all the samples; however, surgeries performed with the laser also revealed a significant reduction in virus load per cell compared with those performed with electrocautery. The ease when handling the diode laser, because of the flexibility of its fibers and precision of its energy delivery system, provides high-accuracy surgery, which facilitates the treatment of large and/or multifocal lesions. The use of high-power diode laser is more effective in treatment protocols of lesions caused by HPV.

  5. Evidence for healing interventions with perinatal bereavement.

    PubMed

    Capitulo, Kathleen Leask

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of perinatal grief and evidence-based healing interventions for it. The loss of a pregnancy or death of an infant causes profound grief, yet society has long minimized or ignored this grief, which is among the most painful of bereavement experiences. Throughout the last century, research on grief and the special needs of bereaved parents has changed the context of professional intervention from protective to supportive. The central focus of bereavement interventions is to assist families in healing by helping them make meaning of their losses. The use of symbols, spirituality, and rituals has been shown to help bring meaning. Research has shown that memories are key to healing, and that gender, age, and relationships bring different grief expressions and experiences. While children's understanding of loss and grief differs with developmental age, they should also be given the opportunity to participate in grief rituals and practices. Professionals who care for bereaved parents have a unique opportunity to offer support by validating their grief, facilitating rituals, providing mementos, and letting the bereaved tell their stories. While no intervention can bring back their beloved children, appropriate intervention can promote healing.

  6. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  7. Healing in the Sámi North

    PubMed Central

    Stabbursvik, Ellen Anne Buljo

    2010-01-01

    There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today’s tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today’s changing global society. PMID:20862528

  8. Using behavior modification to promote wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E; Walsh, A; Bradley, M

    2000-10-01

    Successfully caring for patients with wounds under PPS demands that current practice approaches must change. Instead of focusing on dressings and techniques alone, this article describes how first addressing patients' psychological readiness for change can move them quickly to self-care and enhance wound healing, which results in cost savings and better outcomes.

  9. Healing the Hidden Wounds of Racial Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines racial trauma and highlights strategies for healing and transformation to support the disproportionate number of children and youth of color who fail in school and become trapped in the pipelines of treatment, social service, and justice systems. The difficulty in meeting the needs of these children and youth is failing to…

  10. Honey: an immunomodulator in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Honey is a popular natural product that is used in the treatment of burns and a broad spectrum of injuries, in particular chronic wounds. The antibacterial potential of honey has been considered the exclusive criterion for its wound healing properties. The antibacterial activity of honey has recently been fully characterized in medical-grade honeys. Recently, the multifunctional immunomodulatory properties of honey have attracted much attention. The aim of this review is to provide closer insight into the potential immunomodulatory effects of honey in wound healing. Honey and its components are able to either stimulate or inhibit the release of certain cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6) from human monocytes and macrophages, depending on wound condition. Similarly, honey seems to either reduce or activate the production of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils, also depending on the wound microenvironment. The honey-induced activation of both types of immune cells could promote debridement of a wound and speed up the repair process. Similarly, human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cell responses (e.g., cell migration and proliferation, collagen matrix production, chemotaxis) are positively affected in the presence of honey; thus, honey may accelerate reepithelization and wound closure. The immunomodulatory activity of honey is highly complex because of the involvement of multiple quantitatively variable compounds among honeys of different origins. The identification of these individual compounds and their contributions to wound healing is crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind honey-mediated healing of chronic wounds.

  11. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed that the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids are possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway. Here, we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues in in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full-thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 days, with adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were significantly lower, while tumor necrosis factor alpha was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical application of brassinosteroids accelerates wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and reepithelialization phases of the wound repair process, in part by enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in the wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing.

  12. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  13. Inhibition of Midkine Augments Osteoporotic Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haffner-Luntzer, Melanie; Kemmler, Julia; Heidler, Verena; Prystaz, Katja; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Kovtun, Anna; Rapp, Anna E.; Ignatius, Anita; Liedert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The heparin-binding growth and differentiation factor midkine (Mdk) is proposed to negatively regulate osteoblast activity and bone formation in the adult skeleton. As Mdk-deficient mice were protected from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss, this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We have previously demonstrated that Mdk negatively influences bone regeneration during fracture healing. Here, we investigated whether the inhibition of Mdk using an Mdk-antibody (Mdk-Ab) improves compromised bone healing in osteoporotic OVX-mice. Using a standardized femur osteotomy model, we demonstrated that Mdk serum levels were significantly enhanced after fracture in both non-OVX and OVX-mice, however, the increase was considerably greater in osteoporotic mice. Systemic treatment with the Mdk-Ab significantly improved bone healing in osteoporotic mice by increasing bone formation in the fracture callus. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that the OVX-induced reduction of the osteoanabolic beta-catenin signaling in the bony callus was abolished by Mdk-Ab treatment. Furthermore, the injection of the Mdk-Ab increased trabecular bone mass in the skeleton of the osteoporotic mice. These results implicate that antagonizing Mdk may be useful for the therapy of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture-healing complications. PMID:27410432

  14. The biology of rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, M-A; Lädermann, A; Raniga, S; Schär, M-O

    2017-02-01

    Despite advances in surgical reconstruction of chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears leading to improved clinical outcomes, failure rates of 13-94% have been reported. Reasons for this rather high failure rate include compromised healing at the bone-tendon interface, as well as the musculo-tendinous changes that occur after RC tears, namely retraction and muscle atrophy, as well as fatty infiltration. Significant research efforts have focused on gaining a better understanding of these pathological changes in order to design effective therapeutic solutions. Biological augmentation, including the application of different growth factors, platelet concentrates, cells, scaffolds and various drugs, or a combination of the above have been studied. It is important to note that instead of a physiological enthesis, an abundance of scar tissue is formed. Even though cytokines have demonstrated the potential to improve rotator cuff healing in animal models, there is little information about the correct concentration and timing of the more than 1500 cytokines that interact during the healing process. There is only minimal evidence that platelet concentrates may lead to improvement in radiographic, but not clinical outcome. Using stem cells to biologically augment the reconstruction of the tears might have a great potential since these cells can differentiate into various cell types that are integral for healing. However, further studies are necessary to understand how to enhance the potential of these stem cells in a safe and efficient way. This article intends to give an overview of the biological augmentation options found in the literature.

  15. Healing of patellar fractures in two kittens.

    PubMed

    Hermer, J V; Bush, M A; Whiting, C; Langley-Hobbs, S J

    2012-01-01

    Two kittens aged between four and five months were presented having sustained patellar fractures. In both cases, healing was subsequently documented radiographically; this has not been reported previously in the literature. One kitten had bilateral patellar fractures - the symptomatic right stifle was treated with a pin and tension-band-wire which later failed, at which point partial patellectomy was performed. The fracture of the left patella was minimally displaced and was treated conservatively. A radiograph of the left patella taken eleven months after initial presentation showed complete healing of the fracture. The second case was treated surgically with a circumferential wire; healing of the fracture was demonstrated radiographically at twelve weeks postoperatively. Radiographic images taken five weeks postoperatively had shown some narrowing of the fracture gap. These two cases demonstrate that bony union of patellar fractures can be documented, given a long enough duration of radiographic follow-up; circumferential wire was an effective treatment in a displaced fracture, and conservative treatment resulted in complete healing of a minimally displaced fracture.

  16. Walking with Madhu: Healing Ped/agogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, T. Francene

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, the author responds to Madhu Prakash's piece on friendship gardens and healing our "Mother" through Prakash's central question, "How to birth a world in which many worlds flourish and complement each other in their wild, divine diversity; all equally enjoying Ahimsa flourishing and happiness?" Coming…

  17. Growing Healing One Garden at a Time.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Julann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence exists regarding the effect of horticultural therapy on improving human well-being, including promotion of overall health and quality of life, physical strength, and cardiac function. This article shares how a nurse created a healing garden at Lourdes Hospital, where she works. Resource information about therapeutic gardens is included.

  18. Healing Classrooms: Therapeutic Possibilities in Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batzer, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article asks us to consider what the process of healing and composition pedagogy have to learn from each other. More specifically, it identifies how the therapeutic potential of writing, which has been largely neglected in the academy in recent years, can influence the ways we teach transferable writing skills. The article considers how…

  19. Practices in Wound Healing Studies of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  20. In vivo confocal imaging of epidermal cell migration and dermal changes post nonablative fractional resurfacing: study of the wound healing process with corroborated histopathologic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, Oliver F.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Wyatt, Danica; Lac, Diana; Rahman, Zakia; Chan, Kin F.

    2009-03-01

    In vivo wound healing response post nonablative fractional laser treatment is evaluated. Seven healthy subjects receive treatments with a Fraxel re:store™ laser system on the forearm with pulse energies ranging from 10 to 70 mJ. The treatment sites are imaged at 1-h increments up to 40 h using confocal microscope z-stacks using 10-μm-depth spacing. At least five individual microscopic treatment zones are imaged per subject, time point, and treatment energy. Images are analyzed for tissue structure and morphology to classify each lesion as healed or not healed, depending on epidermal re-epithelialization at each time point and treatment energy. Probit analysis is used to statistically determine the ED50 and ED84 probabilities for a positive dose response (healed lesion) as a function of treatment energy. Confocal observations reveal epidermal keratinocyte migration patterns confirmed with histological analysis using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) staining at 10 mJ at 0, 7, 16, and 24-h post-treatment. Results indicate that more time is required to conclude re-epithelialization with larger lesion sizes (all less than 500 μm) corresponding to higher treatment energies. For the entire pulse energy range tested, epidermal re-epithelialization concludes between 10 to 22-h post-treatment for ED50 and 13 to 28 h for ED84.

  1. Assessment of the effect of phenytoin on cutaneous healing from excision of melanocytic nevi on the face and on the back

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Topical phenytoin is a powerful skin wounds healing and it may be useful in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical phenytoin 0.5%, by comparing it with cream (control) in wounds resulting from excision of two melanocytic nevi in the same patient. Our purpose was also to assess if phenytoin had better therapeutic and cosmetic outcomes when compared with cream (control). Methods This study evaluated 100 patients with skin wounds from excision of melanocytic nevi. 50 patients with lesions on the face and 50 patients with lesions on the back, totalizing 200 lesions excised with modified punch. The resulting superficial skin wounds had the same diameter and depth, and second intention healing followed. Patients were followed for 60 days. Student's t-test, Mann Whitney nonparametric test, analysis of variance, LSD test, Shapiro-Wilks test and Fisher test were used to analyze the results, depending on the nature of the variables being studied. Results Phenytoin showed better therapeutic and cosmetic results, by healing faster, with more intense epithelization in wounds in comparison with cream (control). Phenytoin showed a statistically significant difference regarding the following parameters (p < 0.05): wounded area and healing time. Phenytoin application resulted in a smaller area and a shorter healing time. Also the intensity of exudates, bleeding, and the epithelization were more intense in phenytoin-treated wounds. Regarding the shape and thickness of the scar, injuries treated with phenytoin had round and flat shaped scars in most of the cases. Considering patient's gender and phototype, female patients presented smaller wounds and scar areas; and phototype I had the largest scar areas. Contact eczema was an adverse reaction in 7 injuries located on the back caused by cream (control) and hypoallergenic tape. Conclusions Phenytoin showed better therapeutic and cosmetic results compared with cream (control

  2. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    DAMD17-98-1-8519 TITLE: Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing 5b. GRANT NUMBER...To determine the effect of capacitively coupled electric field stimulation on tibial stress fracture healing in men and women. Methods: A

  3. Cold temperature delays wound healing in postharvest sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots s...

  4. Understanding the role of immune regulation in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Park, Julie E; Barbul, Adrian

    2004-05-01

    The immune system plays an integral role in successful wound healing. In addition to contributing to host defenses and inflammation, immune cells are critical regulators of wound healing through the secretion of cytokines, lymphokines, and growth factors. We review the mechanisms by which the immune system regulates wound healing.

  5. An Assessment of Self-Healing Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Several reviews and books have been written concerning self-healing polymers over the last few years. These have focused primarily on the types of self-healing materials being studied, with minor emphasis given to composite properties. The purpose of this review is to assess the self-healing ability of these materials when utilized in fiber reinforced composites

  6. Nodular lesions and mesangiolysis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Yoshio; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure all over the world. Advanced human diabetic nephropathy is characterized by the presence of specific lesions including nodular lesions, doughnut lesions, and exudative lesions. Thus far, animal models precisely mimicking advanced human diabetic nephropathy, especially nodular lesions, remain to be fully established. Animal models with spontaneous diabetic kidney diseases or with inducible kidney lesions may be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Based on pathological features, we previously reported that diabetic glomerular nodular-like lesions were formed during the reconstruction process of mesangiolysis. Recently, we established nodular-like lesions resembling those seen in advanced human diabetic nephropathy through vascular endothelial injury and mesangiolysis by administration of monocrotaline. Here, in this review, we discuss diabetic nodular lesions and its animal models resembling human diabetic kidney lesions, with our hypothesis that endothelial cell injury and mesangiolysis might be required for nodular lesions.

  7. Partial pulpotomy in young permanent teeth with deep carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Mejàre, I; Cvek, M

    1993-12-01

    The material comprised 37 young posterior teeth with deep carious lesions and exposed pulps, treated with partial pulpotomy and dressed with calcium hydroxide. The teeth were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 31 teeth with no clinical or radiographic symptoms before treatment, Group 2 of 6 teeth with temporary pain, widened periodontal space periapically and/or productive osteitis, i.e. increased density of the surrounding alveolar bone. After an observation time of 24 to 140 months (mean = 56 months), healing had occurred in 29 of 31 teeth in Group 1 (93.5%) and in 4 of 6 teeth in Group 2. It was concluded that the present, as well as previously reported results indicate that partial pulpotomy may be an adequate treatment for young permanent molars with a carious exposure, although more studies are needed before the treatment can be recommended for routine clinical use.

  8. Fracture healing physiology and the quest for therapies for delayed healing and nonunion.

    PubMed

    Kostenuik, Paul; Mirza, Faisal M

    2017-02-01

    Delayed healing and nonunion of fractures represent enormous burdens to patients and healthcare systems. There are currently no approved pharmacological agents for the treatment of established nonunions, or for the acceleration of fracture healing, and no pharmacological agents are approved for promoting the healing of closed fractures. Yet several pharmacologic agents have the potential to enhance some aspects of fracture healing. In preclinical studies, various agents working across a broad spectrum of molecular pathways can produce larger, denser and stronger fracture calluses. However, untreated control animals in most of these studies also demonstrate robust structural and biomechanical healing, leaving unclear how these interventions might alter the healing of recalcitrant fractures in humans. This review describes the physiology of fracture healing, with a focus on aspects of natural repair that may be pharmacologically augmented to prevent or treat delayed or nonunion fractures (collectively referred to as DNFs). The agents covered in this review include recombinant BMPs, PTH/PTHrP receptor agonists, activators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and recombinant FGF-2. Agents from these therapeutic classes have undergone extensive preclinical testing and progressed to clinical fracture healing trials. Each can promote bone formation, which is important for the stability of bridged calluses, and some but not all can also promote cartilage formation, which may be critical for the initial bridging and subsequent stabilization of fractures. Appropriately timed stimulation of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in the fracture callus may be a more effective approach for preventing or treating DNFs compared with stimulation of osteogenesis alone. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:213-223, 2017.

  9. How prayer heals: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Levin, J S

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical model that outlines various possible explanations for the healing effects of prayer. Four classes of mechanisms are defined on the basis of whether healing has naturalistic or supernatural origins and whether it operates locally or nonlocally. Through this framework, most of the currently proposed hypotheses for understanding absent healing and other related phenomena-hypotheses that invoke such concepts as subtle energy, psi, consciousness, morphic fields, and extended mind-are shown to be no less naturalistic than the Newtonian, mechanistic forces of allopathic biomedicine so often derided for their materialism. In proposing that prayer may heal through nonlocal means according to mechanisms and theories proposed by the new physics, Dossey is almost alone among medical scholars in suggesting the possible limitations and inadequacies of hypotheses based on energies, forces, and fields. Yet even such nonlocal effects can be conceived of as naturalistic; that is, they are explained by physical laws that may be unbelievable or unfamiliar to most physicians but that are nonetheless becoming recognized as operant laws of the natural universe. The concept of the supernatural, however, is something altogether different, and is, by definition, outside of or beyond nature. Herein may reside an either wholly or partly transcendent Creator-God who is believed by many to heal through means that transcend the laws of the created universe, both its local and nonlocal elements, and that are thus inherently inaccessible to and unknowable by science. Such an explanation for the effects of prayer merits consideration and, despite its unprovability by medical science, should not be dismissed out of hand.

