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  1. Loss of passive external rotation at 90 degrees abduction is predictive of a medially healed Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Allen; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2006-07-01

    This prospective study correlates passive range of external rotation with arthroscopic findings in patients with anterior instability for the purpose of defining criteria that can be used to detect a medially healed Bankart lesion. External rotation at 90 degrees abduction (ER90) was assessed on examination with the patient under anesthesia in bilateral shoulders of 46 consecutive patients with unidirectional, anterior glenohumeral instability. Arthroscopy was used to identify 22 patients with a detached Bankart lesion (group I) and 24 patients with a medially healed Bankart lesion (group II). Differences in ER90 between symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders for both groups were compared. The t test and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test measured significance. In group I, mean ER90 in the symptomatic shoulder was 5 degrees greater than in the asymptomatic shoulder; in group II, mean ER90 in the symptomatic shoulder was 7.4 degrees less than in the asymptomatic shoulder (P < .001). Loss of ER90 was highly sensitive (92%) and specific (95%), with a positive predictive value of 96% for detection of a medially healed Bankart lesion. If a loss of 5 degrees or more of ER90 in the affected shoulder is found on examination under anesthesia, one should have a high degree of suspicion for the presence of a medially healed Bankart lesion. Level II, development of diagnostic criteria on basis of consecutive patients.

  2. Do Bankart lesions heal better in shoulders immobilized in external rotation?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Immobilization in external rotation (ER) for shoulder dislocation has been reported to improve the coaptation of Bankart lesions to the glenoid. We compared the position of the labrum in patients treated with immobilization in ER or internal rotation (IR). A secondary aim was to evaluate the rate of Bankart lesions. Patients and methods 55 patients with primary anterior shoulder dislocation, aged between 16 and 40 years, were randomized to immobilization in ER or IR. Computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed shortly after the injury. After the immobilization, MRI arthrography was performed. We evaluated the rate of Bankart lesions and measured the separation and displacement of the labrum as well as the length of the detached part of the capsule on the glenoid neck. Results Immobilization in ER reduced the number of Bankart lesions (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.1 –13; p = 0.04). Separation decreased to a larger extent in the ER group than in the IR group (mean difference 0.6 mm, 95% CI: 0.1 – 1.1, p = 0.03). Displacement of the labrum and the detached part of the capsule showed no significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Immobilization in ER results in improved coaptation of the labrum after primary traumatic shoulder dislocation. PMID:19916693

  3. Do Bankart lesions heal better in shoulders immobilized in external rotation?

    PubMed

    Liavaag, Sigurd; Stiris, Morten Georg; Lindland, Elisabeth Stokke; Enger, Martine; Svenningsen, Svein; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2009-10-01

    Immobilization in external rotation (ER) for shoulder dislocation has been reported to improve the coaptation of Bankart lesions to the glenoid. We compared the position of the labrum in patients treated with immobilization in ER or internal rotation (IR). A secondary aim was to evaluate the rate of Bankart lesions. 55 patients with primary anterior shoulder dislocation, aged between 16 and 40 years, were randomized to immobilization in ER or IR. Computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed shortly after the injury. After the immobilization, MRI arthrography was performed. We evaluated the rate of Bankart lesions and measured the separation and displacement of the labrum as well as the length of the detached part of the capsule on the glenoid neck. Immobilization in ER reduced the number of Bankart lesions (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.1 -13; p = 0.04). Separation decreased to a larger extent in the ER group than in the IR group (mean difference 0.6 mm, 95% CI: 0.1 - 1.1, p = 0.03). Displacement of the labrum and the detached part of the capsule showed no significant differences between the groups. Immobilization in ER results in improved coaptation of the labrum after primary traumatic shoulder dislocation.

  4. [Bony Bankart lesions].

    PubMed

    Spiegl, U J; Braun, S; Euler, S A; Warth, R J; Millett, P J

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the anteroinferior glenoid rim, termed bony Bankart lesions, have been reported to occur in up to 22% of first time anterior shoulder dislocations. The primary goal of treatment is to create a stable glenohumeral joint and a good shoulder function. Options for therapeutic intervention are largely dependent on the chronicity of the lesion, the activity level of the patient and postreduction fracture characteristics, such as the size, location and number of fracture fragments. Non-operative treatment can be successful for small, acute fractures, which are anatomically reduced after shoulder reduction. However, in patients with a high risk profile for recurrent instability initial Bankart repair is recommended. Additionally, bony fixation is recommended for acute fractures that involve more than 15-20% of the inferior glenoid diameter. On the other hand chronic fractures are generally managed on a case-by-case basis depending on the amount of fragment resorption and bony erosion of the anterior glenoid with high recurrence rates under conservative therapy. When significant bone loss of the anterior glenoid is present, anatomical (e.g. iliac crest bone graft and osteoarticular allograft) or non-anatomical (e.g. Latarjet and Bristow) reconstruction of the anterior glenoid is often indicated.

  5. Isolated HAGL lesion after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a professional soccer player.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Akman, Senol

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability commonly occurs following an avulsion of capsulolabral complex from glenoid (Bankart lesion) or rarely after humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion). Arthroscopic Bankart repair offers high success rates of healing. However, trauma following the treatment may cause implant failure or re-avulsion of the treated tissue. We aim to present the diagnosis and treatment of an isolated HAGL lesion in a professional soccer player who had previously undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  6. Acute bony bankart lesion and surgical fixation.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Michael D; Provencher, Matthew T

    2009-10-01

    The patient was a 25-year-old man who sustained a traumatic left anterior shoulder dislocation. After self-reducing the first time, as well as in subsequent repeated dislocations over the following 2-day period, the patient reported his injury to the medical staff, who sent him to the physical therapist for evaluation. Anterior-posterior, scapular outlet, and axillary radiographic views demonstrated a bony glenoid lesion consistent with a bony Bankart lesion, which was best seen on the scapular outlet view. A 3-dimensional computed tomography scan was performed to assess the size and displacement of the bony Bankart lesion. Six days following injury, the patient underwent operative fixation of the bony Bankart lesion. Following surgery, the patient completed 5 months of physical therapy and subsequently returned to high-demand upper body activities. At 3 years following surgery, the patient reported full functional ability without shoulder instability or pain.

  7. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsumasa

    2004-01-01

    The Bankart lesion is an essential finding of traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reliability of diagnosis by ultrasonography (US) of the Bankart lesion when using an axillary approach. Six cadaveric shoulders were examined by US from the axilla. The shoulders were then dissected along the plane of the ultrasonic beam. The labrum at the 4-o'clock position of all 6 cadavers was present along the ultrasonic plane; there were no obstacles from the skin to the glenoid rim, and all cases had a normal labrum at the 4-o'clock position. US images of the normal labrum showed that the labrum was continuously connected to the glenoid rim with no borderline (low-echo line) between them. Preoperative US from the axilla was performed in 75 patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery. Anteroinferior labra were classified preoperatively from the US images as normal, detached (low-echo line between glenoid rim and labrum), or displaced (labrum displaced from glenoid rim), with a diagnosis of a Bankart lesion being made for the latter two types. US findings were correlated with arthroscopic observations. This revealed that for the detection of Bankart lesions, US had a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 77.4%, an accuracy of 84.0%, a positive predictive value of 84.8%, and a negative predictive value of 82.8%. These results demonstrate that US with an axillary approach is useful in the diagnosis of Bankart lesions of the shoulder.

  8. A new "double-pulley" dual-row technique for arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Chunyan

    2011-09-01

    The double-row technique is a new concept for arthroscopic treatment of bony Bankart lesion in shoulder instability. It presents a new and reproducible technique for arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart fragments with suture anchors. This technique creates double-mattress sutures which compress the fragment against its bone bed and restores better bony anatomy of the anterior glenoid rim with stable and non-tilting fixation that may improve healing.

  9. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Methods Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. Results The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Conclusions Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27904726

  10. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Chae-Chil; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-12-01

    Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions.

  11. A pulled sutures technique for bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ill; Choi, Hyung Suk; Min, Kyung Dae; Kwon, Sai Won; Kim, Jun Bum; Kim, Yong-Beom; Chun, Dong-Il

    2014-05-01

    In an attempt to present a new surgical technique for arthroscopic bony Bankart fixation, the authors developed the pulled sutures technique. In executing the new method, the authors first passed several non-absorbable sutures through labroligamentous tissue with displaced articular fragment by mimicking transglenoid suture technique. Aimed at achieving a safe and stable fixation, using a knotless anchor rather than transglenoid suture, was deployed. Overall, this pulled sutures technique was shown to be effective with the result of direct reduction, stable, and safe fixation for bony Bankart's lesion.

  12. Follow-up computed tomography arthrographic evaluation of bony Bankart lesions after arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Seung-Jun; Lhee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2012-04-01

    The follow-up results of bony union after an arthroscopic bony Bankart repair have not been reported. We studied follow-up computed tomography (CT) arthrograms to evaluate radiographic healing of bony Bankart fragments. Among 41 patients who underwent arthroscopy for a bony Bankart lesion between July 2006 and May 2009, 31 cases in 30 patients who had undergone sequential follow-up CT arthrography preoperatively, at 3 months postoperatively, and at 1 year postoperatively were enrolled. Radiologic patterns of fracture healing were classified into bony healing and fibrous healing. The mean age was 23.4 years, and the mean follow-up was 30.5 months. The mean interval from the first trauma to surgery was 32.5 months, and the mean preoperative dislocation number was 12.1. The mean preoperative glenoid defect was 14.1%. The fracture healing patterns included 26 bony and 5 fibrous unions. There was a significant positive relation between the total dislocation number and the preoperative glenoid defect (P = .003). The proportion of the mean fragment dimension to a circle drawn through the outer cortex of the inferior glenoid was 8.4% preoperatively, 6.6% at 3 months postoperatively, and 6.2% at 1 year postoperatively. The fragment size decreased from that measured preoperatively to the size measured 3 months after surgery (P < .05). However, the fragment size was maintained between 3 months and 1 year postoperatively (P > .05). The mean Rowe score at 1 year postoperatively was 97.2. Follow-up CT arthrographic evaluation showed that small bony Bankart fragments survived without resorption until 1 year postoperatively, even with fibrous union, and that reattached bone fragment fixation to the anatomic position with the labrum could survive. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion and Subscapularis Remplissage.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Colten; Tolan, Stefan J; Tokish, John M

    2017-06-01

    Posterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss has only a fraction of the prevalence of anterior instability. Unlike the latter, there is a paucity of literature regarding the treatment of posterior bony Bankart lesions and even less with concomitant reverse Hill-Sachs lesions. This combination of pathology leads to a difficult situation regarding treatment options. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of a posterior bony Bankart lesion and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The importance of proper portal placement cannot be overstated. By use of the lateral position and strategically placed portals, the posterior bony Bankart lesion and attached labral complex were appropriately mobilized. We reduced the glenoid bone, with the attached capsulolabral complex, to the glenoid rim and performed fixation using a knotless suture anchor. We then placed 2 double-loaded suture anchors into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The sutures were passed creating horizontal mattress configurations that were tied at the end of the procedure, effectively externalizing the humeral head defect. Our technique results in satisfactory fragment reduction, as well as appropriate capsular tension, and effectively prevents the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion from engaging.

  14. Results of arthroscopic capsulolabral repair: Bankart lesion versus anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion lesion.

    PubMed

    Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Elhassan, Bassem; Diller, David; Massimini, Daniel; Higgins, Laurence D; Warner, Jon J P

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of arthroscopic capsulolabral repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability and to compare the outcome in patients who have Bankart lesions versus those with anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion (ALPSA) lesions. This study included 99 patients (93 shoulders), 72 male and 17 female, with a mean age of 32 years, who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic, recurrent anterior shoulder instability, by use of suture anchors. In 67 shoulders (72%) a discrete Bankart lesion was repaired, and in 26 shoulders (28%) an ALPSA lesion was repaired. The 2 groups were analyzed with regard to the number of preoperative dislocations and number of postoperative recurrences. At a mean follow-up of 47 months (range, 24 to 98 months), recurrence of instability was documented in 10 shoulders (10.7%). Of the shoulders, 5 had Bankart lesions (7.4%) and 5 had ALPSA lesions (19.2%) (P = .0501). The mean number of dislocations or subluxations before the index surgery was significantly higher in the ALPSA group (mean, 12.3 [range, 2 to 57]) than in the Bankart group (mean, 4.9 [range, 2 to 24]) (P < .05). However, there were no significant differences in the number of anchors used, incidence of minor glenoid erosion, or incidence of bony Bankart lesions between the groups (P > .05 for all). Patients with ALPSA lesions present with a higher number of recurrent dislocations than those with discrete Bankart lesions. In addition, the failure rate after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair is higher in the ALPSA group than in the Bankart group. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  15. Open Bankart repair with suture anchors for traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability: comparison of results between small and large Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Davy; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Wu, Jiunn-Jer

    2006-01-01

    This retrospective study was to demonstrate the clinical outcome of open Bankart repair with suture anchors for recurrent anterior shoulder instability, and to compare surgical results of small (<3 clock units) and large (>3 clock units) Bankart lesions. With an average follow-up of 55.6 months (2-8 years), there were 82 patients (60 right, 22 left shoulders) with the mean age of 27 years accepting open Bankart repair with suture anchors and capsular shift procedure by the same team. According to surgical findings, these patients were grouped into small (<3 clock units) and large (>3 clock units) Bankart lesions. Subjective outcomes were recorded according to the Bankart scoring system of Rowe. Rowe scores averaged 85.9+/-12.9 (range 25-100). The patients, 92-7 %, had objectively excellent or good results. Twenty nine patients (35.4%) had small Bankart lesions and 53 patients had large Bankart lesions. The Rowe scores in small Bankart lesions were better than that in large Bankart lesions (93.5+/-6.8 vs. 81.8+/-13.6, Wilcoxon rank sum test, P<0.001). Mean scores of stability (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P=0.043), motion (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P=0.037), and function (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P<0.001) in small lesions also had superior outcomes than in large lesions. Four patients (4.9%) got fair results and two (2.4%) patients got poor results at the end of follow-up. The average loss of external rotation is 10 degrees . Open Bankart repair with the aid of suture anchors still got satisfactory results in the treatment of traumatic recurrent anterior instability of the shoulder. The size of the Bankart lesion was a factor affecting surgical outcome. Small Bankart lesions usually got better results than large Bankart lesions.

  16. The "bony Bankart bridge" procedure: a new arthroscopic technique for reduction and internal fixation of a bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Millett, Peter J; Braun, Sepp

    2009-01-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of bony Bankart lesions can be challenging. We present a new easy and reproducible technique for arthroscopic reduction and suture anchor fixation of bony Bankart fragments. A suture anchor is placed medially to the fracture on the glenoid neck, and its sutures are passed around the bony fragment through the soft tissue including the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex. The sutures of this anchor are loaded in a second anchor that is placed on the glenoid face. This creates a nontilting 2-point fixation that compresses the fragment into its bed. By use of the standard technique, additional suture anchors are used superiorly and inferiorly to the bony Bankart piece to repair the labrum and shift the joint capsule. We call this the "bony Bankart bridge" procedure.

  17. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L; Krych, Aaron J; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-12-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy.

  18. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  19. [The role of capsulolabral complex in Bankart lesion repair using Mitek anchors].

    PubMed

    Holibka, R; Pach, M; Kalina, R

    2007-08-01

    repair has been a much discussed issue for a long time. At our department Mitek implants have been used. Although the operative procedures were faultlessly done, the results of the first 100 operations were not satisfactory. In some patients, the labrum reinserted by Mitek anchors failed to heal; it either remained loose or was attached to the scapular neck distally and thus did not provide sufficient stability that would prevent recurrent dislocation of the shoulder. In view of this, we conducted reconstructive operations on cadaver limbs, after a thorough topographic and anatomic study of the glenohumeral joint, and developed a modified method; after the labrum and capsule were freed, implants were inserted into the superior part of the anterior glenoid rim. This created a sufficient capsulolabral complex that prevented recurrent dislocation. Arthroscopic Bankart lesion repair, with the insertion of anchors by our method, markedly improved surgical outcomes and provided good shoulder stability. We believe that, in the future, this method will be more widely used in arthroscopic treatment of Bankart lesions.

  20. Arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and SLAP lesions: operative techniques and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Choon Key; Hwang, Tae Hyok; Suh, Kuen Tak; Park, Jong Won

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical results and operation technique of arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, all of which had an anterior-inferior Bankart lesion that continued superiorly to include separation of the biceps anchor in the patients presenting recurrent shoulder dislocations. From May 2003 to January 2006, we reviewed 15 cases with combined Bankart and SLAP lesions among 62 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations who underwent arthroscopic repair. The average age at surgery was 24.2 years (range, 16 to 38 years), with an average follow-up period of 15 months (range, 13 to 28 months). During the operation, we repaired the unstable SLAP lesion first with absorbable suture anchors and then also repaired Bankart lesion from the inferior to superior fashion. We analyzed the preoperative and postoperative results by visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, the range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) and Rowe shoulder scoring systems. We compared the results with the isolated Bankart lesion. VAS for pain was decreased from preoperative 4.9 to postoperative 1.9. Mean ASES and Rowe shoulder scores were improved from preoperative 56.4 and 33.7 to postoperative 91.8 and 94.1, respectively. There were no specific complication and no significant limitation of motion more than 10 degree at final follow-up. We found the range of motions after the arthroscopic repair in combined lesions were gained more slowly than in patients with isolated Bankart lesions. In recurrent dislocation of the shoulder with combined Bankart and SLAP lesion, arthroscopic repair using absorbable suture anchors produced favorable clinical results. Although it has technical difficulty, the concomitant unstable SLAP lesion should be repaired in a manner that stabilizes the glenohumeral joint, as the Bankart lesion can be repaired if the unstable SLAP lesion is repaired first.

  1. Locked bucket-handle type bony Bankart lesion resulting from manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon Sik; Song, Hyun Seok

    2016-06-01

    A patient who underwent manipulation for stiffness accompanying a rotator cuff tear experienced a complication consisting of a bony Bankart lesion connected to the superior and inferior labrum. This lesion was displaced posteriorly, locked behind the humeral head and blocking the reduction. Attachment of the labrum to this fragment made reduction and fixation easier. This bony Bankart lesion was fixed successfully by arthroscopic placement of knotless suture anchors. Level of evidence Case report, Level IV.

  2. Arthroscopic Repair of Combined Bankart and SLAP Lesions: Operative Techniques and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Choon Key; Hwang, Tae Hyok; Park, Jong Won

    2010-01-01

    Background To evaluate the clinical results and operation technique of arthroscopic repair of combined Bankart and superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, all of which had an anterior-inferior Bankart lesion that continued superiorly to include separation of the biceps anchor in the patients presenting recurrent shoulder dislocations. Methods From May 2003 to January 2006, we reviewed 15 cases with combined Bankart and SLAP lesions among 62 patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations who underwent arthroscopic repair. The average age at surgery was 24.2 years (range, 16 to 38 years), with an average follow-up period of 15 months (range, 13 to 28 months). During the operation, we repaired the unstable SLAP lesion first with absorbable suture anchors and then also repaired Bankart lesion from the inferior to superior fashion. We analyzed the preoperative and postoperative results by visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, the range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) and Rowe shoulder scoring systems. We compared the results with the isolated Bankart lesion. Results VAS for pain was decreased from preoperative 4.9 to postoperative 1.9. Mean ASES and Rowe shoulder scores were improved from preoperative 56.4 and 33.7 to postoperative 91.8 and 94.1, respectively. There were no specific complication and no significant limitation of motion more than 10 degree at final follow-up. We found the range of motions after the arthroscopic repair in combined lesions were gained more slowly than in patients with isolated Bankart lesions. Conclusions In recurrent dislocation of the shoulder with combined Bankart and SLAP lesion, arthroscopic repair using absorbable suture anchors produced favorable clinical results. Although it has technical difficulty, the concomitant unstable SLAP lesion should be repaired in a manner that stabilizes the glenohumeral joint, as the Bankart lesion can be repaired if the unstable SLAP lesion is repaired first. PMID

  3. Correlation between Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Audi B; Tran, Anh; Bailey, Michael; Proper, Stewart

    2006-06-01

    Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions are commonly associated with anterior shoulder dislocations. The presence of Bankart lesion indicates the need for surgical repair. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be sensitive in detecting these two lesions. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions on MRI for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. Between 2003 and 2005, 61 patients from Alfred and Sandringham Hospitals had an MRI as part of the investigation for traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. The MRI scans were reviewed and subsequently confirmed by a radiologist to show the presence or absence of Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The data were then analysed by a statistician. Although patients with one of these lesions were more than two-and-a-half times as likely to have the other, small study numbers precluded this result from achieving statistical significance. (odds ratio, 2.67 (0.83-8.61), P = 0.10). Younger age was a strong predictor of a recurrence of shoulder dislocation (odds ratio, 0.93 (0.89-0.98), P = 0.005). The presence of Bankart or Hill-Sachs lesions on MRI for the primary shoulder dislocation group was similar to the recurrent group (73% vs. 72% for Bankart lesion and 67% vs. 70% for Hill-Sachs lesion). There is a strong correlation between both lesions. This apparent trend can be useful in predicting the presence of a Bankart lesion when a Hill-Sachs lesion is identified on a plain radiograph. This study suggests the consideration of surgical repair after identification of a Hill-Sachs lesion on plain radiographs, especially for younger patients where the rate of re-dislocation is high.

  4. Simulated capsulolabral lesion in cadavers: dislocation does not result from a bankart lesion only.

    PubMed

    Pouliart, Nicole; Marmor, Simon; Gagey, Olivier

    2006-07-01

    Although an anteroinferior capsulolabral detachment (typical Bankart lesion) has been evaluated in other experimental studies, it has not yet been tested with an apprehension test in an intact shoulder model. Adjacent combinations of 4 zones of the capsuloligamentous complex were sequentially detached from the glenoid neck in 50 cadaveric shoulders. Stability was tested before and after each resection step: inferior stability with a sulcus test and anterior stability with an anterior drawer test and with a load-and-shift test in the apprehension position. A metastable anteroinferior dislocation occurred in 18 specimens after section of 3 zones and in 14 only after section of 4 zones. A locked dislocation occurred after section of all 4 zones in 33 specimens and in the other 17 shoulders only after the posterior capsule was also cut. The humeral head cannot dislocate anteroinferiorly when there only is a Bankart lesion. In our study superior and posterior extension was necessary before the tensioning mechanism in external rotation and abduction failed enough for dislocation to occur. Because the Bankart lesion is most likely not the only lesion present in patients with recurrent dislocation, a careful search for other lesions needs to be done when one is attempting surgical treatment. These lesions would need to be treated as well if one wants to avoid the risk of residual instability.

  5. Arthroscopic Double-Row Suture Anchor Repair of Acute Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Ly, Justin A; Coleman, Erin M; Kropf, Eric J

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of anterior shoulder instability is well described with various techniques, including arthroscopic double-row repair, an alternative to open stabilization procedures in high-risk groups. The surgical management of posterior instability in high-risk and athletic populations is a less-explored entity. We describe our technique for an all arthroscopic double-row suture anchor repair of a large posterior bony Bankart lesion. We prefer this technique over percutaneous cannulated screw fixation because the double-row suture technique allows for incorporation of capsular plication with bony fixation in an effort to better restore normal anatomy for capsulolabral complex. Double-row repair capsulolabral repair or fixation of the bony Bankart is performed via a suture-bridge technique. Medial row anchors are placed down the glenoid neck and shuttled around the bony fragment and labrum. The lateral-row anchor is placed at the rim of the native glenoid. This repair technique has been shown to increase the surface area for healing and more closely reconstruct the native anatomic capsulolabral complex footprint, improve force distribution, and potentially impart enhanced posterior stability to the glenohumeral joint.

  6. The biomechanical effect of shoulder remplissage combined with Bankart repair for the treatment of engaging Hill-Sachs lesions.

    PubMed

    Argintar, Evan; Heckmann, Nathanael; Wang, Lawrence; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical effects of the remplissage repair combined with Bankart repair for engaging Hill-Sachs lesions on range of motion (ROM), translation, and glenohumeral kinematics. Six cadaveric shoulders were tested using a custom shoulder testing system. ROM, kinematics, and anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior glenohumeral translations were quantified at 0° and 60° glenohumeral abduction. Six conditions were tested: intact, Bankart lesion, Bankart with 40 % Hill-Sachs lesion, Bankart repair, Bankart repair with remplissage, and remplissage repair alone. Humeral external rotation (ER) and total range of motion increased significantly after the creation of the Bankart lesion at both 0° and 60° abduction. The Bankart repair restored ER to intact values at 0° and 60° abduction, and the addition of the remplissage repair did not significantly alter range of motion from the Bankart repair alone. AP translation increased following the creation of the Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions and was restored with the Bankart repair; the remplissage did not alter translation from the Bankart repair alone. At maximum ER at 60° abduction, the apex of the humeral head shifted posteriorly and inferiorly with remplissage repair. The addition of the remplissage procedure combined with Bankart repair for treatment of large Hill-Sachs lesions had no statistically significant effect on ROM or translation, but altered the kinematics of the glenohumeral joint. Thus, by addressing the humeral bone defect following an anterior shoulder dislocation, the remplissage technique with concurrent Bankart repair may be a relatively minimally invasive option for converting engaging Hill-Sachs lesions to non-engaging and promoting shoulder stability, though further biomechanical and clinical studies are warranted.

  7. Assessment of coincidence and defect sizes in Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions after anterior shoulder dislocation: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Horst, K; Von Harten, R; Weber, C; Andruszkow, H; Pfeifer, R; Dienstknecht, T; Pape, H C

    2014-02-01

    Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions are often associated with anterior shoulder dislocation. The MRI technique is sensitive in diagnosing both injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions with MRI to determine the correlation in occurrence and defect sizes of these lesions. Between 2006 and 2013, 446 patients were diagnosed with an anterior shoulder dislocation and 105 of these patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. All patients were examined using MRI. Bankart lesions were classified as cartilaginous or bony lesions. Hill-Sachs lesions were graded I-III using a modified Calandra classification. The co-occurrence of injuries was high [odds ratio (OR) = 11.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.60-36.52; p < 0.001]. Patients older than 29 years more often presented with a bilateral injury (OR = 16.29; 95% CI = 2.71-97.73; p = 0.002). A correlation between a Bankart lesion and the grade of a Hill-Sachs lesion was found (ρ = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.16-0.49; p < 0.001). Bankart lesions co-occurred more often with large Hill-Sachs lesions (O  = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.02-1.52; p = 0.033). If either lesion is diagnosed, the patient is 11 times more likely to have suffered the associated injury. The size of a Hill-Sachs lesion determines the co-occurrence of cartilaginous or bony Bankart lesions. Age plays a role in determining the type of Bankart lesion as well as the co-occurrence of Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. This study is the first to demonstrate the use of high-quality MRI in a reasonably large sample of patients, a positive correlation of Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder dislocations and an association between the defect sizes.

  8. Large Hill-Sachs Lesion: a Comparative Study of Patients Treated with Arthroscopic Bankart Repair with or without Remplissage.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Grant H; Park, Min Jung; Zhang, Clare; Kelly, John D; Huffman, G Russell

    2015-07-01

    There is little comparative long-term clinical data comparing Bankart repair alone to the addition of remplissage. Our purpose was to compare results of patients with significant humeral head lesions and who underwent either isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair or remplissage. This is a retrospective cohort study of 14 isolated arthroscopic Bankart and 10 remplissage repairs all with large engaging Hill-Sachs (HS) lesions. Average follow-up was 40.72 months (26.3-51.1) in the Bankart group and 31.55 months (24.1-39.9) in the remplissage group. Surgical failure was defined as a dislocation or subluxation. Groups were matched on handedness, age within 3 years, and HS lesion size. Glenoid bone loss and HS size were measured on MRI. Additionally, WOSI and DASH scores were obtained. The average age at surgery was 26.0 years (17.8-41.1) of the isolated Bankart patient and 24.4 years (16.4-38.3) in the remplissage group. The average HS lesion volume was 310.22 mm(3) in the Bankart group and 283.79 mm(3) in the remplissage group. The failure rate for the Bankart group was 8 out of 14 patients (57.14%). For the remplissage group, the failure rate was 2 out of 10 patients (20.0%). Average WOSI scores were 73.72 in the Bankart group and 79.54 in the remplissage group. For DASH scores, the average Disability/Symptoms Scores were 16.23 for the Bankart group and 12.05 for the remplissage patients. In comparison to isolated Bankart repair, remplissage was a superior option for recurrent instability patients with large Hill-Sachs lesions as seen by diminished failure rates and improved outcome scores.

  9. Consequences of a Perthes-Bankart lesion in twenty cadaver shoulders.

    PubMed

    Pouliart, Nicole; Gagey, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether an anteroinferior capsulolabral lesion is sufficient to allow the humeral head to dislocate and whether a limited inferior approach for creating the lesions influenced the results compared with an all-arthroscopic approach. Four ligamentous zones of the glenohumeral capsule were sequentially detached from the glenoid neck and labrum in 20 cadaver shoulders through an inferior approach. Before and after each resection step, inferior stability was tested using a sulcus test and anterior stability using a drawer test and an apprehension maneuver. Dislocation was only possible when at least 3 zones were cut. This study confirmed that superior and posterior extension of the classic anteroinferior Perthes-Bankart lesion is necessary before the capsular restraint in external rotation and abduction is overcome and dislocation occurs. Lesions other than the Perthes-Bankart need to be investigated when recurrent dislocation is treated, because this anteroinferior injury is most probably not the sole factor responsible for the instability.

  10. Combined arthroscopic repair of a type IV SLAP tear and Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Champ L; Romeo, Anthony A

    2009-09-01

    Lesions of the superior labrum can be a source of significant shoulder pain and disability. SLAP (superior labrum anterior-posterior) tears have been classified into many different types. A type IV SLAP tear is a bucket-handle tear of the superior labrum with extension into the biceps tendon. This relatively uncommon SLAP tear, if present, has been shown to be frequently associated with other pathology including Bankart lesions. We present an arthroscopic technique for combined repair of a type IV SLAP tear and Bankart lesion. Steps include initial reduction of the bucket-handle portion of the superior labral injury, repair of the anterior-inferior labral detachment, and, finally, repair of the superior labrum and biceps tendon split.

  11. [Clinical results after all arthroscopic reduction and fixation of bony Bankart lesion].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Chun-Yan; Lu, Yi; Xue, Qing-Yun

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the shoulder function after arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation in patients with bony Bankart lesion. Between May 2004 and May 2008, 45 patients with bony Bankart lesion who were treated with all arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation with metal anchors were included in this study. Among them 40 patients were male and 5 patients were female. The average age at the surgery was 27.6 years (16.5 - 50.1 years). The average duration of follow-up was 29.7 months (24.8 - 49.0 months). A history of recurrent dislocation of affected shoulder was found in all patients. Metal anchors were used to fix the bony Bankart lesion during the surgery. Hill-Sachs remplissage technique was used to treat the Engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. The preoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) score, Constant-Murley score, Rowe score and the VAS score for instability were 84 ± 14, 95.1 ± 4.6, 39.4 ± 2.9 and 5 ± 3 respectively. No significant change was found regarding active forward elevation, external rotation and internal rotation after the surgery. The ASES score, Constant-Murley score, Rowe score and the VAS score of stability were 95 ± 7, 98.3 ± 2.2, 84.5 ± 22.0 and 1 ± 2, improved significantly higher after the surgery (P < 0.01). One subluxation and 3 redislocation were happened during follow-up. The overall failure rate was 8.9% (4/45). All arthroscopic reduction and fixation of bony Bankart lesion can achieve a good result.

  12. Arthroscopic repair of chronic bony bankart lesion using a low anterior portal.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C; Westerberg, Paul

    2012-12-01

    We describe the repair of a chronic bony Bankart lesion in a case with recurrent instability using standard techniques and equipment for addressing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability. A 25-year-old man with recurrent instability and a chronic bony Bankart lesion with a Hill-Sachs lesion was treated. The inferior 2 sutures and knotless anchors are placed through a low anterior portal, which improves the angle of approach to the inferior portion of the glenoid that is fractured. The knotless anchors are impacted through the low anterior portal, just superior to the level of the suture, as the fragment tends to retract medially and inferiorly, with the drill guide slightly on the face of the glenoid. The superior-anterior portal adjacent to the biceps tendon gives a better view of the glenoid articular cartilage position of the anchors required to restore the anatomic location of the fracture fragment. The low anterior portal improved and simplified the reduction of the fracture fragment to the glenoid neck by allowing access to the anterior-inferior bony Bankart lesion that was repairable with suture and knotless anchors using standardized techniques.

  13. Arthroscopic Repair of Chronic Bony Bankart Lesion Using a Low Anterior Portal

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jefferson C.; Westerberg, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe the repair of a chronic bony Bankart lesion in a case with recurrent instability using standard techniques and equipment for addressing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability. A 25-year-old man with recurrent instability and a chronic bony Bankart lesion with a Hill-Sachs lesion was treated. The inferior 2 sutures and knotless anchors are placed through a low anterior portal, which improves the angle of approach to the inferior portion of the glenoid that is fractured. The knotless anchors are impacted through the low anterior portal, just superior to the level of the suture, as the fragment tends to retract medially and inferiorly, with the drill guide slightly on the face of the glenoid. The superior-anterior portal adjacent to the biceps tendon gives a better view of the glenoid articular cartilage position of the anchors required to restore the anatomic location of the fracture fragment. The low anterior portal improved and simplified the reduction of the fracture fragment to the glenoid neck by allowing access to the anterior-inferior bony Bankart lesion that was repairable with suture and knotless anchors using standardized techniques. PMID:23766999

  14. Assessment of coincidence and defect sizes in Bankart and Hill–Sachs lesions after anterior shoulder dislocation: a radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Von Harten, R; Weber, C; Andruszkow, H; Pfeifer, R; Dienstknecht, T; Pape, H C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bankart and Hill–Sachs lesions are often associated with anterior shoulder dislocation. The MRI technique is sensitive in diagnosing both injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate Bankart and Hill–Sachs lesions with MRI to determine the correlation in occurrence and defect sizes of these lesions. Methods: Between 2006 and 2013, 446 patients were diagnosed with an anterior shoulder dislocation and 105 of these patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. All patients were examined using MRI. Bankart lesions were classified as cartilaginous or bony lesions. Hill–Sachs lesions were graded I–III using a modified Calandra classification. Results: The co-occurrence of injuries was high [odds ratio (OR) = 11.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.60–36.52; p < 0.001]. Patients older than 29 years more often presented with a bilateral injury (OR = 16.29; 95% CI = 2.71–97.73; p = 0.002). A correlation between a Bankart lesion and the grade of a Hill–Sachs lesion was found (ρ = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.16–0.49; p < 0.001). Bankart lesions co-occurred more often with large Hill–Sachs lesions (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.02–1.52; p = 0.033). Conclusion: If either lesion is diagnosed, the patient is 11 times more likely to have suffered the associated injury. The size of a Hill–Sachs lesion determines the co-occurrence of cartilaginous or bony Bankart lesions. Age plays a role in determining the type of Bankart lesion as well as the co-occurrence of Bankart and Hill–Sachs lesions. Advances in knowledge: This study is the first to demonstrate the use of high-quality MRI in a reasonably large sample of patients, a positive correlation of Bankart and Hill–Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder dislocations and an association between the defect sizes. PMID:24452107

  15. Arthroscopic repair of small and medium-sized bony Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Son, Won-Su; Moon, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    There has been no study about treatment guidelines for arthroscopic repair according to the size of bony Bankart lesions of less than 25% of the glenoid width. To evaluate the results of arthroscopic repair for bony Bankart lesions managed with different repair techniques based on their size. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between March 2005 and February 2009, 44 of 52 consecutive patients with bony Bankart lesions with a size of less than 25% of the entire glenoid were managed with an arthroscopic approach. Of those patients, 34 (77%) were available for outcome analysis at a minimum 24 months' follow-up (mean, 34 months; range, 24-60 months). The size of the fragment was measured by computed tomography (CT) and classified as small (<12.5% of the inferior glenoid width) and medium (12.5%-25%). Sixteen lesions were classified as small (small group), and 18 were classified as medium (medium group). For small lesions, capsulolabral repair using suture anchors without excision of the bony fragment was performed. For medium lesions, anatomic reduction and fixation using suture anchors was performed, and the adequacy of reduction was assessed by CT postoperatively. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain score and modified Rowe score for bony Bankart repair were compared and the postoperative recurrence rate investigated. One patient from the small group (6.3%) and 1 patient without anatomic reduction of the bony fragment in the medium group (5.6%) experienced traumatic redislocations. The mean VAS score improved from 1.7 preoperatively to 0.5 at final follow-up, and the mean Rowe score improved from 59 to 91 (both P < .001). The mean postoperative Rowe scores increased from 58 to 92 in the small group and from 60 to 91 in the medium group (both P < .001). Residual joint incongruity measuring ≤2 mm on both axial and coronal scans, which was considered an anatomic reduction, was present in 14 cases (77.8%) in the medium group. In the medium group, the mean

  16. Shoulder Bankart lesion with posterior instability: A case report of ultrasound detection.

    PubMed

    Arai, Ryuzo; Ito, Taisuke; Okudaira, Shuzo; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-08-01

    Minor instability of the shoulder has recently drawn attention as a cause of shoulder pain in athletes. However, it is difficult to correctly diagnose the direction in which the humeral head translates and subluxates, and to clarify the pathology of the instability. We present a case of a 20-year-old male with an unstable shoulder who could not raise his left arm due to pain. Since 6 years prior to the onset of pain, the patient could asymptomatically perform voluntary subluxation, but it was slight and the direction of the subluxation could not be confirmed. On physical examination, the conventional apprehension test and Castagna test were positive, but the jerk test was negative. Imaging studies including arthroscopy showed a Bankart lesion associated with anterior labrum detachment. There was no posterior Bankart lesion. Due to painful anterior shoulder instability, arthroscopic Bankart repair was successfully done; however, 9 months later the patient began experiencing symptomatic subluxation of the shoulder. At this time, the conventional apprehension test and Castagna test were both negative. It was difficult to detect the direction of the subluxation, just like in the preoperative condition. We performed an ultrasonographic examination from the posterior side; this clearly revealed the posterior subluxation mechanism as posterior slide of the humeral head and anterior shift of the glenoid. Based on these findings, we modified the rehabilitation and the subluxation resolved. This case suggests that ultrasound imaging can be an effective practical option for evaluating shoulder instability, especially in cases of slight posterior subluxation.

  17. Do reduction and healing of the bony fragment really matter in arthroscopic bony Bankart reconstruction?: a prospective study with clinical and computed tomography evaluations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-Yan; Zhu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xin; Li, Feng-Long; Lu, Yi; Wu, Guan

    2013-11-01

    Bony Bankart lesions can be treated with arthroscopic repair. However, few studies have evaluated the importance of bony fragment reduction and healing to stability of the glenohumeral joint after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair. To evaluate functional results after surgery and determine the correlation between reduction and healing of the fracture and postoperative stability of the glenohumeral joint. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 50 patients (47 men, 3 women; average age, 27.6 years; range, 16.5-50.1 years) with bony Bankart lesions and recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations were treated with arthroscopic reduction and internal fixation with suture anchors. The average follow-up period was 32.5 months (range, 24.3-61.2 months). Preoperative and postoperative range of motion and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Constant-Murley, and Rowe scores were compared to evaluate the results of the surgeries. Sequential 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scans were available for 37 patients and were analyzed to investigate the effect of the bony defect of the glenoid and the correlation between the success of the surgery and reduction and healing of the bony fragment. After surgery, active forward elevation was significantly improved (P < .05). No significant differences were found regarding external and internal rotations after surgery. The ASES, Constant-Murley, and Rowe scores improved significantly after surgery. Redislocations occurred in 3 patients, and a positive anterior apprehension sign was detected in 1 patient during follow-up. The overall failure rate was 8.0% (4/50). The CT scans during the follow-up period showed a nonunion of the bony fragment in 13.5% of cases (5/37). The reconstructed size of the glenoid was <80% in 3 of the 4 failure cases but >80% in all of the successful cases. Arthroscopic reduction and fixation of a bony Bankart lesion can achieve good results in selected cases. The size of the reconstructed glenoid

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Arthroscopic versus Open Repair for Treatment of Bankart Lesions in the Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yaosheng; Su, Xiuyun; Liu, Shubin

    2015-10-08

    The optimal treatment for Bankart lesion remains controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients managed with open Bankart repair versus arthroscopic Bankart repair. After systematic review of online databases, a total of 11 trials with 1022 subjects were included. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed using the PEDro critical appraisal tool, and non-RCTs were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa (NO) quality assessment tool. Outcomes of shoulder stability, range of motion (ROM), functional scales, and surgical times were analyzed. Data synthesis showed significant differences between the two strategies, with regards to stability of the shoulder (P=0.008, RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89 to 0.98), and ROM (P<0.001, SMD=-0.47, 95% CI: -0.72 to -0.22). Open Bankart repair produced a more stable shoulder but had a relatively poor shoulder motion, compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair, for the treatment of Bankart lesion.

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Arthroscopic versus Open Repair for Treatment of Bankart Lesions in the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yaosheng; Su, Xiuyun; Liu, Shubin

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment for Bankart lesion remains controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients managed with open Bankart repair versus arthroscopic Bankart repair. Material/Methods After systematic review of online databases, a total of 11 trials with 1022 subjects were included. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed using the PEDro critical appraisal tool, and non-RCTs were evaluated by Newcastle-Ottawa (NO) quality assessment tool. Outcomes of shoulder stability, range of motion (ROM), functional scales, and surgical times were analyzed. Results Data synthesis showed significant differences between the two strategies, with regards to stability of the shoulder (P=0.008, RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89 to 0.98), and ROM (P<0.001, SMD=−0.47, 95% CI: −0.72 to −0.22). Conclusions Open Bankart repair produced a more stable shoulder but had a relatively poor shoulder motion, compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair, for the treatment of Bankart lesion. PMID:26446430

  20. A biomechanical study of bankart lesion fixation - biodegradable ArthroRivet tack vs. suture repair.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kevin J; Mukherjee, Debi P; Ogden, Alan L; Sadasivan, Kalia K; Albright, James A; Pietrzak, William S

    2007-01-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation is commonly used in soft tissue procedures performed in the shoulder. ArthroRivettrade mark tacks (referred to as rivets here), made from a copolymer of 82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid, were developed for the Bankart procedure. Although a previous in vivo study demonstrated favorable comparison of the fixation strength and absorption characteristics of this device with that of polyglyconate bioabsorbable tacks, there have been no published biomechanical studies of this rivet in the shoulder. Fourteen shoulders were harvested from fresh-frozen cadavers of average age 74 years (46-89). Biomechanical testing was performed by measuring the energy, or work, required to anteriorly displace the humeral head 6 mm from the glenoid. Each shoulder was tested intact, vented, and before and after repair of a simulated Bankart lesion at 0, 45, and 90 degrees of abduction with and without maximal external rotation. Overall, the average work required ranged from 54.7 N-mm to 178.27 N-mm. Although the biomechanical performance of the rivet, based on resistance to anterior displacement of the humeral head, was indistinguishable from that of the suture repair, the statistical power of the test was low due to the large variance in the cadaver specimens. The results, in general, correlated well with those of previously published studies, suggesting the suitability of the bioabsorbable rivet for use in Bankart repair.

  1. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Fixation of Bony Bankart Lesions: Clinical Outcome, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results, and Return to Sports.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Bangoj, Robert; Martetschläger, Frank; Wörtler, Klaus; Seppel, Gernot; Aboalata, Mohamed; Tischer, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Vogt, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    in activity. Nonunion occurred in 16.6%, with a higher frequency in patients with chronic lesions (P = .031). Anatomic reduction was achieved in 72%, the medial step-off in patients with nonanatomic reduction averaged 1.8 ± 0.9 mm, and the remaining glenoid defect size averaged 6.8% ± 7.3%. Full-thickness cartilage defects of the anterior glenoid were detected in 70% of patients. Arthroscopic suture anchor repair may enable an anatomic reduction of bony Bankart lesions with no or only minimal articular steps and provides successful midterm outcomes concerning clinical scores, recurrence, and patient satisfaction. The return to activity is limited for various, mostly non-shoulder-related causes. Chronic lesions may have an inferior healing potential; therefore early surgical stabilization of acute Bankart fragments is suggested to avoid possible nonunion. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair versus Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-12-01

    This study compared the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and Latarjet operation in patients with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Thirty-seven shoulders subjected to arthroscopic remplissage with a Bankart repair (group A) and 35 shoulders subjected to a Latarjet operation (group B), for a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion without significant glenoid bone loss, were retrospectively evaluated. Each group was followed up for a mean more than 2-year period. At the last follow-up, postoperative pain, shoulder mobility, muscle strength, Rowe score, and UCLA score revealed no significant difference between the two groups. The postoperative mean deficit in external rotation at the side (ERs) was 8° ± 23° in group A (P = 0.044). In group B, the mean deficits in ERs, external rotation at 90° of abduction, and internal rotation to the posterior were 10° ± 20°, 7° ± 16°, and 1.9° ± 4°, respectively (P = 0.004, 0.022, and 0.009, respectively). The recurrence rate was 5.4 % (two shoulders) in group A and 5.7 % (two shoulders) in group B (n.s.). The overall complication rate was significantly higher in group B (14.3 %) than in group A (0 %) (P = 0.017). For recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, both arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair and the Latarjet procedure were safe and reliable techniques with a low recurrence rate. However, the Latarjet group had a significantly higher postoperative complication rate than the remplissage group. Case-control study, Level III.

  3. Simple versus horizontal suture anchor repair of Bankart lesions: which better restores labral anatomy?

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, Lindsey S; Marzo, John M

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine which suture repair technique better restores glenoid labrum height: horizontal sutures or simple sutures. Sixteen cadaveric glenoids, 8 per repair technique, were used to measure native labral height at the 3:00 to 6:00 positions in half-hour increments. A Bankart lesion was then created from 3:00 to 6:30. Height measurements at each time point were again taken after creation of the Bankart lesion. Repair with a 3-mm knotted suture anchor was then performed at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30 with either a simple or horizontal suture technique, and postrepair heights were measured across all time points. Significant decreases in height, as compared with native height, were observed at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30 in the simple repair group. Decreases in height of 1.4 mm (P = .044), 2.1 mm (P = .030), and 1.1 (P = .034) were observed at 3:30, 4:30, and 5:30. There was no significant decrease in height at these respective time points in the horizontal repair group. The in vitro horizontal mattress suture technique better restores labral height and anatomy when compared with a simple suture technique in the repair of acute Bankart lesions. Compared with the simple suture technique, horizontal suture repair may provide increased stability to the glenohumeral construct. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  5. ORV Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Myer, Daniel M; Caldwell, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    The arthroscopic treatment of the "bony Bankart lesion" continues to evolve. We present a novel technique that we developed at Orthopaedic Research of Virginia, the "transosseous bony Bankart repair," which incorporates several essential concepts to provide for optimal healing and rehabilitation. We promote arthroscopic repair emphasizing bone preservation, a fracture interface without interposing sutures, the ability to reduce capsular volume, and multiple points of stable glenolabral fixation. Our technique positions suture anchors within the subchondral bone of the intact glenoid to allow for an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment. By use of an arthroscopic drill, spinal needle, and nitinol suture passing wire, the sutures are passed in a retrograde fashion through the bony Bankart fragment and anterior capsule in a mattress configuration. Additional inferior and superior anchors are placed to further provide stability and reduce capsular volume. While maximizing fracture surface area and optimizing bony healing, the end result is an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment and the glenoid articular surface.

  6. Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed

    Loh, Bryan; Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2016-11-01

    Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder. Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. All patients were thoroughly investigated preoperatively in which a detailed history were obtained, relevant physical examinations were performed (Load and Shift/Anterior Apprehension test) and pre-operative radiographs taken. Some patients subsequently underwent either an MRI or an MRA scan if the initial clinical evaluation was equivocal. Anterior Shoulder Apprehension test and the Load and Shift test identified 214 of 227 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 90-97%]. MRI correctly identified 23 of 26 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 70-98%). Out of the five superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears identified on MRI, only three were confirmed during arthroscopic surgery. MRA correctly identified 84 of 89 Bankart tears, for a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI, 87-98%). In our study, we report that clinical evaluation with focused history-taking and anterior apprehension, load and shift clinical examination can diagnose anterior shoulder instability as reliably as MR imaging. For patients with equivocal clinical findings, MR imaging can aid in the diagnosis.

  7. Is clinical evaluation alone sufficient for the diagnosis of a Bankart lesion without the use of magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Tan, Andrew Hwee Chye

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) offer great utility in diagnosing Bankart lesions but they are associated with a high degree of intra and interobserver variability. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation and imaging modalities in Bankart lesions such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRA of the shoulder. Methods Between February 2004 to January 2015, a retrospectively review of the surgical records at a tertiary hospital identified a total of 250 patients treated with a shoulder arthroscopy for Bankart repair. All patients were thoroughly investigated preoperatively in which a detailed history were obtained, relevant physical examinations were performed (Load and Shift/Anterior Apprehension test) and pre-operative radiographs taken. Some patients subsequently underwent either an MRI or an MRA scan if the initial clinical evaluation was equivocal. Results Anterior Shoulder Apprehension test and the Load and Shift test identified 214 of 227 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 90–97%]. MRI correctly identified 23 of 26 Bankart tears, with a sensitivity of 89% (95% CI, 70–98%). Out of the five superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) tears identified on MRI, only three were confirmed during arthroscopic surgery. MRA correctly identified 84 of 89 Bankart tears, for a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI, 87–98%). Conclusions In our study, we report that clinical evaluation with focused history-taking and anterior apprehension, load and shift clinical examination can diagnose anterior shoulder instability as reliably as MR imaging. For patients with equivocal clinical findings, MR imaging can aid in the diagnosis. PMID:27942510

  8. Effect of glenohumeral position on contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and the glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, DooSup; Chung, HoeJeong; Yi, Chang-Ho; Yoon, Yeo-Seung; Son, Jongsang; Kim, Youngho; On, Myoung-Gi; Yang, JaeHyung

    2016-02-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is a common injury, but the optimal management of dislocation remains controversial. We hypothesized that reducing the shoulder in externally rotated position would aid the reduction in capsulolabral lesions. Thus, in this study, contact pressure between the capsulolabral lesion and the glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions was measured using a cadaver model. In 10 specimens, the humerus was externally rotated by abduction on the coronal plane to measure the contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and glenoid in free ALPSA and Bankart lesions using a Tekscan pressure system. Stability of the joint was confirmed using the Vicon motion analysis system. In the normal shoulder joint, the peak pressure between the subscapularis muscle and the anterior capsule according to the location of the glenohumeral joint decreased to 83.4 ± 21.2 kPa in the 0° abduction and -30° external rotation positions and showed a 300.7 ± 42.9 kPa peak value in the 60° abduction and 60° external rotation positions. In both free ALPSA and Bankart lesions, the lowest pressure between the labral lesion and the glenoid was measured at 0° abduction and -30° external rotation, and the highest pressure was recorded at 60° external rotation and 60° abduction. The contact pressure between the capsulolabral complex and the glenoid significantly increased when the abduction and external rotation angles were increased. Based on our results, the conservative management in free ALPSA lesions would respond better than Bankart lesions. YWMR-12-0-038.

  9. Traumatic shoulder dislocation with combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament in a professional basketball player: three-year follow-up of surgical stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aakash A; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability has been well documented to have associated lesions such as a Bankart tear, humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL), Hill-Sachs lesion, fracture, and nerve injury. To our knowledge, the combined Bankart and HAGL injury in a single acute anterior shoulder dislocation has not yet been reported. We describe a traumatic first-time anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation in a professional basketball player with a combined Bankart and HAGL lesion. The patient underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair followed by open repair of the HAGL lesion with an open capsular shift reconstruction. At 3 years' follow-up, the patient had returned to an elite level of play, with an excellent outcome.

  10. Arthroscopic autologous bone graft with arthroscopic Bankart repair for a large bony defect lesion caused by recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Hachisuka, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Oomae, Hiromichi; Yokoya, Shin; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2007-06-01

    Many clinicians believe that a large bony defect of the glenoid must be treated with bone grafting when a Bankart procedure is performed. Various types of bone graft, such as open bone graft, Eden-Hybinnette, J-bone graft, coracoid transfer, and Latarjet, have been used. These require open procedures that are difficult to perform arthroscopically. We performed an arthroscopic autologous bone graft and an arthroscopic Bankart repair at the same time to treat a patient with recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint and a large bony Bankart lesion. We harvested from the lateral site of the acromion 2 bones that were 2.7 mm in cylindrical diameter. We transplanted these bones to the large bony defect of the anteroinferior area of the glenoid and placed anchors between the 2 plugs. During the 30 months since the surgery was performed, the patient has not experienced dislocation or apprehension about the shoulder. A 3-dimensional computed tomography scan showed enlargement of the glenoid surface. Our surgical procedure offers promise for treatment of patients with recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint and a large bony Bankart lesion because it allows the surgeon to alter the size and the grafted site of the cylindrical bone according to the size of the defect.

  11. Arm Abduction Provides a Better Reduction of the Bankart Lesion During Immobilization in External Rotation After an Initial Shoulder Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Eiji; Kitamura, Toshio; Hitachi, Shin; Hatta, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Sano, Hirotaka

    2015-07-01

    Shoulder dislocation often recurs, especially in the younger population. Immobilization in external rotation, in which a Bankart lesion is displaced in the anterior, medial, and inferior directions, was introduced as a new method of nonoperative treatment, but its clinical efficiency is controversial. In terms of reducing the lesion, it is reasonable to incorporate not only external rotation, which makes the anterior soft tissues tight to push the lesion posteriorly and laterally, but also abduction, which makes the inferior soft tissues tight to push the lesion superiorly. Abducting the arm during immobilization in external rotation will improve the reduction of a Bankart lesion. Controlled laboratory study. There were 37 patients with initial shoulder dislocation enrolled in this study. After reduction, MRI was taken in 4 positions of the shoulder: adduction and internal rotation (Add-IR), adduction and external rotation (Add-ER), 30° of abduction and 30° of external rotation (Abd-30ER), and 30° of abduction and 60° of external rotation (Abd-60ER). On radial slices, the separation, displacement of the labrum, and opening angle of the capsule were measured. Add-ER improved the reduction of the anterior labrum but not the inferior labrum when compared with Add-IR. Both Abd-30ER and Abd-60ER improved the reduction of the inferior labrum as compared with Add-IR. Furthermore, Abd-60ER improved the reduction more than Add-ER. Among the 4 positions tested, Abd-60ER is the best position in terms of reducing the Bankart lesion. Abducting the shoulder during immobilization in external rotation is demonstrated to improve the reduction of the Bankart lesion. Therefore, this position is expected to reduce the recurrence rate after initial dislocation of the shoulder. Future clinical trials are necessary. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Combined posterior Bankart lesion and posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments associated with recurrent posterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Hill, J David; Lovejoy, John F; Kelly, Robert A

    2007-03-01

    Recurrent posterior glenohumeral instability is uncommon and is often misdiagnosed. Damage to the posterior capsule, posteroinferior glenohumeral ligament, and posterior labrum have all been implicated as sources of traumatic posterior instability. We describe a case of traumatic recurrent posterior instability resulting from a posterior Bankart lesion accompanied by posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments. The Bankart lesion was repaired using a single arthroscopic suture anchor at the glenoid articular margin. The posterior humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments was addressed with 3 suture anchors placed at the capsular origin at the posterior humeral head. Using these anchors, the posterior capsule was advanced laterally and superiorly for a secure repair. Arthroscopic anatomic reconstruction of both lesions resulted in an excellent clinical outcome.

  13. Intra-articular Loose Body with Concomitant Bankart Lesion after a Traumatic Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason B T; Tan, Andrew H C

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of pathoanatomic lesions encountered in anterior shoulder dislocation is broad. There could be a presence of loose bodies, chondral and osteochondral, in the shoulder joint and also concomitant rotator cuff partial tears resulting from acute and chronic shoulder instability. We present one case report of a 46-year-old male Chinese with an uncommon case of Bankart lesion, with a full thickness chondral defect over the superior glenoid articular surface manifesting as a large intra-articular loose cartilaginous body. The patient presented with persistent shoulder pain with signs of shoulder instability. He underwent arthroscopic repair of his Bankart lesion with the removal of intra-articular loose body. We aim to discuss the diagnosis, radiological imaging, as well as, arthroscopic treatment of loose body in the glenohumeral joint due to anterior shoulder dislocation in our report. In our case report, we highlight the importance to identify other associated injuries from the history and examination after an episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Arthroscopic treatment is a useful minimally invasive option to remove the large fragment of intra-articular loose body and also repair the Bankart lesion in the same setting. Both of these lesions must be treated as they are crucial for pain relief, as well as stabilizing the shoulder, to prevent further episodes of dislocation.

  14. Treatment of Bankart lesions in traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder: a randomized controlled trial comparing arthroscopy and open techniques.

