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Sample records for baobab adansonia digitata

  1. The importance of baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) in rural West African subsistence--suggestion of a cautionary approach to international market export of baobab fruits.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Christine; Prehsler, Sarah; Hartl, Anna; Vogl, Christian R

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission recently authorized the import of baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) fruit pulp as a novel food. In rural West Africa the multipurpose baobab is used extensively for subsistence. Three hundred traditional uses of the baobab were documented in Benin, Mali, and Senegal across 11 ethnic groups and 4 agroecological zones. Baobab fruits and leaves are consumed throughout the year. The export of baobab fruits could negatively influence livelihoods, including reduced nutritional intake, change of power relations, and access rights. Capacity building and certification could encourage a sustainable and ethical trade of baobab fruits without neglecting baobab use in subsistence.

  2. The history of introduction of the African baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae: Bombacoideae) in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen L; Rangan, Haripriya; Kull, Christian A; Murphy, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the pathways of introduction of the African baobab, Adansonia digitata, to the Indian subcontinent, we examined 10 microsatellite loci in individuals from Africa, India, the Mascarenes and Malaysia, and matched this with historical evidence of human interactions between source and destination regions. Genetic analysis showed broad congruence of African clusters with biogeographic regions except along the Zambezi (Mozambique) and Kilwa (Tanzania), where populations included a mixture of individuals assigned to at least two different clusters. Individuals from West Africa, the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia shared a cluster. Baobabs from western and central India clustered separately from Africa. Genetic diversity was lower in populations from the Indian subcontinent than in African populations, but the former contained private alleles. Phylogenetic analysis showed Indian populations were closest to those from the Mombasa-Dar es Salaam coast. The genetic results provide evidence of multiple introductions of African baobabs to the Indian subcontinent over a longer time period than previously assumed. Individuals belonging to different genetic clusters in Zambezi and Kilwa may reflect the history of trafficking captives from inland areas to supply the slave trade between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. Baobabs in the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia indicate introduction from West Africa through eighteenth and nineteenth century European colonial networks.

  3. The history of introduction of the African baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae: Bombacoideae) in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Karen L.; Rangan, Haripriya; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the pathways of introduction of the African baobab, Adansonia digitata, to the Indian subcontinent, we examined 10 microsatellite loci in individuals from Africa, India, the Mascarenes and Malaysia, and matched this with historical evidence of human interactions between source and destination regions. Genetic analysis showed broad congruence of African clusters with biogeographic regions except along the Zambezi (Mozambique) and Kilwa (Tanzania), where populations included a mixture of individuals assigned to at least two different clusters. Individuals from West Africa, the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia shared a cluster. Baobabs from western and central India clustered separately from Africa. Genetic diversity was lower in populations from the Indian subcontinent than in African populations, but the former contained private alleles. Phylogenetic analysis showed Indian populations were closest to those from the Mombasa-Dar es Salaam coast. The genetic results provide evidence of multiple introductions of African baobabs to the Indian subcontinent over a longer time period than previously assumed. Individuals belonging to different genetic clusters in Zambezi and Kilwa may reflect the history of trafficking captives from inland areas to supply the slave trade between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. Baobabs in the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia indicate introduction from West Africa through eighteenth and nineteenth century European colonial networks. PMID:26473060

  4. Spatial genetic structuring of baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae) in the traditional agroforestry systems of West Africa.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Assogbadjo, Achille E; Hardy, Olivier J; Glele Kakaï, Romain; Sinsin, Brice; Van Damme, Patrick; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluates the spatial genetic structure of baobab (Adansonia digitata) populations from West African agroforestry systems at different geographical scales using AFLP fingerprints. Eleven populations from four countries (Benin, Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal) had comparable levels of genetic diversity, although the two populations in the extreme west (Senegal) had less diversity. Pairwise F(ST) ranged from 0.02 to 0.28 and increased with geographic distance, even at a regional scale. Gene pools detected by Bayesian clustering seem to be a byproduct of the isolation-by-distance pattern rather than representing actual discrete entities. The organization of genetic diversity appears to result essentially from spatially restricted gene flow, with some influences of human seed exchange. Despite the potential for relatively long-distance pollen and seed dispersal by bats within populations, statistically significant spatial genetic structuring within populations (SGS) was detected and gave a mean indirect estimate of neighborhood size of ca. 45. This study demonstrated that relatively high levels of genetic structuring are present in baobab at both large and within-population level, which was unexpected in regard to its dispersal by bats and the influence of human exchange of seeds. Implications of these results for the conservation of baobab populations are discussed.

  5. The African baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae): genetic resources in neglected populations of the Nuba Mountains, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Wiehle, Martin; Prinz, Kathleen; Kehlenbeck, Katja; Goenster, Sven; Mohamed, Seifeldin Ali; Finkeldey, Reiner; Buerkert, Andreas; Gebauer, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Adansonia digitata L. is one of the most important indigenous fruit trees of mainland Africa. Despite its significance for subsistence and income generation of local communities, little is known about the genetic and morphological variability of East African populations of A. digitata, including those of Sudan. The aim of the current study, therefore, was to analyze genetic and morphological variability of different baobab populations in Kordofan, Sudan and to estimate the effect of human intervention on genetic differentiation and diversity.• A total of 306 trees were randomly sampled from seven spatially separated locations in the Nuba Mountains, Sudan, to cover a wide range of differing environmental gradients and management regimes ('homesteads' and 'wild'). Genetic analyses were conducted using nine microsatellite markers. Because of the tetraploid nature of A. digitata, different approaches were applied to estimate patterns of genetic diversity. Investigations were completed by measurements of dendrometric and fruit morphological characters.• Genetic diversity was balanced and did not differ between locations or management regimes, although tendencies of higher diversity in 'homesteads' were observed. A Bayesian cluster approach detected two distinct gene pools in the sample set, mainly caused by one highly diverse population close to a main road. The variability of tree characters and fruit morphometries was high, and significantly different between locations.• Results indicated a rather positive effect with human intervention. The observed populations provide a promising gene pool and likely comprise ecotypes well-adapted to environmental conditions at the northern distribution range of the species, which should be considered in conservation and management programs. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  6. A 1000-Year Carbon Isotope Rainfall Proxy Record from South African Baobab Trees (Adansonia digitata L.)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A proxy rainfall record for northeastern South Africa based on carbon isotope analysis of four baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) trees shows centennial and decadal scale variability over the last 1,000 years. The record is in good agreement with a 200-year tree ring record from Zimbabwe, and it indicates the existence of a rainfall dipole between the summer and winter rainfall areas of South Africa. The wettest period was c. AD 1075 in the Medieval Warm Period, and the driest periods were c. AD 1635, c. AD 1695 and c. AD1805 during the Little Ice Age. Decadal-scale variability suggests that the rainfall forcing mechanisms are a complex interaction between proximal and distal factors. Periods of higher rainfall are significantly associated with lower sea-surface temperatures in the Agulhas Current core region and a negative Dipole Moment Index in the Indian Ocean. The correlation between rainfall and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation Index is non-static. Wetter conditions are associated with predominantly El Niño conditions over most of the record, but since about AD 1970 this relationship inverted and wet conditions are currently associated with la Nina conditions. The effect of both proximal and distal oceanic influences are insufficient to explain the rainfall regime shift between the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age, and the evidence suggests that this was the result of a northward shift of the subtropical westerlies rather than a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. PMID:25970402

  7. A 1000-Year Carbon Isotope Rainfall Proxy Record from South African Baobab Trees (Adansonia digitata L.).

    PubMed

    Woodborne, Stephan; Hall, Grant; Robertson, Iain; Patrut, Adrian; Rouault, Mathieu; Loader, Neil J; Hofmeyr, Michele

    2015-01-01

    A proxy rainfall record for northeastern South Africa based on carbon isotope analysis of four baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) trees shows centennial and decadal scale variability over the last 1,000 years. The record is in good agreement with a 200-year tree ring record from Zimbabwe, and it indicates the existence of a rainfall dipole between the summer and winter rainfall areas of South Africa. The wettest period was c. AD 1075 in the Medieval Warm Period, and the driest periods were c. AD 1635, c. AD 1695 and c. AD1805 during the Little Ice Age. Decadal-scale variability suggests that the rainfall forcing mechanisms are a complex interaction between proximal and distal factors. Periods of higher rainfall are significantly associated with lower sea-surface temperatures in the Agulhas Current core region and a negative Dipole Moment Index in the Indian Ocean. The correlation between rainfall and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation Index is non-static. Wetter conditions are associated with predominantly El Niño conditions over most of the record, but since about AD 1970 this relationship inverted and wet conditions are currently associated with la Nina conditions. The effect of both proximal and distal oceanic influences are insufficient to explain the rainfall regime shift between the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age, and the evidence suggests that this was the result of a northward shift of the subtropical westerlies rather than a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  8. Chemopreventive and remediation effect of Adansonia digitata L. Baobab (Bombacaceae) stem bark extracts in mouse model malaria.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, A O; Bewaji, C O

    2018-01-10

    Adansonia digitata L. Baobab (Bombacaceae) solvent extracts have been reported to possess medicinal properties and are currently been used traditionally for the treatment of malaria and several other diseases and infection; however few reports exist in literature that provides supportive scientific evidence in favour of its medicinal use. This study investigated the efficacy of Adansonia digitata stem bark extract in offering protection against experimental malaria and also examined its remediation effect when administered after established infection. Weanling albino mice were used in the study. The mice were transfected intraperitonially with an inoculums size of 1× 10 7 of chloroquine susceptible strain of plasmodium berghei infected erythrocytes. Mechanisms of action of the extract were investigated by measuring the degree of tissue peroxidation and tissue antioxidant status. Severity of malaria was determined by measuring the serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and serum and tissue Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. There was a significant increase in serum CRP, TNF-α concentrations and serum and tissue ALP activity in the control mice following Plasmodium berghei infection. All the treatment had effect on the growth of Plasmodium berghei parasites in mice. The extracts showed a significant dose dependent increase packed cell volume (PCV), percentage chemosupression/clearance and a significant decrease in percentage parasitemia at the two doses when administered after established infection. Methanolic extract (MEAD) at 400mg/kg exhibited the highest chemosupressive activity. The extract significantly reduced the degree of tissue peroxidation, increased the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase and superoxide dismutase activity. Administration of the extract after established infection reduced serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations and serum and tissue ALP activity. Our study suggests that Adansonia digitata protects

  9. Patterns of genetic and morphometric diversity in baobab (Adansonia digitata) populations across different climatic zones of Benin (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Assogbadjo, A E; Kyndt, T; Sinsin, B; Gheysen, G; van Damme, P

    2006-05-01

    Baobab (Adansonia digitata) is a multi-purpose tree used daily by rural African communities. The present study aimed at investigating the level of morphometric and genetic variation and spatial genetic structure within and between threatened baobab populations from the three climatic zones of Benin. A total of 137 individuals from six populations were analysed using morphometric data as well as molecular marker data generated using the AFLP technique. Five primer pairs resulted in a total of 217 scored bands with 78.34 % of them being polymorphic. A two-level AMOVA of 137 individuals from six baobab populations revealed 82.37 % of the total variation within populations and 17.63 % among populations (P < 0.001). Analysis of population structure with allele-frequency based F-statistics revealed a global F(ST) of 0.127 +/- 0.072 (P < 0.001). The mean gene diversity within populations (H(S)) and the average gene diversity between populations (D(ST)) were estimated at 0.309 +/- 0.000 and 0.045 +/- 0.072, respectively. Baobabs in the Sudanian and Sudan-Guinean zones of Benin were short and produced the highest yields of pulp, seeds and kernels, in contrast to the ones in the Guinean zone, which were tall and produced only a small number of fruits with a low pulp, seed and kernel productivity. A statistically significant correlation with the observed patterns of genetic diversity was observed for three morphological characteristics: height of the trees, number of branches and thickness of the capsules. The results indicate some degree of physical isolation of the populations collected in the different climatic zones and suggest a substantial amount of genetic structuring between the analysed populations of baobab. Sampling options of the natural populations are suggested for in or ex situ conservation.

  10. Patterns of Genetic and Morphometric Diversity in Baobab (Adansonia digitata) Populations Across Different Climatic Zones of Benin (West Africa)

    PubMed Central

    ASSOGBADJO, A. E.; KYNDT, T.; SINSIN, B.; GHEYSEN, G.; VAN DAMME, P.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Baobab (Adansonia digitata) is a multi-purpose tree used daily by rural African communities. The present study aimed at investigating the level of morphometric and genetic variation and spatial genetic structure within and between threatened baobab populations from the three climatic zones of Benin. • Methods A total of 137 individuals from six populations were analysed using morphometric data as well as molecular marker data generated using the AFLP technique. • Key Results Five primer pairs resulted in a total of 217 scored bands with 78·34 % of them being polymorphic. A two-level AMOVA of 137 individuals from six baobab populations revealed 82·37 % of the total variation within populations and 17·63 % among populations (P < 0·001)· Analysis of population structure with allele-frequency based F-statistics revealed a global FST of 0·127 ± 0·072 (P < 0·001). The mean gene diversity within populations (HS) and the average gene diversity between populations (DST) were estimated at 0·309 ± 0·000 and 0·045 ± 0·072, respectively. Baobabs in the Sudanian and Sudan-Guinean zones of Benin were short and produced the highest yields of pulp, seeds and kernels, in contrast to the ones in the Guinean zone, which were tall and produced only a small number of fruits with a low pulp, seed and kernel productivity. A statistically significant correlation with the observed patterns of genetic diversity was observed for three morphological characteristics: height of the trees, number of branches and thickness of the capsules. • Conclusions The results indicate some degree of physical isolation of the populations collected in the different climatic zones and suggest a substantial amount of genetic structuring between the analysed populations of baobab. Sampling options of the natural populations are suggested for in or ex situ conservation. PMID:16520343

  11. The acute effects of baobab fruit ( Adansonia digitata) on satiety in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Rebecca; Clegg, Miriam; Coe, Shelly

    2017-06-01

    The baobab fruit is high in both dietary fibre and polyphenols and therefore may increase satiety. The aim of the study was to measure the effects of baobab fruit extract on satiety. The study was conducted on 20 healthy participants. The study was a one-day single-blind crossover design. Participants were randomised to either a test smoothie consisting of 15 g of baobab extract or a control smoothie without the addition of baobab. Subjective ratings of satiety were taken on visual analogue scales immediately pre-consumption and then post-consumption, and energy intake at a post ad libitum meal was recorded. Subjective measures of hunger were reduced following the test smoothie compared with the control ( p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in calorie intake at an ad libitum meal. This research has positive implications for the use of baobab for reducing hunger, possibly having a positive effect on weight maintenance.

  12. AMS radiocarbon dating of very large Grandidier's baobabs (Adansonia grandidieri)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Patrut, Roxana T.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Margineanu, Dragos

    2015-10-01

    The article reports the AMS radiocarbon investigation of the two largest known Adansonia grandidieri specimens. The two baobabs, which are named Tsitakakoike and Pregnant baobab, are located in Southwestern Madagascar, near Andombiro. A third specimen from this area, the House baobab, was also investigated. According to measurements, Tsitakakoike is the biggest individual above ground level of all Adansonia species. The House baobab was selected for its exposed structure, which is identical to the closed ring-shaped structure with false cavities identified by us in large and old Adansonia digitata specimens. According to our research, Tsitakakoike and the Pregnant baobab have multi-stemmed cylindrical trunks which are mainly hollow; the two very large baobabs also possess a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon dates of the oldest wood samples collected from the large trunks were 1274 ± 20 BP for Tsitakakoike and 930 ± 20 BP for the Pregnant baobab. According to their original positions and to the architectures of the two A. grandidieri, the ages of Tsitakakoike and Pregnant baobab would be between 1300 and 1500 years. Therefore, A. grandidieri becomes the third Adansonia species with individuals that can live over 1000 years, according to accurate dating results.

  13. Variability of vitamins B1, B2 and minerals content in baobab (Adansonia digitata) leaves in East and West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hyacinthe, Traoré; Charles, Parkouda; Adama, Korbo; Diarra, Compaoré-Sérémé; Dicko, Mamoudou H; Svejgaard, Jan J; Diawara, Bréhima

    2015-01-01

    The regional variability and age–age correlation on vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and minerals (Ca, Mg, P, K, Cu, Fe, Mn, Na, and Zn) concentration in baobab leaves were investigated. Baobab was cultivated from seeds from 11 countries including Benin, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Tanzania, Togo, Senegal, and Sudan. Vitamins B1 and B2 content were assessed using microbiological VitaFast kits methods and minerals by atomic absorption and flame spectrometry methods. Overall, the results showed a higher content of vitamin B2 compared to vitamin B1 with the highest vitamin B2 content (1.04 ± 0.05 mg/100 g DM) from Senegal. The highest iron (Fe) content of 26.39 mg/100 g was found in baobab leaves from Mali. For age–age correlation, adult baobab leaves of Nankoun in Burkina Faso provided the highest calcium (Ca) content of 3373 mg/100 g. However, for provenance trial, young plants from three communities of Burkina Faso showed the highest calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) content. The study demonstrated that vitamins B1 and B2 and mineral contents in baobab leaves vary with the country and the age of the tree. Vitamin B1 content was higher in baobab leaves from ascendants compared to those from descendants, while in contrast vitamin B2 content was higher in the leaves from the descendants compared to their ascendants (mother tree). PMID:25649547

  14. Searching for the oldest baobab of Madagascar: radiocarbon investigation of large Adansonia rubrostipa trees.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F; Danthu, Pascal; Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel Leong; Patrut, Roxana T; Lowy, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab) specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called "Grandmother" consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab) specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the "polygamous baobab", consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs.

  15. Searching for the Oldest Baobab of Madagascar: Radiocarbon Investigation of Large Adansonia rubrostipa Trees

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Patrut, Roxana T.; Lowy, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab) specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called “Grandmother” consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab) specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the “polygamous baobab”, consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs. PMID:25806967

  16. Protective Effect of Adansonia digitata against Isoproterenol-Induced Myocardial Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Mona A M; Hassan, Amal I; Mahmoud, Manal G; Asker, Mohsen S

    2016-01-01

    The baobab fruit (Adansonia digitata) was analyzed for proximate composition, amino acids, and minerals. The fruit pulp was found to be a good source of carbohydrates, proteins, phenols, and substantial quantities of K, Ca, and Mg. Amino acid analyses revealed high glutamic and aspartic acid, but the sulfur amino acids were the most limited. The present study was designed to investigate the role of Adansonia digitata (Baobab fruit pulp) against isoproterenol induced myocardial oxidative stress in experimental rats by demonstrating the changes in tissue cardiac markers, some antioxidant enzymes, interleukin-1 β (IL-1 β), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO), Collagen-1, galectin-3, and serum corticosterone. The activities of enzymatic antioxidant glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and non-enzymatic antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) in the heart tissue; additionally, histopathological examination of the heart was estimated. Male albino rats were randomly divided into four groups of ten animals each. Group I served as normal control animal. Group II animals received isoproterenol (ISP) (85 mg/kg body weight intraperitonealy (i.p.) to develop myocardial injury. Group III were myocardial oxidative animals treated with Baobab fruit pulp (200 µg/rats/day) for 4 weeks. Group IV received Baobab fruit pulp only. The data suggested an isoproterenol increase in levels of cardiac marker enzymes [creatine kinase MB (CK- MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], IL-1ß, MCP-1, MPO, Collagen, and galectin-3, with concomitant decrease in the activities GPX and GSH in heart tissue as well as corticosterone in serum. Baobab fruit pulp brings all the parameters to near normal level in ISP-induced myocardial infarction in rats. Histopathological examination of heart tissue of ISP-administered model rat showed infiltration of inflammatory cells and congestion in the blood vessels. However, treatment with Baobab fruit pulp (200

  17. Adansonia digitata and Adansonia gregorii fruit shells serve as a protection against high temperatures experienced during wildfires.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Andreas; Neinhuis, Christoph; Lautenschläger, Thea

    2018-02-17

    The thick and woody shell of the fruit of Adansonia species cannot be explained solely by adaptation to zoochory or hydrochory. Since the trunks of Adansonia possess a thick and fire-resistant bark and wildfires occur regularly in its habitat (savannah), we examined with the African Adanonia digitata and the Australian Adansonia gregorii whether the fruit offers protection against high heat typically experienced in wildfires. Heat-resistance tests were conducted by applying a simple heat test based on known temperature and temperature residence times occurring in savannah fires and complemented by tests to reveal the impact of heat on germination since long-term seed dormancy is known for Adansonia. Germination tests with acid treated and heat treated seeds were performed to establish if heat also increased germination rate as effectively as acid treatments have been found to do. Heat was found to increase germination rate, but not as effectively as treatment with acid, therefore fruits exposed to high temperatures experienced in wildfires may have a better chance of germination than fruits that were not exposed to wildfires. The ability of the investigated fruits to protect seeds from high temperatures suggests that wildfires may have played a role in the evolution of the hard-shell structure typically found in Adansonia.

  18. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A; von Reden, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old.

  19. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A.; von Reden, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old. PMID:26760300

  20. Biogeography and floral evolution of baobabs (Adansonia, Bombacaceae) as inferred from multiple data sets.

    PubMed

    Baum, D A; Small, R L; Wendel, J F

    1998-06-01

    The phylogeny of baobab trees was analyzed using four data sets: chloroplast DNA restriction sites, sequences of the chloroplast rpl16 intron, sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA, and morphology. We sampled each of the eight species of Adansonia plus three outgroup taxa from tribe Adansonieae. These data were analyzed singly and in combination using parsimony. ITS and morphology provided the greatest resolution and were largely concordant. The two chloroplast data sets showed concordance with one another but showed significant conflict with ITS and morphology. A possible explanation for the conflict is genealogical discordance within the Malagasy Longitubae, perhaps due to introgression events. A maximum-likelihood analysis of branching times shows that the dispersal between Africa and Australia occurred well after the fragmentation of Gondwana and therefore involved overwater dispersal. The phylogeny does not permit unambiguous reconstruction of floral evolution but suggests the plausible hypothesis that hawkmoth pollination was ancestral in Adansonia and that there were two parallel switches to pollination by mammals in the genus.

  1. A biomechanical perspective on the role of large stem volume and high water content in baobab trees (Adansonia spp.; Bombacaceae).

    PubMed

    Chapotin, Saharah Moon; Razanameharizaka, Juvet H; Holbrook, N Michele

    2006-09-01

    The stems of large trees serve in transport, storage, and support; however, the degree to which these roles are reflected in their morphology is not always apparent. The large, water-filled stems of baobab trees (Adansonia spp.) are generally assumed to serve a water storage function, yet recent studies indicate limited use of stored water. Through an analysis of wood structure and composition, we examined whether baobab morphology reflects biomechanical constraints rather than water storage capacity in the six Madagascar baobab species. Baobab wood has a high water content (up to 79%), low wood density (0.09-0.17 g · cm(-3)), high parenchyma content (69-88%), and living cells beyond 35 cm into the xylem from the cambium. Volumetric construction cost of the wood is several times lower than in more typical trees, and the elastic modulus approaches that of parenchyma tissue. Safety factors calculated from estimated elastic buckling heights were low, indicating that baobabs are not more overbuilt than other temperate and tropical trees, yet the energy investment in stem material is comparable to that in temperate deciduous trees. Furthermore, the elastic modulus of the wood decreases with water content, such that excessive water withdrawal from the stem could affect mechanical stability.

  2. Water relations of baobab trees (Adansonia spp. L.) during the rainy season: does stem water buffer daily water deficits?

    PubMed

    Chapotin, Saharah Moon; Razanameharizaka, Juvet H; Holbrook, N Michele

    2006-06-01

    Baobab trees are often cited in the literature as water-storing trees, yet few studies have examined this assumption. We assessed the role of stored water in buffering daily water deficits in two species of baobabs (Adansonia rubrostipa Jum. and H. Perrier and Adansonia za Baill.) in a tropical dry forest in Madagascar. We found no lag in the daily onset of sap flow between the base and the crown of the tree. Some night-time sap flow occurred, but this was more consistent with a pattern of seasonal stem water replenishment than with diurnal usage. Intrinsic capacitance of both leaf and stem tissue (0.07-0.08 and 1.1-1.43 MPa(-1), respectively) was high, yet the amount of water that could be withdrawn before turgor loss was small because midday leaf and stem water potentials (WPs) were near the turgor-loss points. Stomatal conductance was high in the daytime but then declined rapidly, suggesting an embolism-avoidance strategy. Although the xylem of distal branches was relatively vulnerable to cavitation (P50: 1.1-1.7 MPa), tight stomatal control and minimum WPs near--1.0 MPa maintained native embolism levels at 30-65%. Stem morphology and anatomy restrict water movement between storage tissues and the conductive pathway, making stored-water usage more appropriate to longer-term water deficits than as a buffer against daily water deficits.

  3. Larvicidal and repellent properties of Adansonia digitata against medically important human malarial vector mosquito Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Krishnappa, K; Elumalai, K; Dhanasekaran, S; Gokulakrishnan, J

    2012-06-01

    Development of plant-based alternative compounds for mosquito control has gained importance now-a-days, in view of increasing resistance in mosquito vectors to existing insecticides. The larvicidal and repellent activities of benzene, chloroform, hexane and methanol leaf extracts of Indian medicinal plant, Adansonia digitata were investigated against malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi. In all, 25 III instar larvae of An. stephensi were exposed to various concentrations (30-180 mg/l) in the laboratory by using the standard protocol described by WHO (2005). The larvae were exposed for 24 h and mortalities were subjected to log-probit analysis. Repellent activity of crude leaf extract at the dosages of 2, 4 and 6 mg/cm2 was evaluated in a net cage (45 × 30 × 45 cm) containing 100 blood starved female mosquitoes of An. stephensi using the protocol of WHO (1996). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of A. digitata showed the presence of triterpenoids and saponins. The LC50 and LC90 values of hexane, benzene, chloroform, and methanol extracts of A. digitata against An. stephensi larvae in 24 h were 111.32, 97.13, 88.55, 78.18 and 178.63, 176.19, 168.14, 155.42 mg/l, respectively. The repellent activity of methanol extract was found to be most effective and at higher concentration of 6 mg/cm2 benzene, chloroform hexane and methanol extracts provided 100% protection up to 150, 180, 120 and 210 min against An. stephensi, respectively. The preliminary study indicated that A. digitata showed larvicidal and repellent activities against An. stephensi and could be used for controlling mosquitoes. Further studies are indicated to purify the active compounds from these plants for developing larvicide and repellents.

  4. Nuclear microsatellite variation in Malagasy baobabs (Adansonia, Bombacoideae, Malvaceae) reveals past hybridization and introgression

    PubMed Central

    Leong Pock Tsy, Jean-Michel; Lumaret, Roselyne; Flaven-Noguier, Elodie; Sauve, Mathieu; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Danthu, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Adansonia comprises nine species, six of which are endemic to Madagascar. Genetic relationships between the Malagasy species remain unresolved due to conflicting results between nuclear and plastid DNA variation. Morphologically intermediate individuals between distinct species have been identified, indicative of interspecific hybridization. In this paper, microsatellite data are used to identify potential cases of hybridization and to provide insights into the evolutionary history of the genus on Madagascar. Methods Eleven microsatellites amplified with new primers developed for Adansonia rubrostipa were used to analyse 672 individuals collected at 27 sites for the six Malagasy species and morphologically intermediate individuals. Rates of individual admixture were examined using three Bayesian clustering programs, STRUCTURE, BAPS and NewHybrids, with no a priori species assignment. Key Results Population differentiation was coherent, with recognized species boundaries. In the four Malagasy species of section Longitubae, 8·0, 9·0 and 9·5 % of individuals with mixed genotypes were identified by BAPS, NewHybrids and STRUCTURE, respectively. At sites with sympatric populations of A. rubrostipa and A. za, NewHybrids indicated these individuals to be F2 and, predominantly, backcrosses with both parental species. In northern Madagascar, two populations of trees combining A. za and A. perrieri morphology and microsatellite alleles were identified in the current absence of the parental species. Conclusions The clear genetic differentiation observed between the six species may reflect their adaptation to different assortments of climate regimes and habitats during the colonization of the island. Microsatellite variation reveals that hybridization probably occurred in secondary contact between species of section Longitubae. This type of hybridization may also have been involved in the differentiation of a local new stabilized entity showing specific

  5. Nuclear microsatellite variation in Malagasy baobabs (Adansonia, Bombacoideae, Malvaceae) reveals past hybridization and introgression.

    PubMed

    Leong Pock Tsy, Jean-Michel; Lumaret, Roselyne; Flaven-Noguier, Elodie; Sauve, Mathieu; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Danthu, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    Adansonia comprises nine species, six of which are endemic to Madagascar. Genetic relationships between the Malagasy species remain unresolved due to conflicting results between nuclear and plastid DNA variation. Morphologically intermediate individuals between distinct species have been identified, indicative of interspecific hybridization. In this paper, microsatellite data are used to identify potential cases of hybridization and to provide insights into the evolutionary history of the genus on Madagascar. Eleven microsatellites amplified with new primers developed for Adansonia rubrostipa were used to analyse 672 individuals collected at 27 sites for the six Malagasy species and morphologically intermediate individuals. Rates of individual admixture were examined using three Bayesian clustering programs, STRUCTURE, BAPS and NewHybrids, with no a priori species assignment. Population differentiation was coherent, with recognized species boundaries. In the four Malagasy species of section Longitubae, 8·0, 9·0 and 9·5 % of individuals with mixed genotypes were identified by BAPS, NewHybrids and STRUCTURE, respectively. At sites with sympatric populations of A. rubrostipa and A. za, NewHybrids indicated these individuals to be F2 and, predominantly, backcrosses with both parental species. In northern Madagascar, two populations of trees combining A. za and A. perrieri morphology and microsatellite alleles were identified in the current absence of the parental species. The clear genetic differentiation observed between the six species may reflect their adaptation to different assortments of climate regimes and habitats during the colonization of the island. Microsatellite variation reveals that hybridization probably occurred in secondary contact between species of section Longitubae. This type of hybridization may also have been involved in the differentiation of a local new stabilized entity showing specific microsatellite alleles and morphological characters

  6. Baobab trees (Adansonia) in Madagascar use stored water to flush new leaves but not to support stomatal opening before the rainy season.