  10. Enhancing resilience of interdependent networks by healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stippinger, Marcell; Kertész, János

    2014-12-01

    Interdependent networks are characterized by two kinds of interactions: The usual connectivity links within each network and the dependency links coupling nodes of different networks. Due to the latter links such networks are known to suffer from cascading failures and catastrophic breakdowns. When modeling these phenomena, usually one assumes that a fraction of nodes gets damaged in one of the networks, which is followed possibly by a cascade of failures. In real life the initiating failures do not occur at once and effort is made to replace the ties eliminated due to the failing nodes. Here we study a dynamic extension of the model of interdependent networks and introduce the possibility of link formation with a probability w, called healing, to bridge non-functioning nodes and enhance network resilience. A single random node is removed, which may initiate an avalanche. After each removal step healing starts resulting in a new topology. Then a new node fails and the process continues until the giant component disappears either in a catastrophic breakdown or in a smooth transition. Simulation results are presented for square lattices as starting networks under random attacks of constant intensity. We find that the shift in the position of the breakdown has a power-law scaling as a function of the healing probability with an exponent close to 1. Below a critical healing probability, catastrophic cascades form and the average degree of surviving nodes decreases monotonically, while above this value there are no macroscopic cascades and the average degree has first an increasing character and decreases only at the very late stage of the process. These findings facilitate to plan intervention in case of crisis situation by describing the efficiency of healing efforts needed to suppress cascading failures.

  11. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE) approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally. PMID:20492676

  12. Salmonella osteomyelitis: A rare differential diagnosis in osteolytic lesions around the knee.

    PubMed

    Salem, Khaled Hamed

    2014-02-01

    Salmonella osteomyelitis in immunocompetent adults is uncommon. It usually has a diaphyseal location or present as spondylitis. Metaphyseal affection is extremely rare. A 51-year-old male presented with refractory knee pain. Plain X-rays showed a rounded osteolytic lesion in the proximal tibia without marginal sclerosis. A minimal C-reactive protein elevation and a normal leucocytic count were present. Further imaging raised suspicion of malignancy so that a biopsy was done. After fenestering the lesion, 15-ml turbid fluid was evacuated. Microbiological examination showed Salmonella enteritidis. Repeated debridements were done and antibiotic therapy with ciprofloxacin was initiated. The cavity was then filled with synthetic bone graft leading to progressive healing. Although rare, Salmonella bone infection usually lacks the typical periosteal reaction and the laboratory evidence of infection of pyogenic osteomyelitis. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of osteolytic neoplastic lesions.

  13. A continuum thermo-inelastic model for damage and healing in self-healing glass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-07-08

    Self-healing glass, a recent advancement in the class of smart sealing materials, has attracted great attention from both research and industrial communities because of its unique capability of repairing itself at elevated temperatures. However, further development and optimization of this material rely on a more fundamental and thorough understanding of its essential thermo-mechanical response characteristics, which is also pivotal in predicting the coupling and interactions between the nonlinear stress and temperature dependent damage and healing behaviors. In the current study, a continuum three-dimensional thermo-inelastic damage-healing constitutive framework has been developed for the compliant self-healing glass material. The important feature of the present model is that various phenomena governing the mechanical degradation and recovery process, i.e. the nucleation, growth, and healing of the cracks and pores, are described with distinct mechanism-driven kinetics, where the healing constitutive relations are propagated from lower-length scale simulations. The proposed formulations are implemented into finite element analyses and the effects of various loading conditions and material properties on the material’s mechanical resistance are investigated.

  14. Enhancement of wound healing by shikonin analogue 93/637 in normal and impaired healing.

    PubMed

    Mani, H; Sidhu, G S; Singh, A K; Gaddipati, J; Banaudha, K K; Raj, K; Maheshwari, R K

    2004-01-01

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process, which involves interactions of multiple cell types, various growth factors, their mediators and the extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, we evaluated the effects of shikonin analogue 93/637 (SA), derived from the plant Arnebia nobilis, on normal and hydrocortisone-induced impaired healing in full thickness cutaneous punch wounds in rats. SA (0.1%) was applied topically daily as an ointment in polyethylene glycol base on wounds. SA treatment significantly accelerated healing of wounds, as measured by wound contraction compared to controls in hydrocortisone-impaired animals. SA treatment promoted formation of granulation tissue including cell migration and neovascularization, collagenization and reepithelialization. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was higher as revealed by immunohistochemistry in treated wounds compared to controls. However, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1) was not affected by SA treatment. Since bFGF is known to accelerate wound healing, the increased expression of bFGF by SA may be partly responsible for the enhancement of wound healing. These studies suggest that SA could be further studied for clinical use to enhance wound healing.

  15. Effects of mouse genotype on bone wound healing and irradiation-induced delay of healing.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Julie; Mizuno, Shuichi; Kung, Jason; Goff, Julie; Epperly, Michael; Dixon, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effects of mouse genotype (C57BL/6NHsd, NOD/SCID, SAMR1, and SAMP6) and ionizing irradiation on bone wound healing. Unicortical wounds were made in the proximal tibiae, and the time course of spontaneous healing and effects of irradiation were monitored radiographically and histologically. There was reproducible healing beginning with intramedullary osteogenesis, subsequent bone resorption by osteoclasts, gradual bridging of the cortical wound, and re-population of medullary hematopoietic cells. The most rapid wound closure was noted in SAMR1 mice, followed by SAMP6, C57BL/6NHsd, and NOD/SCID. Ionizing irradiation (20 Gy) to the leg significantly delayed bone wound healing in mice of all four genotypes. Mice with genetically-determined predisposition to early osteopenia (SAMP6) or with immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) had impairments in bone wound healing. These mouse models should be valuable for determining the effects of irradiation on bone healing and also for the design and testing of novel bone growth-enhancing drugs and mitigators of ionizing irradiation.

  16. Spirit-body healing II: a nursing intervention model for spiritual/creative healing.

    PubMed

    Lane, Mary Rockwood

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an advanced intervention for spiritual healing that evolved from spirit-body healing, a hermeneutic phenomenological research study. The research study examined the lived experience of art and healing with cancer patients in the Arts in Medicine program at Shands Hospital, University of Florida. Max Van Manen's method of researching the lived experience was used in 63 patients over a 4-year period. Healing themes that emerged from the research were (1) go into darkness, (2) go elsewhere, (3) art becomes the turning point, (4) slip through the veil, (5) know the truth and trust the process, (6) embody your spirit, (7) feel the healing energy of love and compassion, and (8) experience transcendence. The intervention we offer allows nurses to apply creativity and guided imagery as advanced therapeutics and to continue to provide the leadership needed for integrating spiritual healing into patient care. It is one that personifies the nursing mission formalized by many hospitals: a commitment to treat the bodies, minds, and spirits of patients to the best of our ability as part of our routine care.

  17. Desmoglein 3-Dependent Signaling Regulates Keratinocyte Migration and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Rötzer, Vera; Hartlieb, Eva; Winkler, Julia; Walter, Elias; Schlipp, Angela; Sardy, Miklós; Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The desmosomal transmembrane adhesion molecules desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and desmocollin 3 (Dsc3) are required for strong keratinocyte cohesion. Recently, we have shown that Dsg3 associates with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and suppresses its activity. Here, we further investigated the role of Dsg3-dependent control of p38MAPK function. Dsg3-deficient mice display recurrent spontaneously healing skin erosions. In lesional and perilesional biopsies, p38MAPK activation was detectable compared with control animals. This led us to speculate that Dsg3 regulates wound repair in a p38MAPK-dependent manner. Indeed, scratch-wounded keratinocyte monolayers exhibited p38MAPK activation and loss of Dsg3 in cells lining the wound edge. Human keratinocytes after silencing of Dsg3 as well as primary cells isolated from Dsg3 knockout animals exhibited accelerated migration, which was further corroborated in an ex vivo skin outgrowth assay. Importantly, migration was efficiently blocked by inhibition of p38MAPK, indicating that p38MAPK mediates the effects observed upon loss of Dsg3. In line with this, we show that levels of active p38MAPK associated with Dsc3 are increased in Dsg3-deficient cells. These data indicate that Dsg3 controls a switch from an adhesive to a migratory keratinocyte phenotype via p38MAPK inhibition. Thus, loss of Dsg3 adhesion may foster wound closure by allowing p38MAPK-dependent migration.

  18. [Autoinflammatory diseases as cause of wound healing defects].

    PubMed

    Löhrer, R; Eming, R; Wolfrum, N; Krieg, T; Eming, S A

    2011-07-01

    Ulcerations of the skin and mucosal membranes are a common feature of autoinflammatory diseases. They can give raise to chronic wound healing defects and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic skin ulcers. The increased activation of the innate immune system in the absence of an apparent provocation for inflammation is a hallmark of autoinflammatory diseases. Mutations and alterations of signaling pathways regulating the innate immune response to physical trauma/tissue damage result into an unrestrained activation of the inflammasome, which leads to increased activation of Interleukin-1. Uncontrolled recruitment and activation of myeloid effector cells within the wound site lead to the release of potent proteases that cause the degradation of structural components of the skin. The majority of these diseases respond well to immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory treatment regimes. Therapeutic resistance converts the acute inflammatory response into a chronic and non-resolving inflammatory process that leads to tissue degeneration. In this article we will focus on the review of those autoinflammatory diseases that often display ulcerative cutaneous and aphthous lesions including pyoderma gangrenosum, Behçet disease, PAPA syndrome and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS). Furthermore, the article will be complemented by an overview of those inflammatory diseases that are associated with non-ulcerative cutaneous manifestations.

  19. Plasticity of Myeloid Cells during Oral Barrier Wound Healing and the Development of Bisphosphonate-related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujie; Kaur, Kawaljit; Kanayama, Keiichi; Morinaga, Kenzo; Park, Sil; Hokugo, Akishige; Kozlowska, Anna; McBride, William H; Li, Jun; Jewett, Anahid; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2016-09-23

    Injury to the barrier tissue initiates a rapid distribution of myeloid immune cells from bone marrow, which guide sound wound healing. Bisphosphonates, a widely used anti-bone resorptive drug with minimal systemic side effects, have been linked to an abnormal wound healing in the oral barrier tissue leading to, in some cases, osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Here we report that the development of ONJ may involve abnormal phenotypic plasticity of Ly6G+/Gr1+ myeloid cells in the oral barrier tissue undergoing tooth extraction wound healing. A bolus intravenous zoledronate (ZOL) injection to female C57Bl/6 mice followed by maxillary first molar extraction resulted in the development of ONJ-like lesion during the second week of wound healing. The multiplex assay of dissociated oral barrier cells exhibited the secretion of cytokines and chemokines, which was significantly modulated in ZOL mice. Tooth extraction-induced distribution of Ly6G+/Gr1+ cells in the oral barrier tissue increased in ZOL mice at week 2. ONJ-like lesion in ZOL mice contained Ly6G+/Gr1+ cells with abnormal size and morphology as well as different flow cytometric staining intensity. When anti-Ly6G (Gr1) antibody was intraperitoneally injected for 5 days during the second week of tooth extraction, CD11b+GR1(hi) cells in bone marrow and Ly6G+ cells in the oral barrier tissue were depleted, and the development of ONJ-like lesion was significantly attenuated. This study suggests that local modulation of myeloid cell plasticity in the oral barrier tissue may provide the basis for pathogenesis and thus therapeutic as well as preventive strategy of ONJ.

  20. Craniovertebral junction lesions: our experience with the transoral surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Mouchaty, Homère; Perrini, Paolo; Conti, Renato; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review our experience with the transoral surgical management of anterior craniovertebral junction (CVJ) lesions with particular attention to the decision making and to the indication for a consecutive stabilization. During 10 years (1998-2007), 52 consecutive patients presenting exclusively fixed anterior compression at the cervicomedullary junction underwent transoral surgery. Mean age was 55.85 years (range 17-75 years). Encountered lesions were: malformation (32 cases), rheumatoid arthritis (11 cases), tumor (5 cases) or trauma (4 cases). A total of 79% of patients presented with chronic/recurrent headache (cranial and/or high-cervical pain), 73% with varying degrees of quadrip aresis, and 29% with lower cranial nerve deficits. All of the patients but two, with posterior stabilization performed elsewhere, underwent synchronous anterior decompression and posterior occipitocervical fixation. Adjuncts to the transoral approach (Le Fort I with or without splitting of the palate), tailored to the local anatomy and to the extension of the lesions, were performed in seven cases. Follow-up ranged between 4 and 96 months. Of 35 patients with severe preoperative neurological deficits, 33 improved. The remaining 15 patients who presented with mild symptoms, healed throughout the follow-up. Perioperative mortality occurred in two cases and surgical morbidity in eight cases (dural laceration, cerebrospinal fluid leak with meningitis, malocclusion, oral wound dehiscence and occipital wound infection). Delayed instability occurred in one patient because of cranial settling of C2 vertebral body. A successful surgery achieving a stable decompression at the CVJ is an expertise demanding procedure. It requires accurate preoperative evaluation and, appropriate choice of decompression technique and stabilization instruments. Enlarged transoral approaches (despite higher morbidity) are a supportive means in cases of severe basilar invagination, cranial

  1. Immunopathogenesis of non-healing American cutaneous leishmaniasis and progressive visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Lynn; Henard, Calvin A.; Melby, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of Leishmania infection are determined by host immune and nutrition status, parasite species, and co-infection with other pathogens. While subclinical infection and self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) are common, uncontrolled parasite replication can lead to non-healing local lesions or visceral leishmaniasis (VL). It is known that infection control requires Th1-differentiation cytokines (IL-12, IL-18, and IL-27) and Th1 cell and macrophage activation. However, there is no generalized consensus for the mechanisms of host susceptibility. The recent studies on regulatory T cells and IL-17-producing cells help explain the effector T cell responses that occur independently of the known Th1/Th2 cell signaling pathways. This review focuses on the immunopathogenesis of non-healing American CL and progressive VL. We summarize recent evidence from human and animal studies that reveals the mechanisms of dysregulated, hyper-responses to Leishmania braziliensis, as well as the presence of disease-promoting or the absence of protective responses to Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania donovani. We highlight immune-mediated parasite growth and immunopathogenesis, with an emphasis on the putative roles of IL-17 and its related cytokines as well as arginase. A better understanding of the quality and regulation of innate immunity and T cell responses triggered by Leishmania will aid in the rational control of pathology and the infection. PMID:23053396

  2. Brazilian red propolis improves cutaneous wound healing suppressing inflammation-associated transcription factor NFκB.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Flavia Regina Sobreira; Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Moura-Nunes, Nathalia; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Daleprane, Julio Beltrame

    2017-02-01

    The use of natural products in wound healing has been extensively studied in the context of complementary and alternative medicine. Propolis, a natural product, is a polyphenol-rich resin used for this purpose. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Brazilian Red Propolis Extract (BRPE) on inflammation and wound healing in mice, using a tissue repair model. The BRPE polyphenol content was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). A full-thickness excision lesion was created, and mice were treated orally with daily doses of vehicle solution (water-alcohol solution containing 2% of ethanol, control group) or 100mg/kg of BRPE (P100 group) during nine consecutive days. BRPE chemical composition analysis showed that this complex matrix contains several phenolic compounds such as phenolic acids, phenolic terpenes and flavonoids (especially catechins, flavonols, chalcones, isoflavones, isoflavans, pterocarpans and bioflavonoids). After BRPE administration, it was observed that, when compared to the control group, P100 group presented faster wound closure (p<0.001); less neutrophils per mm(2) (p<0.05) and macrophages (p<0.01) in tissue analyses, down regulation of the inflammatory transcription factor pNF-κB protein expression, and reduced production of inflammatory cytokine, such as TGF-β, TNF-α (p<0.0001), and IL-6 (p<0.001). These findings suggest a positive role of BRPE oral administration in the wound healing process via suppressing the inflammatory response during tissue repair.

  3. Effect of helium-neon and infrared laser irradiation on wound healing in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, B.; McCarthy, R.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Forde, D.E.; Overfield, M.; Bapna, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the biostimulating effects of helium-neon laser radiation (HeNe; 632.8 nm), pulsed infrared laser radiation (IR; 904 nm), and the two combined on skin wound healing in New Zealand white rabbits. Seventy-two rabbits received either (1) no exposure, (2) 1.65 J/cm2 HeNe, (3) 8.25 J/cm2 pulsed IR, or (4) both HeNe and IR together to one of two dorsal full-thickness skin wounds, daily, for 21 days. Wound areas were measured photographically at periodic intervals. Tissue samples were analyzed for tensile strength, and histology was done to measure epidermal thickness and cross-sectional collagen area. Significant differences were found in the tensile strength of all laser-treated groups (both the irradiated and nonirradiated lesion) compared to group 1. No differences were found in the rate of wound healing or collagen area. Epidermal growth was greater in the HeNe-lased area compared to unexposed tissue, but the difference was not significant. Thus, laser irradiation at 632.8 nm and 904 nm alone or in combination increased tensile strength during wound healing and may have released tissue factors into the systemic circulation that increased tensile strength on the opposite side as well.