    PubMed

    Archetti Netto, Nicola; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Lenza, Mario; dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Faloppa, Flavio; Belloti, João Carlos

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the functional assessments of arthroscopy and open repair for treating Bankart lesion in traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Fifty adult patients, aged less than 40 years, with traumatic anterior shoulder instability and the presence of an isolated Bankart lesion confirmed by diagnostic arthroscopy were included in the study. They were randomly assigned to receive open or arthroscopic treatment of an isolated Bankart lesion. In all cases of both groups, the lesion was repaired with metallic suture anchors. The primary outcomes included the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. After a mean follow-up period of 37.5 months, 42 patients were evaluated. On the DASH scale, there was a statistically significant difference favorable to the patients treated with the arthroscopic technique, but without clinical relevance. There was no difference in the assessments by University of California, Los Angeles and Rowe scales. There was no statistically significant difference regarding complications and failures, as well as range of motion, for the 2 techniques. On the basis of this study, the open and arthroscopic techniques were effective in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The arthroscopic technique showed a lower index of functional limitation of the upper limb, as assessed by the DASH questionnaire; this, however, was not clinically relevant. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual-window subscapularis-sparing approach: a new surgical technique for combined reconstruction of a glenoid bone defect or bankart lesion associated with a HAGL lesion in anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2012-03-01

    Combined bankart lesion and humeral avulsion of glenohumeral ligament lesion (HAGL) is a well-described pathologic complex in anterior shoulder instability; open surgical approaches with and without arthroscopic assistance have been suggested for simultaneous 1-stage repair of these lesions. Presence of a significant glenoid bone defect (inverted-pear glenoid) adds to the complexity of the problem and necessitates a bony reconstruction procedure. Open surgical approaches described for management of this combined lesion complex in anterior shoulder instability necessitate a subscapularis-cutting approach; suboptimal healing of the tenotomized subscapularis and subsequent delayed rehabilitation predisposes to late subscapularis dysfunction, and this compromises clinical outcomes. This study describes a new surgical technique that utilizes a dual-window approach through the subscapularis muscle; the dual window enables access to the glenoid and humeral lesions without the need for a subscapularis tenotomy. The approach can be used to perform a congruent-arc Latarjet procedure (for glenoid bone defects) or a Bankart repair (for capsulolabral lesions), in combination with a HAGL repair. Preliminary arthroscopy is essential to identify significant bone defects and HAGL lesions. The dual-window approach for reconstruction of the lesions involves (1) a lateral "subscapularis-sparing" window to identify and repair the HAGL lesion; (2) a medial "subscapularis muscle-splitting" window to perform either a glenoid capsulolabral reconstruction or a congruent-arc Latarjet procedure; and (3) a balanced inferior capsular shift and lateralization procedure of the glenohumeral capsule. Technical tips and guidelines to avoid complications are discussed, and a rehabilitation protocol is presented.

  16. The Bony Bankart Lesion: How to Measure the Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Skupiński, Jarosław; Piechota, Małgorzata Zofia; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Maczuch, Jarosław; Babińska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Summary An osseous Bankart lesion is commonly seen in patients with an anterior shoulder dislocation. It is defined as a detachment of the anteroinferior labrum associated with a glenoid rim fracture. Radiological studies are crucial not only for detecting glenoid bone defects but also for measuring the amount of bone loss. The precise quantification of the bony defect is crucial for the therapeutic desicion-making and clinical outcomes. Although we know that major glenoid bone loss requires surgical intervention, none of the studies performed so far answered the question what size of the defect should be an indication for open surgery procedures. Moreover, there is still no consensus on the exact percentage of glenoid loss that results in a higher risk of re-dislocations. In our opinion, there is a strong need for a consensus on universally accepted measuring techniques of the glenoid defect as well as on algorithms with validated glenoid bone loss threshold values for therapeutic decision-making. In this study, we review the techniques described so far in the literature and try to assess if any of these techniques should be treated as a leading method of detecting and quantifying osseous glenoid lesions. PMID:28243338

  17. The Bony Bankart Lesion: How to Measure the Glenoid Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Skupiński, Jarosław; Piechota, Małgorzata Zofia; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Maczuch, Jarosław; Babińska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    An osseous Bankart lesion is commonly seen in patients with an anterior shoulder dislocation. It is defined as a detachment of the anteroinferior labrum associated with a glenoid rim fracture. Radiological studies are crucial not only for detecting glenoid bone defects but also for measuring the amount of bone loss. The precise quantification of the bony defect is crucial for the therapeutic desicion-making and clinical outcomes. Although we know that major glenoid bone loss requires surgical intervention, none of the studies performed so far answered the question what size of the defect should be an indication for open surgery procedures. Moreover, there is still no consensus on the exact percentage of glenoid loss that results in a higher risk of re-dislocations. In our opinion, there is a strong need for a consensus on universally accepted measuring techniques of the glenoid defect as well as on algorithms with validated glenoid bone loss threshold values for therapeutic decision-making. In this study, we review the techniques described so far in the literature and try to assess if any of these techniques should be treated as a leading method of detecting and quantifying osseous glenoid lesions.

  18. Hill-Sachs Off-track Lesions as Risk Factor for Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Locher, Joel; Wilken, Frauke; Beitzel, Knut; Buchmann, Stefan; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of "off-track" Hill-Sachs lesions, according to the glenoid track concept, as a risk factor for recurrent instability and need for revision surgery after arthroscopic Bankart repair. We retrospectively reviewed 254 patients with anteroinferior glenohumeral instability who were managed with an arthroscopic stabilization procedure between 2006 and 2013. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography scans were available for 100 of these patients to calculate the glenoid track and the presence of "on-track" or off-track Hill-Sachs lesions. Recurrence of instability was evaluated at a mean follow-up of 22.4 months. Of 100 patients whose magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography scans were available, 88 had an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and 12 had an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion. Revision surgery for recurrent instability was performed in 5 patients (6%) with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion and in 4 patients (33%) with an off-track Hill-Sachs lesion (odds ratio, 8.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.85-37.26; P = .006). An off-track Hill-Sachs lesion is a significant and important risk factor for recurrence of instability and need for revision surgery after arthroscopic Bankart repair when compared with an on-track Hill-Sachs lesion. Level IV, prognostic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bankart repair versus Bankart repair plus remplissage: an in vitro biomechanical comparative study.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Jean; Diop, Amadou; Bou Ghosn, Rony; Ghosn, Rosny Bou; Lanari, Dimitri; Canonne, Adrien; Maurel, Nathalie

    2016-02-01

    To biomechanically compare Bankart lesion repair alone and Bankart lesion repair associated with infraspinatus capsulotenodesis described as «remplissage», in the treatment of combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Seven pairs (right and left) of cadaveric shoulders have been tested, first without any lesion and then after performing a combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. For each pair, the specimens were then randomly assigned for Bankart lesion repair alone on one side or for Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage on the other side. During tests, the shoulder was placed at 90° of abduction and at maximal external rotation, which value was recorded. A 50 N postero-anterior load was then applied to the proximal humerus, and the stiffness was calculated from the obtained load-displacement curve. Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions significantly (p < 0.05) decreased joint stiffness compared with intact joint. Bankart lesion repair alone did not restore stiffness to the level of intact, while adding the remplissage to the Bankart lesion repair did. External rotation was significantly increased after creation of the Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesion; Bankart repair restored the external rotation to the level of intact, while Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage significantly decreased external rotation compared with intact and to Bankart lesion repair alone. In cadaveric shoulders with combined Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, Bankart lesion repair associated with remplissage restored intact joint stiffness contrary to Bankart lesion repair alone. This increase in stiffness was associated with a decrease in external rotation.

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY on the MANAGEMENT of GLENOHUMERAL JOINT DISLOCATION. Closed Reduction vs. Arthroscopic Remplissage with Bankart Lesion Repair.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Riad; Hamie, Muhieddine Rada; Yassine, Mahmoud Sami

    2016-01-01

    Conservative treatment of posttraumatic anteroinferior shoulder instability leads to a high failure rate and consequently high recurrence in young and active population. Each recurrence can increase the structural damage of both bony structures and soft tissues (Hill-Sachs lesion, Bankart lesion). Remplissage technique combined with Bankart repair have been proposed as a treatment option. Early arthroscopic treatment for shoulder dislocation will result in better outcome and lower recurrence rate than nonoperative management. We retrospectively reviewed 60 cases from 2010 to 2015 treated by remplissage technique with Bankart repair or closed reduction for anterior shoulder dislocation. All surgeries and closed reductions were done by the same surgeon. Mean age of patients was 30 years, most of them males having experienced one or more recurrent dislocations; mean follow-up was 2 years. Patients with Hill-Sachs lesions < 40% on the articular surface and < 20% of bone defect in the glenoid cavity were included. Exclusion criteria were: glenohumeral arthritis or other inflammation, fracture around the shoulder joint, elderly patients with osteoporosis. All patients included in the study were followed up after 6, 12 and 24 months. Rowe score was used to assess the stability of the shoulders and goniometry to assess the range of motion of the glenohumeral joints. The results confirm that the remplissage technique with Bankart repair takes the upper hand over the conservative management and does not produce any severe adverse effect on postoperative shoulder range of motion. A slight restriction (≈10º) observed in external rotation did not prevent 69% of patients from resuming their preinjury sports activities. At the last follow-up, 90% of patients had a stable shoulder. Conservative management was associated with high rate of recurrence limiting the daily activity of our patients and interfering with their return to sports activities. Except from the recurrence of

  1. Treatment of chronic anterior shoulder dislocation by open reduction and simultaneous Bankart lesion repair.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Alireza; Navali, Amirmohammad

    2010-06-16

    Untreated chronic shoulder dislocation eventually leads to functional disability and pain. Open reduction with different fixation methods have been introduced for most chronic shoulder dislocation. We hypothesized that open reduction and simultaneous Bankart lesion repair in chronic anterior shoulder dislocation obviates the need for joint fixation and leads to better results than previously reported methods. Eight patients with chronic anterior dislocation of shoulder underwent open reduction and capsulolabral complex repair after an average delay of 10 weeks from injury. Early motion was allowed the day after surgery in the safe position and the clinical and radiographic results were analyzed at an average follow-up of one year. The average Rowe and Zarin's score was 86 points. Four out of eight shoulders were graded as excellent, three as good and one as fair (Rowe and Zarins system). All patients were able to perform their daily activities and they had either mild or no pain. Anterior active forward flexion loss averaged 18 degrees, external active rotation loss averaged 17.5 degrees and internal active rotation loss averaged 3 vertebral body levels. Mild degenerative joint changes were noted in one patient. The results show that the overall prognosis for this method of operation is more favorable than the previously reported methods and we recommend concomitant open reduction and capsulolabral complex repair for the treatment of old anterior shoulder dislocation. Therapeutic study, Level IV (case series [no, or historical, control group]).

  2. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: a report of 49 cases with a minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Ming; Lu, Yi; Zhang, Jin; Shen, Jie-Wei; Jiang, Chun-Yan

    2011-08-01

    Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions are known to be a risk factor for recurrence dislocation after arthroscopic repair in patients with anterior shoulder instability. For a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, arthroscopic remplissage is a solution. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with the Hill-Sachs remplissage technique can achieve good results without significant impairment of shoulder function. Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-nine consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and Hill-Sachs remplissage for anterior shoulder instability were followed up for a mean duration of 29.0 months (range, 24-35 months). There were 42 males and 7 females with a mean age of 28.4 years (range, 16.7-54.7 years). All patients had diagnosed traumatic unidirectional anterior shoulder instability with a bony lesion of glenoid and an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Physical examination, radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed during postoperative follow-up. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, and Rowe score were used to evaluate shoulder function. The active forward elevation increased a mean of 8.0° (range, -10° to 80°) postoperatively. However, the patients lost 1.9° (range, -40° to 30°) of external rotation to the side. Significant improvement was detected with regard to the ASES score (84.7 vs 96.0, P < .001), Constant score (93.3 vs 97.8, P = .005), and Rowe score (36.8 vs 89.8, P < .001).There were 1 redislocation, 2 subluxations, and 1 patient with a positive apprehension test; the overall failure rate was 8.2% (4 of 49). Successful healing of the infraspinatus tendon within the Hill-Sachs lesion was shown by magnetic resonance imaging. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with Hill-Sachs remplissage can restore shoulder stability without significant impairment of shoulder function in patients with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions.

  3. A biomechanical analysis of a single-row suture anchor fixation of a large bony bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Dyskin, Evgeny; Marzo, John M; Howard, Craig; Ehrensberger, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether a single-row suture anchor repair of a bony Bankart lesion comprising 19% of the glenoid length restores peak translational force and glenoid depth compared with the intact shoulder. Nine thawed adult cadaveric shoulders were dissected and mounted in 45° of abduction and 30° of external rotation. A bony Bankart lesion was simulated with an anterior longitudinal osteotomy, parallel to the superoinferior axis of the glenoid, equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length. The humeral head was displaced 10 mm anteriorly at a speed of 2 mm/s with a 50-N compressive load applied. Testing was performed with the glenoid intact, a simulated lesion, and the lesion repaired with 3 single-row suture anchors. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) peak translational force and glenoid depth were reported. The Friedman test and post hoc comparisons with the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for between-group analyses. Peak translational force decreased after osteotomy (13.7 N; IQR, 9.6 to 15.5 N; P = .01) and increased after the repair (18.3 N; IQR, 18.3 to 20.6 N; P = .01) compared with the intact shoulder (23.7 N; IQR, 16.4 to 29.9 N). Glenoid depth significantly decreased after the osteotomy (0.2 mm; IQR, -0.6 to 0.7 mm) compared with baseline (1.7 mm; IQR, 1.3 to 2.0 mm; P = .01) and increased after repair (0.8 mm; IQR, 0.1 to 1.0 mm; P = .03) compared with the osteotomized shoulder. The glenoid depth of the repair was less than the baseline value (P = .01). Repair of an anterior bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length with 3 suture anchors restored the peak translational force needed to anteriorly displace the humerus relative to the glenoid; however, this technique failed to restore the natural glenoid depth in a laboratory setting. Our findings describe the inability of a single-row suture anchor repair to provide anatomic fixation of the bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length

  4. Arthroscopic repair for combined Bankart and superior labral anterior posterior lesions: a comparative study between primary and recurrent anterior dislocation in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Sup; Yi, Chang-Ho; Yoon, Yeu-Seung

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes between a primary dislocation group (group P) and a recurrent dislocation group (group R) with combined lesion of Bankart and type II SLAP lesions (type V SLAP lesion) and to evaluate incidence of type V SLAP lesion. In addition, the authors evaluated clinical outcomes of these patients by dividing two groups according to the sequence for Bankart and SLAP lesion suture. From May 2000 to May 2005, 310 patients who gave informed consent, underwent the diagnostic arthroscopy and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA). One hundred and ten patients met the following criteria: (1) post-traumatic primary or recurrent anterior shoulder instability, (2) a normal contralateral shoulder, (3) a type V SLAP lesion, and (4) minimum follow-up of two years. Group P included 42 patients, and group R, 68 patients. Among all patients, 58 patients who had Bankart lesions sutured first were included in group B, and 52 who had their SLAP lesions sutured beforehand, group S. Visual analogue scale, range of motion, Rowe and Constant score were used to compare results between group P and group R, also group B and group S. The incidence rates of type V SLAP lesion were 42.8% in group P and 32.0% in group R. The overall treatment results in our study were good. Even if the difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant, group P showed greater recovery of range of motion than group R in external rotation. No significant difference was found between the two different operative methods according to suture sequence. The incidence rates of type V SLAP lesion were 42.8% in the primary dislocation group and 32.0% in the recurrent dislocation group. The overall treatment results in our study were good. Although there was no statistical significance in surgical time between the two groups, when both SLAP and Bankart lesions are present, the Bankart lesion must be sutured first to reduce surgical time.

  5. [Clinical and functional course of patients after arthroscopic repair of a Bankart lesion].

    PubMed

    Barrios-Moyano, Antonio; Negrete-Corona, Jorge; Chávez-Hinojosa, Edgard

    2009-01-01

    Show the experience of the Orthopedics Service at Lic. Adolfo López Mateos Regional ISSSTE Hospital, in the management of anterior unidirectional shoulder instability with an arthroscopic technique consisting of reattaching the labrum in the glenoid with anchored sutures and capsular tightening with radiofrequency. Twenty-six patients with anterior unidirectional shoulder instability who were operated-on between August 2006 and November 2008 were included. Twelve patients underwent capsular retightening with radiofrequency and in 14 patients the latter was combined with sutured anchors. The patients selected had a history of relapsing glenohumeral dislocations and subluxations with anterior instability, with or without associated Bankart lesions, and all of them were young. The results were assessed basically with the functional UCLA scale and considering the occurrence of any instability-related event during the postoperative follow-up; from this perspective, there were no cases of recurrent instability. Two cases reported severe postoperative pain, and one had irritation of the sutures; 6 patients had residual limitation of combined lateral rotation and abduction movements, with a mean of 10 degrees compared with the sound contralateral limb. The most frequent incident was infiltration of solutions into the soft tissues due to the operative time. Capsular retightening with radiofrequency, whether combined or not with other repair techniques, has proven highly satisfactory from the perspective of the glenohumeral stabilization for anterior unidirectional instability. The arthroscopic approach offers the known advantages of being less aggressive to the soft tissues and a shorter time to resume work activities when rehabilitation therapy and exercises are followed.

  6. Muscle strength and function of shoulders with Bankart lesion after successful arthroscopic treatment: interlimb comparison 24 months after surgery.

    PubMed

    Tahta, Mesut; Akmeşe, Ramazan; Özberk, Zekiye Nisa; Coşkun, Ozlem Oner; Işik, Çetin; Korkusuz, Feza; Bozkurt, Murat

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair with the focus on strength after the repair. 56 shoulders with Bankart lesion were operated on arthroscopically. Gender, mechanism of the first dislocation, number of dislocations, dominant side, operated side and the number of anchors used for surgery were recorded. DASH and Oxford instability scoring systems were applied preoperatively and compared to scores at the 24-month follow-up. The scoring systems were also applied to contralateral shoulders at the 24th month of follow-up. Range of motion was measured with a goniometer. Muscle strength was analyzed with a dynamometer simultaneously with the muscle activity of four perishoulder muscles. The data were recorded with surface EMG. Range of motion, muscle strength and activity were evaluated according to the contralateral shoulder at the 24th month of follow-up. Male/female ratio was 42/14 with a mean age of 32 years. The mean number of dislocations was 3 ± 1 and all were traumatic dislocations. The number of mean anchors used was 3.1 and the mean follow-up period was 24 months. In clinical evaluation, the preoperative and postoperative results of the DASH and Oxford instability scores of the unstable shoulders were significantly different. In the comparison between the operated and contralateral shoulders, there was no significant difference in DASH and Oxford instability scores at the 24th month of follow-up. There was no significant loss of range of motion. Only internal rotation strength was significantly reduced and there was no significant change in the EMG patterns. Although good clinical results can be achieved, internal rotation strength is reduced after arthroscopic surgery, but daily activities are not affected. There is no guarantee for patients of excellent recovery. Level III cohort study.

  7. Absorption of the bone fragment in shoulders with bony Bankart lesions caused by recurrent anterior dislocations or subluxations: when does it occur?

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mizuno, Naoko; Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo

    2013-06-01

    Recently, bony defects of the glenoid in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability have been increasingly noticed. The bone fragment of a bony Bankart lesion is often utilized for Bankart repair, but the fragment is at times smaller than the glenoid defect. The reason for this mismatch in size is unknown. The bone fragment of a bony Bankart lesion might gradually be absorbed over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 163 shoulders were prospectively examined by computed tomography. In shoulders with bony Bankart lesions, glenoid defects and bone fragment absorption were assessed, and findings were compared with the time elapsed after the primary traumatic episode. When a bone fragment was not detected despite loss of the normal contour of the glenoid rim, the findings were classified as erosions if the rim appeared round and slightly compressed and classified as complete bone fragment absorption if the rim appeared straight and sharp. There were no glenoid defects in 55 shoulders, erosions in 16 shoulders, and glenoid defects in 92 shoulders. The size of the glenoid defect was 0% to 10% in 15 shoulders, 10% to 20% in 44, 20% to 30% in 26, 30% to 40% in 6, and 40% to 50% in 1. The average defect size was 7.9% in shoulders scanned at <1 year, 10.7% between 1 and 2 years, and 11.3% at >2 years, indicating no relationship with time after trauma. Regarding bone fragment absorption, all 92 shoulders with glenoid defects showed absorption to some extent. The extent of absorption was <50% in 32 shoulders, >50% in 45, and 100% in 15. The average extent of absorption was 51.9% in shoulders scanned at <1 year, 65.3% between 1 and 2 years, and 70.0% at >2 years, indicating a significant relationship with time after trauma. Bone fragment absorption was seen in all of the shoulders with bony Bankart lesions. Most bone fragments showed severe absorption within 1 year after the primary traumatic episode. Before arthroscopic Bankart repair, not only

  8. Anterior dislocation of the shoulder associated with Bankart lesion in a patient with Poland's syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, P; Schnurr, C; Hackenbroch, M; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2010-02-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital entity characterized by unilateral partial or total hypoplasia of the major pectoralis muscle, breast and/or ipsilateral hand abnormalities. It has been reported in association with various structural and functional abnormalities. We report about a 23-year-old male kick-boxer with Poland's syndrome who presented in our department the history of two traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations due to boxing and self-reductions. Physical examination showed an instability of the left shoulder, and the MRI scans demonstrated a Bankart lesion. The patient had been treated with an arthroscopic Bankart repair; reattachment of the detached antero-inferior labrum down to the glenoid and repairing of the inferior gleno-humeral ligament complex. To our knowledge this is a first case report of a patient presenting with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations due to kick-boxing associated with Poland's syndrome.

  9. Evaluation of a treatment algorithm for acute traumatic osseous Bankart lesions resulting from first time dislocation of the shoulder with a two year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J A; Ryf, Christian; Hepp, Pierre; Rillmann, Paavo

    2013-10-25

    Studies dealing with acute osseous Bankart lesions and corresponding treatment strategies are rare. The purpose of this study is to analyze the results after applying our treatment algorithm for acute glenoid rim fractures caused by first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. 25 patients were included in this retrospective case series. All patients sustained a first time shoulder dislocation caused by ski or snowboard accidents. An osseous Bankart lesion was detected in all shoulders. Operative therapy was performed in patients with osseous defects of 5% or more, otherwise conservative therapy was initiated. Primary study outcome parameter was the Rowe score. Additionally, the outer rotation deficit and operative complications were analysed. 12 patients showed a defect size of less than 5% and were treated conservatively. The average lesion size was 2%. For these patients, the Rowe score was excellent in 58%, good in 25%, and moderate in 17% of patients. Three patients (25%) complained about a feeling of instability. 13 patients had a lesion size of more than 5%, average 15%, and were treated operatively. The Rowe score for this group was excellent in 54%, good in 31%, and moderate results in 15% of patients. One patient (8%) complained about a feeling of instability, without recurrent dislocations. There were no statistically significant differences between both study groups (ROWE score: p = 0.98). Applying our treatment algorithm for acute osseous Bankart lesions consisting of a conservative strategy for small defect sizes and a surgical approach for medium-sized and large defects leads to encouraging mid-term results and a low rate of recurrent instability in active patients.

  10. Evaluation of a treatment algorithm for acute traumatic osseous Bankart lesions resulting from first time dislocation of the shoulder with a two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies dealing with acute osseous Bankart lesions and corresponding treatment strategies are rare. The purpose of this study is to analyze the results after applying our treatment algorithm for acute glenoid rim fractures caused by first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. Methods 25 patients were included in this retrospective case series. All patients sustained a first time shoulder dislocation caused by ski or snowboard accidents. An osseous Bankart lesion was detected in all shoulders. Operative therapy was performed in patients with osseous defects of 5% or more, otherwise conservative therapy was initiated. Primary study outcome parameter was the Rowe score. Additionally, the outer rotation deficit and operative complications were analysed. Results 12 patients showed a defect size of less than 5% and were treated conservatively. The average lesion size was 2%. For these patients, the Rowe score was excellent in 58%, good in 25%, and moderate in 17% of patients. Three patients (25%) complained about a feeling of instability. 13 patients had a lesion size of more than 5%, average 15%, and were treated operatively. The Rowe score for this group was excellent in 54%, good in 31%, and moderate results in 15% of patients. One patient (8%) complained about a feeling of instability, without recurrent dislocations. There were no statistically significant differences between both study groups (ROWE score: p = 0.98). Conclusions Applying our treatment algorithm for acute osseous Bankart lesions consisting of a conservative strategy for small defect sizes and a surgical approach for medium-sized and large defects leads to encouraging mid-term results and a low rate of recurrent instability in active patients. PMID:24160987

  11. Clinical Outcome and Glenoid Morphology After Arthroscopic Repair of Chronic Osseous Bankart Lesions: A Five to Eight-Year Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Soichiro; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Norimasa; Matsuki, Keisuke; Kawai, Nobuaki; Tokai, Morihito; Ohnishi, Kazutomo; Ueda, Yusuke; Hoshika, Shota; Kitamura, Nobuto; Yasuda, Kazunori; Moriishi, Joji

    2015-11-18

    Arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair for shoulders with chronic recurrent anterior instability has been reported as an effective procedure with promising short-term outcomes. However, to date, we know of no report describing longer-term outcomes and glenoid morphologic change. The purpose of the present study was to report intermediate to long-term outcomes and glenoid morphologic change after arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair in patients with substantial glenoid bone loss. A consecutive series of eighty-five patients with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability associated with a chronic osseous Bankart lesion underwent arthroscopic repair from January 2005 through December 2006. Forty-six patients with bone loss of >15% of the inferior glenoid diameter relative to the assumed inferior circle regardless of the fragment size were selected as candidates for this study. Thirty-eight patients (83%), including thirty-four male and four female patients, with a mean age of 23.4 years (range, fifteen to thirty-six years) at the time of surgery, were available for final follow-up at a mean of 6.2 years (range, 5.0 to 8.1 years) after surgery. One patient had a redislocation during a traffic accident five months after surgery before obtaining an osseous union. The mean Rowe score and the mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index improved significantly from 30.7 points preoperatively to 95.4 points postoperatively and from 26.5% to 81.5%, respectively. Although the mean preoperative fragment size was measured as only 4.7%, the mean glenoid bone loss improved from 20.4% preoperatively to -1.1% postoperatively. Arthroscopic osseous Bankart repair is an effective primary treatment for shoulders with substantial glenoid bone loss as it provides successful outcomes without recurrence of instability once osseous union is obtained. Glenoid morphology can be normalized during the intermediate to long-term postoperative period, even in shoulders with a smaller fragment

  12. Critical reflection of the advanced rehabilitation of an elite rugby league player sustaining a posterior Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Andrew; Funk, Lennard

    2013-02-01

    The following is a critical description and discussion of the successful assessment and rehabilitation of a right shoulder posterior Bankart repair in an elite rugby league player. The rehabilitation follows accelerated, goal based guidelines, widely adopted in current sports practice but not well documented in the literature (Funk & Snow, 2007; Park, Lin, Yokota, & McFarland, 2004). The study serves to be the first critical discussion of such a regime.

  13. [Arthroscopic Bankart lesion repair by double-row vertical mattress suture with anchors for anteroinferior glenohumeral instability].

    PubMed

    Tang, Kang-Lai; Chen, Guang-Xing; Guo, Lin; Gong, Ji-Cheng; Zhou, Bing-Hua; Yang, Hui-Feng; Gu, Ling-Chuan; Li, Hong-Zhi; Yang, Liu; Xu, Jian-Zhong

    2007-10-15

    To introduce a new arthroscopic Bankart repair by vertical mattress suture with anchors, and to evaluate its clinical effectiveness. A new arthroscopic Bankart repair by vertical mattress suture with anchors was performed, including to insert only 2 anchors at 3 o'clock and 5 o'clock position and make vertical mattress suture of labrum-ligament complex at 2, 4 and 6 o'clock of labrum, and to shift up the anterior-inferior capsule. Nine cases of anterior glenohumeral instability without severe glenoid bone defect were followed-up for an average period of 14 months (range from 6 to 26 months). The average surgery age was 28 years (range from 21 to 46 years). The average surgery time was 51 min (40 - 75 min). Clinical scores as evaluated by the modified Rowe score advanced from 40 +/- 16 points to 92 +/- 19 points (75 - 94). There was no any recurrence and complication. External rotation was reduced by 5 degrees at 0 degrees adduction and by 3 degrees at 90 degrees of abduction. The arthroscopic Bankart repair by vertical mattress suture with anchors for anteroinferior glenohumeral instability is favorable as an easy, short-time surgery with excellent clinical results in short-term follow-up.

  14. Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Matthew D.; Burns, Joseph P.; Snyder, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of glenoid bony integrity is critical to minimizing the risk of recurrence and re-creating normal kinematics in the setting of anterior glenohumeral instability. We present an arthroscopic suture anchor–based technique for treating large bony Bankart fractures in which the fragment is secured to the intact glenoid using mattress sutures placed through the bony fragment and augmented with soft-tissue repair proximal and distal to the bony lesion. This straightforward technique has led to excellent fragment reduction and good outcomes in our experience. PMID:25973373

  15. Functional outcome and the structural integrity of arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W; Pinto, Clinton; Poon, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations are common in young patients with Bankart lesions. Arthroscopic repair is an established treatment; however, recurrent instability occurs in up to 35% of patients. It is unclear whether recurrence is the result of a failure of the surgical repair to heal or a repeat injury. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess radiographic healing of Bankart lesions 6 months post surgical repair and identify any correlations between radiographic findings and subsequent recurrent dislocations. Methods Eighteen patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were obtained both pre-operatively and 6 months postoperatively. Standard T1 and T2 views were obtained along with an abduction and external rotation (ABER) view. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years for the risk of recurrence, and functional outcomes were obtained, including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale, Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Scores were correlated with pre-operative and postoperative MR findings. Results Six of 18 patients developed recurrent instability. We could not identify correlations between reconstructed labrum (labral bumper) position, failure at suture sites and ABER findings with recurrent instability or functional outcome. Paradoxically, there was a nonstatistically significant trend for patients with no clefts between the labrum and the glenoid at any points along the repair to have worse outcomes than patients with partial or complete clefts. Conclusions In our pilot study, MR arthrogram was used to evaluate the labrum in detail 6 months postoperatively. Despite its proven ability to detect labral lesions, we were unable to demonstrate any features on postoperative MR arthrogram that predicted either functional outcome or recurrent instability. At 6 months

  16. Functional outcome and the structural integrity of arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mark; Young, Simon W; Pinto, Clinton; Poon, Peter C

    2015-04-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations are common in young patients with Bankart lesions. Arthroscopic repair is an established treatment; however, recurrent instability occurs in up to 35% of patients. It is unclear whether recurrence is the result of a failure of the surgical repair to heal or a repeat injury. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess radiographic healing of Bankart lesions 6 months post surgical repair and identify any correlations between radiographic findings and subsequent recurrent dislocations. Eighteen patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were obtained both pre-operatively and 6 months postoperatively. Standard T1 and T2 views were obtained along with an abduction and external rotation (ABER) view. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years for the risk of recurrence, and functional outcomes were obtained, including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale, Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Scores were correlated with pre-operative and postoperative MR findings. Six of 18 patients developed recurrent instability. We could not identify correlations between reconstructed labrum (labral bumper) position, failure at suture sites and ABER findings with recurrent instability or functional outcome. Paradoxically, there was a nonstatistically significant trend for patients with no clefts between the labrum and the glenoid at any points along the repair to have worse outcomes than patients with partial or complete clefts. In our pilot study, MR arthrogram was used to evaluate the labrum in detail 6 months postoperatively. Despite its proven ability to detect labral lesions, we were unable to demonstrate any features on postoperative MR arthrogram that predicted either functional outcome or recurrent instability. At 6 months post operation, functional recovery and

  17. Revision arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Abouali, Jihad Alexander Karim; Hatzantoni, Katerina; Holtby, Richard; Veillette, Christian; Theodoropoulos, John

    2013-09-01

    Failed anterior shoulder stabilization procedures have traditionally been treated with open procedures. Recent advances in arthroscopic techniques have allowed for certain failed stabilization procedures to be treated by arthroscopic surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. We searched Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) for articles on revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Key words included shoulder dislocation, anterior shoulder instability, revision surgery, and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. We included 16 studies comprising 349 patients. All studies were retrospective (1 Level II study and 15 Level IV studies). The mean incidence of recurrent instability after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair was 12.7%, and the mean follow-up period was 35.4 months. The most common cause for failure of the primary surgeries was a traumatic injury (62.1%), and 85.1% of patients returned to playing sports. The reasons for failure of revision cases included glenohumeral bone loss, hyperlaxity, and return to contact sports. With proper patient selection, the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair appear similar to those of revision open Bankart repair. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are required to confirm these findings. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and Level IV studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. Material/Methods We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). Results According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25–100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12–35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. Conclusions With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex. PMID:26256225

  19. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-08-10

    Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25-100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12-35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex.

  20. Kinematic effect of MGHL incorporation into Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Garber, Alexander C; Argintar, Evan; Shin, Sang-Jin; McGarry, Michelle H; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-05-01

    Surgical treatment for traumatic shoulder instability has progressed in tandem with the evolution of the current understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the shoulder. Proponents of incorporating the middle glenohumeral ligament (MGHL) in Bankart repair believe this technique could increase repair strength. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the range of motion and humeral head kinematic changes that result from including the MGHL in a Bankart repair in an effort to identify possible changes in shoulder biomechanics as a result of this addition in surgical repair.Six cadaveric shoulders were tested in 4 conditions: intact, Bankart lesion, repair excluding the MGHL, and repair including the MGHL. Each condition was tested for range of motion, glenohumeral translation, and humeral head apex position. Standard Bankart repair and repair with MGHL inclusion resulted in decreased range of motion, but no statistically significant difference was found between the 2 repair types (P=.846). Anterior translation was significantly reduced with both the Bankart repair (4.8 ± .9; P=.049) and included MGHL repair (4.6 ± 0.9; P=.029). No statistically significant difference was found between both repairs (P=.993). Although both repairs showed posterior displacement of the humeral head apex when in external rotation, this trend only reached statistical significance when compared with the Bankart lesion in 90° of external rotation (P=.0456); however, no significant difference was found between the 2 repairs (P=.999). Inclusion or exclusion of the MGHL in a Bankart repair does not significantly affect the range of motion, translation, or kinematics of the glenohumeral joint. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Risk of motion loss with combined Bankart and SLAP repairs.

    PubMed

    Takase, Katsumi

    2009-08-01

    We have performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures using absorbable or metallic suture anchors for traumatic anterior shoulder instability for over a decade. This article describes the frequency, pathology, and therapeutic results of patients treated for superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions concomitant with Bankart lesions. Twenty patients (Group A) had a mean age of 33.8 years at the time of surgery. On arthroscopic findings, SLAP lesions were classified type 2 in 15 patients and type 4 in 5, based on Snyder's criteria. In addition, intra-articular free bodies were present in 2 SLAP lesions, and a capsular tear was present in 1. We performed debridement (Group A1) or reattachment (Group A2) to the superior glenoid edge of these lesions, considering whether they communicated to Bankart lesions. The therapeutic results were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Japan Shoulder Society (JSS) shoulder instability score. Mean JOA and JSS shoulder instability scores were 95.1 and 90.8 points, respectively. All Group A patients remained pain free, and no instability recurred in any patient. Meanwhile, mean JSS shoulder instability function and range of motion scores were 18.9 and 15.1 points, respectively, in Group A1, and 17.5 and 10.1 points, respectively, in Group A2. A significant correlation in range of motion was observed in Groups A1 and A2 (P=.04). Regarding postoperative limitation in external rotation with the arm at the side, the difference in range from that on the healthy side was 9.8 degrees in Group A (7.0 degrees in Group A1 and 12.6 degrees in Group A2). When SLAP lesions communicated to Bankart lesions, we had satisfactory results without SLAP repair; therefore, unnecessary repairs for the concomitant pathology should be avoided, and different postoperative care should be performed for patients with Bankart repair with reattachment of a SLAP lesion.

  2. Arthroscopic bony bankart repair using double-threaded headless screw: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, Takeshi; Nagura, Issei; Mifune, Yutaka; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of arthroscopic fixation for bony Bankart lesion using a double-threaded cannulated screw. A 39-year-old man sustained a left shoulder injury from a motorcycle accident. Radiographs showed bony Bankart lesion and CT revealed 40% defect of glenoid articular surface. Arthroscopic fixation was performed using double-threaded cannulated screw after the bony fragment was reduced by suturing the labrum at the edge with a suture anchor. Arthroscopic bony Bankart repair using double-threaded cannulated screw fixation is effective because compression force could be applied between bony fragments and the screw head is not exposed in the glenohumeral joint.

  3. Evaluation of vernier acuity near healed retinal laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    Seven Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in own eye 6 years previously were evaluated for their vernier acuity by electrophysiologic recording techniques. In these experiments, 95 percent contrast vernier acuity targets were presented at high luminance levels to anesthetized primates. Visual evoked potentials were recorded by conventional means form scalp electrodes through hospital grade amplifiers. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses form a neodymium-YAG laser had produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, 'white dot' lesions and 'red dot' lesions in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. Vernier recording proved somewhat successful in smaller animals with less than contained retinal hemorrhage lesions in the fovea. Initial analyses demonstrated a significant decrease of the pattern response signal/noise in the experimental eye overall, and an apparent relative loss of vernier signal in some lesioned eyes. Animals with the more severe lesions have somewhat degraded small patten responses and no recordable vernier response. Apparent lesser losses produced less effect.

  4. Secondary Syphilid Developing Over Healed Lesions of Varicella: Wolf's Isotopic Response?

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Tirthankar; Shome, Koushik; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Roy, Sudipta; Gharami, Ramesh C

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic response is a distinctive phenomenon in which a new skin disorder occurs at the site of another, unrelated, and already healed skin disease. Most of the cases documented in the literature were associated with herpes zoster as primary disease while the list of “second” diseases is quite long. We report here a hitherto unreported occurrence of isotopic response in which secondary syphilis occurred on the healed lesions of varicella. PMID:25814712

  5. Anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs defects: a comparison of arthroscopic Bankart repair with and without posterior capsulodesis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Juh, Hyung Suk; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair and those of arthroscopic Bankart repair with posterior capsulodesis for anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions. Thirty-five shoulders that underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair (Bankart group) and 37 shoulders that underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with posterior capsulodesis (remplissage group) for anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were evaluated retrospectively. The mean age at the time of the surgery was 26.1 ± 7.0 years in the Bankart group and 24.8 ± 9.0 years in the remplissage group. At the final follow-up, the Rowe and UCLA scores significantly improved in both the Bankart and remplissage groups (P < 0.001, in both groups). The post-operative mean deficit in external rotation at the side was 3° ± 10° in the Bankart group and 8° ± 23° in the remplissage group (P = n.s. and P = 0.044, respectively). There was no decrease in muscle strength in either group. The recurrence rate was 25.7 % in the Bankart group and 5.4 % in the remplissage group (P = 0.022). Arthroscopic Bankart repair with posterior capsulodesis demonstrated good clinical outcomes with a low recurrence rate in the treatment for anterior shoulder instability with an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Although a limitation in external rotation was observed, there was no significant limitation of any other motion and no decrease in muscle strength after the remplissage procedure. Posterior capsulodesis alone for remplissage should be considered as a surgical technique that can replace the conventional method. Case-control study, Level III.

  6. Revision open Bankart surgery after arthroscopic repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Yi, Jin Woong; Lee, Bong Gun; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2009-11-01

    Only a few studies have provided homogeneous analysis of open revision surgery after a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Open Bankart revision surgery will be effective in a failed arthroscopic anterior stabilization but inevitably results in a loss of range of motion, especially external rotation. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-six shoulders that went through traditional open Bankart repair as revision surgery after a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure for traumatic anterior shoulder instability were enrolled for this study. The mean patient age at the time of revision surgery was 24 years (range, 16-38 years), and the mean duration of follow-up was 42 months (range, 25-97 months). The preoperative mean range of motion was 173 degrees in forward flexion and 65 degrees in external rotation at the side. After revision surgery, the ranges measured 164 degrees and 55 degrees, respectively (P = .024 and .012, respectively). At the last follow-up, the mean Rowe score was 81 points, with 88.5% of the patients reporting good or excellent results. After revision surgery, redislocation developed in 3 shoulders (11.5%), all of which had an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion and associated hyperlaxity (2+ or greater laxity on the sulcus sign). Open revision Bankart surgery for a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair can provide a satisfactory outcome, including a low recurrence rate and reliable functional return. In open revision Bankart surgery after failed stabilization for traumatic anterior shoulder instability, the surgeon should keep in mind the possibility of a postoperative loss of range of motion and a thorough examination for not only a Bankart lesion but also other associated lesions, including a bone defect or hyperlaxity, to lower the risk of redislocation.

  7. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  8. The Use of Accessory Portals in Bankart Repair With Posterior Extension in the Lateral Decubitus Position.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Hamamoto, Jason T; Campbell, Kevin J; McCarthy, Mark; Higgins, John D; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-10-01

    The Bankart lesion, in which the anteroinferior labrum is detached from the glenoid, is the critical anatomic lesion in the majority of patients with anterior glenohumeral instability. Some patients with anterior glenohumeral instability will have Bankart lesions with posterior extension beyond the 6-o'clock position, and achieving anatomic labral repair in these cases can present a technical challenge. In our experience, the lateral decubitus position and use of accessory portals allow superior visualization of the inferior half of the glenohumeral joint for glenoid and labral preparation, anchor placement, and suture management. The use of double-loaded suture anchors at the inferior glenoid provides multiple points of fixation at this challenging location while limiting the number of anchors required. The purpose of this article is to present a simple and reproducible technique for arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions with posterior extension, emphasizing the use of accessory 5-o'clock trans-subscapularis and 7-o'clock portals.

  9. Spontaneous Healing of Mycobacterium ulcerans Lesions in the Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Rita; Marcq, Elly; Trigo, Gabriela; Gonçalves, Carine M.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Castro, António G.; Pedrosa, Jorge; Fraga, Alexandra G.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. BU is characterized by a wide range of clinical forms, including non-ulcerative cutaneous lesions that can evolve into severe ulcers if left untreated. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing has been reported to occur, although knowledge on this process is scarce both in naturally infected humans and experimental models of infection. Animal models are useful since they mimic different spectrums of human BU disease and have the potential to elucidate the pathogenic/protective pathway(s) involved in disease/healing. In this time-lapsed study, we characterized the guinea pig, an animal model of resistance to M. ulcerans, focusing on the macroscopic, microbiological and histological evolution throughout the entire experimental infectious process. Subcutaneous infection of guinea pigs with a virulent strain of M. ulcerans led to early localized swelling, which evolved into small well defined ulcers. These macroscopic observations correlated with the presence of necrosis, acute inflammatory infiltrate and an abundant bacterial load. By the end of the infectious process when ulcerative lesions healed, M. ulcerans viability decreased and the subcutaneous tissue organization returned to its normal state after a process of continuous healing characterized by tissue granulation and reepethelialization. In conclusion, we show that the experimental M. ulcerans infection of the guinea pig mimics the process of spontaneous healing described in BU patients, displaying the potential to uncover correlates of protection against BU, which can ultimately contribute to the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26625302

  10. Effect of secondary infection on epithelialisation and total healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Liliane de Fátima; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Saheki, Maurício Naoto; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Miranda, Luciana de Freitas Campos; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Fagundes, Aline; Ribeiro, Érica Aparecida Dos Santos; Barreto, Leonardo; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes

    2017-09-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) generally presents with a single or several localised cutaneous ulcers without involvement of mucous membranes. Ulcerated lesions are susceptible to secondary contamination that may slow the healing process. This study verified the influence of non-parasitic wound infection on wound closure (epithelialisation) and total healing. Twenty-five patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CL and ulcerated lesions underwent biopsy of ulcer borders. One direct microbial parameter (germ identification in cultures) and four indirect clinical parameters (secretion, pain, burning sensation, pruritus) were analysed. FINDINGS Biopsies of ten lesions showed secondary infection by one or two microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Candida parapsilosis). "Secretion" and "burning sensation" influenced epithelialisation time but not total healing time. Positive detection of germs in the ulcer border and "pain" and "pruritus" revealed no influence on wound closure. Our borderline proof of clinical CL ulcer infection inhibiting CL wound healing supports the need to follow antimicrobial stewardship in CL ulcer management, which was recently proposed for all chronic wounds.

  11. Effect of secondary infection on epithelialisation and total healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Liliane de Fátima; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Saheki, Maurício Naoto; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Miranda, Luciana de Freitas Campos; Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Fagundes, Aline; Ribeiro, Érica Aparecida dos Santos; Barreto, Leonardo; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) generally presents with a single or several localised cutaneous ulcers without involvement of mucous membranes. Ulcerated lesions are susceptible to secondary contamination that may slow the healing process. OBJECTIVE This study verified the influence of non-parasitic wound infection on wound closure (epithelialisation) and total healing. METHODS Twenty-five patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CL and ulcerated lesions underwent biopsy of ulcer borders. One direct microbial parameter (germ identification in cultures) and four indirect clinical parameters (secretion, pain, burning sensation, pruritus) were analysed. FINDINGS Biopsies of ten lesions showed secondary infection by one or two microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Candida parapsilosis). “Secretion” and “burning sensation” influenced epithelialisation time but not total healing time. Positive detection of germs in the ulcer border and “pain” and “pruritus” revealed no influence on wound closure. CONCLUSIONS Our borderline proof of clinical CL ulcer infection inhibiting CL wound healing supports the need to follow antimicrobial stewardship in CL ulcer management, which was recently proposed for all chronic wounds. PMID:28902290

  12. Positive tuberculin skin test or interferon-gamma release assay in patients with radiographic lesion suggesting old healed tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Yoon, Soonho; Koo, Hyeon-kyoung; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Ji Sun; Lee, Sang-Min; Yang, Seok-Chul; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young-Whan; Han, Sung-Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2012-07-01

    Radiographic lesions suggesting old healed tuberculosis (TB) is considered a risk factor for the subsequent development of active TB. The aim of this study was to estimate the positive rates of tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) in persons with old healed TB. Participants with lesions suggesting old healed TB on chest images and controls without such lesions were prospectively enrolled between January 1, 2010, and January 31, 2011. TST and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) were performed. In total, 193 participants with old healed TB and 126 controls were recruited. The rates of positive TST and QFT-GIT among patients with old healed TB were 54.6% and 77.7%, respectively. The rates of positive TST and QFT-GIT among patients without old healed TB were 38.9% and 61.9%. Sixteen percent of participants with old healed TB showed negative results by both TST and QFT-GIT. The positive rate of TST waned among participants with old healed TB who were older than 60 yr, whereas QFT-GIT positivity was unaffected by age. The positive rates of TST and IGRA among participants with radiographic lesions suggesting old healed TB was higher than without those lesions. In addition, IGRA may be more accurate than TST for the detection of latent TB infection, especially in populations of individuals older than 60 yr.

  13. Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Fixation Using a Modified Sugaya Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesions in the setting of anterior shoulder instability has had successful long-term results. Key factors such as patient positioning, portal placement, visualization, mobilization of bony/soft tissues, and anatomic reduction and fixation are crucial to yield such results. We present a modified Sugaya technique that is reproducible and based on such key principles. This technique facilitates ease of anchor and suture placement to allow for anatomic reduction and fixation. PMID:24265994

  14. Skeletal Lesions in Human Tuberculosis May Sometimes Heal: An Aid to Palaeopathological Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Kara L.; Link, Karl; Rühli, Frank; Henneberg, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    In three to five percent of active cases of tuberculosis, skeletal lesions develop. Typically, these occur on the vertebrae and are destructive in nature. In this paper, we examined cases of skeletal tuberculosis from a skeletal collection (Galler Collection) with focus on the manifestation of bony changes due to tuberculosis in various body regions in association with antibiotic introduction. This skeletal collection was created in 1925–1977 by a pathologist at the University Hospital in Zürich, Ernst Galler. It includes the remains of 2426 individuals with documented clinical histories as well as autopsies. It contained 29 cases of skeletal tuberculosis lesions. We observed natural healing of vertebral lesions through several processes including fusion of vertebrae, bone deposition and fusion of posterior elements. In these cases, we observed a higher frequency and proportion of bone deposition and fusion of posterior vertebral elements where pharmacological agents were used. There were also four cases of artificial healing through surgically induced posterior spinal fusion. With the introduction of pharmaceutical treatments, the number of individuals with multiple tuberculous foci decreased from 80% to 25% when compared to individuals who did not receive any drug therapy. Investigation of comorbidities showed that pneumonia, pleuritis and being underweight were consistently present, even with pharmaceutical treatment. Our results have applications in palaeopathological diagnoses where healing and consequent bone deposition may complicate differential diagnoses. PMID:23638146

  15. Outcomes of arthroscopic Hill-Sachs remplissage and anterior Bankart repair: a retrospective controlled study including ultrasound evaluation of posterior capsulotenodesis and infraspinatus strength assessment.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Di Napoli, Giuseppe; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Hill-Sachs lesions are compression fractures that result from shoulder dislocation. They involve "engaging" the humeral head on the anterior glenoid rim when the arm is abducted and externally rotated. The defect grows as the number of dislocations increases. Arthroscopic remplissage and anterior Bankart repair do not significantly affect infraspinatus strength while ensuring healing of the capsulotenodesis. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Sixty-one patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability treated by arthroscopic Bankart repair and Hill-Sachs remplissage at least 24 months previously were compared with a control group of 40 healthy participants. Preoperative imaging included magnetic resonance imaging for Bankart lesion identification and computed tomography to quantify the humeral head defect. Active range of motion and clinical scores (Walch-Duplay, Constant-Murley, and Rowe) were assessed. External rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) were measured with arm at the side (ER1 and IR1) and abducted at 90° (ER2 and IR2). Infraspinatus strength was assessed with the scapula free (infraspinatus strength test [IST]) and retracted (infraspinatus scapula retraction test [ISRT]). Infraspinatus tenodesis and posterior capsulodesis healing were evaluated by ultrasound (US). The follow-up median was 39.5 months (range, 24-56 months). One patient experienced a recurrence of instability at 34 months. In the remplissage patients, ER1 was significantly lower in the affected compared with the unaffected shoulder (P < .001). Mean IST and ISRT strength values did not show differences between sides. The mean Constant-Murley score rose from 62.9 ± 7.1 to 90 ± 5.2 (P < .0001). The Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were excellent in 23 (78.6%), good in 6 (17.8%), and poor in 1 patient (both scores). The remplissage group had significantly lower ER1 (P < .001), ER2 (P < .001), and IR2 (P < .01) values compared with the control group. Differences in IST and ISRT

  16. Solcoseryl in prevention of stress-induced gastric lesions and healing of chronic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Drozdowicz, D; Pytko-Polonczyk, J; Brzozowski, T; Bielański, W

    1991-03-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract of calf blood, protects the gastric mucosa against various topical irritants and enhances the healing of chronic gastric ulcerations but the mechanisms of these effects have been little studied. This study was designed to elucidate the active principle in Solcoseryl and to determine the role of prostaglandins (PG) and polyamines in the antiulcer properties of this agent. Using both, the radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay, EGF-like material was detected in Solcoseryl preparation. Solcoseryl given s.c. prevented the formation of stress-induced gastric lesions and this was accompanied by an increase in the generation of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa. Similar effects were obtained with EGF. Pretreatment with indomethacin, to suppress mucosal generation of prostaglandins (PG), greatly augmented stress-induced gastric ulcerations and antagonized the protection exerted by both Solcoseryl and EGF. Solcoseryl, like EGF, enhanced the healing of chronic gastro-duodenal ulcerations. This effect was abolished by the pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines. The healing effects of Solcoseryl and EGF was also reduced by prednisolone which decreased the angiogenesis in the granulation tissue in the ulcer area. These results indicate that Solcoseryl 1. contains EGF-like material, 2. displays the protective and ulcer healing effects similar to those of EGF and involving both PG and polyamines and 3. acts via similar mechanism as does EGF.

  17. Reduction of iatrogenic RPE lesions in AMD patients: evidence for wound healing?

    PubMed

    Rabenlehner, Doris; Stanzel, Boris V; Krebs, Ilse; Binder, Susanne; Goll, Alexandra

    2008-03-01

    Our purpose was to study retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) wound healing in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Abrasive debridement of nasal RPE was performed with a metal cannula during pars plana vitrectomy for foveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) membrane excision combined with simultaneous autologous RPE transplantation. Fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography images, and red-free pictures were taken initially within 1-2 weeks postoperatively, subsequently in 2-week intervals until 3 months, monthly until 6 months, and every 3 months thereafter. The borders of these lesions were measured; areas were calculated and compared using ArchiCad Software. Fourteen eyes of 14 patients suffering from AMD were included (nine women and four men, mean age 75.6 years +/-6.6 years). Six of 14 (42.9 %) patients showed a reduction of the RPE debrided area. The size of these lesions reduced 5.6-20% within 2 postoperative months compared with their size at first examination (from a mean of 13.7 mm2 +/- 7.2 at baseline to a mean of 12.8 mm2 +/- 6.7 at 2 months postoperatively). No further reduction of the lesions was seen after the 2 months. In eight cases, borders of the RPE debrided areas stayed stable during observation time. Wound healing of abrasively debrided RPE monolayer defects in patients with AMD occurs to a certain extent in nearly half of the cases. This process seems to stop after 2 months.

  18. Comparison of Time to Recurrence of Instability After Open and Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Mandeep S.; Manzo, Richard L.; Cote, Mark; Ware, James K.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Nissen, Carl W.; Shea, Kevin P.; Arciero, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The results of open and arthroscopic instability repairs have been shown to be equivalent in recent literature. Purpose: To compare the time to recurrence (TTR) of instability and disease-specific outcome measures in patients undergoing open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability and a Bankart lesion on diagnostic arthroscopy underwent either open Bankart repair (OB) or arthroscopic Bankart and suture capsulorrhaphy (ABSC) using suture anchors. There was a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The primary outcome measures included Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score and time to recurrence of instability (dislocation or subluxation). Rowe score, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Short Form–12 (SF-12) score were also compared. Results: A total of 82 shoulders in 80 patients (ABSC, n = 58; OB, n = 24) were evaluated at a mean of 39 months postoperatively. There were 4 clinical failures in the OB group (4 dislocations) and 7 clinical failures in the ABSC group (2 dislocations and 5 subluxations; P = .72 vs OB). The mean time to recurrence of postoperative instability was significantly shorter in the ABSC group (12.6 ± 2.7 months) compared with the OB group (34.2 ± 12 months; P = .04). The WOSI score in the OB group (265 ± 48.1) was better but not statistically significantly compared with the ABSC group (449.8 ± 63.8; P = .06). Conclusion: The time to recurrence of instability after open Bankart repair is significantly longer compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair. Clinical Relevance: Delayed time to recurrence after open Bankart repair suggests that the open technique may be more suited to withstand the high stress and demands of a heavy-duty profession (contact athletes and heavy manual labor). PMID:27570783

  19. Comparison of Time to Recurrence of Instability After Open and Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Techniques.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Manzo, Richard L; Cote, Mark; Ware, James K; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Nissen, Carl W; Shea, Kevin P; Arciero, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    The results of open and arthroscopic instability repairs have been shown to be equivalent in recent literature. To compare the time to recurrence (TTR) of instability and disease-specific outcome measures in patients undergoing open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability and a Bankart lesion on diagnostic arthroscopy underwent either open Bankart repair (OB) or arthroscopic Bankart and suture capsulorrhaphy (ABSC) using suture anchors. There was a minimum follow-up of 24 months. The primary outcome measures included Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score and time to recurrence of instability (dislocation or subluxation). Rowe score, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Short Form-12 (SF-12) score were also compared. A total of 82 shoulders in 80 patients (ABSC, n = 58; OB, n = 24) were evaluated at a mean of 39 months postoperatively. There were 4 clinical failures in the OB group (4 dislocations) and 7 clinical failures in the ABSC group (2 dislocations and 5 subluxations; P = .72 vs OB). The mean time to recurrence of postoperative instability was significantly shorter in the ABSC group (12.6 ± 2.7 months) compared with the OB group (34.2 ± 12 months; P = .04). The WOSI score in the OB group (265 ± 48.1) was better but not statistically significantly compared with the ABSC group (449.8 ± 63.8; P = .06). The time to recurrence of instability after open Bankart repair is significantly longer compared with arthroscopic Bankart repair. Delayed time to recurrence after open Bankart repair suggests that the open technique may be more suited to withstand the high stress and demands of a heavy-duty profession (contact athletes and heavy manual labor).