    PubMed

    Chapotin, Saharah Moon; Razanameharizaka, Juvet H; Holbrook, N Michele

    2006-01-01

    Baobab trees (Adansonia, Bombacaceae) are widely thought to store water in their stems for use when water availability is low. We tested this hypothesis by assessing the role of stored water during the dry season in three baobab species in Madagascar. In the dry season, leaves are present only during and after leaf flush. We quantified the relative contributions of stem and soil water during this period through measures of stem water content, sap flow and stomatal conductance. Rates of sap flow at the base of the trunk were near zero, indicating that leaf flushing was almost entirely dependent on stem water. Stem water content declined by up to 12% during this period, yet stomatal conductance and branch sap flow rates remained very low. Stem water reserves were used to support new leaf growth and cuticular transpiration, but not to support stomatal opening before the rainy season. Stomatal opening coincided with the onset of sap flow at the base of the trunk and occurred only after significant rainfall.

  7. Arabinogalactan Proteins From Baobab and Acacia Seeds Influence Innate Immunity of Human Keratinocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Abderrakib; Despres, Julie; Benard, Magalie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Leprince, Jerome; Vaudry, David; Rihouey, Christophe; Vicré-Gibouin, Maité; Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure

    2017-09-01

    Plant derived arabinogalactan proteins (AGP) were repeatedly confirmed as immunologically as well as dermatologically active compounds. However, little is currently known regarding their potential activity toward skin innate immunity. Here, we extracted and purified AGP from acacia (Acacia senegal) and baobab (Adansonia digitata) seeds to investigate their biological effects on the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line in an in vitro system. While AGP from both sources did not exhibit any cytotoxic effect, AGP from acacia seeds enhanced cell viability. Moreover, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that AGP extracted from both species induced a substantial overexpression of hBD-2, TLR-5, and IL1-α genes. These data suggest that plant AGP, already known to control plant defensive processes, could also modulate skin innate immune responses. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2558-2568, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fungi associated with black mould on baobab trees in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Cruywagen, Elsie M; Crous, Pedro W; Roux, Jolanda; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    There have been numerous reports in the scientific and popular literature suggesting that African baobab (Adansonia digitata) trees are dying, with symptoms including a black mould on their bark. The aim of this study was to determine the identity of the fungi causing this black mould and to consider whether they might be affecting the health of trees. The fungi were identified by sequencing directly from mycelium on the infected tissue as well as from cultures on agar. Sequence data for the ITS region of the rDNA resulted in the identification of four fungi including Aureobasidium pullulans, Toxicocladosporium irritans and a new species of Rachicladosporium described here as Rachicladosporium africanum. A single isolate of an unknown Cladosporium sp. was also found. These fungi, referred to here as black mould, are not true sooty mould fungi and they were shown to penetrate below the bark of infected tissue, causing a distinct host reaction. Although infections can lead to dieback of small twigs on severely infected branches, the mould was not found to kill trees.

  9. Seven new species of the Botryosphaeriaceae from baobab and other native trees in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Pavlic, Draginja; Wingfield, Michael J; Barber, Paul; Slippers, Bernard; Hardy, Giles E St J; Burgess, Treena I

    2008-01-01

    In this study seven new species of the Botryosphaeriaceae are described from baobab (Adansonia gibbosa) and surrounding endemic tree species growing in the Kimberley region of northwestern Australia. Members of the Botryosphaeriaceae were predominantly endophytes isolated from apparently healthy sapwood and bark of endemic trees; others were isolated from dying branches. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and EF1-alpha sequence data revealed seven new species: Dothiorella longicollis, Fusicoccum ramosum, Lasiodiplodia margaritacea, Neoscytalidium novaehollandiae, Pseudofusicoccum adansoniae, P. ardesiacum and P. kimberleyense.

  10. Three new Graphium species from baobab trees in South Africa and Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Cruywagen, E M; de Beer, Z W; Roux, J; Wingfield, M J

    2010-12-01

    Baobabs (Adansonia spp.) are iconic trees, known for their immense size, strange forms, sources of food and as the subjects of myths and mysteries. It is thus surprising that little is known regarding the fungi that infect these trees. During a survey to determine which wound infecting fungi occur on baobabs, synnematous structures were observed and Graphium-like isolates were obtained. Culture characteristics and micro-morphology, together with DNA sequence comparisons for the SSU rRNA, rRNA-ITS and TEF-1α gene regions were used to characterise these fungi. These data revealed three novel Graphium spp. and these are described as G. adansoniae, G. madagascariense and G. fabiforme.

  11. New Genetic and Linguistic Analyses Show Ancient Human Influence on Baobab Evolution and Distribution in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Haripriya; Bell, Karen L.; Baum, David A.; Fowler, Rachael; McConvell, Patrick; Saunders, Thomas; Spronck, Stef; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the role of human agency in the gene flow and geographical distribution of the Australian baobab, Adansonia gregorii. The genus Adansonia is a charismatic tree endemic to Africa, Madagascar, and northwest Australia that has long been valued by humans for its multiple uses. The distribution of genetic variation in baobabs in Africa has been partially attributed to human-mediated dispersal over millennia, but this relationship has never been investigated for the Australian species. We combined genetic and linguistic data to analyse geographic patterns of gene flow and movement of word-forms for A. gregorii in the Aboriginal languages of northwest Australia. Comprehensive assessment of genetic diversity showed weak geographic structure and high gene flow. Of potential dispersal vectors, humans were identified as most likely to have enabled gene flow across biogeographic barriers in northwest Australia. Genetic-linguistic analysis demonstrated congruence of gene flow patterns and directional movement of Aboriginal loanwords for A. gregorii. These findings, along with previous archaeobotanical evidence from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, suggest that ancient humans significantly influenced the geographic distribution of Adansonia in northwest Australia. PMID:25830225

  12. Phylogenetic species recognition and hybridisation in Lasiodiplodia: A case study on species from baobabs.

    PubMed

    Cruywagen, Elsie M; Slippers, Bernard; Roux, Jolanda; Wingfield, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    Lasiodiplodia species (Botryosphaeriaceae, Ascomycota) infect a wide range of typically woody plants on which they are associated with many different disease symptoms. In this study, we determined the identity of Lasiodiplodia isolates obtained from baobab (Adansonia species) trees in Africa and reviewed the molecular markers used to describe Lasiodiplodia species. Publicly available and newly produced sequence data for some of the type strains of Lasiodiplodia species showed incongruence amongst phylogenies of five nuclear loci. We conclude that several of the previously described Lasiodiplodia species are hybrids of other species. Isolates from baobab trees in Africa included nine species of Lasiodiplodia and two hybrid species. Inoculation trials with the most common Lasiodiplodia species collected from these trees produced significant lesions on young baobab trees. There was also variation in aggressiveness amongst isolates from the same species. The apparently widespread tendency of Lasiodiplodia species to hybridise demands that phylogenies from multiple loci (more than two and preferably four or more) are compared for congruence prior to new species being described. This will avoid hybrids being incorrectly described as new taxa, as has clearly occurred in the past. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The BAOBAB data portal and DACCIWA database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissebrat, Guillaume; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Cloché, Sophie; Ferré, Hélène; Fleury, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to boost the data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines: a user-friendly data management and dissemination system, quasi real-time display websites and a scientific paper exchange collaborative tool. The information system is enriched by past and ongoing projects (IMPETUS, FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, ACASIS, DACCIWA...) addressing meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, hydrology, extreme events, health, adaptation of human societies... It is becoming a reference information system on environmental issues in West Africa: BAOBAB (Base Afrique de l'Ouest beyond AMMA Base). The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the BAOBAB data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property…). The BAOBAB data portal counts about 900 registered users, and 50 data requests every month. The databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and ESPRI in France: http://baoab.sedoo.fr. The ongoing DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions over West Africa) project uses the BAOBAB portal to

  14. African Baobabs with False Inner Cavities: The Radiocarbon Investigation of the Lebombo Eco Trail Baobab

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; Woodborne, Stephan; von Reden, Karl F.; Hall, Grant; Hofmeyr, Michele; Lowy, Daniel A.; Patrut, Roxana T.

    2015-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation results of the Lebombo Eco Trail tree, a representative African baobab from Mozambique. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part of the tree were investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating. According to dating results, the age values of all samples increase from the sampling point with the distance into the wood. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the increase of age values with the distance into the wood (up to a point of maximum age) represents a major anomaly. The only realistic explanation for this anomaly is that such inner cavities are, in fact, natural empty spaces between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. We named them false cavities. Several important differences between normal cavities and false cavities are presented. Eventually, we dated other African baobabs with false inner cavities. We found that this new architecture enables baobabs to reach large sizes and old ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 1425 ± 24 BP, which corresponds to a calibrated age of 1355 ± 15 yr. The dating results also show that the Lebombo baobab consists of five fused stems, with ages between 900 and 1400 years; these five stems build the complete ring. The ring and the false cavity closed 800–900 years ago. The results also indicate that the stems stopped growing toward the false cavity over the past 500 years. PMID:25621989

  15. BAOBAB: a Java editor for large phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Dutheil, J; Galtier, N

    2002-06-01

    BAOBAB is a Java user interface dedicated to viewing and editing large phylogenetic trees. Original features include: (i) a colour-mediated overview of magnified subtrees; (ii) copy/cut/paste of (sub)trees within or between windows; (iii) compressing/ uncompressing subtrees; and (iv) managing sequence files together with tree files. http://www.univ-montp2.fr/~genetix/.

  16. AMS radiocarbon investigation of the African baobab: Searching for the oldest tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Mayne, Diana H.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Patrut, Roxana T.

    2013-01-01

    The Glencoe baobab, a very large specimen from South Africa, split twice in 2009. Several wood samples were collected from the eastern cavity, from the outer part of the main section and also from the largest broken segment which was connected to this section. These wood samples were processed and investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1838 ± 21 BP, which corresponds to a calibrated age of 1835 ± 40 years. Thus, the Glencoe baobab becomes the oldest dated baobab and also the oldest angiosperm tree with accurate dating results. The distribution of dating results revealed that the Glencoe baobab is a multi-generation tree, with several standing or collapsed and partially fused stems, showing different ages.

  17. Suicide is a Baobab Tree: A Narrative Medicine Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Facioli, Adriano Machado; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; de Almeida, Karlo Jozefo Quadros; Trindade, Eliana Mendonça Vilar

    2015-01-01

    This case study is an example of applying narrative medicine as a useful tool for health professionals to manage an existential and complex scenario such as the suicide of a sibling. Some suicides are like baobab trees—these large and resilient trees grow deep roots for many years, only spreading their limbs above ground once they are firmly established. Like the baobab, when suicide or a suicide attempt occurs, suicidal ideations are well cultivated and have often already been repeatedly planted. Consequently, suicide is often difficult to prevent: once the death seed is planted, it is difficult to recreate life. Every year, more than 800,000 people die by suicide worldwide (1.4% of all deaths), which is approximately 1 person every 40 seconds. These unexpected deaths, predominantly occuring among young and middle-aged adults, have a continuing ripple effect and result in a huge economic, social, and psychological burden for individuals, families, communities, and countries. The complexity of suffering and pain experienced by suicidal individuals and their families, regardless of the success or failure of the suicidal act, is intensified by strong stigmas attached to traditional concepts of sin and eternal damnation. This unfortunate reality emerges in the narrative as a tragic family drama, which is permeated by deep feelings of helplessness. But suicide is preventable. Prevention requires 3 important factors: knowledge, public support, and creation of strategies to enact social change. Now is the time to act and make suicide prevention an imperative goal. PMID:26176576

  18. Suicide is a Baobab Tree: A Narrative Medicine Case Study.

    PubMed

    Facioli, Adriano Machado; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; De Almeida, Karlo Jozefo Quadros; Trindade, Eliana Mendonça Vilar

    2015-01-01

    This case study is an example of applying narrative medicine as a useful tool for health professionals to manage an existential and complex scenario such as the suicide of a sibling. Some suicides are like baobab trees—these large and resilient trees grow deep roots for many years, only spreading their limbs above ground once they are firmly established. Like the baobab, when suicide or a suicide attempt occurs, suicidal ideations are well cultivated and have often already been repeatedly planted. Consequently, suicide is often difficult to prevent: once the death seed is planted, it is difficult to recreate life. Every year, more than 800,000 people die by suicide worldwide (1.4% of all deaths), which is approximately 1 person every 40 seconds. These unexpected deaths, predominantly occuring among young and middle-aged adults, have a continuing ripple effect and result in a huge economic, social, and psychological burden for individuals, families, communities, and countries. The complexity of suffering and pain experienced by suicidal individuals and their families, regardless of the success or failure of the suicidal act, is intensified by strong stigmas attached to traditional concepts of sin and eternal damnation. This unfortunate reality emerges in the narrative as a tragic family drama, which is permeated by deep feelings of helplessness. But suicide is preventable. Prevention requires 3 important factors: knowledge, public support, and creation of strategies to enact social change. Now is the time to act and make suicide prevention an imperative goal.

  19. Comparative AMS radiocarbon dating of pretreated versus non-pretreated tropical wood samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Mayne, Diana H.; Elder, Kathryn E.; Roberts, Mark L.; McNichol, Ann P.

    2010-04-01

    Several wood samples collected from Dorslandboom, a large iconic African baobab ( Adansonia digitata L.) from Namibia, were investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating subsequent to pretreatment and, alternatively, without pretreatment. The comparative statistical evaluation of results showed that there were no significant differences between fraction modern values and radiocarbon dates of the samples analyzed after pretreatment and without pretreatment, respectively. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 993 ± 20 BP. Dating results also revealed that Dorslandboom is a multi-generation tree, with several stems showing different ages.

  20. Potassium permanganate is not an effective pond disinfectant to control Dero digitata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proliferative gill disease (PGD) is a major problem in cultured channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. This parasite requires Dero digitata to complete its life cycle. It is believed potassium permanganate disinfects ponds and reduces D. digitata populations, but this practice has not been verified...

  1. Modifications of hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme activities in rats fed baobab seed oil containing cyclopropenoid fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Andrianaivo-Rafehivola, A A; Siess, M H; Gaydou, E M

    1995-05-01

    The effects on drug metabolizing enzymes of cyclopropenoid fatty acids present in baobab seed oil were evaluated in rats fed either a diet with baobab seed oil (1.27% cyclopropenoid fatty acids in the diet) or a diet with heated baobab seed oil (0.046% cyclopropenoid fatty acids in the diet). Comparison was made with rats fed a mixture of oils that contained no cyclopropenoid fatty acid. Rats fed baobab oil showed retarded growth. In comparison with the other groups, the relative liver weights were markedly increased whereas cytochrome P-450 content and NADPH cytochrome c reductase and NADH cytochrome c reductase activities were decreased. In rats fed the heated baobab oil the relative liver weight was decreased and the cytochrome P-450 level and reductase activities were increased relative to levels in rats fed the unheated oil. Ethoxycoumarin deethylase, ethoxyresorufin deethylase and pentoxyresorufin depentylase activities, expressed on the basis of cytochrome P-450, were greater in the group fed unheated baobab seed oil. Cytosolic glutathione transferase activity was markedly decreased in rats fed fresh baobab seed oil and heating the oil, which reduced the content of cyclopropenoid fatty acids, led to a considerable increase of this activity. UDP-glucuronyl transferase activities were not modified by the type of oil included in the diet. It is possible that the mechanisms of action of cyclopropenoid fatty acids are related to alterations of membrane lipid composition or microsomal proteins.

  2. Baobab Laboratory Information Management System: Development of an Open-Source Laboratory Information Management System for Biobanking.

    PubMed

    Bendou, Hocine; Sizani, Lunga; Reid, Tim; Swanepoel, Carmen; Ademuyiwa, Toluwaleke; Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Meuller, Heimo; Abayomi, Akin; Christoffels, Alan

    2017-04-01

    A laboratory information management system (LIMS) is central to the informatics infrastructure that underlies biobanking activities. To date, a wide range of commercial and open-source LIMSs are available and the decision to opt for one LIMS over another is often influenced by the needs of the biobank clients and researchers, as well as available financial resources. The Baobab LIMS was developed by customizing the Bika LIMS software ( www.bikalims.org ) to meet the requirements of biobanking best practices. The need to implement biobank standard operation procedures as well as stimulate the use of standards for biobank data representation motivated the implementation of Baobab LIMS, an open-source LIMS for Biobanking. Baobab LIMS comprises modules for biospecimen kit assembly, shipping of biospecimen kits, storage management, analysis requests, reporting, and invoicing. The Baobab LIMS is based on the Plone web-content management framework. All the system requirements for Plone are applicable to Baobab LIMS, including the need for a server with at least 8 GB RAM and 120 GB hard disk space. Baobab LIMS is a server-client-based system, whereby the end user is able to access the system securely through the internet on a standard web browser, thereby eliminating the need for standalone installations on all machines.

  3. Baobab Laboratory Information Management System: Development of an Open-Source Laboratory Information Management System for Biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Bendou, Hocine; Sizani, Lunga; Reid, Tim; Swanepoel, Carmen; Ademuyiwa, Toluwaleke; Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Meuller, Heimo; Abayomi, Akin

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory information management system (LIMS) is central to the informatics infrastructure that underlies biobanking activities. To date, a wide range of commercial and open-source LIMSs are available and the decision to opt for one LIMS over another is often influenced by the needs of the biobank clients and researchers, as well as available financial resources. The Baobab LIMS was developed by customizing the Bika LIMS software (www.bikalims.org) to meet the requirements of biobanking best practices. The need to implement biobank standard operation procedures as well as stimulate the use of standards for biobank data representation motivated the implementation of Baobab LIMS, an open-source LIMS for Biobanking. Baobab LIMS comprises modules for biospecimen kit assembly, shipping of biospecimen kits, storage management, analysis requests, reporting, and invoicing. The Baobab LIMS is based on the Plone web-content management framework. All the system requirements for Plone are applicable to Baobab LIMS, including the need for a server with at least 8 GB RAM and 120 GB hard disk space. Baobab LIMS is a server–client-based system, whereby the end user is able to access the system securely through the internet on a standard web browser, thereby eliminating the need for standalone installations on all machines. PMID:28375759

  4. Inhibition of Bacillus cereus growth by bacteriocin producing Bacillus subtilis isolated from fermented baobab seeds (maari) is substrate dependent.

    PubMed

    Kaboré, Donatien; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Sawadogo-Lingani, Hagrétou; Diawara, Bréhima; Dicko, Mamoudou Hama; Jakobsen, Mogens; Thorsen, Line

    2013-03-01

    Maari is a spontaneously alkaline fermented food condiment made from baobab tree seeds. Due to the spontaneous nature of maari fermentations growth of the opportunistic human pathogen Bacillus cereus is occasionally observed. Bacillus subtilis strains are important for alkaline seed fermentations because of their enzymatic activities contributing to desirable texture, flavor and pH development. Some B. subtilis strains have antimicrobial properties against B. cereus. In the present work, three bacteriocin producing B. subtilis strains (B3, B122 and B222) isolated from maari were tested. The production of antimicrobial activity by the three strains was found to be greatly influenced by the substrate. All three B. subtilis strains produced antimicrobial activity against B. cereus NVH391-98 in BHI broth as determined by the agar well diffusion assay, whereas no antimicrobial activity was detected in whole cooked baobab seeds and in 10% (w/v) grinded baobab seeds. Incorporation of BHI with up to 5% (w/w) grinded baobab seeds enhanced the antimicrobial activity of B. subtilis compared with pure BHI in a strain dependent manner. Incorporation of BHI with 50% (w/w) baobab grinded seeds decreased the antimicrobial activity. Addition of the inorganic salts FeCl₃, MgSO₄ and MnSO₄ has previously been reported to increase bacteriocin production of B. subtilis, but the addition of these salts to 10% (w/v) grinded baobab seed broth did not cause antimicrobial activity. Survival of B. cereus NVH391-98 in co-culture with B. subtilis was tested in BHI broth, 10% (w/v) grinded baobab seed based broth and during baobab seed fermentation to produce maari. B. cereus NVH391-98 grew well in all three substrates in mono-culture. All the 3 B. subtilis strains were able to decrease B. cereus NVH391-98 to levels below the detection limit (<10 CFU/ml) in BHI, but not in baobab seed based substrates, even though the outgrowth of B. cereus NVH391-98 was delayed by up to 40 h. In

  5. Praseodymium sorption on Laminaria digitata algal beads and foams.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengye; Hamza, Mohammed F; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2017-10-15

    Algal (Laminaria digitata) beads and algal foams have been prepared by a new synthesis mode and the sorbents were tested for praseodymium sorption in batch and fixed-bed like systems (recirculation or one-pass modes), respectively. Metal binding occurs through ion-exchange with Ca(II) ions used for ionotropic gelation of alginate contained in the algal biomass and eventually with protons. Sorption isotherms at pH 4 are described by the Langmuir and the Sips equations with maximum sorption capacities close to 110-120mgPrg -1 . Uptake kinetics are fitted by the pseudo-second order reaction rate equation for both beads and foams; in the case of beads the Crank equation also gives good fit of experimental data. Metal is successfully desorbed using 2M HCl/0.05M CaCl 2 solutions and the sorbent can be efficiently re-used for a minimum of 5 cycles with negligible decrease in sorption/desorption properties and appreciable concentrating effect (around 8-10 times the initial metal concentration). Tested in continuous mode, the algal foam shows typical breakthrough curves that are fitted by the Yan method; desorption is also efficient and allows under the best conditions to achieve a concentration factor close to 8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Setaria digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea): Mitochondrial gene content, arrangement and composition compared with other nematodes.

    PubMed

    Yatawara, Lalani; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Rajapakse, R P V J; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence (13,839bp) of parasitic nematode Setaria digitata and its structure and organization compared with Onchocerca volvulus, Dirofilaria immitis and Brugia malayi. The mt genome of S. digitata is slightly larger than the mt genomes of other filarial nematodes. S. digitata mt genome contains 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs) that are typically found in metazoans. This genome contains a high A+T (75.1%) content and low G+C content (24.9%). The mt gene order for S. digitata is the same as those for O. volvulus, D. immitis and B. malayi but it is distinctly different from other nematodes compared. The start codons inferred in the mt genome of S. digitata are TTT, ATT, TTG, ATG, GTT and ATA. Interestingly, the initiation codon TTT is unique to S. digitata mt genome and four protein-coding genes use this codon as a translation initiation codon. Five protein-coding genes use TAG as a stop codon whereas three genes use TAA and four genes use T as a termination codon. Out of 64 possible codons, only 57 are used for mitochondrial protein-coding genes of S. digitata. T-rich codons such as TTT (18.9%), GTT (7.9%), TTG (7.8%), TAT (7%), ATT (5.7%), TCT (4.8%) and TTA (4.1%) are used more frequently. This pattern of codon usage reflects the strong bias for T in the mt genome of S. digitata. In conclusion, the present investigation provides new molecular data for future studies of the comparative mitochondrial genomics and systematic of parasitic nematodes of socio-economic importance. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Trophic significance of the kelp Laminaria digitata (Lamour.) for the associated food web: a between-sites comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Gauthier; Riera, Pascal; Leroux, Cédric

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed at establishing the trophic significance of the kelp Laminaria digitata for consumers inhabiting two rocky shores of Northern Brittany (France), displaying contrasted ecological conditions. The general trophic structure did not vary between these two sites, with a wide diversity of filter-feeders and predators, and only 14% of the species sampled belonging to the grazers' trophic group. The diversity of food sources fueling the food web appeared also similar. The food webs comprised four trophic levels and the prevalence of omnivory appeared relatively low compared to previous studies in the same area. Conversely, to the food web structure, which did not differ, the biochemical composition of L. digitata differed between the two sites, and was correlated to a larger diversity of grazers feeding on this kelp in sheltered conditions. This indicated that the spatial variability occurring in the nutritive value of L. digitata is likely to deeply affect the functioning of kelp-associated food webs. The contribution of L. digitata-derived organic matter to the diet of filter-feeders inhabiting these two environments was assessed using the mixing model Isosource, which showed the higher contribution of kelp matter in sheltered conditions. These results highlight the spatial variability that may occur in the functioning of kelp-associated food webs. Moreover, this suggests that hydrodynamics is likely to control the availability of kelp-derived organic matter to local filter-feeders, probably through an increase of detritus export in exposed areas.

  8. Stomatal behavior of ozone-sensitive and -insensitive coneflowers ( Rudbeckia laciniata var. digitata ) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Treesearch

    Nancy Grulke; H. S. Neufeld; A. W. Davison; M. Roberts; A. H. Chappelka

    2006-01-01

    • Morphological and physiological attributes were assessed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ozone (O3) sensitivity in a highly sensitive species, cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata var. digitata). • Foliage at the same height in the canopy on paired O3-...

  9. First report of powdery mildew on cucumis zambianus, cucurbita digitata and zehneria scabraCaused by podosphaera xanthii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew is a serious disease of cucurbit crops worldwide. In the fall of 2016, symptoms of powdery mildew were observed on 2-month old plants of Cucumis zambianus, Cucurbita digitata and Zehneria scabra in research plots in Charleston, SC. Incidence on 28 plants of C. zambianus was 64.3%. On ...

  10. Butanol fermentation of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoru; From, Nikolaj; Angelidaki, Irini; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Bjerre, Anne-Belinda

    2017-08-01

    Seaweed represents an abundant, renewable, and fast-growing biomass resource for 3rd generation biofuel production. This study reports an efficient butanol fermentation process carried out by Clostridium beijerinckii DSM-6422 using enzymatic hydrolysate of the sugar-rich brown seaweed Laminaria digitata harvested from the coast of the Danish North Sea as substrate. The highest butanol yield (0.42g/g-consumed-substrates) compared to literature was achieved, with a significantly higher butanol:acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) molar ratio (0.85) than typical (0.6). This demonstrates the possibility of using the seaweed L. digitata as a potential biomass for butanol production. For the first time, consumption of alginate components was observed by C. beijerinckii DSM-6422. The efficient utilization of sugars and lactic acid further highlighted the potential of using this strain for future development of large-scale cost-effective butanol production based on (ensiled) seaweed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. First Blindness Cases of Horses Infected with Setaria Digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jihun; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Kim, Ha-Jung; Jeong, Hak-Sub; Kim, Byung-Su; Choi, Eunsang; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2017-12-01

    Ocular setariases of cattle were reported but those of equine hosts have never been reported in the Republic of Korea (Korea). We found motile worms in the aqueous humor of 15 horses (Equus spp.) from 12 localities in southern parts of Korea between January 2004 and November 2017. After the affected animals were properly restrained under sedation and local anesthesia, 10 ml disposable syringe with a 16-gauge needle was inserted into the anterior chamber of the affected eye to successfully remove the parasites. The male worm that was found in 7 of the cases showed a pair of lateral appendages near the posterior terminal end of the body. The papillar arrangement was 3 pairs of precloacal, a pair of adcloacal, and 3 pairs of postcloacal papillae, plus a central papilla just in front of the cloaca. The female worms found in the eyes of 8 horses were characterized by the tapering posterior terminal end of the body with a smooth knob. Worms were all identified as Setaria digitata (von Linstow, 1906) by the morphologic characteristics using light and electron microscopic observations. This is the first blindness cases of 15 horses infected with S. digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in Korea.

  12. Colony-specific calcification and mortality under ocean acidification in the branching coral Montipora digitata.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Javid; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Nishida, Kozue; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) threatens calcifying marine organisms including reef-building corals. In this study, we examined the OA responses of individual colonies of the branching scleractinian coral Montipora digitata. We exposed nubbins of unique colonies (n = 15) to ambient or elevated pCO2 under natural light and temperature regimes for 110 days. Although elevated pCO2 exposure on average reduced calcification, individual colonies showed unique responses ranging from declines in positive calcification to negative calcification (decalcification) to no change. Similarly, mortality was greater on average in elevated pCO2, but also showed colony-specific patterns. High variation in colony responses suggests the possibility that ongoing OA may lead to natural selection of OA-tolerant colonies within a coral population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lactate oxidation coupled to energy production in mitochondria like particles from Setaria digitata, a filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Sivan, V M; Raj, R K

    1994-10-14

    In the filarial parasite, Setaria digitata, the mitochondria like particles (MLP) show NAD reduction with sodium lactate. The MLP also reduces dye and ferricyanide with lactate. The ferricyanide reduction by lactate is found to be sensitive to the cytochrome o inhibitor orthohydroxy diphenyl (OHD) and complex I inhibitor rotenone, modulated by ADP (+) and ATP (-) and inhibited by pyruvate and oxaloacetate. MLP shows lactate oxidation sensitive to OHD, rotenone and sodium malonate. Thus, the lactate utilizing complex system, consisting of an NADH generating MLP bound lactate dehydrogenase and a lactate flavocytochrome reductase tightly linked to complex I and cytochrome o, produces ATP in functional association with fumarate reductase complex and other enzyme systems. Hence, this study provides new dimensions to the study of metabolism in filarial parasites.