  4. Low temperatures reduce skin healing in the Jacaré do Pantanal (Caiman yacare, Daudin 1802)

    PubMed Central

    Pressinotti, Leandro Nogueira; Borges, Ricardo Moraes; Alves De Lima, Angela Paula; Aleixo, Victor Manuel; Iunes, Renata Stecca; Borges, João Carlos Shimada; Cogliati, Bruno; Cunha Da Silva, José Roberto Machado

    2013-01-01

    Summary Studies of skin wound healing in crocodilians are necessary given the frequent occurrence of cannibalism in intensive farming systems. Air temperature affects tissue recovery because crocodilians are ectothermic. Therefore, the kinetics of skin wound healing in Caiman yacare were examined at temperatures of 33°C and 23°C. Sixteen caiman were selected and divided into two groups of eight maintained at 23°C or 33°C. The studied individuals' scars were photographed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of the experimental conditions, and samples were collected for histological processing after 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Macroscopically, the blood clot (heterophilic granuloma) noticeably remained in place covering the wound longer for the caiman kept at 23°C. Microscopically, the temperature of 23°C slowed epidermal migration and skin repair. Comparatively, new blood vessels, labeled using von Willebrand factor (vWF) antibody staining, were more frequently found in the scars of the 33°C group. The collagen fibers in the dermis were denser in the 33°C treatment. Considering the delayed healing at 23°C, producers are recommended to keep wounded animals at 33°C, especially when tanks are cold, to enable rapid wound closure and better repair of collagen fibers because such lesions tend to compromise the use of their skin as leather. PMID:24244853

  5. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables: a novel regulator of cutaneous wound healing, modelling and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel; Moshiri, Ali; Tabandeh, Mohammad R

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effects of avocado/soybean unsaponifiables (ASU) on the healing response of cutaneous wound defect in rats. Sixty male rats were randomly divided into three groups including control, vehicle and treatment (n = 20 in each group). A 2 × 2 cm(2) wound defect was made on the dorsum. The control, vehicle and treatment groups were treated daily with topical application of saline, cream and cream/ASU for 10 days, respectively. The wounds were monitored daily. The animals were euthanised at 10, 20 and 30 days post injury (D). The dry matter, hydroxyproline, collagen, n-acetyl glucosamine (NAGLA) and n-acetyl galactosamine (NAGAA) contents of the skin samples were measured and the histopathological and biomechanical characteristics of the samples were investigated. Statistics of P < 0·05 was considered significant. Treatment significantly increased tissue glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents at various stages of wound healing compared to controls. Treatment modulated inflammation, improved fibroplasia and produced high amounts of scar tissue at short term. At long term, treatment reduced the scar tissue size and increased the quality and rate of wound contraction and reepithelisation compared to controls. The treated lesions were more cosmetically pleasing and had significantly higher biomechanical characteristics than controls. ASU was effective in rat wound healing.

  6. Noninvasive differential diagnosis of dental periapical lesions in cone-beam CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazunori; Rysavy, Steven; Flores, Arturo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This paper proposes a novel application of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to an everyday clinical dental challenge: the noninvasive differential diagnosis of periapical lesions between periapical cysts and granulomas. A histological biopsy is the most reliable method currently available for this differential diagnosis; however, this invasive procedure prevents the lesions from healing noninvasively despite a report that they may heal without surgical treatment. A CAD using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool which helps to avoid potentially unnecessary surgery and to investigate the unknown healing process and rate for the lesions. Methods: The proposed semiautomatic solution combines graph-based random walks segmentation with machine learning-based boosted classifiers and offers a robust clinical tool with minimal user interaction. As part of this CAD framework, the authors provide two novel technical contributions: (1) probabilistic extension of the random walks segmentation with likelihood ratio test and (2) LDA-AdaBoost: a new integration of weighted linear discriminant analysis to AdaBoost. Results: A dataset of 28 CBCT scans is used to validate the approach and compare it with other popular segmentation and classification methods. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed method with 94.1% correct classification rate and an improvement of the performance by comparison with the Simon’s state-of-the-art method by 17.6%. The authors also compare classification performances with two independent ground-truth sets from the histopathology and CBCT diagnoses provided by endodontic experts. Conclusions: Experimental results of the authors show that the proposed CAD system behaves in clearer agreement with the CBCT ground-truth than with histopathology, supporting the Simon’s conjecture that CBCT diagnosis can be as accurate as histopathology for differentiating the periapical lesions.

  7. [Bone lesion in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ise, Mikiko; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2007-12-01

    Bone destruction is a hallmark of multiple myeloma(MM). Almost all MM patients develop osteolytic bone lesions that can cause pathologic fractures and severe bone pain. Osteolytic lesions result from increased bone resorption due to osteoclast stimulation and decreased bone formation due to osteoblast inhibition. Plain radiography, CT, and MRI are established imaging techniques in MM. FDG-PET imaging is promising newer scanning technique under current evaluation. The aggressive features of MM bone lesions have significantly contributed to poor prognosis. Therefore, a systemic approach to analgesia, which includes radiotherapy and orthopedic intervention, must be applied as a part of the comprehensive care plan of MM patient. Bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce vertebral fractures and bone pain.

  8. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  9. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model.

    PubMed

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Significance: Molecular biology techniques are being used to aid in determining the mechanisms responsible for tissue repair without scar formation. Wound healing is genetically determined, but there have been few studies that examine the genes responsible for tissue regeneration in mammals. Research using genetic mapping is extremely important for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the different phases of tissue regeneration. This process is complex, but an early inflammatory phase appears to influence lesion closure, and the present study demonstrates that acute inflammation loci influence tissue regeneration in mice in a positive manner. Recent Advances: Mapping studies of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been undertaken in recent years to examine candidate genes that participate in the regeneration phenotype. Our laboratory has identified inflammation modifier QTL for wound healing. Mouse lines selected for the maximum (AIRmax) or minimum (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) have been used to study not only the tissue repair but also the impact of the genetic control of inflammation on susceptibility to autoimmune, neoplasic, and infectious diseases. Murphy Roths Large and AIRmax mice are exclusive in their complete epimorphic regeneration, although middle-aged inbred mice may also be capable of healing. Critical Issues: Inflammatory reactions have traditionally been described in the literature as negative factors in the process of skin injury closure. Inflammation is exacerbated due to the early release of mediators or the intense release of factors that cause cell proliferation after injury. The initial release of these factors as well as the clean-up of the lesion microenvironment are both crucial for following events. In addition, the activation and repression of some genes related to the regeneration phenotype may modulate lesion closure, demonstrating the significance of genetic studies to better understand the mechanisms

  10. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model

    PubMed Central

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Molecular biology techniques are being used to aid in determining the mechanisms responsible for tissue repair without scar formation. Wound healing is genetically determined, but there have been few studies that examine the genes responsible for tissue regeneration in mammals. Research using genetic mapping is extremely important for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the different phases of tissue regeneration. This process is complex, but an early inflammatory phase appears to influence lesion closure, and the present study demonstrates that acute inflammation loci influence tissue regeneration in mice in a positive manner. Recent Advances: Mapping studies of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been undertaken in recent years to examine candidate genes that participate in the regeneration phenotype. Our laboratory has identified inflammation modifier QTL for wound healing. Mouse lines selected for the maximum (AIRmax) or minimum (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) have been used to study not only the tissue repair but also the impact of the genetic control of inflammation on susceptibility to autoimmune, neoplasic, and infectious diseases. Murphy Roths Large and AIRmax mice are exclusive in their complete epimorphic regeneration, although middle-aged inbred mice may also be capable of healing. Critical Issues: Inflammatory reactions have traditionally been described in the literature as negative factors in the process of skin injury closure. Inflammation is exacerbated due to the early release of mediators or the intense release of factors that cause cell proliferation after injury. The initial release of these factors as well as the clean-up of the lesion microenvironment are both crucial for following events. In addition, the activation and repression of some genes related to the regeneration phenotype may modulate lesion closure, demonstrating the significance of genetic studies to better understand the mechanisms

  11. Differences in cutaneous wound healing between dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Mark W; Henderson, Ralph A

    2006-07-01

    Regardless of the species involved, wound healing follows a predictable course of overlapping phases. In spite of these commonalities, significant species differences in cutaneous wound healing have been uncovered in the Equidae and, more recently, between the dog and cat. It has also recently been shown that the subcutaneous tissues play an important supporting role in cutaneous wound healing, which may help to ex-plain healing differences between cats and dogs. These discoveries may improve veterinarians' understanding of problem wound healing in the cat and, hopefully, lead to better strategies for wound management in this sometimes troublesome species.

  12. Wound healing: a new approach to the topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ferdi; Ermertcan, Aylin Türel

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex and well-coordinated interaction between inflammatory cells and mediators, establishing significant overlap between the phases of wound healing. Wound healing is divided into three major phases: inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Unlike the acute wound, the nonhealing wound is arrested in one of the phases of healing, typically the inflammatory phase. A systematic approach to the management of the chronic nonhealing wound emphasizes three important elements of wound bed preparation in chronic wounds: debridement, moisture, and countering bacterial colonization and infection. In this article, wound-healing process and new approaches to the topical wound care have been reviewed.

  13. Renal lesions of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, K M; Newman, S J; White, L A; Rohrbach, B W; Ramsay, E C

    2011-05-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the occurrence of renal lesions in a variety of nondomestic felids, necropsy cases from 1978 to 2008 were reviewed from a municipal zoo and a large cat sanctuary for those in which the kidneys were examined histologically. Seventy exotic felids were identified (25 tigers, 18 lions, 6 cougars, 5 leopards, 3 snow leopards, 3 clouded leopards, 3 Canadian lynx, 2 ocelots, 2 bobcats, 2 cheetahs, 1 jaguar), and their histologic renal lesions were evaluated and compared. The most common lesion was tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN); 36 of 70 (51%) cats were affected to some degree. Lymphocytic interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion in the tigers (9 of 25, 36%) and was rarely seen in other species. Although the renal pelvis was not available for all cats, 28 of 47 (60%) had some degree of lymphocytic pyelitis. There was no significant association between the presence of pyelitis and that of TIN. Only 1 cat had pyelonephritis. Renal papillary necrosis was present in 13 of 70 (19%) cats and was significantly associated with historical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment (odds ratio, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 26.8). Only 1 cat (lion) had amyloid accumulation, and it was restricted to the corticomedullary junction. Primary glomerular lesions were absent in all cats. Intraepithelial pigment was identified in many of the cats but was not correlated with severity of TIN. Despite several previous reports describing primary glomerular disease or renal amyloidosis in exotic felids, these lesions were rare to absent in this population.

  14. Can Small Lesions Induce Language Reorganization as Large Lesions Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestu, Fernando; Saldana, Cristobal; Amo, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hidalgo, Mercedes; Fernandez, Alberto; Fernandez, Santiago; Mata, Pedro; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Ortiz, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Shift of the cortical mechanisms of language from the usually dominant left to the non-dominant right hemisphere has been demonstrated in the presence of large brain lesions. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in a patient with a cavernoma over the anterolateral superior temporal gyrus associated with epilepsy. Language mapping was performed by…

  15. Secondary Bacterial Infections of Buruli Ulcer Lesions Before and After Chemotherapy with Streptomycin and Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Kpeli, Grace S.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Asan-Ampah, Kobina; Quenin-Fosu, Kwabena; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Paintsil, Albert; Lamptey, Isaac; Anku, Benjamin; Kwakye-Maclean, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a chronic necrotizing skin disease. It usually starts with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque containing large clusters of extracellular acid-fast bacilli. Surrounding tissue is destroyed by the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone produced by microcolonies of M. ulcerans. Skin covering the destroyed subcutaneous fat and soft tissue may eventually break down leading to the formation of large ulcers that progress, if untreated, over months and years. Here we have analyzed the bacterial flora of BU lesions of three different groups of patients before, during and after daily treatment with streptomycin and rifampicin for eight weeks (SR8) and determined drug resistance of the bacteria isolated from the lesions. Before SR8 treatment, more than 60% of the examined BU lesions were infected with other bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most prominent ones. During treatment, 65% of all lesions were still infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa. After completion of SR8 treatment, still more than 75% of lesions clinically suspected to be infected were microbiologically confirmed as infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa or Proteus miriabilis. Drug susceptibility tests revealed especially for S. aureus a high frequency of resistance to the first line drugs used in Ghana. Our results show that secondary infection of BU lesions is common. This could lead to delayed healing and should therefore be further investigated. PMID:23658847

  16. Arsenic exposure, dietary patterns, and skin lesion risk in bangladesh: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rathouz, Paul J; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-02-01

    Dietary factors are believed to modulate arsenic toxicity, potentially influencing risk of arsenical skin lesions. The authors evaluated associations among dietary patterns, arsenic exposure, and skin lesion risk using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh (2000-2009). They identified dietary patterns and estimated dietary pattern scores using factor analysis. Scores were tested for association with incident skin lesion risk and interaction with water arsenic exposure by using ∼6 years of follow-up data (814 events among 9,677 individuals) and discrete time hazards models (adjusting for key covariates). The authors identified 3 clear dietary patterns: the "gourd and root," "vegetable," and "animal protein" patterns. The gourd and root pattern score was inversely associated with skin lesion risk (P(trend) = 0.001), with hazard ratios of 0.86, 0.73, and 0.69 for the second, third, and fourth highest quartiles. Furthermore, the association between water arsenic and skin lesion incidence was stronger among participants with low gourd and root scores (multiplicative P(interaction) < 0.001; additive P(interaction) = 0.05). The vegetable pattern and animal protein pattern showed similar but weaker associations and interactions. Eating a diet rich in gourds and root vegetables and increasing dietary diversity may reduce arsenical skin lesion risk in Bangladesh.

  17. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  18. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  19. A comprehensive review of advanced biopolymeric wound healing systems.

    PubMed

    Mayet, Naeema; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that involves the mediation of many initiators effective during the healing process such as cytokines, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, the defence mechanism of the body undergoes a step-by-step but continuous process known as the wound healing cascade to ensure optimal healing. Thus, when designing a wound healing system or dressing, it is pivotal that key factors such as optimal gaseous exchange, a moist wound environment, prevention of microbial activity and absorption of exudates are considered. A variety of wound dressings are available, however, not all meet the specific requirements of an ideal wound healing system to consider every aspect within the wound healing cascade. Recent research has focussed on the development of smart polymeric materials. Combining biopolymers that are crucial for wound healing may provide opportunities to synthesise matrices that are inductive to cells and that stimulate and trigger target cell responses crucial to the wound healing process. This review therefore outlines the processes involved in skin regeneration, optimal management and care required for wound treatment. It also assimilates, explores and discusses wound healing drug-delivery systems and nanotechnologies utilised for enhanced wound healing applications.

  20. Advanced Materials for Use in Soft Self-Healing Devices.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tan-Phat; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2017-02-23

    Devices integrated with self-healing ability can benefit from long-term use as well as enhanced reliability, maintenance and durability. This progress report reviews the developments in the field of self-healing polymers/composites and wearable devices thereof. One part of the progress report presents and discusses several aspects of the self-healing materials chemistry (from non-covalent to reversible covalent-based mechanisms), as well as the required main approaches used for functionalizing the composites to enhance their electrical conductivity, magnetic, dielectric, electroactive and/or photoactive properties. The second and complementary part of the progress report links the self-healing materials with partially or fully self-healing device technologies, including wearable sensors, supercapacitors, solar cells and fabrics. Some of the strong and weak points in the development of each self-healing device are clearly highlighted and criticized, respectively. Several ideas regarding further improvement of soft self-healing devices are proposed.

  1. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing.

  2. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed Central

    Folha, Roberta A. C.; Pinfildi, Carlos E.; Liebano, Richard E.; Rampazo, Érika P.; Pereira, Raphael N.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:26647744

  3. Polydimethylsiloxane-based self-healing composite and coating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Hyoun

    This thesis describes the science and technology of a new class of autonomic polymeric materials which mimic some of the functionalities of biological materials. Specifically, we demonstrate an autonomic self-healing polymer system which can heal damage in both coatings and bulk materials. The new self-healing system we developed greatly extends the capability of self-healing polymers by introducing tin catalyzed polycondensation of hydroxyl end-functionalited polydimethylsiloxane and polydiethoxysiloxane based chemistries. The components in this system are widely available and comparatively low in cost, and the healing chemistry also remains stable in humid or wet environments. These achievements significantly increase the probability that self-healing could be extended not only to polymer composites but also to coatings and thin films in harsh environments. We demonstrate the bulk self-healing property of a polymer composite composed of a phase-separated PDMS healing agent and a microencapsulated organotin catalyst by chemical and mechanical testing. Another significant research focus is on self-healing polymer coatings which prevent corrosion of a metal substrate after deep scratch damage. The anti-corrosion properties of the self-healing polymer on metal substrates are investigated by corrosion resistance and electrochemical tests. Even after scratch damage into the substrate, the coating is able to heal, while control samples which do not include all the necessary healing components reveal rapid corrosion propagation. This self-healing coating solution can be easily applied to most substrate materials, and is compatible with most common polymer matrices. Self-healing has the potential to extend the lifetime and increase the reliability of thermosetting polymers used in a wide variety of applications ranging from microelectronics to aerospace.