  20. Muscle strength after anterior shoulder stabilization: arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong Girl; Lim, Chan Teak; Cho, Nam Su

    2007-11-01

    A number of reports have been made on the muscle strength at the last follow-up after arthroscopic or open Bankart repairs. Few have analyzed the change over time in muscle strength and compared the changes between different operative methods. Muscle strength recovers faster after arthroscopic Bankart repair than after open Bankart repair, and the final muscle strength is not different between the 2 procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty patients with anterior shoulder instability and an isolated Bankart lesion were enrolled for this study. Thirty patients underwent open Bankart repair (open group), and 30 patients went through arthroscopic Bankart repair (arthroscopic group). The open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength during forward elevation than did the arthroscopic group up to 3 months after surgery, but the difference narrowed to about 5% at 6 months (P = .074). At 6 months after surgery, the muscle strength of the open group measured 85.8% +/- 11.5% in forward elevation, 89.5% +/- 10.3% in external rotation, and 89.3% +/- 13.3% in internal rotation. The corresponding figures of the arthroscopic group were 90.6% +/- 8.6%, 92.1% +/- 9.1%, and 92.1% +/- 11.7%. As for external and internal rotations, the open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength 6 weeks after surgery, but the differences were reduced to about 6% and 4%, respectively, at 3 months (P = .092 and .163, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in final muscle strength 12 months after the operation between the 2 groups (P = .503, .468, and .659, respectively). Muscle strength recovered faster with an arthroscopic procedure than with an open procedure during the early postoperative periods, and strength was restored to the level of the unaffected side at 6 months postoperatively. In the group with open Bankart repairs, the muscle strength during forward elevation recovered slower than did external and internal rotation muscle

  1. Healing of a cyst-like lesion involving an implant with nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Bill

    2015-05-01

    Numerous reports primarily in the implant literature outline the loss of an implant claimed to be as a consequence of endodontic pathosis from an adjacent tooth. This case report outlines the resolution of a large cyst-like periapical lesion that resolved with nonsurgical management when the canal was dressed with calcium hydroxide on 4 occasions because of persistent intracanal exudate. A favorable healing outcome was achieved for the affected tooth and the implant. This report adds to a growing body of evidence to suggest that implant retained crowns are not vulnerable when an endodontic infection occurs in an adjacent tooth.

  2. Healing of a large periapical lesion using triple antibiotic paste and intracanal aspiration in nonsurgical endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Jaidev Singh; Amita; Saini, Suresh Kumar; Bedi, Harmandeep Singh; Ratol, Sukhmilap Singh; Gill, Bobbin

    2014-07-01

    A patient with a large periapical lesion in relation to the maxillary right central and lateral incisors is presented here. During the conservative root canal treatment, aspiration of the fluid was done through the root canal, followed by placement of triple antibiotic paste for two weeks. Complete periapical healing was observed at the 24-month recall. This report confirms that for treatment of a large periapical lesion it is not always necessary to do surgical treatment and even cyst-like periapical lesions heal following conservative endodontic therapy.

  3. Open Bankart repair for revision of failed prior stabilization: outcome analysis at a mean of more than 10 years.

    PubMed

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Benke, Michael T; Neviaser, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of open Bankart repair for failed stabilization surgery at a mean follow-up of >10 years. Thirty patients underwent revision open Bankart repair by a single surgeon for failed prior stabilization surgery, with a standard technique and postoperative rehabilitation. All patients were referred by other surgeons. Evaluation was by an independent examiner, at a mean follow-up of 10.2 years. Evaluation included a history, physical examination for range of motion, outcome scores, recurrence, return to athletics, and radiographic examination. All cases had persistent Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. Failures included 14 patients with a failed single arthroscopic Bankart repair; 1 patient with 2 failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs; 1 patient with an arthroscopic failure and an open Bankart repair; 7 patients with failed open Bankart repairs; and 1 patient with a failed open Bankart repair, then a failed arthroscopic attempt. Two patients had had thermal capsulorrhaphy; 2 others had staple capsulorrhaphy, 1 with an open capsular shift and 1 after a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair, an open Bankart repair, and then a coracoid transfer. All arthroscopic Bankart repairs had anchors placed medial and superior on the glenoid neck. Mean motion loss compared with the normal contralateral side was as follows: elevation 1.15°, abduction 4.2°, external rotation at the side 3.2°, external rotation in abduction 5.1°, and internal rotation 0.6 vertebral levels (NS). No patient had an apprehension sign, pain, or instability. Of 23 who played sports, 22 resumed after. Outcomes scores were as follows: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 89.44; Rowe, 86.67; Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, 476.26. On radiographic examination, there were 13 normal radiographs and 7 with mild, 2 with moderate, and 0 with severe arthritic changes. The open Bankart repair offers a reliable, consistently successful option for revision of

  4. Botulinum toxin type A in the healing of chronic lesion following bilateral spasticity of gluteus muscle.

    PubMed

    Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Fanelli, Benedetta; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2014-08-01

    Use of botulinum toxin is expanding as the clinical studies demonstrate new potential therapeutic applications. In rehabilitation, botulinum toxin is above all used as adjunct therapy for the treatment of spasticity, but it may prove useful for other atypical clinical situations. A 17-year-old man had a sub-arachnoid haemorrhage following the rupture of cerebral aneurism. The patient presented gluteus maximus and medius bilaterally spasticity that produced a chronic lesion in the intergluteal cleft, a flexed wrist and a flexed elbow. As treatment for this spasticity, a total of 100 U botulinum toxin type A were injected into the glutei muscles. This treatment allowed for application of topical medication and subsequently, chronic lesion healing. Botulinum toxin A may be an important therapeutic aid for clinicians faced with treating persistent pathological conditions caused by spasticity. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The results of Bankart repair without capsular plication in patients with recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kalkar, İsmail; Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Saygılı, Mehmet Selçuk; Esenyel, Ayşın; Gürbüz, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation, who had been treated with repair of the Bankart lesion without capsuler plication. The study included 22 shoulders of 22 patients (16 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 28 years, who underwent Bankart repair between 2011 and 2014. Patients with bilateral shoulder instability, multiple instability, >25% glenoid bone loss, and those with a history of shoulder surgery were not included in the study. The average follow-up time was 21.2 months. Evaluation was made of the preoperative number of dislocations, postoperative recurrence, functional status, and daily activity performance of the patients. Shoulder range of motion was measured. The results were evaluated using the Rowe shoulder score and the Oxford shoulder instability score. Recurrence was observed in only one patient who had a shoulder dislocation after trauma, thus giving a recurrence rate of 4.5%. Shoulder range of motion was full in all except that one patient. The mean Rowe shoulder score was 95.5 (excellent) and Oxford shoulder stability score was 44.6 (excellent). No recurrent shoulder dislocation was observed in patients who underwent Bankart repair surgery. Plication was not performed with the Bankart repair. Close to full range of motion was obtained in all patients. In conclusion, Bankart repair alone can be considered to be sufficient for the treatment of traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

  6. Symptoms before periapical surgery related to histologic diagnosis and postoperative healing at 12 months for 178 periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha, María; Carrillo, Celia; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Peñarrocha, David; von Arx, Thomas; Vera, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    To compare the preoperative signs and symptoms with the histologic diagnosis and postoperative healing at 12 months for 178 periapical lesions. A total of 152 patients who had undergone periapical surgery from 2005 to 2008 were studied. The study included patients presenting with signs and symptoms before periapical surgery with a sufficient tissue sample (periapical lesion) for histologic analysis and a minimal follow-up of 12 months. The signs and symptoms present in the soft tissues at the initial examination were recorded. The histologic analysis established the diagnosis as granuloma, cyst, or scar tissue. The postoperative healing at 12 months was evaluated according to the criteria of von Arx and Kurt. Of the 152 patients, 147, with 178 periapical lesions, were included in the present study. No significant relationship was found between the preoperative signs and symptoms, lesion type, and evolution. However, scar tissues were asymptomatic in 78.1%, and 36.4% of granulomas were painful. Of the 8 cysts, 50% were asymptomatic and 50% caused pain. Fibrous scars created no soft tissue alterations in 68.7%. Granulomas had fistulized in 31.7%, and 75% of cysts had produced no alterations. The lesions with swelling had worse healing, and those with no soft tissue alterations had better postoperative healing. Chronic periapical lesions (granuloma, cyst, and scar tissue) are usually asymptomatic and do not create soft tissue alterations. However, they can deteriorate, producing pain and fistulization. Worse postoperative healing was observed for lesions with swelling, although the difference was not significant. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Open Latarjet procedure for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Flinkkilä, T; Sirniö, K

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study assessed the functional results of open Latarjet operation for recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a consecutive series of patients. Fifty two patients (mean age 28.4 [range 17-62] years, 45 men) were operated on using open Latarjet operation after one (n=46) or two (n=6) failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs. The indication for revision surgery was recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Fifty patients had a Hill-Sachs lesion and 32 patients had glenoid bone lesions on plain radiographs. No attempt was made to grade the severity of bony pathology. Functional outcome and stability of 49 shoulders were assessed after an average follow-up of 38 (range 24-85) months using Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) score, Oxford shoulder instability score, and subjective shoulder value (SSV). Forty-two patients had a stable shoulder at follow-up. Seven of 49 (14%) had symptoms of instability; one patient had recurrent dislocation, and six patients had subluxations. Mean WOSI, Oxford, and SSV scores were 83.9, 19.9, and 84.9, respectively. All scores were significantly better in patients who had a stable shoulder compared with those who had an unstable shoulder (WOSI 86.8 vs. 64.3; Oxford 18.2 vs. 30.8; and SSV 88.3 vs. 61.7; P<0.01). One patient needed a reoperation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Open Latarjet operation is a good option for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair. The instability recurrence rate is acceptable and the reoperation rate was low. Level IV, retrospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs provide similar outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Abboud, Joseph A; Hasan, Syed A; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair has decreased, largely because of improvements in surgical technique. We wanted to know whether there were differences in functional outcomes (using a validated outcomes measure) in patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair or open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. We retrospectively reviewed 106 patients who had a Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability from 1998-2001. Of the 93 patients included, 69 patients had arthroscopic Bankart repair and 24 patients had open Bankart repair. The indications for surgery in the two groups were similar. The average age of the patients was 29.9 years (arthroscopic Bankart repair, 31 years; open Bankart repair, 28 years). The followup ranged from 24-77 months. The average modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score (PENN score) for pain, satisfaction, and function were 26.3, 8.5, and 55.1, respectively, in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 26.6, 8.8, and 54.2, respectively, in the open Bankart repair group. The total score was 90 in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 89.5 in the open Bankart repair group. Recurrent instability occurred in one patient in each group. We found no difference in outcomes between the arthroscopic and open Bankart repair groups using patient-assessed outcomes. Therapeutic Study, Level III (retrospective comparative study). See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William B.

    2016-01-01

    My personal ethos of healing is an expression of the belief that I can and do act to heal patients while I attend to the traditional goals of medicine. The 7 supporting principles that inform my ethos are dignity, authenticity, integrity, transparency, solidarity, generosity, and resiliency. I invite others, including medical students, residents, and practicing physicians, to reflect and discover their own ethos of healing and the principles that guide their professional growth. A short digital documentary accompanies this essay for use as a reflective prompt to encourage personal and professional development. PMID:26755787

  10. Strontium ranelate improves delayed healing of osteolytic lesions of the jaw in a man with chronic osteomyelitis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Konstantinos D; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Fragkou, Archondoula N; Zoubos, Aristides B; Papaggelopoulos, Panagiotis J; Skarantavos, Grigoris

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a man with osteolytic lesions of the right mandible due to chronic osteomyelitis, with delayed healing after six months of antibiotic therapy. The patient received off-label therapy with strontium ranelate, with significant radiological improvement of his condition after 3 months.

  11. Strontium ranelate improves delayed healing of osteolytic lesions of the jaw in a man with chronic osteomyelitis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Fragkou, Archondoula N.; Zoubos, Aristides B.; Papaggelopoulos, Panagiotis J.; Skarantavos, Grigoris

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report the case of a man with osteolytic lesions of the right mandible due to chronic osteomyelitis, with delayed healing after six months of antibiotic therapy. The patient received off-label therapy with strontium ranelate, with significant radiological improvement of his condition after 3 months. PMID:25002884

  12. Healing of oral lichenoid lesions after replacing amalgam restorations: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Issa, Y; Brunton, P A; Glenny, A M; Duxbury, A J

    2004-11-01

    We sought to systematically review the literature related to oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs) and amalgam restorations. Cohort and case-controlled studies (no randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials available) were reviewed with respect to inclusion criteria and data on patients with OLLs, treatment interventions, and the measurement of outcomes. Fourteen cohort and 5 case-controlled trials met the criteria. The study population consisted of 1158 patients (27% male and 73% female; age range, 23-79 years). From 16% to 91% of patients had positive patch test results for at least 1 mercury compound. Of 1158 patients, 636 had to have their restorations replaced. The follow-up period ranged from 2 months to 9 1/2 years. Complete healing ranged from 37.5% to 100%. The greatest improvements were seen in lesions in close contact with amalgam. Protocols must be standardized to obtain valid results. The replacement of amalgam restorations can result in the resolution or improvement of OLLs. Patch testing seems to be of limited value. The topographic relationship between an OLL and an amalgam restoration is a useful--but not conclusive--marker.

  13. Eccentric Training for Tendon Healing After Acute Lesion: A Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kaux, Jean-François; Libertiaux, Vincent; Leprince, Pierre; Fillet, Marianne; Denoel, Vincent; Wyss, Clémence; Lecut, Christelle; Gothot, André; Le Goff, Caroline; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Drion, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    The tendon is a dynamic entity that remodels permanently. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection has been shown to have a beneficial effect on tendon healing after lesion in rats. Furthermore, eccentric exercise seems to improve the mechanical quality of the tendon. A combination of PRP injection and eccentric training might be more effective than either treatment alone. Controlled laboratory study. Adult male rats were anesthetized, an incision was performed in the middle of their left patellar tendon and an injection of physiological fluid (PF) or homologous PRP was randomly made at the lesion level. The rats were then divided into 2 groups: the eccentric group, undergoing eccentric training 3 times a week, and the untrained group, without any training. Thus, 4 groups were compared. After 5 weeks, the tendons were removed and their ultimate tensile strength and energy were measured. Tendons were frozen for proteomic analyses when all biomechanical tests were completed. Statistical analysis was performed with linear mixed effect models. No significant difference was found between the treatments using PF injection or PRP injection alone. However, the value of the ultimate tensile force at rupture was increased by 4.5 N (108% of control, P = .006) when eccentric training was performed. An intragroup analysis revealed that eccentric training significantly improved the ultimate force values for the PRP group. Proteomic analysis revealed that eccentric training led to an increase in abundance of several cytoskeletal proteins in the PF group, while a decrease in abundance of enzymes of the glycolytic pathway occurred in the PRP-treated groups, indicating that this treatment might redirect the exercise-driven metabolic plasticity of the tendon. Eccentric training altered the metabolic plasticity of tendon and led to an improvement of injured tendon resistance regardless of the treatment injected (PF or PRP). This study demonstrates the necessity of eccentric rehabilitation

  14. The open latarjet procedure is more reliable in terms of shoulder stability than arthroscopic bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Bessière, Charles; Trojani, Christophe; Carles, Michel; Mehta, Saurabh S; Boileau, Pascal

    2014-08-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Latarjet bone block procedure are widely considered mainstays for surgical treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The choice between these procedures depends mainly on surgeon preference or training rather than published evidence. We compared patients with recurrent posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability treated with arthroscopic Bankart or open Latarjet procedure in terms of (1) frequency and timing of recurrent instability, (2) risk factors for recurrent instability, and (3) patient-reported outcomes. In this retrospective comparative study, we paired 93 patients undergoing open Latarjet procedures with 93 patients undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repairs over the same period for posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability by one of four surgeons at the same center. Both groups were comparable except that patients in the Latarjet group had more glenoid lesions and more instability episodes preoperatively. Minimum followup was 4 years (mean, 6 years; range, 4-10 years). Patients were assessed with a questionnaire, including stability, Rowe score, and return to sports. Recurrent instability was defined as at least one episode of recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Return to sports was evaluated using a 0% to 100% scale that patients completed after recovery from surgery. Various risk factors for recurrent instability were also analyzed. At latest followup, 10% (nine of 93) in the Latarjet group and 22% (20 of 93) in the Bankart group demonstrated recurrent instability (p = 0.026; odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.17-0.91). Ten recurrences in the Bankart group (50%) occurred after 2 years, compared to only one (11%) in the Latarjet group. Reoperation rate was 6% and 7% in the Bankart and Latarjet groups, respectively. In both groups, patients younger than 20 years had higher recurrence risk (p = 0.019). In the Bankart group, independent factors predictive for recurrence were practice of competitive sports and

  15. Clinical Outcome of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Combined With Simultaneous Capsular Repair.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Iuchi, Ryo; Mae, Tatsuo; Mizuno, Naoko; Take, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    A capsular tear and humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament lesion are not uncommon findings in association with a Bankart lesion. However, there have been few reports regarding the prevalence of such capsular lesions and the postoperative recurrence after capsular repair. Purpose/Hypothesis: This study investigated the prevalence of capsular lesions and clarified their influence on the postoperative recurrence of instability. In addition, factors were identified that were associated with the occurrence of capsular lesions and the postoperative recurrence of instability. We hypothesized that clinical outcomes would be improved by combining arthroscopic Bankart repair with simultaneous capsular repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Capsular lesions were retrospectively examined through operative records, still pictures, and videos in 172 shoulders with traumatic anterior instability. First, the prevalence of capsular lesions and their severity were investigated. Then, postoperative recurrence was determined in shoulders observed for a minimum of 2 years. Finally, factors were assessed that were associated with the occurrence of capsular lesions and the postoperative recurrence of instability. A capsular lesion was recognized in 37 shoulders (21.5%), being severe and mild in 20 and 17, respectively. All were repaired simultaneously with the arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After follow-up for at least 2 years, recurrence of instability was detected in 10 of 34 shoulders (29.4%), including 6 (31.6%) with severe capsular lesions and 4 (26.7%) with mild lesions. The recurrence rate was significantly higher in shoulders with a capsular lesion than in shoulders without a capsular lesion (18 of 120, 15%; P = .013), but there was no significant difference between severe and mild lesions. Regardless of the sport played, capsular lesions were significantly more frequent in patients ≥30 years old, patients with complete dislocation, and patients with a coexisting

  16. The Open Bankart Repair for Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability in Teenage Athletes.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Mark D; Hennrikus, William L

    2016-03-03

    Traumatic anterior shoulder instability from recurrent dislocations or subluxations is a debilitating problem for the teenage athlete. The risk of recurrent instability is high in this adolescent population. We performed a retrospective case series analysis of adolescent athletes with recurrent instability treated with open Bankart repair and evaluated functional outcomes as well as redislocation rates. The retrospective study included 21 teenage patients with Bankart lesions and recurrent anterior shoulder instability. There were 19 males (90%) and 2 females (10%) with an average age of 16 years (range, 14 to 18 y). Patients were evaluated based on Rowe and UCLA shoulder scores, return to previous level of sport, external rotation, and recurrence. The average number of anchors used to repair the Bankart lesion was 3 (range, 2 to 5). One patient was lost to follow-up at 6 months after surgery. The remaining 20 patients all had at least 2-year follow-up. The recurrent instability rate was zero. In total, 100% of patients had an excellent result based on an average Rowe score of 96.5 points of 100 points (a score of 90 to 100 is an excellent result). In total, 100% of patients had good/excellent result based on an average UCLA shoulder score of 34 of 35 (a score >27 is a good/excellent result). At final follow-up, 7 patients (34%) had lost an average of 11 degrees of external rotation (range, 5 to 20 degrees) on the injured shoulder with the arm at the side compared with the noninjured shoulder. Contact teenage athletes with recurrent anterior shoulder instability can be treated with open Bankart repair with a low recurrence, excellent functional shoulder outcomes, and return to sport. A small amount of external rotation may be lost with this technique. Care must be taken when considering this method with throwing athletes (ie, quarterback or pitcher). The open Bankart should remain a viable alternative for the adolescent population with recurrent anterior

  17. A novel technique for advancing the inferior labrum in a bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brook A; Garrett, William H; Wright, Garth B; Khan, Maher W; Taylor, Jonathon B; Nord, Keith D

    2013-05-01

    Passing suture during a Bankart repair can be a difficult task. A key component of a Bankart repair involves shifting the anteroinferior capsule and labrum superiorly. This technical note describes a new technique of reaching the inferior aspect of the Bankart lesion from posterior. Typical suture passers push the tissue further away. Using a SutureLasso through the low posterolateral portal allows one to push the tissue from inferior toward the suture anchor, making it simpler to advance the capsulolabral complex. Three suture anchors are used in the anteroinferior quadrant. The lowest suture anchor is the critical anchor for advancing the capsule and labrum. The SutureLasso is placed into the axillary recess through the low posterolateral portal, and the nitinol wire is advanced through the capsule and labrum, retrieving the suture and pulling it back through the tissue for tying with a sliding locking knot. This ensures good superior advancement of the tissue and helps obtain an optimal arthroscopic result in Bankart repair. Additional anchors are placed, and suture passage for the middle and superior anchors is then completed from anterior. The advancement and restoration of the tissue tightness provide the optimal components for an excellent result.

  18. Revision of failed arthroscopic bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Domenick J

    2007-04-01

    The results following open revision surgery following a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure are not well documented. To evaluate the results of patients with a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair treated with a traditional, open Bankart repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients (28 male and 2 female) who had a mean age of 24 years (range 15-36) at the time of operation were evaluated. The mean interval from the time of the operation to the final follow-up was 46 months (range 24-55). The rating systems of Rowe and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) were recorded preoperatively and at the time of the final evaluation. After open repair, mean modified Rowe scores improved from 25 preoperatively to 84.2 points. The results were excellent in 2 (6.7%), good in 24 (80%), and fair in 4 (13.3%); there were no poor results. The UCLA shoulder score improved from a mean of 17 points preoperatively to 29 points (P = .001 for all comparisons). Twenty-six patients (87%) did not have an anchor placement inferior to the 4-o'clock position for a right shoulder or the 8-o'clock position for the left shoulder after the index arthroscopic repair. There were no rotator interval closures performed at the index arthroscopic Bankart repair, and 10 patients (33%) required an interval closure at the open revision procedure. Twenty-five patients (83%) immobilized the operated arm in a sling for less than 2 weeks following the index arthroscopic repair. Patients with failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be successfully treated with a revision, open Bankart repair. Inadequate postoperative immobilization, large rotator intervals, and improper anchor placement are possible risk factors that may increase the incidence of failure of an arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  19. Arthroscopic Double-Row Anterior Stabilization and Bankart Repair for the “High-Risk” Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Cathal J.; Fabricant, Peter D.; Kang, Richard; Cordasco, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to operative intervention for the patient with recurrent shoulder instability, current literature suggests that younger athletic patients unwilling to modify their activities may benefit from an early surgical shoulder stabilization procedure. Although open shoulder stabilization clearly has a role to play in some cases, we believe that further optimization of arthroscopic fixation techniques may allow us to continue to refine the indications for open stabilization. In particular, when an arthroscopic approach is used for capsulolabral repair in relatively high-risk groups, it may be beneficial to use a double-row repair technique. We describe our technique for shoulder stabilization through double-row capsulolabral repair of a soft-tissue Bankart lesion in the high-risk patient with shoulder instability or the patient with a small osseous Bankart lesion. PMID:24749044

  20. Arthroscopic double-row anterior stabilization and bankart repair for the "high-risk" athlete.

    PubMed

    Moran, Cathal J; Fabricant, Peter D; Kang, Richard; Cordasco, Frank A

    2014-02-01

    In addition to operative intervention for the patient with recurrent shoulder instability, current literature suggests that younger athletic patients unwilling to modify their activities may benefit from an early surgical shoulder stabilization procedure. Although open shoulder stabilization clearly has a role to play in some cases, we believe that further optimization of arthroscopic fixation techniques may allow us to continue to refine the indications for open stabilization. In particular, when an arthroscopic approach is used for capsulolabral repair in relatively high-risk groups, it may be beneficial to use a double-row repair technique. We describe our technique for shoulder stabilization through double-row capsulolabral repair of a soft-tissue Bankart lesion in the high-risk patient with shoulder instability or the patient with a small osseous Bankart lesion.

  1. Healing Process of Osteonecrotic Lesions of the Femoral Head Following Transtrochanteric Rotational Osteotomy: A Computed Tomography-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Devendra; Swaminathan, Siva; Oh, Jong Keon; Moon, Jun Gyu; Dwivedi, Chirayu; Hong, Suk Joo

    2017-01-01

    Background Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is a controversial hip-preserving procedure with a variable success rate. The healing process of femoral head osteonecrosis after TRO has been poorly explained till now. This study aimed to evaluate the healing process of previously transposed necrotic lesion after a TRO for nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head using computed tomography (CT). Methods Among 52 patients (58 hips) who had preserved original femoral head after TRO, we retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (28 hips) who had undergone sequential CT scans and had no major complication following TRO. The average age was 34 years (range, 18 to 59 years). The mean follow-up period was 9.1 years. We evaluated the reparative process of the transposed osteonecrotic lesion with CT scans. Results Plain radiographs of the osteonecrotic lesion revealed sclerotic and lucent changes in 14 hips (50%) and normal bony architecture in the other 14 hips (50%) at the final follow-up. CT scans of the osteonecrotic lesions showed cystic changes with heterogeneous sclerosis in 13 hips (46%), normal trabecular bone with or without small cysts in 9 hips (32%), and fragmentation of the necrotic lesion in 6 hips (22%). Seventeen hips (60%) showed minimal (13 hips) to mild (4 hips) nonprogressive collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area. The collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area on the CT scan was significantly associated with the healing pattern (p = 0.009), as all 6 patients (6 hips) with fragmentation of the necrotic lesion had minimal (5 hips) to mild (1 hip) collapse. Furthermore, a significant association was found between the collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area on the CT scan of 17 hips (60%) and postoperative Harris hip score (p = 0.021). We observed no differences among the healing patterns on CT scans with regard to age, gender, etiology, staging, preoperative lesion type, preoperative intact area, percentage of necrotic area

  2. Healing Process of Osteonecrotic Lesions of the Femoral Head Following Transtrochanteric Rotational Osteotomy: A Computed Tomography-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Lakhotia, Devendra; Swaminathan, Siva; Shon, Won Yong; Oh, Jong Keon; Moon, Jun Gyu; Dwivedi, Chirayu; Hong, Suk Joo

    2017-03-01

    Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is a controversial hip-preserving procedure with a variable success rate. The healing process of femoral head osteonecrosis after TRO has been poorly explained till now. This study aimed to evaluate the healing process of previously transposed necrotic lesion after a TRO for nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head using computed tomography (CT). Among 52 patients (58 hips) who had preserved original femoral head after TRO, we retrospectively reviewed 27 patients (28 hips) who had undergone sequential CT scans and had no major complication following TRO. The average age was 34 years (range, 18 to 59 years). The mean follow-up period was 9.1 years. We evaluated the reparative process of the transposed osteonecrotic lesion with CT scans. Plain radiographs of the osteonecrotic lesion revealed sclerotic and lucent changes in 14 hips (50%) and normal bony architecture in the other 14 hips (50%) at the final follow-up. CT scans of the osteonecrotic lesions showed cystic changes with heterogeneous sclerosis in 13 hips (46%), normal trabecular bone with or without small cysts in 9 hips (32%), and fragmentation of the necrotic lesion in 6 hips (22%). Seventeen hips (60%) showed minimal (13 hips) to mild (4 hips) nonprogressive collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area. The collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area on the CT scan was significantly associated with the healing pattern (p = 0.009), as all 6 patients (6 hips) with fragmentation of the necrotic lesion had minimal (5 hips) to mild (1 hip) collapse. Furthermore, a significant association was found between the collapse of the transposed osteonecrotic area on the CT scan of 17 hips (60%) and postoperative Harris hip score (p = 0.021). We observed no differences among the healing patterns on CT scans with regard to age, gender, etiology, staging, preoperative lesion type, preoperative intact area, percentage of necrotic area, direction of rotation and

  3. The Superior Labrum, Anterior-to-Posterior ’SLAP’ Lesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    and no muscular atrophy. The capsular structures were intact with no evidence of Bankart or Hill Sachs lesions . The superior Military Medicine...include 1) anteroinferior Bankart -type labral lesions in continuity with SLAP lesions , 2) biceps tendon separation with an unstable flap tear of the...The Superior Labrum, Anterior-to-Posterior ‘SLAP’ Lesion Radiology Corner The Superior Labrum, Anterior-to-Posterior ‘SLAP’ Lesion Guarantor

  4. Effects of low intensity laser irradiation during healing of infected skin lesions in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Lilge, Lothar; Mazzulli, Tony; Pritzker, Kenneth P.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) on healing of infected skin wounds in the rat. Methods: Wounds on the dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats (14 per group) were inoculated or sham-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. Wounds were irradiated or sham-irradiated three times weekly from Day 1-19 using 635nm or 808nm diode lasers at radiant exposure of 1 or 20 J/cm2 delivered in continuous wave (CW) or at an intensity modulation frequency of 3800Hz. Wound area and bacterial growth were evaluated three times weekly. Results: CW 808 nm (1 and 20 J/cm2) irradiation generally delayed healing in acute wounds. However, from Day 10 onwards CW 808 nm (1 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2) and 808 nm 3800 Hz (1 J/cm2) irradiation improved healing in inoculated wounds. Healing in acute wounds improved using 635 nm irradiation at low radiant exposure (1 J/cm2); however, using 635 nm irradiation at high radiant exposure (20 J/cm2) delayed healing. Bacterial balance in wounds was significantly altered using 635 nm (20 J/cm2) and CW 808 nm irradiation (1 and 20 J/cm2). Conclusion: Clearing wounds of normal flora was not associated with improved healing. Proliferation of staphylococcal species in wounds was associated with delayed healing.

  5. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others. The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases. Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical-pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions. The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique. Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles.

  6. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  7. Analysis of the functional results of arthroscopic Bankart repair in posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocations of shoulder.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit; Sharma, Pulak; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2012-11-01

    The Bankart lesion represents the most common form of labro-ligamentous injury in patients with traumatic dislocations of the shoulder leading to shoulder instability. We report the clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion in 50 patients. Sixty five patients with posttraumatic anterior dislocation of shoulder were treated by arthroscopic repair from Jan 2005 to Nov 2008. Fifty patients, with an average age of 26.83 years (range 18-45 years), were reviewed in the study. The average followup period was 27 months (range 24-36 months). University of California Los Angeles shoulder rating scale was used to determine the outcome after surgery. The recurrence rates, range of motion, as well as postoperative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Thirty six patients (72.0%) had excellent results, whereas seven patients (14.0%) had good results. The mean pre- and postoperative range of external rotation was 80.38° and 75.18°, respectively. Eighty-six percent patients had stability compared with the normal sided shoulder and were able to return to sports. There were no cases of redislocation observed in this study; however, three cases had mild laxity of the joint. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent postoperative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

  8. Analysis of the functional results of arthroscopic Bankart repair in posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocations of shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amit; Sharma, Pulak; Chaudhary, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Bankart lesion represents the most common form of labro-ligamentous injury in patients with traumatic dislocations of the shoulder leading to shoulder instability. We report the clinical outcome of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion in 50 patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty five patients with posttraumatic anterior dislocation of shoulder were treated by arthroscopic repair from Jan 2005 to Nov 2008. Fifty patients, with an average age of 26.83 years (range 18-45 years), were reviewed in the study. The average followup period was 27 months (range 24-36 months). University of California Los Angeles shoulder rating scale was used to determine the outcome after surgery. The recurrence rates, range of motion, as well as postoperative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results: Thirty six patients (72.0%) had excellent results, whereas seven patients (14.0%) had good results. The mean pre- and postoperative range of external rotation was 80.38° and 75.18°, respectively. Eighty-six percent patients had stability compared with the normal sided shoulder and were able to return to sports. There were no cases of redislocation observed in this study; however, three cases had mild laxity of the joint. Conclusion: Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent postoperative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates. PMID:23325970

  9. Mature B cells accelerate wound healing after acute and chronic diabetic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Sîrbulescu, Ruxandra F; Boehm, Chloe K; Soon, Erin; Wilks, Moses Q; Ilieş, Iulian; Yuan, Hushan; Maxner, Ben; Chronos, Nicolas; Kaittanis, Charalambos; Normandin, Marc D; El Fakhri, Georges; Orgill, Dennis P; Sluder, Ann E; Poznansky, Mark C

    2017-09-18

    Chronic wounds affect 12-15% of patients with diabetes and are associated with a drastic decrease in their quality of life. Here we demonstrate that purified mature naïve B220(+) /CD19(+) /IgM(+) /IgD(+) B cells improve healing of acute and diabetic murine wounds after a single topical application. B cell treatment significantly accelerated acute wound closure by 2-3 days in wild-type mice and 5-6 days in obese diabetic mice. The treatment led to full closure in 43% of chronic diabetic wounds, as compared to only 5% in saline-treated controls. Applying equivalent numbers of T cells or disrupted B cells failed to reproduce these effects, indicating that live B cells mediated pro-healing responses. Topically-applied B cell treatment was associated with significantly reduced scar size, increased collagen deposition and maturation, enhanced angiogenesis and increased nerve growth into and under the healing wound. β-III tubulin+ nerve endings in scars of wounds treated acutely with B cells showed increased relative expression of growth-associated protein 43. The improved healing associated with B cell treatment was supported by significantly increased fibroblast proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the wound bed and edges, altered kinetics of neutrophil infiltration, as well as an increase in TGF-β and a significant reduction in MMP2 expression in wound granulation tissue. Our findings indicate that the timeline and efficacy of wound healing can be experimentally manipulated through the direct application of mature, naive B cells, which effectively modify the balance of mature immune cell populations within the wound microenvironment and accelerate the healing process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. The use of acupuncture-like electrical stimulation for wound healing of lesions unresponsive to conventional treatment.

    PubMed

    Sumano, H; Mateos, G

    1999-01-01

    Based on previous experimental evidence suggesting improved healing of wounds treated with electrical stimulation, we conducted a clinical trial with patients seeking alternative medicine after unsuccessful conventional medical treatment. Electricity was delivered in two forms: (1) For wounds with extensive loss of tissue and/or those that had failed to heal spontaneously, electrical stimulation was delivered via subcutaneously inserted needles surrounding the wound edges and applying a dose charge of 0.6 coulombs/cm2/day; (2) in second degree burn injuries, lesions were covered with gauze soaked in a 10% (w/v) sterile saline solution and the same dose of electricity was applied as for (1). Forty-four patients were treated with electrical stimulation of the skin; 34 in group (1) and 10 in group (2). Following electrostimulation in all patients in both groups healing proceeded in a thoroughly organized manner, almost regardless of the severity of the type of wound or burn treated. Advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed.

  11. Does the "bumper" created during Bankart repair contribute to shoulder stability?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Muraki, Takayuki; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Itoi, Eiji; Cofield, Robert H; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal repair configuration for anterior shoulder instability after a labral tear. Nine fresh, frozen shoulders were used. With a 50-N axial force, the humeral head was translated anteriorly, and the translational force was measured. The measurement was performed with the capsule intact, after creating a Bankart lesion, and after the Bankart repair at 5 different positions: glenoid rim, glenoid surface-2 mm (on the glenoid surface 2 mm from the glenoid rim), glenoid surface-5 mm, scapular neck-2 mm (on the scapular neck 2 mm from the glenoid rim), and scapular neck-5 mm. Glenoid rim fixation was done with and without a "bumper." The "bumper" was created by plicating the capsule to form a thickened mass of tissue. The translational force was restored to the intact level after the glenoid rim fixation. However, there was no significant difference in force after the Bankart repair with and without a "bumper" nor after the glenoid rim fixation and glenoid surface-2 mm. The force significantly decreased after scapular neck-2 mm and scapular neck-5 mm compared with the glenoid rim fixation. The anchor fixation on the glenoid face does not increase the translational force compared with the glenoid rim placement, but the placement on the scapular neck decreases the translational force. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Bankart repair. Comparative study with and without suction drainage to assess shoulder pain and functional limitation].

    PubMed

    Godino, M; Vides, M; Benítez, N; Guerado, E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two patient cohorts with Bankart lesion, one with intraarticular drainage after surgery and another group without drainage. We designed a study cohort for patients with Bankart repair due to relapsing shoulder dislocation; they underwent arthroscopy and were stabilized with suture anchors; intraarticular drainage was used in one group and no drainage was used in a control patient cohort. Thirty-one consecutive patients were operated by the same team. All patients were evaluated at the office using the Rowe, Constant and UCLA scales. The statistical tests used included chi-square, the student-t test or the Wilcoxon rank sum test (nonparametric version). The UCLA median value was 35 (34.5-35) in group B and 33 (32.5 -35) in group A, with p = 0.13. The Rowe test score was 100 (95;100) in group B and 100 in group A (85;100), with p = 0.913. The Constant test score was 96 (88.8-98) in group B and 96 (90.5-100) in group A with p = 0.535 and no differences. This comparative study includes two groups that underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair, one with drainage and another one without drainage. Good results were obtained in both groups. In this study the placement of a postoperative intraarticular drainage did not improve clinical results, as no statistically significant differences were observed between both groups.

  13. [Curative effect of arthroscopic suture anchor fixation on shoulder bankart injury].

    PubMed

    Li, Anping; Chen, You; Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Tianlong

    2013-03-01

    To determine the curative effect of arthroscopic suture anchor fixation on shoulder bankart injury. Sixteen patients with shoulder recurrent dislocation and diagnosed bankart injury were treated with suture anchor fixed by shoulder arthroscopy. Both shoulders of the patients had X-ray, MRI, physical examination before the operation. Suture anchors were used to fix the lesion labrum by shoulder arthroscopy. University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score and visual analogue scale (VAS) score were adopted for the final evaluation at the latest follow-up. All patients were followed for a period of 25 (7-68) months. At the latest follow-up, no redislocation and instability occured. The pre- and post-operation UCLA score was (20.8 ± 0.8) vs (32.9 ± 1.5), excellent in 6, good in 10, with no poor score, while the pre- and post-operation VAS score was (3.3 ± 0.8) vs (0.6 ± 0.5). Suture anchor fixation guided by arthroscopy is good for bankart injury caused by recurrent shoulder dislocation, which has many advantages, such as mini-invasion, rapid recovery and a satisfactory outcome in function and motion.

  14. Concomitant SLAP repair does not influence the surgical outcome for arthroscopic Bankart repair of traumatic shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Asansu, Mustafa; Tok, Okan

    2017-01-01

    Prior studies revealed the presence of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) injury together with Bankart lesions in some patients. The purpose of the study is to compare the clinical results of isolated Bankart repairs with the clinical results of Bankart repairs when performed with concomitant SLAP repairs. The patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability were evaluated retrospectively. Group 1 consisted of 19 patients who had arthroscopic SLAP repair together with Bankart repair. The mean age of the patients was 23. Group 2 consisted of 38 patients who underwent isolated Bankart repair. The mean age was 24. Knotless anchors were used in both groups. The mean follow-up was 34 months (range: 26-72). In group 1, the mean preoperative Constant score was 84 (range: 74-90, standard deviation (SD): 5.91) and Rowe score was 64.1 (range: 40-70, SD: 8.14). In group 2, the preoperative Constant score was 84.4 (range: 70-96, SD: 5.88) and Rowe score was 60 (range: 45-70, SD: 7.95). In group 1, the postoperative mean Constant score raised to 96.8 (range: 88-100, SD: 2.91) and the mean Rowe score raised to 92.3 (range: 85-100, SD: 5.17). In group 2, the postoperative mean Constant score was 94.9 (range: 88-100, SD: 3.70) and the mean Rowe score was 94.2 (range: 80-100, SD: 4.71). The difference between the scores of two groups was insignificant ( p > 0.05). When the numbers of redislocations and range of motion were compared, no significant difference was found ( p > 0.05). Accompanying SLAP repair in surgical treatment with Bankart repair for shoulder instability does not affect the results negatively. Properly repaired labral tears extending from anterior inferior to the posterior superior of the glenoid in instability treatment have the same outcome in overall results as repaired isolated Bankart lesions.

  15. Arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair for the treatment of glenohumeral instability with Hill-Sachs defects.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Garcia, Grant; Patel, Amit; Kelly, John D

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether arthroscopic remplissage with Bankart repair is an effective treatment strategy for patients with Bankart lesions and large Hill-Sachs defects. Between 2006 and 2008, 20 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability and large Hill-Sachs defects. Preoperative imaging in all patients identified avulsion of the anterior inferior glenohumeral ligament with an associated Hill-Sachs defect that involved greater than 25% of the humeral head. Patients were followed up postoperatively with the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and the Penn Shoulder Score. Recurrent subluxation or dislocation was documented. There were 15 male patients and 5 female patients. The mean age of the patients was 27.3 years. The mean length of follow-up in this series was 29.2 months (range, 24.3 to 37.7 months). At final follow-up, 3 patients reported recurrence of instability, which spontaneously reduced in all cases. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 92.5 (pain, 47.3; function, 45.3). The mean Penn score was 90 of 100 (pain, 27.3 of 30; satisfaction, 8.5 of 10; function, 54.3 of 60). The mean total Western Ontario Shoulder Instability score was 72.74% (mean physical symptom score, 77.10%; mean sports and recreation score, 70.25%; mean lifestyle score, 75%; mean emotions score, 58.50%). Using an all-arthroscopic remplissage technique with Bankart repair, we were able to restore function, diminish pain, and yield satisfaction in 85% of the patients in this study. Our results compare favorably with historic controls with similar pathology at early- to intermediate-term follow-up in terms of recurrence. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Revision of Failed Artroscopic Bankart Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, José María Silberberg; Gimenez, Martín Alejandro; Salvucci, Mauro Gabriel Maroa; Ferro, Diego; Rullan, Ramón Muiña

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To present our functional outcomes from patients treated arthroscopically for a failed Bankart repair, using suture anchors and capsulolabral tissue only. Methods: Series of 22 patients presented with a recurrence of instability after a previous stabilization surgery (3 Latarjet, Bankart 19). We treated them by a an all-arthroscopic procedure, avoiding bone grafts, when glenoid track was found to be enough to proceed. The failure was associated with trauma in 11 patients, a non-anatomic repair in 6 patients, capsular laxity in 4 patients and a non-union of the coracoid graft in 1 patient. Revision surgery included: Bankart repair with anchors in 17 cases, a posterior-inferior capsulo-labral plication in one case, and 5 remplissages. In 4 cases subscapularis augmentation was used because of poor capsular quality. Screw removal was necessary when treating the non-union case. Patients were followed-up by a minimum of 23 months (range 23-26), and evaluated by the UCLA Test, SS test and Rowe score. Results: Thirteen patients had an excellent result, 6 good, 2 satisfactory and one bad result, according to UCLA score. The mean Rowe score was 90.4, at final follow up. The Simple Shoulder Test went from an 8 preoperative to an 11 postoperative, mean scores. 19 of 22 patients returned to the same level of activity prior to the injury. Complications: recurrence in 2 cases, subluxation in 2 and one shoulder stiffness that required an arthrolysis. Conclusion: An arthroscopic revision surgery, after a failed Bankart repair, presents satisfactory results in selected patients. Arthroscopic vision allows a correct diagnosis of injuries as possible causes of failure and subsequent treatment.

  17. [The effect of Solcoseryl eye gel in combination with neomycin and bacitracin on the healing of corneal lesions after foreign body removal].

    PubMed

    Haydon, P

    1983-09-01

    The effect of Solcoseryl on the healing rate of corneal lesions after foreign body removal was assessed in a double-blind study. Solcoseryl is a protein-free hemodialysate which is widely used to stimulate tissue repair processes. The healing rate was determined by means of photodocumentation which was complete in 82 out of 92 cases. The Solcoseryl group showed in significantly faster healing rate and a lower tendency to development of corneal opacities than the control group. No side-effects were observed which could be attributed to either of the drugs used in the study.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of a repaired capsulolabral complex after arthroscopic bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Lee, Yong Seuk; Tae, Suk Kee; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Jong Woong; Ha, Hae Chan

    2008-12-01

    Revision Bankart operations frequently show capsulolabral buttress loss and recurrent soft tissue Bankart lesion. Capsulolabral augmentation is designed to increase glenohumeral stability by 2 separate mechanisms: deepening the glenoid concavity and reducing capsular laxity. This is accomplished by shifting the capsule to buttress the glenoid labrum. A retained capsulolabral buttress may show loss of height and slope at a certain period after surgery, regardless of stability. Thus, the authors wanted to confirm the importance of an intraoperative establishment of capsulolabral buttress in terms of stability. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Arthroscopically repaired Bankart lesions in 21 consecutive shoulders that showed no frank dislocation were evaluated using axial and oblique coronal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 timepoints (preoperative period, average postoperative week 6 and a nearly full range of motion recovery, and postoperative month 6 with a return to daily activity). The authors measured 2 parameters (height and slope) on axial (mainly capsulolabral containment) and oblique coronal images (mainly inferior glenohumeral ligament) at the anteroinferior portion of the glenoid (5 mm above the most inferior anchor). In addition, they compared the above-mentioned parameters at postoperative month 6 by magnetic resonance imaging in 21 controls and in 21 patients whose instability recurred after surgery (not included in the prospective study). There was a significant increase between the preoperative period and postoperative week 6 in all 4 parameters (P < .0001). There was also a significant increase between the preoperative period and postoperative month 6 in all 4 parameters (P < .0001). However, no statistically significant difference was observed between postoperative week 6 and postoperative month 6 in all 4 parameters (P > .1). Furthermore, significant differences were observed between normal controls and patients with recurrent

  19. Return to Play After Open Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Geoffrey P.; Pearsall, Albert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Results of open Bankart repair have been well reported. However, less information is available outlining the timetable for return to play (RTP) in athletes after this procedure. Purpose: To review the current literature regarding (1) the timetable recommended for athletes to RTP after an open Bankart repair and (2) the objective criteria on which the decision to allow an athlete to RTP is based. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted of all relevant English-language articles using the electronic databases OVID and PubMed between the years 1947 and 2012 to identify open Bankart repair. Two reviewers screened articles for eligibility based on the following criteria: (1) an open Bankart repair, (2) a minimum follow-up of at least 8 months, (3) any report that described the procedure in athletes, and (4) any report that described the time for an athlete to RTP. All relevant data were collected and analyzed with regard to number of patients; mean follow-up; Rowe, Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow (ASES) scores; redislocation rate; and return-to-sport timing. Results: In all, 559 relevant citations were identified, of which 29 articles met the inclusion criteria. The mean follow-up was 51.7 months (range, 8-162 months), and the mean age was 25.9 years (range, 21-31 years). The average Rowe score for all studies was 86.9 (range, 63-90). The average redislocation rate was 5.3%. Twenty-six of 29 studies cited a specific timetable for unrestricted RTP, with an average of 23.2 weeks (range, 12-36 weeks). Only 38% of authors reported sport-specific criteria for return to competition, with the majority allowing return to noncontact sports at 12 to 16 weeks, and the resumption of throwing/contact sports by 24 weeks. Three reports described specific functional parameters for RTP. Conclusion: The current review summarized return-to-play guidelines for athletic competition after open

  20. A long-term clinical follow-up study after arthroscopic intra-articular Bankart repair using absorbable tacks.

    PubMed

    Elmlund, Anna; Kartus, Catarina; Sernert, Ninni; Hultenheim, Ingrid; Ejerhed, Lars

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the study was to perform an independent long-term evaluation after arthroscopic Bankart repair using absorbable tacks. We hypothesise that arthroscopic Bankart repair using absorbable tacks will result in stable shoulders. Eighty-one consecutive patients (84 shoulders) with symptomatic, recurrent, anterior, post-traumatic shoulder instability were included in the study. All the patients had a Bankart lesion. The age of the patients was 28 (15-62) years. The number of dislocations prior to surgery was five (sublux-50). The operation was performed 28 (3-360) months after the index injury by one of three surgeons with a special interest in shoulder surgery using an intra-articular arthroscopic Bankart procedure involving absorbable Suretac fixators. Seventy-six/84 (90%) of the shoulders (50 male, 23 female patients) were re-examined by two independent observers, after a follow-up period of 98 (46-129) months. In the long-term, the failure rate in terms of stability was 8/76 (11%) dislocations and a further 6/76 (8%) had experienced or had clinical signs of subluxation. The Rowe score was 91 (38-98) points at follow-up and the Constant score was 90 (56-100) points. The Constant score for the contralateral shoulder was 93 (69-100) points (P < 0.001). In the long-term, the arthroscopic Bankart procedure using Suretac fixators resulted in stable, well-functioning shoulders in the majority of patients. Eighteen per cent of the patients had experienced signs of instability during the follow-up period in terms of dislocations or subluxations.

  1. Postprocedural wound-healing efficacy following removal of dermatosis papulosa nigra lesions in an African American population: a comparison of a skin protectant ointment and a topical antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan C; Averyhart, Aisha N; Heath, Candrice R

    2011-03-01

    Removal of dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN) lesions results in superficial cutaneous wounds that are frequently treated with topical antibiotic ointments. We hypothesize that antibiotics are not necessary for effective and safe healing of such wounds. This study compared the wound healing efficacy and safety of the skin protectant Aquaphor Healing Ointment (AHO) (Beiersdorf Inc, Wilton, CT) and Polysporin first-aid ointment (Poly/Bac) (polymyxin B sulfate/bacitracin zinc) (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ) after removal of DPN lesions. This double-blind, split-face, pilot study removed two DPN lesions from each side of the face of 20 African American subjects. Wounds on opposite sides of the face were treated with AHO or Poly/Bac twice daily for 21 days. Wounds were evaluated for erythema, edema, crusting, scabbing, epithelial confluence, melanin confluence, general wound appearance, and subjective irritation on days 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21 after surgery using 5-point scales. Wound healing parameter assessments showed no differences between wounds treated with AHO versus Poly/Bac in erythema, edema, epithelial confluence, crusting, scabbing, melanin confluence, or postinflammatory hyperpigmentation at any time point. Subjective irritation was similar between treatments for burning, stinging, itching, tightness, tingling, and pain. No adverse events were reported. This was a small study in a homogenous population of African Americans. Postprocedural treatment with AHO and Poly/Bac demonstrated equivalent wound healing in an African American population. These results support the hypothesis that antibiotics are not necessary for safe and effective healing of facial wounds resulting from removal of DPN lesions. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Platelet lysate and chondroitin sulfate loaded contact lenses to heal corneal lesions.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Delfino, Alessio; Riva, Federica; Icaro Cornaglia, Antonia; Marrubini, Giorgio; Musitelli, Giorgio; Del Fante, Claudia; Perotti, Cesare; Caramella, Carla; Ferrari, Franca

    2016-07-25

    Hemoderivative tear substitutes contain various ephiteliotrophic factors, such as growth factors (GF), involved in ocular surface homeostasis without immunogenic properties. The aim of the present work was the loading of platelet lysate into contact lenses to improve the precorneal permanence of platelet lysate growth factors on the ocular surface to enhance the treatment of corneal lesions. To this purpose, chondroitin sulfate, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, which is normally present in the extracellular matrix, was associated with platelet lysate. In fact, chondroitin sulfate is capable of electrostatic interaction with positively charged growth factors, in particular, with bFGF, IGF, VEGF, PDGF and TGF-β, resulting in their stabilization and reduced degradation in solution. In the present work, various types of commercially available contact lenses have been loaded with chondroitin sulfate or chondroitin sulfate in association with platelet lysate to achieve a release of growth factors directly onto the corneal surface lesions. One type of contact lenses (PureVision(®)) showed in vitro good proliferation properties towards corneal cells and were able to enhance cut closure in cornea constructs.

  3. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 cream improves burn-wound healing and attenuates burn-gastric lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mikus, D; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Petricevic, A; Aralica, G; Druzijancic, N; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Pigac, B; Perovic, D; Kolombo, M; Kokic, N; Mikus, S; Duplancic, B; Fattorini, I; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Prkacin, I; Konjevoda, P; Stambuk, N; Anic, T

    2001-12-01

    The effects of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were investigated when administered topically or systemically in burned mice. This agent is known to have a beneficial effect in a variety of models of gastrointestinal lesions, as well as on wound or fracture healing. Deep partial skin thickness burns (1.5x1.5 cm) covering 20% of total body area, were induced under anesthesia on the back of mice by controlled burning and gastric lesions were assessed 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days following injury. The first application of BPC 157 was immediately following burning, and thereafter, once daily, until 24 h before sacrifice. In the initial experiments, exposure to direct flame for 5 s, the BPC 157 was applied at 10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w. intraperitoneally (i.p.) by injection or alternatively, topically, at the burn, as a thin layer of cream (50 microg of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream (also used as local vehicle-control)), while silver sulfadiazine 1% cream was a standard agent acting locally. Others received no local medication: they were treated i.p. by injection of distilled water (distilled water-control) or left without any medication (control). In subsequent experiments involving deeper burns (direct flame for 7 s), BPC 157 creams (50 microg, 5 microg, 500 ng, 50 ng or 5 ng of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream), or vehicle as a thin layer of cream, were applied topically, at the burn. Compared with untreated controls, in both experiments, in the BPC 157 cream-treated mice all parameters of burn healing were improved throughout the experiment: less edema was observed and inflammatory cell numbers decreased. Less necrosis was seen with an increased number of capillaries along with an advanced formation of dermal reticulin and collagen fibers. An increased number of preserved follicles were observed. Two weeks after injury, BPC 157 cream

  4. Randomized controlled trial of arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy with Bankart repair and isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    McRae, Sheila; Leiter, Jeff; Subramanian, Kanthalu; Litchfield, Robert; MacDonald, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Electrothermal arthroscopic capsulorrhaphy (ETAC) was introduced as an adjunct to shoulder stabilization surgery to address capsular laxity in the treatment of traumatic anterior dislocation. No previous RCT has compared arthroscopic Bankart repair with ETAC of the medial glenohumeral ligament and anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament versus undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair alone. Our hypothesis was that there would be no difference in quality of life between these two groups. Complication/failure rates were also compared. Eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned to receive arthroscopic Bankart repair with (n = 44) or without ETAC (n = 44). Post-operative visits occurred at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months with WOSI, ASES, and Constant scores completed, and rates of dislocation/subluxation were determined. Data on 74 patients were analysed, with the rest lost to follow-up. There were no differences between groups at any post-surgery time points for WOSI, ASES, or Constant scores (n.s.). Eight patients in the no-ETAC group and 7 in the ETAC group were considered failures (n.s.). No benefits in patient-reported outcome or recurrence rates using ETAC were found. Mean WOSI scores 2 years post-surgery were virtually identical for the two groups. ETAC could not be shown to provide benefit or detriment when combined with arthroscopic labral repair for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. II.

  5. Functional and imaging outcomes of arthroscopic simultaneous rotator cuff repair and bankart repair after shoulder dislocations.

    PubMed

    Shields, Edward; Mirabelli, Mark; Amsdell, Simon; Thorsness, Robert; Goldblatt, John; Maloney, Michael; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have investigated outcomes of simultaneous rotator cuff (RC) repair and superior labral injury repair; however, there is limited information in the literature on outcomes of simultaneous RC repair and Bankart lesion repair after acute shoulder dislocations. To determine functional and imaging outcomes of simultaneous arthroscopic RC repair and Bankart repair after acute shoulder dislocations and to compare functional outcomes to contralateral, asymptomatic shoulders. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic simultaneous RC repair and Bankart repair with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were recruited. All patients had suffered an acute shoulder dislocation. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Constant-Murley, and Short Form (SF)-36 scores were obtained. The affected shoulder also underwent ultrasound imaging to assess the integrity of the RC. Thirteen patients (mean age, 58.8 ± 11.2 years; mean follow-up, 38.5 ± 12.3 months) were recruited. In a comparison of the affected versus unaffected shoulder, there were no significant differences in the mean ASES score (89.7 ± 12.6 vs 95.0 ± 6.7, respectively), mean Constant score (80.5 ± 18.9 vs 86.8 ± 7.9, respectively), or mean abduction strength (15.4 ± 6.4 lb vs 15.4 ± 5.2 lb, respectively) (P > .05). The mean SF-36 physical component summary was 48.4. According to ultrasound imaging, there were persistent/recurrent full-thickness tears in 4 patients, and 1 patient had a new full-thickness tear. At follow-up, patients with full-thickness RC tears in the affected shoulder compared with their unaffected shoulder showed similar mean ASES scores (90.9 ± 11.8 vs 97.6 ± 4.3, respectively), mean Constant scores (77.8 ± 20.3 vs 84.8 ± 7.2, respectively), and mean abduction strength (11.5 ± 5.3 lb vs 12.6 ± 4.5 lb, respectively) (P > .05). After simultaneous arthroscopic repair of the RC and a Bankart lesion in patients after shoulder

  6. An analysis of technical aspects of the arthroscopic Bankart procedure as performed in the United States.

    PubMed

    Burks, Robert T; Presson, Angela P; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intersurgeon variation in technical aspects of performing an arthroscopic Bankart repair. A unique approach with experienced equipment representatives from 3 different arthroscopic companies was used. Experienced representatives were identified by DePuy Mitek, Smith & Nephew, and Arthrex and filled out questionnaires on how their surgeons performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures. This was performed in a blinded fashion with no knowledge of the identities of the specific surgeons or representatives by us. A video on different aspects of the procedure was observed by each representative before filling out the questionnaire to help standardize responses. Data were collected using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture). Data were analyzed as an infrequent observation with 0% to 30% of representatives reporting the observation; sometimes, 31% to 70% reporting the observation; and often, greater than 70% of representatives reporting. Seventy-six percent of representatives had 6 or more years of arthroscopic experience. Forty-three percent of representatives reported that their surgeons use 3 portals for the procedure often. Forty-four percent reported that viewing was performed exclusively from the posterior portal while the surgeon was performing the repair. Seventy-three percent reported that the Hill-Sachs lesion was observed often, and 61% reported that the posterior labrum was evaluated often before the repair. Only 25% of representatives reported that the Bankart lesion was extensively released and mobilized often. Thirty-three percent reported 3 anchors as being used often. Seventy-five percent reported biocomposite anchors as being used often. Single-loaded anchors were reported as being used often by 47%. Eighty-one percent reported that sutures were placed in a simple fashion. Eighty-three percent reported the use of any posterior sutures or anchors for additional plication as infrequent. There is significant

  7. [Arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors: results and risk factors of recurrence of instability].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing; Wang, Jian-Quan; Yin, Yu; Tian, De-Xiang; Ao, Ying-Fang

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the results of arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation with a minimum 1-year follow-up and to assess risk factors for recurrence. From March 2002 to March 2010, 259 patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors. And 188 patients (50 athletes, 138 nonathletes) were available for follow-up. The mean age at the time of surgery was 25.3 years (range, 13 - 58 years). The mean follow-up was 38.6 months (range, 12 - 110 months). All of the 188 patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with the American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) shoulder score and Rowe score system. The rate of recurrent instability, range of motion, and risk factors for postoperative recurrence were evaluated. The ASES score was 72.6 preoperatively, and Rowe score was 33.4. The ASES scores improved significantly to 91.9 postoperatively (P < 0.001). The Rowe scores improved to 81.9 postoperatively (P < 0.001). And 152 patients were greatly satisfied with the results, 16 satisfied and 20 unsatisfied. The satisfactory rate was 89.4%. 24 patients (12.8%) suffered a recurrence after surgery, 14 athletes and 10 nonathletes. The recurrence rates were 28.0% in the athlete group and 7.2% in the nonathlete group. On average there was no significant loss of external rotation postoperatively (average, 75.2° preoperatively and 67.2° postoperatively). Patients under age 20, and athlete patients were associated with recurrence (P < 0.05). Other factors including length of time until surgery, type of anchors, number of anchors, presence of bony Bankart lesion, presence of a superior labrum, anterior and posterior tear, presence of posterior or inferior labrum lesion, presence of rotator cuff tear, ligamentous laxity and rotator interval closure did not influence the recurrence rate (P > 0.05). Arthroscopic Bankart repair is a good option for the

  8. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes Participating in Collision and Contact Sports

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Michael G.; Milchteim, Charles; Zondervan, Robert L.; Andrews, James R.; Ostrander, Roger V.