  14. Symbiotic zooxanthellae provide the host-coral Montipora digitata with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Papina, M; Meziane, T; van Woesik, R

    2003-07-01

    We compared the fatty acid composition of the host-coral Montipora digitata with the fatty acid composition in the coral's endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae). Fatty acids as methyl esters were determined using gas chromatography (GC) and verified by GC-mass spectrometry. We found the main difference between the fatty acids in the host and their symbionts were that zooxanthellae supported higher proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The presence of fatty acids specific to dinoflagellates (i.e. 18:4omega3, 22:5omega3 and 22:6omega3) in the host tissue suggests that zooxanthellae provide the coral host not only with saturated fatty acids, but also with diverse polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  15. A Regional Stable Carbon Isotope Dendro-Climatology from the South African Summer Rainfall Area.

    PubMed

    Woodborne, Stephan; Gandiwa, Patience; Hall, Grant; Patrut, Adrian; Finch, Jemma

    2016-01-01

    Carbon isotope analysis of four baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) trees from the Pafuri region of South Africa yielded a 1000-year proxy rainfall record. The Pafuri record age model was based on 17 radiocarbon dates, cross correlation of the climate record, and ring structures that were presumed to be annual for two of the trees. Here we present the analysis of five additional baobabs from the Mapungubwe region, approximately 200km west of Pafuri. The Mapungubwe chronology demonstrates that ring structures are not necessarily annually formed, and accordingly the Pafuri chronology is revised. Changes in intrinsic water-use efficiency indicate an active response by the trees to elevated atmospheric CO2, but this has little effect on the environmental signal. The revised Pafuri record, and the new Mapungubwe record correlate significantly with local rainfall. Both records confirm that the Medieval Warm Period was substantially wetter than present, and the Little Ice Age was the driest period in the last 1000 years. Although Mapungubwe is generally drier than Pafuri, both regions experience elevated rainfall peaking between AD 1570 and AD 1620 after which dry conditions persist in the Mapungubwe area until about AD 1840. Differences between the two records correlate with Agulhas Current sea-surface temperature variations suggesting east/west displacement of the temperate tropical trough system as an underlying mechanism. The Pafuri and Mapungubwe records are combined to provide a regional climate proxy record for the northern summer rainfall area of southern Africa.

  16. A Regional Stable Carbon Isotope Dendro-Climatology from the South African Summer Rainfall Area

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carbon isotope analysis of four baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) trees from the Pafuri region of South Africa yielded a 1000-year proxy rainfall record. The Pafuri record age model was based on 17 radiocarbon dates, cross correlation of the climate record, and ring structures that were presumed to be annual for two of the trees. Here we present the analysis of five additional baobabs from the Mapungubwe region, approximately 200km west of Pafuri. The Mapungubwe chronology demonstrates that ring structures are not necessarily annually formed, and accordingly the Pafuri chronology is revised. Changes in intrinsic water-use efficiency indicate an active response by the trees to elevated atmospheric CO2, but this has little effect on the environmental signal. The revised Pafuri record, and the new Mapungubwe record correlate significantly with local rainfall. Both records confirm that the Medieval Warm Period was substantially wetter than present, and the Little Ice Age was the driest period in the last 1000 years. Although Mapungubwe is generally drier than Pafuri, both regions experience elevated rainfall peaking between AD 1570 and AD 1620 after which dry conditions persist in the Mapungubwe area until about AD 1840. Differences between the two records correlate with Agulhas Current sea-surface temperature variations suggesting east/west displacement of the temperate tropical trough system as an underlying mechanism. The Pafuri and Mapungubwe records are combined to provide a regional climate proxy record for the northern summer rainfall area of southern Africa. PMID:27427912

  17. Early development of zooxanthella-containing eggs of the corals Porites cylindrica and Montipora digitata: The endodermal localization of zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Mamiko; Hidaka, Michio

    2006-10-01

    We studied the early development of zooxanthellae-containing eggs of the scleractinian corals Porites cylindrica and Montipora digitata to elucidate how zooxanthellae become localized to the endoderm of planulae during the course of development. In both species, zooxanthellae were distributed evenly in the oocytes and delivered almost equally to the blastomeres during cleavage. In P. cylindrica, gastrulation occurred via delamination or ingression, and blastomeres containing zooxanthellae dropped into the blastocoel during gastrulation. Thus, zooxanthellae were restricted to the endodermal cells at the gastrula or early planula stage in P. cylindrica. In M. digitata, gastrulation occurred by a combination of invagination and epiboly to form a somewhat concave gastrula. Zooxanthellae were present in both endodermal and ectodermal cells of early planulae, but they disappeared from the ectoderm as the planulae matured. In our previous study on two species of Pocillopora, we found that zooxanthellae were localized in eggs as well as in embryos, and that blastomeres containing zooxanthellae later dropped into the blastocoel to become restricted to the endoderm (Hirose et al., 2000). The timing and mechanism of zooxanthella localization and types of gastrulation differed among species belonging to the three genera. These results suggest that zooxanthella localization in the embryos reflects the timing of the determination of presumptive endoderm cells and/or specificity of zooxanthellae toward presumptive endoderm cells.

  18. Feeding in fear? How adult male western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) adjust to predation and savanna habitat pressures.

    PubMed

    Lindshield, Stacy; Danielson, Brent J; Rothman, Jessica M; Pruetz, Jill D

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated risk-sensitive foraging in adult male western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) occupying a savanna environment at Fongoli, Senegal. The aim of this study was to determine how the risks of predation and heat stress influenced their behavior while feeding on a key food, fruit of the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata). Proximity of fruiting baobab trees to anthropogenic landmarks were compared to food intake, feeding rate, and behavioral indicators of fear in adult males (N = 11) at Fongoli. Additionally, we compared foraging to vegetative habitats, baobab ripe fruit nutritive quality, surface water availability, and foraging party composition. Fruit abundance increased with proximity to anthropogenic landmarks, and chimpanzees exhibited higher frequencies of antipredator behaviors as they approached these risky areas. However, predation risk did not deter adult males from visiting these fruiting trees; instead, risky foraging bouts were associated with higher food intakes and longer feeding times. Additionally, higher feeding rates were observed in open-canopy habitats, and this behavior may have minimized their risk of heat stress. Adaptations that minimize predation risk are widespread in mammalian prey species, but these traits are poorly understood in chimpanzees. Great apes encounter few nonhuman predators capable of successfully capturing and killing them; thus, such events are rarely observed. Although people rarely hunt chimpanzees in Senegal, we found that adult males perceived humans as predators and adjusted their behavior while foraging in risky habitats. From an applied perspective, risk-taking behavior is important for understanding and mitigating the problem of crop-feeding in locations where chimpanzees and humans live in sympatry. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fast time resolution measurements of high concentrations of iodine above a Laminaria Digitata seaweed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Stephen; Adams, Thomas; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    We report observations of extremely large concentrations of molecular iodine (I2) measured in situ above a seaweed bed composed of laminaria digitata (90%) and laminaria hyperborea (10%) growing in its natural habitat. Measurements were made off the coast of Roscoff in Brittany, France, during day-time low tides on several days in September and November 2012 with the greatest tidal amplitudes. Iodine was quantified using a portable, battery-powered broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) deployed from the in-shore research vessel "Aurelia" operated by the Station Biologique de Roscoff. For the 5 second integration times used here, the BBCEAS instrument has a detection limit for iodine of 12 pptv (parts per trillion by volume). The boat was anchored above the seaweed bed before it was exposed to air by the ebbing tide; the boat was grounded on the seaweed bed around the tidal minimum, and then refloated as the incoming tide covered the seaweed. I2 concentrations were strongly anti-correlated with water depth. Initially little I2 was seen above background levels whilst the blades of the seaweed plants were floating on the water surface. However several hundred pptv of I2 was observed within a few minutes of the plants' stipes breaking the surface and first blades coming to rest on rocks out of the water. Iodine concentrations increased further as the tide ebbed, typically peaking around 1500 pptv around the tidal minimum (by which time the seaweed had been exposed for 45 minutes). I2 concentrations decreased rapidly back to background levels as the returning tide submerged the seaweeds. The concentration profiles showed a lot of high frequency structure, with I2 concentrations commonly varying by a factor 2 (or more) within 60 seconds. Additionally the profiles of I2 emitted from the seaweeds immediately below the instrument's inlet typically sat on a smoothly-varying background of approximately 100 pptv, which we attribute to I2 from other more

  20. Analysis of bacterial community shifts in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs fed diets supplemented with β-glucan from Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P; Dal Bello, F; O'Doherty, J; Arendt, E K; Sweeney, T; Coffey, A

    2013-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of algal and yeast β-glucans on the porcine gastrointestinal microbiota, specifically the community of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and coliforms. A total of 48 pigs were fed four diets over a 28-day period to determine the effect that each had on these communities. The control diet consisted of wheat and soya bean meal. The remaining three diets contained wheat and soya bean meal supplemented with β-glucan at 250 g/tonne from Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Faecal samples were collected from animals before feeding each diet and after the feeding period. The animals were slaughtered the following day and samples were collected from the stomach, ileum, caecum, proximal colon and distal colon. Alterations in Lactobacillus in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were analysed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles generated by group-specific 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Plate count analysis was also performed to quantify total coliforms. DGGE profiles indicated that all β-glucan diets provoked the emergence of a richer community of Lactobacillus. The richest community of lactobacilli emerged after feeding L. digitata (LD β-glucan). Plate count analysis revealed that the L. hyperborea (LH β-glucan) diet had a statistically significant effect on the coliform counts in the proximal colon in comparison with the control diet. β-glucan from L. digitata and S. cerevisiae also generally reduced coliforms but to a lesser extent. Nevertheless, the β-glucan diets did not significantly reduce levels of Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium. DGGE analysis of GIT samples indicated that the three β-glucan diets generally promoted the establishment of a more varied range of Lactobacillus species in the caecum, proximal and distal colon. The LH β-glucan had the most profound reducing effect on coliform counts when compared with the control diet and diets supplemented with L

  1. Not all Laminaria digitata are the same! Phenotypic plasticity and the selection of appropriate surrogate macroalgae for ecohydraulic experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; McLelland, Stuart J.; Henry, Pierre-Yves T.; Paul, Maike; Eiff, Olivier; Evertsen, Antti-Jussi O.; Aberle, Jochen; Teacă, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Whilst early physical modelling and theoretical studies of the interactions between vegetation and flowing water employed rigid structures such as wooden dowels, recent studies have progressed to flexible surrogate plants. However, even appropriately-scaled flexible surrogates fail to capture the variability in thallus morphology, flexibility and strength, both within and between individuals, and frontal or planform area over space and time. Furthermore, although there have been a number of field studies, measurements of hydraulic variables have generally been limited to time-averaged at-a-point measurements that aim to approximate the depth-mean velocity. This is problematic because in spatially heterogeneous flows, point measurements are dependent upon the sampling location. Herein, we describe research carried out by the participants in the PISCES work package of the HYDRALAB IV project that sought to address these limitations and assess the level of complexity needed to adequately reproduce the hydrodynamics of the natural system in physical models. We selected an 11 m long × 6 m wide region of a tidal inlet, the Hopavågen Bay, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway, that contained 19 Laminaria digitata thalli and 101 other macroalgae thalli. Two L. digitata specimens ~0.50 m apart were selected for detailed study and a 2 m long × 8 m wide frame was oriented around them by enforcing zero cross-stream discharge at its upstream edge. We then quantified: 1. the mean and turbulent flow field of the undisturbed condition (Case A); 2. the positions, geometrical and biomechanical properties of the macroalgae; and 3. the mean and turbulent flow field after the macroalgae were completely removed (Case B). Later, Case A was replicated in the same location (±0.025 m) before the 19 L. digitata thalli were replaced with 19 "optimized" surrogates (Case C). These three cases were then repeated in the Total Environment Simulator at the University of Hull, UK. Live macroalgae thalli could

  2. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram; Mahajan, Arun Y

    2015-01-01

    Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of Ipomoea digitata (ID) based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Emulsified neem oil fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Significant increase in the sperm density and the sperm motility (P < 0.01) along with increase in the testis, and epididymes weight in neem-oil induced infertile rats treated with ID at both dose levels. This effect is vis-à-vis to serum hormonal levels. Presence of β-sitosterol in the root of ID likely to enhance the process of spermatogenesis as it is evident from histomorphological studies. Results of the present investigation reveal that ID is a good candidate for the management of male infertility.

  3. Effects of nutrient enrichment on the release of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen by the scleractinian coral Montipora digitata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Miyajima, T.

    2010-09-01

    The effects of nutrient enrichment on the release of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC and DON, respectively) from the coral Montipora digitata were investigated in the laboratory. Nitrate (NO3 -) and phosphate (PO4 3-) were supplied to the aquarium to get the final concentrations of 10 and 0.5 μmol l-1, respectively, and the corals were incubated for 8 days. The release rate of DON per unit coral surface area significantly decreased after the nutrient enrichment, while the release rate of DOC was constant. Because the chlorophyll a (chl a) content of zooxanthellae per unit surface area increased, the release rate of DOC significantly decreased when normalized to unit chl a. These results suggested that the incorporation of NO3 - and PO4 3- stimulated the synthesis of new cellular components in the coral colonies and consequently, reduced extracellular release of DOC and DON. Actually, significant increase in N and P contents relative to C content was observed in the coral’s tissue after the nutrient enrichment. The present study has concluded that inorganic nutrient enrichment not only affects coral-algal metabolism inside the colony but also affects a microbial community around the coral because the organic matter released from corals functions as energy carrier in the coral reef ecosystem.

  4. In vivo speciation studies and antioxidant properties of bromine in Laminaria digitata reinforce the significance of iodine accumulation for kelps

    PubMed Central

    Küpper, Frithjof C.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Leblanc, Catherine; Toyama, Chiaki; Uchida, Yuka; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Robinson, Joanne; Verhaeghe, Elodie F.; Malin, Gill; Luther, George W.; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Kloareg, Bernard; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Megson, Ian L.; Potin, Philippe; Feiters, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of bromine in marine brown algae remains poorly understood. This contrasts with the recent finding that the accumulation of iodide in the brown alga Laminaria serves the provision of an inorganic antioxidant – the first case documented from a living system. The aim of this study was to use an interdisciplinary array of techniques to study the chemical speciation, transformation, and function of bromine in Laminaria and to investigate the link between bromine and iodine metabolism, in particular in the antioxidant context. First, bromine and iodine levels in different Laminaria tissues were compared by inductively coupled plasma MS. Using in vivo X-ray absorption spectroscopy, it was found that, similarly to iodine, bromine is predominantly present in this alga in the form of bromide, albeit at lower concentrations, and that it shows similar behaviour upon oxidative stress. However, from a thermodynamic and kinetic standpoint, supported by in vitro and reconstituted in vivo assays, bromide is less suitable than iodide as an antioxidant against most reactive oxygen species except superoxide, possibly explaining why kelps prefer to accumulate iodide. This constitutes the first-ever study exploring the potential antioxidant function of bromide in a living system and other potential physiological roles. Given the tissue-specific differences observed in the content and speciation of bromine, it is concluded that the bromide uptake mechanism is different from the vanadium iodoperoxidase-mediated uptake of iodide in L. digitata and that its function is likely to be complementary to the iodide antioxidant system for detoxifying superoxide. PMID:23606364

  5. Synthesis and characterization of low-cost activated carbon prepared from Malawian baobab fruit shells by H3PO4 activation for removal of Cu(II) ions: equilibrium and kinetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vunain, Ephraim; Kenneth, Davie; Biswick, Timothy

    2017-12-01

    In this study, low-cost activated carbon (AC) prepared from baobab fruit shells by chemical activation using phosphoric acid was evaluated for the removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution. The prepared activated carbon samples were characterized using N2-adsorption-desorption isotherms, SEM, FTIR, EDX and XRD analysis. The sample activated at 700 °C was chosen as our optimized sample because its physicochemical properties and BET results were similar to those of a commercial sample. The N2-adsorption-desorption results of the optimized sample revealed a BET surface area of 1089 m2/g, micropore volume of 0.3764 cm3/g, total pore volume of 0.4330 cm3/g and pore size of 1.45 nm. Operational parameters such as pH, initial copper concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage and temperature were studied in a batch mode. Equilibrium data were obtained by testing the adsorption data using three different isotherm models: Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevish (D-R) models. It was found that the adsorption of copper correlated well with the Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 3.0833 mg/g. The kinetics of the adsorption process was tested through pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best correlation for the experimental data studied. The adsorption followed chemisorption process. The study provided an effective use of baobab fruit shells as a valuable source of adsorbents for the removal of copper ions from aqueous solution. This study could add economic value to baobab fruit shells in Malawi, reduce disposal problems, and offer an economic source of AC to the AC users.

  6. The biogeochemical effect of seaweeds upon close-to natural concentrations of dissolved iodate and iodide in seawater Preliminary study with Laminaria digitata and Fucus serratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdale, Victor W.

    2008-06-01

    Toward assessing the biogeochemical significance of seaweeds in relation to dissolved iodine in seawater, the effect of whole seaweeds ( Laminaria digitata and Fucus serratus) upon iodide and iodate, at essentially natural concentrations, has been studied. The weeds were carefully removed from the sub-littoral zone of the Menai Straits and exposed to iodide and iodate at their natural temperature (6 °C), but under continuous illumination. Laminaria digitata was found to decrease the concentration of iodate with an exponential rate constant of 0.008-0.24 h -1. This is a newly discovered process which, if substantiated, will require an entirely new mechanism. Generally, apparent iodide concentration increased except in a run with seawater augmented with iodide, where it first decreased. The rate constant for loss of iodide was 0.014-0.16 h -1. Meanwhile, F. serratus was found not to decrease iodate concentrations, as did L. digitata. Indeed, after ˜30 h iodate concentrations increased, suggesting that the weed may take in iodide before oxidising and releasing it. If substantiated, this finding may offer a way into one of the most elusive of processes within the iodine cycle - iodide oxidation. With both seaweeds sustained long-term increases of apparent iodide concentration are most easily explained as a secretion by the weeds of organic matter which is capable of reducing the Ce(IV) reagent used in determination of total iodine. Modelling of the catalytic method used is provided to support this contention. The possibility of developing this to measure the strain that seaweeds endure in this kind of biogeochemical flux experiment is discussed. A Chemical Oxygen Demand type of approach is applied using Ce(IV) as oxidant. The results of the iodine experiments are contrasted with the several investigations of 131I interaction with seaweeds, which have routinely used discs of weed cut from the frond. It is argued that experiments conducted with stable iodine may

  7. Comparative ozone responses of cutleaf coneflowers (Rudbeckia laciniata var. digitata, var. ampla) from Rocky Mountain and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks, USA.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Howard S; Johnson, Jennifer; Kohut, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L. var. digitata) is native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) and an ozone bioindicator species. Variety ampla, whose ozone sensitivity is less well known, is native to Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO). In the early 2000s, researchers found putative ozone symptoms on var. ampla and rhizomes were sent to Appalachian State University to verify that the symptoms were the result of ozone exposure. In 2011, potted plants were exposed to ambient ozone from May to August. These same plants were grown in open-top chambers (OTCs) in 2012 and 2013, and exposed to charcoal-filtered (CF), non-filtered (NF), elevated ozone (EO), NF+50ppb in 2012 for 47days and NF+30/NF+50ppb ozone in 2013 for 36 and 36days, respectively. Ozone symptoms similar to those found in ROMO (blue-black adaxial stippling) were reproduced both in ambient air and in the OTCs. Both varieties exhibited foliar injury in the OTCs in an exposure-dependent manner, verifying that symptoms resulted from ozone exposure. In two of the three study years, var. digitata appeared more sensitive than var. ampla. Exposure to EO caused reductions in ambient photosynthetic rate (A) and stomatal conductance (g s ) for both varieties. Light response curves indicated that ozone reduced A, g s , and the apparent quantum yield while it increased the light compensation point. In CF air, var. ampla had higher light saturated A (18.2±1.04 vs 11.6±0.37μmolm -2 s -1 ), higher light saturation (1833±166.7 vs 1108±141.7μmolm -2 s -1 ), and lower Ci/Ca ratio (0.67±0.01 vs 0.77±0.01) than var. digitata. Coneflowers in both Parks are adversely affected by exposure to ambient ozone and if ozone concentrations increase in the Rocky Mountains, greater amounts of injury on var. ampla can be expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro antioxidant, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of fractions from Cienfuegosia digitata Cav., Sida alba L. and Sida acuta Burn f. (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Konaté, K; Souza, A; Coulibaly, A Y; Meda, N T R; Kiendrebeogo, M; Lamien-Meda, A; Millogo-Rasolodimby, J; Lamidi, M; Nacoulma, O G

    2010-11-15

    In this study polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, lipoxygenase (LOX) and Xanthine Oxidase (XO) inhibitory effects of n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of aqueous acetone extracts from S. alba L., S. acuta Burn f and Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. were investigated. The total phenolics, flavonoids, flavonols and total tannins were determined by spectrophotometric methods using Folin-ciocalteu, AlCl3 reagents and tannic acid, respectively. The antioxidant potential was evaluated using three methods: inhibition of free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydramzyl (DPPH), ABTS radical cation decolorization assay and Iron (III) to iron (II) reduction activity (FRAP). For enzymatic activity, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities were used. This study shows a relationship between polyphenol contents, antioxidant and enzymatic activities. Present results showed that ethyl acetate and dichloromethane fractions elicit the highest polyphenol content, antioxidant and enzymatic activities.

  9. Development of a locally sustainable functional food based on mutandabota, a traditional food in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, Augustine; Linnemann, Anita R; Sybesma, Wilbert; Kort, Remco; Nout, M J R; Smid, Eddy J

    2014-05-01

    A probiotic dairy product was developed on the basis of a traditional dish called mutandabota to enable resource-poor populations in southern Africa to benefit from a functional food. Mutandabota is widely consumed in rural southern Africa, making it an ideal food matrix to carry probiotics. First, a process to produce probiotic mutandabota was designed. Raw cow milk was boiled and subsequently cooled to ambient temperature (25°C). Next, dry pulp from the fruit of the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata L.) was added to the milk at a concentration of 4% (wt/vol). This mixture was inoculated with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba and left to ferment for 24h, while the growth of the bacterial culture was monitored. Final ingredients were then added to produce probiotic mutandabota that had 14% (wt/vol) baobab fruit pulp and 7% (wt/vol) sugar in cow milk. The pH of probiotic mutandabota was pH 3.5, which ensures that the product is microbiologically safe. The viable plate count of L. rhamnosus yoba increased from 5.8 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL at the point of inoculation to 8.8 ± 0.4 log cfu/mL at the moment of consumption, thereby meeting the criterion to have a viable count of the probiotic bacterium in excess of 6 log cfu/mL of a product. Baobab fruit pulp at 4% promoted growth of L. rhamnosus yoba with a maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of 0.6 ± 0.2/h at 30°C. The developed technology, though specific for this particular product, has potential to be applied for the delivery of probiotics through a variety of indigenous foods in different regions of the world. Upon consumption, probiotic mutandabota is expected to improve the population's intestinal health, which is especially relevant for vulnerable target groups such as children and elderly people. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of food grade solvents for lipid extraction and impact of storage temperature on fatty acid composition of edible seaweeds Laminaria digitata (Phaeophyceae) and Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Matthias; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of different food- and non-food grade extraction solvents on yield and fatty acid composition of the lipid extracts of two seaweed species (Palmaria palmata and Laminaria digitata). The application of chloroform/methanol and three different food grade solvents (ethanol, hexane, ethanol/hexane) revealed significant differences in both, extraction yield and fatty acid composition. The extraction efficiency, in terms of yields of total fatty acids (TFA), was in the order: chloroform/methanol>ethanol>hexane>ethanol/hexane for both species. Highest levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were achieved by the extraction with ethanol. Additionally the effect of storage temperature on the stability of PUFA in ground and freeze-dried seaweed biomass was investigated. Seaweed samples were stored for a total duration of 22months at three different temperatures (-20°C, 4°C and 20°C). Levels of TFA and PUFA were only stable after storage at -20°C for the two seaweed species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of level and duration of feeding polysaccharide (laminarin and fucoidan) extracts from brown seaweed (Laminaria digitata) on quality indices of fresh pork.

    PubMed

    Moroney, N C; O'Grady, M N; Robertson, R C; Stanton, C; O'Doherty, J V; Kerry, J P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of level (450 or 900 mg laminarin (L) and fucoidan (F) /kg feed) and duration (3 or 6 wks) of feeding a seaweed (Laminaria digitata) extract containing L/F on the quality of pork (longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL)) stored in modified atmosphere packs and on organ lipid stability was examined. Mechanisms of L/F antioxidant activity in LTL were evaluated. Plasma total antioxidant status, LTL pH, colour, microbiology and 'eating quality' sensory analysis were unaffected by dietary L/F. 'Visual' sensory descriptors (purchasing appeal and overall visual acceptability) were enhanced (p<0.05) in L/F450-3 LTL. Lipid oxidation was lower (p<0.05) in L/F450-3 and L/F900-3 LTL and reduced in L/F900-6 kidney homogenates. In cooked minced pork, lipid oxidation was not reduced by dietary L/F. Saturated fatty acids were lower (p<0.05) in L/F900-6 LTL. Results indicated L/F in pig diets for 3 weeks enhanced pork quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of a brown seaweed (Laminaria digitata) extract containing laminarin and fucoidan on the quality and shelf-life of fresh and cooked minced pork patties.

    PubMed

    Moroney, N C; O'Grady, M N; O'Doherty, J V; Kerry, J P

    2013-07-01

    A spray-dried seaweed extract containing laminarin (L, 9.3%) and fucoidan (F, 7.8%) (L/F extract) from brown seaweed (Laminaria digitata) was added directly to minced pork (M. longissimus dorsi) (LD) at levels of 0.01%, 0.1% and 0.5% (w/w). Fresh and cooked minced pork patties were stored in modified atmosphere packs containing 80% O2:20% CO2 and 70% N2:30% CO2, respectively, for up to 14 days at 4 °C. The L/F extract reduced the surface redness ('a*' values) of fresh patties as a function of concentration. The L/F extract (0.5%) exerted the greatest lipid pro-oxidant activity in fresh patties. The L/F extract (0.5%) significantly decreased (P<0.05) lipid oxidation in cooked patties. The L/F extract had no effect on the microbiological status, pH, water holding capacity (WHC) or cook loss of patties. Pork patties containing 0.01% L/F were preferred by sensory panellists. Further research will focus on the use of refined purified seaweed extracts in functional meat products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modelled rainfall skill assessment against a 1000-year time/space isotope dendro-climatology for southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodborne, Stephan; Hall, Grant; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoclimate reconstruction using isotopic analysis of tree growth increments has yielded a 1000-year record of rainfall variability in southern Africa. Isotope dendro-climatology reconstructions from baobab trees (Adansonia digitata) provide evidence for rainfall variability from the arid Namib Desert and the Limpopo River Valley. Isotopic analysis of a museum specimen of a yellowwood tree (Podocarps falcatus) yields another record from the southwestern part of the subcontinent. Combined with the limited classic denro-climatologies available in the region these records yield palaeo-rainfall variability in the summer and winter rainfall zones as well as the hyper-arid zone over the last 1000 years. Coherent shifts in all of the records indicate synoptic changes in the westerlies, the inter-tropical convergence zone, and the Congo air boundary. The most substantial rainfall shift takes place at about 1600 CE at the onset of the Little Ice Age. Another distinctive feature of the record is a widespread phenomenon that occurs shortly after 1810 CE that in southern Africa corresponds with a widespread social upheaval known as the Difequane or Mfekane. Large scale forcing of the system includes sea-surface temperatures in the Agulhas Current, the El Nino Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The Little Ice Age and Mfekane climate shifts result from different forcing mechanisms, and the rainfall response in the different regions at these times do not have a fixed phase relationship. This complexity provides a good scenario to test climate models. A first order (wetter versus drier) comparison between each of the tree records and a 1000-year palaeoclimate model simulation for the Little Ice Age and Mfekane transitions demonstrates a generally good correspondence.

  14. Addition of seaweed (Laminaria digitata) extracts containing laminarin and fucoidan to porcine diets: influence on the quality and shelf-life of fresh pork.

    PubMed

    Moroney, N C; O'Grady, M N; O'Doherty, J V; Kerry, J P

    2012-12-01

    A seaweed extract containing laminarin (L) and fucoidan (F) (L/F) was manufactured from brown seaweed (Laminaria digitata) in spray-dried (L/F-SD) and wet (L/F-WS) forms. The effect of supplementation of pig diets with L/F-SD and L/F-WS (L, 500 mg/kg feed; F, 420 mg/kg feed) for 21 days pre-slaughter, on quality indices of fresh M. longissimus dorsi (LD) steaks was examined. Susceptibility of porcine liver, heart, kidney and lung tissue homogenates to iron-induced (1mM FeSO₄) lipid oxidation was also investigated. Dietary supplementation with L/F did not increase plasma total antioxidant status (TAS). In LD steaks stored in modified atmosphere packs (80% O₂:20% CO₂) (MAP) for up to 15 days at 4 °C, muscle pH, surface colour (CIE 'L*' lightness, 'a*' redness and 'b*' yellowness values) and microbiology (psychrotrophic and mesophilic counts, log CFU/g pork) were unaffected by dietary L/F. In general, levels of lipid oxidation (TBARS, mg MDA (malondialdehyde)/kg pork) followed the order: C>LF-SD>L/F-WS. A statistically significant reduction in lipid oxidation (P<0.05) was observed in LD steaks from 75% of pigs (n=6) fed with L/F-WS compared to controls. Iron-induced lipid oxidation increased in liver, heart, kidney and lung tissue homogenates over the 24h storage period and dietary L/F-WS reduced lipid oxidation to the greatest extent in liver tissue homogenates. Results demonstrate potential for the incorporation of marine-derived bioactive antioxidant components into muscle foods via the animal's diet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rhizome extracts of Curcuma zedoaria Rosc induce caspase dependant apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species in filarial parasite Setaria digitata in vitro.