  4. HIV/AIDS: impact on healing.

    PubMed

    Burns, J; Pieper, B

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are leading chronic illnesses in many major cities worldwide. Frequently, people with HIV infection require surgery or develop chronic wounds. This paper summarizes the impact of HIV infection on body organs and systems and the effect of antiretroviral therapy as a basis for potential complications with wound care and healing. The authors also present research on wound healing in HIV-positive people undergoing operative procedures. Besides the physical effect of HIV infection on the person, clinicians must also realize psychosocial and economic effects of the disease when considering wound care. This paper also addresses care considerations for patients with HIV/AIDS in the inpatient, outpatient, and home care settings.

  5. A self-healing dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Stacy; McKay, Thomas G.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators that can provide muscle-like actuation are unable to self-heal like real muscle tissue. This severely limits dielectric elastomer reliability and robustness. This paper describes a way to instill self-healing into the DE by using a two-phase dielectric consisting of an open-cell silicone sponge saturated with silicone oil. When the dielectric is breached, the oil is able to flow back into any void, re-establishing the dielectric structure. The sponge holds the oil in place and provides dimensional stability, while the oil ensures the integrity of the dielectric layer. The operation of this has been demonstrated in a prototype DE actuator that continued to function despite being perforated multiple times with a sharp object.

  6. Assisted self-healing in ripped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Blaeckberg, L.; Sjoestrand, H.; Klintenberg, M.; Ringbom, A.

    2010-11-15

    A monolayer of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon (graphene) is a material with great technological promise because of, for example, its transport, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. In this work noble gas diffusion through ripped graphene sheets is explored. The motivation is improved detection systems used worldwide to verify compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. It is demonstrated that even ripped graphene sheets and/or nonoverlapping graphene flakes inhibit noble gas diffusion. The latter has been shown for He and Xe where an infinitely long rip was constructed to have Stone-Wales edges. It is also shown that the ripped graphene layer self-heal in an alternating pentagon, hexagon, heptagon (5-6-7) and 7-6-5 pattern perpendicular to the rip. Moreover, the noble gas (He and Xe) assists in the healing process of wider rips.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell applications to tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendons are often subject to age related degenerative changes that coincide with a diminished regenerative capacity. Torn tendons often heal by forming scar tissue that is structurally weaker than healthy native tendon tissue, predisposing to mechanical failure. There is increasing interest in providing biological stimuli to increase the tendon reparative response. Stem cells in particular are an exciting and promising prospect as they have the potential to provide appropriate cellular signals to encourage neotendon formation during repair rather than scar tissue. Currently, a number of issues need to be investigated further before it can be determined whether stem cells are an effective and safe therapeutic option for encouraging tendon repair. This review explores the in-vitro and invivo evidence assessing the effect of stem cells on tendon healing, as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:23738300

  8. Anti-inflammatory and wound healing potential of cashew apple juice (Anacardium occidentale L.) in mice

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira Vasconcelos, Mirele; Gomes-Rochette, Neuza F; de Oliveira, Maria Liduína M; Nunes-Pinheiro, Diana Célia S; Tomé, Adriana R; Maia de Sousa, Francisco Yuri; Pinheiro, Francisco Geraldo M; Moura, Carlos Farley H; Miranda, Maria Raquel A; Mota, Erika Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Cashew apple is a tropical pseudofruit consumed as juice due to its excellent nutritional and sensory properties. In spite of being well known for its important antioxidant properties, the cashew apple has not been thoroughly investigated for its therapeutic potential. Thereby, this study evaluated the antioxidant capacity, anti-inflammatory, and wound-healing activities of cashew apple juice. Juices from ripe and immature cashew apples were analyzed for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and wound-healing properties. Those were evaluated in murine models of xylene-induced ear edema and wound excision. Swiss mice were treated with cashew juice by gavage. Edema thickness was measured and skin lesions were analyzed by planimetry and histology. Both antioxidant content and total antioxidant activity were higher in ripe cashew apple juice (RCAJ) than in unripe cashew apple juice (UNCAJ). The UNCAJ presented the main anti-inflammatory activity by a significant inhibition of ear edema (66.5%) when compared to RCAJ (10%). Moreover, UNCAJ also showed the best result for wound contraction (86.31%) compared to RCAJ (67.54%). Despite of higher antioxidant capacity, RCAJ did not promote better anti-inflammatory, and healing responses, which may be explained by the fact that treatment increased antioxidants level leading to a redox “imbalance” turning down the inflammatory response modulation exerted by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results suggest that UNCAJ presents a greater therapeutic activity due to a synergistic effect of its phytochemical components, which improve the immunological mechanisms as well as an optimal balance between ROS and antioxidants leading to a better wound healing process. PMID:25819683

  9. Anti-inflammatory and wound healing potential of cashew apple juice (Anacardium occidentale L.) in mice.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Vasconcelos, Mirele; Gomes-Rochette, Neuza F; de Oliveira, Maria Liduína M; Nunes-Pinheiro, Diana Célia S; Tomé, Adriana R; Maia de Sousa, Francisco Yuri; Pinheiro, Francisco Geraldo M; Moura, Carlos Farley H; Miranda, Maria Raquel A; Mota, Erika Freitas; de Melo, Dirce Fernandes

    2015-12-01

    Cashew apple is a tropical pseudofruit consumed as juice due to its excellent nutritional and sensory properties. In spite of being well known for its important antioxidant properties, the cashew apple has not been thoroughly investigated for its therapeutic potential. Thereby, this study evaluated the antioxidant capacity, anti-inflammatory, and wound-healing activities of cashew apple juice. Juices from ripe and immature cashew apples were analyzed for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and wound-healing properties. Those were evaluated in murine models of xylene-induced ear edema and wound excision. Swiss mice were treated with cashew juice by gavage. Edema thickness was measured and skin lesions were analyzed by planimetry and histology. Both antioxidant content and total antioxidant activity were higher in ripe cashew apple juice (RCAJ) than in unripe cashew apple juice (UNCAJ). The UNCAJ presented the main anti-inflammatory activity by a significant inhibition of ear edema (66.5%) when compared to RCAJ (10%). Moreover, UNCAJ also showed the best result for wound contraction (86.31%) compared to RCAJ (67.54%). Despite of higher antioxidant capacity, RCAJ did not promote better anti-inflammatory, and healing responses, which may be explained by the fact that treatment increased antioxidants level leading to a redox "imbalance" turning down the inflammatory response modulation exerted by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results suggest that UNCAJ presents a greater therapeutic activity due to a synergistic effect of its phytochemical components, which improve the immunological mechanisms as well as an optimal balance between ROS and antioxidants leading to a better wound healing process.

  10. THE INDUCTION OF RHEUMATIC-LIKE CARDIAC LESIONS IN RABBITS BY REPEATED FOCAL INFECTIONS WITH GROUP A STREPTOCOCCI

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, George E.; Swift, Homer F.

    1950-01-01

    Cardiac lesions like those characteristic of rheumatic fever in man have been induced in a small portion of rabbits that were subjected to successive focal infections with group A streptococci of several serological types. Fresh myocardial interstitial granulomata so induced bear striking resemblance to Aschoff bodies, the histologic hallmarks of human active rheumatic fever; and the fresh and healed lesions found in the cardiac valves, endocardia, epicardia, blood vessels, and aortae of some of these rabbits are homologous with those characteristic of rheumatic fever in man. These experimental myocardial and vascular lesions and those of human rheumatic fever differ in several important respects from the lesions of experimental and human serum disease. PMID:15415504

  11. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  12. Combined nitric oxide-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) film/F127 hydrogel for accelerating wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Raggio Santos, Karen Slis; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; de Oliveira, Marcelo G

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing biomaterials represent a potential strategy for use as active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. Topical NO-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films and Pluronic F127 hydrogels (F127) have already exhibited effective skin vasodilation and wound healing actions. In this study, we functionalized PVA films with SNO groups via esterification with a mixture of mercaptosucinic acid (MSA) and thiolactic acid (TLA) followed by S-nitrosation of the SH moieties. These films were combined with an underlying layer of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide), i.e., PEO-PPO-PEO (Pluronic F127) hydrogel and used for the topical treatment of skin lesions in an animal model. The mixed esterification of PVA with MSA and TLA led to chemically crosslinked PVA-SNO films with a high swelling capacity capable of spontaneously releasing NO. Real time NO-release measurements revealed that the hydrogel layer reduces the initial NO burst from the PVA-SNO films. We demonstrate that the combination of PVA-SNO films with F127 hydrogel accelerates wound contraction, decreases wound gap and cellular density and accelerates the inflammatory phase of the lesion. These results were reflected in an increase in myofibroblastic differentiation and collagen type III expression in the cicatricial tissue. Therefore, PVA-SNO films combined with F127 hydrogel may represent a new approach for active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing.

  13. Gastric Ulcers in Middle-Aged Rats: The Healing Effect of Essential Oil from Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Polo, C. M.; Moraes, T. M.; Pellizzon, C. H.; Marques, M. O.; Rocha, L. R. M.; Hiruma-Lima, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    The elderly population has experienced increased life expectancy as well as the increased incidence of gastric ulcers. The peels of fruits from Citrus aurantium L., popularly known in Brazil as orange bitter, are commonly used asatea form for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders, such as ulcer and gastritis. We evaluated the healing effects of essential oil from the peels of Citrus aurantium fruits (OEC) on gastric ulcers in middle-aged rats. We examined the effects of a 14-day chronic OEC treatment on gastric mucosa in middle-aged male Wistar rats that were given acetic-acid-induced gastric lesions by morphometric and immunohistological analyses. Oral OEC treatment significantly reduced the lesion area (76%) within the gastric mucosa and significantly increased (P < .05) the height of regenerated mucosa (59%) when compared to the negative control group. Immunohistochemical analysis of the molecular markers such as COX-2, HSP-70, VEGF, and PCNA in the gastric mucosa confirmed that OEC treatment induced healing effects by increasing the number of new blood vessels and by augmenting gastric mucus in the mucosa glands. These results suggest that the oil from Citrus aurantium effectively heals gastric ulcers in middle-aged animals; however, safe use of OEC demands special care and precautions. PMID:23243451

  14. Self-Healing, Inflatable, Rigidizable Shelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haight, Andrea; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Dixit, Anshu; Gleeson, Dan

    2012-01-01

    An inflatable, rigidizable shelter system was developed based on Rigi dization on Command (ROC) technology incorporating not only the requ ired low-stowage volume and lightweight character achieved from an i nflatable/rigidizable system, but also a self-healing foam system inc orporated between the rigidizable layers of the final structure to m inimize the damage caused by any punctures to the structure.

  15. Wound Healing Delay in the ZDSD Rat

    PubMed Central

    A. SUCKOW, MARK; A. GOBBETT, TROY; G. PETERSON, RICHARD

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of diabetic delayed wound healing are essential to the development of strategies to improve clinical approaches for human patients. The Zucker diabetic Sprague Dawley (ZDSD) rat has proved to be an accurate model of diet-induced obesity and diabetes and we evaluated the utility of the ZDSD rat as a model for delayed wound healing associated with diabetes and obesity. Groups of ZDSD and Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were placed on a diabetogenic diet and evaluated two weeks later for hyperglycemia, as a sign of diabetes. Rats with blood glucose levels of >300 mg/dl were considered diabetic and those with blood glucose of <180 mg/dl were considered non-diabetic. All SD rats were non-diabetic. A full-thickness excisional skin wound was created in anesthetized rats using a punch biopsy and wound diameter measured on days 1, 4, 7, 9 and 11. Blood glucose levels and body weights were measured periodically before and after wounding. Diabetic ZDSD rats had significantly greater blood glucose levels than non-diabetic ZDSD and SD rats within 10 days of being placed on the diabetogenic diet. Furthermore, diabetic ZDSD rats initially weighed more than non-diabetic ZDSD and SD rats, however, by the end of the study there was no significant difference in body weight between the ZDSD groups. By day nine, wounds in ZDSD rats were significantly larger than those in SD rats and this persisted until the end of the study at day fourteen. Wounds from all groups were characterized histologically by abundant fibroblast cells, collagen deposition and macrophages. These results demonstrate delayed wound healing in both diabetic and non-diabetic ZDSD rats and suggest that obesity or metabolic syndrome are important factors in wound healing delay. PMID:28064221

  16. A mouse model of mandibular osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Paccione, M F; Warren, S M; Spector, J A; Greenwald, J A; Bouletreau, P J; Longaker, M T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing. By applying this model to transgenic mice or using in situ hybridization techniques, we can subsequently investigate candidate genes that are believed to be important in membranous osteotomy healing. In the current study, 20 adult male CD-1 mice underwent a full-thickness osteotomy between the second and third molars of the right hemimandible using a 3-mm diamond disc and copious irrigation. Compo-Post pins were secured into the mandible, 2 mm anterior and posterior to the osteotomy. After the soft tissues were reapproximated and the skin was closed, an acrylic external fixator was attached to the exposed posts for stabilization. The animals were killed on postoperative day number 7, 10, 14, and 28 (n=5 animals per time point). The right hemimandibles were decalcified and embedded in paraffin for histologic evaluation or immunohistochemistry localizing osteocalcin. At 7 days after the osteotomy, early intramembranous bone formation could be seen extending from either edge of the osteotomized bone. By 10 days, an increasing number of small blood vessels could be seen within and around the osteotomy. At 14 days, the bone edges were in close approximation, and by 28 days the callus had been replaced by actively remodeling woven bone in all specimens examined. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that osteocalcin expression correlated temporally with the transition from a soft to a hard callus. Furthermore, osteocalcin was spatially confined to osteoblasts actively laying down new osteoid or remodeling bone. This study describes a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing that can be used as a paradigm for future osteotomy healing studies investigating candidate genes critical for osteogenesis and successful bone repair.

  17. Role of Wnt signaling in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiyun; Duan, Jing; Ning, Dandan; Li, Jingbao; Liu, Ruofei; Yang, Ruixin; Jiang, Jean X; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is well known to play major roles in skeletal development and homeostasis. In certain aspects, fracture repair mimics the process of bone embryonic development. Thus, the importance of Wnt signaling in fracture healing has become more apparent in recent years. Here, we summarize recent research progress in the area, which may be conducive to the development of Wnt-based therapeutic strategies for bone repair.

  18. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  19. Proteoglycans in Normal and Healing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret Mary; Melrose, James

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Proteoglycans have a distinct spatial localization in normal skin and are essential for the correct structural development, organization, hydration, and functional properties of this tissue. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is no longer considered to be just an inert supportive material but is a source of directive, spatial and temporal, contextual information to the cells via components such as the proteoglycans. There is a pressing need to improve our understanding of how these important molecules functionally interact with other matrix structures, cells and cellular mediators in normal skin and during wound healing. Recent Advances: New antibodies to glycosaminoglycan side chain components of skin proteoglycans have facilitated the elucidation of detailed localization patterns within skin. Other studies have revealed important proliferative activities of proteinase-generated fragments of proteoglycans and other ECM components (matricryptins). Knockout mice have further established the functional importance of skin proteoglycans in the assembly and homeostasis of the normal skin ECM. Critical Issues: Our comprehension of the molecular and structural complexity of skin as a complex, dynamic, constantly renewing, layered connective tissue is incomplete. The impact of changes in proteoglycans on skin pathology and the wound healing process is recognized as an important area of pathobiology and is an area of intense investigation. Future Directions: Advanced technology is allowing the development of new artificial skins. Recent knowledge on skin proteoglycans can be used to incorporate these molecules into useful adjunct therapies for wound healing and for maintenance of optimal tissue homeostasis in aging skin. PMID:25785238

  20. A Sheep Model for Cancellous Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Angad; Pelletier, Matthew Henry; Yu, Yan; Christou, Chris; Walsh, William Robert

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate well-characterized bone defect animal models remain essential for preclinical research. This pilot study demonstrates a relevant animal model for cancellous bone defect healing. Three different defect diameters (8, 11, 14 mm) of fixed depth (25 mm) were compared in both skeletally immature (18-month-old) and aged sheep (5-year-old). In each animal, four defects were surgically created and placed in the cancellous bone of the medial distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses bilaterally. Animals were euthanized at 4 weeks post-operatively to assess early healing and any biological response. Defect sites were graded radiographically, and new bone formation quantified using μCT and histomorphometry. Fibrous tissue was found within the central region in most of the defects with woven bone normally forming near the periphery of the defect. Bone volume fraction [bone volume (BV)/TV] significantly decreased with an increasing defect diameter. Actual BV, however, increased with defect diameter. Bone ingrowth was lower for all defect diameters in the aged group. This pilot study proposes that the surgical creation of 11 mm diameter defects in the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses of aged sheep is a suitable large animal model to study early healing of cancellous bone defects. The refined model allows for the placement of four separate bone defects per animal and encourages a reduction in animal numbers required for preclinical research. PMID:25593961

  1. Snake and staff symbolism, and healing.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2002-07-01

    Since time immemorial the snake has been venerated as an enigmatic creature with supernatural powers. As a snake and staff symbol it is also traditionally associated with the healing arts, either as the single-snake emblem of Asklepios, or as the double-snake emblem (caduceus) of Hermes. The mythological basis for this symbolism is reviewed. The Asklepian emblem has been associated with health care since the 5th century BC, when Asklepios became accepted by the Greeks as the god of healing. Whether he was also an historical figure as healer in earlier ages is less certain. The origin of the double-snake emblem is shrouded in the mists of antiquity. In classical times it became the herald's wand of Hermes, messenger of the gods who guided departed souls to the underworld, and was seen as protector of travellers, shepherds and merchants. In the latter capacity Hermes also conveyed a negative connotation as protector of thieves. During the Middle Ages the caduceus became a symbol of the healing sciences (pharmacy and alchemy in particular), and today, although mythologically incorrect, it is in common usage in the health care field.