    2017-01-01

    -Sachs lesion, and repair of a superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesion. Conclusion: Arthroscopic Bankart repair is an effective surgical option for traumatic shoulder instability in adolescents participating in collision and contact sports. At a minimum 4-year follow-up, arthroscopic Bankart repair effectively restored stability in 90% of cases; 80% returned to their preinjury level of sport. PMID:28451607

  9. Outcomes After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Adolescent Athletes Participating in Collision and Contact Sports.

    PubMed

    Saper, Michael G; Milchteim, Charles; Zondervan, Robert L; Andrews, James R; Ostrander, Roger V

    2017-03-01

    Literature on arthroscopic stabilization in adolescent patients participating in collision and contact sports is limited, as most studies include adolescents within a larger sample group comprised primarily of adults. To review the outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability in an adolescent population participating in collision and contact sports. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This retrospective review included 39 shoulders in 37 adolescent (≤19 years) athletes who underwent primary arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors with at least 2-year follow-up. All patients had a history of trauma to their shoulder resulting in an anterior dislocation. Outcome measures included patient satisfaction, the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and Rowe score. Recurrence of dislocation and return to sporting activity were also assessed. The mean age at the time of surgery was 16.9 years (range, 15-19 years), and the mean follow-up was 6.3 years (range, 4.3-10.0 years); 58.6% of patients participated in collision sports. Time to surgery after the initial dislocation episode was 9.2 months (range, 0.5-36.2 months). Four shoulders (10.3%) had dislocation events postoperatively. The majority (78.1%) of patients returned to sports at the same level of competition. Mean VAS was 0.49 ± 1.0, and the mean ASES and Rowe scores were 92.8 ± 12.6 and 85.0 ± 24.2, respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated that subjective functional outcomes were negatively correlated with recurrence (ASES, P = .005; Rowe, P = .001) and failure to return to sport (ASES, P = .016; Rowe, P = .004). Independent variables shown to have no significant relationship to functional outcomes included age, follow-up, number of preoperative dislocations, time to surgery, sport classification, competition level, tear extent, number of anchors, concurrent Hill-Sachs lesion, and repair of a superior labral anterior

  10. Arthroscopic Bristow-Latarjet combined with bankart repair restores shoulder stability in patients with glenoid bone loss.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Thélu, Charles-Édouard; Mercier, Numa; Ohl, Xavier; Houghton-Clemmey, Robert; Carles, Michel; Trojani, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair alone cannot restore shoulder stability in patients with glenoid bone loss involving more than 20% of the glenoid surface. Coracoid transposition to prevent recurrent shoulder dislocation according to Bristow-Latarjet is an efficient but controversial procedure. We determined whether an arthroscopic Bristow-Latarjet procedure with concomitant Bankart repair (1) restored shoulder stability in this selected subgroup of patients, (2) without decreasing mobility, and (3) allowed patients to return to sports at preinjury level. We also evaluated (4) bone block positioning, healing, and arthritis and (5) risk factors for nonunion and coracoid screw pullout. Between July 2007 and August 2010, 79 patients with recurrent anterior instability and bone loss of more than 20% of the glenoid underwent arthroscopic Bristow-Latarjet-Bankart repair; nine patients (11%) were either lost before 2-year followup or had incomplete data, leaving 70 patients available at a mean of 35 months. Postoperative radiographs and CT scans were evaluated for bone block positioning, healing, and arthritis. Any postoperative dislocation or any subjective complaint of occasional to frequent subluxation was considered a failure. Physical examination included ROM in both shoulders to enable comparison and instability signs (apprehension and relocation tests). Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores were obtained at each review. Patients were asked whether they were able to return to sports at the same level and practice forced overhead sports. Potential risk factors for nonhealing were assessed. At latest followup, 69 of 70 (98%) patients had a stable shoulder, external rotation with arm at the side was 9° less than the nonoperated side, and 58 (83%) returned to sports at preinjury level. On latest radiographs, 64 (91%) had no osteoarthritis, and bone block positioning was accurate, with 63 (90%) being below the equator and 65 (93%) flush to the glenoid surface. The coracoid graft

  11. Mid-term results of arthroscopic Bankart repair: A review of 31 cases.

    PubMed

    Tordjman, D; Vidal, C; Fontès, D

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the overall function (Walch-Duplay score), stability, time and because it is time of return to sport and level of return to sport, and satisfaction of patients who underwent an arthroscopic Bankart repair for chronic anterior shoulder instability at 5 years' follow-up. In addition, the potential correlation between the postoperative Walch-Duplay score and the presence of risk factors for recurrence, the ISIS score, associated labral lesions discovered intraoperatively and clinical presentation was determined. This was a retrospective, single-centre study of 30 patients (31 arthroscopic Bankart procedures) operated between January 2003 and December 2012. The Walch-Duplay score, recurrence rate (dislocation or subluxation), return to sports and subjective satisfaction were evaluated. The mean postoperative Duplay score was 77.4 points (100-15)±30.6. At review, 25.8% of patients had recurrence of the preoperative symptoms, including 16.1% glenohumeral dislocation and 9.7% subluxation. Patients requiring revision surgery (Bristow-Latarjet procedure) had no additional instability episodes. Among the athletes, 16 (66.6%) returned to their pre-injury level, four (16.6%) changed to a different sport and four stopped participating (16.6%). The subjective evaluation of the procedure was satisfactory in 75% of cases. No risk factors for recurrence were significantly related to the Walch-Duplay score. Despite satisfactory Walch-Duplay scores and subjective results, this mid-term follow-up study revealed a significant number of patients with recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair, confirming published data. Careful patient selection is essential prior to proposing this procedure and patients should be informed of the potential risk of revision surgery. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Incapacity of work after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Tobias M; Freude, Thomas; Fiedler, Sebastian; Schröter, Steffen; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ateschrang, Atesch

    2015-10-01

    The incapacity with respect to work following anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation and subsequent Bankart repair has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to examine a patient's incapacity according to the classification by the REFA Association. The recovery time was measured and the outcome of patients with heavy workload was compared to those with lower workloads. A total of 74 patients who underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The Constant-Murley Score, UCLA Shoulder Score and ROWE Score for Shoulder Instability were recorded for clinical assessment. The mean follow-up time was 43.1 months (SD ± 17.4; 24-110 months) with a mean age of 34.7 years (SD ± 12.6). Workload was classified as per the REFA Association classification system. Postoperative duration of a patient's incapacity with respect to work and other subjective ratings were provided by the patients themselves. The mean incapacity of work was 2.73 months (95 % CI 1.19-5.36). The incapacity of work was 2.06 months (95 % CI 1.55-2.68) in the group with low physical strains at work (REFA 0-1) and 3.40 months (95 % CI 2.70-4.24) in the group with heavy workload (REFA 2-4/p = 0.005). Overall, the mean Constant-Murley Score was 87.7 (SD ± 13.5). The average UCLA Shoulder Score summed up to 31.9 (SD ± 3.87) and the mean ROWE Score was 87.6 (SD ± 21.7). 13 (17.5 %) patients had problems to compete in their jobs. Three patients had to change the job postoperatively. In this study, a relationship between the time of incapacity of work and the workload was observed; patients with low physical strains returned significantly earlier to work after arthroscopic Bankart repair (p = 0.005). In general, the clinical results as measured in the Constant/UCLA/Rowe score were comparable to other studies.

  13. Human papilloma virus lesions of the oral cavity: healing and relapse after treatment with 810-980 nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Angiero, Francesca; Buccianti, Alberto; Parma, Luisa; Crippa, Rolando

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of laser therapy in treating oral human papilloma virus (HPV) lesions. In particular, mode of action, healing, postoperative patient compliance, visual numeric scale (VNS) pain index, and recurrence were analyzed. During 2001-2012, in 170 patients (80 women and 90 men), 174 intraoral and lip HPV lesions were detected and excised by diode laser of different wavelengths (810-980 nm), with an average power of 2.1 W, in continuous wave mode, using 300 to 320 μm optical fibers. In most cases (95.4%), complete healing occurred in the first 30 days. There were no adverse effects and all patients were carefully followed up until complete healing occurred, documenting any complications. There was only one recurrence, which was later treated successfully; the mean VNS pain score was below one. In treating HPV lesions, the diode laser is not only a valuable tool for their eradication but especially it reduces relapses, thanks to the characteristics of the laser light.

  14. Biomechanical effectiveness of an arthroscopic posterior bankart repair versus an open bone block procedure for posterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Mathias; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Khan, Nicklas; Patzer, Thilo; Windhagen, Henning; Petersen, Wolf; Bohnsack, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The most effective surgical treatment for traumatic posterior shoulder instability remains unclear. An arthroscopic posterior Bankart repair is as effective as an open posterior bone block-capsulorrhaphy procedure regarding the restoration of humeral displacement with posterior and inferior forces. Controlled laboratory study. Biomechanical testing of 16 human shoulders was performed in 3 testing conditions: after ventilation (intact joint), after creation of a posteroinferior Bankart lesion with an additional cut of the posterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, and after surgical shoulder stabilization. The shoulder stabilization was performed either by an open posterior bone block procedure and glenoid-based T-capsulorrhaphy or by an arthroscopic Bankart repair. Testing was performed in 2 positions-the sulcus test position and the jerk test position-with a passive humerus load of 50 N applied in the posterior, posteroinferior, and inferior directions. After the arthroscopic repair, there was no significant difference between the translation and the intact state for all tested directions. The bone block repair-capsulorrhaphy caused a significant decrease of posterior translation (sulcus test and jerk test positions) and posteroinferior translation (jerk test position). But the resulting posterior and posteroinferior translation was even significantly lower than the translation measured for the intact joints. However, the reduction of inferior translation, compared with that of the defect condition, was not significant after the bone block repair (sulcus test and jerk test positions). Compared with that of the intact joint, inferior translation after the bone block repair was significantly higher. The posterior bone block repair-capsulorrhaphy overcorrects posterior translation and does not effectively restore inferior stability, whereas the arthroscopic posterior Bankart repair restores posterior and inferior laxity of the intact joint. An arthroscopic

  15. The surgical outcome of immediate arthroscopic Bankart repair for first time anterior shoulder dislocation in young active patients.

    PubMed

    Law, Billy Kan-Yip; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Ho, Eric Po-Yan; Chang, Joseph Jeremy Hsi-Tse; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluated the surgical outcomes of young active patients with arthroscopic Bankart repair within 1 month after first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. From July 2002-October 2004, patients presented with first-time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation and treated with arthroscopic stabilization within 1 month of injury were retrospectively reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were performed before the operation in all cases. Cases with contralateral shoulder multidirectional instability or glenoid bone loss of more than 30% on preoperative computed tomography on the injury side were excluded. All patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair, using metallic suture anchors or soft tissue bio-absorbable anchors by a same group of surgeons and followed the same rehabilitation protocol. Recurrence, instability signs, range of motion, WOSI score, Rowe score and complications were assessed. Thirty-eight patients were recruited: the average age was 21 (16-30). All patients had definite trauma history. Radiologically, all patients had Bankart/Hill-Sachs lesion. All the operations were done within 1 month after injury (6-25 days). The average hospital stay was 1.2 days (1-5 days). The average follow-up was 28 months (24-48 months). There were two cases of posttraumatic re-dislocation (5.2%). The average external rotation lag was 5 degrees (0-15) in 90 degrees shoulder abduction when compared with contralateral side. 95% of patients had excellent or good Rowe score. The average WOSI score was 83%. There was one case of transient ulnar nerve palsy and one case of superficial wound infection. This study concluded that immediate arthroscopic Bankart repair with an accelerated rehabilitation program is an effective and safe technique for treating young active patients with first-time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

  16. [Role of integrin-linked kinase signaling pathway in skin lesions and wound healing in diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rixing; Li, Yeyang; Li, Gang; Lin, Weihua; Sun, Jing' en; Zhou, Wangbiao

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling pathway in the skin lesions and wound healing in diabetic rats. Thirty-six SD rats were divided into diabetic wound group (D) and non-diabetic wound group (N) according to the random number table, with 18 rats in each group. 10 g/L streptozocin (60 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected in rats in group D, while the rats in group N were given same quantity of sodium citrate buffer. Two weeks after successful reproduction of diabetic model of rats in group D, two full-thickness skin of an area of 2 cm × 2 cm was resected on both sides of back of rats in the two groups. Wounds of three rats of each group were photographed and examined on post injury day (PID) 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21, and the wound healing rates were calculated. The non-injured skin and wound tissue (central part) on back of three rats of the rest 15 rats in the two groups were harvested on PID 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21, respectively. Morphology of the non-injured skin tissue was observed with HE staining, and the thickness of full-thickness skin and epidermis were measured. The mRNA expression levels of ILK, protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in non-injured skin tissue were determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR. The protein expression levels of ILK, Akt, phosphorylated Akt, GSK-3β, and phosphorylated GSK-3β in non-injured skin tissue, and ILK, phosphorylated Akt in wound tissue were assessed with Western blotting. Data were processed with two independent-sample t test, one-way analysis of variance, SNK test and analysis of variance of factorial design. (1) After injury, the wound scabs of rats in group N were dry, and red granulation tissue with no excretion were seen when the scabs fell off, and the wound healed fast. After injury, excretion under the wound scabs of rats in group D was seen, and the scabs easily fell off with exposure of pink granulation tissue with much excretion, and

  17. A comparison of the effect of triamcinolone ointment and mouthwash with or without zinc on the healing process of aphthous stomatitis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenooz, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Gholizadeh, Narges; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Definitive etiology of RAS has not been conclusively established. There is no certain treatment for aphthous stomatitis but some drugs such as steroids are commonly used for the treatment of RAS. Regarding the effect of zinc on the healing process of epithelial layer and cell division, in this research the effect of triamcinolone (with orabase) in combination with a zinc-containing mouthwash and triamcinolone alone on the healing process of RAS lesions was assessed. Methods. The present study consisted of 20 patients diagnosed with RAS. The patients were instructed to rinse the mouth-wash or placebo three times a day and triamcinolone ointment twice a day for two weeks. The largest dimension of the ulcer was measured by a digital caliper and the severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Number, size, duration, ulcer-free period and pain of the lesions were evaluated twice a week for twomonths. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Mann-Whitney U test and t-test. Results. A decrease was seen in the mean pain severity score (P = 0.631) and the size of the lesions but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.739). Also the difference between the number of lesions (P = 0.739), duration and ulcer-free period (P = 0.873) were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Zinc mouthwash seems to be as effective on wound healing process as typical treatment modalities for RAS. PMID:27429724

  18. A comparison of the effect of triamcinolone ointment and mouthwash with or without zinc on the healing process of aphthous stomatitis lesions.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenooz, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Gholizadeh, Narges; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Definitive etiology of RAS has not been conclusively established. There is no certain treatment for aphthous stomatitis but some drugs such as steroids are commonly used for the treatment of RAS. Regarding the effect of zinc on the healing process of epithelial layer and cell division, in this research the effect of triamcinolone (with orabase) in combination with a zinc-containing mouthwash and triamcinolone alone on the healing process of RAS lesions was assessed. Methods. The present study consisted of 20 patients diagnosed with RAS. The patients were instructed to rinse the mouth-wash or placebo three times a day and triamcinolone ointment twice a day for two weeks. The largest dimension of the ulcer was measured by a digital caliper and the severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Number, size, duration, ulcer-free period and pain of the lesions were evaluated twice a week for twomonths. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Mann-Whitney U test and t-test. Results . A decrease was seen in the mean pain severity score (P = 0.631) and the size of the lesions but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.739). Also the difference between the number of lesions (P = 0.739), duration and ulcer-free period (P = 0.873) were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Zinc mouthwash seems to be as effective on wound healing process as typical treatment modalities for RAS.

  19. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  20. Healing of recurrent herpes simplex corneal epithelial lesions treated with topical acyclovir A non-contact photomicrographic in vivo study in the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Tabery, H M

    2001-06-01

    To examine morphological changes occurring in recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) epithelial keratitis after the application of topical acyclovir ointment 3%. 7 patients examined with the slit lamp and photographed by non-contact in vivo photomicrography. Within one day of treatment the lesions lost their typical herpetic features, and after about 2-3 days the morphology seemed to reflect only the sequelae: unhealthy epithelium and abnormal cells located at the level of the basement membrane. Two patients showed epitheliopathy compatible with the side-effects of the treatment. The rapid loss of typical HSV features after drug application reflects a successful arrest of the virus replication, freeing the epithelial healing forces. At what point of time infectious virus is eradicated and the treatment can be safely stopped cannot be determined clinically. Healing in the sense of restitution ad integrum is a slow process showing individual variations. Abnormal intra-/subepithelial cells are last to disappear.

  1. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for recurrent anterior shoulder instability: functional outcomes and identification of risk factors for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Issaq; Ashton, Fiona; Robinson, Christopher Michael

    2012-07-18

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift is a well-established technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift and to identify risk factors that are predictive of recurrence of glenohumeral instability. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database consisting of 302 patients who had undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for the treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. The prevalence of patient and injury-related risk factors for recurrence was assessed. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the predicted probability of recurrence within two years. The chief outcome measures were the risk of recurrence and the two-year functional outcomes assessed with the Western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores. The rate of recurrent glenohumeral instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift was 13.2%. The median time to recurrence was twelve months, and this complication developed within one year in 55% of these patients. The risk of recurrence was independently predicted by the patient's age at surgery, the severity of glenoid bone loss, and the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion (all p < 0.001). These variables were incorporated into a model to provide an estimate of the risk of recurrence after surgery. Varying the cutoff level for the predicted probability of recurrence in the model from 50% to lower values increased the sensitivity of the model to detect recurrences but decreased the positive predictive value of the model to correctly predict failed repairs. There was a significant improvement in the mean WOSI and DASH scores at two years postoperatively (both p < 0.001), but the mean scores in the group with recurrence were significantly lower than those in the group

  2. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. Purpose: This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors related to the postoperative recurrence of instability in athletes. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 115 athletes (123 shoulders) were classified into 5 groups according to type of sport: rugby (41 shoulders), American football (32 shoulders), other collision sports (18 shoulders), contact sports (15 shoulders), and overhead sports (17 shoulders). First, the recurrence rate in each sporting category was investigated, with 113 shoulders followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Then, factors related to postoperative recurrence were investigated in relation to the type of sport. Results: Postoperative recurrence of instability was noted in 23 of 113 shoulders (20.4%). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in rugby, 17.2% in American football, 11.1% in other collision sports, 14.3% in contact sports, and 12.5% in overhead sports. The most frequent cause of recurrence was tackling, and recurrence occurred with tackling in 12 of 16 athletes playing rugby or American football. Reoperation was completed in 11 shoulders. By univariate analysis, significant risk factors for postoperative recurrence of instability included playing rugby, age between 10 and 19 years at surgery, preoperative glenoid defect, small bone fragment of bony Bankart lesion, and capsular tear. However, by multivariate analysis, the most significant factor was not the type of sport but younger age at operation and a preoperative glenoid defect with

  3. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Recurrence of Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Mae, Tatsuo; Sato, Seira; Okimura, Shinichiro; Kuroda, Miki

    2017-09-01

    Several risk factors for the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair have been reported, but there have been few detailed investigations of the specific risk factors in relation to the type of sport. This study investigated the postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair without additional reinforcement procedures in competitive athletes, including athletes with a large glenoid defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors related to the postoperative recurrence of instability in athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 115 athletes (123 shoulders) were classified into 5 groups according to type of sport: rugby (41 shoulders), American football (32 shoulders), other collision sports (18 shoulders), contact sports (15 shoulders), and overhead sports (17 shoulders). First, the recurrence rate in each sporting category was investigated, with 113 shoulders followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Then, factors related to postoperative recurrence were investigated in relation to the type of sport. Postoperative recurrence of instability was noted in 23 of 113 shoulders (20.4%). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in rugby, 17.2% in American football, 11.1% in other collision sports, 14.3% in contact sports, and 12.5% in overhead sports. The most frequent cause of recurrence was tackling, and recurrence occurred with tackling in 12 of 16 athletes playing rugby or American football. Reoperation was completed in 11 shoulders. By univariate analysis, significant risk factors for postoperative recurrence of instability included playing rugby, age between 10 and 19 years at surgery, preoperative glenoid defect, small bone fragment of bony Bankart lesion, and capsular tear. However, by multivariate analysis, the most significant factor was not the type of sport but younger age at operation and a preoperative glenoid defect with small or no bone fragment. Compared with the other

  4. Outcomes of Bankart Repairs Using Modern Arthroscopic Technique in an Athletic Population.

    PubMed

    Milchteim, Charles; Tucker, Scott A; Nye, Darin D; Lamour, Richard J; Liu, Wei; Andrews, James R; Ostrander, Roger V

    2016-07-01

    To report a large number of highly active patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair at our institution over the last decade. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent primary and revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs using bioabsorbable anchors was performed. Outcome measures included recurrence of dislocation, American Shoulder and Elbow Scores (ASES), Rowe, visual analog scale (VAS), return to sports, and satisfaction scores. A total of 94 shoulders met the inclusion criteria. The recurrence rate was 6/94 (6.4%) at a mean follow-up of 5 years (range, 3 to 8.3). The mean postoperative scores were as follows: ASES = 91.5/100; Rowe = 84.3/100; VAS = 0.8/10; satisfaction = 8.8/10. In those who attempted to return to sports, 82.5% were able to return to the same level of competition. Statistical analyses revealed a significant increase in risk of recurrence among high school and recreational athletes. No recurrences were observed among professional or college-level athletes. No significant difference in recurrence rates was observed in regards to age, time to surgery, type of athlete (collision v limited contact), repair of SLAP lesion, number of anchors, or revision surgery. Although several repair techniques exist for traumatic anterior shoulder instability, arthroscopic repair remains a viable option even in a highly active patient population. This study uniquely identified high school and recreational athletes at higher risk for recurrence. This is perhaps due to inferior shoulder development and technique as well as to limited access to postoperative physical therapy. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality After Arthroscopic Bankart, Open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow Procedures: A Review of 2864 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bokshan, Steven L.; DeFroda, Steven F.; Owens, Brett D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability is commonly performed and is highly successful in reducing instances of recurrent instability. Purpose: To determine and compare the incidence of 30-day complications and patient and surgical risk factors for complications for arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures from 2005 to 2014 from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) prospective database were analyzed. Baseline patient variables were assessed, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Outcomes measures included length of operation, length of hospital stay, need for hospital admission, 30-day readmission, and 30-day return to the operating room. Binary logistic regression was performed for the presence of any complications after all 3 procedures. Results: There were 2864 surgical procedures (410 open Bankart, 163 Latarjet-Bristow, and 2291 arthroscopic Bankart) included. There was no significant difference with regard to age (P = .11), body mass index (P = .17), American Society of Anesthesiologists class (P = .423), or CCI (P = .479) for each group. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had the highest overall complication rate (5.5%) compared with open (1.0%) and arthroscopic (0.6%) Bankart repairs. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had significantly longer mean operative times (P < .001) in addition to the highest 30-day return rate to the operating room (4.3%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-7.4%). Smoking status was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (P = .05; odds ratio, 8.0) after Latarjet-Bristow. Conclusion: Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability has a low rate of complication (arthroscopic Bankart, 0.6%; open Bankart, 1.0%; Latarjet-Bristow, 5.5%) in the early postoperative period, with

  6. Comparison of 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality After Arthroscopic Bankart, Open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow Procedures: A Review of 2864 Cases.

    PubMed

    Bokshan, Steven L; DeFroda, Steven F; Owens, Brett D

    2017-07-01

    Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability is commonly performed and is highly successful in reducing instances of recurrent instability. To determine and compare the incidence of 30-day complications and patient and surgical risk factors for complications for arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All arthroscopic Bankart, open Bankart, and Latarjet-Bristow procedures from 2005 to 2014 from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) prospective database were analyzed. Baseline patient variables were assessed, including the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Outcomes measures included length of operation, length of hospital stay, need for hospital admission, 30-day readmission, and 30-day return to the operating room. Binary logistic regression was performed for the presence of any complications after all 3 procedures. There were 2864 surgical procedures (410 open Bankart, 163 Latarjet-Bristow, and 2291 arthroscopic Bankart) included. There was no significant difference with regard to age (P = .11), body mass index (P = .17), American Society of Anesthesiologists class (P = .423), or CCI (P = .479) for each group. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had the highest overall complication rate (5.5%) compared with open (1.0%) and arthroscopic (0.6%) Bankart repairs. The Latarjet-Bristow procedure had significantly longer mean operative times (P < .001) in addition to the highest 30-day return rate to the operating room (4.3%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2%-7.4%). Smoking status was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (P = .05; odds ratio, 8.0) after Latarjet-Bristow. Surgical intervention for anterior shoulder instability has a low rate of complication (arthroscopic Bankart, 0.6%; open Bankart, 1.0%; Latarjet-Bristow, 5.5%) in the early postoperative period, with the most common being surgical site infection, deep vein thrombosis

  7. Evaluation of efficacy of chlorhexidine intracanal medicament on the periodontal healing of concomitant endodontic-periodontal lesions without communication: an interventional study.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Jyoti; Tewari, Sanjay; Tewari, Shikha; Duhan, Jigyasa

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of concomitant endodontic-periodontal lesions remains a challenge in clinical practice and requires effective endodontic and regenerative periodontal therapy. Among other factors, cross seeding and recolonization of flora may affect the outcome of periodontal therapy. Intracanal medicaments have been shown to exert antimicrobial activity on the external root surface, and local delivery of antimicrobials has been suggested to be a complementary approach in the management of periodontitis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to determine the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX) intracanal medicament on the clinical outcomes of therapy. Thirty-one patients were divided into two treatment groups: 1) open flap debridement (OFD) in endodontically treated teeth (control); and 2) OFD in endodontically treated teeth with CHX placed in the coronal space (test). The clinical variables evaluated were probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and percentage of sites with PD ≥5 mm. Reevaluation was performed at 3 and 6 months post-surgery. Both treatments resulted in improvement in all the clinical variables evaluated. Postoperative measurements from test and control groups showed reductions in mean PD of 2.22 ± 1.27 and 0.91 ± 0.81 mm, mean CAL gains of 2.16 ± 1.12 and 0.60 ± 0.93 mm, and 43.33% ± 31.37% and 17.71% ± 14.23% reduction in sites with PD ≥5 mm. Significantly more PD reduction, CAL gain, and percentage reduction in sites with PD ≥5 mm were observed in the test group at 6 months (P <0.05). CHX may be used as an effective intracanal medicament for promoting periodontal healing in concomitant endodontic-periodontal lesions.

  8. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels

  9. Recurrent Shoulder Instability After Primary Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Michael A; Mauntel, Timothy C; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2017-09-01

    The glenohumeral joint is one of the most frequently dislocated joints and occurs with increasing frequency in collision and contact athletes, especially those in sports that repeatedly place the glenohumeral joint in a position of vulnerability. Nonoperative management of shoulder instability especially in young contact athletes results in unacceptably high recurrence rates; thus, early surgical stabilization has become commonplace. Surgical stabilization typically yields acceptable outcomes. However, recurrent anterior instability may occur following a previous stabilization procedure at rates of 7% to 12%. Recurrent glenohumeral instability represents a treatment challenge for orthopedic surgeons as it not only has the potential to result in subsequent surgery, therapy, and missed activity time, but also has been associated with long-term degenerative joint changes. Thus, recurrent instability requires close examination to determine underlying pathology leading to failure. Evaluation of underlying pathology requires consideration of patient activity-related factors, hyperlaxity and multidirectional instability, glenoid bone loss, glenoid track lesions, and other pathologic lesions. Revision surgical stabilization approaches include arthroscopic and open stabilization, as well as glenoid osseous augmentation procedures. Postoperative rehabilitation and release to sports and activity must be tailored to protect the shoulder from continued instability. Understanding that risk of recurrent glenohumeral instability and the risk factors associated with it are essential so that these factors may be mitigated and recurrent instability prevented.

  10. Fuctional outcome after open and arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Lützner, Jörg; Krummenauer, F; Lübke, J; Kirschner, S; Günther, K-P; Bottesi, M

    2009-01-28

    Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occurred earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20 degrees or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations.

  11. Long-term outcomes of the Bankart and Latarjet repairs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rollick, Natalie C; Ono, Yohei; Kurji, Hafeez M; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian Ky

    2017-01-01

    The most common surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability include the arthroscopic Bankart repair, the open Bankart repair and the open Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term outcomes following these procedures. A systematic review of modern procedures with a minimum follow-up of 5 years was completed. The objective outcome measures evaluated were post-operative dislocation and instability rate, the Rowe score, radiographic arthritis and complications. Twenty-eight studies with a total of 1652 repairs were analyzed. The estimated re-dislocation rate was 15.1% following arthroscopic Bankart repair, 7.7% following open Bankart repair and 2.7% following Latarjet repair, with the comparison between arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet reaching statistical significance (p<0.001). The rates of subjective instability and radiographic arthritis were consistently high across groups, with no statistical difference between groups. Estimated complication rates were statistically higher in the open Latarjet repair (9.4%) than in the arthroscopic Bankart (0%; p=0.002). The open Latarjet procedure yields the most reliable method of stabilization but the highest complication rate. There are uniformly high rates of post-operative subjective instability symptoms and radiographic arthritis at 5 years regardless of procedure choice.

  12. Long-term outcomes of the Bankart and Latarjet repairs: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rollick, Natalie C; Ono, Yohei; Kurji, Hafeez M; Nelson, Atiba A; Boorman, Richard S; Thornton, Gail M; Lo, Ian KY

    2017-01-01

    The most common surgical techniques for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability include the arthroscopic Bankart repair, the open Bankart repair and the open Latarjet procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term outcomes following these procedures. A systematic review of modern procedures with a minimum follow-up of 5 years was completed. The objective outcome measures evaluated were post-operative dislocation and instability rate, the Rowe score, radiographic arthritis and complications. Twenty-eight studies with a total of 1652 repairs were analyzed. The estimated re-dislocation rate was 15.1% following arthroscopic Bankart repair, 7.7% following open Bankart repair and 2.7% following Latarjet repair, with the comparison between arthroscopic Bankart and open Latarjet reaching statistical significance (p<0.001). The rates of subjective instability and radiographic arthritis were consistently high across groups, with no statistical difference between groups. Estimated complication rates were statistically higher in the open Latarjet repair (9.4%) than in the arthroscopic Bankart (0%; p=0.002). The open Latarjet procedure yields the most reliable method of stabilization but the highest complication rate. There are uniformly high rates of post-operative subjective instability symptoms and radiographic arthritis at 5 years regardless of procedure choice. PMID:28450792

  13. A prospective, comparative, radiological, and clinical study of the influence of the "remplissage" procedure on shoulder range of motion after stabilization by arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, Geoffroy; Kilinc, Alexandre Sahin; Werther, Jean Roger; Doursounian, Levon

    2011-10-01

    Certain failures of arthroscopic Bankart repairs seem to be related to the presence of a Hill-Sachs defect. It has been suggested that Hill-Sachs lesions can be treated by "remplissage" (filling in) of the defect. The effect of this procedure on the mobility of the shoulder is not known. To determine if filling in the Hill-Sachs defect with rotator cuff tendon would modify the range of motion of the operated shoulder. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A prospective study of 2 patient populations (arthroscopic Bankart repair alone vs Bankart and remplissage) was undertaken after selecting patients using the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). Patients with a Hill-Sachs lesion seen on anteroposterior radiographs had a remplissage procedure if this procedure allowed them to obtain an ISIS lower than 4. The main clinical outcome was the range of motion (external rotation at the side [ER1], external rotation in abduction [ER2], internal rotation [IR], and forward elevation), assessed by the difference between each shoulder at 1 and 2 years' follow-up. Complications, recurrence, and the Walch-Duplay scores were noted at the same time. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. No significant statistical difference was noted in the range of motion between each group: ER1, difference of 4° (P = .22); ER2, difference of 3° (P = .49); anterior elevation, difference of 5° (P = .35); and internal rotation, 2 vertebrae (P = .22). The rate of recurrence was identical in both groups (6.25%). For patients without redislocation, the Walch-Duplay score was excellent (14/17) or good (3/17) in the first group and excellent (12/15) or good (3/15) in the second group. Posterosuperior pain during forceful movements or when tired was noted in one third of patients having undergone remplissage. The remplissage technique did not alter the range of motion of the shoulder compared with Bankart procedure alone; however, one third of patients did experience posterosuperior pain.

  14. Sports ability after Bankart procedure in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, A; Csépai, D; Hidas, P; Bánóczy, A

    1996-01-01

    Recurrent anterior shoulder instability and the restoration of sports ability after surgery are common problems, especially among professional athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate, level and time of returning to sports activity activity after Bankart procedure in anterior shoulder instability in high level athletes. From 1992-1994 61 patients suffering from recurrent anterior shoulder instability were operated on open Bankart procedure, 44 out of 61 were professional athletes. There were 7 handball, 7 basketball, 6 football, 2 waterpolo and 1 baseball player and 4 wrestlers, 2 weight-lifters, 2 boxers, 3 bicyclists, 2 motorists, 2 swimmers, 2 sailors, 2 kayakers and 2 skiers. The mean duration of instability was 19.1 months (3-72) before operation. 29 patients had posttraumatic recurrent anterior dislocation and 15 patients had posttraumatic anterior subluxations. The average number of redislocations was 4.4, ranging from 2 to 11. At the follow-up examination the patients were tested clinically for instability using the special score created by Walch and Duplay and the Constant functional score. We measured the strength of the rotator cuff by Kintrex isokinetic device from the 10th postoperative week. 35 out of 44 professional athletes could be followed-up. The average follow-up period was 14.2 months, from 6 to 31. 88% of the patients were able to return to sports participation, 66% on the previous level and 22% on a lower level. 12% of the patients finished their professional sports career. The mean rehabilitation period was 5.8 months, the average period of full restoration of sports ability was 9.3 months. Similar results were documented with the Constant score and the Walch-Duplay test (88% excellent or good, 12% fair). The main reason for the inability to continue sports activity was some pain during extreme abduction and external rotation of the arm and recurrent sensations of subluxation (3 cases). Based on the results of the follow

  15. Sporting Activity After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair for Chronic Glenohumeral Instability.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Saier, Tim; Minzlaff, Philipp; Seppel, Gernot; Braun, Sepp; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect detailed data on postoperative sporting activity after arthroscopic Bankart repair for chronic shoulder instability. Of 113 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair between February 2008 and August 2010, 81 met the inclusion criteria and were surveyed by a specially designed postal sport-specific questionnaire. Of these 81 patients, 66 (82%) were available for evaluation. All previously active patients performed some activity at follow-up. Of 9 patients (56%) who had been inactive, 5 took up new activities postoperatively. Forty-four patients (66%) stated that surgery had (strongly) improved their sporting proficiency. Seventeen patients (26%) reported no impact, and 5 patients (8%) reported a further deterioration compared with preoperatively. The improvement in sporting proficiency was negatively correlated with the preoperative risk level (ρ = 0.42, P < .001), preoperative performance level (ρ = 0.31, P = .012), and preoperative Tegner scale (ρ = 0.36, P = .003), as well as hours of sporting activity per week (ρ = 0.25, P = .042), whereas age showed a positive correlation (ρ = 0.28, P = .023). There was no change in duration, frequency, number of disciplines, Tegner activity scale, risk category, or performance level. Arthroscopic Bankart repair provides a high rate of return to activity among patients treated for chronic shoulder instability. A number of previously inactive patients returned to activity postoperatively. However, one-third of patients reported no benefit from surgery in terms of sporting activity. The improvement in sporting proficiency was highly dependent on the demands on the shoulder in sports, as well as the age of the patient. Overall, there was no significant increase in duration, frequency, number of disciplines, Tegner activity scale, or performance level between preoperative and follow-up evaluation and no increased return to high-risk activities. Level IV, therapeutic

  16. What Is the Critical Value of Glenoid Bone Loss at Which Soft Tissue Bankart Repair Does Not Restore Glenohumeral Translation, Restricts Range of Motion, and Leads to Abnormal Humeral Head Position?

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Koh, Yong Won; Bui, Christopher; Jeong, Woong Kyo; Akeda, Masaki; Cho, Nam Su; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-11-01

    A general consensus has been formed that glenoid bone loss greater than 20% to 25% is the critical amount at which bony augmentation procedures are needed; however, recent clinical results suggest that the critical levels must be reconsidered to lower values. This study aimed to find the critical value of anterior glenoid bone loss when a soft tissue repair is not adequate to restore anterior-inferior glenohumeral translation, rotational range of motion, or humeral head position using a biomechanical anterior shoulder instability model. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested with a customized shoulder testing system. Range of motion, translation, and humeral head position were measured at 60° of glenohumeral abduction in the scapular plane under a total of 40-N rotator cuff muscle loading in the following 11 conditions: intact; soft tissue Bankart lesion and repair; Bankart lesion with 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% glenoid bone defects based on the largest anteroposterior width of the glenoid; and soft tissue Bankart repair for each respective glenoid defect. Serial osteotomies for each percentage of bone loss were made parallel to the long axis of the glenoid. There was significantly decreased external rotation (121.2° ± 2.8° to 113.5° ± 3.3°; P = .004), increased anteroinferior translation with an externally applied load (3.0 ± 1.2 mm to 7.5 ± 1.1 mm at 20 N; P = .008), and increased posterior (0.2 ± 0.6 mm to 2.7 ± 0.8 mm; P = .049) and inferior shift (2.9 ± 0.7 mm to 6.6 ± 1.1 mm; P = .018) of the humeral head apex in the position of maximum external rotation after soft tissue Bankart repair of a 15% glenoid defect compared with the repair of a Bankart lesion without a glenoid defect, respectively. Glenoid defects of 15% or more of the largest anteroposterior glenoid width should be considered the critical bone loss amount at which soft tissue repair cannot restore glenohumeral translation, restricts rotational range of motion

  17. Results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with Hill-Sachs remplissage for anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Bonnevialle, Nicolas; Azoulay, Vadim; Faraud, Amélie; Elia, Fanny; Swider, Pascal; Mansat, Pierre

    2017-05-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mid-term outcomes of Bankart repair with Hill-Sachs remplissage (BHSR) and to highlight prognostic factors of failure. Thirty-four patients operated on for anterior shoulder instability with BHSR were enrolled in a prospective non-randomised study. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was performed at 1.5, three, six months and yearly thereafter. Outcome measures included Rowe and Walch-Duplay score. At mean follow-up of 35 months (24-63), the Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores reached respectively 92.7 and 88.2 points. The mean deficit in external rotation was 6° in ER1 and 1° in ER2 (p = 0.4, p = 0.9 respectively). Five patients (14.7%) had a recurrence of instability and three others had a persistent anterior apprehension. In the failure group, the Hill-Sachs lesion was deeper (26% vs 19% of the humeral diameter; p = 0.04) and range of motion at 1.5 months postoperatively was greater. Age at surgery, pre-operative instability severity index score (ISIS), hyperlaxity, type and level of sport, amount of glenoid bone loss had no correlation with failure rate. The rate of failure at mid-term follow-up of BHSR was higher than commonly reported. The premature recovery of range of motion seems to be a clinical sign of failure at follow-up. Moreover, in case of deep Hill-Sachs lesion (>20%) an alternative procedure should be considered. Level IV.

  18. Outcome of Bankart repair in contact versus non-contact athletes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Kijima, H; Nagamoto, H; Kurokawa, D; Takahashi, H; Sano, H; Itoi, E

    2015-06-01

    The clinical results of arthroscopic Bankart repair for contact athletes varies according to published reports. The purposes of this study were to analyze the clinical outcome of open or arthroscopic Bankart repair and to investigate the results in contact and non-contact athletes. Clinical outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair is similar to that of open procedure. One hundred patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation without a large bony defect were retrospectively reviewed. Fifty-one contact and 49 non-contact athletes were found with a mean follow-up of 17 months. Forty-nine shoulders underwent arthroscopic Bankart repairs; 51 shoulders had open Bankart repairs. In non-contact athletes, there was a 5% (1/22 cases) recurrence rate in the open group and 4% (1/27 cases) in the arthroscopic group. In contrast, in contact athletes, there was a 10% (3/29 cases) recurrence rate in the open group and 14% (3/22 cases) in the arthroscopic group. There was no significant difference in the recurrence rate between contact and non-contact athletes, although contact athletes showed two to three times a higher recurrence rate than that of non-contact athletes. The Rowe score and Constant score showed no significant difference between the two procedures and between the contact and non-contact athletes. The rate of the complete return to sports showed no significant difference between contact and non-contact athletes. The recurrence rate of Bankart repair in the contact athletes was 2 times higher in the open group and 3 times higher in the arthroscopic group than in the non-contact athletes. Clinical outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair was similar to that of open procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk factors for shoulder re-dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown effective clinical results after arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR) but have shown several risk factors for re-dislocation after surgery. We evaluated whether patients are at a risk for re-dislocation during the first year after ABR, examined the recurrence rate after ABR, and sought to identify new risk factors. Methods We performed ABR using bioabsorbable suture anchors in 102 consecutive shoulders (100 patients) with traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Average patient age and follow-up period was 25.7 (range, 14–40) years and 67.5 (range, 24.5–120) months, respectively. We evaluated re-dislocation after ABR using patient telephone interviews (follow-up rate, 100%) and correlated re-dislocation with several risk factors. Results Re-dislocation after ABR occurred in nine shoulders (8.8%), of which seven sustained re-injuries within the first year with the arm elevated at 90° and externally rotated at 90°. Of the remaining 93 shoulders without re-dislocation, 8 had re-injury under the same conditions within the first year. Thus, re-injury within the first year was a risk for re-dislocation after ABR (P < 0.001, chi-squared test). Using multivariate analysis, large Hill-Sachs lesions (odds ratio, 6.77, 95% CI, 1.24–53.6) and <4 suture anchors (odds ratio, 9.86, 95% CI, 2.00–76.4) were significant risk factors for re-dislocation after ABR. Conclusions The recurrence rate after ABR is not associated with the time elapsed and that repair strategies should augment the large humeral bone defect and use >3 anchors during ABR. PMID:24993404

  20. Risk factors for shoulder re-dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hideaki; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2014-07-04

    Recent studies have shown effective clinical results after arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR) but have shown several risk factors for re-dislocation after surgery. We evaluated whether patients are at a risk for re-dislocation during the first year after ABR, examined the recurrence rate after ABR, and sought to identify new risk factors. We performed ABR using bioabsorbable suture anchors in 102 consecutive shoulders (100 patients) with traumatic anterior shoulder instability. Average patient age and follow-up period was 25.7 (range, 14-40) years and 67.5 (range, 24.5-120) months, respectively. We evaluated re-dislocation after ABR using patient telephone interviews (follow-up rate, 100%) and correlated re-dislocation with several risk factors. Re-dislocation after ABR occurred in nine shoulders (8.8%), of which seven sustained re-injuries within the first year with the arm elevated at 90° and externally rotated at 90°. Of the remaining 93 shoulders without re-dislocation, 8 had re-injury under the same conditions within the first year. Thus, re-injury within the first year was a risk for re-dislocation after ABR (P < 0.001, chi-squared test). Using multivariate analysis, large Hill-Sachs lesions (odds ratio, 6.77, 95% CI, 1.24-53.6) and <4 suture anchors (odds ratio, 9.86, 95% CI, 2.00-76.4) were significant risk factors for re-dislocation after ABR. The recurrence rate after ABR is not associated with the time elapsed and that repair strategies should augment the large humeral bone defect and use >3 anchors during ABR.

  1. Biomechanics of open Bankart and coracoid abutment procedures in a human cadaveric shoulder model.

    PubMed

    Clavert, Philippe; Kempf, Jean-François; Kahn, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The specific aims of this experiment were (1) to develop a clinically relevant model of anteroinferior shoulder dislocation in the apprehension position to compare the biomechanics of the intact anterior capsuloligamentous structures, and (2) to evaluate the initial strength of an open Bankart and of a coracoid abutment procedure. Fifteen shoulders from deceased donors were used. For the intact shoulders, mean peak load was 486 N, and stiffness was 26,7 N/mm. For the Bankart repair, the mean peak load was 264 N, and mean stiffness was 14.1 N/mm. Transosseous repairs failed by suture pullout through soft tissues. For the coracoid abutment repair, the mean peak load was 607 N and stiffness was 25.57 N/mm. This study reveals that the biomechanical performance of the Bankart and coracoid abutment repairs fails to reproduce the properties of the natural intact state.

  2. Results of 45 arthroscopic Bankart procedures: Does the ISIS remain a reliable prognostic assessment after 5 years?

    PubMed

    Boughebri, Omar; Maqdes, Ali; Moraiti, Constantina; Dib, Choukry; Leclère, Franck Marie; Valenti, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS) includes preoperative clinical and radiological risk factors to select patients who can benefit from an arthroscopic Bankart procedure with a low rate of recurrence. Patients who underwent an arthroscopic Bankart for anterior shoulder instability with an ISIS lower than or equal to four were assessed after a minimum of 5-year follow-up. Forty-five shoulders were assessed at a mean of 79 months (range 60-118 months). Average age was 29.4 years (range 17-58 years) at the time of surgery. Postoperative functions were assessed by the Walch and Duplay and the Rowe scores for 26 patients; an adapted telephonic interview was performed for the 19 remaining patients who could not be reassessed clinically. A failure was defined by the recurrence of an anterior dislocation or subluxation. Patients were asked whether they were finally very satisfied, satisfied or unhappy. The mean Walch and Duplay score at last follow-up was 84.3 (range 35-100). The final result for these patients was excellent in 14 patients (53.8 %), good in seven cases (26.9 %), poor in three patients (11.5 %) and bad in two patients (7.7 %). The mean Rowe score was 82.6 (range 35-100). Thirty-nine patients (86.7 %) were subjectively very satisfied or satisfied, and six (13.3 %) were unhappy. Four patients (8.9 %) had a recurrence of frank dislocation with a mean delay of 34 months (range 12-72 months). Three of them had a Hill-Sachs lesion preoperatively. Two patients had a preoperative ISIS at 4 points and two patients at 3 points. The selection based on the ISIS allows a low rate of failure after an average term of 5 years. Lowering the limit for indication to 3 points allows to avoid the association between two major risk factors for recurrence, which are valued at 2 points. The existence of a Hill-Sachs lesion is a stronger indicator for the outcome of instability repair. Level IV, Retrospective Case Series, Treatment Study.

  3. Post-processing open-source software for the CBCT monitoring of periapical lesions healing following endodontic treatment: technical report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Villoria, Eduardo M; Lenzi, Antônio R; Soares, Rodrigo V; Souki, Bernardo Q; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Marques, Alexandre P; Fidel, Sandra R

    2017-01-01

    To describe the use of open-source software for the post-processing of CBCT imaging for the assessment of periapical lesions development after endodontic treatment. CBCT scans were retrieved from endodontic records of two patients. Three-dimensional virtual models, voxel counting, volumetric measurement (mm(3)) and mean intensity of the periapical lesion were performed with ITK-SNAP v. 3.0 software. Three-dimensional models of the lesions were aligned and overlapped through the MeshLab software, which performed an automatic recording of the anatomical structures, based on the best fit. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the changes in lesions size after treatment were performed with the 3DMeshMetric software. The ITK-SNAP v. 3.0 showed the smaller value corresponding to the voxel count and the volume of the lesion segmented in yellow, indicating reduction in volume of the lesion after the treatment. A higher value of the mean intensity of the segmented image in yellow was also observed, which suggested new bone formation. Colour mapping and "point value" tool allowed the visualization of the reduction of periapical lesions in several regions. Researchers and clinicians in the monitoring of endodontic periapical lesions have the opportunity to use open-source software.

  4. The kinematics and kinetics of slipknots for arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P J; Hagan, R P; Fisher, A C; Holt, E M; Frostick, S P

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed to enable the in vitro measurement of the kinematics and kinetics of a slipknot, both while the knot is being tightened and with the knot in place and the tension removed. During tightening, the apparatus provides a linearly increasing resistance, which may be considered analogous to the resistance experienced when the labrum is drawn toward and apposed to the edge of the glenoid cavity during a Bankart repair. The tension to close the knot is measured with a tensiometer, in tandem with the closure of the capsule model onto the bone anchor, which is measured with a datalogger. The tightening tension was limited to 25 N and intraoperator and interoperator comparisons were made for four knots tied by six participants. Failure of a knot was taken to be reverse slippage of 2 mm. A second criterion of ease of slide was used to assess each knot. We found wide interoperator variability with regard to slipknot tying. A methodology for quality control of slipknot tying is presented.

  5. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Zarezade, Abolghasem; Dehghani, Mohammad; Rozati, Ali Reza; Banadaki, Hossein Saeid; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22%) had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75); of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78). Nine patients (24.32%) had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67). Finally, 22 patients (59.46%) showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56). According to Fisher's exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method. PMID:25590034

  6. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair for Anterior-Inferior Shoulder Instability at 13-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Aboalata, Mohamed; Plath, Johannes E; Seppel, Gernot; Juretzko, Julia; Vogt, Stephan; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2017-03-01

    49.5%. Clinical outcome at a mean follow-up of 13 years after arthroscopic repair of anterior-inferior shoulder instability is comparable with the reported results of open Bankart repair in the literature and allows management of concomitant lesions arthroscopically. Modifiable risk factors of postoperative redislocation and arthropathy must be considered. Stabilization after the first-time dislocation achieves better clinical and radiological outcomes than after multiple dislocations.

  7. Restoration of joint congruency and the glenoidal labrum after arthroscopic revision Bankart repair: a MRI match-paired analysis comparing primary Bankart repair and the uninjured labrum.

    PubMed

    Stein, T; Buckup, J; Mehling, A P; Hoffmann, R; Efe, T; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R; Welsch, F

    2014-08-01

    The restoration of joint congruency and labrum slope and height after arthroscopic revision Bankart repair (RB) compared to the primary arthroscopic Bankart repair (PB) remain unclear. Twenty-three consecutive patients after RB with minor glenoid deficits were matched to 23 patients after PB and retrospectively followed by a score system and native 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment. Bankart repair surgeries were performed using double-loaded knotless suture anchors. The glenoidal (GAA) and labral articulation arc (LAA), labrum slope, height index and morphology were assessed separately for the anterior and inferior glenoid and compared to 23 healthy volunteers [radiologic control group (RC)]. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repair showed 28.0 months post-operative equivalent anterior labral congruency (LAA, 9.3°/PB 9.9°/RC 10.1°) and inferior (LAA 9.9°/PB 9.6°/RC 10.5°). The anterior GAA remain decreased (54.6°/PB 55.7°/RC 58.0°) with an original inferior GAA (85.1°/PB 83.2°/RC 83.8°). The RB labrum was slightly decreased anteriorly (slope 22.9°/PB 23.9°/RC 24.6°; height index 2.4/PB 3.0/RC 3.2). The inferior portion had an equivalent labrum slope (23.8°/PB 24.7°/RC 25.1°), but a decreased height index (2.1/PB 2.2/RC 2.3). Morphologic labrum analysis revealed significant changes between all three groups. The clinical outcome after revision surgery was good-to-excellent, but inferior to the primary stabilization and without influence of joint congruency and labrum morphology to the clinical outcome. A properly applied arthroscopic revision of a Bankart repair generates sufficient restoration of the anteroinferior labral joint congruency and good clinical results. Case series.

  8. Arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels and skin lesions, arsenic metabolism, neurological functions, and biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: Review of recent findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Gamble, Mary; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2009-09-01

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35-75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (> 300 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10-300 {mu}g/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominately at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 {mu}g/L, mean 99 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention.

  9. Arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels and skin lesions, arsenic metabolism, neurological functions, and biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: review of recent findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Gamble, Mary; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2009-09-01

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35-75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (>300 microg/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10-300 microg/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominantly at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 microg/L, mean 99 microg/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention.

  10. Arsenic Exposure at Low-to-Moderate Levels and Skin Lesions, Arsenic Metabolism, Neurological Functions, and Biomarkers for Respiratory and Cardiovascular Diseases: Review of Recent Findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Gamble, Mary; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35–75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (> 300 µg/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10–300 µg/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominately at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 µg/L, mean 99 µg/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention. PMID:19371619

  11. A novel flexible drill device enabling arthroscopic transosseous repair of Bankart lesions.

    PubMed

    Won, Y-Y; Park, J S; Choi, S J; Hong, S I

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a flexible drill device that makes arthroscopic transosseous repair possible, and report preliminary results. Twelve patients with post-traumatic anterior inferior glenohumeral instability were selected. the flexible drill device is inserted into the shoulder joint through the posterior portal and the guide pipe unit is placed 5mm posterior to the margin of the anterior glenoid rim. The flexible drill is driven through the glenoid with the power drill, creating a hole in the glenoid. A non-absorbable suture is passed through the hole and a sliding knot tying is performed over the capsule and labrum after completing stitches with the suture hook loaded. The same procedures are repeated in the 2, 3 and 4 o'clock positions of the glenoid. There was no recurrence of dislocation at the mean follow-up period of 52.3 months. The mean Rowe score was 89.5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstruction of a bony bankart lesion: best fit based on radius of curvature.

    PubMed

    Dehaan, Alexander; Munch, Jacqueline; Durkan, Michael; Yoo, Jung; Crawford, Dennis

    2013-05-01

    The inferior coracoid process has traditionally been considered to be the gold standard for glenoid augmentation after anteroinferior bone loss. Other autograft sites, and more recently, osteochondral allograft sites, have been described as potential donor sources. Potential autograft and osteochondral allograft sites were compared to identify the graft source that would provide the best fit for glenoid augmentation. Controlled laboratory study. Mose circles, a geometric tool found on a standard goniometer, were used to make radius of curvature measurements of 10 anatomic locations in 17 cadaveric specimens. The bony surface of the glenoid, measured from superior to inferior (G-SI) and from anterior to posterior (G-AP), was used as the standard for comparison. Autograft sites were the inferior coracoid, lateral coracoid, and inner table of the iliac crest. Potential osteochondral allograft sites were the radial head, scaphoid fossa of the distal radius (S-DR), lunate fossa of the distal radius (L-DR), medial tibial plateau, and lateral distal tibia. An acceptable match for autograft sites was based on a paired analysis and defined as a radius of curvature within 5 mm of the G-SI or the G-AP of the same cadaveric specimen. Allograft sites were evaluated using an unpaired analysis in which an ideal fit was defined as a radius of curvature of 25 to 30 mm, based on the interquartile range of the G-SI and G-AP. The median (interquartile range) radii of curvature for the G-SI and G-AP were 30 mm (range, 25-30 mm) and 25 mm (range, 25-25 mm), respectively. The inferior coracoid was within 5 mm of the G-SI 59% of the time and the G-AP 94% of the time; no measurements from the lateral coracoid or iliac crest were within the range of the glenoid radius of curvature. Analysis of the allograft sites demonstrated an acceptable fit for 94% of the distal tibia, 68% of the medial tibial plateau, 12% of the S-DR, and 0% of the L-DR and the radial head specimens. An autograft of the inferior coracoid or an osteochondral allograft of the lateral distal tibia provided the best match to re-establish the native radius of curvature of the glenoid. To best re-create the native glenohumeral anatomy, surgeons should consider the use of an autograft of the inferior coracoid or an osteochondral allograft of the lateral distal tibia for the reconstruction of osseous glenoid defects.