    PubMed

    Senathilake, K S; Karunanayake, E H; Samarakoon, S R; Tennekoon, K H; de Silva, E D

    2016-08-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is mainly caused by filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and is the second leading cause of long term and permanent disability in tropical countries. To date, incapability to eliminate long lived adult parasites by current drugs remains the major challenge in the elimination of LF. Hence, in the current study, the efficacy of rhizome extracts of Curcuma zedoaria (a plant traditionally used in Sri Lanka in the management of LF) was evaluated as an effective filaricide in vitro. Sequential solvent extracts of C. zedoaria rhizomes were screened for in vitro antifilarial activity at 0.01-1 mg/mL concentrations by motility inhibition assay and 3-(4, 5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay using cattle parasite Setaria digitata as a model organism. Exposure of parasites to hexane and chloroform extracts of C. zedoaria caused a dose dependant reduction in motility and viability of microfilariae (IC50 = 72.42 μg/mL for hexane extract, 191.14 μg/mL for chloroform extract) and adult parasites (IC50 = 77.07 μg/mL for hexane extract, 259.87 μg/mL for chloroform extract). Both extracts were less toxic to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells when compared to filariae. A dose dependant increase in caspase 3/CED 3 and a decrease in total protein content, cyclooxygenase (COX) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activities were observed in adult parasites treated with hexane or chloroform extract. A significant degree of chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation were also observed in these worms by Hoechst 33342 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining respectively. Dose dependant chromosomal DNA laddering was observed in treated adult worms but not in microfilariae in response to both extracts. Oxidative stress parameters such as reduction in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and increase in glutathione s transferase (GST

  16. A Metagenomics Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Dietary Supplementation with Ascophyllum nodosum or Laminaria digitata on Rumen Function in Rusitec Fermenters

    PubMed Central

    Belanche, Alejandro; Jones, Eleanor; Parveen, Ifat; Newbold, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need to identify alternative feeds for livestock that do not compete with foods for humans. Seaweed might provide such a resource, but there is limited information available on its value as an animal feed. Here we use a multi-omics approach to investigate the value of two brown seaweeds, Ascophyllum nodosum (ASC) and Laminaria digitata (LAM), as alternative feeds for ruminants. These seaweeds were supplemented at 5% inclusion rate into a control diet (CON) in a rumen simulation fermenter. The seaweeds had no substantial effect on rumen fermentation, feed degradability or methane emissions. Concentrations of total bacteria, anaerobic fungi, biodiversity indices and abundances of the main bacterial and methanogen genera were also unaffected. However, species-specific effects of brown seaweed on the rumen function were noted: ASC promoted a substantial decrease in N degradability (−24%) due to its high phlorotannins content. Canonical correspondence analysis of the bacterial community revealed that low N availability led to a change in the structure of the bacterial community. ASC also decreased the concentration of Escherichia coli O157:H7 post-inoculation. In contrast, LAM which has a much lower phlorotannin content did not cause detrimental effects on N degradability nor modified the structure of the bacterial community in comparison to CON. This adaptation of the microbial community to LAM diets led to a greater microbial ability to digest xylan (+70%) and carboxy-methyl-cellulose (+41%). These differences among brown seaweeds resulted in greater microbial protein synthesis (+15%) and non-ammonia N flow (+11%) in LAM than in ASC diets and thus should led to a greater amino acid supply to the intestine of the animal. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that incorporation of brown seaweed into the diet can be considered as a suitable nutritional strategy for ruminants; however, special care must be taken with those seaweeds with high

  17. Multi-approach mapping to help spatial planning and management of the kelp species L. digitata and L. hyperborea: Case study of the Molène Archipelago, Brittany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajjouk, Touria; Rochette, Sébastien; Laurans, Martial; Ehrhold, Axel; Hamdi, Anouar; Le Niliot, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The Molène Archipelago in Brittany (France) hosts one of the largest kelp forests in Europe. Beyond their recognized ecological importance as an essential habitat and food for a variety of marine species, kelp also contributes towards regional economies by means of the alginate industry. Thousands of tons of kelp are collected each year for the needs of the chemical and food industries. Kelp harvesting in Brittany mainly concerns two species, Laminaria digitata (59,000 t) and Laminaria hyperborea (24,000 t), that, together, represent approximately 95% of the national landings. Estimating the available standing stock and its distribution is a clear need for providing appropriate and sustainable management measures. Prior to estimating the spatial distribution of biomasses, we produced a detailed seabed topography map with accurate hard substrate delineation thanks to surveys and appropriate processing of airborne optical and acoustic imaging. Habitat suitability models of presence-absence and biomass were then developed for each species by relating in situ observations from underwater video and sampling to the many biotic and abiotic factors that may govern kelp species distribution. Our statistical approach combining generalized additive models (GAM) in a delta approach also provided spatial uncertainty associated with each prediction to help management decisions. This study confirmed that the adopted strategy, based on an integrated approach, enhanced knowledge on kelp biomass distributions in the Molène Archipelago and provided a promising direct link between research and management. Indeed, the high resolution topography and hard substrate maps produced for the study greatly improved knowledge on the sea bottom of the area. This was also of major importance for an accurate mapping of kelp distribution. The quality of the habitat suitability models was verified with fishing effort data (RECOPESCA program) and confirmed by local managers and kelp harvesters

  18. Mineral composition of non-conventional leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Barminas, J T; Charles, M; Emmanuel, D

    1998-01-01

    Six non-conventional leafy vegetables consumed largely by the rural populace of Nigeria were analyzed for mineral composition. Mineral contents appeared to be dependent on the type of vegetables. Amaranthus spinosus and Adansonia digitata leaves contained the highest level of iron (38.4 mg/100 g and 30.6 mg/100 g dw, respectively). These values are low compared to those for common Nigerian vegetables but higher than those for other food sources. All the vegetables contained high levels of calcium compared to common vegetables, thus they could be a rich source of this mineral. Microelement content of the leaves varied appreciably. Zinc content was highest in Moringa oleifera, Adansonia digitata and Cassia tora leaves (25.5 mg/100 g, 22.4 mg/100 g and 20.9 mg/100 g dw, respectively) while the manganese content was comparatively higher in Colocasia esculenta. The concentrations of the mineral elements in the vegetables per serving portion are presented and these values indicate that the local vegetables could be valuable and important contributors in the diets of the rural and urban people of Nigeria. The mean daily intake of P, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn were lower than their recommended dietary allowances (RDAs). However, the manganese daily intake was found not to differ significantly (p = 0.05) from the RDA value.

  19. BAOBAB (Big And Outrageously Bold Asteroid Belt) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, L. A.; Thomas, C. A; Englander, J. A.; Ruesch, O.; Hosseini, S.; Goossens, S. J.; Mazarico, E. M.; Schmerr, N.

    2017-01-01

    One of the intriguing results of NASA's Dawn mission is the composition and structure of the Main Asteroid Belt's only known dwarf planet, Ceres [1]. It has a top layer of dehydrated clays and salts [2] and an icy-rocky mantle [3,4]. It is widely known that the asteroid belt failed to accrete as a planet by resonances between the Sun and Jupiter. About 20-30 asteroids >100 km diameter are probably differentiated protoplanets [5]. 1) how many more and which ones are fragments of protoplanets? 2) How many and which ones are primordial rubble piles left over from condensation of the solar nebula? 3) How would we go about gaining better and more complete characterization of the mass, interior structure and composition of the Main Belt asteroid population? 4) What is the relationship between asteroids and ocean worlds? Bulk parameters such as the mass, density, and porosity, are important to characterize the structure of any celestial body, and for asteroids in particular, they can shed light on the conditions in the early solar system. Asteroid density estimates exist but currently they are often based on assumed properties of taxonomic classes, or through astronomical survey data where interactions with asteroids are weak at best resulting in large measurement uncertainty. We only have direct density estimates from spacecraft encounters for a few asteroids at this time. Knowledge of the asteroids is significant not only to understand their role in solar system workings, but also to assess their potential as space resources, as impact hazards on Earth, or even as harboring life forms. And for the distant future, we want to know if the idea put forth in a contest sponsored by Physics Today, to surface the asteroids into highly reflecting, polished surfaces and use them as a massively segmented mirror for astrophysical exploration [6], is feasible.

  20. Proximate Analysis of Five Wild Fruits of Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Uamusse, Amália; Sjöholm, Ingegerd

    2013-01-01

    Mozambique is rich in wild fruit trees, most of which produce fleshy fruits commonly consumed in rural communities, especially during dry seasons. However, information on their content of macronutrients is scarce. Five wild fruit species (Adansonia digitata, Landolphia kirkii, Sclerocarya birrea, Salacia kraussii, and Vangueria infausta) from different districts in Mozambique were selected for the study. The contents of dry matter, fat, protein, ash, sugars, pH, and titratable acidity were determined in the fruit pulps. Also kernels of A. digitata and S. birrea were included in the study. The protein content in the pulp was below 5 g/100 g of dry matter, but a daily intake of 100 g fresh wild fruits would provide up to 11% of the recommended daily intake for children from 4 to 8 years old. The sugar content varied between 2.3% and 14.4% fresh weight. The pH was below 3, except for Salacia kraussii, for which it was slightly below 7. Kernels of A. digitata contained, on average, 39.2% protein and 38.0% fat, and S. birrea kernels 32.6% protein and 60.7% fat. The collection of nutritional information may serve as a basis for increased consumption and utilization. PMID:23983641

  1. Proximate analysis of five wild fruits of Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Magaia, Telma; Uamusse, Amália; Sjöholm, Ingegerd; Skog, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Mozambique is rich in wild fruit trees, most of which produce fleshy fruits commonly consumed in rural communities, especially during dry seasons. However, information on their content of macronutrients is scarce. Five wild fruit species (Adansonia digitata, Landolphia kirkii, Sclerocarya birrea, Salacia kraussii, and Vangueria infausta) from different districts in Mozambique were selected for the study. The contents of dry matter, fat, protein, ash, sugars, pH, and titratable acidity were determined in the fruit pulps. Also kernels of A. digitata and S. birrea were included in the study. The protein content in the pulp was below 5 g/100 g of dry matter, but a daily intake of 100 g fresh wild fruits would provide up to 11% of the recommended daily intake for children from 4 to 8 years old. The sugar content varied between 2.3% and 14.4% fresh weight. The pH was below 3, except for Salacia kraussii, for which it was slightly below 7. Kernels of A. digitata contained, on average, 39.2% protein and 38.0% fat, and S. birrea kernels 32.6% protein and 60.7% fat. The collection of nutritional information may serve as a basis for increased consumption and utilization.

  2. Polyphenol content and antioxidant activity of fourteen wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Lamien-Meda, Aline; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Compaoré, Moussa M Y; Meda, Roland N T; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Zeba, Boukare; Millogo, Jeanne F; Nacoulma, Odile G

    2008-03-06

    A total of fourteen (14) species of wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso were analyzed for their phenolic and flavonoid contents, and their antioxidant activities using the DPPH, FRAP and ABTS methods. The data obtained show that the total phenolic and total flavonoid levels were significantly higher in the acetone than in the methanol extracts.Detarium microcarpum fruit had the highest phenolic and the highest flavonoid content,followed by that of Adansonia digitata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Ximenia americana and Lannea microcarpa. Significant amounts of total phenolics were also detected in the other fruit species in the following order of decreasing levels: Tamarindus indica > Sclerocaryabirrea > Dialium guineense > Gardenia erubescens > Diospyros mespiliformis > Parkiabiglobosa > Ficus sycomorus > Vitellaria paradoxa. Detarium microcarpum fruit also showed the highest antioxidant activity using the three antioxidant assays. Fruits with high antioxidant activities were also found to possess high phenolic and flavonoid contents. There was a strong correlation between total phenolic and flavonoid levels and antioxidant activities.

  3. The Hidden Leaves of the Baobab Tree: Lived Experiences of African American Female Chief Academic Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Kyeanna Mozzel

    2010-01-01

    The chief academic officer (CAO) role is critical to the academic and often administrative mission of an institution of higher education. Key constituents served by CAOs are become more diverse; however the individuals serving in the position are not diversifying at the same rate. The purpose of this study was to collect and portray the…

  4. The 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory, antioxidant, antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of fourteen ethnomedicinally used African spices and culinary herbs.

    PubMed

    Dzoyem, Jean Paul; Kuete, Victor; McGaw, Lyndy J; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2014-10-28

    Culinary herbs and spices are widely used ethnomedically across Africa. They are traditionally employed in the treatment of several ailments including inflammation disorders, pain alleviation and infectious diseases. Pharmacological studies are necessary to provide a scientific basis to substantiate their traditional use and safety. In this study, the 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory, antioxidant, antimycobacterial and the cytotoxic activities, total phenolic and flavonoid contents of fourteen edible plants were investigated. The 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity was evaluated by the ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay method. The antioxidant activity was determined using free-radical scavenging assays. The antimycobacterial activity was determined by a broth microdilution method against three species of mycobacteria: Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium fortuitum using tetrazolium violet as growth indicator. The cytotoxicity was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on Vero monkey kidney cells. All the extracts tested had some 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity ranging from 32.9 to 78.64%. Adansonia digitata (fruit) had the highest antioxidant capacity (IC₅₀ values of 8.15 μg/mL and 9.16 μg/mL in the DPPH and ABTS assays respectively; TEAC of 0.75 in the FRAP assay) along with the highest amount of total phenolics (237.68 mg GAE/g) and total flavonoids (16.14 mg E/g). There were good correlations between DPPH and ABTS values (R(2) 0.98) and between total phenolics and total flavonoids (R(2) 0.94). Tamarindus indica had significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium aurum (MIC 78 μg/mL). As could be expected with edible plants, all the extracts had a relatively low cytotoxicity with LC₅₀ values higher than 102 μg/mL with the exception of the two Aframomum species (33 and 74 μg/mL). This study provides scientific support for some of the the traditional uses

  5. Indigenous food ingredients for complementary food formulations to combat infant malnutrition in Benin: a review.

    PubMed

    Chadare, Flora J; Madode, Yann E; Fanou-Fogny, Nadia; Kindossi, Janvier M; Ayosso, Juvencio Og; Honfo, S Hermann; Kayodé, Ap Polycarpe; Linnemann, Anita R; Hounhouigan, D Joseph

    2018-01-01

    This paper reviews indigenous Beninese food resources as potential ingredients for complementary infant foods with the aim to develop affordable formulations for low-income households in each agro-ecological zone of the country. Potential ingredients were selected on their documented nutritional value. The selected foods encompass 347 food resources, namely 297 plant products from home gardens or collected from natural vegetation and 50 animals, either domesticated or from the wild. The compiled data reveal that the distribution of the available food resources was unbalanced between agro-ecological zones. Only a few animal ingredients are obtainable in northern Benin. Most resources are seasonal, but their availability may be extended. A high variation was observed in energy and nutrient contents. Antinutritional factors were identified in some resources, but processing techniques were reported to reduce their presence in meals. In general, ingredients from local tree foods (Adansonia digitata, Parkia biglobosa) were adequate as sources of nutrients for complementary infant foods. Based on this review, local foods for the development of complementary food formulas for Beninese infants and children may be selected for each agro-ecological zone. The approach used is exemplary for other sub-Saharan African countries in need of complementary infant foods. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Dietary fiber, organic acids and minerals in selected wild edible fruits of Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Magaia, Telma; Uamusse, Amália; Sjöholm, Ingegerd; Skog, Kerstin

    2013-12-01

    The harvesting, utilization and marketing of indigenous fruits and nuts have been central to the livelihoods of the majority of rural communities in African countries. In this study we report on the content of dietary fiber, minerals and selected organic acids in the pulps and kernels of the wild fruits most commonly consumed in southern Mozambique. The content of soluble fiber in the pulps ranged from 4.3 to 65.6 g/100 g and insoluble fiber from 2.6 to 45.8 g/100 g. In the kernels the content of soluble fiber ranged from 8.4 to 42.6 g/100 g and insoluble fiber from 14.7 to 20.9 g/100 g. Citric acid was found in all fruits up to 25.7 g/kg. The kernels of Adansonia digitata and Sclerocarya birrea were shown to be rich in calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc. The data may be useful in selecting wild fruit species appropriate for incorporation into diets.

  7. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) associated with wildlife and vegetation of Haller park along the Kenyan coastline.

    PubMed

    Wanzala, W; Okanga, S

    2006-09-01

    This artcile describes the results obtained from a tick survey conducted in Haller park along the Kenyan coastline. The survey aimed at evaluating tick-host associations, assessing tick population density, and providing baseline information for planning future tick control and management in the park. Ticks (2,968) were collected by handpicking from eight species of wildlife and by dragging in 14 selected sites within the park. A considerable proportion of ticks were also collected from leaves, stems, and bark of most dominant trees, namely, Casuarina equisetifolia L. (Forst. and Forst.), Cocos nucifera L., Adansonia digitata L., Musa paradisiaca L., and Azadiracta indica Adr. Juss. Dragging was conducted in sites predominantly occupied by Cynodon dactylon L. (Pers.), Cenchrus ciliaris L., Stenotaphrum dimidiatum L. (Kuntze.) Brongn., and Brachiaria xantholeuca Hack. Ex Schinz Stapf. and Loudetia kagerensis K. Schum. Hutch. Eight tick species were identified, and the collection included Rhipicephalus pravus Dönitz 1910, Rhipicephalus pulchellus Gerstäcker 1873, Hyalomma marginatum rufipes Koch 1844, Amblyomma gemma Dönitz 1910, Amblyomma hebraeum Koch 1844, Amblyomma sparsum Neumann 1899, Amblyomma nuttalli Dönitz 1909, and Boophilus decoloratus Koch 1844. Given that the identified tick species are known to parasitize humans as well as livestock, there exist risks of emergence of zoonotic infections mediated by tick vectors. In the recreational environment of Haller park, where tick vectors share habitats with hosts, there is a need to develop sustainable and effective tick control and management strategies to minimize economic losses that tick infestation may cause.

  8. Optimal traits of plant hydraulic capacitance as an adaptation to hydroclimatic variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartzell, S. R.; Bartlett, M. S., Jr.; Porporato, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic capacitance allows plants to uptake and store water when it is abundant. This stored water is utilized during periods of water stress, decreasing tissue damage and increasing carbon assimilation. By providing a more consistent and readily accessible water supply, it buffers water stress variability across daily and seasonal timescales. The rate of plant water storage and withdrawal varies widely between plant species and is principally governed by several plant hydraulic parameters, principally the hydraulic capacitance, the total water storage capacity, and the conductance between xylem and water storage tissue. The timescale of the plant response to changes in environmental conditions may be related to the timescale of relevant environmental variability. For example, the Baobab tree (Adansonia), which grows in an environment with very strong seasonal rainfall variability, has a relatively long timescale of hydraulic response, while an evergreen tree such as Pinus taeda, which mainly contends with daily and inter-rainfall moisture variability, has a much shorter timescale of hydraulic response. Here a model of hydraulic capacitance is coupled to a resistance model of soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. We force this model with stochastic rainfall and examine plant responses to moisture variability at various timescales. Optimal plant hydraulic properties are examined as a function of mean soil moisture (daily variability), mean period between rainfall events (inter-rainfall variability), and seasonal rainfall variability, and the relative importance of each type of variability in shaping plant water use strategies is assessed. Results are compared to typical hydraulic parameters of plants growing under specific environmental conditions. Values of hydraulic traits which optimize carbon assimilation and water use efficiency are found; these values are dependent on mean environmental conditions as well as the timescale of environmental variability.

  9. Dewatering treatments to increase dry matter content of the brown seaweed, kelp (Laminaria digitata ((Hudson) JV Lamouroux)).

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Joe A; Turner, Lesley B; Adams, Jessica M M; Dyer, Philip W; Theodorou, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Macroalgal water content is an on-going problem for the use of readily accessible seaweeds in sustainable biorefining, including fuel production. Silage is a reduced-water, compactable, easily stored, transportable material. Ensiling could establish a non-seasonal supply of preserved algal biomass, but requires high initial dry matter content to mitigate environmental pollution risks from effluent. This study investigated potential dewatering methods for kelp harvested throughout the year. Treatments included air-drying, osmotic media and acids. Significant interactions between treatment and harvest-time were observed for traits of interest. Fresh weight loss during treatment was composed of changes in water and dry matter content. Air-drying gave reliable increase in final dry matter content; in summer and autumn 30% dry matter content was reached after 24h. Dilute hydrochloric acid reduced stickiness and rendered material suitable for dewatering by screw-pressing; it may be possible to use the consequent pH reduction to promote efficient preservation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. The Community of Learning Is in the Baobab Tree--How the Branches Stay Together in the Context of Professional Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger-Le Fevre, Celeste; Fritz, Elzette; van der Westhuizen, Gert

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how participation in a community of learning supported transformation on a personal and professional level in a Master's programme at a South African university. It draws on the concept of transformational learning in the professional preparation of educational psychologists, and how such learning plays out in the development…

  11. Finding of 13(2) , 17(3) -cyclopheophorbide a enol as a degradation product of chlorophyll in shrunk zooxanthellae of the coral Montipora digitata.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Shioi, Yuzo; Ishikawa, Yoshio; Suzuki, Yoshimi

    2015-02-01

    We examined the morphology and pigment composition of zooxanthellae in corals subjected to normal temperature (27°C) and thermal stress (32°C). We observed several normal and abnormal morphological types of zooxanthellar cells. Normal cells were intact and their chloroplasts were unbroken (healthy); abnormal cells were shrunken and had partially degraded or broken chloroplasts, or they were bleached and without chloroplasts. At 27°C, most healthy zooxanthellar cells were retained in the coral tissue, whereas shrunken zooxanthellae were expelled. Under thermal stress, the abundance of healthy zooxanthellae declined and the proportion of shrunken/abnormal cells increased in coral tissues. The rate of algal cell expulsion was reduced under thermal stress. Within the shrunken cells, we detected the presence of a chl-like pigment that is not ordinarily found in healthy zooxanthellae. Analysis of the absorption spectrum, absorption maxima, and retention time (by HPLC) indicated that this pigment was 13(2) , 17(3) -cyclopheophorbide a enol (cPPB-aE), which is frequently found in marine and lacustrine sediments, and in protozoans that graze on phytoplankton. The production of cPPB-aE in shrunken zooxanthellae suggests that the chls have been degraded to cPPB-aE, a compound that is not fluorescent. The lack of a fluorescence function precludes the formation of reactive oxygen species. We therefore consider the formation of cPPB-aE in shrunken zooxanthellae to be a mechanism for avoiding oxidative stress. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Phycology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Phycological Society of America.

  12. Spatially explicit multi-threat assessment of food tree species in Burkina Faso: A fine-scale approach

    PubMed Central

    Kindt, Roeland; Loo, Judy; Schmidt, Marco; Bognounou, Fidèle; Da, Sié Sylvestre; Diallo, Ousmane Boukary; Ganaba, Souleymane; Gnoumou, Assan; Lompo, Djingdia; Lykke, Anne Mette; Mbayngone, Elisée; Nacoulma, Blandine Marie Ivette; Ouedraogo, Moussa; Ouédraogo, Oumarou; Parkouda, Charles; Porembski, Stefan; Savadogo, Patrice; Thiombiano, Adjima; Zerbo, Guibien; Vinceti, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades agroforestry parklands in Burkina Faso have come under increasing demographic as well as climatic pressures, which are threatening indigenous tree species that contribute substantially to income generation and nutrition in rural households. Analyzing the threats as well as the species vulnerability to them is fundamental for priority setting in conservation planning. Guided by literature and local experts we selected 16 important food tree species (Acacia macrostachya, Acacia senegal, Adansonia digitata, Annona senegalensis, Balanites aegyptiaca, Bombax costatum, Boscia senegalensis, Detarium microcarpum, Lannea microcarpa, Parkia biglobosa, Sclerocarya birrea, Strychnos spinosa, Tamarindus indica, Vitellaria paradoxa, Ximenia americana, Ziziphus mauritiana) and six key threats to them (overexploitation, overgrazing, fire, cotton production, mining and climate change). We developed a species-specific and spatially explicit approach combining freely accessible datasets, species distribution models (SDMs), climate models and expert survey results to predict, at fine scale, where these threats are likely to have the greatest impact. We find that all species face serious threats throughout much of their distribution in Burkina Faso and that climate change is predicted to be the most prevalent threat in the long term, whereas overexploitation and cotton production are the most important short-term threats. Tree populations growing in areas designated as ‘highly threatened’ due to climate change should be used as seed sources for ex situ conservation and planting in areas where future climate is predicting suitable habitats. Assisted regeneration is suggested for populations in areas where suitable habitat under future climate conditions coincides with high threat levels due to short-term threats. In the case of Vitellaria paradoxa, we suggest collecting seed along the northern margins of its distribution and considering assisted regeneration in

  13. Spatially explicit multi-threat assessment of food tree species in Burkina Faso: A fine-scale approach.

    PubMed

    Gaisberger, Hannes; Kindt, Roeland; Loo, Judy; Schmidt, Marco; Bognounou, Fidèle; Da, Sié Sylvestre; Diallo, Ousmane Boukary; Ganaba, Souleymane; Gnoumou, Assan; Lompo, Djingdia; Lykke, Anne Mette; Mbayngone, Elisée; Nacoulma, Blandine Marie Ivette; Ouedraogo, Moussa; Ouédraogo, Oumarou; Parkouda, Charles; Porembski, Stefan; Savadogo, Patrice; Thiombiano, Adjima; Zerbo, Guibien; Vinceti, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades agroforestry parklands in Burkina Faso have come under increasing demographic as well as climatic pressures, which are threatening indigenous tree species that contribute substantially to income generation and nutrition in rural households. Analyzing the threats as well as the species vulnerability to them is fundamental for priority setting in conservation planning. Guided by literature and local experts we selected 16 important food tree species (Acacia macrostachya, Acacia senegal, Adansonia digitata, Annona senegalensis, Balanites aegyptiaca, Bombax costatum, Boscia senegalensis, Detarium microcarpum, Lannea microcarpa, Parkia biglobosa, Sclerocarya birrea, Strychnos spinosa, Tamarindus indica, Vitellaria paradoxa, Ximenia americana, Ziziphus mauritiana) and six key threats to them (overexploitation, overgrazing, fire, cotton production, mining and climate change). We developed a species-specific and spatially explicit approach combining freely accessible datasets, species distribution models (SDMs), climate models and expert survey results to predict, at fine scale, where these threats are likely to have the greatest impact. We find that all species face serious threats throughout much of their distribution in Burkina Faso and that climate change is predicted to be the most prevalent threat in the long term, whereas overexploitation and cotton production are the most important short-term threats. Tree populations growing in areas designated as 'highly threatened' due to climate change should be used as seed sources for ex situ conservation and planting in areas where future climate is predicting suitable habitats. Assisted regeneration is suggested for populations in areas where suitable habitat under future climate conditions coincides with high threat levels due to short-term threats. In the case of Vitellaria paradoxa, we suggest collecting seed along the northern margins of its distribution and considering assisted regeneration in the

  14. Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    P, Sudha; Zinjarde, Smita S; Bhargava, Shobha Y; Kumar, Ameeta R

    2011-01-20

    Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition (< 10%). However, strong porcine pancreatic amylase inhibitory activity (> 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440 μgml-1) and Ocimum tenuiflorum

  15. Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition (< 10%). However, strong porcine pancreatic amylase inhibitory activity (> 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440

  16. Small subunit ribosomal RNA sequence links the myxospore stage of Henneguya mississippiensis n. sp. from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus to an actinospore released by the benthic oligochaete Dero digitata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are more than 200 species of Henneguya described from fish. Of these, only three life cycles have been determined, identifying the actinospore and myxospore stages from their respective hosts. Two of these life cycles involve the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and the freshwater oligo...

  17. A review of commercially important African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Van Wyk, B-E

    2015-12-24

    Data on the relative importance and research status of commercially relevant African medicinal plants are needed for developing new research strategies in order to stimulate much-needed ethnopharmacological research and to promote the commercialization of African plants. To present an illustrated bird's eye view and comparative analysis of the relative popularity and importance of commercialized African medicinal plants. A comparison is made between the general popularity and commercial importance of the species (as indicated by their footprint on the World Wide Web) and their scientific popularity and importance (as indicated by the number of research publications). The inventory and review is strongly focussed to cover all or most of the medicinal plant raw materials in the international trade that are exported from African countries, with less emphasis on those that are regularly traded on local and regional markets within Africa. The review is based on literature data, Scopus and Google searches, commercial information and the author's own experience and observations. More than 5400 plant species are used in traditional medicine in Africa, of which less than 10% have been commercially developed to some extent. Africa is home to more than 80 valuable commercial species that are regularly traded on international markets, including phytomedicines (e.g. Harpagophytum procumbens and Pelargonium sidoides), functional foods (e.g. Adansonia digitata and Hibiscus sabdariffa) and sources of pure chemical entities (e.g. caffeine from Coffea arabica and yohimbine from Pausinystalia johimbe). According to the Scopus results, about 60% of all recent publications on African medicinal plants appeared in the last decade, with an average of 280 papers (28 per year) for 85 prominent species of international trade. The most popular African species for research (number of publications in brackets) were: Ricinus communis (5187), Aloe vera (2832), Catharanthus roseus (2653), Sesamum

  18. Wild medicinal and food plants used by communities living in Mopane woodlands of southern Angola: Results of an ethnobotanical field investigation.