  2. The placebo effect: illness and interpersonal healing

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Franklin G.; Colloca, Luana; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2010-01-01

    The placebo effect has been a source of fascination, irritation, and confusion within biomedicine over the past 60 years. Although scientific investigation has accelerated in the past decade, with particular attention to neurobiological mechanisms, there has been a dearth of attention to developing a comprehensive theory of the placebo effect. In this article, we attempt to address this gap by reviewing evidence relating to the reality and clinical significance of the placebo effect. We suggest the hypothesis that the placebo effect operates predominantly by producing symptomatic relief of illness, such as pain, anxiety, and fatigue, rather than by modifying the pathophysiology of disease. The placebo effect as a clinical phenomenon is characterized as representing the interpersonal component of healing, as distinct from spontaneous natural healing and technological healing dependent on physiologically active pharmaceuticals or procedures. Speculations regarding the evolution of the placebo effect are entertained. Finally, we argue that research on the placebo effect has the potential to revitalize the art of medicine and discuss ethical issues relating to the use of placebo interventions in clinical practice and in research on the placebo effect. We hope that this preface to developing a theory of the placebo effect will provoke debate and alternative conceptualizations and theoretical hypotheses in service of promoting a deeper and more fruitful understanding of this elusive phenomenon. PMID:19855122

  3. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C.; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B.; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure. PMID:25032064

  4. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  5. BPC 157's effect on healing.

    PubMed

    Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P; Grabarevic, Z; Zoricic, I; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Coric, V; Konjevoda, P; Petek, M; Rucman, R; Turkovic, B; Perovic, D; Mikus, D; Jandrijevic, S; Medvidovic, M; Tadic, T; Romac, B; Kos, J; Peric, J; Kolega, Z

    1997-01-01

    The 15 amino acid agent BPC 157, showing a wide range of organoprotective action in different experimental models, was used in our experiments in order to establish its influence on different elements connected with the healing process. Elements thought to be of greatest importance in the process of healing are formation of granulation tissue, angiogenesis and production of collagen. In our work we tested the influence of BPC 157 on: granulation tissue and collagen formation, on angiogenesis as well as on tensile strength development, using three experimental rat models: 1) skin incisional wounds; 2) colon-colon anastomoses; and 3) angiogenesis model with synthetic sponge implantation. The specimens were histologically assessed for collagen, reticulin and blood vessels using scoring and morphometry. In all experiments significant differences between BPC 157-treated animals and controls were found, showing a strong, promoting involvement of BPC in the healing process. It is worth noting that these effects were achieved by different routes of application, including intragastric and local, making BPC 157 a potentially useful therapeutic agent.

  6. Trehalose lyophilized platelets for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Kaipainen, Arja; Ho, David; Orser, Cindy; Pebley, Walter; Rudolph, Alan; Orgill, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    Fresh platelet preparations are utilized to treat a wide variety of wounds, although storage limitations and mixed results have hampered their clinical use. We hypothesized that concentrated lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations, preserved with trehalose, maintain and possibly enhance fresh platelets' ability to improve wound healing. We studied the ability of a single dose of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets to enhance wound healing when topically applied on full-thickness wounds in the genetically diabetic mouse. We compared these results with the application of multiple doses of fresh platelet preparations and trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets as well as multiple doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and wounds left untreated. Trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets, in single and multiple applications, multiple applications of fresh platelets and multiple applications of VEGF increased granulation tissue deposition, vascularity, and proliferation when compared with untreated wounds, as assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Wounds treated with multiple doses of VEGF and a single dose of freeze-dried platelets reached 90% closure faster than wounds left untreated. A single administration of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations enhanced diabetic wound healing, therefore representing a promising strategy for the treatment of nonhealing wounds.

  7. Autonomous materials with controlled toughening and healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael E.; Lin, Yirong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2010-11-01

    Biological systems exhibit many advanced sensory and healing traits that can be applied to the design of modern material systems. The foremost goal for the development of future adaptive structures is to provide materials capable of autonomously adapting in order to impede damage progression and, subsequently, heal the damaged region. Here, a novel autonomous material system is devised using shape memory polymers (SMPs), which employ a fiber optic network, functioning both as a damage detection sensor and thermal stimulus delivery system. This system mimics the advanced sensory system as well as toughening and healing mechanisms found in human bones. By incorporating both methods into this material, the resulting autonomous system is able to increase toughness by 11 times over the original material. In addition to toughening, the shape memory effect can be used to close the crack and upon reloading of the toughened SMP specimen to failure, the system demonstrates a 96% strength recovery of the virgin strength. Following crack closure the new material system has 4.9 times more toughness than the un-toughened specimen even through it has been strained four times past its virgin failure strain.

  8. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-07-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure.

  9. Surgical approach to bone healing in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Vito; Speciale, Domenico; Sammarco, Giulio; Patella, Silvio; Spinarelli, Antonio; Patella, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures represent one of the most common cause of disability and one of the major voice in the health economic budget in many countries of the world. Fragility fractures are especially meta-epiphyseal fractures, in skeletal sites with particular biomechanic characteristic (hip, vertebrae), complex and with more fragments, with slow healing process (mineralization and remodeling) and co-morbidity. The healing of a fracture in osteoporotic bone passes through the normal stages and concludes with union of the fracture although the healing process is prolonged. Fractures in the elderly osteoporotic patients represent a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeons. Osteoporosis does not only increase the risk of fracture but also represents a problem in osteofixation of fractures in fracture treatment. The major technical problem that surgeons face, is the difficulty to obtain a stable fixation of an implant due to osteoporotic bone. The load transmitted at the bone-implant interface can often exceed the reduced strain tolerance of osteoporotic bone. In the treatment of osteoporotic fractures it is important to consider different aspects: general conditions of elderly patient and comorbidity, the reduced muscular and bone mass and the increased bone fragility, structural modifications as medullary expansion. The aim of surgical treatment is to obtain a stable fixation that reduces pain and permits an early mobilization. PMID:22461162

  10. Intakes of several nutrients are associated with incidence of arsenic-related keratotic skin lesions in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Pierce, Brandon; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-12-01

    Risk of skin lesions due to chronic arsenic exposure can be further affected by nutrient intake. We prospectively evaluated the association of nutrient intake and gender with incident skin lesions using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate these effects in stratified analyses based on skin lesion severity. Overall, we observed significant associations between low intakes of various nutrients (retinol, calcium, fiber, folate, iron, riboflavin, thiamin, and vitamins A, C, and E) and skin lesion incidence, particularly for keratotic skin lesions. Associations for vitamins C and E showed significant linear trends. Gender-specific analyses revealed an inverse association between the lowest quartile of nutrient intake and keratotic skin lesion incidence for retinol equivalents, calcium, folate, iron, and fiber among women. Interactions by gender were observed for retinol equivalents (P-interaction = 0.03), calcium (P-interaction = 0.04), vitamin A (P-interaction = 0.03), and riboflavin (P-interaction = 0.04) with the incidence of keratotic skin lesions. Understanding differential susceptibility to skin lesion incidence based on nutrient intake will help researchers develop targeted interventions to prevent health consequences of arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh and beyond.

  11. A Consideration of the Perspectives of Healing Practitioners on Research Into Energy Healing.

    PubMed

    Warber, Sara L; Bruyere, Rosalyn L; Weintrub, Ken; Dieppe, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Energy healing is a complex intervention with the purpose of enhancing wholeness within the client. Approaches to complex interventions require thoughtful utilization of a wide range of research methods. In order to advance the research in this field, we sought to understand the healing practitioners' point of view by reviewing qualitative literature, research reviews, and commentary written by and about practitioners. Further, we conducted a brief survey among healers, asking their opinions on types and topics of research in this field. Emerging from this inquiry is an overview of the healers' state required for successful healing, the importance of the clients' contribution, the heterogeneity of the process of healing, and the importance of choosing appropriate outcomes to reflect the goal of wholeness. Beyond attending to measurement of these nuanced aspects, we propose utilization of research designs appropriate for complex interventions, more use of qualitative research techniques, consideration of large data registries, and adoption of the perspectives of realist research. An important gap identified was the overall lack of understanding of the clients' experience and contribution to the healing encounter.

  12. A Consideration of the Perspectives of Healing Practitioners on Research Into Energy Healing

    PubMed Central

    Bruyere, Rosalyn L.; Weintrub, Ken; Dieppe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Energy healing is a complex intervention with the purpose of enhancing wholeness within the client. Approaches to complex interventions require thoughtful utilization of a wide range of research methods. In order to advance the research in this field, we sought to understand the healing practitioners' point of view by reviewing qualitative literature, research reviews, and commentary written by and about practitioners. Further, we conducted a brief survey among healers, asking their opinions on types and topics of research in this field. Emerging from this inquiry is an overview of the healers' state required for successful healing, the importance of the clients' contribution, the heterogeneity of the process of healing, and the importance of choosing appropriate outcomes to reflect the goal of wholeness. Beyond attending to measurement of these nuanced aspects, we propose utilization of research designs appropriate for complex interventions, more use of qualitative research techniques, consideration of large data registries, and adoption of the perspectives of realist research. An important gap identified was the overall lack of understanding of the clients' experience and contribution to the healing encounter. PMID:26665045

  13. Effect of a deproteinized blood extract on the recovery of blood circulation in an ischaemic skin lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Smahel, J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model was used to study the revascularization of an ischaemic skin lesion and the effect on this process of the blood extract Solcoseryl. Under the conditions given in the experiment, restoration of the circulation was by 2 modes--re-flow in the original vessels, and neovascularization. Solcoseryl given daily i.p. encouraged the re-flow phenomenon and therefore, by improving the microcirculation and nutrition, the healing of the ischaemic lesions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6176254

  14. Targeting macrophage Histone deacetylase 3 stabilizes atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hoeksema, Marten A; Gijbels, Marion JJ; Van den Bossche, Jan; van der Velden, Saskia; Sijm, Ayestha; Neele, Annette E; Seijkens, Tom; Stöger, J Lauran; Meiler, Svenja; Boshuizen, Marieke CS; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Levels, Johannes HM; Boon, Louis; Mullican, Shannon E; Spann, Nathanael J; Cleutjens, Jack P; Glass, Chris K; Lazar, Mitchell A; de Vries, Carlie JM; Biessen, Erik AL; Daemen, Mat JAP; Lutgens, Esther; de Winther, Menno PJ

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are key immune cells found in atherosclerotic plaques and critically shape atherosclerotic disease development. Targeting the functional repertoire of macrophages may hold novel approaches for future atherosclerosis management. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized role of the epigenomic enzyme Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in regulating the atherosclerotic phenotype of macrophages. Using conditional knockout mice, we found that myeloid Hdac3 deficiency promotes collagen deposition in atherosclerotic lesions and thus induces a stable plaque phenotype. Also, macrophages presented a switch to anti-inflammatory wound healing characteristics and showed improved lipid handling. The pro-fibrotic phenotype was directly linked to epigenetic regulation of the Tgfb1 locus upon Hdac3 deletion, driving smooth muscle cells to increased collagen production. Moreover, in humans, HDAC3 was the sole Hdac upregulated in ruptured atherosclerotic lesions, Hdac3 associated with inflammatory macrophages, and HDAC3 expression inversely correlated with pro-fibrotic TGFB1 expression. Collectively, we show that targeting the macrophage epigenome can improve atherosclerosis outcome and we identify Hdac3 as a potential novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease. PMID:25007801

  15. Dextran-based hydrogel containing chitosan microparticles loaded with growth factors to be used in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M P; Morgado, P I; Miguel, S P; Coutinho, P; Correia, I J

    2013-07-01

    Skin injuries are traumatic events, which are seldom accompanied by complete structural and functional restoration of the original tissue. Different strategies have been developed in order to make the wound healing process faster and less painful. In the present study in vitro and in vivo assays were carried out to evaluate the applicability of a dextran hydrogel loaded with chitosan microparticles containing epidermal and vascular endothelial growth factors, for the improvement of the wound healing process. The carriers' morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Their cytotoxicity profile and degradation by-products were evaluated through in vitro assays. In vivo experiments were also performed to evaluate their applicability for the treatment of skin burns. The wound healing process was monitored through macroscopic and histological analysis. The macroscopic analysis showed that the period for wound healing occurs in animals treated with microparticle loaded hydrogels containing growth factors that were considerably smaller than that of control groups. Moreover, the histological analysis revealed the absence of reactive or granulomatous inflammatory reaction in skin lesions. The results obtained both in vitro and in vivo disclosed that these systems and its degradation by-products are biocompatible, contributed to the re-establishment of skin architecture and can be used in a near future for the controlled delivery of other bioactive agents used in regenerative medicine.

  16. Culture-Based Screening of Aerobic Microbiome in Diabetic Foot Subjects and Developing Non-healing Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Saba; Ahmad, Jamal; Parwez, Iqbal; Ozair, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried on diabetic foot patients to deduce clinical attributes, the occurrence of the range of aerobic microbial flora and to assess their comparative in vitro susceptibility to the customarily used antimicrobials. We also studied the potential risk factors involved in the development of non-healing ulcers. A total of 87 organisms were isolated from 70 specimens, including Escherichia coli (19.5%) among the Gram-negative and Staphylococcus aureus (18.4%) among the Gram-positive as the predominant aerobes explored. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli were predominant isolates of non-healing ulcers. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern revealed that vancomycin (100%) and amikacin (90.4%) exhibited highest sensitivity to Gram-positive cocci, while all strains of P. aeruginosa were sensitive toward imipenem (100%). The prevalent uncontrolled glycemic status, altered lipid spectra, the existence of neuropathy, and peripheral vascular disease, suggested predisposition toward the development of non-healing lesions. The study has underlined the need for continuous surveillance of bacteria and their antimicrobial sensitivity blueprints to provide the basis for empirical therapy and to minimize the risk of complications. Further, stringent clinical evaluation, and medical history will help in revealing the risk of developing non-healing status in diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:27920754

  17. The n-Hexane, ethylacetate, and butanol fractions from Hydnocarpi Semen enhanced wound healing in a mice ulcer model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geum Seon; Yim, Dongsool; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Kang, Tae Jin

    2012-12-01

    Our previous report showed that Hydnocarpi Semen (HS) extract has wound repair activity at ulcer lesion in diabetic mice. In this study, fractions of n-Hexane, ethylacetate (EtOAc), and butanol (BuOH) from HS crude extract were evaluated for their wound healing activity by using in vivo diabetic ulcer models and in vitro acute inflammation model. Although n-Hexane and EtOAc fractions promote wound healing in mice with ulcer, the BuOH fraction exhibited the most potent wound healing activity and the wound area score significantly decreased after treatment of BuOH fraction even at dose of 2 mg/kg. BuOH fraction stimulated macrophages to increase the production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-α. The BuOH fraction also enhanced the production of TGF-β and VEGF, which were involved in fibroblast activation and angiogenesis. The mRNA expression and activation of MMP-9 were increased by three fractions and the activity was higher in BuOH fraction-treated group compared to the other groups. The mechanism that the HS helps to promote healing of diabetic ulcer is possibly associated with the production of TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, as well as the secretion of VEGF, TGF-β, and MMP-9, which were involved in proliferation of capillaries and fibroblasts. These results suggest that HS can be a new candidate material for the treatment of wound in skin ulcer.