  13. Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Reconstruction, a Systematic Review of Surgical Technical Factors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Landon; Rothermel, Shane; Joshi, Rajat; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-08-30

    Recurrent instability remains of concern after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. We evaluated various technical factors including anchor design, anchor material, number of anchors used, and interval closure on risk of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Cochrane databases was conducted, following PRISMA guidelines. Extracted data were recorded on a standardized form. Methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINORS) and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) were used to assess study quality and risk bias. Because of study heterogeneity and low levels of evidence, meta-analysis was not possible. Pooled weighted means were calculated and individual study evaluation and comparisons (qualitative analysis) were performed for systematic review. Of 2097 studies identified, 26 met criteria for systematic review. Pooled weighted means revealed 11.4% versus 15% recurrent instability with 3 or more suture anchors versus fewer than 3 anchors, 10.1% versus 7.8% with absorbable versus nonabsorbable suture anchors, respectively, and 8.0% versus 9.4% with knotless versus standard anchors, respectively. Interval closure did not qualitatively decrease recurrent instability or decrease range of motion. Our systematic review reveals that despite individual study, and previous systematic reviews pointing to the contrary, the composite contemporary published literature would support no difference in the risk of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction with rotator interval closure, differing numbers of anchors used for the repair, use of knotless versus standard anchors, or use of bioabsorbable versus nonabsorbable anchors. We recommend surgeons focus on factors that have been shown to modify the risk factors after arthroscopic Bankart reconstruction, such as patient selection. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  14. Redislocation risk after an arthroscopic Bankart procedure in collision athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alkaduhimi, Hassanin; van der Linde, Just A; Willigenburg, Nienke W; Paulino Pereira, Nuno Rui; van Deurzen, Derek F P; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine the redislocation risk for collision athletes after an arthroscopic Bankart repair and to compare the redislocation rate between collision athletes and noncollision athletes after an arthroscopic Bankart repair. A PubMed and Embase query was performed, screening all relevant literature of arthroscopic Bankart procedures mentioning redislocation rates in collision athletes. Studies with a follow-up <2 years or lacking information on redislocation rates in collision athletes were excluded. We used the modified Coleman Methodology Score to assess the quality of included studies. Finally, the data in all the studies were combined and analyzed. There were 1012 studies screened on title and abstract, of which 111 studies were full-text screened, and finally 20 studies were included. Four studies reported on collision athletes only, whereas 16 compared collision with noncollision athletes. Fourteen studies reported increased redislocation rates for collision athletes in comparison to noncollision athletes (absolute risk difference varying from 0.4% to 28.6%), whereas 2 studies reported decreased rates (absolute risk differences of -6% and -2.4%). A combined analysis revealed that collision athletes have an increased absolute risk of 8.09 with 95% CI from 3.61 to 12.57% for development of postoperative instability in comparison to noncollision athletes (P = .001). Collision athletes have an increased risk for redislocation in comparison to noncollision athletes after an arthroscopic Bankart repair, although there were no differences in return to sport. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glenoid rim fracture through anchor points after arthroscopic Bankart repair for shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Seung-Jun; Oh, Se-Kwan; Oh, KyungSoo; Noh, YoungMin; Suh, Kuen-Tak

    2015-02-01

    We studied the incidence of postoperative glenoid rim fractures and analysed the relationships of glenoid rim fracture with osteolysis, fracture pattern, number of anchors and postoperative activity after arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchor fixation. Among 570 patients of the Bankart repair group, nine patients who had undergone revision arthroscopy for glenoid rim fracture after initial Bankart repair with at least two years post-revision follow-up were enrolled. Mean age was 28.8 years (range, 18-49 years), and mean follow-up was 36.4 months (range, 25-64 months). The mean time from Bankart repair to failure of initial surgery following trauma was 27.3 months (range, four to-84 months). Initial suture anchors were made of bioabsorbable composites (poly-D-L-lactic acid, PDLLA) without ceramic osteo-filler (seven cases) and metals (two cases). PDLLA without ceramic osteo-filler suture anchors were used for revision surgery. We reviewed 570 patients for relationship between osteolysis and glenoid rim fracture. Five patients including three and two with bioabsorbable and metal suture anchors, respectively, experienced glenoid rim fracture at more than two years postoperatively. Osteolysis around initial suture anchors groups showed higher glenoid rim fracture incidence compared with the control group (odd ratio =4.186 [95 % CI, 1.108-15.818]; p = 0.037). Osteolysis related to insertion of metal or PLDDA suture anchors may lead to glenoid rim fracture. Remnant metal or bioabsorbable suture anchors without ceramic composite could be a stress riser at two years postoperatively.

  16. Morphological Characteristics of the Repaired Labrum According to Glenoid Location and Its Clinical Relevance After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair: Postoperative Evaluation With Computed Tomography Arthrography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yoon; Chung, Seok Won; Kwak, Joo Young

    2014-06-01

    There have been no studies on the postoperative morphological characteristics of the restored labrum at different glenoid locations and its clinical relevance after arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors. To analyze the morphological characteristics of the restored labrum at different locations of the glenoid and their relevance to clinical outcomes as well as affecting factors and to trace the inserted suture anchors after arthroscopic Bankart repair using computed tomography arthrography (CTA). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 46 patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 6.8 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with absorbable suture anchors were enrolled in this study. Patients underwent CTA preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively as well as functional outcome evaluation preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months) with the Rowe score and visual analog scale for pain. Labral height and width were measured on conventional axial CTA images at the 3-, 4-, and 5-o'clock positions twice by 2 raters. The postoperative measurements were also compared with those of the healthy anterior labrum, acquired from the same CTA examination of 32 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 8.5 years) with superior labral lesions in the same study period. The postoperative difference in the measurements and between clock positions, and the relationship between the measurements and the clinical factors and functional outcomes, were evaluated. In addition, the locations of all suture anchors were traced on each CTA image, and outcomes according to the locations of the most inferior suture anchors were assessed. The interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities of measurements at each location were excellent (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.773-0.988). Of the 46 patients, 2 (4.35%) had redislocations after surgery. Postoperative labral height and width were significantly increased at all locations (all P < .001) up to a level similar to the healthy

  17. Surgical trends in Bankart repair: an analysis of data from the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery certification examination.

    PubMed

    Owens, Brett D; Harrast, John J; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Thompson, Terry L; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2011-09-01

    Arthroscopic Bankart repair emerged in the 1990s as a minimally invasive alternative to open repair. The optimal technique of surgical stabilization of the unstable glenohumeral joint remains controversial. A review of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) data would show a trend toward an increasing number of arthroscopic versus open Bankart procedures. Descriptive epidemiology study. A query of the ABOS database for all cases of open or arthroscopic Bankart repair from 2003 through 2008 was performed, as the CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) codes for arthroscopic repair were introduced in 2003. All cases coded with CPT codes for arthroscopic Bankart repair (29806) or open Bankart repair (23455) were reviewed. Additional data were obtained on the surgeons (year of procedure, geographic location, fellowship training, subspecialty examination area) as well as the patients (age, gender, follow-up length, complications, objective outcome measures [pain, deformity, function, and satisfaction]). From 2003 to 2008, a total of 4562 Bankart repair cases were reported, composing 8.6% of the total number of shoulder surgery cases in the ABOS database. From 2003 to 2005, 71.2% of Bankart repairs were arthroscopic, compared with 87.7% between 2006 and 2008 (P < .0001). Surgeons having obtained subspecialty training in sports medicine performed the majority (65.3%) of Bankart repairs. Over the entire period, sports-trained surgeons also performed a higher proportion of arthroscopic repairs (84.1%) compared with surgeons without this training (71.9%) (P < .0001). However, by 2008 both non-fellowship-trained and sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeons performed arthroscopic repair in 90% of cases. Surgeons in the Northeast region performed a significantly greater proportion of arthroscopic Bankart repairs (84.7%) than did surgeons in other regions (78.6%) (P < .0001) from 2003 to 2008. The most commonly reported complications were nerve palsy/injury and

  18. Combination therapy using Pentostam and Praziquantel improves lesion healing and parasite resolution in BALB/c mice co-infected with Leishmania major and Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most natural host populations are exposed to a diversity of parasite communities and co-infection of hosts by multiple parasites is commonplace across a diverse range of systems. Co-infection with Leishmania major and Schistosoma mansoni may have important consequences for disease development, severity and transmission dynamics. Pentavalent antimonials and Praziquantel (PZQ) have been relied upon as a first line of treatment for Leishmania and Schistosoma infections respectively. However, it is not clear how combined therapy with the standard drugs will affect the host and parasite burden in concomitance. The aim of the current study was to determine the efficacy of combined chemotherapy using Pentostam and PZQ in BALB/c mice co-infected with L. major and S. mansoni. Methods The study used BALB/c mice infected with L. major and S. mansoni. A 3 × 4 factorial design with three parasite infection groups (Lm, Sm, Lm + Sm designated as groups infected with L. major, S. mansoni and L. major + S. mansoni, respectively) and four treatment regimens [P, PZQ, P + PZQ and PBS designating Pentostam®(GlaxoSmithKline UK), Praziquantel (Biltricide®, Bayer Ag. Leverkusen, Germany), Pentostam + Praziquantel and Phosphate buffered saline] as factors was applied. In each treatment group, there were 10 mice. Lesion development was monitored for 10 weeks. The parasite load, body weight, weight of the spleen and liver were determined between week 8 and week 10. Results Chemotherapy using the first line of treatment for L. major and S. mansoni reduced the lesion size and parasite loads but did not affect the growth response, spleen and liver. In the co-infected BALB/c mice, the use of Pentostam or PZQ did not result in any appreciable disease management. However, treatment with P + PZQ resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) larger reduction of lesions, net increase in the body weight, no changes in the spleen and liver weight and reduced Leishman

  19. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids

  20. Traumatic anterior instability of the pediatric shoulder: a comparison of arthroscopic and open bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Shymon, Stephen J; Roocroft, Joanna; Edmonds, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs have proven efficacy in adults with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Although studies have included children in their analysis, none have previously compared functional outcomes or redislocation rates between these 2 methodologies for anteroinferior glenoid labrum repair in this young population. We hypothesize that open and arthroscopic Bankart repair in children will have similar functional outcomes and redislocation rates, but differing results from adults treated in a similar manner. A retrospective chart review was performed on all Bankart repairs performed between 2006 and 2010 at a tertiary care children's hospital. A shift in treatment modalities occurred in 2008 creating 2 cohorts, open and arthroscopic. Brachial plexus injury, congenital soft-tissue disorder, or incomplete charts were excluded. Demographics, age at surgery, follow-up length, and sport were recorded. Telephone interviews were then performed obtaining the most current QuickDASH (Disability Arm, Shoulder, or Hand), WOSI (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index), SF-12 (Short Form 12), SANE (Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation), and verbal pain scores; as well as, inquiring about recurrent dislocation and further surgery. Ninety-nine children (16.9±1.5 y) were included (28 open, 71 arthroscopic). There were no differences in preoperative demographics. Fifty-one patients completed the questionnaires (11 open, 40 arthroscopic). No significant differences in the outcomes scores were seen between the 2 groups. Of the 99 patients, 21 (21%) had redislocation or secondary surgery; there was no significant difference in failure rate between groups (4 open, 17 arthroscopic). A plotted survival curve demonstrated that the adolescent shoulder undergoing Bankart repair for recurrent traumatic anterior instability has a 2-year survival of 86% and a 5-year survival of only 49%, regardless of technique. In adolescents, there is no significant difference in

  1. Intra-lesional injections of recombinant human epidermal growth factor promote granulation and healing in advanced diabetic foot ulcers: multicenter, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montequín, José I; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen M; Díaz, Odalys González; Savigne, William; Sancho-Soutelo, Natasha; Rivero-Fernández, Fidel; Sánchez-Penton, Pablo; Morejón-Vega, Lourdes; Artaza-Sanz, Heriberto; García-Herrera, Arístides; González-Benavides, Cecilio; Hernández-Cañete, Carlos M; Vázquez-Proenza, Alberto; Berlanga-Acosta, Jorge; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2009-12-01

    A multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out to evaluate the intra-lesional infiltration of recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) in Wagner's grade 3 or 4 diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Subjects (149) were randomised to receive EGF (75 or 25 microg) or placebo, three times per week for 8 weeks and standard good wound care. The main endpoint was granulation tissue covering > or = 50% of the ulcer at 2 weeks. It was achieved by 19/48 controls versus 44/53 in the 75 microg group [odds ratio (OR): 7.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9-18.9] and 34/48 in the 25 microg group (OR: 3.7; 1.6-8.7). Secondary outcome variables such as end-of-treatment complete granulation response (28/48 controls, 46/53 with 75 microg and 34/48 with 25 microg EGF), time-to-complete response (controls: 5 weeks; both EGF dose groups: 3 weeks), and wound closure after follow-up (25/48 controls, 40/53 with 75 microg and 25/48 with 25 microg EGF) were also treatment dependent. Multivariate analyses yielded that they were significantly enhanced by 75 microg EGF treatment and neuropathic versus ischemic ulcers. Most adverse events were mild and no drug-related severe adverse reactions were reported. It was concluded that recombinant human EGF (rhEGF) local injections offer a favourable risk-benefit balance in patients with advanced DFU.

  2. A clinical trial to assess the use of sodium hypochlorite and oxytetracycline on the healing of digital dermatitis lesions in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The increased frequency of diseases, especially those of the hoof, cause economic losses, such as premature culling of affected animals, decreased milk production, weight loss, reduced fertility, and the high costs of treatment. A great variety of hoof conditions may affect cattle, one of them is digital dermatitis. These conditions are probably due to multiple factorial diseases and present with similar clinical signs. Bovine lameness is typically treated by foot trimming and debridment of the lesions, coupled when necessary with systemic antibiotics and therapeutic footbaths, which results in a clinical cure in the majority of the cases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the topical action of sodium hypochlorite associated with the systemic use of oxytetracycline for the treatment of wounds clinically diagnosed as bovine digital dermatitis. One hundred and twenty Holstein cattle varying ages from 1 to 9 y and presenting the clinical signs of digital dermatitis, were used in this study. Group 1 (G1) received topical treatment with a 1% sodium hypochlorite footbath twice a day for 30 d and 4 treatments of parenteral oxytetracycline (10 mg/kg bodyweight, IM, q48h). Group 2 (G2) received only the topical treatment with 1% sodium hypochlorite, as described for G1. Group 3 (G3) received only with parenteral oxytetracycline, as described for G1. Group 4 (G4) was treated exclusively with a dicloro divynil pirrolidona, ortoiododimetil, para-nitofenil-fosforotioato in a vegetal tar-based ointment, immediately after the surgery. After 45 d, the recovery rates were as follows: G1, 86.67%; G2, 73.33%; G3, 56.67%; and G4, 50%. The surgical treatment of digital dermatitis with subsequent treatment with oxytetracycline systemically and 1% sodium hypochlorite topically was the most effective for the convalescence of cattle bearing wounds similar to digital dermatitis. PMID:15943122

  3. Wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Wound healing in orthopaedic care is affected by the causes of the wound, as well as concomitant therapies used to repair musculoskeletal structures. Promoting the health of the host and creating an environment to foster natural healing processes is essential for helping to restore skin integrity. Normal wound healing physiologic processes, factors affecting wound healing, wound classification systems, unique characteristics of orthopaedic wounds, wound contamination and drainage characteristics, and potential complications are important to understand in anticipation of patient needs. Accurate wound assessment and knowledge of nursing implications with specific wound care measures (cleansing, debridement, and dressings) is important for quality care. New technologies are enhancing traditional wound care measures with goals of effective comfortable wound care to promote restoration of skin integrity.

  4. Long-Term Restoration of Anterior Shoulder Stability: A Retrospective Analysis of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Latarjet Procedure.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Stefan M; Scheyerer, Max J; Farshad, Mazda; Catanzaro, Sabrina; Rahm, Stefan; Gerber, Christian

    2016-12-07

    Various operative techniques are used for treating recurrent anterior shoulder instability, and good mid-term results have been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder stability after treatment with the 2 commonly performed procedures, the arthroscopic Bankart soft-tissue repair and the open coracoid transfer according to Latarjet. A comparative, retrospective case-cohort analysis of 360 patients (364 shoulders) who had primary repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1998 and 2007 was performed. The minimum duration of follow-up was 6 years. Reoperations, overt recurrent instability (defined as recurrent dislocation or subluxation), apprehension, the subjective shoulder value (SSV), sports participation, and overall satisfaction were recorded. An open Latarjet procedure was performed in 93 shoulders, and an arthroscopic Bankart repair was done in 271 shoulders. Instability or apprehension persisted or recurred after 11% (10) of the 93 Latarjet procedures and after 41.7% (113) of the 271 arthroscopic Bankart procedures. Overt instability recurred after 3% of the Latarjet procedures and after 28.4% (77) of the Bankart procedures. In the Latarjet group, 3.2% of the patients were not satisfied with their result compared with 13.2% in the Bankart group (p = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier analysis of survivorship, with apprehension (p < 0.001), redislocation (p = 0.01), and operative revision (p < 0.001) as the end points, documented the substantial superiority of the Latarjet procedure and the decreasing effectiveness of the arthroscopic Bankart repair over time. Twenty percent of the first recurrences after arthroscopic Bankart occurred no earlier than 91 months postoperatively, as opposed to the rare recurrences after osseous reconstruction, which occurred in the early postoperative period, with only rare late failures. In this retrospective cohort study, the arthroscopic Bankart procedure was inferior to the open Latarjet procedure for

  5. Anatomic Bankart repair compared with nonoperative treatment and/or arthroscopic lavage for first-time traumatic shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Marks, Paul H; Macdonald, Peter B; Shah, Prakesh S; Theodoropoulos, John; Ravi, Bheeshma; Whelan, Daniel B

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of anatomic Bankart repair in patients with a first-time shoulder dislocation compared with either arthroscopic lavage or traditional sling immobilization. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS, and a clinical trials registry for ongoing and completed randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing anatomic Bankart repair with either rehabilitation or arthroscopic lavage. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. Pooled analyses were performed by use of a random-effects model, and risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. We included 3 randomized trials and 1 quasi-randomized trial comprising 228 patients. Of the included trials, 2 compared anatomic Bankart repair with sling immobilization whereas 2 compared Bankart repair with arthroscopic lavage. A meta-analysis of all 4 trials showed that the rate of recurrent instability was significantly lower among participants undergoing anatomic Bankart repair compared with those undergoing either immobilization or arthroscopic lavage (RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.33). Subgroup analysis showed that this effect persisted when Bankart repair was compared with arthroscopic lavage alone (2 studies) (RR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.31) or sling immobilization alone (2 studies) (RR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.67). Western Ontario Shoulder Instability scores were better with anatomic Bankart repair compared with either arthroscopic lavage or immobilization (2 studies) (mean difference, -232; 95% CI, -317 to -146). There is evidence to suggest treatment of young patients with a first-time shoulder dislocation with anatomic Bankart repair with the goal of lowering the rate of recurrent instability over the long-term and improving short-term quality of life. Level II, systematic review of Level I and II studies

  6. Labral Healing

    PubMed Central

    Catan, Agustín; Vilaseca, Tomas; Arroquy, Damián; Carboni, Martín; Guiñazú, Jorge Eduardo; Orlowsky, Belén; Irigoitia, Nicolas; Chahla, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpouse of this study was to evaluate MRI images of labral repair after one year, trying to stablish MRI images as a reliable tool for the diagnosis of labral healing. Methods: One hundred and sixty-two patients presenting with femoroacetabular impingement that underwent an arthroscopic surgery were treated between 2012 and 2015. Of these, 124 met the selection criteria and were included in this study. Only patients with 12 months of follow up and labral repair were included. Patients with previous hip surgery were excluded. Coronal, sagittal and axial MRI cuts were evaluated by three independent observers, an arthroscopic hip surgery, a fellow in hip arthroscopic surgery and a musculoeskeletal radiologist. Results: on regard of our statistics 68% of the patients had labral healing images, 16% had no healing signals and 16% unsatisfactory images. Just in the 47% the observers had a 100% of agreement. Interobserver variation was: intraobserver agreement was 94% ( arthroscopic surgeon), 72 % (radiologist), 67 % (fellow). Conclusion: The main finding of this study was that a high inter and intraobserver variability was found when analysing the healing status of hip repaired labrums. Assessment of labrum healing after an arthroscopic repair should not only rely on imaging methods and therefore should be concurrently performed with a comprehensive physical examination.

  7. Postoperative Recurrence of Instability Due to New Anterior Glenoid Rim Fractures After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Hirose, Takehito; Tachibana, Yuta; Iuchi, Ryo; Mae, Tatsuo

    2017-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) sometimes reveals a new fracture of the anterior glenoid rim in patients with postoperative recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors, but there have been few previous reports about such fractures. The placement of a large number of suture anchors during arthroscopic Bankart repair might be associated with a new glenoid rim fracture. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Screw-in metal suture anchors were used until June 2011 and suture-based soft anchors from July 2011. A follow-up of at least 2 years was conducted for 128 shoulders treated using metal anchors (metal anchor group) and 129 shoulders treated using soft anchors (soft anchor group). The frequency and features of new glenoid rim fractures were investigated, and the influence of the number of suture anchors and other factors on fractures was also assessed. There were 19 shoulders (14.8%) with postoperative recurrence in the metal anchor group and 23 shoulders (17.8%) in the soft anchor group. Among 37 shoulders evaluated by CT at recurrence, a new glenoid rim fracture was detected in 13 shoulders (35.1%; 5 shoulders in the metal anchor group and 8 shoulders in the soft anchor group). A fracture at the anchor insertion site was recognized in 4 shoulders from the metal anchor group and 6 shoulders from the soft anchor group, although linear fractures connecting several anchor holes were only seen in the soft anchor group. While new glenoid fractures occurred regardless of the number of suture anchors used, new fractures were significantly more frequent in teenagers at surgery and in junior high school or high school athletes. Such fractures did not only occur in contact athletes but were also found in overhead athletes. Postoperative recurrence of instability associated with a new glenoid rim fracture along the suture anchor insertion site was frequent after arthroscopic Bankart repair. These fractures might be related to placing multiple soft

  8. Long term results of arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gerard W W; Mohamed, Sedeek; Tan, Andrew H C

    2011-06-14

    The arthroscopic method offers a less invasive technique of Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability. We would like to report the 2 year clinical outcomes of bio-absorbable suture anchors used in traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder. Data from 79 shoulders in 74 patients were collected over 4 years (2004-2008). Each patient was followed-up over a period of 2 years. The patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair using bio-absorbable suture anchors for their shoulder instability. These surgeries were performed at a single institution by a single surgeon over the time period. The patients were assessed with two different outcome measurement tools. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score. The scores were calculated before surgery and at the 2-year follow-up. The recurrence rates, range of motion as well post-operative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. SST results from the 12 domains showed a significant improvement from a mean of 6.1 ± 3.1 to 11.1 ± 1.8 taken at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.0001). Data from the UCLA scale showed a Pre and Post Operative Mean of 20.2 ± 5.0 and 32.4 ± 4.6 respectively (p < 0.0001). 34 had excellent post-operative scores, 35 had good scores, 1 had fair score and 3 had poor scores. 75% of the patients returned to sports while 7.6% developed a recurrence of shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent post-operative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates.

  9. Long term results of arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The arthroscopic method offers a less invasive technique of Bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability. We would like to report the 2 year clinical outcomes of bio-absorbable suture anchors used in traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder. Methods Data from 79 shoulders in 74 patients were collected over 4 years (2004 - 2008). Each patient was followed-up over a period of 2 years. The patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair using bio-absorbable suture anchors for their shoulder instability. These surgeries were performed at a single institution by a single surgeon over the time period. The patients were assessed with two different outcome measurement tools. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale and the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score. The scores were calculated before surgery and at the 2-year follow-up. The recurrence rates, range of motion as well post-operative function and return to sporting activities were evaluated. Results SST results from the 12 domains showed a significant improvement from a mean of 6.1 ± 3.1 to 11.1 ± 1.8 taken at the 2-year follow-up (p < 0.0001). Data from the UCLA scale showed a Pre and Post Operative Mean of 20.2 ± 5.0 and 32.4 ± 4.6 respectively (p < 0.0001). 34 had excellent post-operative scores, 35 had good scores, 1 had fair score and 3 had poor scores. 75% of the patients returned to sports while 7.6% developed a recurrence of shoulder dislocation or subluxation. Conclusion Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of suture anchors is a reliable treatment method, with good clinical outcomes, excellent post-operative shoulder motion and low recurrence rates. PMID:21672187

  10. The meniscal healing process

    PubMed Central

    de Albornoz, Pilar Martínez; Forriol, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Summary Meniscus is a difficult structure to repair and replace. An injured or degenerative meniscus promotes osteoarthritic joint changes that should be avoided. Research focused on promoting healing or replacement must cover three different working lines: biology, mechanics and surgical technique. Biology research line looks for specific factors able to develop a collagen tissue in a matrix with cells that joins the edges of the lesion and also looks for factors able to keep the elasticity and able to regenerate the damaged meniscus fibres. On the other side, scaffolds need the adequate viscoelasticity to allow the penetration of vessels and cells to avoid reabsorption. PMID:23738268

  11. Investigation into the microbial flora of healing and non-healing decubitus ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Daltrey, D C; Rhodes, B; Chattwood, J G

    1981-01-01

    Seventy-four pressure lesions in fifty-three geriatric patients were observed at weekly intervals to determine the bacterial flora and the healing index of each lesion, expressed as initial area of lesion (cm2) - final area of lesion (cm2) divided by time in days. The micro-organisms which caused infection included Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus. Many lesions contained a mixed flora. P mirabilis and Ps aeruginosa were associated with necrotic (p less than 0.005) and enlarging (p less than 5 x 10(-7)) lesions. Bacteroides spp were associated with necrotic lesions (p less than 0.05). The presence of S aureus in a lesion was not associated with any particular trend in healing index. The implications of the microbiological findings are discussed. PMID:6790579

  12. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... care to prevent infection. Continue Reading Stages of Wound Healing Wounds heal in stages. The smaller the wound, ... How lacerations heal References Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound healing. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox ...

  13. Self-Healing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Regina; Serugendo, Giovanna Di Marzo

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Self-Awareness as an Aspect of Self-Healing * A Working Taxonomy for Software Self-Healing * Failures, errors and faults * Approaches to Software Self-Healing * Self-healing at code level * Self-healing through self-organisation * Self-healing based on policies * Architectures for self-healing * Model-based solutions for self-healing * Discussion and Conclusion

  14. Ambulatory open Bankart repair under a single general anesthesia: a prospective study of the immediate outcome.

    PubMed

    Molina, Véronique; Gagey, Olivier; Langloÿs, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The interscalenic block technique is widely used for ambulatory shoulder surgery despite a substantial number of failures and adverse effects. We prospectively evaluated satisfaction in 40 consecutive patients who underwent open Bankart repair under a single general anesthesic performed in an ambulatory care unit. The mean age of the patients was 23 years. There were 29 men and 11 women. Patients were evaluated postoperatively with a visual analog scale of pain (in the recovery room, at the time of discharge, and the day after and 1 week after surgery) via a home assessment questionnaire that included the following: effectiveness of oral pain medication, ability to perform activities of daily life, and overall satisfaction. One patient failed to be discharged because of a feeling of faintness not related to pain. None of the 39 patients would have preferred an overnight hospital stay. This study confirms that the open Bankart procedure is feasible as a same-day technique and indicates that a single anesthesic with proper management of analgesia is a reliable technique for major shoulder surgery in an ambulatory care unit.

  15. Arthroscopic posteroinferior capsular plication and rotator interval closure after Bankart repair in patients with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability—A minimum follow-up of 5 years.

    PubMed

    Chiang, En-Rung; Wang, Jung-Pan; Wang, Shih-Tien; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2010-10-01

    Shoulder joint laxity over anteroinferior and posteroinferior labral–capsular structure inpatients with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability was reported in the previous literature. The purpose of this study was to report our experience in arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior–inferior shoulder instability by Bankart lesion stabilisation with rotator interval closure and posteroinferior capsular plication. From August 2000 to November 2004, 45 patients with traumatic anterior–inferior shoulder instability were retrospectively enrolled. Each shoulder was treated with absorbable suture for rotator interval closure and posteroinferior capsular plication after anteroinferior stabilisation. The assessments were performed using the Rowe score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score) and shoulder range of motion (ROM). With the average follow-up time of 77.1 months, all shoulder scores improved after surgery(P < 0.001). The average ROM deficit of the operated shoulders was not significant (P > 0.05) as compared with the healthy side. A total of 42 shoulders remained stable (93.3%) and there were three recurrences (6.6%). All patients without recurrence returned to their pre-injury levels of athletic activity. In patients with anterior glenohumeral instability, arthroscopic stabilisation of anteroinferior capsulolabral structure with rotator interval closure and posteroinferior capsular plication provided a reasonable result without significant loss of ROM at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isoniazid and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, John W.; Campbell, H. Hoyle

    1963-01-01

    In non-tuberculous patients with lesions exhibiting a delayed healing process oral isoniazid in doses of 3 mg./kg. was found to be rapidly effective in stimulating the wounded area to produce healthy granulation tissue. The prompt healing of these defects was accomplished by the formation of scar tissue which resisted stress in a superior manner. A topical ointment of 2% isoniazid in eucerin had a similar beneficial effect in patients with indolent skin ulcers who had failed to respond to routine treatment. Epithelialization rapidly ensued once the granulating base was established. A further series of patients with delayed wound healing and failure to respond to antibiotics or isoniazid alone showed satisfactory response when both measures were used simultaneously. It is postulated that isoniazid provides a stimulus to the growth of normal granulation tissue, may promote greater tensile strength in scars, and may be of benefit in antibiotic-resistant infections because of its ability to boost the host's normal repair mechanisms. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:13933176

  17. Healing sounds.

    PubMed

    Brewer, J F

    1998-02-01

    This article explores Guzzetta's (1988) notion that musical vibrations that are in tune with our human vibratory pattern could have a profound healing effect on the entire body. The question of why music therapy works for some and not others is addressed in the paper and solutions are offered. Central to utilizing therapeutic music and healing sounds with positive effects is an understanding of the principles and theories of sound and harmonics, in order to comprehend its capacity to achieve therapeutic, psychological and physical change. Some of these principles and theories are explored in this article. There is a focus on strategies for the holistic nurse who wishes to use this knowledge to facilitate communication and balance between the mind and body of the patient.

  18. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using knot-tying versus knotless suture anchors: is there a difference?

    PubMed

    Ng, Dennis Zhaowen; Kumar, V Prem

    2014-04-01

    To compare the clinical outcome between the use of knotless sutures versus knot-tying sutures in arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Between January 2007 and January 2011, 87 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with the use of knot-tying suture anchors or knotless suture anchors were evaluated, with 45 patients in the knot-tying suture group and 42 patients in the knotless group. Patients were assigned to either group, with odd-numbered patients going to the knot-tying suture arm and even-numbered patients assigned to the knotless arm. Outcomes included the Constant score, the visual analog scale (VAS) score, patient satisfaction score, and range of motion in forward flexion and external rotation with the arm in adduction. Redislocations or subluxations with the 2 techniques was also studied. Both groups showed a statistically significant improvement between the preoperative and postoperative VAS scores and Constant scores. In the knot-tying suture group, the VAS score improved from 2.5 ± 2.3 to 0.7 ± 0.5 (P < .05) and the Constant score improved from 64 ± 7 to 92 ± 10 (P < .05). In the knotless group, the VAS score improved from 2.8 ± 2.5 to 0.9 ± 0.6 (P < .05), and the Constant score improved from 62 ± 6 to 89 ± 9 (P < .05). The patient satisfaction scores were 6.9 and 7.1 for the knot tying and knotless groups, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found when comparing the outcomes between the 2 groups. The change in the range of forward flexion and external rotation was also similar in the 2 groups. There was also no difference in recurrence or redislocation rates. Both the knot-tying and knotless suture anchors groups showed statistically significant and similar improvement in VAS and Constant scores. Both anchors provided reasonable outcomes. The knotless suture anchor is a good alternative to knot-tying suture anchors so that arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be performed without knot tying. Level II, prospective

  19. Minimum 10-year follow-up of arthroscopic intra-articular Bankart repair using bioabsorbable tacks.

    PubMed

    Privitera, David M; Bisson, Leslie J; Marzo, John M

    2012-01-01

    There are few long-term studies evaluating functional outcomes and rates of arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair with bioabsorbable tacks. We evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic Bankart repair using intra-articular bioabsorbable tacks at a minimum of 10 years' follow-up. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty-two consecutive patients were retrospectively identified. Twenty patients (63%) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 13.5 years (range, 10.75-17.5 years) and average age of 43 years (range, 28-73 years). The surgical shoulder (SS) was compared with a healthy control shoulder (CS) in 15 of 20 patients. Outcome tools included the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) and Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand (DASH). Blinded, independent evaluators performed physical examinations and reviewed radiographs. Thirteen patients (65%) had stable shoulders, 5 of 7 (25%) failed by dislocation, and 2 of 7 (10%) failed by signs of anterior instability on examination. Three patients underwent revision stabilization surgery. Average time to failure was 4.2 years (range, 0.25-14.7 years). Average WOSI and DASH scores were 80% and 7.3, respectively. The CS faired better than SS in WOSI scores (97% vs 83%, respectively; P = .008), main DASH scores (0.39 vs 6.79, respectively; P = .024), and the DASH sports module (0.00 vs 10.94, respectively; P = .043). Patients lost 5.9° of passive forward flexion (P = .031) and 4.3° of passive external rotation (P = .001). Forty percent returned to their preoperative sports level. Higher grades of arthrosis were seen in the SS (20% absent, 40% mild, 25% moderate, and 15% severe) versus CS (P = .002). At long-term follow-up, 65% of patients treated with an arthroscopic Bankart repair using bioabsorbable tacks had a well-functioning, stable shoulder. Disability scores were greatest with sports; however, the majority of patients had well-preserved ranges of motion and good functional

  20. Factors affecting capsular volume changes and association with outcomes after Bankart repair and capsular shift.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Seok Won; Kumar, Gurudeo; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Choi, Jin Hyeok; Lee, Deukhee; Park, Sehyung

    2015-02-01

    Capsular laxity is a main contributing factor in recurrent shoulder instability and is suggested to be correlated with increased capsular volume. Arthroscopic capsular shift combined with Bankart repair can reduce the capsular volume and reinforce the redundant capsule; however, as the capsuloligamentous structure has viscoelastic properties, it is possible for the shifted and tensioned capsule of the glenohumeral joint to slowly stretch out again over time, resulting in an increase in capsular volume. To analyze changes in capsular volume of the glenohumeral joint over time after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift, the factors associated with these changes, and their relevance to outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 105 patients (mean age, 25.8 ± 8.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for anterior shoulder instability and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively and whose various functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>12 months). Among these patients, 27 also had preoperative CTA. These 27 patients were used to make comparisons between preoperative and 3-month postoperative CTA measurements, and all 105 patients were used for all other comparisons. Two raters measured the separate anterior and posterior capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position using 3-dimensional (3D) Slicer software. These measurements were subsequently adjusted for each glenoid size. The changes in capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position over time, the factors related to higher change in anterior capsular volume, and their correlation with outcomes were evaluated. Three months postoperatively, the total and anterior capsular volume and anterior cross-sectional area significantly decreased; however, these values increased again at 1 year postoperatively (all P < .01). The inter- and

  1. Arthroscopic Bankart shoulder stabilization in athletes: return to sports and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerometta, Antoine; Rosso, Claudio; Klouche, Shahnaz; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate return to sports after arthroscopic Bankart stabilization. This is a retrospective study including all athletes aged <50 years who underwent arthroscopic stabilization in 2010 and 2011 (m, 36; f, 10; mean age 28.9 ± 8.1 years; follow-up 24.4 ± 7.7 months). Sixteen patients were practicing competitive sports and 30 recreational sports. Level and delay of return to sports, sports classification according to Allain, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) score, patient satisfaction, apprehension level and avoidance behaviour were noted. 95.7 % returned to the same level after an average of 9.8 ± 5.4 months. Sports level was unchanged or better in 82.6 %, lower in 8.7, and 4.5 % changed sport because of their shoulder. Patients with more than 10 dislocations returned to sports and to their preoperative level later than patients with <10. Male athletes returned to preoperative sports levels faster than female athletes (p < 0.001). The WOSI score and also its item "sports" were worse in those who had not returned (p = 0.0002 and 0.006, respectively). Satisfaction correlated with the WOSI score (p = 0.0004) while 93.3 % were satisfied/very satisfied. The decrease in the apprehension level was significant (p < 0.00001). 36.9 % still experienced avoidance behaviour. Most athletes resumed their main sport often at the same level, but the threshold of 10 dislocations should be considered a risk factor for longer return to sports at any level. The WOSI score is a valuable outcome score after Bankart stabilization. Postoperative avoidance should be distinguished from apprehension. IV.

  2. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  3. Effectiveness and safety of arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation: a meta-analysis of clinical trial data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Xu, Zhao; Peng, Jing; Xing, Fei; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of arthroscopic and open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation using meta-analysis of data from clinical trials. Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PUBMED and EMBASE were used to search and identify clinical trials that evaluated arthroscopic and open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Publication bias was detected using Begg's test and Egger's test. Sixteen trials involving 827 shoulders were included in the study. Based on Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk of bias, three studies were rated as high quality and one study was rated as moderate quality among the randomized controlled trials. Another twelve case-control studies were rated as high quality based on Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. No significant publication bias was detected by Begg's test or Egger's test. Meta-analysis results indicated that arthroscopic repair has a significantly better recovery rate for external rotation at 90° of abduction, external rotation at side (P > 0.05) and forward flexion. However, arthroscopic repair had higher rates of recurrence and reoperation than open Bankart repair. Meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials and case-control studies demonstrated that arthroscopic repair and open Bankart repair were similar in safety. Arthroscopic repair resulted in better recovery of range of motion, but recurrence and reoperation rates were higher than open Bankart repair.

  4. Automated Estimation Of Lesion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Webber, Richard L.; Groenhuis, Roelf A. J.; Troullos, Emanuel; Rethman, Michael T.

    1985-06-01

    Two methods were studied of estimating automatically the relative volume of local lesions in digital subtractions radiographs. The first method approximates the projected, lesion area by an equivalent circular area, and the second by an equivalent polygonal area. Lesion volume is estimated in both methods as equivalent area times the average gray-level difference between the detected area and the surrounding background. Regression results of the estimated relative volume versus the calibrated size of lesions induced in dry human mandibles showed the polygonal approximation to be superior. This method also permitted successful monitoring of bone remodelling during the healing process of surgically induced lesions in dogs. The quantitative results, as well as the examples from in vivo lesions demonstrate feasibility and clinically relavance of the methodology.

  5. Wound healing: an overview of acute, fibrotic and delayed healing.

    PubMed

    Diegelmann, Robert F; Evans, Melissa C

    2004-01-01

    excessive matrix deposition and reduced remodeling. Often fibrotic lesions are associated with increased densities of mast cells. By understanding the functional relationships of these biological processes of normal compared to abnormal wound healing, hopefully new strategies can be designed to treat the pathological conditions.

  6. Arthroscopic Subscapularis Augmentation of Bankart Repair in Chronic Anterior Shoulder Instability With Bone Loss Less Than 25% and Capsular Deficiency: Clinical Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo; Russo, Raffaele; Schroter, Steffen; Zanini, Antonio; Bianchedi, Diana

    2017-05-01

    To assess the short-term outcomes of the arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation (ASA) technique, consisting of a tenodesis of the upper third of the subscapularis tendon and a Bankart repair, and its effect on shoulder external rotation. Patients selected for this study were involved in contact sports, with a history of traumatic recurrent shoulder dislocations and a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Inclusion criteria were patients with glenoid bone loss (GBL) ranging from 5% to 25%, anterior capsular deficiency, and Hill-Sachs lesion who underwent ASA technique. Exclusion criteria were GBL >25%, multidirectional instability, preexisting osteoarthritis, and overhead sports activities. Visual analog scale (VAS) scale for pain, Rowe score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess results. Loss of shoulder external rotation was measured with the arm at the side (ER1 position) or 90° in abduction (ER2 position). Analysis of variance and Fisher tests were used for data evaluation. Significance was established at P ≤ .05. One hundred ten patients (84 men and 26 women, mean age 27 years) were evaluated with a mean follow-up of 40.5 months (range: 24 to 65 months). In 98 patients, a Hill-Sachs lesion was observed and in 57 patients a capsular deficiency was present. Three patients (2.7%) had a traumatic redislocation. At final follow-up, the mean scores were as follows: VAS scale decreased from a mean of 3.5 to 0.5 (P = .015), Rowe score increased from 57.4 to 95.3 (P = .035), and ASES score increased from 66.5 to 96.5 (P = .021). The mean deficit of external rotation was 8° ± 2.5° in the ER1 position and 4° ± 1.5° in the ER2 position. The ASA procedure has been shown to be effective in restoring joint stability in patients practicing sports, affected by chronic anterior shoulder instability associated with anterior GBL (<25%), capsular deficiency, and Hill-Sachs lesions, with mild restriction of external rotation. Level IV

  7. Does the position of shoulder immobilization after reduced anterior glenohumeral dislocation affect coaptation of a Bankart lesion? An arthrographic comparison.

    PubMed

    Momenzadeh, Omid Reza; Pourmokhtari, Masoome; Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Vosoughi, Amir Reza

    2015-12-01

    The position of immobilization after anterior shoulder dislocation has been a controversial topic over the past decade. We compared the effect of post-reduction immobilization, whether external rotation or internal rotation, on coaptation of the torn labrum. Twenty patients aged <40 years with primary anterior shoulder dislocation without associated fractures were randomized to post-reduction external rotation immobilization (nine patients) or internal rotation (11 patients). After 3 weeks, magnetic resonance arthrography was performed. Displacement, separation, and opening angle parameters were assessed and analyzed. Separation (1.16 ± 1.11 vs 2.43 ± 1.17 mm), displacement (1.73 ± 1.64 vs 2.28 ± 1.36 mm), and opening angle (15.00 ± 15.84 vs 27.86 ± 14.74 °) in the externally rotated group were decreased in comparison to the internally rotated group. A statistically significant difference between groups was seen only for separation (p = 0.028); p values of displacement and opening angle were 0.354 and 0.099, respectively. External rotation immobilization after reduction of primary anterior shoulder dislocation could result in a decrease in anterior capsule detachment and labral reduction.

  8. [Severe cartilage loss caused by metallic anchors in surgical treatment of a Bankart lesion: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Bek, Doğan; Ege, Tolga; Erdem, Yusuf; Tunay, Servet

    2015-01-01

    Currently, arthroscopic modalities in the surgical treatment of shoulder instability using suture anchors are more popular than open surgery. However, there are some complications related to the metallic suture anchors used. One of the most common complications is cartilage loss due to shallow placement of the suture anchor. Herein, we report three cases with severe cartilage loss of the humeral head due to metallic proud anchors, including one of whom requiring total shoulder arthroplasty. In conclusion, it is essential to place the suture anchors in an appropriate position and deepness. In case of any doubt, they should be removed or in non-threaded anchors, they should be inserted fully inside the glenoid with an impactor and a hammer to avoid serious cartilage loss.

  9. The antero-inferior (transmuscular) approach for arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion: an anatomic and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Resch, H; Wykypiel, H F; Maurer, H; Wambacher, M

    1996-06-01

    In order to find a direct approach to the antero-inferior third of the glenoid rim, an anatomic study was performed on a total of 89 shoulders (48 cadavers). To obtain defined reference points for the anterior inferior third of the glenoid cavity, it was compared with the hour markings on a clock face. The 4:30 position on the right shoulder and the 7:30 position on the left shoulder were defined as the relevant reference points. The average distance between the palpable end of the coracoid process and the 4:30 and 7:30 positions was 19 mm. The average distance to the point of intersection of the musculocutaneous nerve with the medial margin of the conjoined tendon was more than 5 cm, and was never less than 2 cm. The average distance of the axillary nerve from the 4:30 position was 2.5 cm in the horizontal plane, with a minimum of 1.5 cm. Radially, the average distance of the axillary nerve was 1.7 cm, with a minimum of 1.3 cm. The anatomic study was followed by a clinical study of 264 patients. An antero-inferior portal located maximum 2 cm distal from the palpable coracoid tip was selected for the introduction of a trocar sheath and blunt trocar, passing through the subscapularis muscle to access the antero-inferior area of the glenoid rim. As additional protection for the musculocutaneous nerve, the direction of the trocar was adjusted during introduction. Reattachment of the labrum-capsule complex was performed extra-articularly. In all cases, at least one implant was located inferior to the 4:30 or 7:30 position. No neurovascular complications arose out of the choice of portal. Out of the 264 patients, the first 100 shoulders (98 patients) were followed-up after an average time of 35 months (18 to 62 months). The recurrence rate was 9%. Excluding the first 30 shoulders (30 patients) from the development phase of the technique, the recurrence rate is only 5.7%. The rate of return to overhead sports activities was 62% and to collision sports activities 70%.

  10. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with knotless suture anchor for traumatic anterior shoulder instability: results of short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Yoneda, Minoru; Mizuno, Naoko; Fukushima, Sunao; Nakagawa, Shigeto

    2006-06-01

    To assess the clinical results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with the knotless suture anchor for traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability. A total of 47 patients with traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability and without severe glenoid bone defect who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with knotless suture anchors and were followed-up for longer than 2 years were included in the present study. The average age at surgery was 26 years (range, 16 to 49 years), with an average follow-up period of 28 months (range, 24 to 38 months). Clinical score as evaluated by the modified Rowe score advanced from 31 points to 91 points. In all, 35 patients were scored as excellent and 6 as good; the success rate was 87% (41 of 47), and the recurrence rate was 6.4% (3 of 47). External rotation was reduced by 8 degrees at adduction and by 6 degrees at 90 degrees of abduction. Of 12 patients, 7 (58%) returned completely to collision sports at preinjury levels, and 2 of 12 (17%) returned at a lower level. We experienced anchor-related trouble in 3 cases. One was the backwardness of the anchor at 2 months after operation. Breakage of the anchor loop occurred during the procedures in 2 cases. The clinical results of arthroscopic Bankart repair with knotless suture anchor were favorable; however, some pitfalls, such as the backwardness of the anchor and cutting of the anchor loop, were experienced. When using this anchor, its properties should be well recognized. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  11. Arthrosis of glenohumeral joint after arthroscopic Bankart repair: a long-term follow-up of 13 years.

    PubMed

    Kavaja, Lauri; Pajarinen, Jarkko; Sinisaari, Ilkka; Savolainen, Vesa; Björkenheim, Jan-Magnus; Haapamäki, Ville; Paavola, Mika

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish radiologic and clinical occurrence of glenohumeral arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair. Between January 1994 and December 1998, an arthroscopic Bankart repair was performed in 187 patients at our institution. We were able to assess clinical and radiologic glenohumeral arthrosis in 72 of the 101 patients who met the inclusion criteria (74 shoulders) (71%) after a 13-year follow-up. An additional 9 patients were interviewed by telephone. Radiologic arthrosis was evaluated with the Samilson-Prieto classification and clinical arthrosis with an arthrosis-specific quality-of-life questionnaire (Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder test). In addition, functional impairment was assessed with the Constant score and subjective satisfaction with a questionnaire. Radiologic arthrosis was diagnosed in 50 of 74 shoulders (68%), with 40 (80%) of them classified as mild. The mean score on the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder questionnaire was 280 points (85% of the best possible score), which is considered relatively good. The mean Constant score was 78 points, and 75% of the patients were extremely satisfied or satisfied with the final results of operative treatment. The radiologic evaluation and self-assessment of the patients imply that the incidence of glenohumeral arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair is quite common but the symptoms are generally mild and comparable to nonoperative treatment. Arthrosis rarely causes more than minor subjective symptoms or a minor objectively perceived disadvantage during 13 years' follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term results with Bankart procedure: a 26-year follow-up study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Thierry; Abi-Chahla, Marie Laure; Billaud, Anselme; Geneste, Marc; Durandeau, Alain

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome (>20 years) of patients who underwent an open Bankart procedure, many of them contact athletes, in terms of shoulder stability, return to sport, and the development of osteoarthritis. We retrospectively reviewed 49 patients (50 shoulders) who underwent an open Bankart procedure for recurrent shoulder instability. There were 36 contact athletes (73%) in this cohort. Mean follow-up was 28 years (25-32). Clinical examination was performed by an independent reviewer, with standard shoulder radiographs obtained. Eight patients had recurrence of dislocation after a new traumatic episode, in six cases while playing rugby, with two of them requiring re-operation. Forty (82%) patients returned to their previous level of sports activities, including all 31 rugby players. No statistically significant loss of motion occurred in this group, although there was slight loss of flexion (6 degrees ) and external rotation (9 degrees ). The mean Rowe score at final follow-up was 82 (25-97), and all but two patients considered themselves satisfied with the results of the surgery. Thirty-four (69%) patients showed signs of osteoarthritis at follow-up, as follows: Stage 1 -18, Stage 2 - 5, Stage 3 - 5, and Stage 4 - 1. At long-term follow-up, patients undergoing an open Bankart procedure for recurrent shoulder instability obtained a high percentage of shoulder stability, and reliably returned to high-level sports activities. However, 69% did show radiographic signs of osteoarthritis. Copyright 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic Bankart repair augmented by plication of the inferior glenohumeral ligament via horizontal mattress suturing for traumatic shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kong Hwee; Soeharno, Henry; Chew, Chee Ping; Lie, Denny

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the two-year clinical outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair augmented by plication of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL) via horizontal mattress suturing. This study was a retrospective analysis of 76 arthroscopic Bankart repairs by a single surgeon from 2004 to 2008. Bioabsorbable suture anchors were used, with anchors placed at the 5:30, 4 and 3 o'clock positions of the right shoulder (correspondingly at the 6:30, 8 and 9 o'clock positions for the left shoulder). The lower most anchor was tied via horizontal mattress suture with plication of the IGHL, while the remaining two anchors were tied using simple sutures. The patients were postoperatively assessed, clinically and using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale. The mean age of the patients at the time of presentation was 24.09 ± 7.98 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 28.7 months. The postoperative recurrence rate of dislocation was 7.89% (six shoulders), of which five shoulders required revision surgeries. Excluding the revision cases, clinical assessment of the strength of the supraspinatus and the range of motion of the operated shoulders at two years post operation were either maintained or full in all patients. Analysis of the UCLA results showed pre- and postoperative mean scores of 25.94 ± 3.43 and 33.77 ± 3.07, respectively (p < 0.05). Arthroscopic Bankart repair augmented by plication of the IGHL and anchored via horizontal mattress suturing is a safe and reliable treatment for shoulder instability, with good clinical outcomes and low recurrence rates.

  14. Neer modification of open Bankart procedure: what are the rates of recurrent instability, functional outcome, and arthritis?

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Fourati, E; Bicknell, Ryan

    2012-09-01

    Neer modified the Bankart procedure by combining a superoinferior capsular shift with the labral reattachment. The theoretical advantages of the modification were that such a procedure would restore the patient's anatomy and also treat the repeated capsular stretching encountered in anteroinferior instability without limiting external rotation and, thereby reducing the risk of arthritis. We therefore determined: (1) the rate of recurrent instability after this modification, (2) patient function, and (3) the incidence and stage of glenohumeral osteoarthritis at greater than 2 years followup in patients with traumatic anteroinferior instability. We retrospectively reviewed all 64 patients (average age, 27 years) who had the modified Bankart procedure for recurrent dislocations (n = 39) or subluxation (n = 25) from 1991 to 1997. The labrum was reattached with suture anchors and a superoinferior capsular shift was added. We determined the rate of recurrent instability, Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores and shoulder ROM, and the presence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis (modified Samilson and Prieto classification). The minimum followup was 24 months (median, 40 months; range, 24-120 months). Recurrent instability occurred in seven of the 64 patients (11%) at an average of 25 months postoperatively (range, 7 days to 6 years); in six patients the recurrence was associated with trauma; five of the six patients underwent reoperation with a Latarjet procedure. Eight additional patients (13%) presented with persistent shoulder apprehension or discomfort. The average Rowe score was 83% (range, 20-100%) and average Walch-Duplay score 83% (range, 15-100%). However, only 36 of 64 (56%) patients could return to the same sport at the same level. The loss of external rotation was 13° compared with the contralateral side. Glenohumeral osteoarthritis incidence increased from 4% preoperatively to 17% postoperatively. The open Bankart procedure modified by Neer provided high function scores

  15. Comparison of pro-inflammatory cytokines of non-healing and healing cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Moafi, M; Rezvan, H; Sherkat, R; Taleban, R; Asilian, A; Hamid Zarkesh-Esfahani, S; Nilforoushzadeh, M A; Jaffary, F; Mansourian, M; Sokhanvari, F; Ansari, N

    2017-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) heals spontaneously within several weeks or months, but, in rare cases, CL-active lesions last for many years. In this study, we assessed cell-mediated immunity in non-healing CL through the measurement of three pro-inflammatory cytokines: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-17a and CXCL-11. For this, 32 patients afflicted with healing or non-healing CL were recruited in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of every patient were treated with three antigens: purified protein derivative (PPD), soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Cytokine quantification was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results of our study showed that neither cytokine produced in the presence of a PPD stimulator (as an irrelevant antigen) significantly differed between the healing and non-healing groups (P-value ≥0.05 for all of them). However, IFN-γ, CXCL-11 and IL-17a levels produced in the presence of PHA or SLA were significantly higher within the healing than in the non-healing group (P-value <0.01 for all of them). It seems that appropriate levels of IFN-γ, as well as IL-17a and CXCL-11, contribute to the control of Leishmania infection.

  16. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing and Care Print A A A What's in ... mouth, or sunken eyes. There's good news about wound healing when you're a teen: Age is on ...

  17. What is esoteric healing?

    PubMed

    Settersten, Lori

    2011-06-01

    Esoteric Healing is a type of energy healing that originated from the teachings of Djwhal Khul and Alice Bailey first published in the early 1950s. Esoteric Healing instructors and practitioners are located in more than 19 countries throughout the world. Nurses and nurse practitioners as well as other health professionals (e.g., psychologists and physicians) have integrated Esoteric Healing into their current practice and/or have a separate practice in Esoteric Healing. According to Dochterman and Bulechek, the nursing diagnosis "energy field, disturbed" is defined as a "disruption in the flow of energy surrounding a person's being." Esoteric Healing is proposed to assist a person in balancing her or his flow of energy. In this article, Esoteric Healing is defined, and the components of the energy field according to the teachings of Esoteric Healing are differentiated. The basic Esoteric Healing treatment procedure, treatment protocols, and indications for when Esoteric Healing may be an appropriate healing modality option are described. Finally, research on Esoteric Healing is addressed.

  18. Gene therapy for bone healing.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2010-06-23

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, spinal fusions, and the nonunion and delayed union of fractures. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment.

  19. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  20. Bristow-Latarjet and Bankart: a comparative study of shoulder stabilization in 185 shoulders during a seventeen-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hovelius, Lennart; Vikerfors, Ola; Olofsson, Anders; Svensson, Olle; Rahme, Hans

    2011-10-01

    In 2 Swedish hospitals, 88 consecutive shoulders underwent Bankart repair (B), and 97 consecutive shoulders underwent Bristow-Latarjet repair (B-L) for traumatic anterior recurrent instability. Mean age at surgery was 28 years (B-L group) and 27 years (B group). All shoulders had a follow-up by letter or telephone after a mean of 17 years (range, 13-22 years). The patients answered a questionnaire and completed the Western Ontario Shoulder Index (WOSI), Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH), and SSV (Simple Shoulder Value) assessments. Recurrance resulted revision surgery in 1 shoulder in the B-L group and in 5 shoulders in the B group (P = .08). Redislocation or subluxation after the index operation occurred in 13 of 97 B-L shoulders and in 25 of 87 of B shoulders (after excluding 1 patient with arthroplasty because of arthropathy, P = .017). Of the 96 Bristow shoulders, 94 patients were very satisfied/satisfied compared with 71 of 80 in the B series (P = .01). Mean WOSI score was 88 for B-L shoulders and 79 for B shoulders (P = .002). B-L shoulders also scored better on the DASH (P = .002) and SSV (P = .007). Patients had 11° loss of subjectively measured outward rotation with the arm at the side after B-L repair compared with 19° after Bankart (P = .012). The original Bankart, with tunnels through the glenoid rim, had less redislocation(s) or subluxation(s) than shoulders done with anchors (P = .048). Results were better after the Bristow-Latarjet repair than after Bankart repairs done with anchors with respect to postoperative stability and subjective evaluation. Shoulders with original Bankart repair also seemed to be more stable than shoulders repaired with anchors. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  2. Nonsurgical management of periapical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. They often occur without any episode of acute pain and are discovered on routine radiographic examination. The incidence of cysts within periapical lesions varies between 6 and 55%. The occurrence of periapical granulomas ranges between 9.3 and 87.1%, and of abscesses between 28.7 and 70.07%. It is accepted that all inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Studies have reported a success rate of up to 85% after endodontic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions. A review of literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, Lesion Sterilization and Repair Therapy, and the Apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. PMID:21217952

  3. Faith healing and faith in healing.

    PubMed

    Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Sarkar and Seshadri have presented an interesting paper in this issue on the ethical approach that a physician should take when faced with requests for faith healing (1). The paper describes four approaches that the physician can take. These are rejecting the request, keeping oneself detached from the issue, endorsing the request and trying to understand the practices concerned so as to make a reasoned decision. This commentary attempts to explore the issue of faith healing further, from the point of view of clinical care. It shall discuss five important dimensions which can supplement the arguments by Sarkar and Seshadri. These are the concepts of faith, spirituality and religion and faith healing; the difference between cure and healing; patient-centred care; the various factors influencing a doctor's response to requests for faith healing; and finally, the ethical issues to be considered while making a decision. Before launching into the discussion, it should be made clear that this commentary refers mainly to those faith healing practices which are not overtly harmful, such as prayers, and wearing rings and amulets.