    PubMed

    Urso, Valeria; Signorini, Maria Adele; Tonini, Matteo; Bruschi, Piero

    2016-01-11

    Mopane woodlands play an important role in the livelihood strategies of local populations; however, they have been scarcely investigated by ethnobiologists and very little is currently known about plants traditionally used by local communities, especially about medicinal plants. Our investigation was aimed to document ethnobotanical knowledge in seven communities living in conditions of extreme poverty in a Mopane area of southern Angola (Namibe province). We focused on plants used as medicines and/or food, in order to highlight the role of wild plants in the livelihood of local communities, and possibly to find out plants with potential pharmacological interest. Ethnobotanical data were recorded through semi-structured interviews, filed in a database and quantitatively analyzed. The following synthetic indexes were used: Cultural Importance index (CI), Informant Consensus Factor (FIC), Fidelity Level (FL). Sixty-six informants (26 males, 40 females) were interviewed. A total of 1247 citations were recorded, concerning 132 ethnospecies (folk taxonomic units not necessarily corresponding to single botanical species); 104 were identified at different taxonomic levels. For medicinal purposes, 116 ethnospecies and 20 different uses (650 citations) were reported; for food purposes, 33 ethnospecies and 8 different uses (597 citations). The main used parts resulted to be fruit (471 citations; 21 ethnospecies), followed by underground organs (288, 82) and leaves (175, 41). According to CI values, Berchemia discolor, Ximenia americana var. americana and Adansonia digitata have the highest cultural value in the investigated communities. All of them are woody plants, as well as most of the identified ethnospecies (trees 34.6%, shrubs 32.7%, perennials 21.2%, annuals 8.7%, others 2.8%). Medicinal plants are especially used to treat disorders of the gastrointestinal tract (52 ethnospecies, 205 citations), obstetric/gynecological troubles (27, 40) and colds and respiratory tract

  19. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conical and expansible material made from the root of a seaweed (Laminaria digitata or Laminaria japonica). The device is used to induce abortion. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  20. Nutrient and Total Polyphenol Contents of Dark Green Leafy Vegetables, and Estimation of Their Iron Bioaccessibility Using the In Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Atuna, Richard Atinpoore; McBride, Richard; Carey, Edward Ewing

    2017-01-01

    Dark green leafy vegetables (DGLVs) are considered as important sources of iron and vitamin A. However, iron concentration may not indicate bioaccessibility. The objectives of this study were to compare the nutrient content and iron bioaccessibility of five sweet potato cultivars, including three orange-fleshed types, with other commonly consumed DGLVs in Ghana: cocoyam, corchorus, baobab, kenaf and moringa, using the in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Moringa had the highest numbers of iron absorption enhancers on an “as-would-be-eaten” basis, β-carotene (14169 μg/100 g; p < 0.05) and ascorbic acid (46.30 mg/100 g; p < 0.001), and the best iron bioaccessibility (10.28 ng ferritin/mg protein). Baobab and an orange-fleshed sweet potato with purplish young leaves had a lower iron bioaccessibility (6.51 and 6.76 ng ferritin/mg protein, respectively) compared with that of moringa, although these three greens contained similar (p > 0.05) iron (averaging 4.18 mg/100 g) and β-carotene levels. The ascorbic acid concentration of 25.50 mg/100 g in the cooked baobab did not enhance the iron bioaccessibility. Baobab and the orange-fleshed sweet potato with purplish young leaves contained the highest levels of total polyphenols (1646.75 and 506.95 mg Gallic Acid Equivalents/100 g, respectively; p < 0.001). This suggests that iron bioaccessibility in greens cannot be inferred based on the mineral concentration. Based on the similarity of the iron bioaccessibility of the sweet potato leaves and cocoyam leaf (a widely-promoted “nutritious” DGLV in Ghana), the former greens have an added advantage of increasing the dietary intake of provitamin A. PMID:28737681

  1. WOWBugs: New Life for Life Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Robert W.; And Others

    This book of life science activities introduces a new experimental animal--the WOWBug, "Melittobia digitata"--that is commonly found in nature but has never before been used in the precollege classroom. It includes 20 activities and experiments for grades 5-12, that cover topics from basic orientation to ecological interactions, from physical…

  2. Molecular and morphological characterization of myxozoan actinospore types from a commercial catfish pond in the Mississippi Delta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The actinospore diversity of infected Dero digitata was surveyed (May, 2011) from a channel catfish production pond in the Mississippi Delta region for the elucidation of unknown myxozoan life cycles. Only two myxozoan life cycles have been molecularly confirmed in channel catfish (Ictalurus puncta...

  3. WOWBugs: Materials Development and Classroom Implementation of a Novel Organism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.; And Others

    The purpose of the WOWBug project was to promote "Melittobia digitata," a fruit-fly sized wasp, as a new organism for life science instruction and to determine the potential usefulness of the wasp to teach fundamental life science concepts. Fifty-five middle school teachers were introduced to the WOWBug and practiced with prototype…

  4. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conical and expansible material made from the root of a seaweed (Laminaria digitata or Laminaria japonica...

  5. Iconography in Bradshaw rock art: breaking the circularity.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Jack

    2011-09-01

    Interpreting the symbols found in the rock art of an extinct culture is hampered by the fact that such symbols are culturally determined. How does one break the circularity inherent in the fact that the knowledge of both the symbols and the culture comes from the same source? In this study, the circularity is broken for the Bradshaw rock art of the Kimberley by seeking anchors from outside the culture. Bradshaw rock art in the Kimberley region of Australia and Sandawe rock art in the Kolo region of Eastern Tanzania were surveyed in six visits on foot, by vehicle, by helicopter and from published or shared images, as well as from the published and online images of Khoisan rock art. Uniquely shared images between Bradshaw and Sandawe art, such as the 'mushroom head' symbol of psilocybin use, link the two cultures and indicate that they were shamanistic. Therefore, many mysterious features in the art can be understood in terms of trance visualisations. A number of other features uniquely link Bradshaw and Sandawe cultures, such as a special affinity for small mammals. There are also many references to baobabs in early Bradshaw art but not later. This can be explained in the context of the Toba super-volcano, the likely human transport of baobabs to the Kimberley and the extraordinary utility of the baobab. Many more mysterious symbols in Bradshaw rock art might await interpretation using the approaches adopted here. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2011 Optometrists Association Australia.

  6. Physiological responses of intertidal marine brown algae to nitrogen deprivation and resupply of nitrate and ammonium.

    PubMed

    Young, Erica B; Berges, John A; Dring, Matthew J

    2009-04-01

    Intertidal macroalgae Fucus and Laminaria experience seasonally fluctuating inorganic N supply. This study examined the effects of long-term N deprivation, recovery following N resupply, and effects of elevated ammonium and nitrate exposure on N acquisition in intertidal algae using manipulations of N supply in tank culture. Over 15 weeks of N deprivation, internal N and nitrate reductase activity (NRA) declined, but maximum quantum yield of PSII was unaffected in Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus. Low NRA was maintained despite no external nitrate availability and depletion of internal pools, suggesting a constitutive NRA, insensitive to N supply. Nitrate resupplied to N-starved thalli was rapidly taken up and internal nitrate pools and NRA increased. Exposure to elevated (50 microM) nitrate over 4 days stimulated nitrate uptake and NRA in Laminaria digitata and F. serratus. Exposure to elevated ammonium suppressed NRA in L. digitata but not in F. serratus. This novel insensitivity of NRA to ammonium in Fucus contrasts with regulation of NRA in other algae and higher plants. Ammonium suppression of NRA in L. digitata was not via inhibition of nitrate uptake and was independent of nitrate availability. L. digitata showed a higher capacity for internal nitrate storage when exposed to elevated ambient nitrate, but NRA was lower than in Fucus. All species maintained nitrate assimilation capacity in excess of nitrate uptake capacity. N uptake and storage strategies of these intertidal macroalgae are adaptive to life in fluctuating N supply, and distinct regulation of N metabolism in Fucus vs Laminaria may relate to position in the intertidal zone.

  7. Decline in Kelp in West Europe and Climate.

    PubMed

    Raybaud, Virginie; Beaugrand, Grégory; Goberville, Eric; Delebecq, Gaspard; Destombe, Christophe; Valero, Myriam; Davoult, Dominique; Morin, Pascal; Gevaert, François

    2013-01-01

    Kelp ecosystems form widespread underwater forests playing a major role in structuring the biodiversity at a regional scale. Some seaweeds such as Laminaria digitata are also economically important, being exploited for their alginate and iodine content. Although some studies have shown that kelp ecosystems are regressing and that multiple causes are likely to be at the origin of the disappearance of certain populations, the extent to which global climate change may play a role remains speculative. Here we show that many populations of L. digitata along European coasts are on the verge of local extinction due to a climate-caused increase in sea temperature. By modeling the spatial distribution of the seaweed, we evaluate the possible implications of global climate change for the geographical patterns of the species using temperature data from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). Projections of the future range of L. digitata throughout the 21st century show large shifts in the suitable habitat of the kelp and a northward retreat of the southern limit of its current geographic distribution from France to Danish coasts and the southern regions of the United Kingdom. However, these projections depend on the intensity of warming. A medium to high warming is expected to lead to the extirpation of the species as early as the first half of the 21st century and there is high confidence that regional extinction will spread northwards by the end of this century. These changes are likely to cause the decline of species whose life cycle is closely dependent upon L. digitata and lead to the establishment of new ecosystems with lower ecological and economic values.

  8. Fucus and Ascophyllum seaweeds are significant contributors to coastal iodine emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Thorenz, U. R.; Kundel, M.; Venables, D. S.; Ceburnis, D.; Chen, J.; Vogel, A. L.; Küpper, F. C.; Smyth, P. P. A.; Berresheim, H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    Based on the results of a pilot study in 2007, which found high mixing ratios of molecular iodine (I2) above the intertidal macroalgae (seaweed) beds at Mweenish Bay (Ireland), we extended the study to nine different locations in the vicinity of Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the west coast of Ireland during a field campaign in 2009. I2 mixing ratios from 104 to 393 ppt were found above the macroalgae beds, implying a high source strength of I2. Such mixing ratios are sufficient to result in photochemically-driven coastal new-particle formation events. Mixing ratios above the Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus beds increased with exposure time - after 6 h exposure to ambient air the mixing ratios were one order of magnitude higher than those initially present. This contrasts with the emission characteristics of Laminaria digitata, where most I2 was emitted within the first half hour of exposure. Discrete in situ measurements (off-line) of I2 emission from ambient air-exposed chamber experiments of L. digitata, A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus substantially supported the field observations. Further online and time-resolved measurements of the I2 emission from O3-exposed macroalgal experiments in chamber confirmed the distinct I2 emission characteristics of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus compared to that of L. digitata. The emission rates of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus were comparable to or even higher than L. digitata after the initial exposure period of ~20-30 min. We suggest that A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus may provide an unaccounted and important source of photolabile iodine in the coastal boundary layer and that their impact on photochemistry and coastal new particle formation should be reevaluated in light of their longer exposure at low-tide and their widespread distribution.

  9. The seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum are significant contributors to coastal iodine emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Thorenz, U. R.; Kundel, M.; Venables, D. S.; Ceburnis, D.; Ho, K. F.; Chen, J.; Vogel, A. L.; Küpper, F. C.; Smyth, P. P. A.; Nitschke, U.; Stengel, D. B.; Berresheim, H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-05-01

    Based on the results of a pilot study in 2007, which found high mixing ratios of molecular iodine (I2) above the intertidal macroalgae (seaweed) beds at Mweenish Bay (Ireland), we extended the study to nine different locations in the vicinity of Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the west coast of Ireland during a field campaign in 2009. The mean values of \\chem{I_2} mixing ratio found above the macroalgae beds at nine different locations ranged from 104 to 393 ppt, implying a high source strength of I2. Such mixing ratios are sufficient to result in photochemically driven coastal new-particle formation events. Mixing ratios above the Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus beds increased with exposure time: after 6 h exposure to ambient air the mixing ratios were one order of magnitude higher than those initially present. This contrasts with the emission characteristics of Laminaria digitata, where most I2 was emitted within the first half hour of exposure. Discrete in situ measurements (offline) of I2 emission from ambient air-exposed chamber experiments of L. digitata, A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus substantially supported the field observations. Further online and time-resolved measurements of the I2 emission from O3-exposed macroalgal experiments in a chamber confirmed the distinct I2 emission characteristics of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus compared to those of L. digitata. The emission rates of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus were comparable to or even higher than L. digitata after the initial exposure period of 20-30 min. We suggest that A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus may provide an important source of photolabile iodine in the coastal boundary layer and that their impact on photochemistry and coastal new-particle formation should be reevaluated in light of their longer exposure at low tide and their widespread distribution.

  10. THE BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION BROADBAND AND BROAD-BEAM ARRAY: DESIGN OVERVIEW AND SENSITIVITY FORECASTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; McQuinn, Matthew

    2013-03-15

    This work describes a new instrument optimized for a detection of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm power spectrum between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.5: the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) array. BAOBAB will build on the efforts of a first generation of 21 cm experiments that are targeting a detection of the signal from the Epoch of Reionization at z {approx} 10. At z {approx} 1, the emission from neutral hydrogen in self-shielded overdense halos also presents an accessible signal, since the dominant, synchrotron foreground emission is considerably fainter than at redshift 10. The principle science driver formore » these observations are baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum which have the potential to act as a standard ruler and constrain the nature of dark energy. BAOBAB will fully correlate dual-polarization antenna tiles over the 600-900 MHz band with a frequency resolution of 300 kHz and a system temperature of 50 K. The number of antennas will grow in staged deployments, and reconfigurations of the array will allow for both traditional imaging and high power spectrum sensitivity operations. We present calculations of the power spectrum sensitivity for various array sizes, with a 35 element array measuring the cosmic neutral hydrogen fraction as a function of redshift, and a 132 element system detecting the BAO features in the power spectrum, yielding a 1.8% error on the z {approx} 1 distance scale, and, in turn, significant improvements to constraints on the dark energy equation of state over an unprecedented range of redshifts from {approx}0.5 to 1.5.« less

  11. Co-generation of biohydrogen and biomethane through two-stage batch co-fermentation of macro- and micro-algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lingkan; Cheng, Jun; Xia, Ao; Jacob, Amita; Voelklein, Markus; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-10-01

    Aquatic micro-algae can be used as feedstocks for gaseous biofuel production via biological fermentation. However, micro-algae usually have low C/N ratios, which are not advantageous for fermentation. In this study, carbon-rich macro-algae (Laminaria digitata) mixed with nitrogen-rich micro-algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Nannochloropsis oceanica) were used to maintain a suitable C/N ratio of 20 for a two-stage process combining hydrogen and methane fermentation. Co-fermentation of L. digitata and micro-algae facilitated hydrolysis and acidogenesis, resulting in hydrogen yields of 94.5-97.0mL/gVS; these values were 15.5-18.5% higher than mono-fermentation using L. digitata. Through the second stage of methane co-fermentation, a large portion of energy remaining in the hydrogenogenic effluents was recovered in the form of biomethane. The two-stage batch co-fermentation markedly increased the energy conversion efficiencies (ECEs) from 4.6-6.6% during the hydrogen fermentation to 57.0-70.9% in the combined hydrogen and methane production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preliminary screening of some traditional zulu medicinal plants for anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Opoku, A R; Geheeb-Keller, M; Hutchings, A D; Terblanche, S E; Jäger, A K; van Staden, J

    1999-12-15

    Aqueous and methanolic extracts from different parts of nine traditional Zulu medicinal plants, of the Vitaceae from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were evaluated for therapeutic potential as anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial agents. Of the twenty-nine crude extracts assayed for prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors, only five methanolic extracts of Cyphostemma natalitium-root, Rhoicissus digitata-leaf, R. rhomboidea-root, R. tomentosa-leaf/stem and R. tridentata-root showed significant inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1). The extracts of R. digitata-leaf and of R. rhomboidea-root exhibited the highest inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis with 53 and 56%, respectively. The results suggest that Rhoicissus digitata leaves and of Rhoicissus rhomboidea roots may have the potential to be used as anti-inflammatory agents. All the screened plant extracts showed some degrees of anti-microbial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. The methanolic extracts of C. natalitium-stem and root, R. rhomboidea-root, and R. tomentosa-leaf/stem, showed different anti-microbial activities against almost all micro-organisms tested. Generally, these plant extracts inhibited the gram-positive micro-organisms more than the gram-negative ones. Several plant extracts inhibited the growth of Candida albicans while only one plant extract showed inhibitory activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All the plant extracts which demonstrated good anti-inflammatory activities also showed better inhibitory activity against Candida albicans.

  13. Immunomodulatory Effects of Dietary Seaweeds in LPS Challenged Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar as Determined by Deep RNA Sequencing of the Head Kidney Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Palstra, Arjan P.; Kals, Jeroen; Blanco Garcia, Ainhoa; Dirks, Ron P.; Poelman, Marnix

    2018-01-01

    Seaweeds may represent immuno-stimulants that could be used as health-promoting fish feed components. This study was performed to gain insights into the immunomodulatory effects of dietary seaweeds in Atlantic salmon. Specifically tested were 10% inclusion levels of Laminaria digitata (SW1) and a commercial blend of seaweeds (Oceanfeed®) (SW2) against a fishmeal based control diet (FMC). Differences between groups were assessed in growth, feed conversion ratio and blood parameters hematocrit and hemoglobin. After a LPS challenge of fish representing each of the three groups, RNAseq was performed on the head kidney as major immune organ to determine transcriptomic differences in response to the immune activation. Atlantic salmon fed with dietary seaweeds did not show major differences in performance in comparison with fishmeal fed fish. RNAseq resulted in ∼154 million reads which were mapped against a NCBI Salmo salar reference and against a de novo assembled S. salar reference for analyses of expression of immune genes and ontology of immune processes among the 87,600 cDNA contigs. The dietary seaweeds provoked a more efficient immune response which involved more efficient identification of the infection site, and processing and presentation of antigens. More specifically, chemotaxis and the chemokine-mediated signaling were improved and therewith the defense response to Gram-positive bacterium reduced. Specific Laminaria digitata effects included reduction of the interferon-gamma-mediated signaling. Highly upregulated and specific for this diet was the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related gene protein. The commercial blend of seaweeds caused more differential expression than Laminaria digitata and improved immune processes such as receptor-mediated endocytosis and cell adhesion, and increased the expression of genes involved in response to lipopolysaccharide and inflammatory response. Particularly, expression of many important immune

  14. Macroinvertebrates of Luxapalila Creek, Mississippi and Alabama, 1987-89

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    invertebrates were identified to the lowest possible taxon with appropriate keys. Voucher speci- mens have been retained at the US Army Engineer Waterways...unidenta 0 0.0000 4 0.0065 Chaetogaster diaphanus 3 0.0080 51 0.0831 Dero digitata 3 0.0080 10 0.0163 Dero furcata 13 0.0347 0 0.0000 Dero nivea 8...and included Nais pardalis (14.7 percent), Dero nivea (12.7 percent), D. obtusa (12.4 percent), N. variables (8.6 percent), Pristinella osborni (8.5

  15. Revisiting the phylogeny of Bombacoideae (Malvaceae): Novel relationships, morphologically cohesive clades, and a new tribal classification based on multilocus phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Sobrinho, Jefferson G; Alverson, William S; Alcantara, Suzana; Queiroz, Luciano P; Mota, Aline C; Baum, David A

    2016-08-01

    Bombacoideae (Malvaceae) is a clade of deciduous trees with a marked dominance in many forests, especially in the Neotropics. The historical lack of a well-resolved phylogenetic framework for Bombacoideae hinders studies in this ecologically important group. We reexamined phylogenetic relationships in this clade based on a matrix of 6465 nuclear (ETS, ITS) and plastid (matK, trnL-trnF, trnS-trnG) DNA characters. We used maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference to infer relationships among 108 species (∼70% of the total number of known species). We analyzed the evolution of selected morphological traits: trunk or branch prickles, calyx shape, endocarp type, seed shape, and seed number per fruit, using ML reconstructions of their ancestral states to identify possible synapomorphies for major clades. Novel phylogenetic relationships emerged from our analyses, including three major lineages marked by fruit or seed traits: the winged-seed clade (Bernoullia, Gyranthera, and Huberodendron), the spongy endocarp clade (Adansonia, Aguiaria, Catostemma, Cavanillesia, and Scleronema), and the Kapok clade (Bombax, Ceiba, Eriotheca, Neobuchia, Pachira, Pseudobombax, Rhodognaphalon, and Spirotheca). The Kapok clade, the most diverse lineage of the subfamily, includes sister relationships (i) between Pseudobombax and "Pochota fendleri" a historically incertae sedis taxon, and (ii) between the Paleotropical genera Bombax and Rhodognaphalon, implying just two bombacoid dispersals to the Old World, the other one involving Adansonia. This new phylogenetic framework offers new insights and a promising avenue for further evolutionary studies. In view of this information, we present a new tribal classification of the subfamily, accompanied by an identification key. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Compton suppression method and epithermal NAA in the determination of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Y A; Landsberger, S; O'Kelly, D J; Braisted, J; Gabdo, H; Ewa, I O B; Umar, I M; Funtua, I I

    2010-10-01

    We used in this study Compton suppression method and epithermal neutron activation analysis to determine the concentration of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages. The work was performed at the University of Texas TRIGA Reactor by short, medium, and long irradiation protocols, using thermal flux of 1.4x10(12)n cm(-2)s(-1) and epithermal flux of 1.4x10(11)n cm(-2)s(-1). Application of Compton suppression method has reduced interferences from Compton scattered photons thereby allowing easy evaluation of Na, Cl, Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Co, Cr, Rb, Fe, and Se. The epithermal NAA method has enabled determination of Cd, As, Ba, Sr, Br, I, and V with little turn-around time. Quality Control and Quality Assurance of the method was tested by analyzing four Standard Reference Materials (non-fat powdered milk, apple leaves, citrus leaves, and peach leaves) obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology. Our results show that sorghum, millet, and maize have high values of Zn, Mn, Fe, low values of Cd, As, and Se. Powdered milks, rice, beans, and soybeans were found to have moderate amounts of all the elements. Tobacco recorded high content of Cd, Mn, and As, whereas tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and okro seed have more As values than others. However, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, and noodles show lower concentrations of all the elements. The distribution of these nutrients and heavy metals in these food and beverages shows the need to fortify biscuits and pastas with micro and macro-nutrients and reduce the use of tobacco, tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and Okro seed to avoid intake of heavy elements. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of lipid and fatty acid composition of shallow-water corals under thermal stress: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbs, A. B.; Yakovleva, I. M.

    2012-03-01

    Coral bleaching induces changes in lipid and fatty acid composition that result in low lipid content, reducing the likelihood of coral survival. Species-specific differences in the metabolism of lipid reserves may contribute to the differential resistance of corals under acute heat exposures. Here, we examined the dynamics of lipids and fatty acid abundance in corals subjected to short-term heat stress. The stony corals Acropora intermedia, Montipora digitata, and the soft coral Sinularia capitalis all showed a 60-75% decline in both storage and structural lipids. However, S. capitalis and M. digitata exhibited no significant change in the percentages of structural lipids (i.e., polar lipids and sterols) until they had lost 90-95% of their endosymbionts, whereas A. intermedia showed a rapid decline in structural lipids after a 50% loss of symbionts. After a 90-95% loss of symbionts under heat stress, all three corals showed a relative depletion of polyunsaturated fatty acids that had symbiont biomarkers, suggesting that polyunsaturated fatty acids were translocated from the symbiont to the coral host tissue.

  18. Evaluation of the anticoagulant potential of polysaccharide-rich fractions extracted from macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Adrien, Amandine; Dufour, Delphine; Baudouin, Stanislas; Maugard, Thierry; Bridiau, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential anticoagulant activity of sulphated polysaccharide-containing extracts of six french edible marine macroalgae. Aqueous extracts of brown (Himanthalia elongata, Laminaria digitata, Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesiculosus), green (Ulva lactuca) and red (Chondrus crispus) macroalgae were prepared and their biochemical properties were determined, including major biomolecules, sulphate and ash contents. The anticoagulant activity of each extract was investigated using different scales from the specific antithrombin-dependent pathway (anti-Xa and anti-IIa) to the intrinsic and/or common (Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, APTT), extrinsic (Prothrombin Time, PT) or common (Thrombin Time, TT) anticoagulant pathways, and compared with those of commercial anticoagulants, heparin and Lovenox®. Laminaria digitata, Fucus vesiculosus and Chondrus crispus extracts showed a significant APTT anticoagulant capacity, only 5-fold lower than that of Lovenox®, which is a pure low molecular weight heparin used as an anticoagulant agent to prevent pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing surgery.

  19. Lipid composition of positively buoyant eggs of reef building corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Iakayuki; Kato, Misako; Heyward, Andrew; Ikeda, Yutaka; Iizuka, Tokio; Maruyama, Tadashi

    1993-07-01

    Lipid composition of the eggs of three reef building corals, Acropora millepora, A. tenuis and Montipora digitata, were determined. Sixty to 70% of the egg dry weight was lipid, which consisted of wax esters (69.5 81.8%), triacylglycerols (1.1 8.4%) and polar lipids c/mainly phospholipids (11.9 13.2%). Montipora digitata also contained some polar lipids typical of the thylakoid membrane in chloroplasts, probably due to the presence of symbiotic zooxanthellae in the eggs. The wax esters appeared to be the major contributor to positive buoyancy of the eggs, and specific gravity of wax esters in A. millepora was estimated to be 0.92. Among the fatty acids of the wax esters, 34.9 51.3% was hexadecanoic acid (16:0) while the major fatty acids in polar lipids were octadecenoic acid (18:1), hexadecanoic acid (16:0), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) and eicosatetraenoic acid (20:4). The wax ester appears to be the main component of the 4.5 6.0 μm diameter lipid droplets which fill most of the central mass of the coral eggs.

  20. Biogas production generated through continuous digestion of natural and cultivated seaweeds with dairy slurry.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Wall, David M; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-11-01

    The technical feasibility of long term anaerobic mono-digestion of two brown seaweeds, and co-digestion of both seaweeds with dairy slurry was investigated whilst increasing the organic loading rate (OLR). One seaweed was natural (L. digitata); the second seaweed (S. Latissima) was cultivated. Higher proportions of L. digitata in co-digestion (66.6%) allowed the digester to operate more efficiently (OLR of 5kgVSm(-3)d(-1) achieving a specific methane yield (SMY) of 232LCH4kg(-1)VS) as compared to lower proportions (33.3%). Co-digestion of 66.6% cultivated S. latissima, with dairy slurry allowed a higher SMY of 252LCH4kg(-1)VS but at a lower OLR of 4kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Optimum conditions for mono-digestion of both seaweeds were effected at 4kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Chloride concentrations increased to high levels in the digestion of both seaweeds but were not detrimental to operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. β-1,3-Glucans are components of brown seaweed (Phaeophyceae) cell walls.

    PubMed

    Raimundo, Sandra Cristina; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Eberhard, Stefan; Hahn, Michael G; Popper, Zoë A

    2017-03-01

    LAMP is a cell wall-directed monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes a β-(1,3)-glucan epitope. It has primarily been used in the immunolocalization of callose in vascular plant cell wall research. It was generated against a brown seaweed storage polysaccharide, laminarin, although it has not often been applied in algal research. We conducted in vitro (glycome profiling of cell wall extracts) and in situ (immunolabeling of sections) studies on the brown seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales) and Laminaria digitata (Laminariales). Although glycome profiling did not give a positive signal with the LAMP mAb, this antibody clearly detected the presence of the β-(1,3)-glucan in situ, showing that this epitope is a constituent of these brown algal cell walls. In F. vesiculosus, the β-(1,3)-glucan epitope was present throughout the cell walls in all thallus parts; in L. digitata, the epitope was restricted to the sieve plates of the conductive elements. The sieve plate walls also stained with aniline blue, a fluorochrome used as a probe for callose. Enzymatic digestion with an endo-β-(1,3)-glucanase removed the ability of the LAMP mAb to label the cell walls. Thus, β-(1,3)-glucans are structural polysaccharides of F. vesiculosus cell walls and are integral components of the sieve plates in these brown seaweeds, reminiscent of plant callose.