  18. Temporal Healing in Rat Achilles Tendon: Ultrasound Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: 1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. 2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. 3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. 4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing. PMID:23149902

  19. Hock lesions and free-stall design.

    PubMed

    Weary, D M; Taszkun, I

    2000-04-01

    We compared the prevalence and severity of skin lesions on the hocks of lactating dairy cows in southern British Columbia, comparing 20 farms using three common bedding surfaces: sawdust, sand, and geotextile mattresses. Skin lesions were scored at five positions on the hock. For each position we noted if the lesion showed inflammatory attributes, and then assigned a severity score. Of the 1752 lactating cows scored, 1267 cows (73%) had at least one hock lesion. Of those cows with lesions, 87% had lesions on both legs, 76% had lesions on more than one location on the hock, and 78% had a lesion of at least moderate severity (i.e., evidence of skin breakage or an area of hair loss >10 cm2). Lesions were most prevalent on farms that used geotextile mattresses (91% of cows) and least common on farms that used sand (24% of cows). Moreover, lesions on cows from farms using mattresses were more numerous and more severe than those on cows from sand-bedded farms. The prevalence and severity of lesions on farms using sawdust was intermediate. Lesions also varied in relation to location on the hock. For farms using geotextile mattresses, lesions were more common and more severe on the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. On farms using sawdust, lesions were common on the dorsal surface of the tuber calcis and the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. Lesions were rare on all five positions for cows from sand-bedded farms. Among the 10 farms sampled using sawdust, we found a significant negative relationship between the length of the stall and severity of lesions. For cows with lesions, the number and severity of lesions increased with age.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells in post-surgical cavities of large maxillary bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bertolai, Roberto; Catelani, Carlo; Signorini, Mattia; Rossi, Alessandro; Giannini, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent studies have highlighted that MSCs are capable of regenerating large bone defects when used in combination with bone substitutes and increasing allo-graft osteointegration. We investigated the hypothesis that autologous MSCs may lead to increased bone regeneration and reduced healing time in post-surgical cavities of large maxillary bone lesions. Methods This study involved 10 patients (TEST GROUP) (6 males and 4 females). All patients had expansive mandibular lesions larger than 3 cm. From the surgical point of view, the 10 patients were treated with MSCs (withdrawal of the iliac crest bone marrow BMMSs) directly into the post-surgical cavity, without the addition of filler. Results and radiological data, in the postoperative, were compared to those of patients who did not receive any grafting of MSCs. The 7 patients with mandibular lesions showed a rapid and very good healing with an 85–90% ossification of the major defect at 12 months. Conclusions Through the use of stem cells a greater ossification of the residual cavity (85–90%) was observed at 12 months after surgical enucleation in contenitive defects. PMID:28228785

  1. Covalently Linked Tandem Lesions in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patrzyc, Helen B.; Dawidzik, Jean B.; Budzinski, Edwin E.; Freund, Harold G.; Wilton, John H.; Box, Harold C.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generate a type of DNA damage called tandem lesions, two adjacent nucleotides both modified. A subcategory of tandem lesions consists of adjacent nucleotides linked by a covalent bond. Covalently linked tandem lesions generate highly characteristic liquid chromotography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) elution profiles. We have used this property to comprehensively survey X-irradiated DNA for covalently linked tandem lesions. A total of 15 tandem lesions were detected in DNA irradiated in deoxygenated aqueous solution, five tandem lesions were detected in DNA that was irradiated in oxygenated solution. PMID:23106212

  2. Healing the heart: integrating complementary therapies and healing practices into the care of cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Snyder, Mariah

    2002-01-01

    Complementary therapies and healing practices have been found to reduce stress, anxiety, and lifestyle patterns known to contribute to cardiovascular disease. Promising therapies include imagery and hypnosis, meditation, yoga, tai chi, prayer, music, exercise, diet, and use of dietary supplements. Many of these complementary approaches to healing have been within the domain of nursing for centuries and can readily be integrated into the care of patients with cardiovascular disease. While individual complimentary modalities hold considerable merit, it is critical that the philosophy underlying these therapies--caring, holism, and harmony--also be understood and honored.

  3. Dieulafoy's lesion of the rectum.

    PubMed

    Gul, Y A; Jabbar, M F; Karim, F A; Moissinac, K

    2002-06-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. It may present with massive and life threatening bleed and although more common in the upper gastrointestinal tract, it is being increasingly reported as affecting the lower gastrointestinal tract. Diagnosis is usually achieved during proctoscopic and endoscopic visualization. In cases where there is profuse and torrential hemorrhage, angiography may help to confirm the diagnosis. There are a few treatment options available, all of which have a varying degree of success. More commonly than not, a combination of treatment is warranted as illustrated by our case. Recurrent bleeding may occur just as in cases of Dieulafoy's lesion affecting the upper gastrointestinal tract. Even though endoscopic visualization of the lower gastrointestinal tract in the presence of profuse lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage may not be possible, this important procedure should not be omitted as the bleeding source may be lying in a low and accessible location for prompt interventional haemorrhage control.

  4. Characterization of the Protective Role of Regulatory T Cells in Experimental Periapical Lesions Development and Its Chemoattraction Manipulation as a Therapeutic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Glowacki, Andrew J; Favaro Trombone, Ana Paula; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes Silva, Renato; Sfeir, Charles S.; Little, Steven R.; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathogenesis of periapical lesions is determined by the balance between host pro-inflammatory immune response and counteracting anti-inflammatory and reparative responses, which include regulatory T cells (Tregs) as potential immunoregulatory agents. In this study, we investigated (in a cause-and-effect manner) the involvement of CCL22-CCR4 axis in Tregs migration to the periapical area and the role of Tregs in the determination of outcomes in periapical lesions. Methods Periapical lesions were induced in C57Bl/6 (WT) and CCR4KO mice (pulp exposure and bacterial inoculation), and treated with anti-GITR to inhibit Tregs function or alternatively with CCL22-releasing, PLGA particles to induce site-specific migration of Tregs. Post treatment, lesions were analyzed for Tregs influx and phenotype, overall periapical bone loss and inflammatory/immunological and wound healing markers expression (analyzed by RealTimePCRarray). Results Tregs inhibition by anti-GITR or CCR4 depletion results in a significant increase in periapical lesions severity, associated with upregulation of proinflammatory, Th1, Th17 and tissue destruction markers in parallel with decreased Tregs and healing markers expression. The local release of CCL22 in the root canal system resulted in the promotion of Tregs migration in a CCR4-dependent manner, leading to the arrest of periapical lesions progression, associated with downregulation of pro-inflammatory, Th1, Th17 and tissue destruction markers in parallel with increased Tregs and healing markers expression. Conclusions Since the natural and CCL22 induced Tregs migration switch active lesion into inactivity phenotype, Tregs chemoattractant may be a promisor strategy for the clinical management of periapical lesions. PMID:26589811

  5. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    the articulation between C1 and the os odontoideum on flexion imaging. The remainder of his cervical vertebral bodies had normal alignment with no...appears normal. Figure 3. Flexion view of plain cervical spine. This image shows abnormal translation of the articulation between C1 and the C2 os...worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion Journal Issue: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 12(4) Author: Robson

  6. Vascular lesions in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Grishman, E; Venkataseshan, V S

    1988-05-01

    Three groups of kidney specimens from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined for histologic evidence of vascular lesions in small arteries and arterioles. Group 1 consisted of 24 autopsy kidneys from patients who died before the advent of steroid therapy, and Group 2, of 26 more recent autopsy specimens from patients treated with steroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Group 3 comprised 276 renal biopsies. Group 1 showed characteristic subendothelial eosinophilic deposits in small arteries and arterioles of 8 cases; Group 2 showed similar lesions in 5 specimens, while 3 others revealed evidence of resorption of deposits. Deposits were characterized by clumping and were delimited toward the media by a thick basement membrane. Only one case showed necrotizing arteritis resembling polyarteritis nodosa. Group 3 presented vascular deposits in 19 cases and thrombotic microangiopathy in 2. Electron microscopic appearance of some of the deposits is described. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a mixture of IgG, IgA, and IgM in 7 cases, a finding that was not seen in a group of non-lupus patients with various vascular lesions. Vascular deposits are generally rare in systemic lupus erythematosus, although in autopsies widely scattered involvement of arteries and arterioles was seen in nearly 1/3 of the cases. The deposits were more common in male patients. The evolution of the lesions could be followed through various stages to eventual sclerosis, particularly in patients treated with steroids or immunosuppressants. Some deposits appeared to resolve after treatment. Patients with vascular deposits had more severe glomerular disease and a more serious clinical course. Thrombotic microangiopathy appears to be a secondary phenomenon whose pathogenesis is unknown.

  7. Self-healing polymer composites: mimicking nature to enhance performance.

    PubMed

    Trask, R S; Williams, H R; Bond, I P

    2007-03-01

    Autonomic self-healing materials, where initiation of repair is integral to the material, are being developed for engineering applications. This bio-inspired concept offers the designer an ability to incorporate secondary functional materials capable of counteracting service degradation whilst still achieving the primary, usually structural, requirement. Most materials in nature are themselves self-healing composite materials. This paper reviews the various self-healing technologies currently being developed for fibre reinforced polymeric composite materials, most of which are bioinspired, inspired by observation of nature. The most recent self-healing work has attempted to mimic natural healing through the study of mammalian blood clotting and the design of vascular networks found in biological systems. A perspective on current and future self-healing approaches using this biomimetic technique is offered. The intention is to stimulate debate outside the engineering community and reinforce the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in this exciting field.

  8. Human skin transcriptome during superficial cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nuutila, Kristo; Siltanen, Antti; Peura, Matti; Bizik, Jozef; Kaartinen, Ilkka; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Nieminen, Tapio; Harjula, Ari; Aarnio, Pertti; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2012-01-01

    Healing of the epidermis is a crucial process for maintaining the skin's defense integrity and its resistance to environmental threats. Compromised wound healing renders the individual readily vulnerable to infections and loss of body homeostasis. To clarify the human response of reepithelialization, we biopsied split-thickness skin graft donor site wounds immediately before and after harvesting, as well as during the healing process 3 and 7 days thereafter. In all, 25 biopsies from eight patients qualified for the study. All samples were analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Here, we identified the genes associated with normal skin reepithelialization over time and organized them by similarities according to their induction or suppression patterns during wound healing. Our results provide the first elaborate insight into the transcriptome during normal human epidermal wound healing. The data not only reveal novel genes associated with epidermal wound healing but also provide a fundamental basis for the translational interpretation of data acquired from experimental models.

  9. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    PubMed Central

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure–property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  10. Management of Chronic Non-healing Wounds by Hirudotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Arsheed; Jan, Afroza; Wajid, MA; Tariq, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    A chronic wound is a wound that does not heal in an orderly set of stages and in a predictable amount of time or wounds that do not heal within three months are often considered chronic. Chronic wounds often remain in the inflammatory stage for too long and may never heal or may take years. Chronic wound patients often report pain as dominant in their lives. Persistent pain is the main problem for patients with chronic ulcers. Many wounds pose no challenge to the body’s innate ability to heal; some wounds, however, may not heal easily either because of the severity of the wounds themselves or because of the poor state of health of the individual. Any wound that does not heal within a few weeks should be examined by a healthcare professional because it might be infected, might reflect an underlying disease. PMID:28289608

  11. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials.

  12. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials.

  13. Fibronectin in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, R. A.; Mitchell, M. E.

    1989-01-01

    Cryostat sections of central nervous system (CNS) tissues of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other CNS diseases were stained with antibodies to fibronectin, a macrophage fibronectin receptor component, fibrin/fibrinogen, and albumin using immunoperoxidase. In active, but not inactive, MS plaques vessel fibronectin was increased (to approximately 57% of Factor VIII+ vessels) over uninvolved MS and normal control white matter (P less than 0.001 for both). Fibronectin was primarily localized to vessel walls and amount of staining correlated with degree of inflammation. Active plaques and necrotic lesions also had extracellular fibronectin and fibrin/ogen. These molecules and the fibronectin receptor were found on macrophages. Albumin was more widely and diffusely distributed in lesions than fibronectin. Thus, in addition to extravasation from damaged vessels, fibronectin may be deposited on or synthesized by endothelial cells and macrophages in the CNS. Fibronectin could facilitate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell luminal surfaces, promote migration of mononuclear cells, and enhance myelin phagocytosis in MS lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2528301

  14. Automatic segmentation of psoriasis lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Yang; Shi, Chenbo; Wang, Li; Shu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    The automatic segmentation of psoriatic lesions is widely researched these years. It is an important step in Computer-aid methods of calculating PASI for estimation of lesions. Currently those algorithms can only handle single erythema or only deal with scaling segmentation. In practice, scaling and erythema are often mixed together. In order to get the segmentation of lesions area - this paper proposes an algorithm based on Random forests with color and texture features. The algorithm has three steps. The first step, the polarized light is applied based on the skin's Tyndall-effect in the imaging to eliminate the reflection and Lab color space are used for fitting the human perception. The second step, sliding window and its sub windows are used to get textural feature and color feature. In this step, a feature of image roughness has been defined, so that scaling can be easily separated from normal skin. In the end, Random forests will be used to ensure the generalization ability of the algorithm. This algorithm can give reliable segmentation results even the image has different lighting conditions, skin types. In the data set offered by Union Hospital, more than 90% images can be segmented accurately.

  15. Imaging of skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Hillary R; Curtin, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    Skull base imaging requires a thorough knowledge of the complex anatomy of this region, including the numerous fissures and foramina and the major neurovascular structures that traverse them. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play complementary roles in imaging of the skull base. MR is the preferred modality for evaluation of the soft tissues, the cranial nerves, and the medullary spaces of bone, while CT is preferred for demonstrating thin cortical bone structure. The anatomic location and origin of a lesion as well as the specific CT and MR findings can often narrow the differential diagnosis to a short list of possibilities. However, the primary role of the imaging specialist in evaluating the skull base is usually to define the extent of the lesion and determine its relationship to vital neurovascular structures. Technologic advances in imaging and radiation therapy, as well as surgical technique, have allowed for more aggressive approaches and improved outcomes, further emphasizing the importance of precise preoperative mapping of skull base lesions via imaging. Tumors arising from and affecting the cranial nerves at the skull base are considered here.

  16. Tuberculosis in a child presenting as asymptomatic oropharyngeal and laryngeal lesions.

    PubMed

    Magina, S; Lisboa, C; Resende, C; Azevedo, F; Amado, F; Cardoso, V; Almeida, F; Mesquita-Guimarães, J

    2003-01-01

    We describe an 11-year-old boy who had several, asymptomatic, erythematous papules in the oropharynx and larynx with recent onset, two cervical lymphadenopathies, and a painless, erythematous plaque on the right wrist with a 2.5-year history of slow growth. Histologic examination of the mucocutaneous lesions revealed a submucous infiltrate of lymphocytes and Langhans giant cells in the papules and granulomatous dermatitis in the plaque. The cervical lymph node was biopsied and on the surgical scar, an erythematous, nodular lesion developed. A biopsy specimen of this lesion showed tuberculoid granulomas with prominent caseation necrosis, and culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Mantoux test was strongly positive with a vesicular response. A diagnosis of mucocutaneous lupus vulgaris and scrofuloderma secondary to cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis was made. Two months after initiation of antituberculosis therapy there was a complete resolution of mucous lesions and healing with atrophic scars on the neck and wrist. This is a rare presentation in the literature and reminds clinicians that tuberculosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of oral cavity lesions.

  17. Characterization of Chronic Cutaneous Lesions from TNF-Receptor-1-Deficient Mice Infected by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carolina Ferreira; Manzoni-de-Almeida, Daniel; Mello, Paula Seixas; Natale, Caio Cotta; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Miranda, Luíza da Silva; Ferraz, Fernanda Oliveira; dos Santos, Liliane Martins; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Vieira, Leda Quercia

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania major-infected TNF receptor 1 deficient (TNFR1 KO) mice resolve parasitism but fail to resolve lesions, while wild-type mice completely heal. We investigated the cell composition, cytokine production, and apoptosis in lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. Chronic lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice presented larger number of CD8+ T and Ly6G+ cells. In addition, higher concentrations of mRNA for IFN-γ CCL2 and CCL5, as well as protein, but lower numbers of apoptotic cells, were found in lesions from TNFR1 KO mice than in WT, at late time points of infection. Our studies showed that persistent lesions in L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice may be mediated by continuous migration of cells to the site of inflammation due to the presence of chemokines and also by lower levels of apoptosis. We suggest that this model has some striking similarities to the mucocutaneous clinical form of leishmaniasis. PMID:22203861

  18. Assessment of disease lesion removal as a method to control chronic Montipora white syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beurmann, Silvia; Runyon, Christina M; Videau, Patrick; Callahan, Sean M; Aeby, Greta S

    2017-03-06

    Coral colonies in Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i (USA), are afflicted with the tissue loss disease chronic Montipora white syndrome (cMWS). Here we show that removal of chronic disease lesions is a potential method to slow the progression of cMWS in M. capitata. Over the 24 wk observation period, treatment colonies lost almost half the amount of tissue that was lost by control colonies. The percentage of tissue loss at each sampling interval (mean ± SEM; treatment: 1.17 ± 0.47%, control: 2.25 ± 0.63%) and the rate of tissue loss per day (treatment: 0.13 ± 0.04%, control: 0.27 ± 0.08%) were both significantly lower on treated colonies than control colonies. While lesion removal stopped tissue loss at the initial infection site, which allowed colony healing, it did not prevent re-infection; in all but one of the treated colonies, new cMWS lesions appeared in other areas of the colony but not around the treatment margins. Additionally, the rate of new infections was similar between treatment and control colonies, indicating that physical injury from lesion removal did not appear to increase cMWS susceptibility. These results indicate that lesion removal reduced morbidity in M. capitata exhibiting cMWS but did not stop the disease.