  4. Effects of omeprazole on healing of naturally-occurring gastric ulcers in thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Murray, M J; Haven, M L; Eichorn, E S; Zhang, D; Eagleson, J; Hickey, G J

    1997-11-01

    Seventeen Thoroughbred horses with moderate to severe gastric ulceration were purchased from a race track within 10 days of racing and were treated once daily with either omeprazole (9 horses) or vehicle (8 horses) and evaluated gastroscopically for ulcer healing. Horses were administered omeprazole (1.5 mg/kg bwt/day) or vehicle by nasogastric tube once daily. Gastroscopic examination was performed on Days 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28, until lesions healed completely. Selected images of gastric lesions were captured by computer at each endoscopic examination, with a measuring caliper included in captured images. The area and perimeter of lesions were measured by computer and healing rates of specific lesions were determined by calculating the rate of linear advance of the margins toward the centre of the lesion. Additionally, the number of days to complete healing of the entire gastric squamous mucosa was compared between treatment groups. Gastric lesions healed at a significantly faster rate in horses receiving omeprazole than in vehicle-treated horses (P < 0.001). Complete healing of the entire stomach occurred in 10-21 days in omeprazole-treated horses, and 14-28 days in 3 of 8 vehicle-treated horses, with the remaining vehicle-treated horses having unhealed lesions on Day 28. In addition, 5 vehicle-treated horses developed new lesions in the squamous epithelial mucosa during the trial; no new lesions were observed in the omeprazole-treated group.

  5. The healing Buddha.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas S N; Chen, Peter S Y

    2004-11-01

    The iconography of the healing Buddha embraces two healing traditions, symbolized by the healing stone lapis lazuli from Central Asia and by the myrobalan fruit from the ayurvedic medicine of ancient India. The first mention of the healing Buddha is in Buddhist texts of the first century BC, and the earliest extant icons date from the fourth century AD. This suggests the cult of the healing Buddha was a relatively late development in the history of Buddhism. Worshippers sought his help in alleviating spiritual, mental and physical suffering, as well as for medical cures. In China followers believed he was also a cosmic Buddha, to whom one appealed for longevity and protection from disasters. This form of faith-based healing remains vibrant in China, Japan and Tibet to this day.

  6. Authenticity and healing.

    PubMed

    McGee, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    Caring and compassion cannot be faked. These are not actions we perform mechanically but states of being that flow from within to make healing connection with others in need. To be authentically healing requires that we live authentic lives. This paper describes what it means to be authentic from a psychospiritual perspective, discusses the components of authentic caring and ends with an exploration of ways to cultivate the authenticity of our lives in general and in our efforts to heal others.

  7. Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Versus Open Bristow-Latarjet for Shoulder Instability: A Matched-Pair Multicenter Study Focused on Return to Sport.

    PubMed

    Blonna, Davide; Bellato, Enrico; Caranzano, Francesco; Assom, Marco; Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The arthroscopic Bankart repair and open Bristow-Latarjet procedure are the 2 most commonly used techniques to treat recurrent shoulder instability. To compare in a case control-matched manner the 2 techniques, with particular emphasis on return to sport after surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A study was conducted in 2 hospitals matching 60 patients with posttraumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (30 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart procedure and 30 treated with open Bristow-Latarjet procedure). Patients with severe glenoid bone loss and revision surgeries were excluded. In one hospital, patients were treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair using anchors; in the other, patients underwent the Bristow-Latarjet procedure. Patients were matched according to age at surgery, type and level of sport practiced before shoulder instability (Degree of Shoulder Involvement in Sports [DOSIS] scale), and number of dislocations. The primary outcomes were return to sport (Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports [SPORTS] score), rate of recurrent instability, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS), Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), and range of motion (ROM). After a mean follow-up of 5.3 years (range, 2-9 years), patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair obtained better results in terms of return to sport (SPORTS score: 8 vs 6; P = .02) and ROM in the throwing position (86° vs 79°; P = .01), and they reported better subjective perception of the shoulder (SSV: 86% vs 75%; P = .02). No differences were detectable using the OSIS or WOSI. The rate of recurrent instability was not statistically different between the 2 groups (Bankart repair 10% vs Bristow-Latarjet 0%; P = .25), although the study may have been underpowered to detect a clinically important difference in this parameter. The multiple regression analysis showed that the independent

  8. Self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Hager, Martin D; Greil, Peter; Leyens, Christoph; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2010-12-14

    Self-healing materials are able to partially or completely heal damage inflicted on them, e.g., crack formation; it is anticipated that the original functionality can be restored. This article covers the design and generic principles of self-healing materials through a wide range of different material classes including metals, ceramics, concrete, and polymers. Recent key developments and future challenges in the field of self-healing materials are summarised, and generic, fundamental material-independent principles and mechanism are discussed and evaluated.

  9. How Satisfied Are Patients with Arthroscopic Bankart Repair? A 2-Year Follow-up on Quality-of-Life Outcome.

    PubMed

    Saier, Tim; Plath, Johannes E; Waibel, Sabrina; Minzlaff, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Herschbach, Peter; Imhoff, Andreas B; Braun, Sepp

    2017-06-29

    To report general life and health satisfaction after arthroscopic Bankart repair in patients with post-traumatic recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability and to investigate postoperative time lost to return to work at 2-year follow-up. Between 2011 and 2013 patients treated with arthroscopic Bankart repair in the beach chair position for acute shoulder instability were included in this study. Questions on Life Satisfaction Modules (FLZ(M)) and the Short Form 12 (SF-12) were used as quality-of-life outcome scales. Oxford Instability Score (OIS), Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH), and self-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder index were used as functional outcome scales. Return to work (months) was monitored and analyzed depending on physical workload. Data were assessed the day before surgery and prospectively monitored until 24 months postoperatively. Quality-of-life outcome was correlated with functional shoulder outcome and compared with normative age-adjusted data. Paired t-test, Wilcoxon test, Mann-Whitney U-Test, and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Fifty-three patients were prospectively included. The mean age at surgery was 29.4 years. Satisfaction with general life and satisfaction with health (FLZ(M)) as well as physical component scale (SF-12) improved significantly to values above normative data within 6 to 12 months after surgery (each P < .001). OIS, QuickDASH, and ASES improved significantly from baseline until 24 months after surgery (each P < .001). For ASES, improvement above minimal clinically important difference was shown. There was a positive correlation between quality of life and functional outcome scores (P < .05; rho, 0.3-0.4). Mean time to return to work was 2 months (range, 0-10; standard deviation, 1.9), with significantly longer time intervals observed in patients with heavy physical workload (3.1 months; range, 0 to 10

  10. Structural and clinical integrity of the rotator cuff in athletes after arthroscopic Bankart repair using the three-portal technique.

    PubMed

    Stein, T; Buckup, J; Efe, T; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R; Hoffmann, R; Zimmermann, E; Welsch, F

    2015-03-01

    Muscular recovery of structural integrity after arthroscopic Bankart repair using the para- and trans-musculotendinous three-portal technique has not been investigated. Twenty-seven athletes [mean age 26.9 years, (group 1; G1)] were prospectively and longitudinally monitored after arthroscopic Bankart repair using the three-portal technique by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and specific clinical muscular testing. The muscular integrity was assessed at the subscapularis (SSC) for the para-tendinous anteroinferior portal, the supraspinatus (SSP) for the trans-tendinous suprabicipital portal, and the infraspinatus (ISP) for the trans-tendinous posterior portal. Muscular atrophy was assessed by standardized ratios of transverse and vertical diameters for the SSC and ISP, as defined by cross-sectional area ratios for the SSP. Fatty infiltration was assessed by signal intensity analysis for the upper and lower SSC, SSP, and upper ISP as a ratio with the lower ISP. These parameters were analyzed for pre-operative (T0), 1-year (T1), and 2-year status (T2), and compared to 27 healthy volunteers [mean age 29.4 years, (group 2, G2)]. The structural integrity assessments were performed after 14.8 (T1) and 32.0 months (T2). The SSC analysis revealed no muscular impairments in the upper and lower portions between T0 and T2 or compared to G2. MRI analysis for SSP and ISP showed full muscular recovery without any changes between T0 and T2 or deficits compared to G2. The number of pre-operative dislocations had no influence on the muscular integrity. MR analysis detected signs of overuse syndrome in 15 % at T0, 41 % at T1, and 63 % at T2; 77, 22, and 26 % of patients at T0, T1, and T2, respectively, were symptomatic. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using the three-portal technique prevents full muscular integrity for para-tendinous anteroinferior portals at the SSC, the trans-tendinous suprabicipital portal through the SSP, and the trans-tendinous portal through the ISP.

  11. Shoulder sport-specific impairments after arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective longitudinal assessment.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thomas; Linke, Ralf Dieter; Buckup, Johannes; Efe, Turgay; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rudiger; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Jäger, Alwin; Welsch, Frederic

    2011-11-01

    Reports of return to shoulder-dependent sport after surgical stabilization previously underestimated impairments, which were not reflected in the score systems used. Return to shoulder-dependent sport depends on the type of sport performed. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-seven athletes (26.9 years of age at surgery) who underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair were longitudinally monitored by shoulder-dependent sport-specific activity (Shoulder Sport Activity Score [SSAS]) and ability (Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System [ASOSS]) scores and visual analog scales for reachieved proficiency level, sport-specific shoulder pain, and functional deficits. Data were assessed at 4 points of treatment: preoperatively, and postoperatively after 6, 16, and 32 months (P0-P3). Athletes were analyzed separately according to shoulder sport: noncollision/nonoverhead (G1), collision (G2), overhead (G3), and martial arts (G4). The G1 and G2 athletes had re-achieved the preinjury sport activity and sport proficiency status and excellent ASOSS scores after 32 months (SSAS(G1) = 7.2, SSAS(G2) = 8.1, ASOSS(G1) = 94.4, ASOSS(G2) = 95.2), whereas G3 and G4 athletes remained at an inferior activity level (SSAS(G3) = 8.0, SSAS(G4) = 8.3) and proficiency level. The ASOSS documented a prolonged period of shoulder rehabilitation for G3 and G4 athletes to reach a good shoulder-dependent sport ability outcome after 32 months (ASOSS(G3) = 89.0, ASOSS(G4) = 93.1). All groups recorded persisting limitations in visual analog scales for sport-specific shoulder function and pain. The established scores (Rowe = 95.9, Walch-Duplay = 93.3, Constant = 94.0) did not reflect these sport-specific impairments. Athletes with 5 or more preoperative dislocations had significantly longer surgery-to-sport resumption intervals with a prolonged proficiency recovery. The athletes' shoulder stabilization resulted in a prolonged rehabilitation depending on the functional demand of the performed

  12. Superior labral anterior posterior lesions of the shoulder: Current diagnostic and therapeutic standards

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Dominik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion becomes more and more frequent which is the consequence of evolving progress in both, imaging and surgical technique as well as implants. The first classification of SLAP lesions was described in 1990, a subdivision in four types existed. The rising comprehension of pathology and pathophysiology in SLAP lesions contributed to increase the types in SLAP classification to ten. Concerning the causative mechanism of SLAP lesions, acute trauma has to be differed from chronic degeneration. Overhead athletes tend to develop a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit which forms the basis for two controversial discussed potential mechanisms of pathophysiology in SLAP lesions: Internal impingement and peel-back mechanism. Clinical examination often remains unspecific whereas soft tissue imaging such as direct or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography has technically improved and is regarded to be indispensable in detection of SLAP lesions. Concomitant pathologies as Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears or perilabral cysts should be taken into consideration when planning a personalized therapeutic strategy. In addition, normal variants such as sublabral recess, sublabral hole, Buford complex and other less common variants have to be distinguished. The most frequent SLAP type II needs a sophisticated approach when surgical teatment comes into consideration. While SLAP repair is considered to be the standard operative option, overhead athletes benefit from a biceps tenodesis because improved patient-reported satisfaction and higher rate of return to pre-injury level of sports has been reported. PMID:26495243

  13. Relationship Between Glenoid Defects and Hill-Sachs Lesions in Shoulders With Traumatic Anterior Instability.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Iuchi, Ryo; Mae, Tatsuo

    2015-11-01

    While the combination of a glenoid defect and a Hill-Sachs lesion in a shoulder with anterior instability has recently been termed a bipolar lesion, their relationship is unclear. To investigate the relationship of the glenoid defect and Hill-Sachs lesion and the factors that influence the occurrence of these lesions as well as the recurrence of instability. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. The prevalence and size of both lesions were evaluated retrospectively by computed tomography scanning in 153 shoulders before arthroscopic Bankart repair. First, the relationship of lesion prevalence and size was investigated. Then, factors influencing the occurrence of bipolar lesions were assessed. Finally, the influence of these lesions on recurrence of instability was investigated in 103 shoulders followed for a minimum of 2 years. Bipolar lesions, isolated glenoid defects/isolated Hill-Sachs lesions, and no lesion were detected in 86, 45, and 22 shoulders (56.2%, 29.4%, and 14.4%), respectively. As the glenoid defect became larger, the Hill-Sachs lesion also increased in size. However, the size of these lesions showed a weak correlation, and large Hill-Sachs lesions did not always coexist with large glenoid defects. The prevalence of bipolar lesions was 33.3% in shoulders with primary instability and 61.8% in shoulders with recurrent instability. In relation to the total events of dislocations/subluxations, the prevalence was 44.2% in shoulders with 1 to 5 events, 69.0% in shoulders with 6 to 10 events, and 82.8% in shoulders with ≥11 events. Regarding the type of sport, the prevalence was 58.9% in athletes playing collision sports, 53.3% in athletes playing contact sports, and 29.4% in athletes playing overhead sports. Postoperative recurrence of instability was 0% in shoulders without lesions, 0% with isolated Hill-Sachs lesions, 8.3% with isolated glenoid defects, and 29.4% with bipolar lesions. The presence of a bipolar lesion significantly influenced the

  14. Identification and management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of an MRA-confirmed humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Arif; McLeod, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present the assessment and conservative management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of a humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion in an active individual. Clinical Features: A 47 year-old female office-worker with constant, deep, right shoulder pain with occasional clicking and catching claimed to have “tore something” in her right shoulder five years ago while performing reverse bicep curls. A physical exam led to differential diagnoses of a Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) lesion, Bankart lesion, and bicipital tendinopathy. A Magnetic Resonance Arthrogram revealed a HAGL lesion. Intervention and Outcome: A conservative chiropractic treatment plan in addition to physical therapy was initiated. The patient reported 75% improvement in symptoms after 4 treatments over a four-week duration. Summary: This case demonstrates the successful implementation of a conservative plan of management suggesting that the treatment provided to this patient should be considered and attempted prior to arthroscopic surgery. PMID:27385837

  15. Self-healing biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Alice B W; Craig, Stephen L; Reichert, William M

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be considered zeroth generation self-healing materials, then taxonomically speaking, first generation self-healing materials describe approaches that "halt" and "fill" damage, whereas second generation self-healing materials strive to "fully restore" the prefailed material structure. In spite of limited commercial use to date, primarily because the technical details have not been suitably optimized, it is likely from a practical standpoint that first generation approaches will be the first to be employed commercially, whereas second generation approaches may take longer to implement. For self-healing biomaterials the optimization of technical considerations is further compounded by the additional constraints of toxicity and biocompatibility, necessitating inclusion of separate discussions of design criteria for self-healing biomaterials. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and patient-reported outcomes following two procedures for recurrent traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder: Latarjet procedure vs. Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    An, Vincent Vinh Gia; Sivakumar, Brahman Shankar; Phan, Kevin; Trantalis, John

    2016-05-01

    The Bankart repair and Latarjet procedure are both viable surgical options for recurrent traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder joint. The anatomic repair is the more popular option, with 90% of surgeons internationally choosing the Bankart repair as the initial treatment. There has been no previous review directly comparing the 2 techniques. Hence, we aimed to systematically review studies to compare the outcomes of Bankart repairs vs. the Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability of the shoulder. Six electronic databases were searched for original, English-language studies comparing the Bankart and Latarjet procedures. Studies were critically appraised using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Data were extracted from the text, tables, and figures of the selected studies. Eight comparative studies were identified with 795 shoulders; 416 of them underwent open or arthroscopic Bankart repairs, and 379 were repaired by the open Latarjet procedure. Primary and revision procedures were studied. The Latarjet procedure conferred significantly lower risk of recurrence and redislocation. There was no significant difference in the rates of complication requiring reoperation between the two procedures. Rowe scores were higher and loss of external rotation lower in the Latarjet group compared with the Bankart repair group. Our studies demonstrate that the Latarjet procedure is a viable and possibly superior alternative to the Bankart repair, offering greater stability with no significant increase in complication rate. However, the studies identified were retrospective and of limited quality, and therefore randomized controlled trials with large populations of patients or prospective assessment of national orthopedic registries should be employed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of hyperparathyroidism and dietary calcium supplementation on bone healing.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, G B; Schmidt, R E; Gleiser, C A; MacKenzie, W F

    1979-02-01

    Effects of nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism and dietary calcium supplementation on bone healing were determined. Groups (n = 4) of 5 mature male dogs each were fed the following diets: group 1, control diet (0.48% Ca, 0.43% P); group 2, test diet (0.12% Ca, 1.14% P): group 3, control diet plus calcium; group 4, test diet plus calcium. The dietary calcium supplementation was calcium gluconate. Lesions were induced in the right tibial cortex by trephinization. Within the time limitations of this study, it was determined that nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism does not inhibit bone healing and that dietary calcium supplementation does not aid bone healing.

  18. Ten-year follow-up of acute arthroscopic Bankart repair for initial anterior shoulder dislocation in young patients.

    PubMed

    Chapus, V; Rochcongar, G; Pineau, V; Salle de Chou, É; Hulet, C

    2015-12-01

    Early treatment of initial anterior glenohumeral dislocation in young patients is controversial and the interest of surgery, and notably arthroscopic stabilization, has not been demonstrated. A prospective study was therefore performed to assess (1) short-to-medium-term recurrence rate, (2) functional outcome, and (3) and medium-term osteoarthritis rate. Early arthroscopic stabilization by anterior capsule-labrum reinsertion after initial anterior shoulder dislocation is associated with low recurrence rate. Twenty-one patients with initial anterior dislocation were included between June 2002 and February 2004. All patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair within 30 days of dislocation. Patients were followed up prospectively, with clinical (Duplay and Constant scores) and radiological assessment (osteoarthritis). There were 5 recurrent dislocations (25%); 2 patients reported sensations of subluxation: i.e., 7 failures (35%). Mean Walch-Duplay score at 10 years was 88±1 (range, 30-100) and mean Rowe score 86±22 (range, 35-100). There was significant internal rotation deficit of one vertebral level between operated and contralateral shoulder (P < 0.005). At 10 years, 3 shoulders (15%) showed Samilson grade 1 centered glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Early arthroscopic capsule-labrum reinsertion by the Bankart technique in the month following initial anterior dislocation of the shoulder in patients under 25 years of age provided a low recurrence rate (35%) compared to the literature, including dislocation (25%) and subluxation (10%). Functional outcome was satisfactory, and osteoarthritis rate was low (15% Samilson grade 1). IV, prospective non-comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  1. Self Healing Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. Self-healing is a crucial in implementing the next generation of smart grids allowing to ensure a high quality of service to the users. We then map our self-healing procedure in a percolation problem and analyse the interplay between redundancies and topology in improving the resilience of networked infrastructures to multiple failures. We find exact results both for planar lattices and for random lattices, hinting the role of duality in the design of resilient networks. Finally, we introduce a cavity method approach to study the recovery of connectivity after damage in self-healing networks. CNR-PNR National Project ``Crisis-Lab,'' EU HOME/2013/CIPS/AG/4000005013 project CI2C and EU FET project MULTIPLEX nr.317532.

  2. Stress and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I

    1979-01-01

    An experiment was performed to compare the effects of stressors--cold, heat and noise--on primary wound activity (i.e., wound closure in the first 24 h after wound infliction) and on rate of healing in mice. A significant correlation was found between reduced primary wound activity and a faster rate of healing. Conversely, a correlation was found between relatively greater primary wound activity and a slower rate of healing. A possible explanation of this correlation is a compensatory mechanism inherent to the skin healing process. This mechanism is visualized as (1) stress exposure affecting the skin by (a) causing it to become thinner and tauter and (b) causing it to have less elastic recoil; therefore, (2) when a square wound is produced in stressed skin, (a) the wound does not recoil readily or gapes soon after cutting and (b) a longer wound perimeter results. Because there is evidence that rate of healing is governed by cells on the wound perimeter, the greater the perimeter, the greater the number of cells that will undergo rapid mitosis and the faster will be the rate of healing. Therefore, stressed skin will heal at a faster rate, compensating for the loss of elasticity and cellular depletion caused by stress. This study is of interest to anthropology because it deals with dynamic adaptation, trying to grasp the meaning of the elusive endocrine interface between environmental stimulation and a measurable physical entity like healing. This work may have revealed a functional complex that is common to the healing of all mammalian skin, whereby retarding effects of stress on the healing process are obviated.

  3. Wound healing - A literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ana Cristina de Oliveira; Costa, Tila Fortuna; Andrade, Zilton de Araújo; Medrado, Alena Ribeiro Alves Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration and tissue repair processes consist of a sequence of molecular and cellular events which occur after the onset of a tissue lesion in order to restore the damaged tissue. The exsudative, proliferative, and extracellular matrix remodeling phases are sequential events that occur through the integration of dynamic processes involving soluble mediators, blood cells, and parenchymal cells. Exsudative phenomena that take place after injury contribute to the development of tissue edema. The proliferative stage seeks to reduce the area of tissue injury by contracting myofibroblasts and fibroplasia. At this stage, angiogenesis and reepithelialization processes can still be observed. Endothelial cells are able to differentiate into mesenchymal components, and this difference appears to be finely orchestrated by a set of signaling proteins that have been studied in the literature. This pathway is known as Hedgehog. The purpose of this review is to describe the various cellular and molecular aspects involved in the skin healing process. PMID:27828635

  4. Pink lesions.

    PubMed

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  5. Saliva and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Veerman, Enno C I

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation. A synthetic cyclic variant of histatin exhibits a 1,000-fold higher activity than linear histatin, which makes this cyclic variant a promising agent for the development of a new wound healing medication. Conclusively, recognition of the many roles salivary proteins play in wound healing makes saliva a promising source for the development of new drugs involved in tissue regeneration.

  6. Contrasting Lesion Dynamics of White Syndrome among the scleractinian corals Porites spp

    PubMed Central

    Lozada-Misa, Paula; Kerr, Alexander; Raymundo, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    White syndrome (WS) is currently the most prevalent disease of scleractinian corals in the Indo-Pacific region, with an ability to exist in both epizootic and enzootic states. Here, we present results of an examination of WS lesion dynamics and show that potentially associated traits of host morphology (i.e., branching vs. massive), lesion size, and tissue deposition rate influence disease severity and recovery. Lesion healing rate was positively correlated with initial lesion size in both morphologies, but the rate at which lesions healed differed between morphologies. New lesions in branching Porites cylindrica appeared less frequently, were smaller and healed more quickly, but were more abundant than in closely-related massive Porites sp(p). The positive association between lesion size and healing rate was partly explained by geometry; branching limited lesion maximum size, and larger lesion margins contained more polyps producing new tissue, resulting in faster healing. However, massive colonies deposited tissue more slowly than branching colonies, resulting in slower recovery and more persistent lesions. Corallite size and density did not differ between species and did not, therefore, influence healing rate. We demonstrated multiple modes of pathogen transmission, which may be influenced by the greater potential for pathogen entrainment in branching vs. massive morphologies. We suggest that attributes such as colony morphology and species-specific growth rates require consideration as we expand our understanding of disease dynamics in colonial organisms such as coral. PMID:26120844

  7. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Dislocation Arthropathy: Radiological Long-term Outcome of Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in 100 Shoulders at an Average 13-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Aboalata, Mohamed; Seppel, Gernot; Juretzko, Julia; Waldt, Simone; Vogt, Stephan; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2015-05-01

    Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a well-documented, long-term complication of open stabilization procedures. However, there is a lack of knowledge about long-term radiographic outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. Glenohumeral osteoarthritis will develop less frequently in arthroscopic Bankart repair compared with open repairs reported in the literature. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The inclusion criteria for this study were (1) all-arthroscopic Bankart repair for a (2) symptomatic anteroinferior shoulder instability and (3) a minimum follow-up of 10 years. True anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to evaluate the prevalence and grade of osteoarthritis according to the Samilson classification. Patients were assessed by the Constant score and examined for passive external rotation deficits. Of 165 shoulders that fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 100 were available for evaluation. The median Constant score at an average±SD 156.2±18.5 months after Bankart repair was 94 (range, 46-100). Twenty-one shoulders (21%) sustained a recurrent dislocation. Overall, 31% of shoulders showed no evidence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis; 41% showed mild, 16% moderate, and 12% severe degenerative changes. Osteoarthritis did not correlate with Constant score results (P=.427). The grade of osteoarthritis was significantly associated with the number of preoperative dislocations (P=.016), age at initial dislocation (P=.005) and at surgery (P=.002), and the number of anchors used (P=.001), whereas time from initial dislocation to surgery (P=.854) and external rotation deficit at 0° and 90° of abduction (P=.104 and .348, respectively) showed no significant correlation. Recurrent dislocation did not affect the presence or grade of osteoarthritis (P=.796 and .665, respectively). At an average 13 years after arthroscopic Bankart repair, osteoarthritic changes are a common finding and, overall, are comparable with reports in the literature regarding open

  8. Arthroscopic Repair of Inferior Labrum From Anterior to Posterior Lesions Associated With Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder may arise spontaneously; however, recent evidence suggests that traumatic events may play a role in this syndrome. Variable degrees of injury around the circumference of the glenoid have been reported, ranging from Bankart and Kim lesions to 270° of injury and even 360° of injury. Hyperabduction injury may cause inferior subluxation of the shoulder and result in traumatic isolated injury to the inferior labrum from anterior to posterior. This particular lesion spans approximately 180° of the inferior hemisphere and may lead to symptomatic MDI. In contrast to open or arthroscopic plication procedures for atraumatic MDI without labral injury, the goal in these cases is anatomic arthroscopic repair of the inferior labrum tear without the need for capsular plication, volume reduction, or rotator interval closure. PMID:25685683

  9. Healing Childhood Trauma Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuban, Caelan

    2012-01-01

    Millions of the world's children are exposed to traumatic events and relationships every day. Whatever the cause, this overwhelming stress produces a host of unsettling symptoms and reactions. The author highlights six practical principles that undergird healing interventions.

  10. Healing Childhood Trauma Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuban, Caelan

    2012-01-01

    Millions of the world's children are exposed to traumatic events and relationships every day. Whatever the cause, this overwhelming stress produces a host of unsettling symptoms and reactions. The author highlights six practical principles that undergird healing interventions.

  11. Biomimetic Self-Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-21

    undesired transmission of energy to the living system. All organisms, from the smallest bacteria to the largest animals and trees, have different...amount of healing agent delivered (and healing), but also the peak energy before failure; the morphology of the catalyst particles;[69] and the use of...121] After cleaning the wound from bacteria and debris (phago- cytosed by white cells), growth factors are released from the platelets inducing

  12. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  13. Microorganisms in closed periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Abou-Rass, M; Bogen, G

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the microorganisms of strictly selected closed periapical lesions associated with both refractory endodontic therapy and pulpal calcification. Definitive criteria were established that assured complete clinical isolation of the periapical lesion from the oral and periodontal environment. A total of 13 criteria-referenced lesions were selected from 70 patients with endodontic surgical indications. A well controlled culturing method was used in all cases and samples were taken by one clinician at three separate sites during each surgery. Samples taken at the surgical window and within the body of the lesion served as controls, whilst a third sample was taken at the apex. In all 13 cases, samples taken from the apex yielded microorganisms comprising 63.6% obligate anaerobes and 36.4% facultative anaerobes. Prevalence of the isolated species was 31.8% for Actinomyces sp., 22.7% Propionibacterium sp., 18.2% Streptococcus sp., 13.6% Staphlyococcus sp., 4.6% Porphyromonas gingivalis, 4.6% Peptostreptococcus micros and 4.6% Gram-negative enterics. The results of this investigation indicate that closed periapical lesions associated with calcified teeth or those resistant to root canal treatment harbour bacteria. The inability to eradicate all root canal microorganisms during root canal treatment, along with anatomical factors, may allow further bacterial colonization of the root apex and surrounding periapical tissues, and consequently prevent healing.

  14. Connexins in wound healing; perspectives in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Becker, David L; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Anthony R J

    2012-08-01

    Skin lesions are common events and we have evolved to rapidly heal them in order to maintain homeostasis and prevent infection and sepsis. Most acute wounds heal without issue, but as we get older our bodies become compromised by poor blood circulation and conditions such as diabetes, leading to slower healing. This can result in stalled or hard-to-heal chronic wounds. Currently about 2% of the Western population develop a chronic wound and this figure will rise as the population ages and diabetes becomes more prevalent [1]. Patient morbidity and quality of life are profoundly altered by chronic wounds [2]. Unfortunately a significant proportion of these chronic wounds fail to respond to conventional treatment and can result in amputation of the lower limb. Life quality and expectancy following amputation is severely reduced. These hard to heal wounds also represent a growing economic burden on Western society with published estimates of costs to healthcare services in the region of $25B annually [3]. There exists a growing need for specific and effective therapeutic agents to improve healing in these wounds. In recent years the gap junction protein Cx43 has been shown to play a pivotal role early on in the acute wound healing process at a number of different levels [4-7]. Conversely, abnormal expression of Cx43 in wound edge keratinocytes was shown to underlie the poor rate of healing in diabetic rats, and targeting its expression with an antisense gel restored normal healing rates [8]. The presence of Cx43 in the wound edge keratinocytes of human chronic wounds has also been reported [9]. Abnormal Cx43 biology may underlie the poor healing of human chronic wounds and be amenable therapeutic intervention [7]. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  17. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn–soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0–30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0–13 and without paper sheets during d 14–30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1–5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually

  18. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn-soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0-30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0-13 and without paper sheets during d 14-30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1-5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually or rapidly

  19. Bone healing in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Buza, John A.; Einhorn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Delayed fracture healing and nonunion occurs in up to 5–10% of all fractures, and can present a challenging clinical scenario for the treating physician. Methods for the enhancement of skeletal repair may benefit patients that are at risk of, or have experienced, delayed healing or nonunion. These methods can be categorized into either physical stimulation therapies or biological therapies. Physical stimulation therapies include electrical stimulation, low-intensity pulsed ultrasonography, or extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Biological therapies can be further classified into local or systemic therapy based on the method of delivery. Local methods include autologous bone marrow, autologous bone graft, fibroblast growth factor-2, platelet-rich plasma, platelet-derived growth factor, and bone morphogenetic proteins. Systemic therapies include parathyroid hormone and bisphosphonates. This article reviews the current applications and supporting evidence for the use of these therapies in the enhancement of fracture healing. PMID:27920804

  20. Spirituality, healing and medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, D

    1991-01-01

    The natural science base of modern medicine influences the way in which medicine is delivered and may ignore the spiritual factors associated with illness. The history of spirituality in healing presented here reflects the growth of scientific knowledge, demands for religious renewal, and the shift in the understanding of the concept of health within a broader cultural context. General practitioners have been willing to entertain the idea of spiritual healing and include it in their daily practice, or referral network. Recognizing patients' beliefs in the face of suffering is an important factor in health care practice. PMID:1777299

  1. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-07-01

    Fracture healing is a complex process, and a significant number of fractures are complicated by impaired healing and non-union. Impaired healing is prevalent in certain risk groups, such as the elderly, osteoporotics, people with malnutrition, and women after menopause. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial in the treatment of fractures and could thus be a potentially new treatment option for induction of fracture healing in humans. Furthermore, fractures in animals with experimental conditions of impaired healing such as aging, estrogen withdrawal, and malnutrition can heal in an expedited manner after PTH treatment. Interestingly, fractures occurring at both cancellous and cortical sites can be treated successfully, indicating that both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic fractures can be the target of PTH-induced healing. Finally, the data suggest that PTH partly prevents the delay in fracture healing caused by aging. Recently, the first randomized, controlled clinical trial investigating the effect of PTH on fracture healing was published, indicating a possible clinical benefit of PTH treatment in inducing fracture healing. The aim of this article is therefore to review the evidence for the potential of PTH in bone healing, including the underlying mechanisms for this, and to provide recommendations for the clinical testing and use of PTH in the treatment of impaired fracture healing in humans.

  2. Arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation (ASA) versus open Latarjet to treat recurrent anterior shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: clinical comparison of two series.

    PubMed

    Russo, R; Della Rotonda, G; Cautiero, F; Ciccarelli, M; Maiotti, M; Massoni, C; Di Pietto, F; Zappia, M

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss is still debated. The purpose of this study is to compare short-term results of two techniques treating chronic shoulder instability with moderate glenoid bone loss: bone block according to open Latarjet-Patte procedure and arthroscopic Bankart repair in association with subscapularis augmentation. Ninety-one patients with moderate anterior glenoid bone loss underwent from 2011 to 2015. From these patients, two groups of 20 individuals each have been selected. The groups were homogeneous in terms of age, gender, dominance and glenoid bone loss. In group A, an open Latarjet procedure has been performed, and in group B, an arthroscopic Bankart repair associated with subscapularis augmentation has been performed. The mean follow-up in group A was 21 months (20-39 months), while in group B was 20 months (15-36 months). QuickDash score, Constant and Rowe shoulder scores, were used for evaluations of results. The mean preoperative rate of QuickDash score was 3.6 for group A and 4.0 for group B; Rowe Score was 50.0 for group A and 50.0 for group B. Preoperative mean Constant score was 56.2 for Latarjet-Patte and 55.2 for Bankart plus ASA. Postoperative mean QuickDash score was in group A 1.8 and 1.7 in group B; Rowe Score was 89.8 and 91.6; Constant Score was 93.3 and 93.8. No complications related to surgery have been observed for both procedures. Not statistically significant difference was reported between the two groups (p > .05). Postoperatively, the mean deficit of external rotation in ER1 was -9° in group A and -8 in group B; In ER2, the mean deficit was -5° in both groups (p = .0942). Arthroscopic subscapularis augmentation of Bankart repair is an effective procedure for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss without any significant difference in comparison with the well-known open Latarjet procedure.

  3. Open Bankart Repair for the Treatment of Anterior Shoulder Instability without Substantial Osseous Glenoid Defects: Results After a Minimum Follow-up of Twenty Years.

    PubMed

    Moroder, Philipp; Odorizzi, Marco; Pizzinini, Severino; Demetz, Ernst; Resch, Herbert; Moroder, Peter

    2015-09-02

    Neglected osseous glenoid defects are thought to be one of the reasons for the reported high rates of recurrent instability at long-term follow-up after Bankart repair. We hypothesized that open Bankart repair for the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability in the absence of a substantial osseous glenoid defect would result in a lower long-term recurrence rate than has been reported in previous long-term studies. Forty-seven patients were treated with a primary modified open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior shoulder instability between 1989 and 1994. Double-contrast computed tomography scanning was used to exclude patients with a substantial osseous glenoid defect. Forty patients (85.1%) were available for subjective and objective follow-up at a minimum of twenty years (maximum, twenty-five years). Twenty-six patients (65%) underwent clinical examination as well as bilateral shoulder radiography, and fourteen (35%) completed a self-assessment questionnaire and were interviewed by telephone. Seven patients (17.5%) had a recurrence of instability, and six of them had the instability occur after more than eight years without symptoms. The mean Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index score (and standard deviation) was 256.7 ± 284.8 points; the mean Rowe score, 88.7 ± 12.0 points; and the mean Subjective Shoulder Value, 90.1% ± 10.5%.The mean range of motion of the affected shoulder was decreased by 4° of abduction (p = 0.009), two levels of internal rotation (p = 0.003), 5° of internal rotation in 90° of abduction (p = 0.005), 7° of external rotation in neutral position (p < 0.001), and 7° of external rotation in 90° of abduction (p = 0.004) compared with the contralateral side. The collective instability arthropathy (CIA) index was 0.92 for the affected side and 0.35 for the contralateral side. Open Bankart repair provides good results twenty years after surgery in terms of subjective and objective outcome measurements. However, the long

  4. Bone fragment union and remodeling after arthroscopic bony bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability with a glenoid defect: influence on postoperative recurrence of instability.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Mae, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Although good clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, the extent of bone union is still unclear. To investigate bone union after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair and its influence on postoperative recurrence of instability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 113 consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, postoperative evaluation of bone union by computed tomography (CT) was performed at various times in 81 shoulders. Bone union was investigated during 3 periods: 3 to 6 months postoperatively (first period), 7 to 12 months postoperatively (second period), and 13 months or more postoperatively (third period). The influence of the size of the preoperative glenoid defect and the size of the bone fragment on bone union was investigated, as well as the influence of bone union on postoperative recurrence of instability. In shoulders with bone union, bone fragment remodeling and changes in the glenoid defect size were also investigated. The bone union rate was 30.5% in the first period, 55.3% in the second period, and 84.6% in the third period. Among 53 shoulders with CT evaluation in the second period or later and follow-up for a minimum of 1 year, there was complete union in 33 shoulders (62.3%), partial union in 3 (5.7%), nonunion in 8 (15.1%), and no fragment on CT in 9 (17.0%). The complete union rate was 50% for 22 shoulders with small bone fragments (<5% of the glenoid diameter), 56.3% for 16 shoulders with medium fragments (5%-10%), and 86.7% for 15 shoulders with large fragments (>10%). The recurrence rate for postoperative instability was only 6.1% for shoulders with complete union, while it was 50% for shoulders with partial union, nonunion, no fragment, and no fragment on CT. The recurrence rate was significantly higher (36.4%) in shoulders with small fragments, but it was significantly lower in shoulders with bone union. In shoulders with bone union, the bone fragment frequently became

  5. Scarless fetal healing. Therapeutic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to call attention to the fetal wound healing process as a blueprint for ideal tissue repair. Wound healing in the fetus is fundamentally different from healing in the adult. Fetal tissue repair occurs rapidly and in the absence of scar formation. Because scarring and fibrosis dominate some diseases in every area of medicine, an understanding of fetal wound healing should help develop therapeutic strategies to avert the devastating consequences of excessive scar formation. PMID:1731647

  6. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  7. Educators Healing Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quisenberry, Nancy L., Ed.; McIntyre, D. John, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays on racism and the role of teachers in healing racism. There are three sections with nine papers. After an "Introduction" (D. John McIntyre), Section 1, "Historical Perspectives," includes: (1) "Racism in Education" (Gwendolyn Duhon Boudreaux, Rose Duhon-Sells, Alice Duhon-Ross, and Halloway C. Sells); and…

  8. Healing Magazine, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBiase, Miriam H., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newly designed volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue shares information on guiding children through times of trauma, particularly after the events of September 11th. Two articles provide information on debriefing after trauma…

  9. Microdeformation in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Cornelia; White, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces greatly influence cellular organization and behavior. Cells respond to applied stress by changes in form and composition until a suitable state is reestablished. However, without any mechanical stimuli cells stop proliferating, discontinue migration, go into cell-cycle arrest, and eventually die. Hence, one can assume that pathologies closely depending on cell migration like cancer or atherosclerosis might be governed by biophysical parameters. Moreover, mechanical cues will have fundamental effects in wound healing. Especially negative pressure wound therapy has the potential to endorse wound healing by induction of both macrodeformation (wound contraction) and microdeformation (tissue reactions at microscopic level). So far, the capacity for researchers to study the link between mechanical stimulation and biological response has been limited by the lack of instrumentation capable of stimulating the tissue in an appropriate manner. However, first reports on application of micromechanical forces to wounds elucidate the roles of cell stretch, substrate stiffness, and tissue deformation during cell proliferation and differentiation. This review deals with their findings and tries to establish a link between the current knowledge and the questions that are essential to clinicians in the field: What is the significance of mirodeformations for wound healing? Does "dead space" impede propagation of mechanical cues? How can microdeformations induce cell proliferation? What role do fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and mesenchymal stem cells play in chronic wounds with regard to micromechanical forces? © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. [Pathophysiology of healing].

    PubMed

    Armendáriz, Mar Pastor; Hernández, F Javier Domínguez; Caro, Pedro Bas; González, Pedro Pablo Herrera; Mota, Salvador Postigo; Corral, Juan Carlos López

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of wounds is part of the daily practice of the nursing staff and the knowledge of the physiology of healing, as well as modern treatment techniques are of great importance to provide the most effective and rapid healing method. The response of living tissues to injury constitutes the basis for understanding the process of healing. A reset of the total or partial integrity of tissues is part of a basic response. An alteration of the barrier of tissues can cause a loss of homeostasis generating a State of systemic hipermetabolism. Therefore, any wound caused a discontinuity of epithelium covering the body, triggers a cascade of events in a process to achieve that protection barrier will not disintegrate. These events will allow the regeneration of the tissue that has suffered the injury; forming a scar tissue that has the ability to maintain the barrier protection and support of the elements that it protects. Defined as scarring, to a natural repair process ofa wound by forming a scar. It is important to make a reminder of how you act reparative physiological mechanisms i.e. the cascade of healing processes, it is important to take into account these repair mechanisms to know the basis of how tissues work so you can assess and diagnose the alterations to this patient, in order to apply a right and proper treatment according to the needs of the patient.

  11. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  12. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  13. Bruise healing - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Indications URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100207.htm Bruise healing - series—Indications To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 3 Go to slide 2 ...

  14. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  15. Indigenous Healing Legacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliman, Valerie

    2001-01-01

    On a tour of Cuba, Native scholars from North and South America reconnected with the "extinct" Taino people and shared their knowledge of traditional healing herbs. Western science is just beginning to validate the tremendous knowledge base that indigenous healers have developed--most indigenous medicinal knowledge is useful for finding…

  16. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  17. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of collagen. So they're tougher and less flexible than the skin around them. Caring for Serious Wounds at Home Serious wounds don't heal overnight. It can take weeks for the body to build new tissue. So after you leave ...

  18. Indigenous Healing Legacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliman, Valerie

    2001-01-01

    On a tour of Cuba, Native scholars from North and South America reconnected with the "extinct" Taino people and shared their knowledge of traditional healing herbs. Western science is just beginning to validate the tremendous knowledge base that indigenous healers have developed--most indigenous medicinal knowledge is useful for finding…

  19. Healing Racism: Education's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutstein, Nathan, Ed.; Morgan, Michael, Ed.

    The 16 essays in this collection address how to lessen the effects of racism through classroom education by emphasizing the oneness of humanity and the relatedness of all human beings. These selections offer advice about healing racism from the early grades through secondary education. The essays are: (1) "Racism as a Disease" (John Woodall); (2)…

  20. Healing Racism: Education's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutstein, Nathan, Ed.; Morgan, Michael, Ed.

    The 16 essays in this collection address how to lessen the effects of racism through classroom education by emphasizing the oneness of humanity and the relatedness of all human beings. These selections offer advice about healing racism from the early grades through secondary education. The essays are: (1) "Racism as a Disease" (John Woodall); (2)…

  1. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  2. Estrogen enhances wound healing in the penis of rats.

    PubMed

    Mowa, C N; Hoch, R; Montavon, C L; Jesmin, S; Hindman, G; Hou, G

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta and aromatase are expressed in various cell-types and compartments of the penis, including the epidermis of glans penis. Here, we hypothesize that estrogen helps maintain the viability and integrity of glans penis and test the hypothesis by treating lesioned glans penis with either 17beta-estradiol or vehicle only. Estrogen was found to facilitate wound healing and increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunoreactivity compared to control, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry. We conclude that estrogen plays a role in maintaining glans penis integrity, in part, by facilitating penile healing, possibly via up-regulating VEGF levels.

  3. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  4. [Chastity and healing power].

    PubMed

    Kudlien, F

    1984-01-01

    The idea of a connection between chastity and healing power is to be found as well in primitive cultures as in ethnomedicine and in the medicine of Antiquity. What is meant in the Hippocratic Oath, though, is not the sexual restraint of the physician himself, but moreover in the attitude towards his patient and all the people living in the same house with the patient. This is different, though, in ethnomedicine, where the healer is demanded to live sexually abstinent for a certain time and the persons assisting him are often expected to stay untouched, i.e. chaste. "Chastity", however, as conceived by the Ancient Greek and Roman meant the integrity of marital faith. The urine of women who were chaste in this sense was believed to have healing powers. Furthermore mention is made of an African tribe, of which it was said that its members originating definitely from this tribe only, were immune against the bite of snakes and therefore had a special capacity of healing bitten persons. Ethnomedicine, on the other side, attributes great power to those who lead an unchaste life as well as to illegitimately born children. We are here confronted with an ambiguity inherent in popular imagination of disease and healing. A figure of German poetry of the Middle Ages "Der Arme Heinrich" by Hartmann von Aue, f.i., is in search of the heartblood from a young, freeborn maiden which is to cure him from leprosy. In many cases objects used by virgins or unmarried men were believed to have healing powers. Especially the imagination of epilepsy and orgasm being related to each other, lead to the claim for sexual abstinence of the patient, yes, even for his castration. On the other hand, however, epileptics were recommended to have sexual intercourse. Fasting, sometimes together with sexual abstinence, was considered to be important for the healer and as well for the patient to be cured. Plants were given in order to lead to sexual abstinence. In primitive cultures the imagination of

  5. Extraoral sinus tract misdiagnosed as an endodontic lesion.

    PubMed

    Cohenca, Nestor; Karni, Sunil; Rotstein, Ilan

    2003-12-01

    The extraoral sinus tract may occur as a result of an inflammatory process associated with a necrotic pulp. However, several non-odontogenic disorders may also produce an extraoral sinus tract. Thus, the differential diagnosis of this clinical finding is of paramount importance in providing appropriate clinical care because misdiagnosis of this condition may result in healing failure or unnecessary treatment. This case report of a 19-yr-old male patient describes an extraoral cutaneous sinus tract misdiagnosed as an endodontic lesion. Consequently, the patient underwent unnecessary exploratory procedures and antibiotic therapy. Identification of the inflammatory source of the lesion and removal of the affected tissue led to tissue healing.

  6. Definition and evaluation of mucosal healing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mazzuoli, Silvia; Guglielmi, Francesco W; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Salemme, Marianna; Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2013-12-01

    Since the introduction of biological therapy, endoscopic and histological remission, i.e. mucosal healing, has become an important therapeutic goal in Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. Mucosal healing is associated with lower rates of hospitalization and surgery, although its role in preventing progression and changing the natural history of the disease has not been clearly demonstrated. A precise definition of mucosal healing has not yet been established, although the concept used in clinical trials is the "complete absence of all inflammatory and ulcerative lesions in all segments of gut" at endoscopy. This definition does not include mucosal improvement and does not distinguish among grades of mucosal healing. In both Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis trials, several qualitative and quantitative numeric endoscopic indices have been proposed to measure and distinguish endoscopic changes. In addition, the microscopic features associated with inflammatory bowel diseases are considerably modified by the course of the disease and the treatments adopted. However, it is not yet clear whether microscopic healing should be a primary endpoint in clinical trials. In this paper we discuss endoscopic and histological findings and the limitations of the endoscopic and histological indices as a basis for a standardised diagnosis of mucosal healing. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-healing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional structure fabricated from a self-healing polymeric material, comprising poly(ester amides) obtained from ethylene glycol, azelaic acid and 1,1-aminoundecanoic acid, wherein polymeric material has a melt index above 2.5 g/10 min. as determined by ASTM D1238 at 190.degree. C. and 2.16kg, impact resistance and ductility sufficient to resist cracking and brittle fracture upon impact by a 9 mm bullet fired at a temperature of about 29.degree. C. at subsonic speed in a range from about 800 feet/sec to about 1000 feet/sec. It has been determined that the important factors necessary for self-healing behavior of polymers include sufficient impact strength, control of the degree of crystallinity, low melting point and the ability to instantly melt at impacted area.

  8. Understanding traditional African healing

    PubMed Central

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists. PMID:26594664

  9. The Fragility of Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lawlor, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This article explores a paradox—the simultaneous cultivation and suppression of “healing dramas” by pediatric rehabilitation therapists. Dramatic moments are defined as ones in which the routine exercises and treatment activities of therapeutic practice are transformed into narrative plots. These improvisational plots involve multiple characters, risks, suspense, and above all, a heightened sense that something is at stake. Experience itself becomes the focus of attention for the patient. Based upon ethnographic research in Chicago and Los Angeles, this article offers an anatomy of two such moments, investigating not only how healing dramas are constructed between patients and healers but how and why institutional discourses and practices invite their abandonment. PMID:20930950

  10. Wound healing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tisi, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases (CuAO) and flavin-containing amine oxidases (PAO) are hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of polyamines. Currently, a key role has been ascribed to apoplastic amine oxidases in plants, i.e., to behave as H2O2-delivering systems in the cell wall during cell growth and differentiation as well as in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Indeed, H2O2 is the co-substrate for the peroxidase-driven reactions during cell-wall maturation and a key signalling molecule in defence mechanisms. We recently demonstrated the involvement of an apoplastic PAO in the wound-healing process of the Zea mays mesocotyl. Experimental evidence indicated a similar role for an apoplastic PAO in Nicotiana tabacum. In this addendum we suggest that a CuAO activity is also involved in this healing event. PMID:19704660

  11. Understanding traditional African healing.

    PubMed

    Mokgobi, M G

    2014-09-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists.

  12. Biomimetic Self-Healing.

    PubMed

    Diesendruck, Charles E; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S; White, Scott R

    2015-09-01

    Self-healing is a natural process common to all living organisms which provides increased longevity and the ability to adapt to changes in the environment. Inspired by this fitness-enhancing functionality, which was tuned by billions of years of evolution, scientists and engineers have been incorporating self-healing capabilities into synthetic materials. By mimicking mechanically triggered chemistry as well as the storage and delivery of liquid reagents, new materials have been developed with extended longevity that are capable of restoring mechanical integrity and additional functions after being damaged. This Review describes the fundamental steps in this new field of science, which combines chemistry, physics, materials science, and mechanical engineering. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Femoral Strength after Induced Lesions in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Belill, Kathryn A; Settle, Timothy L; Angel, C Roselina; Kim, Seon-Woo; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Rats are a common model for the study of bone healing, with the cranium, femur, and tibia being the bones studied most frequently. This study examines noncritical-sized lesions that would allow rats to continue to bear weight without the need for fixation but that are sufficiently large to enable characterization of the healing process. We compared the femoral bone strength associated with 3 lesion sizes selected for use in future studies. Sprague–Dawley rats (age, 10 to 16 wk) were used to assess the ultimate breaking strength, stress, and break force of normal, unmanipulated femurs. We then created lesions of 3 different sizes in the mid- to distal diaphysis of the left and right femurs and characterized the associated decreases in bone strength. Femurs (n= 85) for this study were collected through tissue sharing from rats used in other acute surgical procedures and were tested by using a 3-point bending flexural materials-testing machine. Our hypothesis was that, as a model for bone healing, 3 induced lesions of different sizes would show incremental and proportional decreases in femoral strength, with the intermediate-sized (1.5-mm) lesion demonstrating a decrease of 20% to 40%. A lesion of 1.5 mm yielded a decrease in strength of 17% for both the left and right femurs. The strength of left femurs carrying intermediate lesions was significantly less than that of control, uninjured femur bones. In addition to providing validation for our own future bone-healing project, these data are a useful baseline for other investigators studying bone healing in a rat femur model. PMID:24956210

  14. Postoperative evaluation of drill holes for arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors by the use of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahito; Goto, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Masahiro; Nishimori, Yasuhiro; Takenaga, Tetsuya; Murase, Atsunori; Nagaya, Yuko; Iguchi, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sugimoto, Katsumasa; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2015-05-01

    Here we investigated the angle and placement of bone holes for suture anchors using postoperative computed-tomography scapula scans. The study group comprised 20 shoulders from 20 consecutive patients (13 males and seven females; mean age 23.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair. All anchors were inserted through the anterior portal after establishing a bone hole at the edge of the glenoid articular surface using a drill. Computed tomography images of the scapula were taken 1 month postoperatively and used to create three-dimensional scapula models with Mimics and Magics software. Bone holes in the anterior-inferior (3:00-6:00) position were assigned either to the non-perforated group if they were positioned entirely inside the glenoid bone or to the perforated group if the far cortex of the glenoid was penetrated by the drill. The angle between the glenoid articular surface and the bone hole was measured in the oblique coronal and transverse plane views. The length of the bone hole was also assessed. Of the 85 bone holes investigated, 42 were in the 3:00-6:00 position. Perforation was detected in 16 of these 42 holes (38.2%). The angle in the oblique coronal plane view and the length of the bone hole were significantly larger in the non-perforated group than in the perforated group; however, the angle in the transverse plane view did not significantly differ between the two groups. Before inserting an implant in the anterior-inferior area, the angle between the drill guide and the glenoid surface in the oblique coronal plane view should be carefully checked to ensure that the length of the hole inside the glenoid bone is adequate.

  15. Self-healing minefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolader, Glenn E.; Rogers, John; Batteh, Jad

    2004-07-01

    The Self Healing Minefield (SHM) is comprised of a networked system of mobile anti-tank landmines. When the mines detect a breach, each calculates an appropriate response, and some fire small rockets to "hop" into the breach path, healing the breach. The purpose of the SHM is to expand the capabilities of traditional obstacles and provide an effective anti-tank obstacle that does not require Anti-Personnel (AP) submunitions. The DARPA/ATO sponsored program started in June 2000 and culminated in a full 100-unit demonstration at Fort Leonard Wood, MO in April 2003. That program went from "a concept" to a prototype system demonstration in approximately 21 months and to a full tactically significant demonstration in approximately 33 months. Significant accomplishments included the following: (1) Demonstration of a working, scalable (order of a hundred nodes), ad hoc, self-healing RF network. (2) Demonstration of an innovative distributed time synchronization scheme that does not rely on GPS. (3) Demonstration of a non-GPS based, self-mapping, relative geolocation system. (4) Development of an innovative distributed safe, arm, and fire system that allows for independent firing of eight rockets within a single node. (5) Development of a small rocket design with a novel geometry that meets the propulsion requirements.

  16. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    PubMed

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the wound healing and non-healing wound of skin in the past 30 years. This review mainly focuses on the molecular biology of many cytokines (including growth factors) and other molecular factors such as extracellular matrix (ECM) on wound healing. The molecular biology in cell movement such as epidermal cells in wound healing was also discussed. Moreover many common chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot wounds, venous stasis ulcers, etc. usually deteriorate into non-healing wounds. Therefore the molecular biology such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and other molecular factors in diabetes non-healing wounds were also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Social facilitation of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Detillion, Courtney E; Craft, Tara K S; Glasper, Erica R; Prendergast, Brian J; DeVries, A Courtney

    2004-09-01

    It is well documented that psychological stress impairs wound healing in humans and rodents. However, most research effort into influences on wound healing has focused on factors that compromise, rather than promote, healing. In the present study, we determined if positive social interaction, which influences hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in social rodents, promotes wound healing. Siberian hamsters received a cutaneous wound and then were exposed to immobilization stress. Stress increased cortisol concentrations and impaired wound healing in isolated, but not socially housed, hamsters. Removal of endogenous cortisol via adrenalectomy eliminated the effects of stress on wound healing in isolated hamsters. Treatment of isolated hamsters with oxytocin (OT), a hormone released during social contact and associated with social bonding, also blocked stress-induced increases in cortisol concentrations and facilitated wound healing. In contrast, treating socially housed hamsters with an OT antagonist delayed wound healing. Taken together, these data suggest that social interactions buffer against stress and promote wound healing through a mechanism that involves OT-induced suppression of the HPA axis. The data imply that social isolation impairs wound healing, whereas OT treatment may ameliorate some effects of social isolation on health.