  2. Toxic elements and speciation in seafood samples from different contaminated sites in Europe.

    PubMed

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Anacleto, Patrícia; Barbosa, Vera; Sloth, Jens J; Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Tediosi, Alice; Fernandez-Tejedor, Margarita; van den Heuvel, Fredericus H M; Kotterman, Michiel; Marques, António

    2015-11-01

    The presence of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), arsenic (TAs), inorganic arsenic (iAs), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr) and iron (Fe) was investigated in seafood collected from European marine ecosystems subjected to strong anthropogenic pressure, i.e. hotspot areas. Different species (Mytilus galloprovincialis, n=50; Chamelea gallina, n=50; Liza aurata, n=25; Platichthys flesus, n=25; Laminaria digitata, n=15; and Saccharina latissima, n=15) sampled in Tagus estuary, Po delta, Ebro delta, western Scheldt, and in the vicinities of a fish farm area (Solund, Norway), between September and December 2013, were selected to assess metal contamination and potential risks to seafood consumers, as well as to determine the suitability of ecologically distinct organisms as bioindicators in environmental monitoring studies. Species exhibited different elemental profiles, likely as a result of their ecological strategies, metabolism and levels in the environment (i.e. seawater and sediments). Higher levels of Cd (0.15-0.94 mg kg(-1)), Pb (0.37-0.89 mg kg(-1)), Co (0.48-1.1 mg kg(-1)), Cu (4.8-8.4 mg kg(-1)), Zn (75-153 mg kg(-1)), Cr (1.0-4.5 mg kg(-1)) and Fe (283-930 mg kg(-1)) were detected in bivalve species, particularly in M. galloprovincialis from Ebro and Po deltas, whereas the highest content of Hg was found in P. flesus (0.86 mg kg(-1)). In fish species, most Hg was organic (MeHg; from 69 to 79%), whereas lower proportions of MeHg were encountered in bivalve species (between 20 and 43%). The highest levels of As were found in macroalgae species L. digitata and S. latissima (41 mg kg(-1) and 43 mg kg(-1), respectively), with iAs accounting almost 50% of the total As content in L. digitata but not with S. latissima nor in the remaining seafood samples. This work highlights that the selection of the most appropriate bioindicator species is a fundamental step in environmental monitoring of each contaminant

  3. SciTech Connect

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa, E-mail: aluisa@ipma.pt; Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research; MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon

    The presence of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), arsenic (TAs), inorganic arsenic (iAs), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr) and iron (Fe) was investigated in seafood collected from European marine ecosystems subjected to strong anthropogenic pressure, i.e. hotspot areas. Different species (Mytilus galloprovincialis, n=50; Chamelea gallina, n=50; Liza aurata, n=25; Platichthys flesus, n=25; Laminaria digitata, n=15; and Saccharina latissima, n=15) sampled in Tagus estuary, Po delta, Ebro delta, western Scheldt, and in the vicinities of a fish farm area (Solund, Norway), between September and December 2013, were selected to assess metal contamination and potentialmore » risks to seafood consumers, as well as to determine the suitability of ecologically distinct organisms as bioindicators in environmental monitoring studies. Species exhibited different elemental profiles, likely as a result of their ecological strategies, metabolism and levels in the environment (i.e. seawater and sediments). Higher levels of Cd (0.15–0.94 mg kg{sup −1}), Pb (0.37−0.89 mg kg{sup −1}), Co (0.48–1.1 mg kg{sup −1}), Cu (4.8–8.4 mg kg{sup −1}), Zn (75–153 mg kg{sup −1}), Cr (1.0–4.5 mg kg{sup −1}) and Fe (283–930 mg kg{sup −1}) were detected in bivalve species, particularly in M. galloprovincialis from Ebro and Po deltas, whereas the highest content of Hg was found in P. flesus (0.86 mg kg{sup −1}). In fish species, most Hg was organic (MeHg; from 69 to 79%), whereas lower proportions of MeHg were encountered in bivalve species (between 20 and 43%). The highest levels of As were found in macroalgae species L. digitata and S. latissima (41 mg kg{sup −1} and 43 mg kg{sup −1}, respectively), with iAs accounting almost 50% of the total As content in L. digitata but not with S. latissima nor in the remaining seafood samples. This work highlights that the selection of the most appropriate bioindicator

  4. Differential nitric oxide synthesis and host apoptotic events correlate with bleaching susceptibility in reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, T. D.; Krueger, T.; Becker, S.; Fisher, P. L.; Davy, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Coral bleaching poses a threat to coral reefs worldwide. As a consequence of the temperature-induced breakdown in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, bleaching can have extensive effects on reef communities. However, our understanding of bleaching at a cellular level is limited, and this is particularly true regarding differential susceptibility among coral species. Recent work suggests that bleaching may represent a host innate immune-like response to symbiont dysfunction that involves synthesis of the signalling compound nitric oxide (NO) and the induction of host apoptotic-like cell death. In this study, we examined the activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes alongside oxidised NO accumulation (a proxy for NO synthesis) in the reef corals Acropora millepora, Montipora digitata, and Pocillopora damicornis during experimental thermal stress. P. damicornis was the most sensitive species, suffering mortality (tissue sloughing) after 5 days at 33 °C but non-lethal bleaching after 9 days at 31.5 °C. A. millepora bleached at 33 °C but remained structurally intact, while M. digitata showed little evidence of bleaching. P. damicornis and A. millepora both exhibited evidence of temperature-induced NO synthesis and, after 5 days of heating, levels of oxidised NO in both species were fivefold higher than in controls maintained at 28.5 °C. These responses preceded bleaching by a number of days and may have occurred before symbiont dysfunction (measured as chlorophyll a degradation and oxidised NO accumulation). In A. millepora, apparent NO synthesis correlated with the induction of host apoptotic-like pathways, while in P. damicornis, the upregulation of apoptotic pathways occurred later. No evidence of elevated NO production or apoptosis was observed in M. digitata at 33 °C and baseline activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes was negligible in this species. These findings provide important physiological data in the context of the responses of corals to global change and

  5. Fungal Planet description sheets: 154-213.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Guarro, J; Cheewangkoon, R; van der Bank, M; Swart, W J; Stchigel, A M; Cano-Lira, J F; Roux, J; Madrid, H; Damm, U; Wood, A R; Shuttleworth, L A; Hodges, C S; Munster, M; de Jesús Yáñez-Morales, M; Zúñiga-Estrada, L; Cruywagen, E M; de Hoog, G S; Silvera, C; Najafzadeh, J; Davison, E M; Davison, P J N; Barrett, M D; Barrett, R L; Manamgoda, D S; Minnis, A M; Kleczewski, N M; Flory, S L; Castlebury, L A; Clay, K; Hyde, K D; Maússe-Sitoe, S N D; Chen, Shuaifei; Lechat, C; Hairaud, M; Lesage-Meessen, L; Pawłowska, J; Wilk, M; Sliwińska-Wyrzychowska, A; Mętrak, M; Wrzosek, M; Pavlic-Zupanc, D; Maleme, H M; Slippers, B; Mac Cormack, W P; Archuby, D I; Grünwald, N J; Tellería, M T; Dueñas, M; Martín, M P; Marincowitz, S; de Beer, Z W; Perez, C A; Gené, J; Marin-Felix, Y; Groenewald, J Z

    2013-12-01

    Novel species of microfungi described in the present study include the following from South Africa: Camarosporium aloes, Phaeococcomyces aloes and Phoma aloes from Aloe, C. psoraleae, Diaporthe psoraleae and D. psoraleae-pinnatae from Psoralea, Colletotrichum euphorbiae from Euphorbia, Coniothyrium prosopidis and Peyronellaea prosopidis from Prosopis, Diaporthe cassines from Cassine, D. diospyricola from Diospyros, Diaporthe maytenicola from Maytenus, Harknessia proteae from Protea, Neofusicoccum ursorum and N. cryptoaustrale from Eucalyptus, Ochrocladosporium adansoniae from Adansonia, Pilidium pseudoconcavum from Greyia radlkoferi, Stagonospora pseudopaludosa from Phragmites and Toxicocladosporium ficiniae from Ficinia. Several species were also described from Thailand, namely: Chaetopsina pini and C. pinicola from Pinus spp., Myrmecridium thailandicum from reed litter, Passalora pseudotithoniae from Tithonia, Pallidocercospora ventilago from Ventilago, Pyricularia bothriochloae from Bothriochloa and Sphaerulina rhododendricola from Rhododendron. Novelties from Spain include Cladophialophora multiseptata, Knufia tsunedae and Pleuroascus rectipilus from soil and Cyphellophora catalaunica from river sediments. Species from the USA include Bipolaris drechsleri from Microstegium, Calonectria blephiliae from Blephilia, Kellermania macrospora (epitype) and K. pseudoyuccigena from Yucca. Three new species are described from Mexico, namely Neophaeosphaeria agaves and K. agaves from Agave and Phytophthora ipomoeae from Ipomoea. Other African species include Calonectria mossambicensis from Eucalyptus (Mozambique), Harzia cameroonensis from an unknown creeper (Cameroon), Mastigosporella anisophylleae from Anisophyllea (Zambia) and Teratosphaeria terminaliae from Terminalia (Zimbabwe). Species from Europe include Auxarthron longisporum from forest soil (Portugal), Discosia pseudoartocreas from Tilia (Austria), Paraconiothyrium polonense and P. lycopodinum from Lycopodium

  6. Digital Marine Bioprospecting: Mining New Neurotoxin Drug Candidates from the Transcriptomes of Cold-Water Sea Anemones

    PubMed Central

    Urbarova, Ilona; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Okkenhaug, Siri; Seternes, Ole Morten; Johansen, Steinar D.; Emblem, Åse

    2012-01-01

    Marine bioprospecting is the search for new marine bioactive compounds and large-scale screening in extracts represents the traditional approach. Here, we report an alternative complementary protocol, called digital marine bioprospecting, based on deep sequencing of transcriptomes. We sequenced the transcriptomes from the adult polyp stage of two cold-water sea anemones, Bolocera tuediae and Hormathia digitata. We generated approximately 1.1 million quality-filtered sequencing reads by 454 pyrosequencing, which were assembled into approximately 120,000 contigs and 220,000 single reads. Based on annotation and gene ontology analysis we profiled the expressed mRNA transcripts according to known biological processes. As a proof-of-concept we identified polypeptide toxins with a potential blocking activity on sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels from digital transcriptome libraries. PMID:23170083

  7. Combined ocean acidification and low temperature stressors cause coral mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavousi, Javid; Parkinson, John Everett; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Oceans are predicted to become more acidic and experience more temperature variability—both hot and cold—as climate changes. Ocean acidification negatively impacts reef-building corals, especially when interacting with other stressors such as elevated temperature. However, the effects of combined acidification and low temperature stress have yet to be assessed. Here, we exposed nubbins of the scleractinian coral Montipora digitata to ecologically relevant acidic, cold, or combined stress for 2 weeks. Coral nubbins exhibited 100% survival in isolated acidic and cold treatments, but ~30% mortality under combined conditions. These results provide further evidence that coupled stressors have an interactive effect on coral physiology, and reveal that corals in colder environments are also susceptible to the deleterious impacts of coupled ocean acidification and thermal stress.

  8. Differential coral bleaching-Contrasting the activity and response of enzymatic antioxidants in symbiotic partners under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Thomas; Hawkins, Thomas D; Becker, Susanne; Pontasch, Stefanie; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Leggat, William; Fisher, Paul L; Davy, Simon K

    2015-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching due to thermal stress represents a major threat to the integrity and functioning of coral reefs. Thermal thresholds vary, however, between corals, partly as a result of the specific type of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate (Symbiodinium sp.) they harbour. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in corals under thermal and light stress has been recognised as one mechanism that can lead to cellular damage and the loss of their symbiont population (Oxidative Theory of Coral Bleaching). Here, we compared the response of symbiont and host enzymatic antioxidants in the coral species Acropora millepora and Montipora digitata at 28°C and 33°C. A. millepora at 33°C showed a decrease in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and increase in maximum midday excitation pressure on PSII, with subsequent bleaching (declining photosynthetic pigment and symbiont density). M. digitata exhibited no bleaching response and photochemical changes in its symbionts were minor. The symbiont antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase peroxidase showed no significant upregulation to elevated temperatures in either coral, while only catalase was significantly elevated in both coral hosts at 33°C. Increased host catalase activity in the susceptible coral after 5days at 33°C was independent of antioxidant responses in the symbiont and preceded significant declines in PSII photochemical efficiencies. This finding suggests a potential decoupling of host redox mechanisms from symbiont photophysiology and raises questions about the importance of symbiont-derived ROS in initiating coral bleaching. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Essential and toxic elements in seaweeds for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Desideri, D; Cantaluppi, C; Ceccotto, F; Meli, M A; Roselli, C; Feduzi, L

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements (K, Ca, P, S, Cl, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Br, and I) and nonessential or toxic elements (Al, Ti, Si, Rb, Sr, As, Cd, Sn, and Pb) were determined by energy-dispersive polarized x-ray fluorescence spectrometry in 14 seaweeds purchased in local specialty stores in Italy and consumed by humans. The differences in elements between the algae species reached up to 2-4 orders of magnitude. Lithothamnium calcareum showed the highest levels of Ca, Al, Si, Fe, and Ti. Palmaria palmata showed the highest concentrations of K, Rb, and Cl. The highest content of S was in Chondrus crispus. Laminaria digitata contained the highest concentrations of total As, Cd, Sn, Br, and I. The highest concentration of Zn was in Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Ulva lactuca displayed the highest levels of Cu, Ni, Mn, and Pb. Iodine levels ranged from 3.4 in Chlorella pyrenoidosa to 7316 mg/kg(dry) in Laminaria digitata. The nutrimental importance of essential elements was assessed using nutritional requirements. The results showed that the consumption of algae might serve as an important source of the essential elements. Health risk due to the toxic elements present in seaweed was estimated using risk estimators. Total As, Cd, and Pb concentrations ranged from <1 to 67.6, to 7.2 and to 6.7 mg/kg(dry) respectively; therefore, their contribution to total elemental intake does not appear to pose any threat to the consumers, but the concentrations of these elements should be controlled to protect the consumer against potential adverse health risks.

  10. A new leafminer on grapevine and Rhoicissus (Vitaceae) in South Africa within an expanded generic concept of Holocacista (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Heliozelidae)

    PubMed Central

    van Nieukerken, Erik J.; Geertsema, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A grapevine leafminer found recently in table grape orchards and vineyards in the Paarl region (Western Cape, South Africa) is described as Holocacista capensis sp. n. It has also been found on native Rhoicissus digitata and bred on that species in the laboratory. It is closely related to Holocacista salutans (Meyrick, 1921), comb. n. (from Antispila), described from Durban in KwaZulu-Natal, but widespread in southern Africa and a native leafminer of various Vitaceae: Rhoicissus tomentosa, Rhoicissus digitata, Rhoicissus tridentata and Cissus cornifolia. Holocacista capensis has been found on Vitis vinifera both in Gauteng and Western Cape, the earliest record being from 1950 in Pretoria. The initial host shift from native Vitaceae to Vitis must have occurred much earlier. The species is sometimes present in high densities, but hitherto no sizeable damage to the crops has been noted. The genus Holocacista Walsingham & Durrant, 1909, previously known from the single European grapevine leafminer Holocacista rivillei (Stainton, 1855), is expanded and redescribed and for the first time reported from Africa, East and South-East Asia and Australia. It comprises seven named species and at least 15 unnamed species. The following species are also recombined with Holocacista: transferred from Antispilina: South-African Holocacista varii (Mey, 2011), comb. n., feeding on Pelargonium, transferred from Antispila: the Indian species Holocacista micrarcha (Meyrick, 1926), comb. n. and Holocacista pariodelta (Meyrick, 1929), comb. n., both feeding on Lannea coromandelica, and Holocacista selastis (Meyrick, 1926), comb. n. on Psychotria dalzelii. We also remove the following from Antispila: Heliozela anna (Fletcher, 1920), comb. n. and Heliozela argyrozona (Meyrick, 1918), comb. n., whereas the following Indian Vitaceae feeding species are confirmed to belong in Antispila s. str.: Antispila argostoma Meyrick, 1916 and Antispila aristarcha Meyrick, 1916. Holocacista

  11. Gene expression of corals in response to macroalgal competitors.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Tonya L; Snell, Terry W; Hay, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    As corals decline and macroalgae proliferate on coral reefs, coral-macroalgal competition becomes more frequent and ecologically important. Whether corals are damaged by these interactions depends on susceptibility of the coral and traits of macroalgal competitors. Investigating changes in gene expression of corals and their intracellular symbiotic algae, Symbiodinium, in response to contact with different macroalgae provides insight into the biological processes and cellular pathways affected by competition with macroalgae. We evaluated the gene expression profiles of coral and Symbiodinium genes from two confamilial corals, Acropora millepora and Montipora digitata, after 6 h and 48 h of contact with four common macroalgae that differ in their allelopathic potency to corals. Contacts with macroalgae affected different biological pathways in the more susceptible (A. millepora) versus the more resistant (M. digitata) coral. Genes of coral hosts and of their associated Symbiodinium also responded in species-specific and time-specific ways to each macroalga. Changes in number and expression intensity of affected genes were greater after 6 h compared to 48 h of contact and were greater following contact with Chlorodesmis fastigiata and Amphiroa crassa than following contact with Galaxaura filamentosa or Turbinaria conoides. We documented a divergence in transcriptional responses between two confamilial corals and their associated Symbiodinium, as well as a diversity of dynamic responses within each coral species with respect to the species of macroalgal competitor and the duration of exposure to that competitor. These responses included early initiation of immune processes by Montipora, which is more resistant to damage after long-term macroalgal contact. Activation of the immune response by corals that better resist algal competition is consistent with the hypothesis that some macroalgal effects on corals may be mediated by microbial pathogens.

  12. Developing a point-of-care electronic medical record system for TB/HIV co-infected patients: experiences from Lighthouse Trust, Lilongwe, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Tweya, Hannock; Feldacker, Caryl; Gadabu, Oliver Jintha; Ng'ambi, Wingston; Mumba, Soyapi L; Phiri, Dave; Kamvazina, Luke; Mwakilama, Shawo; Kanyerere, Henry; Keiser, Olivia; Mwafilaso, Johnbosco; Kamba, Chancy; Egger, Matthias; Jahn, Andreas; Simwaka, Bertha; Phiri, Sam

    2016-03-05

    Implementation of user-friendly, real-time, electronic medical records for patient management may lead to improved adherence to clinical guidelines and improved quality of patient care. We detail the systematic, iterative process that implementation partners, Lighthouse clinic and Baobab Health Trust, employed to develop and implement a point-of-care electronic medical records system in an integrated, public clinic in Malawi that serves HIV-infected and tuberculosis (TB) patients. Baobab Health Trust, the system developers, conducted a series of technical and clinical meetings with Lighthouse and Ministry of Health to determine specifications. Multiple pre-testing sessions assessed patient flow, question clarity, information sequencing, and verified compliance to national guidelines. Final components of the TB/HIV electronic medical records system include: patient demographics; anthropometric measurements; laboratory samples and results; HIV testing; WHO clinical staging; TB diagnosis; family planning; clinical review; and drug dispensing. Our experience suggests that an electronic medical records system can improve patient management, enhance integration of TB/HIV services, and improve provider decision-making. However, despite sufficient funding and motivation, several challenges delayed system launch including: expansion of system components to include of HIV testing and counseling services; changes in the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines that required system revision; and low confidence to use the system among new healthcare workers. To ensure a more robust and agile system that met all stakeholder and user needs, our electronic medical records launch was delayed more than a year. Open communication with stakeholders, careful consideration of ongoing provider input, and a well-functioning, backup, paper-based TB registry helped ensure successful implementation and sustainability of the system. Additional, on-site, technical support provided

  13. The resurrection of oceanic dispersal in historical biogeography.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Geographical distributions of terrestrial or freshwater taxa that are broken up by oceans can be explained by either oceanic dispersal or vicariance in the form of fragmentation of a previously contiguous landmass. The validation of plate-tectonics theory provided a global vicariance mechanism and, along with cladistic arguments for the primacy of vicariance, helped create a view of oceanic dispersal as a rare phenomenon and an explanation of last resort. Here, I describe recent work that suggests that the importance of oceanic dispersal has been strongly underestimated. In particular, molecular dating of lineage divergences favors oceanic dispersal over tectonic vicariance as an explanation for disjunct distributions in a wide variety of taxa, from frogs to beetles to baobab trees. Other evidence, such as substantial gene flow among island populations of Anolis lizards, also indicates unexpectedly high frequencies of oceanic dispersal. The resurrection of oceanic dispersal is the most striking aspect of a major shift in historical biogeography toward a more even balance between vicariance and dispersal explanations. This new view implies that biotas are more dynamic and have more recent origins than had been thought previously. A high frequency of dispersal also suggests that a fundamental methodological assumption of many biogeographical studies--that vicariance is a priori a more probable explanation than dispersal--needs to be re-evaluated and perhaps discarded.

  14. A systematic review of anti-obesity medicinal plants - an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is the most prevalent health problem affecting all age groups, and leads to many complications in the form of chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus Type 2 and stroke. A systematic review about safety and efficacy of herbal medicines in the management of obesity in human was carried out by searching bibliographic data bases such as, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and IranMedex, for studies reported between 30th December 2008 to 23rd April 2012 on human or animals, investigating the beneficial and harmful effects of herbal medicine to treat obesity. Actually we limited our search to such a narrow window of time in order to update our article published before December of 2008. In this update, the search terms were “obesity” and (“herbal medicine” or “plant”, “plant medicinal” or “medicine traditional”) without narrowing or limiting search items. Publications with available abstracts were reviewed only. Total publications found in the initial search were 651. Total number of publications for review study was 33 by excluding publications related to animals study. Studies with Nigella Sativa, Camellia Sinensis, Crocus Sativus L, Seaweed laminaria Digitata, Xantigen, virgin olive oil, Catechin enriched green tea, Monoselect Camellia, Oolong tea, Yacon syrup, Irvingia Gabonensi, Weighlevel, RCM-104 compound of Camellia Sinensis, Pistachio, Psyllium fibre, black Chinese tea, sea buckthorn and bilberries show significant decreases in body weight. Only, alginate-based brown seaweed and Laminaria Digitata caused an abdominal bloating and upper respiratory tract infection as the side effect in the trial group. No other significant adverse effects were reported in all 33 trials included in this article. In conclusion, Nigella Sativa, Camellia Synensis, Green Tea, and Black Chinese Tea seem to have satisfactory anti-obesity effects. The effect size of these medicinal plants is a critical point that should be considered for

  15. A systematic review of anti-obesity medicinal plants - an update.

    PubMed

    Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Jouyandeh, Zahra; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-06-19

    Obesity is the most prevalent health problem affecting all age groups, and leads to many complications in the form of chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus Type 2 and stroke. A systematic review about safety and efficacy of herbal medicines in the management of obesity in human was carried out by searching bibliographic data bases such as, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and IranMedex, for studies reported between 30th December 2008 to 23rd April 2012 on human or animals, investigating the beneficial and harmful effects of herbal medicine to treat obesity. Actually we limited our search to such a narrow window of time in order to update our article published before December of 2008. In this update, the search terms were "obesity" and ("herbal medicine" or "plant", "plant medicinal" or "medicine traditional") without narrowing or limiting search items. Publications with available abstracts were reviewed only. Total publications found in the initial search were 651. Total number of publications for review study was 33 by excluding publications related to animals study.Studies with Nigella Sativa, Camellia Sinensis, Crocus Sativus L, Seaweed laminaria Digitata, Xantigen, virgin olive oil, Catechin enriched green tea, Monoselect Camellia, Oolong tea, Yacon syrup, Irvingia Gabonensi, Weighlevel, RCM-104 compound of Camellia Sinensis, Pistachio, Psyllium fibre, black Chinese tea, sea buckthorn and bilberries show significant decreases in body weight. Only, alginate-based brown seaweed and Laminaria Digitata caused an abdominal bloating and upper respiratory tract infection as the side effect in the trial group. No other significant adverse effects were reported in all 33 trials included in this article.In conclusion, Nigella Sativa, Camellia Synensis, Green Tea, and Black Chinese Tea seem to have satisfactory anti-obesity effects. The effect size of these medicinal plants is a critical point that should be considered for interpretation. Although there

  16. Estimation of internal and external nitrogen for corals with a long-term 15N-labelling experiment and subsequent model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuaki; Grottoli, Andréa; Matsui, Yohei; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Coral reef ecosystems maintain high primary productivity though the seawater is extremely oligotrophic. One of the hypotheses to explain this paradox is the recycling of nutrients in animal-algal symbiotic organisms such as corals. It is relatively easy to measure nutrient uptake rates by corals from seawater, but the proportion of internally circulating nutrients between the coral host and the endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) is more challenging. Here, we performed a long-term and continuous 15N-labelling experiment to quantify the proportionate contribution of seawater (external N source) and the animal host (internal N source) to the total N influx in the endosymbiotic algae. Branches from the scleractinian corals Porites cylindrica and Montipora digitata from Okinawa, Japan, were cultured for 2 months in indoor, flow-through, filtered seawater tanks with the continuous supply of 15N-labelled nitrate. At the initial and after 2, 4, and 9 weeks of the study, coral branches were collected and the algal and animal fractions were separated for isotopic analyses. In both corals, the N isotope ratio of symbiotic algae exponentially increased and the values were much higher than those of the host tissue, suggesting that the algae had a faster turnover N time than the animal host. Algal and host N biomass normalized to the coral surface area slowly decreased in both coral species over the study period. To calculate the contribution of internal and external N, a simple mixing model of algal N metabolism was designed. Using differential equations of 15N balance and N biomass balance, F1 and F2 (external and internal N fluxes to symbiotic algae, respectively) were expressed as the functions of time. The model calculations showed that F2 was much higher than F1 in P. cylindrica and the percentage of internal N to the total influx N (PIN) was >70%. On the other hand, the contribution of F1 and F2 was comparable in M. digitata and the PIN was 40-70%. These results

  17. Fungal Planet description sheets: 320-370.

    PubMed

    Crous, P W; Wingfield, M J; Guarro, J; Hernández-Restrepo, M; Sutton, D A; Acharya, K; Barber, P A; Boekhout, T; Dimitrov, R A; Dueñas, M; Dutta, A K; Gené, J; Gouliamova, D E; Groenewald, M; Lombard, L; Morozova, O V; Sarkar, J; Smith, M Th; Stchigel, A M; Wiederhold, N P; Alexandrova, A V; Antelmi, I; Armengol, J; Barnes, I; Cano-Lira, J F; Castañeda Ruiz, R F; Contu, M; Courtecuisse, Pr R; da Silveira, A L; Decock, C A; de Goes, A; Edathodu, J; Ercole, E; Firmino, A C; Fourie, A; Fournier, J; Furtado, E L; Geering, A D W; Gershenzon, J; Giraldo, A; Gramaje, D; Hammerbacher, A; He, X-L; Haryadi, D; Khemmuk, W; Kovalenko, A E; Krawczynski, R; Laich, F; Lechat, C; Lopes, U P; Madrid, H; Malysheva, E F; Marín-Felix, Y; Martín, M P; Mostert, L; Nigro, F; Pereira, O L; Picillo, B; Pinho, D B; Popov, E S; Rodas Peláez, C A; Rooney-Latham, S; Sandoval-Denis, M; Shivas, R G; Silva, V; Stoilova-Disheva, M M; Telleria, M T; Ullah, C; Unsicker, S B; van der Merwe, N A; Vizzini, A; Wagner, H-G; Wong, P T W; Wood, A R; Groenewald, J Z

    2015-06-01

    Novel species of fungi described in the present study include the following from Malaysia: Castanediella eucalypti from Eucalyptus pellita, Codinaea acacia from Acacia mangium, Emarcea eucalyptigena from Eucalyptus brassiana, Myrtapenidiella eucalyptorum from Eucalyptus pellita, Pilidiella eucalyptigena from Eucalyptus brassiana and Strelitziana malaysiana from Acacia mangium. Furthermore, Stachybotrys sansevieriicola is described from Sansevieria ehrenbergii (Tanzania), Phacidium grevilleae from Grevillea robusta (Uganda), Graphium jumulu from Adansonia gregorii and Ophiostoma eucalyptigena from Eucalyptus marginata (Australia), Pleurophoma ossicola from bone and Plectosphaerella populi from Populus nigra (Germany), Colletotrichum neosansevieriae from Sansevieria trifasciata, Elsinoë othonnae from Othonna quinquedentata and Zeloasperisporium cliviae (Zeloasperisporiaceae fam. nov.) from Clivia sp. (South Africa), Neodevriesia pakbiae, Phaeophleospora hymenocallidis and Phaeophleospora hymenocallidicola on leaves of a fern (Thailand), Melanconium elaeidicola from Elaeis guineensis (Indonesia), Hormonema viticola from Vitis vinifera (Canary Islands), Chlorophyllum pseudoglobossum from a grassland (India), Triadelphia disseminata from an immunocompromised patient (Saudi Arabia), Colletotrichum abscissum from Citrus (Brazil), Polyschema sclerotigenum and Phialemonium limoniforme from human patients (USA), Cadophora vitícola from Vitis vinifera (Spain), Entoloma flavovelutinum and Bolbitius aurantiorugosus from soil (Vietnam), Rhizopogon granuloflavus from soil (Cape Verde Islands), Tulasnella eremophila from Euphorbia officinarum subsp. echinus (Morocco), Verrucostoma martinicensis from Danaea elliptica (French West Indies), Metschnikowia colchici from Colchicum autumnale (Bulgaria), Thelebolus microcarpus from soil (Argentina) and Ceratocystis adelpha from Theobroma cacao (Ecuador). Myrmecridium iridis (Myrmecridiales ord. nov., Myrmecridiaceae fam. nov.) is also

  18. Honey, Hadza, hunter-gatherers, and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette; Wood, Brian; Crittenden, Alyssa; Porter, Claire; Mabulla, Audax