  19. Healing efficiency of epoxy-based materials for structural application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Marialuigia; Guadagno, Liberata

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a self-healing composite exhibiting high levels of healing efficiency under working conditions typical of aeronautic applications. The self-healing material is composed of a thermosetting epoxy matrix in which a catalyst of Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) and nanocapsules are dispersed. The nanocapsules contain a monomer able to polymerize via ROMP. The preliminary results demonstrate an efficient self-repair function which is also active at very low temperatures.

  20. Identification of Biomarkers Associated with the Healing of Chronic Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    biochemistry from thermally injured swine to that from normally- healing human wound fluid from Phase I of the study. Phase I Technical Objectives 1, 2...Compare wound fluid biochemistry from thermally injured swine to that of normally- healing human wound fluid from Phase I of the study Porcine wound...TITLE: Identification of Biomarkers Associated with the Healing of Chronic Wounds PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura E. Edsberg, Ph.D

  1. Full-thickness skin wound healing using autologous keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts with fibrin: bilayered versus single-layered substitute.

    PubMed

    Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Rameli, Mohd Adha bin P; Low, Kiat Cheong; Law, Jia Xian; Chua, Kien Hui; Latiff, Mazlyzam Bin Abdul; Saim, Aminuddin Bin

    2014-04-01

    Split-skin grafting (SSG) is the gold standard treatment for full-thickness skin defects. For certain patients, however, an extensive skin lesion resulted in inadequacies of the donor site. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach by using a very small portion of an individual's skin to harvest cells for propagation and biomaterials to support the cells for implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of autologous bilayered tissue-engineered skin (BTES) and single-layer tissue-engineered skin composed of only keratinocytes (SLTES-K) or fibroblasts (SLTES-F) as alternatives for full-thickness wound healing in a sheep model. Full-thickness skin biopsies were harvested from adult sheep. Isolated fibroblasts were cultured using medium Ham's F12: Dulbecco modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, whereas the keratinocytes were cultured using Define Keratinocytes Serum Free Medium. The BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F were constructed using autologous fibrin as a biomaterial. Eight full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of the body of the sheep. On 4 wounds, polyvinyl chloride rings were used as chambers to prevent cell migration at the edge. The wounds were observed at days 7, 14, and 21. After 3 weeks of implantation, the sheep were euthanized and the skins were harvested. The excised tissues were fixed in formalin for histological examination via hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and elastin van Gieson staining. The results showed that BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F promote wound healing in nonchambered and chambered wounds, and BTES demonstrated the best healing potential. In conclusion, BTES proved to be an effective tissue-engineered construct that can promote the healing of full-thickness skin lesions. With the support of further clinical trials, this procedure could be an alternative to SSG for patients with partial- and full-thickness burns.

  2. Effect of laser phototherapy on wound healing following cerebral ischemia by cryogenic injury.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Maria S; Velasco, Irineu T; Ferreira, Leila S; Ariga, Suely K K; Abatepaulo, Fatima; Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz; Marques, Márcia M

    2011-12-02

    Laser phototherapy emerges as an alternative or auxiliary therapy for acute ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, degenerative brain disease, spinal cord injury, and peripheral nerve regeneration, but its effects are still controversial. We have previously found that laser phototherapy immunomodulates the response to focal brain damage. Following direct cortical cryogenic injury the effects of laser phototherapy on inflammation and repair was assessed after cryogenic injury (CI) to the central nervous system (CNS) of rats. The laser phototherapy was carried out with a 780 nm AlGaAs diode laser. The irradiation parameters were: power of 40 mW, beam area of 0.04 cm(2), energy density of 3 J/cm(2) (3s) in two points (0.12 J per point). Two irradiations were performed at 3 h-intervals, in contact mode. Rats (20 non-irradiated - controls and 20 irradiated) were used. The wound healing in the CNS was followed in 6 h, 1, 7 and 14 days after the last irradiation. The size of the lesions, the neuron cell viability percentages and the amount of positive GFAP labeling were statistically compared by ANOVA complemented by Tukey's test (p<0.05). The distribution of lymphocytes, leukocytes and macrophages were also analyzed. CI created focal lesions in the cortex represented by necrosis, edema, hemorrhage and inflammatory infiltrate. The most striking findings were: lased lesions showed smaller tissue loss than control lesions in 6 h. During the first 24 h the amount of viable neurons was significantly higher in the lased group. There was a remarkable increase in the amount of GFAP in the control group by 14 days. Moreover, the lesions of irradiated animals had fewer leukocytes and lymphocytes in the first 24 h than controls. Considering the experimental conditions of this study it was concluded that laser phototherapy exerts its effect in wound healing following CI by controlling the brain damage, preventing neuron death and severe astrogliosis that could indicate the

  3. Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-05-01

    We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

  4. Healing from childhood sexual abuse: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Draucker, Claire Burke; Martsolf, Donna S; Roller, Cynthia; Knapik, Gregory; Ross, Ratchneewan; Stidham, Andrea Warner

    2011-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse is a prevalent social and health care problem. The processes by which individuals heal from childhood sexual abuse are not clearly understood. The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical model to describe how adults heal from childhood sexual abuse. Community recruitment for an ongoing broader project on sexual violence throughout the lifespan, referred to as the Sexual Violence Study, yielded a subsample of 48 women and 47 men who had experienced childhood sexual abuse. During semistructured, open-ended interviews, they were asked to describe their experiences with healing from childhood sexual abuse and other victimization throughout their lives. Constructivist grounded theory methods were used with these data to develop constructs and hypotheses about healing. For the Sexual Violence Study, frameworks were developed to describe the participants' life patterns, parenting experiences, disclosures about sexual violence, spirituality, and altruism. Several analytic techniques were used to synthesize the findings of these frameworks to develop an overarching theoretical model that describes healing from childhood sexual abuse. The model includes four stages of healing, five domains of functioning, and six enabling factors that facilitate movement from one stage to the next. The findings indicate that healing is a complex and dynamic trajectory. The model can be used to alert clinicians to a variety of processes and enabling factors that facilitate healing in several domains and to guide discussions on important issues related to healing from childhood sexual abuse.

  5. Nrf2 deficiency impairs fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lippross, Sebastian; Beckmann, Rainer; Streubesand, Nadine; Ayub, Ferda; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Campbell, Graeme; Kan, Yuet Wai; Horst, Fischer; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Varoga, Deike; Lichte, Philipp; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas; Wruck, Christoph Jan

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in wound healing but data relating oxidative stress to fracture healing are scarce. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is the major transcription factor that controls the cellular defence essential to combat oxidative stress by regulating the expression of antioxidative enzymes. This study examined the impact of Nrf2 on fracture healing using a standard closed femoral shaft fracture model in wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO)-mice. Healing was evaluated by histology, real-time RT-PCR, µCT and biomechanical measurements. We showed that Nrf2 expression is activated during fracture healing. Bone healing and remodelling were retarded in the Nrf2-KO compared to the WT-mice. Nrf2-KO-mice developed significantly less callus tissue compared to WT-mice. In addition, biomechanical testing demonstrated lower strength against shear stress in the Nrf2-KO-group compared to WT. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and osteocalcin is reduced during fracture healing in Nrf2-KO-mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Nrf2 deficiency in mice results in impaired fracture healing suggesting that Nrf2 plays an essential role in bone regeneration. Pharmacological activation of Nrf2 may have therapeutic potential for the enhancement of fracture healing.

  6. Folk healing and biomedicine: culture clash or complimentary approach?

    PubMed

    Engebretson, J

    1994-09-01

    Health care professionals are often faced with clients who are using alternative healing techniques along with biomedicine. A comparison of biomedicine in its cultural context to folk healing serves to highlight the cultural aspects of both systems. The cult of Fidencio, a popular healer in northern Mexico and southern United States, is used to illustrate a folk healing system. Biomedicine is presented in a historical context to show the American value of scientific objectivity. Current interest in alternative healing in the United States challenges the absolute primacy of scientific rationalism and opens the door for complementary approaches.

  7. Optimization of intramedullary nailing by numerical simulation of fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Tim; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Simon, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Due to the annular gap between intramedullary (IM) nails and the endosteal surface, high interfragmentary movement can occur under loading. This could prolong the healing time, particularly for thin IM nails that are often used for unreamed IM nailing. The aims of our study were to determine the influence of the nail diameter on the healing time of human tibial shaft fractures and to investigate whether the healing time could be shortened by increasing the stiffness of the implant material. Therefore, a corroborated numerical model for simulating the fracture healing process in humans was used to simulate the healing process of human tibial fractures treated with IM nails. The calculated healing time (up to 71 weeks) was longest for transverse fractures treated with thin IM nails made of titanium. That the healing time was disproportionately long depended on the nail diameter, and could be greatly reduced by using a thicker nail or using steel instead of titanium. To avoid a prolonged healing time, the nail should be thick, and the annular gap should be as narrow as possible. Alternatively, using steel instead of titanium may also help to avoid a prolonged healing time.

  8. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-02

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  9. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  10. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  11. A potential wound-healing-promoting peptide from salamander skin.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lixian; Tang, Jing; Liu, Han; Shen, Chuanbin; Rong, Mingqiang; Zhang, Zhiye; Lai, Ren

    2014-09-01

    Although it is well known that wound healing proceeds incredibly quickly in urodele amphibians, such as newts and salamanders, little is known about skin-wound healing, and no bioactive/effector substance that contributes to wound healing has been identified from these animals. As a step toward understanding salamander wound healing and skin regeneration, a potential wound-healing-promoting peptide (tylotoin; KCVRQNNKRVCK) was identified from salamander skin of Tylototriton verrucosus. It shows comparable wound-healing-promoting ability (EC50=11.14 μg/ml) with epidermal growth factor (EGF; NSDSECPLSHDGYCLHDGVCMYIEALDKYACNCVVGYIGERCQYRDLKWWELR) in a murine model of full-thickness dermal wound. Tylotoin directly enhances the motility and proliferation of keratinocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, resulting in accelerated reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation in the wound site. Tylotoin also promotes the release of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), which are essential in the wound healing response. Gene-encoded tylotoin secreted in salamander skin is possibly an effector molecule for skin wound healing. This study may facilitate understanding of the cellular and molecular events that underlie quick wound healing in salamanders.

  12. Wound healing properties of Hylocereus undatus on diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Perez G, R M; Vargas S, R; Ortiz H, Y D

    2005-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of leaves, rind, fruit pulp and flowers of Hylocereus undatus were studied for their wound healing properties. Wound healing effects were studied on incision (skin breaking strength), excision (percent wound contraction) and the nature of wound granulation tissues, which were removed on day 7 and the collagen, hexosamine, total proteins and DNA contents were determined, in addition to the rates of wound contraction and the period of epithelialization. In streptozotocin diabetic rats, where healing is delayed, topical applications of H. undatus produced increases in hydroxyproline, tensile strength, total proteins, DNA collagen content and better epithelization thereby facilitating healing. H. undatus had no hypoglycemic activity.

  13. Muscle-bone Interactions During Fracture Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    equal vascu- larization in healed bone and non-unions in animal studies as well as in human patients20,24-26. In a murine open tibial fracture model...the periosteum is intact, repair occurs largely through endochondral ossification driven by a periosteal supply of cells10,47-50. Indeed, in open...activated to serve as a secondary supply of cells when the periosteal supply becomes compro- mised52,53. These recent findings of muscle’s ability to

  14. The power of dance: health and healing.

    PubMed

    Hanna, J L

    1995-01-01

    Dance involves the culturally mediated body, emotion, and mind. So do illness and pain. Dance may promote wellness by strengthening the immune system through muscular action and physiological processes. Dance conditions an individual to moderate, eliminate, or avoid tension, chronic fatigue, and other disabling conditions that result from the effects of stress. Dance may help the healing process as a person gains a sense of control through (1) possession by the spiritual in dance, (2) mastery of movement, (3) escape or diversion from stress and pain through a change in emotion, states of consciousness, and/or physical capability, and (4) confronting stressors to work through ways of handling their effects.

  15. Alkyl ferulates in wound healing potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Bernards, M A; Lewis, N G

    1992-10-01

    Seven ferulic acid esters of 1-alkanols ranging in carbon length from C16 to C28 were synthesized and an HPLC protocol for their separation developed. Extracts prepared from wound healing potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and analysed by HPLC indicated that alkyl ferulate esters begin to accumulate 3-7 days after wound treatment. Of the nine esters identified by EIMS, (including two esters of odd chain length alkanols) hexadecyl and octadecyl ferulates were predominant. Alkyl ferulate esters were restricted to the wound periderm.

  16. Stem cells in orthopaedics and fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Alwattar, Basil J; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell application is a burgeoning field of medicine that is likely to influence the future of orthopaedic surgery. Stem cells are associated with great promise and great controversy. For the orthopaedic surgeon, stem cells may change the way that orthopaedic surgery is practiced and the overall approach of the treatment of musculoskeletal disease. Stem cells may change the field of orthopaedics from a field dominated by surgical replacements and reconstructions to a field of regeneration and prevention. This review will introduce the basic concepts of stem cells pertinent to the orthopaedic surgeon and proceed with a more in depth discussion of current developments in the study of stem cells in fracture healing.

  17. Effects of glutamine on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kesici, Ugur; Kesici, Sevgi; Ulusoy, Hulya; Yucesan, Fulya; Turkmen, Aygen U; Besir, Ahmet; Tuna, Verda

    2015-06-01

    Studies reporting the need for replacing amino acids such as glutamine (Gln), hydroxymethyl butyrate (HMB) and arginine (Arg) to accelerate wound healing are available in the literature. The primary objective of this study was to present the effects of Gln on tissue hydroxyproline (OHP) levels in wound healing. This study was conducted on 30 female Sprague Dawley rats with a mean weight of 230 ± 20 g. Secondary wounds were formed by excising 2 × 1 cm skin subcutaneous tissue on the back of the rats. The rats were divided into three equal groups. Group C (Control): the group received 1 ml/day isotonic solution by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group A (Abound): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln, 0·052 g/kg/day/ml HMB and 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Arg by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group R (Resource): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. The OHP levels of the tissues obtained from the upper half region on the 8th day and the lower half region on the 21st day from the same rats in the groups were examined. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistics program SPSS version 17.0. No statistically significant differences were reported with regard to the OHP measurements on the 8th and 21st days (8th day: F = 0·068, P = 0·935 > 0·05; 21st day: F = 0·018, P = 0·983 > 0·05). The increase in mean OHP levels on the 8th and 21st days within each group was found to be statistically significant (F = 1146·34, P = 0·000 < 0·001). We conclude that in adults who eat healthy food, who do not have any factor that can affect wound healing negatively and who do not have large tissue loss at critical level, Gln, Arg and HMB support would not be required to accelerate secondary wound healing.

  18. [From scattering to wavefront. Healing optics].

    PubMed

    Semchishen, V; Mrokhen, M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report, made within research in progress, was to discuss the optical effect of irregular surface structures that might be associated with complicated refractive procedures related with the retinal image quality. We concentrated our discussion on the range of surface structures between the known scattering effects and wavefront aberrations of higher orders. The case study demonstrates that the surface irregularities of the cornea might induce, after refractive laser surgery, significant optical aberrations that are much too different from the classical wavevront or scattering errors. Such optical errors, however, cannot be correctly measured by current commercial wavefront sensors. Finally, the influence of the healing process on Strehl ratio is under discussion.

  19. Religious youth cults: Alternative healing social networks.

    PubMed

    Pattison, E M

    1980-12-01

    The motivation of youth to join esoteric religious cults considered as psychopathology is a limited and reductionistic interpretation. Youthful devotees do demonstrate symptoms of psychic distress, which appear to be significantly ameliorated through participation in religious youth cults. Two major trends in social history reveal the sources of youth cults: loss of faith in the rationalistic Western cosmology and loss of the extended family system. The religious youth cult possesses many of the properties of the normal psychosocial system, which is a critical social structure for healthful coping in the world. As a normative social system, the religious youth cult is an alternative healing system for the existential crises of contemporary youth.