  18. The Advantages of Traditional Chumash Healing

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Chumash healing has been practiced in California for ∼13 000 years. Chumash healers treat their patients with prayer, laughter, dreaming, phytotherapy, aromatherapy, healing ceremonies and other techniques. Healing involves first healing the spirit, then healing the body. Chumash people still maintain their unique identity. Chumash Healers still practice the ancient healing arts in California. This lecture is a brief introduction to Chumash Healing. PMID:15841273

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and subscapularis augmentation: an alternative technique treating anterior shoulder instability with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Maiotti, Marco; Russo, Raffaele; Zanini, Antonio; Schröter, Steffen; Massoni, Carlo; Bianchedi, Diana

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the preliminary results of a new arthroscopic technique consisting of the association of 2 procedures, capsulolabral repair and subscapularis augmentation tenodesis, in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability with both glenoid bone loss and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Eighty-nine patients engaged in sports were enrolled in this retrospective case-series study with 2 to 5 years' follow-up. All patients underwent a computed tomography scan to assess the percentage of glenoid bone loss by the Pico method. A prior stabilization procedure had failed in 20 patients, who were then segregated into a different group. Visual analog scale (VAS), Rowe, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess the results. Only 3 of 89 patients had a post-traumatic redislocation. The mean length of follow-up was 31.5 months (range, 25-60 months). The VAS, Rowe, and ASES scores showed significant improvements: The VAS score decreased from a mean of 3.1 to 0.5 (P = .0157), the Rowe score increased from 58.9 to 94.1 (P = .0215), and the ASES score increased from 68.5 to 95.5 (P = .0197). The mean deficit of external rotation was 6° with the arm at the side of the trunk, and the mean deficit was 3° with the arm in 90° of abduction. The described procedure is a reproducible and effective technique used to restore joint stability in patients engaged in sports who have incurred anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation associated with glenoid bone loss (<25%) and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oesophageal function before, during, and after healing of erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F; Ferrarini, F; Longanesi, A; Angeloni, M; Ragazzini, M; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between oesophageal motor abnormalities and oesophagitis, we carried out four hour studies of oesophageal motility and 24 hour pH measurements in fasting and fed conditions in eight patients before, during (pH only), and after medical healing of erosive oesophagitis. Gastrooesophageal acid reflux decreased (ns) during the treatment, but tended to return to basal values at the end. Oesophageal body motility was unchanged after healing, while the lower oesophageal sphincter basal tone was significantly increased at the end of the study in the postcibal period. The results suggest that the impairment of the sphincter tone in reflux oesophagitis is secondary to the presence of the oesophageal lesions. Macroscopic healing is not paralleled by improved major pathogenic factors of the disease, however--that is, acid reflux and oesophageal body motility. PMID:3345925

  1. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  2. Wound Healing and Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Takeo, Makoto; Lee, Wendy; Ito, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    The skin is a complex organ consisting of the epidermis, dermis, and skin appendages, including the hair follicle and sebaceous gland. Wound healing in adult mammals results in scar formation without any skin appendages. Studies have reported remarkable examples of scarless healing in fetal skin and appendage regeneration in adult skin following the infliction of large wounds. The models used in these studies have offered a new platform for investigations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying wound healing and skin regeneration in mammals. In this article, we will focus on the contribution of skin appendages to wound healing and, conversely, skin appendage regeneration following injuries. PMID:25561722

  3. Crack Healing in Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-17

    have shown experimentally and theoretically that Y - t°m° (24) YM ,. No (25) such that Y remains constant during healing and fracture. The number of...chains per unit volume, Nv., is Nv W (26) where p is the density and Na is Avogadros number. The strain energy density per chain, Uc, is therefore...force f = ol dl/dt, from the integral of fdl, as dlUp= I PoI(’i)dl (30) 4. where io is the monomer friction coefficient and dl/dt is a constant pull-out

  4. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  5. Wound Healing Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-15

    parallel groups of rats, that is. we found no evidence of stimulator( s ) or inhibitor( s ) in the sera of normal or shafr- hepatectomized dogs , but we...the dog was without insulin for 7 days. (continued next page) P5 P 107 , S .= P. ,, F. influenc@ of Clofbrate anc 4&feno. r o-" L ve’ G’owtO ’c 1...WM-103 400 WOUND HEALING STUDIES(U) ALBERT EINSTEIN COLL OF 1/2 MEDICINE BRONX NY S N LEVENSON 15 NOV 86I DADA±-76-C-BBBS UNCLAISSIFIED F/G 6/14 M

  6. Children's cranial lesions from Neolithic.

    PubMed

    Shbat, A; Smrcka, V

    2009-01-01

    In skeletal material from the neolithic settlement at Makotrasy, county Kladno, were analysed two children's craniums (identification numbers Ao 8218 and Ao 4184) with pathological cases. Case 1 (Object 127, Ao 8218) is the individual about 4 to 5 years old. There is oval aperture with the diameter 25 x 20 mm in the area of anthropometrical point bregma, with vertical, multiple knurled edges. Bevelled and rounded segment in the left frontal part of the aperture with diameter 10 mm is imitating healing process. We suggest this case is the trephination with the marks of the healing process in the period of 1 to 2 weeks after the surgery took over. Case 2 (Pit 25, Ao 4184) is child with age determined about 4 years old. Cranium was found buried separately. There is oval defect located at os occipitale and os parietale sin and goes through sutura lambdoidea. Caudal part of defect is missing. The edge of the defect is sharp and inward bevelled with exposed diploe. Traces of any vital reaction were not identified. Diameter is around 50 mm. Perimortal trephination leading to death, or postmortal taking of the trephinational amulet must be considered. There were several pathological lesions on the same skull. Defect of oval shape sized 8 x 12 mm is located at the os parietale dex. Defect interferes mostly with lamina externa and less with lamina interna. Exposed diploe is without any vital reaction.

  7. Meniscal repair by synovial flap transfer. Healing of the avascular zone in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cisa, J; Basora, J; Madarnas, P; Ghibely, A; Navarro-Quilis, A

    1995-02-01

    We studied repair of a longitudinal incision of the right medial meniscus in 44 rabbits after the transfer of a pedunculated synovial flap, without immobilization of the knee. The left medial meniscus was used as the control, after creating the same lesion without synovial flap. Healing was analyzed by histologic studies, including India ink perfusion after 8, 12, 24, and 48 weeks. In three quarters of the cases, the meniscus showed healing with vascularization of an originally avascular zone.

  8. Humor's healing potential.

    PubMed

    Seaward, B L

    1992-04-01

    In the past three decades the medical world has begun to take more serious notice of the healing power of humor and the positive emotions associated with it. Humor and laughter are currently being employed by psychotherapists and other care givers as tools to promote and maintain health, as well as intervention and rehabilitation tools for a host of maladies and illnesses related to stress and life-style. Although this empirical medical approach is relatively new, the study of humor has revealed a complex psychological phenomenon. Senses of humor have been categorized in types associated with personality. Humor has many styles and can be found in almost any situation, on any occasion. Theories of humor include the superiority theory, the incongruity theory, the release/relief theory, and the divinity theory. Laughter has many clinical benefits, promoting beneficial physiological changes and an overall sense of well-being. Humor even has long-term effects that strengthen the effectiveness of the immune system. In healthcare, humor therapy can help relieve stress associated with disease and illness. It serves as a diversionary tactic, a therapeutic tool for disorders such as depression, and a coping mechanism. It also is a natural healing component for care givers trying to cope with the stress and personal demands of their occupations.

  9. Adapting traditional healing practices.

    PubMed

    Weiser, J

    1999-01-01

    The Aboriginal people in Canada have been noted to have low self-esteem, subsequently increasing their risk of HIV. To this effect, two traditional healing practices are being used to help these people avoid HIV infection, and to live more healthily and positively if they are infected. The first method is the Medicine Wheel, which is a traditional model used to represent the complex interrelationship among all living things and show how their immune system is physically affected by their emotions and worries. Many Aboriginal AIDS Organizations, counselors and others are now using this AIDS teaching Wheel model. Meanwhile, the second method is the Sharing Circles, which provide an environment where people feel safe to talk about HIV and give participants a sense of support and a means for expression without stigma or judgement. As a result, many people who attend HIV circles begin to take better care of themselves and of others. Overall, it is emphasized that these traditional healing practices can be effectively adapted for use in HIV counseling and education.

  10. The isolation of Phoma eupyrena from a human lesion.

    PubMed

    Bakerspigel, A; Lowe, D; Rostas, A

    1981-06-01

    A strain of the soil-borne fungus Phoma eupyrena was isolated from the skin of an 18-month-old boy who had a crusting, erythematous, perioral eruption of one month's duration. Treatment with clotrimazole, 15% zinc oxide paste, and dimethicone resulted in eradication of the fungus and in complete healing of the lesions in eight weeks.

  11. Bone Healing: Little Secrets

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to stimulate bone repair, heal non-unions, or restore lost segments of bone is a common goal among orthopaedic surgeons, trauma surgeons, and scientists who investigate wound healing responses. The stimulation of bone repair has been reported using biophysical means such as electromagnetic fields, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave therapy. Reported studies on the use of these modalities suggest beneficial effects but the quality of the evidence and high between-study heterogeneity leave the impact of these biophysical stimuli on bone repair uncertain. New biotechnologies to enhance skeletal repair have focused on growth factors, osteoinductive molecules, and, more recently, autologous adult bone marrow stem cells. Recent randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials using recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-2 for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures, and platelet-derived growth factor for the treatment of ankle fractures have yielded potentially interesting results. More data are needed to confirm these findings. Investigations using prostaglandin EP-2 receptor agonists to enhance tibia shaft fracture healing are also under way. Clinicians and scientists have utilized autologous bone marrow for over a century. Unprocessed preparations have shown uneven results with regard to their ability to enhance bone repair. Recent data, however, demonstrating the use of autologous bone marrow stem cells in a concentrated manner have been very encouraging. Injection of bone marrow aspirate concentrate into non-unions and in conjunction with local bone for the enhancement of spinal fusion have shown impressive results. Perhaps the most well-investigated biotechnology for the enhancement of bone repair is the use of the bone morphogenetic proteins. BMP-2 and BMP-7 are now available as recombinant molecules and have been evaluated in both spinal and long-bone trauma applications. RhBMP-2 has demonstrated efficacy in the enhancement

  12. Bioglass Activated Skin Tissue Engineering Constructs for Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongfei; Peng, Jinliang; Xu, Yuhong; Chang, Jiang; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-13

    Wound healing is a complicated process, and fibroblast is a major cell type that participates in the process. Recent studies have shown that bioglass (BG) can stimulate fibroblasts to secrete a multitude of growth factors that are critical for wound healing. Therefore, we hypothesize that BG can stimulate fibroblasts to have a higher bioactivity by secreting more bioactive growth factors and proteins as compared to untreated fibroblasts, and we aim to construct a bioactive skin tissue engineering graft for wound healing by using BG activated fibroblast sheet. Thus, the effects of BG on fibroblast behaviors were studied, and the bioactive skin tissue engineering grafts containing BG activated fibroblasts were applied to repair the full skin lesions on nude mouse. Results showed that BG stimulated fibroblasts to express some critical growth factors and important proteins including vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, collagen I, and fibronectin. In vivo results revealed that fibroblasts in the bioactive skin tissue engineering grafts migrated into wound bed, and the migration ability of fibroblasts was stimulated by BG. In addition, the bioactive BG activated fibroblast skin tissue engineering grafts could largely increase the blood vessel formation, enhance the production of collagen I, and stimulate the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts in the wound site, which would finally accelerate wound healing. This study demonstrates that the BG activated skin tissue engineering grafts contain more critical growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that are beneficial for wound healing as compared to untreated fibroblast cell sheets.

  13. Hemicellulose dressing for skin lesions caused by herpes zoster in a patient with leukemia-an alternative dressing.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Julieta; Ferreira, Lydia

    2009-01-01

     Herpes zoster is a painful disease that can develop in immunosuppressed children. Prolonged immunosuppression in leukemia patients can substantially delay healing of herpetic lesions. The purpose of this report was to evaluate the use of hemicellulose dressings as an alternative treatment for extensive herpetic lesions in an immunosuppressed child with leukemia. The hemicellulose dressing was applied to the lesions on the second day after debridement. After 36 days, the lesions were completely healed. The hemicellulose dressing was an effective resource for promoting complete epithelial healing.

  14. The Healing Power of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Anthos, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    This teacher believes that art has the power to heal, or at least aid in the healing process. After the terrorist attacks on 9/11, her students needed some way to express the injustice they felt. They discussed the attacks, and had some free drawing to release it from their system. They even did some patriotic-themed projects to boost their…

  15. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    PubMed

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  16. Depressive illness and Navajo healing.

    PubMed

    Storck, M; Csordas, T J; Strauss, M

    2000-12-01

    What is the experience of Navajo patients in Navajo religious healing who, by the criteria and in the vernacular of contemporary psychiatry, would be diagnosed with the disorder called depression? We ask this question in the context of a double dialogue between psychiatry and anthropology and between these disciplines' academic constructs of illness and those of contemporary Navajos. The dialogue is conducted in the arena of patient narratives, providing a means for observing and explicating processes of therapeutic change in individuals, for illustrating variations in forms of Navajo religious healing sought out by patients demonstrating similar symptoms of distress, and for considering the heuristic utility of psychiatric diagnoses and nomenclature in the conceptualization of illness, recovery, and religious healing. From among the 37 percent of patients participating in the Navajo Healing Project who had a lifetime history of a major depressive illness, three are discussed herein, their selection based on two criteria: (1) all met formal psychiatric diagnostic criteria for a major depressive episode at the time of their healing ceremonies, and (2) together, their experiences illustrate the range of contemporary Navajo religious healing, including Traditional, Native American Church (NAC), and Christian forms. We suggest that, despite the explicit role of the sacred in religious healing interventions available to Navajo patients, differences between biomedical and religious healing systems may be of less significance than their shared existential engagement of problems such as those glossed as depression.

  17. Stabilized Hemoglobin Wound Healing Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    tissue oxygen capacitance after hyperbaric oxygen therapy: a new physiologic concept. Plast. Reconstruc. Surg.; 99: 148-155 8 4. Mustoe, T. 2004...Wound healing essentials: let there be oxygen. Wound Repair Regen, 17: 1-18 6. Chambers A.C. and Leaper D.J. 2011. Role of oxygen in wound healing: a

  18. Our Pathway toward Healing Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honour, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Robert Honour, Training and Staff Development Manager, at the Fairfax, Virginia, Department of Family Services (DFS), reports on the outcome of "Healing Racism" training at his organization. Participants in "Healing Racism Institutes" are transforming relationships and creating an organizational culture that…

  19. Self-healing biomaterials(3)

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Craig, Stephen L.; Reichert, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be considered zeroth generation self-healing materials, then taxonomically-speaking, first generation self-healing materials describe approaches that “halt” and “fill” damage, whereas second generation self-healing materials strive to “fully restore” the pre-failed material structure. In spite of limited commercial use to date, primarily because the technical details have not been suitably optimized, it is likely from a practical standpoint that first generation approaches will be the first to be employed commercially, whereas second generation approaches may take longer to implement. For self-healing biomaterials the optimization of technical considerations is further compounded by the additional constraints of toxicity and biocompatibility, necessitating inclusion of separate discussions of design criteria for self-healing biomaterials. PMID:21171168

  20. Our Pathway toward Healing Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honour, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Robert Honour, Training and Staff Development Manager, at the Fairfax, Virginia, Department of Family Services (DFS), reports on the outcome of "Healing Racism" training at his organization. Participants in "Healing Racism Institutes" are transforming relationships and creating an organizational culture that…

  1. How Stitches Help Kids Heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? How Stitches Help Kids Heal KidsHealth > For Kids > How Stitches Help Kids Heal A A A What's in this ... the directions carefully with your mom's or dad's help. Different kinds of materials — sutures, glue, and butterflies — ...

  2. Self-Healing Laminate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiermann, Brett A. (Inventor); Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A laminate material may include a first flexible layer, and a self-healing composite layer in contact with the first flexible layer. The composite layer includes an elastomer matrix, a plurality of first capsules including a polymerizer, and a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The laminate material may self-heal when subjected to a puncture or a tear.

  3. The Healing Power of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Anthos, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    This teacher believes that art has the power to heal, or at least aid in the healing process. After the terrorist attacks on 9/11, her students needed some way to express the injustice they felt. They discussed the attacks, and had some free drawing to release it from their system. They even did some patriotic-themed projects to boost their…

  4. Self-healing polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Urban, Marek W

    2013-09-07

    Inspired by nature, self-healing materials represent the forefront of recent developments in materials chemistry and engineering. This review outlines the recent advances in the field of self-healing polymers. The first part discusses thermodynamic requirements for self-healing networks in the context of conformation changes that contribute to the Gibbs free energy. The chain flexibility significantly contributes to the entropy changes, whereas the heat of reaction and the external energy input are the main contributors to enthalpy changes. The second part focuses on chemical reactions that lead to self-healing, and the primary classes are the covalent bonding, supramolecular assemblies, ionic interactions, chemo-mechanical self-healing, and shape memory polymers. The third part outlines recent advances using encapsulation, remote self-healing and the role of shape memory polymers. Recent developments in the field of self-healing polymers undeniably indicate that the main challenge will be the designing of high glass transition (Tg) functional materials, which also exhibit stimuli-responsive attributes. Build-in controllable hierarchical heterogeneousness at various length scales capable of remote self-healing by physical and chemical responses will be essential in designing future materials of the 21st century.

  5. Synthetic Self-Healing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie

    2014-06-02

    Given enough time, pressure, temperature fluctuation, and stress any material will fail. Currently, synthesized materials make up a large part of our everyday lives, and are used in a number of important applications such as; space travel, under water devices, precise instrumentation, transportation, and infrastructure. Structural failure of these material scan lead to expensive and dangerous consequences. In an attempt to prolong the life spans of specific materials and reduce efforts put into repairing them, biologically inspired, self-healing systems have been extensively investigated. The current review explores recent advances in three methods of synthesized self-healing: capsule based, vascular, and intrinsic. Ideally, self-healing materials require no human intervention to promote healing, are capable of surviving all the steps of polymer processing, and heal the same location repeatedly. Only the vascular method holds up to all of these idealities.

  6. The Flexibility Hypothesis of Healing.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2017-03-01

    Theories of healing have attempted to identify general mechanisms that may work across different modalities. These include altering expectations, remoralization, and instilling hope. In this paper, we argue that many forms of healing and psychotherapy may work by inducing positive psychological states marked by flexibility or an enhanced ability to shift cognitive sets. Healing practices may induce these states of cognitive and emotional flexibility through specific symbolic interventions we term "flexibility primers" that can include images, metaphors, music, and other media. The flexibility hypothesis suggests that cognitive and emotional flexibility is represented, elicited, and enacted through multiple modalities in healing rituals. Identifying psychological processes and cultural forms that evoke and support cognitive and emotional flexibility provides a way to understand the cultural specificity and potential efficacy of particular healing practices and can guide the design of interventions that promote resilience and well-being.

  7. Scar formation and ligament healing.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, K A; Frank, C B

    1998-12-01

    Ligaments are highly organized, dense, fibrous connective-tissue structures that provide stability to joints and participate in joint proprioception. Injuries to ligaments induce a healing response that is characterized by the formation of a scar. The scar tissue is weaker, larger and creeps more than normal ligament and is associated with an increased amount of minor collagens (types III, V and VI), decreased collagen cross-links and an increased amount of glycosaminoglycans. Studies have shown that certain surgical variables alter the healing of ligaments. Such factors include the size of gap between the healing ligament, ends, the use of motion in a stable joint and the presence of multiple ligamentous injuries. Research on ligament healing includes studies on low-load and failure-load properties, alterations in the expression of matrix molecules, cytokine modulation of healing and gene therapy as a method to alter matrix protein and cytokine production.

  8. [Benign vocal fold lesions].

    PubMed

    Pickhard, A; Reiter, R

    2013-05-01

    Benign vocal fold lesions are grouped in lesions arising from the epithelium like papillomas, lesions affecting the Reinke's space (nodules, polyps, cysts, Reinkes's edema as a form of chronic laryngitis) and lesions affecting the arytenoid (granulomas). A multifactorial genesis is assumed. Main symptoms are dysphonia and hyperfunctional vocal behavior that might also be a cause of these lesions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Exploring Inpatients' Experiences of Healing and Healing Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Bellanti, Dawn; Sakallaris, Bonnie R.

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand a patient’s healing experience it is essential to understand the elements that they, the patient, believes contributed to their healing. Previous research has focused on symptom reducers or contributors through environment such as stress. A person’s experience of healing happens over time not instantaneous. Therefore, in this study, the interviews with patients happened after forty-eight hours of hospitalization. This mixed methods study describes the experiences of seventeen inpatients from two healthcare systems using a phenomenological approach combined with evidence based design evaluation methods to document the setting. The qualitative data was analyzed first for reoccurring themes then further explored and defined through quantitative environmental observations. The seventeen patients defined healing as “getting better/well.” Seventy three statements were recorded about contributors and detractors to healing in the physical environment. Three primary themes emerged from the data as positive influencers of a healing experience: being cared for, being comfortable and experiencing something familiar or like home. These results demonstrate that patients perceive their inpatient healing experience through a supported environment. PMID:28725848

  10. Radiotherapy and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Devalia, Haresh L; Mansfield, Lucy

    2008-03-01

    This review article discusses basic radiation physics and effects of radiation on wounds. It examines various postulated hypothesis on the role of circulatory decrease and radiation-induced direct cellular damage. The new concept related to the radiation pathogenesis proposes that there is a cascade of cytokines initiated immediately after the radiation. Sustained activation of myofibroblasts in the wound accounts for its chronicity. Recent advances highlight that transforming growth factor beta1 is the master switch in pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis. This articles overviews its role and summarises the available evidences related to radiation damage. The goal of this article was to provide its modern understanding, as future research will concentrate on antagonising the effects of cytokines to promote wound healing.

  11. Urethral healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Scherz, H C; Kaplan, G W; Boychuk, D I; Landa, H M; Haghighi, P

    1992-08-01

    We studied urethral healing in New Zealand white rabbits by histological examination after insult (urethral catheter) or injury (urethrotomy) specifically for acute and chronic inflammation, fibrosis, fistulas, squamous metaplasia, foreign body giant cells and urethral dilatation. Urethral catheterization resulted in increased inflammation and fibrosis compared to noncatheterized animals. Skin closure techniques and materials resulted in an inflammatory response that may extend to and involve the urethra. Minor differences in suture size were not an important variable but the persistence of suture material may have a role in the degree of inflammation and the formation of foreign body giant cells. Transepithelial closure techniques drag epithelial cells into subcutaneous tissues and may predispose to fistula formation.

  12. Combined Arthroscopic Bankart Repair and Coracoid Process Transfer to Anterior Glenoid for Shoulder Dislocation in Rugby Players: Evaluation Based on Ability to Perform Sport-Specific Movements Effectively.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Atsushi; Morita, Wataru; Yamakawa, Akira; Nozaki, Taiki; Kuroda, Eishi; Hoshikawa, Yoshimitsu; Phillips, Barry B

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of a combination of an arthroscopic Bankart repair and an open Bristow procedure in relation to the subjective quality of performance in movements that are typical in rugby. Forty shoulders in 38 players who underwent surgery for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were reviewed. In all cases, arthroscopic Bankart repair was followed by a Bristow procedure, with preservation of the repaired capsular ligaments, during the same operation. The mean age at the time of surgery was 21 years. Patients were asked to describe common rugby maneuvers (tackle, hand-off, jackal, and saving) preoperatively and postoperatively as "no problem," "insufficient," or "impossible." There were no recurrent dislocations at a mean follow-up of 30.5 months. The mean Rowe score improved significantly from 65.0 (range, 55 to 75) to 97.5 (range, 95 to 100) (P < .001) after surgery. Preoperatively, regarding the tackling motion, none of the patients reported having no problem, whereas the ability was described as insufficient for 23 shoulders and impossible for 17 shoulders. Postoperatively, no problem with tackling was reported for 36 shoulders, whereas insufficiency was reported for 4. The results for the hand-off, jackal, and saving maneuvers were similar (P < .001). No patient rated any of the motions as impossible postoperatively. This combined surgical procedure clearly is effective in preventing recurrent dislocation in rugby players; however, some players complained of insufficiency in the quality of their play when they were tackling or performing other rugby-specific movements. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the Instability Severity Index Score and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index as predictors of failure following arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Bouliane, M; Saliken, D; Beaupre, L A; Silveira, A; Saraswat, M K; Sheps, D M

    2014-12-01

    In this study we evaluated whether the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS) and the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) could detect those patients at risk of failure following arthroscopic Bankart repair. Between April 2008 and June 2010, the ISIS and WOSI were recorded pre-operatively in 110 patients (87 male, 79%) with a mean age of 25.1 years (16 to 61) who underwent this procedure for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. A telephone interview was performed two-years post-operatively to determine whether patients had experienced a recurrent dislocation and whether they had returned to pre-injury activity levels. In all, six (5%) patients had an ISIS > 6 points (0 to 9). Of 100 (91%) patients available two years post-operatively, six (6%) had a recurrent dislocation, and 28 (28%) did not return to pre-injury activity. No patient who dislocated had an ISIS > 6 (p = 1.0). There was no difference in the mean pre-operative WOSI in those who had a re-dislocation and those who did not (p = 0.99). The pre-operative WOSI was significantly lower (p = 0.02) in those who did not return to pre-injury activity, whereas the ISIS was not associated with return to pre-injury activity (p = 0.13). In conclusion, neither the pre-operative ISIS nor WOSI predicted recurrent dislocation within two years of arthroscopic Bankart repair. Patients with a lower pre-operative WOSI were less likely to return to pre-injury activity. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. Is the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline better than standard care when applied to Bankart-operated patients? A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Damkjær, Lars; Petersen, Tom; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between postoperative rehabilitation patients receiving standard care and those receiving care according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline for arthroscopic anterior capsulolabral repair of the shoulder. Descriptive studies with comparison between a retrospective and a prospective cohort. Municipal outpatient rehabilitation centre. A total of 96 arthroscopic Bankart-operated patients. A total of 52 patients received standard care; 44 patients underwent rehabilitation according to the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' rehabilitation guideline. Primary outcome variable was Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index. Secondary outcome measures were Patient-Specific Functional Scale, shoulder range of motion, return to work, return to sports, and costs. There was no significant difference in adjusted mean change scores between the standard care group and the guideline group in the primary outcome variable (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index total = 574.85 vs. 644.48) or the secondary outcomes (Patient-Specific Functional Scale = 4.6 vs. 5.0; range of motion in forward flexion = 46.49° vs. 49.58°; external rotation in adduction = 28.58° vs. 34.18°; external rotation in abduction = 51.29° vs. 47.55°; weeks until return to work = 5.2 vs. 6.9; weeks until return to sports =13.9 vs. 13.1; costs = number of visits; 18.5 vs. 15.9). There were no significant between-group differences in shoulder-related physical function and quality of life between the standard care group and the guideline group, following Bankart operations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Effect of Bankart repair on the loss of range of motion and the instability of the shoulder joint for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shibano, Koji; Koishi, Hayato; Futai, Kazuma; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2014-06-01

    Bankart repair postoperative complications include loss of shoulder motion and shoulder instability. The primary reason that postoperative complications develop may be excessive imbrication of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) or inadequate repair position. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the influence of inadequate repair by computer simulation for a normal shoulder joint. Magnetic resonance images of 10 normal shoulder joints were acquired for 7 positions every 30° from the maximum internal rotation to the maximum external rotation with the arm abducted at 90°. The shortest 3-dimensional path of the AIGHL in each rotational orientation was calculated. We used computer simulations to anticipate the loss of motion and instability by changing the AIGHL length and insertion sites on the glenoid. The AIGHL length measured 50 ± 5 mm at the maximum external shoulder rotation. AIGHL shortening by 3, 6, and 9 mm made the angle of maximum external rotation 80°, 68°, and 54°, respectively. A superior deviation of 3, 6, and 9 mm on the glenoid insertion resulted in a maximum external rotation angle of 85°, 79°, and 77°. An inferior deviation of 3, 6, and 9 mm produced humeral head translation of 1.7, 2.9, and 3.6 mm. Simulation of both excessive imbrication and deviation of the insertion position led to quantitative prediction of the resulting loss of motion and instability. These findings will be useful for anticipating complications after Bankart repair. Basic science study, computer modeling, imaging. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  16. Prevention of ulcerative lesions by episodic treatment of recurrent herpes labialis: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Harmenberg, Johan; Oberg, Bo; Spruance, Spotwood

    2010-03-01

    There are substantial difficulties involved in carrying out clinical studies of recurrent herpes labialis, since the disease has a rapid onset, short-lasting viral shedding period and is rapidly self-healing. The aim of this paper was to critically assess published reports of episodic treatment of herpes labialis and to review biological and methodological problems involved in such studies. Limited, but statistically significant, results have been shown with topical antivirals, such as acyclovir and penciclovir, improving healing times by approximately 10%. Orally administrated antivirals, such as valaciclovir and famciclovir, have subsequently found clinical use. However, these two oral medications have different profiles in phase 3 studies. Famciclovir showed additional improvement of efficacy in terms of lesion healing time, but no effect on prevention of ulcerative lesions, while valaciclovir appeared to have similar efficacy to that of acyclovir cream on lesion healing, but some additional efficacy with respect to prevention of ulcerative lesions. A formulation of acyclovir/hydrocortisone showed further improvement in prevention of ulcerative lesions, while retaining efficacy with respect to lesion healing.

  17. Accelerated healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis in non-healing BALB/c mice using water soluble amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Corware, Karina; Harris, Debra; Teo, Ian; Rogers, Matthew; Naresh, Kikkeri; Müller, Ingrid; Shaunak, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease that causes prominent skin scaring. No water soluble, non-toxic, short course and low cost treatment exists. We developed a new water soluble amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid (AmB-PMA) using established and scalable chemistries. AmB-PMA was stable for 9 months during storage. In vitro, it was effective against Leishmania spp. promastigotes and amastigote infected macrophages. It was also less toxic and more effective than deoxycholate-AmB, and similar to liposomal AmB. Its in vivo activity was determined in both early and established CL lesion models of Leishmania major infection in genetically susceptible non-healing BALB/c mice. Intradermal AmB-PMA at a total dose of 18 mg of AmB/kg body weight led to rapid parasite killing and lesion healing. No toxicity was seen. No parasite relapse occurred after 80 days follow-up. Histological studies confirmed rapid parasite clearance from macrophages followed by accelerated fibroblast mediated tissue repair, regeneration and cure of the infection. Quantitative mRNA studies of the CL lesions showed that accelerated healing was associated with increased Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interferon-γ, and reduced Interleukin-10. These results suggest that a cost-effective AmB-PMA could be used to pharmacologically treat and immunotherapeutically accelerate the healing of CL lesions. PMID:21807409

  18. Nonsurgical Management of an Extensive Endodontic Periapical Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; EsnaAshari, Ehsan; Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Long-term success of endodontic treatment is dependent on adequate and appropriate cleaning and shaping of the root canal along with proper and correct obturation of the entire prepared space. This article aims to report an exceptional non-surgical and orthograde endodontic treatment of maxillary right central incisor with an extensive radiolucent lesion in a 17-year-old male. Six and 20-month follow-ups showed significant changes, including bone formation and periapical healing within the lesion. The patient was asymptomatic. After 20 months, complete radiographic and clinical healing of the periapical lesion was observed. PMID:28179937

  19. Endodontic Treatment of a Large Periradicular Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Ehsani, Sara

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes the endodontic treatment of a large cyst-like periradicular lesion a 29-year-old female with a large chronic periapical abscess in the region of right maxillary sinus presented into private practice, accompanied with non-vital first upper molar and poorly root treated second upper molar. Conservative root canal treatment was carried out for both of the involved teeth in a single appointment. Post operative examination after two weeks revealed complete resolution of the sinus tract. The clinical and radiographic examination after 9 months revealed complete periapical healing. The appropriate diagnosis of periradicular lesion and the treatment of the infected root canal system allowed complete healing of these large lesions without endodontic surgery. PMID:24082906

  20. Progress in corneal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  1. An overview of healing environments.

    PubMed

    Fani, Vavili; Artemis, Kyrkou

    2010-01-01

    Stress is a major obstacle to the healing process and it is partly linked to the quality of the environment. Many examples of healing environments throughout time can confirm the primitive human need for healing or therapeutic facilities. Since the Modern Movement of architecture, hospital design has evolved and adjusted to the changing needs. Nowadays, it is considered to be a function of multiple variables. It is an architect's duty to design an environment (the term environment in this case includes all of its interpretations; natural, built, interior and exterior) that will propose security and will positively affect the recovering patient.

  2. Occipital lesions: a possible cost of cradleboards.

    PubMed

    Holliday, D Y

    1993-03-01

    This examination of a Mimbres-Mogollon pueblo skeletal sample reveals a surprising percentage of individuals with occipital lesions. Each lesion is located in the approximate center of the squama immediately superior to the external occipital protuberance. Notably, no child over the age of 1 year exhibits a lesion that would have been active at the time of death, but a number of older children and adults exhibit evidence of healed lesions in this same area on the occipital. The restricted nature of these lesions, in terms of both their locations and ages of those actively affected, suggests that the use of cradleboards may have been at least a contributing, if not initiatory, factor in their creation. Specifically, this study suggests that the pressure and friction of an infant's head against a cradleboard may have 1) produced ischemic ulcers, 2) produced the conditions favorable for bacterial infections such as impetigo or carbuncles, or 3) complicated the treatment of other infections appearing on the back of the scalp.

  3. Periapical healing outcome following single visit endodontic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Moksha; Babshet, Medha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of apical periodontitis in diabetes mellitus patients is high. The altered immunity in diabetes affects the healing process of periapical tissue. Single visit endodontic treatment has shown to increase the periapical healing rate with better patient compliance. Hence the present study aims at evaluating the clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic treatment, in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with periapical disease. Material and Methods Eighty patients with periapical disease were divided into 2 groups of 40 each: Group I, Control subjects and Group II, Type 2 diabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were assessed preoperatively and at follow up intervals in diabetics. Pre-operative assessment of periapical status was done using CPDR (Clinical periapical diagnosis of root), QLDR (Qualitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) and QTDR (Quantitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) criteria. Postoperative healing was evaluated following single-visit endodontic treatment by Strindberg criteria. Results Group 2 subjects had chronic and exacerbating lesions with significantly larger lesions (p=0.029). 100 % clinical healing outcome in diabetic group was seen in two months. Group 2 showed 85% success in one year on radiographic evaluation. Poor controlled diabetics showed failure compared to fair and good controlled. Conclusions Type 2 diabetics had chronic and larger sized lesions when compared to control subjects. The periapical lesions in patients with poor diabetic control showed failure. The clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic therapy was delayed in diabetic patients. Key words:Apical periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 2, endodontics, periapical lesion, strindberg criteria. PMID:27957260

  4. [Ramp lesions : Tips and tricks in diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Seil, R; Hoffmann, A; Scheffler, S; Theisen, D; Mouton, C; Pape, D

    2017-09-14

    There is an increasing biomechanical and anatomical understanding of the different types of meniscal lesions. Lesions of the posterior part of the medial meniscus in the meniscosynovial area have recently received increased attention. They generally occur in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. They are often missed ("hidden lesions") due to the fact that they cannot be seen by routine anterior arthroscopic inspection. Furthermore, meniscosynovial lesions play a role in anteroposterior knee laxity and, as such, they may be a cause of failure of ACL reconstruction or of postoperative persistent laxity. Little information is available regarding their cause with respect to injury mechanism, natural history, biomechanical implications, healing potential and treatment options. This article presents an overview of the currently available knowledge of these ramp lesions, their possible pathomechanism, classification, biomechanical relevance as well as repair techniques.

  5. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000865.htm Skin lesion of blastomycosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A skin lesion of blastomycosis is a symptom of an infection with the ...

  6. Dressings and healing with honey.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Judy

    Two milestones have revolutionised the management of wounds. First, the introduction of antibiotics, and second, the work carried out by Winter in 1962, introducing the concept that a warm moist environment encouraged healing.

  7. Wound healing and skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Makoto; Lee, Wendy; Ito, Mayumi

    2015-01-05

    The skin is a complex organ consisting of the epidermis, dermis, and skin appendages, including the hair follicle and sebaceous gland. Wound healing in adult mammals results in scar formation without any skin appendages. Studies have reported remarkable examples of scarless healing in fetal skin and appendage regeneration in adult skin following the infliction of large wounds. The models used in these studies have offered a new platform for investigations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying wound healing and skin regeneration in mammals. In this article, we will focus on the contribution of skin appendages to wound healing and, conversely, skin appendage regeneration following injuries. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Wound healing after laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, D A; Meyers, A

    1995-10-01

    Compared with scalpel wounds, CO2 laser wounds show delays in inflammation, collagen production, reepithelialization, and tensile strength in the early stages of healing. Some of these delays are similar to those seen with electrocautery and burn wounds. Later stages compensate for these early deficiencies, because scalpel and laser wounds become more similar in epithelialization and wound strength over time. Healed CO2 laser wounds tend to have less scar contraction than scalpel wounds. Débridement of initial laser wound char, tissue cooling techniques during lasering, and pulsed modes of laser delivery all seem to result in more rapid, favorable healing. Similar wound healing trends have been seen with the CO2 laser in bone, with other lasers, and with laser vascular and neural anastomosis. Biostimulation with low-level laser energy is a complex subject of ongoing investigations.

  9. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  10. Methyl methacrylate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tittelboom, K.; Adesanya, K.; Dubruel, P.; Van Puyvelde, P.; De Belie, N.

    2011-12-01

    Different types of healing agents have already been tested on their efficiency for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Generally, commercial healing agents are used while their properties are adjusted for manual crack repair and not for autonomous crack healing. Consequently, the amount of regain in properties due to self-healing of cracks is limited. In this research, a methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based healing agent was developed specifically for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Various parameters were optimized including the viscosity, curing time, strength, etc. After the desired properties were obtained, the healing agent was encapsulated and screened for its self-healing efficiency. The decrease in water permeability due to autonomous crack healing using MMA as a healing agent was similar to the results obtained for manually healed cracks. First results seem promising: however, further research needs to be undertaken in order to obtain an optimal healing agent ready for use in practice.

  11. Arthroscopic double-pulley remplissage technique for engaging Hill-Sachs lesions in anterior shoulder instability repairs.

    PubMed

    Koo, Samuel S; Burkhart, Stephen S; Ochoa, Eloy

    2009-11-01

    We present a modified arthroscopic technique used to treat anterior shoulder instability associated with mild glenoid bone loss and a large Hill-Sachs lesion. The procedure aims to convert a bony intra-articular defect into an extra-articular defect by insetting the infraspinatus into the Hill-Sachs lesion. The arthroscopic procedure is performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position, and the same portals used for anterior instability repair are used for this technique. The sequence of steps involves placing and passing the glenoid anchors and sutures and then waiting to tie the anterior sutures until after the humeral suture anchors have been placed. The subacromial bursa is cleared; then 2 transtendon suture anchors are placed in the Hill-Sachs lesion. Next, the previously placed Bankart repair sutures are tied, and finally, the remplissage sutures are tied in the subacromial space over the infraspinatus by use of the transtendon double-pulley technique. This technique uses the eyelets of the 2 suture anchors as pulleys and creates a double-mattress suture.

  12. Therapeutic touch: a healing modality.

    PubMed

    Mulloney, S S; Wells-Federman, C

    1996-04-01

    Therapeutic touch is a nursing intervention pioneered more than 20 years ago. A substantial body of literature encompassing theory, clinical practice, and research exists on this energetic healing modality. This article examines the scientific basis for healing through the human energy field, including the basic assumptions from which therapeutic touch was developed and a summary of related research. It also discusses integration of therapeutic touch into clinical practice and identifies resources for further exploration.

  13. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  14. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  15. [Possibilities of endodontic therapy of endodonic-periodontal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nesković, Jelena; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2009-01-01

    Endoperiodontal lesions are frequent in clinical practice and may require complex therapy. It is very important to determine differential diagnosis and the origin of the lesion, because the treatment plan is based on aetiology and stadium of the development of the lesion. The aim of this clinical study was to analyze the efficacy of endodontic treatment in different types of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Thirty patients and 42 teeth with diagnosed endoperiodontal lesions were included in the study and divided in two groups. Vital pulp therapy was applied to 18 vital teeth where the diagnosis was perio-endodontic lesions. The therapy of infected canal system was applied to 24 teeth with endodontic-periodontal or combined lesions. Standard endodontic procedure consisted of cleaning and shaping of the root canal system and between sessions filling with calcium-hydroxide paste. Obturation was made by lateral compact of the guttapercha and Apexit paste. Efficiency was evaluated clinically and radiographically three, six and twelve months later. Radiographic and clinical follow-up showed a significant radiographic improvement and absence of subjective symptoms in a very high percentage of the treated vital and avital teeth. The results of this study showed that in the observation period of 12 months endodontic therapy was successful in 88.89% of vital teeth, and in the group of avital teeth the percentage was 91.67%. Endodontic treatment of the endoperiodontal lesions was sufficient and it was the basic condition to achieve a complete healing of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Such therapy ensures significant improvement or even complete healing of both types of lesions, of endodontic and periodontal origin.

  16. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome.

  18. Diagnostic validity of periapical radiography and CBCT for assessing periapical lesions that persist after endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Casper; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Reibel, Jesper; Wenzel, Ann; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte

    2017-07-14

    Traditionally, healing after surgical endodontic retreatment (SER); i.e. apicectomy with or without a retrograde filling, is assessed in periapical radiographs (PR). Recently, the use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) has increased within endodontics. Generally, CBCT detects more periapical lesions than PR, but basic research on the true nature of these lesions is missing. The objective was to assess the diagnostic validity of PR and CBCT for determining inflammation in SER-cases that were re-operated (SER-R) due to unsuccessful healing, using histology of the periapical lesion as reference for inflammation. Records from 149 patients, receiving SER 2004-10, were screened. In total 108 patients (119 teeth) were recalled for clinical follow-up examination, PR and CBCT, of which 74 patients (83 teeth) participated. Three observers assessed PR and CBCT as "successful healing" or "unsuccessful healing" using Rud and Molven´s criteria. SER-R was offered to all non-healed teeth with expected favorable prognosis for subsequent functional retention. During SER-R, biopsy was performed and histopathology verified whether or not inflammation was present. All re-operated cases were assessed non-healed in CBCT while 11 of these were assessed successfully healed in PR. Nineteen biopsies were examined. Histopathologic diagnosis revealed 42% (teeth=8) without periapical inflammation, 16% (teeth=3) with mild inflammation, and 42% (teeth=8) with moderate to intense inflammation. A correct diagnosis was obtained in 58% with CBCT (true positives) and 63% with PR (true positives+true negatives). Of the re-operated teeth, 42% had no periapical inflammatory lesion, and hence no benefit from SER-R. Not all lesions observed in CBCT represented periapical inflammatory lesions.

  19. Gonadal hormones differently modulate cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Assis de Brito, Thatiana L; Pereira, Gabriela R; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Gonadal hormones influence physiological responses to stress and cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gonadal hormones on cutaneous wound healing in chronically stressed mice. Male and female mice were gonadectomized, and after 25 days, they were spun daily at 115 rpm for 15 min every hour until euthanasia. Twenty-eight days after the gonadectomy, an excisional lesion was created. The animals were killed 7 or 14 days after wounding, and the lesions were collected. Myofibroblast density, macrophage number, catecholamine level, collagen deposition, and blood vessel number were evaluated. In the intact and gonadectomized groups, stress increased the plasma catecholamine levels in both genders. In intact groups, stress impaired wound contraction and re-epithelialization and increased the macrophage number in males but not in females. In addition, stress compromised myofibroblastic differentiation and blood vessel formation and decreased collagen deposition in males but not in females. In contrast to intact mice, wound healing in ovariectomized female mice was affected by stress, while wound healing in castrated male mice was not. In conclusion, gender differences contribute to the cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. In addition, androgens contribute to the stress-induced impairment of the healing of cutaneous wounds but estrogens inhibit it. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  1. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza

    2016-01-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway. PMID:26515142

  2. Use of ethnoveterinary remedies in the management of foot and mouth disease lesions in a diary herd.

    PubMed

    Gakuya, D W; Mulei, C M; Wekesa, S B

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) affecting 95 (57.2%) out of 166 cattle occurred in a medium-scale dairy farm in Kikuyu district, Kenya. Ethnoveterinary remedies of natural Soda ash solution (97% sodium bicarbonate), honey and finger millet flour were used to manage the FMD lesions. The lesions were washed with soda ash solution to remove the necrotic tissue after which raw honey and finger millet flour were applied to the cleaned lesions. The lesions were examined daily and those with necrotic material washed again with the Soda ash solution. Honey and finger millet flour were applied daily for three days. There was rapid healing of the lesions with the animals resuming feeding after three days. The fast healing of the lesions vindicates the use of these cheap, locally available and easy to apply products in the management of FMD lesions. However, more studies are needed to evaluate further their potencies.

  3. Self-healing materials with microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Toohey, Kathleen S; Sottos, Nancy R; Lewis, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey S; White, Scott R

    2007-08-01

    Self-healing polymers composed of microencapsulated healing agents exhibit remarkable mechanical performance and regenerative ability, but are limited to autonomic repair of a single damage event in a given location. Self-healing is triggered by crack-induced rupture of the embedded capsules; thus, once a localized region is depleted of healing agent, further repair is precluded. Re-mendable polymers can achieve multiple healing cycles, but require external intervention in the form of heat treatment and applied pressure. Here, we report a self-healing system capable of autonomously repairing repeated damage events. Our bio-inspired coating-substrate design delivers healing agent to cracks in a polymer coating via a three-dimensional microvascular network embedded in the substrate. Crack damage in the epoxy coating is healed repeatedly. This approach opens new avenues for continuous delivery of healing agents for self-repair as well as other active species for additional functionality.

  4. [Laser therapy in pressure ulcers: evaluation by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing and Nursing Outcomes Classification].

    PubMed

    Palagi, Sofia; Severo, Isis Marques; Menegon, Dóris Baratz; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2015-10-01

    To describe the pressure ulcer healing process in critically ill patients treated with conventional dressing therapy plus low-intensity laser therapy evaluated by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) and the result of Wound Healing: Secondary Intention, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). Case report study according to nursing process conducted with an Intensive Care Unit patient. Data were collected with an instrument containing the PUSH and the result of the NOC. In the analysis we used descriptive statistics, considering the scores obtained on the instrument. A reduction in the size of lesions of 7cm to 1.5cm of length and 6cm to 1.1cm width, in addition to the increase of epithelial tissue and granulation, decreased secretion and odor. There was improvement in the healing process of the lesion treated with adjuvant therapy and the use of NOC allowed a more detailed and accurate assessment than the PUSH.

  5. Leishmanicidal, cytotoxicity and wound healing potential of Arrabidaea chica Verlot.

    PubMed

    Cortez de Sá, Joicy; Almeida-Souza, Fernando; Mondêgo-Oliveira, Renata; Oliveira, Iara Dos Santos da Silva; Lamarck, Lyah; Magalhães, Isadora de Fátima Braga; Ataídes-Lima, Aarão Filipe; Ferreira, Higor da Silva; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lucia

    2016-01-04

    Leishmaniasis includes a wide complex of diseases that affect humans and other mammals, and can range from a mild cutaneous form to a severe visceral type. The safety of the standard treatment using pentavalent antimony is a concern due to its toxic effects. The search for alternative, effective and less toxic treatments has led to the testing of natural products. The present study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic, leishmanicidal and healing potential of Arrabidaea chica. The crude ethanolic extract, as well as the chloroform, methanol and ethyl acetate fractions of A. chica were prepared and phytochemical analysis was performed. Cytotoxic evaluation was carried out through MTT colorimetric assay, and the 50% cellular cytotoxicity was determined. After that, the effect of the extract and fractions against Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes, at intervals of 24, 48 and 72 h, was analyzed, and 50% inhibitory concentration was determined. The healing effect of the plant was also tested in surgical lesions in Swiss mice skin. Phytochemical screening showed that the crude extracts contained flavonoids, tannins, anthocyanidins and chalcones. The leishmanicidal potential of A. chica produced satisfactory results in concentrations of between 60 and 155.9 μg/mL. Cytotoxic assay revealed a 50% reduction in viable cells at a concentration of 189.9 μg/mL. The healing results indicated that the treated group exhibited more pronounced signs of lesion resolution in the early period, but this pattern did not persist throughout the treatment. The results of the present study demonstrate that A. chica has cytotoxic and leishmanicidal potential but its healing effect must be better studied.

  6. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  7. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rúben F; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-05-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  8. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  9. Raves, psychosis, and spirit healing.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2010-07-01

    This paper reflects the intersection of three cultures: the rave (all night dance party and use of the drug, Ecstasy) culture; the ward culture of an inpatient psychiatric program for First Episode Psychosis; the spirit healing culture of the Philippines. All three intersected in Toronto, Canada in the mid 1990s, as illustrated by the clinical case of a 19-year-old university student who was hospitalized with symptoms of drug-induced psychosis. Her initial treatment was not successful and presented dilemmas for the treating staff. Transfer to a second psychiatric facility that permitted attendance at a traditional Filipino healing ceremony resulted in a cure, with no recurrence 10 years later. According to James Dow's 1986 formulation, the components of the key spiritual healing session paralleled the very elements the young woman had sought by participating in raves, an activity that was problematic because it led to family displeasure. Whereas attendance at a rave triggered illness, the healing session, sanctioned by her family and taking place in their midst, resulted in healing.

  10. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  11. Self-healing gelatin ionogels.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R; Bohidar, H B

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate room temperature (20°C) self-healing, and substantial recovery (68-96%) of gel rigidity of gelatin, a polypeptide, ionogels (made in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid (IL) solutions via thermal treatment, IL≤5% (w/v)) after they were cut using a surgical blade. The recovery process did not require any stimuli, and the complete healing under ambient condition required about 10h.The self-healing owed its origin to the reformation of network structures via imidazolium ion mediated charge quenching of deprotonated residues, and hydrophobic interaction between neighbouring alkyl tails of IL molecules. The rate of healing determined from the growth of rigidity modulus was 20±5 mPa/s independent of ionic liquid content of the gel. This was true regardless of the fact that ionogels containing more IL had a lower gel modulus due to propensity of hydrophobic linkages, but these were agile enough to recover their network structures to a higher degree during the healing process. These features indicate that the gelatin ionogel being biocompatibile, and biodegradable holds great potential for applications in the field of biomedical engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Amyloidogenesis in Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ken; Brownstein, Martin H.

    1972-01-01

    Clinically and histologically typical skin lesions of macular and lichenoid amyloidoses were biopsied. Rebiopsies were performed after 2 to 16 weeks, and the sequence of amyloid reproduction in granulation tissue was followed. Initially, medium electron-dense proteinaceous substance with fine filaments was produced within or in close relation to the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum of fibroblasts and subsequently discharged. Typical amyloid filaments emerged within and in the vicinity of this substance. A significant number of collagen fibrils were admixed in the centers of some amyloid islands. Predominantly amorphous amyloid substance was seen in contact with the basal laminae. No plasma cells were observed in foci of amyloid. Nonepithelialized wounds did not contain amyloid. It was suggested that, in the primary skin amyloidoses, abnormal dermal fibroblasts produce amyloid precursors under the influence of the epidermis. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 4Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 8Fig 3 PMID:5049430

  13. Treatment with a novel topical nanoemulsion (NB-001) speeds time to healing of recurrent cold sores.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Jones, Terry M; Jarratt, Michael; Flack, Mary R; Ijzerman, Marian; Ciotti, Susan; Sutcliffe, Joyce; Boivin, Guy; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Baker, James R

    2012-08-01

    Current topical therapies for cold sores are only marginally beneficial due to poor skin penetration. We assessed the safety and efficacy of a novel topical antiviral nanoemulsion (NB-001) with high tissue bioavailability. The primary endpoint was the time to lesion healing. 482 subjects with recurrent cold sores were randomized to self-initiate treatment with either vehicle or NB-001 (0.1%, 0.3% or 0.5%) at the first signs or symptoms of a cold sore episode. Lotion was applied 5 times per day, approximately 3 to 4 hours apart, for 4 days. Time to lesion healing was correlated with NB-001 bioavailability determined in human cadaver skin. Subjects treated with 0.3% NB-001 showed a 1.3-day improvement in the mean time to healing compared to vehicle (P=0.006). This was consistent with human cadaver skin data indicating that the 0.3% nanoemulsion had the highest bioavailability, compared to 0.1% and 0.5% emulsions. No significant safety or dermal irritation concerns or systemic absorption were noted with any of the doses. Topical NB-001 (0.3%) was well tolerated and highly efficacious in shortening the time to healing of cold sores. The improvement in time to healing was similar to that reported for oral nucleoside analogues, but without systemic exposure. Topical agents for recurrent herpes labialis (cold sores) reduce healing time by one half day, compared to oral therapies that speed healing by a day or more. A topical antiviral nanoemulsion was well tolerated and improved cold sore healing time by over a day compared to vehicle control. Nanoemulsion (NB-001) could represent a more efficacious topical treatment for recurrent cold sores.

  14. A Proficiency-Based Progression Training Curriculum Coupled With a Model Simulator Results in the Acquisition of a Superior Arthroscopic Bankart Skill Set.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Richard L; Ryu, Richard K N; Pedowitz, Robert A; Beach, William; Burns, Joseph; Dodds, Julie; Field, Larry; Getelman, Mark; Hobgood, Rhett; McIntyre, Louis; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2015-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of proficiency-based progression (PBP) training using simulation both compared with the same training without proficiency requirements and compared with a traditional resident course for learning to perform an arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR). In a prospective, randomized, blinded study, 44 postgraduate year 4 or 5 orthopaedic residents from 21 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved US orthopaedic residency programs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 skills training protocols for learning to perform an ABR: group A, traditional (routine Arthroscopy Association of North America Resident Course) (control, n = 14); group B, simulator (modified curriculum adding a shoulder model simulator) (n = 14); or group C, PBP (PBP plus the simulator) (n = 16). At the completion of training, all subjects performed a 3 suture anchor ABR on a cadaveric shoulder, which was videotaped and scored in blinded fashion with the use of previously validated metrics. The PBP-trained group (group C) made 56% fewer objectively assessed errors than the traditionally trained group (group A) (P = .011) and 41% fewer than group B (P = .049) (both comparisons were statistically significant). The proficiency benchmark was achieved on the final repair by 68.7% of participants in group C compared with 36.7% in group B and 28.6% in group A. When compared with group A, group B participants were 1.4 times, group C participants were 5.5 times, and group C(PBP) participants (who met all intermediate proficiency benchmarks) were 7.5 times as likely to achieve the final proficiency benchmark. A PBP training curriculum and protocol coupled with the use of a shoulder model simulator and previously validated metrics produces a superior arthroscopic Bankart skill set when compared with traditional and simulator-enhanced training methods. Surgical training combining PBP and a simulator is efficient and effective. Patient safety could be improved if

  15. A Comparison of 2- and 3-dimensional Healing Assessment after Endodontic Surgery Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Volumes or Periapical Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Tom; Sonntag, David; Kohli, Meetu R; Setzer, Frank C

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the assessment of healing after endodontic microsurgery using 2-dimensional (2D) periapical films versus 3-dimensional (3D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. The healing of 51 teeth from 44 patients was evaluated using Molven's criteria (2D) and modified PENN 3D criteria. The absolute area (2D) and volume (3D) changes of apical lesions preoperatively and at follow-up were calculated by segmentation using OsiriX software (Pixmeo, Bernex, Switzerland) and ITK-Snap (free software). There was a significant difference between the mean preoperative lesion volumes of 95.34 mm(3) (n = 51, standard deviation [SD] ±196.28 mm(3)) versus 6.48 mm(3) (n = 51, SD ±17.70 mm(3)) at follow-up (P < .05). The mean volume reduction was 83.7%. Preoperatively, mean lesion areas on periapical films were 13.55 mm(2) (n = 51, SD ±18.80 mm(2)) and 1.83 mm(2) (n = 51, SD ±.68 mm(2)) at follow-up (P < .05). According to Molven's criteria, 40 teeth were classified as complete healing, 7 as incomplete healing, and 4 as uncertain healing. Based on the modified PENN 3D criteria, 33 teeth were classified as complete healing, 14 as limited healing, 1 as uncertain healing, and 3 as unsatisfactory healing. The variation in the distribution of the 2D and 3D healing classifications was significantly different (P < .05). Periapical healing statuses incomplete healing or uncertain healing according to Molven's criteria could be clearly classified using 3D criteria. CBCT analysis allowed a more precise evaluation of periapical lesions and healing of endodontic microsurgery than periapical films. Significant differences existed between the 2 methods. Over the observation period, the mean periapical lesion sizes significantly decreased in volume. Given the correct indications, the use of CBCT imaging may be a valuable tool for the evaluation of healing of endodontic surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  16. Management of a large periapical lesion using Biodentine™ as retrograde restoration with eighteen months evident follow up

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ajinkya M; Kokate, Sharad R; Shah, Reema A

    2013-01-01

    Injury to anterior teeth is a common event. It requires a treatment approach that assures the complete biologic healing and functional restoration of the tooth or teeth involved. A cystic lesion, which is unable to heal nonsurgically, heals well with surgical intervention and use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as retrograde filling has been reported in literature. Another material with largely improved handling properties; Biodentine™ (Septodont, St. Maurdes Fossés, France) was introduced in 2011. It is a calcium silicate based material and manufacturers claim that it can be used for crown and root dentin repair treatment, repair of perforations or resorptions, apexification, and root end fillings. This article presents a case report of surgical management of a large cystic lesion using Biodentine™ as retrograde filling material which has not been reported in literature so far. Eighteen months radiographic follow-up exhibited completely healed cystic lesion. PMID:24347897

  17. Molecular pathology of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yuko

    2010-12-15

    Skin-wound healing is an orchestrated biological phenomena consisting of three sequential phases, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Many biological substances are involved in the process of wound repair, and this short and simplified overview of wound healing can be adopted to determine wound vitality or wound age in forensic medicine. With the development of genetically engineered animals, essential molecules for skin-wound healing have been identified. Especially, cytokines, and growth factors are useful candidates and markers for the determination of wound vitality or age. Moreover, bone marrow-derived progenitor cells would give significant information to wound age determination. In this review article, some interesting observations are presented, possibly contributing to the future practice of forensic pathologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Heat delays skin wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos-Silva, Marco Aurélio; Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2017-02-01

    In vivo studies have shown that the combination of infrared radiation (IR) and visible light (VIS) is responsible for the activation of metaloproteinases, causing matrix degradation and damage to healthy skin. However, the role of heat originating from the VIS spectrum on wound healing remains poorly understood. Our objective was to investigate the macroscopic, microscopic and biochemical effects of heat induced by visible light on cutaneous wound healing in mice. Male mice were anesthetized, subjected to a cutaneous excisional wound and divided into two groups ( n = 10/group) exposed to 23℃ or 43℃ in a thermal chamber for 30 min every other day, for 13 days. On day 14, the animals were sacrificed, and their lesions were processed for histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. The wound area was 42% greater 11 days ( p < 0.01) and 29% greater 14 days ( p < 0.001) after wounding in the 43℃ group than in the 23℃ group. The 43℃ group presented a lower (17%) percentage of reepithelialized wounds ( p < 0.001) 14 days after wounding. The length of the epidermal gap was greater in the 43℃ group ( p < 0.01). The volume density of myofibroblasts and the number of F4/80-positive macrophages was greater in the 43℃ group ( p < 0.05). The 43℃ group showed increased protein expression of type III collagen ( p < 0.001), decreased protein expression of type I collagen ( p < 0.05), increased MMP-1 expression ( p < 0.05), and decreased MMP-2 activity ( p < 0.001). The protein expression of fibrillin-1 ( p < 0.001), MMP-12 ( p < 0.05), TGF-β 1/2/3 ( p < 0.01) and ERK activation ( p < 0.05) was increased in the 43℃ group. Our results suggest that heat delays the stages of wound healing in mice.