    2014-06-01

    Honey is the most energy dense food in nature. It is therefore not surprising that, where it exists, honey is an important food for almost all hunter-gatherers. Here we describe and analyze widespread honey collecting among foragers and show that where it is absent, in arctic and subarctic habitats, honey bees are also rare to absent. Second, we focus on one hunter-gatherer society, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men and women both rank honey as their favorite food. Hadza acquire seven types of honey. Hadza women usually acquire honey that is close to the ground while men often climb tall baobab trees to raid the largest bee hives with stinging bees. Honey accounts for a substantial proportion of the kilocalories in the Hadza diet, especially that of Hadza men. Cross-cultural forager data reveal that in most hunter-gatherers, men acquire more honey than women but often, as with the Hadza, women do acquire some. Virtually all warm-climate foragers consume honey. Our closest living relatives, the great apes, take honey when they can. We suggest that honey has been part of the diet of our ancestors dating back to at least the earliest hominins. The earliest hominins, however, would have surely been less capable of acquiring as much honey as more recent, fully modern human hunter-gatherers. We discuss reasons for thinking our early ancestors would have acquired less honey than foragers ethnographically described, yet still significantly more than our great ape relatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbaodeim: A natural haematinic blend for treatment of dimorphic anemia of malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Atika Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Sudanese nomadic tribes living in the Sahara Region west of Khartoum State depend completely on food made of sour milk and other milk products cooked with onion and dried meat. This is usually added to a porridge made of sorghum flour. Goat and sheep milk is the main component and green vegetables are not commonly taken with this meal. Adults, who move out of their residential areas may have access to other types of food in towns and cities while mothers and children, staying always at home, do not have similar chances. Furthermore, in these dessert areas there is always difficulty in reaching health care facilities and getting medicines. Children from these areas who presented to Ombada Teaching Hospital – west of Omdurman- had very low hemoglobin and their peripheral blood picture showed dimorphic type of anemia. In the search for locally available ingredients that can prevent the occurrence of this type of anemia among the affected population, we studied the constituents of the commonly available fruits and vegetables in the area. We succeeded to formulate a blend (Carbaodeim) made of Carrots (25 gm), Baobab (100 gm) and Godeim (100 gm) which is found to contain iron (34.8 mg), folic acid (2.5 mg), ascorbic acid (372.8 mg), vitamin A (7000 mg), calcium (896.7 mg) and potassium (1910 mg), with many other components that have high nutritional value. This blend is easy to make, safe, nutritious, refreshing and cost effective. Carbaodeim is a naturally available and cost effective haematinic blend that might be added to the food menu of nomadic people as well as patients admitted to hospital with malnutrition or dimorphic type of anemia. PMID:27493404

  20. Modelling a demand driven biogas system for production of electricity at peak demand and for production of biomethane at other times.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, R; Wall, D; Murphy, J D

    2016-09-01

    Four feedstocks were assessed for use in a demand driven biogas system. Biomethane potential (BMP) assays were conducted for grass silage, food waste, Laminaria digitata and dairy cow slurry. Semi-continuous trials were undertaken for all feedstocks, assessing biogas and biomethane production. Three kinetic models of the semi-continuous trials were compared. A first order model most accurately correlated with gas production in the pulse fed semi-continuous system. This model was developed for production of electricity on demand, and biomethane upgrading. The model examined a theoretical grass silage digester that would produce 435kWe in a continuous fed system. Adaptation to demand driven biogas required 187min to produce sufficient methane to run a 2MWe combined heat and power (CHP) unit for 60min. The upgrading system was dispatched 71min following CHP shutdown. Of the biogas produced 21% was used in the CHP and 79% was used in the upgrading system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Variability and similarities in the structural properties of two related Laminaria kelp species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves

    2018-01-01

    Kelps of the genus Laminaria have long been studied and shown to exhibit a seasonal shift in growth and morphology, as nutrients and light levels change during the year. However, the variation of kelp biomechanical properties has been little explored despite the importance of these properties for the interaction of kelp with the flow. Previous research showed that aging does influence the algae biomechanical properties, so this study further investigates the variability of kelp biomechanical properties and morphological characteristics at a given site as a function of the season (growth phase), species, and different kelp parts. Mechanical parameters and morphological characteristics were measured on kelps sampled in winter and summer, and DNA sequencing was used to identify the two related species, L. digitata and L. hyperborea. Descriptive statistics and statistical analysis were used to detect trends in the modulation of kelp mechanical design. Although two distinct species were identified, only minor structural differences were observed between them. The biomechanical properties varied significantly along the kelp, and significant seasonal shifts occurred at the blade level, in relation to the different morphological changes during blade renewal. In general, the variations of the structural properties were mostly linked to the blade growth activity. The absence of significant variation in the mechanical design of the two species highlights the significance of the adaptation to the same local environmental conditions, this adaptation being a key process in vegetation-flow interactions and having implications on the interaction between kelp and hydrodynamics.

  2. Characterisation of phenolics in Flor-Essence--a compound herbal product and its contributing herbs.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ammar; Walshe-Roussel, Brendan; Harris, Cory; Asim, Muhammad; Tamayo, Carmen; Sit, Summer; Arnason, John Thor

    2009-01-01

    Commercially available herbal mixture FE, a proprietary natural health product manufactured by Flora Manufacturing and Distributing Ltd (Flora), is a unique North American traditional herbal product. FE is a chemically complex mixture of eight herbs and has not been subjected to phytochemical analysis. To develop analytical methods to undertake detailed phytochemical analyses of FE, and its eight contributing herbs, including burdock (Arctium lappa L.), sheep sorrel (Rumex acetosella L.), Turkish rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L.), slippery elm Muhl. (Ulmus rubra), watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), blessed thistle (Cnicus benedictus L.) and kelp (Laminaria digitata Lmx.). The identification was undertaken by a combination of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass selective detection (RP-HPLC-DAD-APCI-MSD) analysis and phenolics metabolomic library matching. New separation methods facilitated the identification of 43 markers in the individual herbs which constitute FE. Sixteen markers could be identified in FE originating from four contributing herbs including four caffeoyl quinic acids, three dicaffeoyl quinic acids and two caffeic acid derivatives from A. lappa, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin, five apigenin glycosides and apigenin from R. acetocella and N. officinale and sissostrin from T. pretense. A validated method for quantitative determination of three markers is reported with good intraday, interday and interoperator repeatability using a reliable alcohol based extraction technique. FE and its contributing herbs predominantly contain phenolics. This methodology can be applied to further develop full-scale validation of this product.

  3. Effect of temperature on kinetics of biogas production from macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Membere, Edward; Sallis, Paul

    2018-05-08

    An assessment was carried out on the effect of temperature on the anaerobic digestion of Laminaria digitata biomass, in batch reactors (25, 35, 45 and 55 °C) with a hydraulic retention time of 40 days. The first order, modified Gompertz and logistics models were used to obtain the kinetic parameters of the biogas production process. Results indicate the chemical composition of the algae substrate could be written as C 316 H 613 O 289 N 13 S 1 , with a theoretical methane yield of 336 ± 0.86 L CH 4  kg VS -1 . Experimental methane yield obtained from the reactors for 25, 35, 45, and 55 °C were 318 ± 1.58, 293 ± 1.11, 271 ± 0.98 and 352 ± 0.63 mL CH 4 /gVS respectively. Their R 2  > 0.90 indicate both models fits well for predicating kinetics of methane production. The lowest k h (0.31), high biodegradability index (0.96) and lag time (9.3-11.7 days) were obtained for 55 °C. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of protein, lipid and mineral contents in common Norwegian seaweeds and evaluation of their potential as food and feed.

    PubMed

    Maehre, Hanne K; Malde, Marian K; Eilertsen, Karl-Erik; Elvevoll, Edel O

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine protein and amino acid composition, lipid and fatty acid composition, along with a range of essential minerals in common Norwegian seaweed species representing the red (Palmaria palmata and Vertebrata lanosa), green (Cladophora rupestris, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Ulva lactuca) and brown (Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea, Fucus vesiculosus and Pelvetia canaliculata) classes and assess their potential as alternatives to cereals in food and feed. As macroalgae accumulate heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium and mercury were also analyzed. Proteins ranged from 34 to 123 g kg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the essential amino acid levels may cover both human and salmonid requirements. Lipids were low (6-58 g kg(-1) DW), but the red algae had high relative content of long-chained omega-3 fatty acids (32-34 % of the fatty acids). Iodine contents were particularly high in the Laminaria species. Of the heavy metals only arsenic levels may be of concern. In total, the red alga P. palmata was regarded as the best alternative to cereals in food and feed. For several of the other species, single-component extraction for the ingredients market may be better than using the whole product. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Intraspecific variations in responses to ocean acidification in two branching coral species.

    PubMed

    Sekizawa, Ayami; Uechi, Hikaru; Iguchi, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi; Kumagai, Naoki H; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2017-09-15

    Ocean acidification is widely recognised to have a negative impact on marine calcifying organisms by reducing calcifications, but controversy remains over whether such organisms could cope with ocean acidification within a range of phenotypic plasticity and/or adapt to future acidifying ocean. We performed a laboratory rearing experiment using clonal fragments of the common branching corals Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica under control and acidified seawater (lower pH) conditions (approximately 400 and 900μatm pCO 2 , respectively) and evaluated the intraspecific variations in their responses to ocean acidification. Intra- and interspecific variations in calcification and photosynthetic efficiency were evident according to both pCO 2 conditions and colony, indicating that responses to acidification may be individually variable at the colony level. Our results suggest that some corals may cope with ocean acidification within their present genotypic composition by adaptation through phenotypic plasticity, while others may be placed under selective pressures resulting in population alteration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diversity of kelp holdfast-associated fauna in an Arctic fjord - inconsistent responses to glacial mineral sedimentation across different taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronowicz, Marta; Kukliński, Piotr; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria

    2018-05-01

    Kelp forests are complex underwater habitats that support diverse assemblages of animals ranging from sessile filter feeding invertebrates to fishes and marine mammals. In this study, the diversity of invertebrate fauna associated with kelp holdfasts was surveyed in a high Arctic glacial fjord (76 N, Hornsund, Svalbard). The effects of algal host identity (three kelp species: Laminaria digitata, Saccharina latissima and Alaria esculenta), depth (5 and 10 m) and glacier-derived disturbance (three sites with varying levels of mineral sedimentation) on faunal species richness and composition were studied based on 239 collected algal holdfasts. The species pool was mostly made up by three taxa: colonial Bryozoa and Hydrozoa, and Polychaeta. While the all-taxa species richness did not differ between depths, algal hosts and sites, the patterns varied when the two colonial sessile filter-feeding taxa were analysed alone (Hydrozoa and Bryozoa). The Hydrozoa sample species richness and average taxonomic distinctness were the highest at undisturbed sites, whereas Bryozoa species richness was higher in sediment-impacted localities, indicating relative insensitivity of this phylum to the increased level of mineral suspension in the water column. The average taxonomic distinctness of Bryozoa did not vary between sites. The species composition of kelp-associated fauna varied between sites and depths for the whole community and the most dominant taxa (Bryozoa, Hydrozoa). The high load of inorganic suspension and sedimentation did not cause pauperization of kelp holdfast-associated fauna but instead triggered the changes in species composition and shifts between dominant taxonomic groups.

  7. Reef Development on Artificial Patch Reefs in Shallow Water of Panjang Island, Central Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munasik; Sugiyanto; Sugianto, Denny N.; Sabdono, Agus

    2018-02-01

    Reef restoration methods are generally developed by propagation of coral fragments, coral recruits and provide substrate for coral attachment using artificial reefs (ARs). ARs have been widely applied as a tool for reef restoration in degraded natural reefs. Successful of coral restoration is determined by reef development such as increasing coral biomass, natural of coral recruits and fauna associated. Artificial Patch Reefs (APRs) is designed by combined of artificial reefs and coral transplantation and constructed by modular circular structures in shape, were deployed from small boats by scuba divers, and are suitable near natural reefs for shallow water with low visibility of Panjang Island, Central Java. Branching corals of Acropora aspera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica fragments were transplanted on to each module of two units of artificial patch reefs in different periods. Coral fragments of Acropora evolved high survival and high growth, Porites fragments have moderate survival and low growth, while fragment of Montipora show in low survival and moderate growth. Within 19 to 22 months of APRs deployment, scleractinian corals were recruited on the surface of artificial patch reef substrates. The most recruits abundant was Montastrea, followed by Poritids, Pocilloporids, and Acroporids. We conclude that artificial patch reefs with developed by coral fragments and natural coral recruitment is one of an alternative rehabilitation method in shallow reef with low visibility.

  8. Resolubilization of Protein from Water-Insoluble Phlorotannin–Protein Complexes upon Acidification

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Marine phlorotannins (PhT) from Laminaria digitata might protect feed proteins from ruminal digestion by formation of insoluble non-covalent tannin–protein complexes at rumen pH (6–7). Formation and disintegration of PhT–protein complexes was studied with β-casein (random coil) and bovine serum albumin (BSA, globular) at various pH. PhT had similar binding affinity for β-casein and BSA as pentagalloyl glucose, as studied by fluorescence quenching. The affinity of PhT for both proteins was independent of pH (3.0, 6.0, and 8.0). In the presence of PhT, the pH range for precipitation of tannin–protein complexes widened to 0.5–1.5 pH units around the isoelectric point (pI) of the protein. Complete protein resolubilization from insoluble PhT–protein complexes was achieved at pH 7 and 2 for β-casein and BSA, respectively. It was demonstrated that PhT modulate the solubility of proteins at neutral pH and that resolubilization of PhT–protein complexes at pH deviating from pI is mainly governed by the charge state of the protein. PMID:29058916

  9. The genus Manota Williston (Diptera: Mycetophilidae) in Peruvian Amazonia, with description of sixteen new species and notes on local species richness.

    PubMed

    Hippa, Heikki; Kurina, Olavi; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2017-02-21

    A comprehensive study of material of the worldwide fungus gnat genus Manota Williston, sampled from the Allpahuayo-Mishana National Reserve in Peruvian Amazonia, was conducted. The following 16 species are described as new: M. aligera sp. n., M. aristoseta sp. n., M. calva sp. n., M. ciliata sp. n., M. exigua sp. n., M. digitata sp. n., M. flabellata sp. n., M. iquitosensis sp. n., M. limulata sp. n., M. micella sp. n., M. minutula sp. n., M. nuda sp. n., M. parvula sp. n., M. pauloides sp. n., M. pustulosa sp. n. and M. serrulata sp. n. In addition, the following 16 species are recorded: M. acuminata Jaschhof & Hippa, 2005, M. acutistylus Jaschhof & Hippa, 2005, M. anfracta Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. appendiculata Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. aristata Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. bisulca Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. diversiseta Jaschhof & Hippa, 2005, M. iota Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. micula Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. papillosa Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. paula Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. penicillata Jaschhof & Hippa, 2005, M. pisinna Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. quantula Hippa & Kurina, 2013, M. spinosa Jaschhof & Hippa, 2005 and M. virgata Hippa & Kurina, 2013. Altogether 67 species of Manota are now known from the Neotropical region.

  10. Visible foliar injury caused by ozone alters the relationship between SPAD meter readings and chlorophyll concentrations in cutleaf coneflower.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Howard S; Chappelka, Arthur H; Somers, Greg L; Burkey, Kent O; Davison, Alan W; Finkelstein, Peter L

    2006-03-01

    The ability of the SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter to quantify chlorophyll amounts in ozone-affected leaves of cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata var. digitata) was assessed in this study. When relatively uninjured leaves were measured (percent leaf area affected by stipple less than 6%), SPAD meter readings were linearly related to total chlorophyll with an adjusted R (2) of 0.84. However, when leaves with foliar injury (characterized as a purple to brownish stipple on the upper leaf surface affecting more than 6% of the leaf area) were added, likelihood ratio tests showed that it was no longer possible to use the same equation to obtain chlorophyll estimations for both classes of leaves. Either an equation with a common slope or a common intercept was necessary. We suspect several factors are involved in altering the calibration of the SPAD meter for measuring chlorophyll amounts in visibly ozone-injured leaves, with the most likely being changes in either light absorption or scattering resulting from tissue necrosis.

  11. Hydrogen production from algal biomass via steam gasification.

    PubMed

    Duman, Gozde; Uddin, Md Azhar; Yanik, Jale

    2014-08-01

    Algal biomasses were tested as feedstock for steam gasification in a dual-bed microreactor in a two-stage process. Gasification experiments were carried out in absence and presence of catalyst. The catalysts used were 10% Fe₂O₃-90% CeO₂ and red mud (activated and natural forms). Effects of catalysts on tar formation and gasification efficiencies were comparatively investigated. It was observed that the characteristic of algae gasification was dependent on its components and the catalysts used. The main role of the catalyst was reforming of the tar derived from algae pyrolysis, besides enhancing water gas shift reaction. The tar reduction levels were in the range of 80-100% for seaweeds and of 53-70% for microalgae. Fe₂O₃-CeO₂ was found to be the most effective catalyst. The maximum hydrogen yields obtained were 1036 cc/g algae for Fucus serratus, 937 cc/g algae for Laminaria digitata and 413 cc/g algae for Nannochloropsis oculata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Alginate and Algal-Based Beads for the Sorption of Metal Cations: Cu(II) and Pb(II)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Alginate and algal-biomass (Laminaria digitata) beads were prepared by homogeneous Ca ionotropic gelation. In addition, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) was incorporated into algal beads. The three sorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX): the sorption occurs in the whole mass of the sorbents. Sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of pH, sorption isotherms, and uptake kinetics. A special attention was paid to the effect of drying (air-drying vs. freeze-drying) on the mass transfer properties. For alginate, freeze drying is required for maintaining the porosity of the hydrogel, while for algal-based sorbents the swelling of the material minimizes the impact of the drying procedure. The maximum sorption capacities observed from experiments were 415, 296 and 218 mg Pb g−1 and 112, 77 and 67 mg Cu g−1 for alginate, algal and algal/PEI beads respectively. Though the sorption capacities of algal-beads decreased slightly (compared to alginate beads), the greener and cheaper one-pot synthesis of algal beads makes this sorbent more competitive for environmental applications. PEI in algal beads decreases the sorption properties in the case of the sorption of metal cations under selected experimental conditions. PMID:27598128

  13. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  14. Preliminary screening of some traditional Zulu medicinal plants for antineoplastic activities versus the HepG2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Opoku, A R; Geheeb-Keller, M; Lin, J; Terblanche, S E; Hutchings, A; Chuturgoon, A; Pillay, D

    2000-11-01

    Aqueous and methanol extracts of nine traditional Zulu medicinal plants, Cissus quandrangularis L., Cyphostemma flaviflorum (Sprague) Descoings, Cyphostemma lanigerum (Harv.) Descoings ex Wild & Drum, Cyphostemma natalitium (Szyszyl.) J. v. d. Merwe, Cyphostemma sp., Rhoicissus digitata (L. F.) Gilg & Brandt, Rhoicissus rhomboidea (E. Mey. Ex harv.) Planch, Rhoicissus tomentosa (Lam.) Wild & Drum, R. tridentata (L. F.) Wild & Drum and Rhoicissus tridentata (L. F.) Wild & Drum subsp. cuneifolia (Eckl. & Zeyh.) N. R. Urton, all belonging to the Vitaceae family, were evaluated to determine their therapeutic potentials as antineoplastic agents. The antiproliferative activity in vitro against HepG2 cells was determined. Twenty-two of the twenty-seven crude plant extracts showed activities ranging from 25% to 97% inhibition of proliferation when compared with the control which showed no inhibitory activity. Higher degrees of growth inhibition were found in aqueous root extracts in comparison with the methanol extracts of the same plant parts. The results show potential antineoplastic activity, indicating some scientific validation for traditional usage. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The effect of seasonal variation on biomethane production from seaweed and on application as a gaseous transport biofuel.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Muhammad Rizwan; Xia, Ao; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-06-01

    Biomethane produced from seaweed may be used as a transport biofuel. Seasonal variation will have an effect on this industry. Laminaria digitata, a typical Irish brown seaweed species, shows significant seasonal variation both in proximate, ultimate and biochemical composition. The characteristics in August were optimal with the lowest level of ash (20% of volatile solids), a C:N ratio of 32 and the highest specific methane yield measured at 327LCH4kgVS(-1), which was 72% of theoretical yield. The highest yield per mass collected of 53m(3)CH4t(-1) was achieved in August, which is 4.5 times higher than the lowest value, obtained in December. A seaweed cultivation area of 11,800ha would be required to satisfy the 2020 target for advanced biofuels in Ireland, of 1.25% renewable energy supply in transport (RES-T) based on the optimal gross energy yield obtained in August (200GJha(-1)yr(-1)). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Edible seaweed as future functional food: Identification of α-glucosidase inhibitors by combined use of high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling and HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingrui; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Wiese, Stefanie; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Crude chloroform, ethanol and acetone extracts of nineteen seaweed species were screened for their antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Samples showing more than 60% α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, at a concentration of 1 mg/ml, were furthermore investigated using high-resolution α-glucosidase inhibition profiling combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR). The results showed Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesicolosus to be rich in antioxidants, equaling a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of 135 and 108 mM Troloxmg(-1) extract, respectively. HR-bioassay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR showed the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of A. nodosum, F. vesoculosus, Laminaria digitata, Laminaria japonica and Undaria pinnatifida to be caused by phlorotannins as well as fatty acids - with oleic acid, linoleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid being the most potent with IC50 values of 0.069, 0.075 and 0.10 mM, respectively, and showing a mixed-type inhibition mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Brominating activity of the seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum: Impact on the biosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wever, R.; Tromp, M.G.M.; Krenn, B.E.

    Macroalgae are an important source of volatile halogenated organic compounds, such as bromoform and dibromomethane. The mechanism by which these compounds are formed is still elusive. The authors report that the brown seaweeds Laminaria saccharina, Laminaria digitata, Fucus vesiculosis, Pelvetia canaliculata, and Ascophyllum nodosum and the red seaweeds Chondrus crispus and Plocamium hamatum contain bromoperoxidases. The intact plants are able to brominate exogeneous organic compounds when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Br{sup {minus}} are added to seawater. Further, the authors show that the brominating activity of the brown macroalga A. nodosum, which contains a vanadium bromoperoxidase located on the thallus surface,more » occurs when the plant is exposed to light and not in the dark. The rate of bromination of exogenous organic compounds in seawater by this plant is 68 nmol (g of wet alga){sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus}1}. HOBr is a strong biocidal agent and the authors propose that the formation of HOBr by this seaweed is part of a host defense system.« less

  18. In vitro screening of natural feed additives from crustaceans, diatoms, seaweeds and plant extracts to manipulate rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Belanche, Alejandro; Ramos-Morales, Eva; Newbold, C Jamie

    2016-07-01

    Eight natural products from animal, unicellular algae, brown seaweed and plant origins were chosen according to their theoretical antimicrobial activity: Diatomaceous earths (DE), insoluble chitosan (ICHI), soluble chitosan (CHI), seaweed meal (SWM), Ascophyllum nodosum (ASC), Laminaria digitata (LAM), neem oil (NOIL) and an ivy fruit extract rich in saponins (IVY). Dose-response incubations were conducted to determine their effect on rumen fermentation pattern and gas production, while their anti-protozoal activity was tested using (14) C-labelled bacteria. DE, SWM, NOIL and ICHI had very small effects on rumen function when used at inclusion rate up to 2 g L(-1) . ASC had anti-protozoal effects (up to -23%) promoting a decrease in gas production and methanogenesis (-15%). LAM increased VFA production (+7%) and shifted from butyrate to acetate. CHI also shifted fermentation towards propionate production and lower methane (-23%) and protozoal activity (-56%). IVY decreased protozoal activity (-39%) and ammonia concentration (-56%), as well as increased feed fermentation (+11% VFA concentration) and shifted from acetate to propionate production. ASC, LAM, CHI and IVY showed promising potential in vitro as feed additives to improve rumen function, thus more research is needed to investigate their mode of action in the rumen microbial ecosystem. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. The microbiological and immunomodulatory effects of spray-dried versus wet dietary supplementation of seaweed extract in the pig gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhya, A; O'Doherty, J V; Smith, A; Bahar, B; Sweeney, T

    2012-12-01

    Seaweeds and seaweed extract (SWE) possess antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, prebiotic, and growth-promoting properties. Extracts can be prepared in different ways including wet, spray-dried, and freeze-dried forms. The aim of this study was to determine if spray drying of laminarin and fucoidan derived from Laminaria digitata had an effect on the microbiological and cytokine profile of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) compared to the wet SWE in newly weaned pigs. No differences in cytokine expression were observed between wet and spray dried SWE formulation in either the ileum or colon. Bifidobacteria counts were greater (P < 0.05) in the wet SWE formulation relative to both spray dried SWE and the basal diet in the ileum. In conclusion, neither of the SWE formulations had significant effects on the cytokine profile in the ileum or colon. However, a prebiotic effect observed in the ileum of piglets in response to the wet SWE formulation was lost following spray drying of the SWE.

  20. Concentrations and speciation of arsenic in New England seaweed species harvested for food and agriculture.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vivien F; Jackson, Brian P

    2016-11-01

    A survey of arsenic (As) concentrations and speciation was conducted on 10 species of seaweed from commercial harvesters and from collection at two sites in New England. Concentrations of As ranged from 4 to 106 mg/kg, mostly in the form of arsenosugars, with the distribution of arsenosugar analogs varying between taxa. In brown algae, As levels were correlated with phosphate concentrations, and arsenosugar speciation reflected differences in sulfur and phosphate concentrations between taxa. Several samples of the brown algae species Laminaria digitata contained significant levels of inorganic As (2.8-20 mg/kg), the most toxic form of As. A weak acid extraction with microwave heating was compared with a weaker methanol: water extraction method, and found to give slightly higher extraction efficiency with comparable relative concentrations of inorganic As, supporting the use of this faster and simpler extraction method for monitoring. Seaweed is a niche dietary item in the U.S. but its popularity is increasing; it is also used in agriculture and livestock farming which provide potential indirect routes for human exposure. The presence of occasional high concentrations of iAs, as well as the lack of toxicity studies on organic As species, suggest that monitoring of these high As foods is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Linear β-1,3 Glucans Are Elicitors of Defense Responses in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Klarzynski, Olivier; Plesse, Bertrand; Joubert, Jean-Marie; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Kopp, Marguerite; Kloareg, Bernard; Fritig, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Laminarin, a linear β-1,3 glucan (mean degree of polymerization of 33) was extracted and purified from the brown alga Laminaria digitata. Its elicitor activity on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was compared to that of oligogalacturonides with a mean degree of polymerization of 10. The two oligosaccharides were perceived by suspension-cultured cells as distinct chemical stimuli but triggered a similar and broad spectrum of defense responses. A dose of 200 μg mL−1 laminarin or oligogalacturonides induced within a few minutes a 1.9-pH-units alkalinization of the extracellular medium and a transient release of H2O2. After a few hours, a strong stimulation of Phe ammonia-lyase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, and lipoxygenase activities occurred, as well as accumulation of salicylic acid. Neither of the two oligosaccharides induced tissue damage or cell death nor did they induce accumulation of the typical tobacco phytoalexin capsidiol, in contrast with the effects of the proteinaceous elicitor β-megaspermin. Structure activity studies with laminarin, laminarin oligomers, high molecular weight β-1,3–1,6 glucans from fungal cell walls, and the β-1,6–1,3 heptaglucan showed that the elicitor effects observed in tobacco with β-glucans are specific to linear β-1,3 linkages, with laminaripentaose being the smallest elicitor-active structure. In accordance with its strong stimulating effect on defense responses in tobacco cells, infiltration of 200 μg mL−1 laminarin in tobacco leaves triggered accumulation within 48 h of the four families of antimicrobial pathogenesis-related proteins investigated. Challenge of the laminarin-infiltrated leaves 5 d after treatment with the soft rot pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora resulted in a strong reduction of the infection when compared with water-treated leaves. PMID:11080280

  2. Colony-specific investigations reveal highly variable responses among individual corals to ocean acidification and warming.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Javid; Reimer, James Davis; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    As anthropogenic climate change is an ongoing concern, scientific investigations on its impacts on coral reefs are increasing. Although impacts of combined ocean acidification (OA) and temperature stress (T) on reef-building scleractinian corals have been studied at the genus, species and population levels, there are little data available on how individual corals respond to combined OA and anomalous temperatures. In this study, we exposed individual colonies of Acropora digitifera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica to four pCO2-temperature treatments including 400 μatm-28 °C, 400 μatm-31 °C, 1000 μatm-28 °C and 1000 μatm-31 °C for 26 days. Physiological parameters including calcification, protein content, maximum photosynthetic efficiency, Symbiodinium density, and chlorophyll content along with Symbiodinium type of each colony were examined. Along with intercolonial responses, responses of individual colonies versus pooled data to the treatments were investigated. The main results were: 1) responses to either OA or T or their combination were different between individual colonies when considering physiological functions; 2) tolerance to either OA or T was not synonymous with tolerance to the other parameter; 3) tolerance to both OA and T did not necessarily lead to tolerance of OA and T combined (OAT) at the same time; 4) OAT had negative, positive or no impacts on physiological functions of coral colonies; and 5) pooled data were not representative of responses of all individual colonies. Indeed, the pooled data obscured actual responses of individual colonies or presented a response that was not observed in any individual. From the results of this study we recommend improving experimental designs of studies investigating physiological responses of corals to climate change by complementing them with colony-specific examinations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a novel colorimetric sensor based on alginate beads for monitoring rainbow trout spoilage.