  20. Self-Healing composites for Mitigation of Impact Damage in US Army Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    triggering mechanism for self-healing, rupturing the embedded microcapsules and releasing healing agent into In this study, fiber-reinforced...through the inclusion of urea-formaldehyde properties in self-healing materials have focused on microcapsules containing dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monotonic...systems, healing is Figure 1: (a) Optical micrograph and (b) schematic demonstrating accomplished by incorporating a microencapsulated the self-healing

  1. Healing Circles: An Ethnographic Study of the Interactions Among Health and Healing Practitioners From Multiple Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Healing circle” is a term that has been employed by a group of Northern California integrative medicine researchers as we embarked on an 8-year ethnographic study. As a clinical medical anthropologist and registered nurse specializing in integrative practice and behavioral health, I undertook this study with colleagues from various health disciplines. PMID:25105070

  2. Wound healing properties and kill kinetics of Clerodendron splendens G. Don, a Ghanaian wound healing plant

    PubMed Central

    Gbedema, Stephen Y.; Emelia, Kisseih; Francis, Adu; Kofi, Annan; Eric, Woode

    2010-01-01

    As part of our general objective of investigating indigenous plants used in wound healing in Ghana, we hereby report our findings from some in vitro and in vivo studies related to wound healing activities of Clerodendron splendens G. Don (Verbanaceae). Methanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Micrococcus flavus, as well as resistant strains of Staph. aureus SA1199B, RN4220 and XU212), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteous mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Candida albicans using the micro-well dilution method. Survivor–time studies of the microorganisms, radical scavenging activity using 2,2’-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and various in vivo wound healing activity studies were also conducted on the extract. The extract exhibited biostatic action against all the test microorganisms with a Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) ranging between 64 and 512 μg/ml and a free radical scavenging property with an IC50 value of 103.2 μg/ml. The results of the in vivo wound healing tests showed that upon application of C. splendens ointment, there was a reduction in the epithelization period from 26.7 days (control) to 13.6 days along with a marked decrease in the scar area from 54.2 mm2 (control) to 25.2 mm2. Significant increase in the tensile strength and hydroxyproline content were also observed as compared to the control and was comparable to nitrofurazone. The above results appear to justify the traditional use of C. splendens in wound healing and treatment of skin infections in Ghana. PMID:21808542

  3. Solid state self-healing system: Effects of using PDGEBA, PVC and PVA as linear healing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad, Noor Nabilah; Jamil, Mohd. Suzeren Md.; Abdullah, Shahrum

    2014-09-01

    The solid state self-healing system was obtained by employing a thermosetting epoxy resin, into which a thermoplastic is dissolved. In this study, the effect of healing efficiency was investigated by using different thermoplastic polymers which are poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), polyvinyl chloride and polyvinyl alcohol as healing agents. Healing was achieved by heating the fractured resins to a specific temperature i.e. above their glass transition temperature (Tg) which obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to mobilize the polymeric chains of the healing agent. The curing reaction in the epoxy resins were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Izod impact test was been performed to demonstrate self-healing of the different specimens. Under test, it was found that healable resin with PDGEBA has highest healing efficiency followed by PVC and PVA, with 63%, 35% and 18% of average percentage healing efficiencies respectively. These results are due to the different solubility parameters of the thermoset/network and thermoplastic polymer which led to the phase separation. Morphological studies prove the fracture-healing process and morphological properties of the resins.

  4. Doctoring as leadership: the power to heal.

    PubMed

    Schei, Edvin

    2006-01-01

    Physician power has been attacked, and tabooed, in legitimate efforts to strengthen patients' rights. Yet the structural and symbolic power wielded by doctors is what makes good and right healing actions possible. Avoiding the power issue contributes to a confusing state, where patient trust is faltering and physicians are uncertain about how to fulfill the doctor's role with the intellectual tools of mere science and technology. I argue that constitutive characteristics of health, illness, and the clinical encounter necessitate a prescriptive and responsible healing agent who is more than a technocrat, an information broker, or a seller. The article proposes clinical leadership as a concept offering practical and ethical direction to clinicians, education, research, and health policy. Leadership presupposes reflective awareness of physicians' structural and symbolic power, and is displayed as discerning, empowering improvisations in critical situations, based on empathy and willingness to learn from patients. The notion of clinical leadership highlights patient vulnerability, medicine's ethical core, and the importance of character development in medical education.

  5. Mechanoregulation of Angiogenesis in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Lancerotto, Luca; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-10-01

    Significance: Mechanical forces are important regulators of cell and tissue function. Endothelial cells proliferate in response to tissue stretch and the mechanical properties of the environment direct capillary sprouting and growth. As the vascular network is a key factor in physiology and disease, control of the vascularity by means of mechanical forces could lead to the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Recent Advances: Increased understanding of mechanobiology has stimulated translational research and allowed the development and optimization of clinical devices that exploit mechanical forces for the treatment of diseases, in particular in the field of wound healing. Stretching in distraction osteogenesis and tissue expansion induces neogenesis of well-vascularized tissues. In micro-deformational wound therapy, micro-mechanical distortions of the wound bed stimulate cell proliferation and angiogenesis by stretching resident cells to improve healing of difficult wounds. Relief from tension antagonizes proliferation and angiogenesis in primarily closed wounds allowing for better scar quality. Critical Issues: The integration of mechanobiology into traditional cell biology and pathophysiology in general is not yet complete and further research is needed to fill existing gaps, in particular in the complexity of in vivo conditions. Future Directions: Still largely unexplored approaches based on mechanical perturbation of the micro-/macro-environment can be devised to overcome the limits of current strategies in a broad spectrum of clinical conditions.

  6. Bone healing under experimental anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Giglio, M J; Gorustovich, A; Guglielmotti, M B

    2000-01-01

    The effects of anemia on different physiological parameters have been the object of permanent study. There are no studies in the literature on the effects of this disorder on the process on bone healing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, histologically and histomorphometrically, the process of osteogenesis in the post-extraction alvcolus of the lower molar, and in the peri-implant environment of rats. Twenty male Wistar rats (body weight (b.w.): 60 +/- 7 g) were grouped into two experimental sets. The control group (n:10) was given 0.5 mL saline solution i.p. The anemic group (n:10) was injected with 6 mg/100 g of b.w. or 3 mg/100 g b.w. phenylhidrazine, a well known hemolytic agent. Under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia the rats were submitted to extraction of the first lower molars, and to implantation in the tibia in keeping with the "laminar test" procedure. Other parameters, i.e. body weight (b.w.), food intake (FI), hematocrit (Htc), and hemoglobinemia (Hb) were monitored every 48 hs. The results showed a reduction in b.w., FI, Htc and Hb in the experimental group. The histological and histomorphometrical data show that the condition of anemia affects osteogenesis quali-quantitatively in the post-extraction alveolus and peri-implant microenvironment. Both bone reparative situations showed that ostegenesis is "sensitive" to anemia and/or the associated conditions, causing a delay in bone healing.

  7. Honey: a potent agent for wound healing?

    PubMed

    Lusby, P E; Coombes, A; Wilkinson, J M

    2002-11-01

    Although honey has been used as a traditional remedy for burns and wounds, the potential for its inclusion in mainstream medical care is not well recognized. Many studies have demonstrated that honey has antibacterial activity in vitro, and a small number of clinical case studies have shown that application of honey to severely infected cutaneous wounds is capable of clearing infection from the wound and improving tissue healing. The physicochemical properties (eg, osmotic effects and pH) of honey also aid in its antibacterial actions. Research has also indicated that honey may possess antiinflammatory activity and stimulate immune responses within a wound. The overall effect is to reduce infection and to enhance wound healing in burns, ulcers, and other cutaneous wounds. It is also known that honeys derived from particular floral sources in Australia and New Zealand (Leptospermum spp) have enhanced antibacterial activity, and these honeys have been approved for marketing as therapeutic honeys (Medihoney and Active Manuka honey). This review outlines what is known about the medical properties of honey and indicates the potential for honey to be incorporated into the management of a large number of wound types.

  8. [Mexican ceramic material for skin healing].

    PubMed

    Piña-Barba, María Cristina; Tejeda-Cruz, Adriana; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Arenas-Reyes, María Isabel; Martín-Mandujano, Salvador; Montalvo, César

    2004-01-01

    Sixty female Wistar rats were employed and divided into three experimental groups of 20 rats each. Groups were evaluated at 15, 30, and the last at 45 days after surgery. Each group was divided into four sets of five rats each. All rats were subjected to surgery; an incision of 2 x 2 cm was done on the back of each animal, removing tissue until reaching muscular fascia, where the material was applied. Nitro-furazone was employed as positive control. Test materials were AlPO added with 0.55% wt of Zn; 0.30% wt of Ca(OH)2, and AlPO added with 0.55% wt of Zn and 0.66% wt of Ca(OH)2. Finally, as negative control no material was used. The object of this work was in the first place obtension of test materials and to evaluate the healing skin process in rats using AlPO enriched with Zn and Ca(OH)2; as indicated previously. Obtained materials were characterized employing XRD. Histologic studies tested showed that best healing process of dermal tissue corresponded to rats treated with AlPO added with 0.55% wt of Zn and 0.30% wt of Ca(OH)2. Use of AlPO ceramics to repair skin has not been reported previously.

  9. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Ângela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats.

  10. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  11. Growth factors and cytokines in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Stephan; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Golinko, Michael S; Brem, Harold; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved, complex, multicellular process that, in skin, aims at barrier restoration. This process involves the coordinated efforts of several cell types including keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, macrophages, and platelets. The migration, infiltration, proliferation, and differentiation of these cells will culminate in an inflammatory response, the formation of new tissue and ultimately wound closure. This complex process is executed and regulated by an equally complex signaling network involving numerous growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. Of particular importance is the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), interleukin (IL) family, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha family. Currently, patients are treated by three growth factors: PDGF-BB, bFGF, and GM-CSF. Only PDGF-BB has successfully completed randomized clinical trials in the Unites States. With gene therapy now in clinical trial and the discovery of biodegradable polymers, fibrin mesh, and human collagen serving as potential delivery systems other growth factors may soon be available to patients. This review will focus on the specific roles of these growth factors and cytokines during the wound healing process.

  12. Mercy Ship--a wave of healing.

    PubMed

    Kłoda, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Mercy Ships is an international charity that was founded in 1978 as the maritime division of Youth WithA Mission and currently operates as the largest non-governmental hospital ship in the world. The merchant vessel(M/V) Africa Mercy provides free health care, community development projects, community health education,agriculture projects, and palliative care for terminally ill patients. M/V Anastasis (1978-2007, retired) wasa flagship of the four-strong Mercy Ships Fleet which was manned by volunteers and equipped through donationsto bring physical and spiritual healing to the poor and needy in port cities around the world. The purpose of thisarticle is to make known the growing need for help in developing countries and to share my personal experiencewhile working for the Mercy Ships organisation on board the M/V Anastasis.In developing nations, 1,2 billion people live in absolute poverty and have no access to basic health care, cleanwater and sanitation. The "big killers" in our world today (such as infectious and parasitic diseases, lack of basicsanitation, diarrheal diseases, upper respiratory infections, lack of vaccination, malaria, tuberculosis, hungerand hunger-related diseases, death in childbirth) are preventable. Behind every statistics there is a story, a lifeand a person waiting for hope and healing. What little we do to prevent these can have a major impact.

  13. Enhancing spontaneous stem cell healing (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAGUIRE, GREG; FRIEDMAN, PETER

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells are distributed throughout the human body and are responsible to a great extent for the body’s ability to maintain and heal itself. Accumulating data since the 1990s regarding stem cells have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells are not restricted to their ability to differentiate and are more likely due to their ability to release a multitude of molecules. Recent studies indicated that ≤80% of the therapeutic benefit of adult stem cells is manifested by the stem cell released molecules (SRM) rather than the differentiation of the stem cells into mature tissue. Stem cells may release potent combinations of factors that modulate the molecular composition of the cellular milieu to evoke a multitude of responses from neighboring cells. A multitude of pathways are involved in cellular and tissue function and, when the body is in a state of disease or trauma, a multitude of pathways are involved in the underlying mechanisms of that disease or trauma. Therefore, stem cells represent a natural systems-based biological factory for the production and release of a multitude of molecules that interact with the system of biomolecular circuits underlying disease or tissue damage. Currently, efforts are aimed at defining, stimulating, enhancing and harnessing SRM mechanisms, in order to develop systems-based methods for tissue regeneration, develop drugs/biologics or other therapeutics and enhance the release of SRM into the body for natural healing through proper dietary, exercise and other lifestyle strategies. PMID:24649089

  14. Walking with Madhu: healing ped/agogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, T. Francene

    2015-03-01

    In this essay, the author responds to Madhu Prakash's piece on friendship gardens and healing our "Mother" through Prakash's central question, How to birth a world in which many worlds flourish and complement each other in their wild, divine diversity; all equally enjoying Ahimsa flourishing and happiness? Coming from the standpoint of schooling, education, and teacher preparation, the author works to reground the descriptors of "pre-service" and "in-service" from a technical discourse to an ecological one, where the notion of service becomes expansive and pedagogical. Illustrated is how people in community are building gardens and working with soil in a way that is restorative for more-than human relationships, illuminating the deep ways gardens heal and nourish. This is especially important as we emerge from the wake of Cold War numbness, where gardens enable and empower continued societal growth from ideological mindset of "against" to an increasing ability to look at the discord inside of our own communities/selves and move to growing "with." Working with soil not only opens us to relationship and hospitality with one another, but also inspires peace with the earth.

  15. Can a fractured caprock self-heal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, Jean E.; Detwiler, Russell L.; Ameli, Pasha

    2015-05-01

    The ability of geologic seals to prevent leakage of fluids injected into the deep subsurface is critical for mitigating risks associated with greenhouse-gas sequestration and natural-gas production. Fractures caused by tectonic or injection-induced stresses create potential leakage pathways that may be further enhanced by mineral dissolution. We present results from reactive-flow experiments in fractured caprock (dolomitic anhydrite), where additional dissolution occurs in the rock matrix adjacent to the fracture surfaces. Preferential dissolution of anhydrite left a compacted layer of dolomite in the fractures. At lower flow rate, rock-fluid reactions proceeded to near equilibrium within the fracture with preferential flow paths persisting over the 6-month duration of the experiment and a negligible change in permeability. At higher flow rate, permeability decreased by a dramatic two orders of magnitude. This laboratory-scale observation of self-healing argues against the likelihood of runaway permeability growth in fractured porous caprock composed of minerals with different solubilities and reaction kinetics. However, scaling arguments suggest that at larger length scales this self-healing process may be offset by the formation of dissolution channels. Our results have relevance beyond the greenhouse-gas sequestration problem. Chemical disequilibrium at waste injection sites and in hydrothermal reservoirs will lead to reactive flows that may also significantly alter formation permeability.

  16. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  17. Laboratory Evidence of Strength Recovery of Healed Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.

    2015-12-01

    Fault zones consist of a fault core and a surrounding damage zone. Fault zones are typically characterized by the presence of many healed surfaces, the strength of which is unknown. If a healed fault recovers its strength such that its cohesion is equal to or greater than that of the host rock, repeated cycles of fracture and healing may be one mechanism producing wide fault zones. I present laboratory evidence supporting the strength recovery of healed fault surface, obtained by AE monitoring, strain measurements and X-ray CT techniques. The loading experiment was performed with a specimen collected from an exhumed fault zone. Healed surfaces of the rock sample were interpreted to be parallel to slip surfaces. The specimen was a cylinder with 50 mm diameter and 100 mm long. The long axis of the specimen was inclined with respect to the orientation of the healed surfaces. The compression test used a constant loading rate under 50 MPa of confining pressure. Macroscopic failure occurred when the applied differential stress reached 439 MPa. The macro-fracture surface created during the experiment was very close to the preexisting plane. The AE hypocenters closely match the locations of the preexisting healed surface and the new fault plane. The experiment also revealed details of the initial stage of fault development. The new fault zone developed near, but not precisely on the preexisting healed fault plane. An area of heterogeneous structure where stress appears to have concentrated, was where the AEs began, and it was also where the fracture started. This means that the healed surface was not a weak surface and that healing strengthened the fault such that its cohesion was equal to or greater than that of the intact host rock. These results suggest that repeated cycles of fracture and healing may be the main mechanism creating wide fault zones with multiple fault cores and damage zones.

  18. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  19. PARTIAL ARTICULAR SUPRASPINATUS TENDON AVULSION (PASTA) LESION. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotator cuff pathology can contribute to shoulder pain and may affect the performance of sport activities, work, and activities of daily living. The partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) lesion represents a very common type of rotator cuff pathology seen in rehabilitation. When conservative treatment fails, surgery is generally required. Success of recovery depends on several factors, including: repair techniques, healing process related to timing, rehabilitation programs, and patient compliance with home exercises. To date, most treatment modalities and rehabilitation programs are based on clinical experience rather than scientific evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview on the PASTA lesion, discuss the common treatment approaches adopted to date and to propose a rehabilitation program based on the available scientific evidence. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27274431

  20. Computer-aided tracking of MS lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Deborah; Gurwitz Kletenik, Devorah; Koshy, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions are known to change over time. The location, size and shape characteristics of lesions are often used to diagnose and to track disease progression. We have improved our lesion-browsing tool that allows users to automatically locate successive significant lesions in a MRI stack. In addition, an automatic alignment feature was implemented to facilitate comparisons across stacks. A lesion stack is formed that can be browsed independently or in tandem with the image windows. Lesions of interest can then be measured, rendered and rotated. Multiple windows allow the viewer to compare the size and shape of lesions from the MRI images of the same patient taken at different time intervals.