  19. Clinical and laboratory profiles of patients with early spontaneous healing in cutaneous localized leishmaniasis: a historical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Ribeiro, Carla; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Fagundes, Aline; Madeira, Maria de Fatima; Mello, Cintia Xavier; Mouta-Confort, Eliame; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria; Vasconcellos, Erica de Camargo Ferreira; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; Fatima Antonio, Liliane de; Schubach, Armando; Conceição-Silva, Fatima

    2017-08-10

    Skin ulcers in American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) may heal spontaneously after months/years. However, few cases may present quick heal even during diagnosis procedure (early spontaneous healing- ESH). The main objective of this study was to compare ESH patients with cases requiring specific treatment [non-ESH (NESH)]. A historical cohort study of ACL patients (n = 445) were divided into 2 groups: ESH - spontaneously healed patients (n = 13; 2.90%), and NESH- treated patients (n = 432; 97.10%). We compared clinical and laboratorial findings at diagnosis, including the lesion healing process. ESH patients had a higher percentage of single lesions (p = 0.027), epithelialized lesion on initial examination (p = 0.001), lesions located in the dorsal trunk (p = 0.017), besides earlier healing (p < 0.001). NESH presents higher frequency of ulcerated lesions (p = 0.002), amastigotes identified in histopathology exams (p = 0.005), positive cultures (p = 0.001), and higher positivity in ≥3 parasitological exams (p = 0.030). All ESH cases were positive in only a single exam, especially in PCR. ESH group apparently presented a lower parasitic load evidenced by the difficulty of parasitological confirmation and its positivity only by PCR method. The absence or deficiency of specific treatment is commonly identified as predisposing factors for recurrence and metastasis in ACL. However, due to the drugs toxicity, the treatment of cases which progress to early spontaneous healing is controversial. ESH patients were followed for up to 5 years after cure, with no evidence of recrudescence, therefore suggesting that not treating these patients is justifiable, but periodic dermatological and otorhinolaryngological examinations are advisable to detect a possible relapse.

  20. Aetiology of abfraction lesions.

    PubMed

    Lyons, K

    2001-09-01

    The aetiology of abfraction lesions is complex. Most evidence indicates that physical loading forces are a major contributing factor, although they are unlikely to be entirely responsible. Intraoral chemical influences and toothbrush abrasion, combined with the dynamics of inter-occlusal activity such as chewing, swallowing, and parafunction, lead to stress corrosion and may contribute to abfraction lesions. The multifactorial aetiology that operates in the initiation and progression of these lesions has made investigation difficult. Various theories have been proposed and numerous surveys and studies conducted, but the primary causal factor has yet to be definitively determined. This review concludes that occlusal loading is the initiating factor in the development of abfraction lesions.

  1. [Impaired wound healing following tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Zengel, P; Betz, C S; Berghaus, A; Leunig, A

    2008-07-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the field of otorhinolaryngology. The first tonsillectomy was done about 600 B.C. [3]. This operation is indicated for patients with recurrent tonsillitis, peritonsillar abscess, hypertrophy or asymmetry of the tonsils. Even though a routine procedure, it has a relatively high risk of complications such as post operative hemorrhage, infection or impaired wound healing. The reported case involves a 20 year old female patient who developed velopharyngeal insufficiency as a result of impaired wound healing after tonsillectomy. The patient was treated conservatively and is free of discomfort after 2 months.

  2. Self healing of defected graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhui; Shi, Tuwan; Cai, Tuocheng; Wu, Xiaosong; Yu, Dapeng; Xu, Tao; Sun, Litao

    2013-03-11

    For electronics applications, defects in graphene are usually undesirable because of their ability to scatter charge carriers, thereby reduce the carrier mobility. It would be extremely useful if the damage can be repaired. In this work, we employ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements to study defects in graphene introduced by argon plasma bombardment. We have found that majority of these defects can be cured by a simple thermal annealing process. The self-healing is attributed to recombination of mobile carbon adatoms with vacancies. With increasing level of plasma induced damage, the self-healing becomes less effective.

  3. Laser Biostimulation Of Wound Healing In Arteriopatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallarida, G.; Baldoni, F.; Raimondi, G.; Massaro, M.; Peruzzi, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Ferrari, A.; Scudieri, F.

    1981-05-01

    Low-power laser irradiation has been employed in the attempt to accelerate the wound-healing of ischemic cutaneous ulcerations with threatening or manifest gangrene due to arteriosclerosis obliterans of the lower limbs. Irradiation was performed by using a low-power He-Ne gas laser of 6328 Å wavelength and was concentrated at the peripheral zone of the lesions. The preliminary results of the study indicate that laser stimulation might be new approach in the conservative menagement of the ischemic ulcers in patients with severe peripheral obstructive arteriopaties not suited for arterial reconstruction.

  4. Cartilage cell proliferation in degenerative TFCC wrist lesions.

    PubMed

    Unglaub, Frank; Thomas, Susanne B; Wolf, Maya B; Dragu, Adrian; Kroeber, Markus W; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Horch, Raymund E

    2010-08-01

    The central zone of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) of the wrist is thought to be avascular and is generally considered to lack any healing potential. The purpose of this study was to investigate, if cartilage cells of degenerative disc lesions possess any healing or proliferation potential and whether ulna length plays a significant role in the proliferation process. Cells positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were found in all specimens. Specimens of patients with ulna positive variance showed a decreased number of PCNA positive cells than specimens of patients with either negative or neutral ulna variance. We found that cartilage cells of Palmer type 2C lesions undergo mitotic cell division, thus exhibiting proliferation capability. It could not be shown that ulnar length is significantly correlated with the number of PCNA positive cells.

  5. Quality of healing: defining, quantifying, and enhancing skeletal muscle healing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Emily H; Caterson, Edward J; Jackson, Wesley M; Nesti, Leon J

    2014-05-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is common in everyday physical activity and athletics, as well as in orthopedic trauma and disease. The overall functional disability resulting from muscle injury is directly related to the intrinsic healing properties of muscle and extrinsic treatment options designed to maximize repair and/or regeneration of muscle tissue all while minimizing pathologic healing pathways. It is important to understand the injury and repair pathways in order to improve the speed and quality of recovery. Recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the importance of successfully addressing muscular injury and showed the need for novel treatment options that will maximize functional regeneration of the damaged tissue. These severe, wartime injuries, when juxtaposed to peacetime, sports-related injuries, provide us with interesting case examples of the two extreme forms of muscular damage. Comparing and contrasting the differences in these healing pathways will likely provide helpful cues that will help physicians recapitulate the near complete repair and regeneration in less traumatic injuries in addition to more severe cases. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Tongue granulomatous lesion caused by mandibular primary incisors eruption.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Luciana Tiemi; Sullcahuamán, Judith Angelica Gonzales; Hernandez Lara, Sandra Marisol; Dezan, Cássia Cilene; Walter, Luiz Reynaldo De Figueiredo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this report was to present a case of granulomatous lesion on the ventral surface of the tongue in a 9-month-old, healthy, infant girl, caused by the habit of scraping the tongue on mandibular central incisors. Clinical treatment consisted of manual smoothing of the sharp edges of both incisors and excision of the 2-cm pediculate ulcerative granulomatous mass localized on the ventral surface of the tongue. After 3 weeks, the child could be properly fed and a complete healing of the lesion was observed.

  7. Clinton Foundation - Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL) provides the infrastructure that allows employers to offer Energy Upgrades in a turnkey manner. This document will breakdown the different models of HEAL, financing, etc.

  8. Self Healing Coating/Film Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Calle, Luz; Williams, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing self healing materials and technologies. This project seeks to further develop self healing functionality in thin films for applications such as corrosion protective coatings, inflatable structures, space suit materials, and electrical wire insulation.

  9. High Temperature Self-Healing Metallic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutelia, E. R.; Bakhtiyarov, S. I.; Tsurtsumia, O. O.; Bakhtiyarov, A. S.; Eristavi, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the possibility to realize the self healing mechanisms for heterogeneous architectural metal/ceramic high temperature sandwich thermal barrier coating systems on the surfaces refractory metals by analogy of wound healing in the skin.

  10. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  11. Multimodality Approach to a Stener Lesion: Radiographic, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Surgical Correlation.

    PubMed

    Tresley, Jonathan; Singer, Adam D; Ouellette, Elizabeth A; Blaichman, Jason; Clifford, Paul D

    The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint is a static stabilizer that may rupture from a hyperabduction injury. Although some UCL tears may heal with immobilization, outcomes are worse for Stener lesions, in which the proximal ligament stump slips out from beneath the adductor pollicis aponeurosis and is entrapped proximal and superficial to the aponeurosis, preventing primary healing. We report the case of a patient with a Stener lesion with radiographic, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging correlation, subsequently confirmed with intraoperative photographs. Physicians must be familiar with the regional anatomy to understand the injury pathogenesis and the need for surgical intervention to optimize patient outcomes.

  12. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  13. Healing, healthcare, missions, the church.

    PubMed

    Jarlsberg, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Churches throughout history have modeled ministry on Jesus' life of reaching out, teaching, preaching, and healing. Kampala Baptist Church (KBC) in Uganda is one such church that works to care spiritually and physically for their community. Partnering with local healthcare providers and short- and long-term healthcare missionaries, the church is transforming lives. Read about KBC and explore healthcare missions ministry.

  14. The microenvironment of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Junker, Johan P E; Caterson, E J; Eriksson, Elof

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes experiments performed by us and others, examining the importance of the microenvironment to wound healing. The development of a sealed polyurethane wound chamber has allowed us to perform studies evaluating the effects of growth factors, transplanted cells, and other bioactive substances on wound healing. Studies have compared wet, moist, and dry healing, with the conclusion that a wet, incubator-like microenvironment provides the fastest healing with fewest aberrations and least scar formation. The wet environment is also paramount for the survival and proliferation of transplanted cells or tissue, which has been shown in studies of porcine and human wounds. Moreover, high concentrations of antibiotics and other agents can be introduced in the wound chamber, thereby effectively fighting infection, while maintaining safe systemic concentrations. These findings have been used in clinical settings to treat wounds of different types. A titanium chamber has been developed to create an in vivo incubator, which will serve as a regenerative platform for in vivo tissue engineering.

  15. Autonomic healing of polymer composites.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Sottos, N R; Geubelle, P H; Moore, J S; Kessler, M R; Sriram, S R; Brown, E N; Viswanathan, S

    2001-02-15

    Structural polymers are susceptible to damage in the form of cracks, which form deep within the structure where detection is difficult and repair is almost impossible. Cracking leads to mechanical degradation of fibre-reinforced polymer composites; in microelectronic polymeric components it can also lead to electrical failure. Microcracking induced by thermal and mechanical fatigue is also a long-standing problem in polymer adhesives. Regardless of the application, once cracks have formed within polymeric materials, the integrity of the structure is significantly compromised. Experiments exploring the concept of self-repair have been previously reported, but the only successful crack-healing methods that have been reported so far require some form of manual intervention. Here we report a structural polymeric material with the ability to autonomically heal cracks. The material incorporates a microencapsulated healing agent that is released upon crack intrusion. Polymerization of the healing agent is then triggered by contact with an embedded catalyst, bonding the crack faces. Our fracture experiments yield as much as 75% recovery in toughness, and we expect that our approach will be applicable to other brittle materials systems (including ceramics and glasses).

  16. Redox Signals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2008-01-01

    Physical trauma represents one of the most primitive challenges that threatened survival. Healing a problem wound requires a multi-faceted comprehensive approach. First and foremost, the wound environment will have to be made receptive to therapies. Second, the appropriate therapeutic regimen needs to be identified and provided while managing systemic limitations that could secondarily limit the healing response. Unfortunately, most current solutions seem to aim at designing therapeutic regimen with little or no consideration of the specific details of the wound environment and systemic limitations. One factor that is centrally important in making the wound environment receptive is correction of wound hypoxia. Recent work have identified that oxygen is not only required to disinfect wounds and fuel healing but that oxygen-dependent redox-sensitive signaling processes represent an integral component of the healing cascade. Over a decade ago, it was proposed that in biological systems oxidants are not necessarily always the triggers for oxidative damage and that oxidants such as H2O2 could actually serve as signaling messengers and drive several aspects of cellular signaling. Today, that concept is much more developed and mature. Evidence supporting the role of oxidants such as H2O2 as signaling messenger is compelling. A complete understanding of the continuum between the classical and emergent roles of oxygen requires a thorough consideration of current concepts in redox biology. The objective of this review is to describe our current understanding of how redox-sensitive processes may drive dermal tissue repair. PMID:18249195

  17. Healing Magazine, Volume 8, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue contains articles on intervention for self-injurious behavior, providing school-based grief groups, effectively using time-out as a parenting tool, and KidsPeace's suicide prevention…

  18. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  19. VAC therapy to promote wound healing after surgical revascularisation for critical lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Pipitò, Narayana; Spinelli, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new emerging non-invasive system in wound care, which speeds up wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates, and facilitating the removal of bacteria from the wound. The application of sub-atmospheric pressure on the lesions seems to alter the cytoskeleton of the cells on the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increase the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The aim of this study is to analyse the results of VAC therapy used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of foot wounds in patients affected by critical limb ischaemia (CLI) (Rutherford 6 class) after distal surgical revascularisation, to promote and accelerate the healing of ulcers. Twenty-nine patients (20 males, 9 females; mean age 68·4) affected by CLI of Rutherford 6 class, after surgical revascularisation of the lower limb, underwent VAC therapy in order to speed up wound healing. Complete wound healing was achieved in 19 patients (65·51%), in an average period of 45·4 ± 25·6 days. VAC therapy is a valid aid, after surgical revascularisation, to achieve rapid healing of foot lesions in patients with CLI.

  20. Wound Healing Problems in the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Politis, Constantinus; Schoenaers, Joseph; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Agbaje, Jimoh O.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a primary survival mechanism that is largely taken for granted. The literature includes relatively little information about disturbed wound healing, and there is no acceptable classification describing wound healing process in the oral region. Wound healing comprises a sequence of complex biological processes. All tissues follow an essentially identical pattern to complete the healing process with minimal scar formation. The oral cavity is a remarkable environment in which wound healing occurs in warm oral fluid containing millions of microorganisms. The present review provides a basic overview of the wound healing process and with a discussion of the local and general factors that play roles in achieving efficient would healing. Results of oral cavity wound healing can vary from a clinically healed wound without scar formation and with histologically normal connective tissue under epithelial cells to extreme forms of trismus caused by fibrosis. Many local and general factors affect oral wound healing, and an improved understanding of these factors will help to address issues that lead to poor oral wound healing. PMID:27853435

  1. Comparative study of laser and LED systems of low intensity applied to tendon healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, J. L. N.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Parizotto, N. A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Low-intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) and Light Emitting Diode Therapy (LEDT) of low intensity on the treatment of lesioned Achilles tendon of rats. The experimental model consisted of a partial mechanical lesion on the right Achilles tendon deep portion of 90 rats. One hour after the lesion, the injured animals received applications of laser/LED (685, 830/630, 880 nm), and the same procedure was repeated at 24-h intervals, for 10 days. The healing process and deposition of collagen were evaluated based on a polarization microscopy analysis of the alignment and organization of collagen bundles, through the birefringence (optical retardation-OR). The results showed a real efficiency of treatments based on LEDT and confirmed that LILT seems to be effective on healing process. Although absence of coherence of LED light, tendon healing treatment with this feature was satisfactory and can certainly replace treatments based on laser light applications. Applications of infrared laser at 830 nm and LED 880 nm were more efficient when the aim is a good organization, aggregation, and alignment of the collagen bundles on tendon healing. However, more research is needed for a safety and more efficient determination of a protocol with LED.

  2. LATE-ONSET SELF-HEALING LANGERHANS CELL HISTIOCYTOSIS: REPORT OF A VERY RARE ENTITY

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Fatma Sule; Ergin, Malik; Ozek, Gulcihan; Vergin, Canan; Karakuzu, Ali; Seremet, Sila

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report a case of late-onset self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Case description: A 4½-month-old female patient presenting with an eythematopurpuric eruption underwent a skin biopsy for histopathology and was first diagnosed with isolated cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Her lesions regressed within a few months and she was retrospectively diagnosed with late-onset self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis after being without skin or systemic involvement in a follow-up four years later. Comments: Self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which is characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells and presents with cutaneous lesions, is a rare self-limited variant of histiocytosis and can only be diagnosed retrospectively, after the patient remains free from systemic involvement for several years. Although it presents at birth or during the neonatal period, only a few cases of its late-onset type regarding the age of onset have been reported. Purpuric lesions that appear after the neonatal period serve as a clue for late-onset self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis and the patients should be monitored regularly for systemic involvement if the diagnosis is confirmed by a cutaneous biopsy.

  3. Use of ultrasound, color Doppler imaging and radiography to monitor periapical healing after endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tikku, Aseem P; Kumar, Sunil; Loomba, Kapil; Chandra, Anil; Verma, Promila; Aggarwal, Renu

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of ultrasound, color Doppler imaging and conventional radiography in monitoring the post-surgical healing of periapical lesions of endodontic origin. Fifteen patients who underwent periapical surgery for endodontic pathology were randomly selected. In all patients, periapical lesions were evaluated preoperatively using ultrasound, color Doppler imaging and conventional radiography, to analyze characteristics such as size, shape and dimensions. On radiographic evaluation, dimensions were measured in the superoinferior and mesiodistal direction using image-analysis software. Ultrasound evaluation was used to measure the changes in shape and dimensions on the anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mesiodistal planes. Color Doppler imaging was used to detect the blood-flow velocity. Postoperative healing was monitored in all patients at 1 week and 6 months by using ultrasound and color Doppler imaging, together with conventional radiography. The findings were then analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the 3 imaging techniques. At 6 months, ultrasound and color Doppler imaging were significantly better than conventional radiography in detecting changes in the healing of hard tissue at the surgical site (P < 0.004). This study demonstrates that ultrasound and color Doppler imaging have the potential to supplement conventional radiography in monitoring the post-surgical healing of periapical lesions of endodontic origin.

  4. Use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate adhesive in rat liver induced lesion.

    PubMed

    Santos, Orlando José dos; Marques, Giancarlo de Souza; Sauaia Filho, Euler Nicolau; Frota, Gustavo Medeiros; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro; Santos, Rennan Abud Pinheiro

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the healing process of rat traumatic liver lesion corrected with the use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate adhesive, compared to the use of biologically absorbable chromed catgut thread suture. Thirty mail adult rats were divided into two groups (15 per group) according to the used method for liver lesion correction as follows: adhesive group (AG), and catgut group (CG); each group being divided into three subsets of five animals (7th, 14th, and 21st day), respectively, according to post-surgery evaluation. All animals were submitted to homogeneous lesion applying synthetic bonding to AG and using chromed catgut suture to CG for lesion correction. Macroscopic and microscopic parameters of healing processes were evaluated. Both groups of animals showed excellent abdominal wall healing, with no evidence of infection, and no abdominal cavity peritonitis or abscess. The presence of adherence was observed in both groups with no statistically significant difference. As to macroscopic evaluation, there was statistically significant difference with respect to specific factors of clinical inflammation (ischemic inflammation and giant celular inflammatory reaction) between animals evaluated on the 10th day (ischemic necrosis and giant cellular inflammatory reaction) among animals evaluated on the 14th day (A14 versus C14). Applying 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate adhesive for correcting rat liver lesion does not change healing process when compared to the use of chromed catgut stitch.

  5. New therapeutic strategy for amino acid medicine: prophylactic and healing promoting effect of monosodium glutamate against NSAID-induced enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Amagase, Kikuko; Ochi, Akimu; Kojo, Azusa; Mizunoe, Ami; Taue, Masaya; Kinoshita, Naoya; Nakamura, Eiji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the development and healing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal lesions in rats. Loxoprofen (60 mg/kg, p.o.) induced lesions in the small intestine within 24 h, accompanied by a decrease of Muc2 expression and an increase in enterobacterial invasion and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. These lesions were prevented when MSG was given as a mixture of powdered food for 5 days before the loxoprofen treatment. This effect of MSG was accompanied by an increase in Muc2 expression / mucus secretion as well as the suppression of bacterial invasion and iNOS expression. These intestinal lesions healed spontaneously within 6 days, but the process was impaired by the repeated administration of low-dose loxoprofen (30 mg/kg) for 5 days after the ulceration, with the decrease of vascular endothelial derived growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis. The healing-impairing effect of loxoprofen was prevented by feeding 5% MSG for 5 days after the ulceration. These results suggest that MSG not only prevents loxoprofen-induced small intestinal damage but also promotes a healing of these lesions; the former is functionally associated with the increase in Muc2 expression / mucus secretion and the suppression of bacterial invasion and iNOS expression, while the latter is associated with the stimulation of VEGF expression/angiogenesis.

  6. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  7. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  8. Incidental vertebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Walcott, Brian P

    2011-12-01

    Incidental vertebral lesions on imaging of the spine are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Contributing factors include the aging population, the increasing prevalence of back pain, and increased usage of MR imaging. Additionally, refinements in CT and MR imaging have increased the number of demonstrable lesions. The management of incidental findings varies among practitioners and commonly depends more on practice style than on data or guidelines. In this article we review incidental findings within the vertebral column and review management of these lesions, based on available Class III data.

  9. Sigmund Freud: pioneer in energy healing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stephen D; Edwards, David J

    2010-02-01

    Energy healing is a popular contemporary term for forms of healing that facilitate a natural healing process through harmonizing, rebalancing, and releasing energy flow disturbed or blocked by disease and illness. Biographical evidence indicates that Freud used physical, suggestive, and radiant forms of energy healing, and that his personal life, metapsychology, and psychoanalysis were founded on dynamic, energetic experiences and conceptualizations. Analysis of Freud's life and work leads to the conclusion that in experience, theory, and practice, Freud typified the traditional role of therapist and was a pioneer in modern forms of energy healing.

  10. Skin: histology and physiology of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gantwerker, Eric A; Hom, David B

    2011-08-01

    It is important to understand the histology and physiology of skin for the prediction and optimization of wound healing. Optimal postoperative wound healing to minimize scarring entails minimizing local, systemic, and environmental factors that lead to poor wound healing. Keeping the wound clean and moist, minimizing trauma, and infection are the local wound tenets. Systemic tenets include minimizing medications that inhibit processes of wound healing, maintaining adequate nutrition, pain palliation, UV protection, and smoking cessation. This article presents the dynamic process of wound healing and the basic tenets to minimize scarring. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  12. [Treatment of american cutaneous leishmaniasis, with lesions in the mucosa, using pentamidine isethionate].

    PubMed

    Amato, V S; de Paula, J G; Imamura, R; Amato Neto, V; Duarte, M I; Boulos, M I; Boulos, M; Nicodemo, A C; de Mendonca, J S

    1996-01-01

    Ten patients with mucosal lesions caused by American tegumental leishmaniasis were treated with pentamidine isethionate at the dose 4 mg/kg on alternate days by the intravenous route. The mean posology was 2,140 mg. Healing of the lesions occurred in 9 (90%) of the patients who completed treatment. There was no recurrence during a follow-up time of 1 to 24 months (mean, 7,7 months). One patient discontinued treatment before healing of the lesion because be developed diabetes mellitus. In 3 (30%) patients, blood exams showed increased urea and creatinine levels and leucopenia, which were corrected by increasing the interval between administrations of the drug. Pentamidine isethionate is efficient in bringing about cicatrization of the lesions but needs further evaluation in terms of its value in preventing recurrence.

  13. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved.

  14. Inflammatory choroidal neovascular membrane after healed tuberculous choroidal granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Sikander A. K.; Saifuddin, Khadija; Devulapally, Santhosh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of choroidal granuloma masquerading as intraocular tumor that healed on anti-tuberculous treatment but led to the development of inflammatory choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM). Method: A 42-year-old female patient with past history of hysterectomy presented with diminution of vision in the right eye. Fundus examination in the right eye showed a yellowish white choroidal mass with associated bullous retinal detachment superotemporal to fovea. Left eye fundus was normal. Fundus flourescein angiography showed early and late hyperflourescence with late pooling in serous detachments. Complete systemic evaluation did not yield a clue to diagnosis. Positron emission tomography scan (PET scan) showed enlarged lymph nodes in cervical, mediastinal and peritoneal regions. Lymph node biopsy showed caseating granulomas. Results: The granuloma subsided and a scar formed 5 months after starting anti-tuberculous treatment with improvement in vision. Six months later, the vision deteriorated again with the development of a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) at the margin of the scar. The CNVM resolved and all the signs of activity subsided after giving intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injections. Conclusions: Making a diagnosis of tuberculous granuloma in a case of choroidal mass lesion is a challenge. PET scan helps in identifying metabolically active lymph nodes appropriate for biopsy. Healed scars of tuberculous choroid lesions should be followed closely to detect the development of CNVM. PMID:28293535

  15. Max brödel: illustrating healed valve ring abscesses.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Brendan P; Thomas, Caroline Bedell; Hutchins, Grover M

    2005-09-01

    A 14-year-old adolescent girl presented with severe congestive heart failure, progressive throughout 3 months. A precordial thrill, machinery-like murmur, and right bundle branch block were noted. Death occurred despite digitalis and diuretic therapy and removal of pleural and ascitic fluid. The autopsy revealed 2 multilocular cystic structures in the interventricular septum consistent with being spontaneously drained valve ring abscesses. One of these lesions formed a fistulous communication that penetrated through the interventricular septum between the right aortic sinus of Valsalva and the crista supraventricularis that connected to the right ventricle. Another lesion, an adjacent separate but similar cystlike structure, communicated only with the left ventricular cavity. Although the cause of these lesions is uncertain, it seems probable that they are the residue of spontaneously drained and healed valve ring abscesses. Max Brödel, a medical illustrator and the first director of the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, drew previously unpublished figures of this patient's cardiac lesions. These illustrations exhibit Brödel's superb command of both art and medicine essential to his ability to make complex anatomic relationships demonstrable. We discuss Brödel's career and his influence on both the art and science of medicine.

  16. Wound healing in acutely injured fascia.

    PubMed

    Lau, Frank H; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2014-05-01

    Fascial healing following acute injury, such as that occurring during surgical procedures, is defined functionally. For example, failure of fascial healing following celiotomy is only identified when incisional hernias are diagnosed. Such hernias incur billions of dollars per year in medical costs. Despite the importance of fascial healing, there is a paucity of data regarding the quality such healing. In clinical settings, the quantification of fascial wound healing is limited to a binary state: either there is no clinically apparent functional deficit and full fascia healing is assumed, or an incisional hernia or other functional failure is visible and the fascia did not heal. There are no clinical methods to isolate and functionally test fascia in patients. Recent studies have revealed unexpected findings regarding the recovery of tensile strength, specific surgical methods that optimize fascial healing, and the potential impact of biological pharmaceuticals in eliminating fascial healing failure. However, much remains unknown about the biology of fascial healing. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  17. The self-healing composite anticorrosion coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhao; Wei, Zhang; Le-ping, Liao; Hong-mei, Wang; Wu-jun, Li

    Self-healing coatings, which autonomically repair and prevent corrosion of the underlying substrate, are of particular interest for the researchers. In the article, effectiveness of epoxy resin filled microcapsules was investigated for healing of cracks generated in coatings. Microcapsules were prepared by in situ polymerization of urea-formaldehyde resin to form shell over epoxy resindroplets. Characteristics of these capsules were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and particle size analyzer. The model system of self-healing antisepsis coating consists of an epoxy resin matrix, 10 wt% microencapsulated healing agent, 2wt% catalyst solution. The self-healing function of this coating system is evaluated through corrosion testing of damaged and healed coated steel samples compared to control samples. Electrochemical testing provides further evidence of passivation of the substrate by self-healing coatings.

  18. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  19. Bilateral lacrimal caruncle lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Yuta; Takai, Yoshiko; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of a lesion on the medial lacrimal canthus of both eyes. He had a history of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, i.e., pANCA-positive interstitial pneumonia. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging excluded space occupying lesions, and laboratory testing excluded thyroid-related diseases. The masses were excised, and histopathological examinations showed sebaceous gland hyperplasia and inflammatory changes around the gland. In addition, the specimen from the left eye showed a retention cyst possibly caused by an infection. It was also possible that the use of steroid was involved in the development of the lesions. A relationship between the ANCA and the lesions was not completely eliminated. PMID:28303065

  20. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the talus. During this period of immobilization, nonweightbearing range-of-motion exercises may be recommended. Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti- ... in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion ...

  1. [Wound healing after vacuum drainage].

    PubMed

    Davydov, Iu A; Larichev, A B; Abramov, A Iu

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum therapy was applied in the management of 63 patients with postoperative ventral hernias, 101 patients with a similar pathological conditions were treated by the traditional method for wound healing. From analysis of the results of treatment and with due consideration for the results of additional methods of examination it was established that vacuum prevents accumulation of exudate and blood clots in the wound cavity and removes the risk medium for the development of pyo-inflammatory complications. Moreover, by promoting the coming together of the wound edges and liquidation of the wound cavity, vacuum therapy affects the metabolic reorganizations in the tissues and leads to stabilization of the regeneration mechanisms. The use of vacuum therapy in the postoperative period creates the possibility of regulating the reparative reactions through an active effect on the healing of the wound in the phase of inflammation, protecting in this manner the biology of the wound process and preventing infectious complications.

  2. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  3. Traditional lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    Lesion detection aids ideally aim at increasing the sensitivity of visual caries detection without trading off too much in terms of specificity. The use of a dental probe (explorer), bitewing radiography and fibre-optic transillumination (FOTI) have long been recommended for this purpose. Today, probing of suspected lesions in the sense of checking the 'stickiness' is regarded as obsolete, since it achieves no gain of sensitivity and might cause irreversible tooth damage. Bitewing radiography helps to detect lesions that are otherwise hidden from visual examination, and it should therefore be applied to a new patient. The diagnostic performance of radiography at approximal and occlusal sites is different, as this relates to the 3-dimensional anatomy of the tooth at these sites. However, treatment decisions have to take more into account than just lesion extension. Bitewing radiography provides additional information for the decision-making process that mainly relies on the visual and clinical findings. FOTI is a quick and inexpensive method which can enhance visual examination of all tooth surfaces. Both radiography and FOTI can improve the sensitivity of caries detection, but require sufficient training and experience to interpret information correctly. Radiography also carries the burden of the risks and legislation associated with using ionizing radiation in a health setting and should be repeated at intervals guided by the individual patient's caries risk. Lesion detection aids can assist in the longitudinal monitoring of the behaviour of initial lesions. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Self-healing fuse development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, N. D.; Kinsinger, R. E.; Harris, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    The mercury-filled self-healing fuses developed for this program afford very good protection from circuit faults with rapid reclosure. Fuse performance and design parameters have been characterized. Life tests indicate a capability of 500 fuse operations. Fuse ratings are 150 v at 5, 15, 25 and 50 circuit A. A series of sample fuses using alumina and beryllia insulation have been furnished to NASA for circuit evaluation.

  5. Fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing Hoi; Miclau, Theodore; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Yang, Frank F; Alt, Volker

    2016-06-01

    As the world population rises, osteoporotic fracture is an emerging global threat to the well-being of elderly patients. The process of fracture healing by intramembranous ossification or/and endochondral ossification involve many well-orchestrated events including the signaling, recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during the early phase; formation of a hard callus and extracellular matrix, angiogenesis and revascularization during the mid-phase; and finally callus remodeling at the late phase of fracture healing. Through clinical and animal research, many of these factors are shown to be impaired in osteoporotic bone. Animal studies related to post-menopausal estrogen deficient osteoporosis (type I) have shown healing to be prolonged with decreased levels of MSCs and decreased levels of angiogenesis. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) was shown to be delayed in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture. This might be related to the observed difference in mechanical sensitivity between normal and osteoporotic bones, which requires further experiments to elucidate. In mice fracture models related to senile osteoporosis (type II), it was observed that chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation were impaired; and that transplantation of juvenile bone marrow would result in enhanced callus formation. Other factors related to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have also been noted to be impaired in aged models, affecting the degradation of cartilaginous matrixes and vascular invasion; the result is changes in matrix composition and growth factors concentrations that ultimately impairs healing during age-related osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic related fractures occur at metaphyseal sites clinically, and reports have indicated that differences exist between diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. An animal model that satisfies three main criteria (metaphyseal region, plate fixation, osteoporosis) is suggested for future research for

  6. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemokines in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gillitzer, R; Goebeler, M

    2001-04-01

    Healing of wounds is one of the most complex biological events after birth as a result of the interplay of different tissue structures and a large number of resident and infiltrating cell types. The latter are mainly constituted by leukocyte subsets (neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, and lymphocytes), which sequentially infiltrate the wound site and serve as immunological effector cells but also as sources of inflammatory and growth-promoting cytokines. Recent data demonstrate that recruitment of leukocyte subtypes is tightly regulated by chemokines. Moreover, the presence of chemokine receptors on resident cells (e.g., keratinocytes, endothelial cells) indicates that chemokines also contribute to the regulation of epithelialization, tissue remodeling, and angiogenesis. Thus, chemokines are in an exclusive position to integrate inflammatory events and reparative processes and are important modulators of human-skin wound healing. This review will focus preferentially on the role of chemokines during skin wound healing and intends to provide an update on the multiple functions of individual chemokines during the phases of wound repair.

  8. Bixin action in the healing process of rats mouth wounds.

    PubMed

    Piva, Renata Machado; Johann, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; Costa, Camila Kocler; Miguel, Obdulio Gomez; Rosa, Edvaldo Ribeiro; de Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Ignacio, Sergio Aparecido; Bettega, Patrícia Vida Cassi; Gregio, Ana Maria Trindade

    2013-01-01

    Oral lesions that manifest as ulcer lesions are quite common and can cause discomfort to the patient. Searching for drugs to accelerate the healing of these lesions is nonstop process. Bixin is a molecule found in annatto (urucum) seeds and is considered a viable therapeutic option to treat such lesions due to its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and healing properties. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of the bixin solution in the ulcer healing process in the oral mucosa of rats. Ulcers were induced with punches of 0.5 cm in the middle of the dorsum of the tongue of 64 Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into 8 groups, in which 4 groups were treated with saline solution, while the other 4 were treated with the bixin solution. The animals were sacrificed in the periods 2, 7, 14, and 21 days after the beginning of the treatment. The species were histologically processed and stained with hematoxylin/eosin and picrosirius. Fibroblasts, reepithelialization, and wound contraction could be observed, as could the quantification of neutrophils, macrophages, plasma cells, lymphocytes, and mature and immature collagen. On the seventh day, the experimental group, when compared to the control group, presented a higher proliferation of fibroblasts, more advanced reepithelialization, and a higher contraction in the wounds. A reduction in the average number of neutrophils in the experimental group, when compared to the control group, could be observed in all periods (p=0.000). Up to two days, the total collagen area was higher (p=0.044) in the experimental group (4139.60±3047.51t han in the control group (1564.81±918.47). The deposition of mature collagen, on the 14(th) day, was higher (p=0.048) in the experimental group (5802.40±3578.18) than in the control group (1737.26±1439.97). The results found in the present study indicate that the bixin solution inhibits the acute inflammatory response with a minor average number of neutrophils and

  9. Nonsurgical root canal therapy of large cyst-like inflammatory periapical lesions and inflammatory apical cysts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Louis M; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Jarshen; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2009-05-01

    It is a general belief that large cyst-like periapical lesions and apical true cysts caused by root canal infection are less likely to heal after nonsurgical root canal therapy. Nevertheless, there is no direct evidence to support this assumption. A large cyst-like periapical lesion or an apical true cyst is formed within an area of apical periodontitis and cannot form by itself. Therefore, both large cyst-like periapical lesions and apical true cysts are of inflammatory and not of neoplastic origin. Apical periodontitis lesions, regardless of whether they are granulomas, abscesses, or cysts, fail to heal after nonsurgical root canal therapy for the same reason, intraradicular and/or extraradicular infection. If the microbial etiology of large cyst-like periapical lesions and inflammatory apical true cysts in the root canal is removed by nonsurgical root canal therapy, the lesions might regress by the mechanism of apoptosis in a manner similar to the resolution of inflammatory apical pocket cysts. To achieve satisfactory periapical wound healing, surgical removal of an apical true cyst must include elimination of root canal infection.

  10. Influence of the location of nonischemic diabetic forefoot osteomyelitis on time to healing after undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Cecilia-Matilla, Almudena; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Chana-Valero, Pedro; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2013-09-01

    The forefoot has been reported as the most frequent location of osteomyelitis in the feet of patients with diabetes. The forefoot includes toes and metatarsal heads as common locations of bone infections, but the anatomy of these bones is quite different. As a result, such differences in anatomy may have an impact on the outcomes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether different locations of osteomyelitis in the forefoot have any influence on time to healing after undergoing surgery in a prospective series including 195 patients without peripheral arterial disease and osteomyelitis confirmed by histopathology. Location of the lesion was classified into 4 groups: hallux, first metatarsal head, lesser metatarsal heads, and lesser toes. The time required to achieve healing and the cumulative rate of wounds healed and likelihood of healing were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Time of healing (mean ± SD) in the whole series was 10.7 ± 8.4 weeks. Osteomyelitis located in the lesser toes has a higher probability of healing by the fourth week (odds ratio [OR] = 5.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8-11.6, P < .001), eighth week (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.6-6.4, P < .001), or twelfth week (OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.3-7.0, P = .008) than other osteomyelitis locations. Osteomyelitis located in the first metatarsal joint was less likely to heal by the eighth week (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.9, P = .037) and 12th week (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-1.0, P = .040). In conclusion, time to healing is significantly different according to the location of the bone infection in the forefoot.

  11. The Tennessee study: factors affecting treatment outcome and healing time following nonsurgical root canal treatment.

    PubMed

    Azim, A A; Griggs, J A; Huang, G T-J

    2016-01-01

    To determine factors that may influence treatment outcome and healing time following root canal treatment. Root filled and restored teeth by pre-doctoral students were included in this study. Teeth/roots were followed-up regularly, and treatment outcome was evaluated at every follow-up appointment (healed, healing, uncertain or unsatisfactory). Host (age, immune condition, pulp/periapical diagnosis, tooth/root type, location and anatomy) and treatment factors (master apical file size, apical extension, voids and density of root filling) were recorded from patient dental records. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the impact of the factors on treatment outcomes and healing times. A total of 422 roots from 291 teeth met the inclusion criteria with a mean follow-up period of 2 years. The preoperative pulp condition, procedural errors during treatment, apical extension and density of root fillings significantly affected the treatment outcome. The average time required for a periapical lesion to heal was 11.78 months. The healing time increased in patients with compromised healing, patients older than 40 years, roots with Weine type II root canal systems, root canal systems prepared to a master apical file size <35, and roots with overextended fillings (P < 0.1). Multiple host and treatment factors affected the healing time and outcome of root canal treatment. Follow-up protocols should consider these factors before concluding the treatment outcome: patient's age, immune condition, as well as roots with overextended fillings, root canal systems with smaller apical preparations (size <35) or roots with complex canal systems. Intervention may be recommended if the treatment quality was inadequate or if patients became symptomatic. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Electrical Activation of Wound-Healing Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Penninger, Josef; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective wound healing has been a lasting and challenging topic in health care. Various strategies have been used to accelerate and perfect the healing process. One such strategy has involved the application of an exogenous electrical stimulus to chronic wounds with the aim of stimulating healing responses. The Problem The biology of electric stimulation to instigate healing, however, is very poorly understood. How does electric stimulation induce healing responses? Basic/Clinical Science Advances Recent research shows that the electric fields (EFs) activate multiple signaling pathways that are critical for wound healing. Importantly, the EFs provide a powerful, sometimes an overriding, directional signal for cell migration in wound healing. Unlike other stimuli, EFs have the intrinsic property of being directional. The EF-directed cell migration (electrotaxis/galvanotaxis) appears to be a consequence of EF-induced polarized signaling of epidermal growth factor receptors, integrins, and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Pten, and may be mediated by protein kinase C, intracellular Ca2+, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Because directional cell migration is a key component in wound healing, galvanotaxis may represent an important mechanism of wound healing. Clinical Care Relevance With the constantly enlarging diabetic and aging population, chronic or nonhealing wounds pose increasing health and economic problems, and currently there is no effective therapy available. Electric stimulation activates important intracellular signaling pathways that are polarized in the EF direction, resulting in enhanced and stimulated directional cell migration. Electric stimulation offers a novel approach to achieve better and accelerated wound healing. Conclusion Experimental evidence suggests a significant role of endogenous EFs in cell migration in wound healing. Most importantly, EFs are a very powerful signal to direct cell migration. Electric stimulation therefore

  13. The natural history of osteochondral lesions in the ankle.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-01-01

    Most osteochondral lesions (defects) of the talar dome are caused by trauma, which may be a single event or repeated, less intense events (microtrauma). A lesion may heal, remain asymptomatic, or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing, prolonged joint swelling, and the formation of subchondral bone cysts. During loading, compression of the cartilage forces water into the microfractured subchondral bone. The increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone can cause osteolysis and the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion but most likely is caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking and a concomitant decrease in pH produced by osteoclasts, which sensitize the highly innervated subchondral bone. Prevention of further degeneration depends on several factors, including the repair of the subchondral bone plate and the correct alignment of the ankle joint.

  14. Interrelationship between Periapical Lesion and Systemic Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hajime; Hirai, Kimito; Martins, Christine Men; Furusho, Hisako; Battaglino, Ricardo; Hashimoto, Koshi

    2016-01-01

    Periapical periodontitis, also known as periapical lesion, is a common dental disease, along with periodontitis (gum disease). Periapical periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, caused by endodontic infection, and its development is regulated by the host immune/inflammatory response. Metabolic disorders, which are largely dependent on life style such as eating habits, have been interpreted as a “metabolically-triggered” low-grade systemic inflammation and may interact with periapical periodontitis by triggering immune modulation. The host immune system is therefore considered the common fundamental mechanism of both disease conditions. An elevated inflammatory state caused by metabolic disorders can impact the clinical outcome of periapical lesions and interfere with wound healing after endodontic treatment. Although additional well-designed clinical studies are needed, periapical lesions appear to affect insulin sensitivity and exacerbate non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Immune regulatory cytokines produced by various cell types, including immune cells and adipose tissue, play an important role in this interrelationship. PMID:26881444

  15. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  16. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  17. Healed Depressed Parasagittal Skull Fractures-A Feature of Archaic Australian Aboriginal Remains.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Keryn; Brophy, Brian; Cornish, Brian; Byard, Roger W

    2016-11-01

    The skeletal remains of eight Australian Aboriginals with healed depressed skull fractures were examined. Male:female ratio 5:3; age range 20-60 yrs. Burial dates by (14) C dating in three cases were 500 years BP (n = 2) and 1300 BP. There were 13 healed depressed skull fractures manifested by shallow indentations of cortical bone and thinning of diploe, with no significant disturbance of the inner skull tables. Nine (69%) were located within 35 mm of the sagittal suture/midline. These lesions represent another acquired feature that might be helpful in suggesting that a skull is from a tribal Aboriginal individual and may be particularly useful if the remains are represented by only fragments of calvarium. While obviously not a finding specific to this population, these healed injuries would be consistent with the possible results of certain types of conflict behavior reported in traditional Aboriginal groups that involved formalized inflicted blunt head trauma.

  18. [Therapy of degenerative and posttraumatic rotator cuff lesions].

    PubMed

    Stein, T; Mehling, A P; Welsch, F

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of rotator cuff lesions is age-dependent and up to 19-32 % for full-thickness ruptures and 13-32 % for partial-thickness lesions respectively. The therapy of partial-thickness ruptures should be considered in accordance with the articular, bursal or intratendinous location of the lesion. The therapy of full-thickness ruptures should be applied in accordance with topography and area of defect, retraction, atrophy and fatty infiltration. These parameters are considered to be important prognostic factors for the intraoperative repairability and the success of the surgery. Symptomatic or chronically progredient partial-thickness lesions as well as full-thickness lesions should generally be treated by means of surgical reconstruction. No current scientific consensus exists regarding improved clinical outcome data after the surgical approach in mini-open or arthroscopic technique. Both procedures should meet the requirements of the Gerber criteria for rotator cuff reconstruction: high primary stability, reduction of micro-movements, minimized approach associated morbidity and persisting stability to enable the fibroblastic tendon-to-bone healing. Current studies revealed a potential improvement of the tendon-to-bone healing by the application of several biologic augmentations. At the moment, these additive procedures can be applied in revision situations and for complex rotator cuff lesions with low tendon quality. No high-level in-vivo investigations concerning the human shoulder exist in the current literature that show evidence-based improvements by the additively applied biologic augmentations for rotator cuff repair. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The Effect of Subcritical Bone Loss and Exposure on Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Intercollegiate American Football.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Masini, Brendan D; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on the rate of recurrent shoulder instability after arthroscopic stabilization in an intercollegiate American football population. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty intercollegiate football players underwent primary arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability and returned to football for at least a single season. Preoperatively, 32 patients experienced recurrent subluxations, and 18 patients experienced a single or recurrent dislocation. Shoulders with glenoid bone loss >20%, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, an off-track lesion, and concomitant rotator cuff repair were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of interest was the ability to return to football without subsequent instability. Patients were followed for time to a subsequent instability event after return to play using days of exposure to football and total follow-up time after arthroscopic stabilization. Fifty consecutive patients returned to American football for a mean 1.5 seasons (range, 1-3) after arthroscopic stabilization. Three of 50 (6%; 95% CI, 1.3%-16.5%) patients experienced recurrent instability. There were no subsequent instability events after a mean 3.2 years of military service. All shoulders with glenoid bone loss >13.5% (n = 3) that underwent arthroscopic stabilization experienced recurrent instability upon returning to sport, while none of the shoulders with <13.5% glenoid bone loss (n = 47) sustained a recurrent instability event during football ( X(2) = 15.80, P < .001). Shoulders with >13.5% glenoid bone loss had an incidence rate of 5.31 cases of recurrent instability per 1000 athlete-exposures of football. In 72,000 athlete-exposures to football with <13.5% glenoid bone loss, there was no recurrent instability. Significantly

  20. Wound healing in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Schreml, Stephan; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Prantl, Lukas; Landthaler, Michael; Babilas, Philipp

    2010-11-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major therapeutic and economic issues in medicine today. Cutaneous wound healing is an extremely well-regulated and complex process basically divided into 3 phases: inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling. Unfortunately, we still do not understand this process precisely enough to give direction effectively to impaired healing processes. There have been many new developments in wound healing that provide fascinating insights and may improve our ability to manage clinical problems. Our goal is to acquaint the reader with selected major novel findings about cutaneous wound healing that have been published since the beginning of the new millennium. We discuss advances in areas such as genetics, proteases, cytokines, chemokines, and regulatory peptides, as well as therapeutic strategies, all set in the framework of the different phases of wound healing. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Scarless fetal skin wound healing update.

    PubMed

    Lo, David D; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Nauta, Allison; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2012-09-01

    Scar formation, a physiologic process in adult wound healing, can have devastating effects for patients; a multitude of pathologic outcomes, affecting all organ systems, stems from an amplification of this process. In contrast to adult wound repair, the early-gestation fetal skin wound heals without scar formation, a phenomenon that appears to be intrinsic to fetal skin. An intensive research effort has focused on unraveling the mechanisms that underlie scarless fetal wound healing in an attempt to improve the quality of healing in both children and adults. Unique properties of fetal cells, extracellular matrix, cytokine profile, and gene expression contribute to this scarless repair. Despite the great increase in knowledge gained over the past decades, the precise mechanisms regulating scarless fetal healing remain unknown. Herein, we describe the current proposed mechanisms underlying fetal scarless wound healing in an effort to recapitulate the fetal phenotype in the postnatal environment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Translating 'Asian' Modes of Healing and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses the 'translation of Asian modes of healing and medicine' in six recently published books by raising seven questions. They serve both to review the volumes and to ask how we have moved from understanding systems of healing in terms of tradition and modernity, science and nonscience, globalization and locality, innovation and cultural heritage, to translating them in terms of assemblages, products, modes of resistance, social (dis-)harmony, and ecological balance. The questions span subjects ranging from the meaning of 'Asian' in Asian modes of healing, the object of healing and classifications of systems of healing to their relation with 'biomedicine,' modernization and the state, the extents to which communities share healing tradition, and their existential meaning in context.

  3. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  4. The local immune response in ulcerative lesions of Buruli disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiszewski, A E; Becerril, E; Aguilar, L D; Kader, I T A; Myers, W; Portaels, F; Hernàndez Pando, R

    2006-01-01

    Buruli disease (BU) is a progressive necrotic and ulcerative disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. Three clinical stages of the cutaneous lesions have been described in BU: pre-ulcerative, ulcerative and healed lesions. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and automated morphometry to determine the percentage of macrophages and of CD4/CD8 lymphocytes and their expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Expression of these cytokines was correlated with the inflammatory response evaluated by histopathology. All the studied BU ulcerative cases showed extensive necrosis and chronic inflammation. The most important feature was the presence or absence of granulomas co-existing with a mixed pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. When granulomas were present significantly higher expression of IFN-γ was seen, whereas in ulcerative lesions without granulomas there was increased expression of IL-10 and significantly higher bacillary counts. These features correlated with the chronicity of the lesions; longer-lasting lesions showed granulomas. Thus, granulomas were absent from relatively early ulcerative lesions, which contained more bacilli and little IFN-γ, suggesting that at this stage of the disease strong suppression of the protective cellular immune response facilitates proliferation of bacilli. PMID:16487243

  5. Role of dental restoration materials in oral mucosal lichenoid lesions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajneesh; Handa, Sanjeev; De, Dipankar; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Rattan, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Dental restorative materials containing silver-mercury compounds have been known to induce oral lichenoid lesions. To determine the frequency of contact allergy to dental restoration materials in patients with oral lichenoid lesions and to study the effect of removal of the materials on the lesions. Forty-five patients were recruited in three groups of 15 each: Group A (lesions in close contact with dental materials), Group B (lesions extending 1 cm beyond the area of contact) and Group C (no topographic relationship). Thirty controls were recruited in two groups of 15 individuals each: Group D (oral lichenoid lesions but no dental material) and Group E (dental material but no oral lichenoid lesions). Patch tests were positive in 20 (44.5%) patients. Mercury was the most common allergen to elicit a positive reaction in eight patients, followed by nickel (7), palladium (5), potassium dichromate (3), balsam of Peru, gold sodium thiosulphate 2 and tinuvin (2) and eugenol (1), cobalt chloride (1) and carvone (1). Seven patients elicited positive response to more than one allergen. In 13 of 20 patients who consented to removal of the dental material, complete healing was observed in 6 (30%), marked improvement in 7 (35%) and no improvement in 7 (35%) patients. Relief of symptoms was usually observed 3 months after removal. Limited number of study subjects and short follow up after removal/replacement of dental restoration materials are the main limitations of this study. Contact allergy to amalgam is an important etiologic factor in oral lichenoid lesions and removal of restorative material should be offered to patients who have lesions in close proximity to the dental material.

  6. Proper muscle layer damage affects ulcer healing after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yohei; Mimori, Nobuya; Mizutamari, Hiroya; Kato, Yuhei; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Sawaguchi, Masayuki; Tawaraya, Shin; Igarashi, Kimihiro; Okubo, Syunji

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the established therapy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, management of the artificial ulcers associated with ESD has become important and the relationship between ulcer healing factors and treatment is still unclear. We aimed to evaluate ESD-related artificial ulcer reduction ratio at 4 weeks to assess factors associating with ulcer healing after ESD that may lead to optimal treatment. Between January 2009 and December 2013, a total of 375 lesions fulfilled the expanded criteria for ESD. We defined ulcer reduction rate <90% as (A) poor-healing group; and rate ≥90% as (B) well-healing group. After exclusion, 328 lesions were divided into two groups and analyzed. These two groups were compared based on clinicopathological/endoscopic features, concomitant drugs, and treatment. Ulcer reduction rate was significantly correlated with factors related to the ESD procedure (i.e. procedure time, submucosal fibrosis, and injury of the proper muscle layer, in univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that submucosal fibrosis (F2) (P = 0.03; OR, 16.46; 95% CI, 1.31-206.73) and injury of the proper muscle layer (P = 0.01; OR, 4.27; 95% CI, 2.04-8.92) were statistically significant predictors of delayed healing. This single-center retrospective study indicated that ESD-induced artificial ulcer healing was affected by submucosal fibrosis and injury of the proper muscle layer, which induced damage to the muscle layer. Therefore, the preferable pharmacotherapy can be determined on completion of the ESD procedure. © 2015 The Authors Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  7. New objective criterion for determining, noninvasively, the healing potential of an ischemic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.E.; Stewart, C.A.; Wagner, W.; Sakimura, I.

    1981-02-01

    Peripheral vascular perfusion studies using intravenously administered thallium-201 were performed on 13 patients suffering from ischemic ulcer of the lower extermities. Scintillation camera views and point counting over the lesion and adjacent region were utilized to define qualitatively and quantitatively the relative hyperemia of the lesion. The preliminary findings demonstrate that when the relative hyperemia was equal to or greater than 1.5, 100% (seven of seven) went on to heal their ulcer with conservative management. Of those without this degree of hyperemia, 83% (five of six) will require amputation. Based on this limited series, noninvasive assessment of the relative hyperemia of an ischemic ulcer using thallium-201 is a new, useful, and objective indicator of the healing potential of a so-called ischemic ulcer.

  8. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in healing necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum ulcers.

    PubMed

    Motolese, A; Vignati, F; Antelmi, A; Saturni, V

    2015-01-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD) is a chronic condition, which is characterized by single or multiple lesions on the legs, and occurs in 0.3% of patients with diabetes. Recently, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used in several clinical settings to promote sustained healing and better outcome. We propose the use of PRP for the treatment of NLD-associated recalcitrant wounds. In this study, 15 patients were treated with homologous PRP; all showed marked enhancement in wound healing without any adverse effects. After PRP application, advanced dressings were used until closure of the lesion was obtained, which was complete for all our patients. We therefore propose the use of PRP for recalcitrant wounds in patients with NLD.

  9. Rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen: Gastroprotective and Ulcer Healing Properties in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; Cabrini, Daniela de Almeida; Nascimento, Adamara Machado; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; de Paula Werner, Maria Fernanda; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2014-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan (RGal) isolate