    PubMed

    Majdinasab, Marjan; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hashem; Sepidname, Marziyeh; Negahdarifar, Manizheh; Li, Peiwu

    2018-05-01

    Alginate is a non-toxic, renewable, and linear copolymer obtained from the brown algae Laminaria digitata that can be easily shaped into beads. Its good gel forming properties have made it useful for entrapping food and pharmaceutical ingredients. In this study, alginate beads were used in a novel application as a colorimetric sensor in food intelligent packaging. Colorimetric sensor was developed through entrapping red cabbage extract as a pH indicator in alginate beads. The pH indicator beads were used in rainbow trout packaging for monitoring fillets spoilage. Color change of beads during fish storage was measured using the CIELab method. The alginate bead colorimetric sensor is validated by measuring total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) levels and microbial populations in fish samples. Moreover, peroxide value (PV) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were evaluated during storage. Results indicated that increasing the bacterial population during storage and production of proteolytic enzymes resulted in protein degradation, accumulation of volatile amine compounds, increase in the pH and finally color change of alginate beads. The values of TVB-N, pH, PV and TBARS increased with time of storage. The results of TVB-N and microbial growth were in accordance with color change of beads and CIELab data. Therefore, the proposed system enjoys a high sensitivity to pH variations and is capable of monitoring the spoilage of fish or other protein-rich products through its wide range of color changes. The alginate beads containing the red cabbage extract can, thus, be used as a low-cost colorimetric sensor for intelligent packaging applications.

  4. Microsensor studies on Padina from a natural CO2 seep: implications of morphology on acclimation to low pH.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Fink, Artur; Bischof, Kai; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Low seawater pH can be harmful to many calcifying marine organisms, but the calcifying macroalgae Padina spp. flourish at natural submarine carbon dioxide seeps where seawater pH is low. We show that the microenvironment created by the rolled thallus margin of Padina australis facilitates supersaturation of CaCO3 and calcifi-cation via photosynthesis-induced elevated pH. Using microsensors to investigate oxygen and pH dynamics in the microenvironment of P. australis at a shallow CO2 seep, we found that, under saturating light, the pH inside the microenvironment (pHME ) was higher than the external seawater (pHSW ) at all pHSW levels investigated, and the difference (i.e., pHME - pHSW ) increased with decreasing pHSW (0.9 units at pHSW 7.0). Gross photosynthesis (Pg ) inside the microenvironment increased with decreasing pHSW , but algae from the control site reached a threshold at pH 6.5. Seep algae showed no pH threshold with respect to Pg within the pHSW range investigated. The external carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, acetazolamide, strongly inhibited Pg of P. australis at pHSW 8.2, but the effect was diminished under low pHSW (6.4-7.5), suggesting a greater dependence on membrane-bound CA for the dehydration of HCO3 (-) ions during dissolved inorganic carbon uptake at the higher pHSW . In comparison, a calcifying green alga, Halimeda cuneata f. digitata, was not inhibited by AZ, suggesting efficient bicarbonate transport. The ability of P. australis to elevate pHME at the site of calcification and its strong dependence on CA may explain why it can thrive at low pHSW . © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  5. Cumulative stress restricts niche filling potential of habitat-forming kelps in a future climate.

    PubMed

    King, Nathan G; Wilcockson, David C; Webster, Richard; Smale, Dan A; Hoelters, Laura S; Moore, Pippa J

    2018-02-01

    Climate change is driving range contractions and local population extinctions across the globe. When this affects ecosystem engineers the vacant niches left behind are likely to alter the wider ecosystem unless a similar species can fulfil them.Here, we explore the stress physiology of two coexisting kelps undergoing opposing range shifts in the Northeast Atlantic and discuss what differences in stress physiology may mean for future niche filling.We used chlorophyll florescence ( F v /F m ) and differentiation of the heat shock response (HSR) to determine the capacity of the expanding kelp , Laminaria ochroleuca , to move into the higher shore position of the retreating kelp, Laminaria digitata . We applied both single and consecutive exposures to immersed and emersed high and low temperature treatments, replicating low tide exposures experienced in summer and winter.No interspecific differences in HSR were observed which was surprising given the species' different biogeographic distributions. However, chlorophyll florescence revealed clear differences between species with L. ochroleuca better equipped to tolerate high immersed temperatures but showed little capacity to tolerate frosts or high emersion temperatures.Many patterns observed were only apparent after consecutive exposures. Such cumulative effects have largely been overlooked in tolerance experiments on intertidal organisms despite being more representative of the stress experienced in natural habitats. We therefore suggest future experiments incorporate consecutive stress into their design.Climate change is predicted to result in fewer ground frosts and increased summer temperatures. Therefore, L. ochroleuca may be released from its summer cold limit in winter but still be prevented from moving up the shore due to desiccation in the summer. Laminaria ochroleuca will, however, likely be able to move into tidal pools. Therefore, only partial niche filling by L. ochroleuca will be possible in this system

  6. Seasonal and algal diet-driven patterns of the digestive microbiota of the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata, a generalist marine herbivore.

    PubMed

    Gobet, Angélique; Mest, Laëtitia; Perennou, Morgan; Dittami, Simon M; Caralp, Claire; Coulombet, Céline; Huchette, Sylvain; Roussel, Sabine; Michel, Gurvan; Leblanc, Catherine

    2018-03-27

    Holobionts have a digestive microbiota with catabolic abilities allowing the degradation of complex dietary compounds for the host. In terrestrial herbivores, the digestive microbiota is known to degrade complex polysaccharides from land plants while in marine herbivores, the digestive microbiota is poorly characterized. Most of the latter are generalists and consume red, green, and brown macroalgae, three distinct lineages characterized by a specific composition in complex polysaccharides, which represent half of their biomass. Subsequently, each macroalga features a specific epiphytic microbiota, and the digestive microbiota of marine herbivores is expected to vary with a monospecific algal diet. We investigated the effect of four monospecific diets (Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, Saccharina latissima, Laminaria digitata) on the composition and specificity of the digestive microbiota of a generalist marine herbivore, the abalone, farmed in a temperate coastal area over a year. The microbiota from the abalone digestive gland was sampled every 2 months and explored using metabarcoding. Diversity and multivariate analyses showed that patterns of the microbiota were significantly linked to seasonal variations of contextual parameters but not directly to a specific algal diet. Three core genera: Psychrilyobacter, Mycoplasma, and Vibrio constantly dominated the microbiota in the abalone digestive gland. Additionally, a less abundant and diet-specific core microbiota featured genera representing aerobic primary degraders of algal polysaccharides. This study highlights the establishment of a persistent core microbiota in the digestive gland of the abalone since its juvenile state and the presence of a less abundant and diet-specific core community. While composed of different microbial taxa compared to terrestrial herbivores, the digestive gland constitutes a particular niche in the abalone holobiont, where bacteria (i) may cooperate to degrade algal polysaccharides to

  7. Stream macroinvertebrate drift response to pulsed exposure of the synthetic pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Rasmus B; Friberg, Nikolai

    2005-10-01

    Outdoor experimental channels were used to study the behavioral changes of stream macroinvertebrates exposed to a pulse of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin. The primary end point was the number of macroinvertebrates drifting, but the mobility of macroinvertebrates caught in the drift also was assessed. A specified number of two insect species, Baetis rhodani and Leuctra fusca/digitata, and of the amphipod Gammarus pulex were introduced into small replicated subsections of the experimental channels. Macroinvertebrates were allowed to acclimatize for 26 h prior to a 60-min pulsed exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin. Measurement was initiated 2 h before pesticide application and continued for the following 24 h. Pulse concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 microg L(-1) were applied, and each experiment was replicated 8 times. All three species responded to the pesticide pulse with catastrophic drift. The 0.001 microg L(-1) treatment caused a significant increase in the drift of Gammarus, whereas the drift response threshold was 0.01 microg L(-1) for the two insect species. Drift response onset followed the applied pulse concentration, with the highest concentrations resulting in more individuals of all species entering drift at an early stage. The majority of individuals caught in drift samples during low concentrations showed no change in mobility. At the two highest concentrations, however, both Baetis and Leuctra were in the process of being immobilized, with Leuctra the more sensitive of the two. In contrast, only a few of the Gammarus individuals caught showed changes in mobility after the high-concentration treatments. The present study shows that lambda-cyhalothrin is a potential hazard for macroinvertebrate populations in headwater streams. The clear species-specific responses indicate that sublethal doses have the potential to change the macroinvertebrate community structure. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Predicting plant invasions under climate change: are species distribution models validated by field trials?

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Christine S; Burns, Bruce R; Stanley, Margaret C

    2014-09-01

    Climate change may facilitate alien species invasion into new areas, particularly for species from warm native ranges introduced into areas currently marginal for temperature. Although conclusions from modelling approaches and experimental studies are generally similar, combining the two approaches has rarely occurred. The aim of this study was to validate species distribution models by conducting field trials in sites of differing suitability as predicted by the models, thus increasing confidence in their ability to assess invasion risk. Three recently naturalized alien plants in New Zealand were used as study species (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana, Psidium guajava and Schefflera actinophylla): they originate from warm native ranges, are woody bird-dispersed species and of concern as potential weeds. Seedlings were grown in six sites across the country, differing both in climate and suitability (as predicted by the species distribution models). Seedling growth and survival were recorded over two summers and one or two winter seasons, and temperature and precipitation were monitored hourly at each site. Additionally, alien seedling performances were compared to those of closely related native species (Rhopalostylis sapida, Lophomyrtus bullata and Schefflera digitata). Furthermore, half of the seedlings were sprayed with pesticide, to investigate whether enemy release may influence performance. The results showed large differences in growth and survival of the alien species among the six sites. In the more suitable sites, performance was frequently higher compared to the native species. Leaf damage from invertebrate herbivory was low for both alien and native seedlings, with little evidence that the alien species should have an advantage over the native species because of enemy release. Correlations between performance in the field and predicted suitability of species distribution models were generally high. The projected increase in minimum temperature and reduced

  9. Algal Foams Applied in Fixed-Bed Process for Lead(II) Removal Using Recirculation or One-Pass Modes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of brown algae into biopolymer beads or foams for metal sorption has been previously reported. However, the direct use of these biomasses for preparing foams is a new approach. In this study, two kinds of porous foams were prepared by ionotropic gelation using algal biomass (AB, Laminaria digitata) or alginate (as the reference) and applied for Pb(II) sorption. These foams (manufactured as macroporous discs) were packed in filtration holders (simulating fixed-bed column) and the system was operated in either a recirculation or a one-pass mode. Sorption isotherms, uptake kinetics and sorbent reuse were studied in the recirculation mode (analogous to batch system). In the one-pass mode (continuous fixed-bed system), the influence of parameters such as flow rate, feed metal concentration and bed height were investigated on both sorption and desorption. In addition, the effect of Cu(II) on Pb(II) recovery from binary solutions was also studied in terms of both sorption and desorption. Sorption isotherms are well fitted by the Langmuir equation while the pseudo-second order rate equation described well both sorption and desorption kinetic profiles. The study of material regeneration confirms that the reuse of the foams was feasible with a small mass loss, even after 9 cycles. In the one-pass mode, for alginate foams, a slower flow rate led to a smaller saturation volume, while the effect of flow rate was less marked for AB foams. Competitive study suggests that the foams have a preference for Pb(II) over Cu(II) but cannot selectively remove Pb(II) from the binary solution. PMID:29039806

  10. Copper(II)-mediated thermolysis of alginates: a model kinetic study on the influence of metal ions in the thermochemical processing of macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, J. S.; Dyer, P. W.; Greenwell, H. C.; Selby, D.; Theodorou, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Thermochemical processing methods such as pyrolysis are of growing interest as a means of converting biomass into fuels and commodity chemicals in a sustainable manner. Macroalgae, or seaweed, represent a novel class of feedstock for pyrolysis that, owing to the nature of the environments in which they grow coupled with their biochemistry, naturally possess high metal contents. Although the impact of metals upon the pyrolysis of terrestrial biomass is well documented, their influence on the thermochemical conversion of marine-derived feeds is largely unknown. Furthermore, these effects are inherently difficult to study, owing to the heterogeneous character of natural seaweed samples. The work described in this paper uses copper(II) alginate, together with alginic acid and sodium alginate as model compounds for exploring the effects of metals upon macroalgae thermolysis. A thermogravimetric analysis–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study revealed that, unusually, Cu2+ ions promote the onset of pyrolysis in the alginate polymer, with copper(II) alginate initiating rapid devolatilization at 143°C, 14°C lower than alginic acid and 61°C below the equivalent point for sodium alginate. Moreover, this effect was mirrored in a sample of wild Laminaria digitata that had been doped with Cu2+ ions prior to pyrolysis, thus validating the use of alginates as model compounds with which to study the thermolysis of macroalgae. These observations indicate the varying impact of different metal species on thermochemical behaviour of seaweeds and offer an insight into the pyrolysis of brown macroalgae used in phytoremediation of metal-containing waste streams. PMID:24427515

  11. The DACCIWA project: Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This contribution provides an overview of the EU-funded DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa) project. DACCIWA consists of 16 European and African research organisations and has strong links to universities, weather services and government organisations across West Africa. The project runs from 2010 to 2018 and is built around a major international field campaign in 2016. A key motivation for DACCIWA is the expected tripling of anthropogenic emissions in southern West Africa (SWA) between 2000 and 2030, whose impacts on human health, ecosystems, food security and the regional climate are largely unknown. An integrated assessment of this problem, which is mostly due to massive economic and population growth and urbanization, is challenging due to (a) a superposition of regional effects with global climate change, (b) a strong dependence on the variable West African monsoon, (c) incomplete scientific understanding of interactions between emissions, clouds, radiation, precipitation and regional circulations, and (d) a lack of observations. DACCIWA combines measurements in the field in SWA with extensive modelling activities and work on satellite data. In particular during the main DACCIWA field campaign in June-July 2016 high-quality observations of emissions, atmospheric composition and meteorological parameters were sampled. The campaign involved three research aircraft, three ground-based supersites, enhanced radiosonde launches, and intensive measurements at urban sites in Abidjan and Cotonou. These data have already been quality-controlled and will be freely available to the research community through a database at http://baobab.sedoo.fr/DACCIWA/ after the end of the project. The resulting benchmark dataset is currently combined with a wide range of modelling and satellite-based research activities that will ultimately allow (a) an assessment of the roles of relevant physical, chemical and biological processes, (b) an improvement

  12. Variation in the mineral element concentration of Moringa oleifera Lam. and M. stenopetala (Bak. f.) Cuf.: Role in human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Kumssa, Diriba B; Joy, Edward Jm; Young, Scott D; Odee, David W; Ander, E Louise; Broadley, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (MO) and M. stenopetala (MS) (family Moringaceae; order Brassicales) are multipurpose tree/shrub species. They thrive under marginal environmental conditions and produce nutritious edible parts. The aim of this study was to determine the mineral composition of different parts of MO and MS growing in their natural environments and their potential role in alleviating human mineral micronutrient deficiencies (MND) in sub-Saharan Africa. Edible parts of MO (n = 146) and MS (n = 50), co-occurring cereals/vegetables and soils (n = 95) underneath their canopy were sampled from localities in southern Ethiopia and Kenya. The concentrations of seven mineral elements, namely, calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iodine (I), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in edible parts and soils were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In Ethiopian crops, MS leaves contained the highest median concentrations of all elements except Cu and Zn, which were greater in Enset (a.k.a., false banana). In Kenya, Mo flowers and MS leaves had the highest median Se concentration of 1.56 mg kg-1 and 3.96 mg kg-1, respectively. The median concentration of Se in MS leaves was 7-fold, 10-fold, 23-fold, 117-fold and 147-fold more than that in brassica leaves, amaranth leaves, baobab fruits, sorghum grain and maize grain, respectively. The median Se concentration was 78-fold and 98-fold greater in MO seeds than in sorghum and maize grain, respectively. There was a strong relationship between soil total Se and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4)-extractable Se, and Se concentration in the leaves of MO and MS. This study confirms previous studies that Moringa is a good source of several of the measured mineral nutrients, and it includes the first wide assessment of Se and I concentrations in edible parts of MO and MS grown in various localities. Increasing the consumption of MO and MS, especially the leaves as a fresh vegetable or in powdered form

  13. Variation in the mineral element concentration of Moringa oleifera Lam. and M. stenopetala (Bak. f.) Cuf.: Role in human nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Kumssa, Diriba B; Joy, Edward JM; Young, Scott D; Odee, David W; Ander, E Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background Moringa oleifera (MO) and M. stenopetala (MS) (family Moringaceae; order Brassicales) are multipurpose tree/shrub species. They thrive under marginal environmental conditions and produce nutritious edible parts. The aim of this study was to determine the mineral composition of different parts of MO and MS growing in their natural environments and their potential role in alleviating human mineral micronutrient deficiencies (MND) in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Edible parts of MO (n = 146) and MS (n = 50), co-occurring cereals/vegetables and soils (n = 95) underneath their canopy were sampled from localities in southern Ethiopia and Kenya. The concentrations of seven mineral elements, namely, calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iodine (I), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in edible parts and soils were determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results In Ethiopian crops, MS leaves contained the highest median concentrations of all elements except Cu and Zn, which were greater in Enset (a.k.a., false banana). In Kenya, Mo flowers and MS leaves had the highest median Se concentration of 1.56 mg kg-1 and 3.96 mg kg-1, respectively. The median concentration of Se in MS leaves was 7-fold, 10-fold, 23-fold, 117-fold and 147-fold more than that in brassica leaves, amaranth leaves, baobab fruits, sorghum grain and maize grain, respectively. The median Se concentration was 78-fold and 98-fold greater in MO seeds than in sorghum and maize grain, respectively. There was a strong relationship between soil total Se and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4)-extractable Se, and Se concentration in the leaves of MO and MS. Conclusion This study confirms previous studies that Moringa is a good source of several of the measured mineral nutrients, and it includes the first wide assessment of Se and I concentrations in edible parts of MO and MS grown in various localities. Increasing the consumption of MO and MS, especially the leaves as a

  14. Selection for delayed maturity : Does it take 20 years to learn to hunt and gather?

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas Blurton; Marlowe, Frank W

    2002-06-01

    Humans have a much longer juvenile period (weaning to first reproduction, 14 or more years) than their closest relatives (chimpanzees, 8 years). Three explanations are prominent in the literature. (a) Humans need the extra time to learn their complex subsistence techniques. (b) Among mammals, since length of the juvenile period bears a constant relationship to adult lifespan, the human juvenile period is just as expected. We therefore only need to explain the elongated adult lifespan, which can be explained by the opportunity for older individuals to increase their fitness by providing for grandchildren. (c) The recent model by Kaplan and colleagues suggests that longevity and investment in "embodied capital" will coevolve, and that the need to learn subsistence technology contributed to selection for our extended lifespan.We report experiments designed to test the first explanation: human subsistence technology takes many years to learn, and spending more time learning it gives reproductive benefits that outweight lost time. Taking away some of this time should lead to deficits in efficiency. We paid Hadza foragers to participate in tests of important subsistence skills. We compared efficiency of males and females at digging tubers. They differ greatly in time spent practicing digging but show no difference in efficiency. Children who lost "bush experience" by spending years in boarding school performed no worse at digging tubers or target archery than those who had spent their entire lives in the bush. Climbing baobab trees, an important and dangerous skill, showed no change with age among those who attempted it. We could show no effects of practice time.These findings do not support what we label "the practice theory," but we discuss ways in which the theory could be defended; for example, some as-yet-untested skill may be greatly impaired by loss of a few years of the juvenile period. Our data also show that it is not safe to assume that increases in skill with

  15. Persistent differences between coastal and offshore kelp forest communities in a warming Gulf of Maine.

    PubMed

    Witman, Jon D; Lamb, Robert W

    2018-01-01

    Kelp forests provide important ecosystem services, yet coastal kelp communities are increasingly altered by anthropogenic impacts. Kelp forests in remote, offshore locations may provide an informative contrast due to reduced impacts from local stressors. We tested the hypothesis that shallow kelp assemblages (12-15 m depth) and associated fish and benthic communities in the coastal southwest Gulf of Maine (GOM) differed significantly from sites on Cashes Ledge, 145 km offshore by sampling five coastal and three offshore sites at 43.0 +/- 0.07° N latitude. Offshore sites on Cashes Ledge supported the greatest density (47.8 plants m2) and standing crop biomass (5.5 kg m2 fresh weight) of the foundation species Saccharina latissima kelp at this depth in the Western North Atlantic. Offshore densities of S. latissima were over 150 times greater than at coastal sites, with similar but lower magnitude trends for congeneric S. digitata. Despite these differences, S. latissima underwent a significant 36.2% decrease between 1987 and 2015 on Cashes Ledge, concurrent with a rapid warming of the GOM and invasion by the kelp-encrusting bryozoan Membranipora membranacea. In contrast to kelp, the invasive red alga Dasysiphonia japonica was significantly more abundant at coastal sites, suggesting light or dispersal limitation offshore. Spatial differences in fish abundance mirrored those of kelp, as the average biomass of all fish on Cashes Ledge was 305 times greater than at the coastal sites. Remote video censuses of cod (Gadus morhua), cunner (Tautaogolabrus adspersus), and pollock (Pollachius virens) corroborated these findings. Understory benthic communities also differed between regions, with greater abundance of sessile invertebrates offshore. Populations of kelp-consuming sea urchins Stronglyocentrotus droebachiensis, were virtually absent from Cashes Ledge while small urchins were abundant onshore, suggesting recruitment limitation offshore. Despite widespread warming of

  16. Persistent differences between coastal and offshore kelp forest communities in a warming Gulf of Maine

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Robert W.

    2018-01-01

    Kelp forests provide important ecosystem services, yet coastal kelp communities are increasingly altered by anthropogenic impacts. Kelp forests in remote, offshore locations may provide an informative contrast due to reduced impacts from local stressors. We tested the hypothesis that shallow kelp assemblages (12–15 m depth) and associated fish and benthic communities in the coastal southwest Gulf of Maine (GOM) differed significantly from sites on Cashes Ledge, 145 km offshore by sampling five coastal and three offshore sites at 43.0 +/- 0.07° N latitude. Offshore sites on Cashes Ledge supported the greatest density (47.8 plants m2) and standing crop biomass (5.5 kg m2 fresh weight) of the foundation species Saccharina latissima kelp at this depth in the Western North Atlantic. Offshore densities of S. latissima were over 150 times greater than at coastal sites, with similar but lower magnitude trends for congeneric S. digitata. Despite these differences, S. latissima underwent a significant 36.2% decrease between 1987 and 2015 on Cashes Ledge, concurrent with a rapid warming of the GOM and invasion by the kelp-encrusting bryozoan Membranipora membranacea. In contrast to kelp, the invasive red alga Dasysiphonia japonica was significantly more abundant at coastal sites, suggesting light or dispersal limitation offshore. Spatial differences in fish abundance mirrored those of kelp, as the average biomass of all fish on Cashes Ledge was 305 times greater than at the coastal sites. Remote video censuses of cod (Gadus morhua), cunner (Tautaogolabrus adspersus), and pollock (Pollachius virens) corroborated these findings. Understory benthic communities also differed between regions, with greater abundance of sessile invertebrates offshore. Populations of kelp-consuming sea urchins Stronglyocentrotus droebachiensis, were virtually absent from Cashes Ledge while small urchins were abundant onshore, suggesting recruitment limitation offshore. Despite widespread warming

  17. Exposure and effects of sediment-spiked fludioxonil on macroinvertebrates and zooplankton in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao H; Brock, Theo C M; Barone, Lidia E; Belgers, J Dick M; Boerwinkel, Marie-Claire; Buijse, Laura; van Wijngaarden, René P A; Hamer, Mick; Roessink, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Information from effects of pesticides in sediments at an ecosystem level, to validate current and proposed risk assessment procedures, is scarce. A sediment-spiked outdoor freshwater microcosm experiment was conducted with fludioxonil (lipophilic, non-systemic fungicide) to study exposure dynamics and treatment-related responses of benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates and zooplankton. Besides blank control and solvent control systems the experiment had six different treatment levels (1.7-614mga.s./kg dry sediment) based around the reported 28-d No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for Chironomus riparius (40mga.s./kg dry sediment). Twelve systems were available per treatment of which four were sacrificed on each of days 28, 56 and 84 after microcosm construction. Fludioxonil persisted in the sediment and mean measured concentrations were 53-82% of the initial concentration after 84days. The dissipation rate increased with the treatment level. Also exposure concentrations in overlying water were long-term, with highest concentrations 28days after initiation of the experiment. Sediment-dwelling Oligochaeta and pelagic Rotifera and Cladocera showed the most pronounced treatment-related declines. The most sensitive sediment-dwelling oligochaete was Dero digitata (population NOEC 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). The same NOEC was calculated for the sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrate community. The most sensitive zooplankton species was the cladoceran Diaphanosoma brachyurum (NOEC of 1.6μga.s./L in overlying water corresponding to 5.0mga.s./kg dry sediment). At the two highest treatments several rotifer taxa showed a pronounced decrease, while the zooplankton community-level NOEC was 5.6μga.s./L (corresponding to 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). Zooplankton taxa calanoid Copepoda and Daphnia gr. longispina showed a pronounced treatment-related increase (indirect effects). Consequently, an assessment factor of 10 to the chronic laboratory NOECs of Chironomus riparius

  18. Iodine Emissions from Seaweeds: Species-dependent and Seasonal Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Thomas; Ball, Stephen; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Emissions of iodine from macroalgae into the marine boundary layer (MBL) significantly impact tropospheric chemistry and the biogeochemical cycling of iodine. Gas-phase iodine chemistry perturbs the usual HOx and NOx radical cycles, provides additional sink reactions for tropospheric ozone, and modifies atmospheric oxidizing capacity. Iodine oxides (IxOywith x ≥ 2) formed through the reaction of iodine atoms with ozone nucleate new aerosol particles which, if they grow sufficiently, can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and so influence the local climate in coastal regions. Some seaweeds, such as brown algae, are important bio-accumulators of iodine. They specifically induce iodine metabolism to protect themselves against oxidative stress, both as a defence mechanism and when exposed to air around low tide. Indeed the dominant emission source of iodine into the atmosphere in coastal regions comes from intertidal macroalgal beds, particularly those of kelp species. We present results from an extensive laboratory study of molecular iodine (I2) emissions from five seaweed species (two Fucales, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus, and three kelp species, Laminaria digitata, L. hyperborea and Saccharina latissima). Eighty-four incubation experiments were performed at the Station Biologique in Roscoff (Brittany, France) between September 2012 and June 2013 to quantify species-dependent I2 emission rates in response to progressive air exposure, mimicking low tide, and to investigate any seasonal differences. Measurements were conducted on 'fresh' biological samples: Ascophyllum and Fucus thalli were collected whilst still submerged on an ebbing tide, transported in seawater to the laboratory and analysed immediately; kelp samples were collected by boat, stored in an outside aquarium in running seawater and analysed within a few days. I2 emissions were quantified at high time resolution by broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometry (1σ detection limit

  19. A survey of the spider family Nesticidae (Arachnida, Araneae) in Asia and Madagascar, with the description of forty-three new species

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yucheng; Ballarin, Francesco; Li, Shuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Forty-three new species of Nesticidae are described from China, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam and Madagascar, and two new junior synonyms are suggested. A new genus, Speleoticus gen. n., is described with Nesticus navicellatus Liu & Li, 2013 as the type species, and four species are transferfed from Nesticus, i.e., Speleoticus globosus (Liu & Li, 2013), comb. n., Speleoticus libo (Chen & Zhu, 2005), comb. n., Speleoticus navicellatus (Liu & Li, 2015), comb. n. and Speleoticus uenoi (Yaginuma, 1972), comb. n. The new species described in this paper belong to four genera and are: Hamus cornutus sp. n. (♂♀), Hamus kangdingensis sp. n. (♂), Hamus luzon sp. n. (♀), Hamus mangunensis sp. n. (♂), Nescina kohi sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella baiseensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella baobab sp. n. (♂), Nesticella caeca sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella chongqing sp. n. (♀), Nesticella dazhuangensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella fuliangensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella gazuida sp. n. (♀), Nesticella gongshanensis sp. n. (♀), Nesticella griswoldi sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella hongheensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella huomachongensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella jingpo sp. n. (♀), Nesticella kaohsiungensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella lisu sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella liuzhaiensis sp. n. (♀), Nesticella nandanensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella phami sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella potala sp. n. (♀), Nesticella qiaoqiensis sp. n. (♀), Nesticella qiongensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella robusta sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella rongtangensis sp. n. (♂), Nesticella sanchaheensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella sulawesi sp. n. (♀), Nesticella sumatrana sp. n. (♂), Nesticella tibetana sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella vanlang sp. n. (♀), Nesticella wanzaiensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella xiongmao sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella xixia sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella yanbeiensis sp. n. (♂♀), Nesticella yao sp. n. (♀), Nesticella zhiyuani sp. n. (

  20. Skeletons in confusion: a review of astrophorid sponges with (dicho–)calthrops as structural megascleres (Porifera, Demospongiae, Astrophorida)

    PubMed Central

    Van Soest, Rob W.M.; Beglinger, Elly J.; De Voogd, Nicole J.

    2010-01-01

    , Pachastrella geodioides, is barely distinct from the type species of Calthropella, Calthropella simplex. Two species previously assigned to Dercitus or Stoeba (Dercitus loricatus and Stoeba natalensis) are excluded from the genus Dercitus as they do not fit with the emended and improved definition of the genus. One species assigned to Calthropella, Calthropella digitata, is excluded from that genus and assigned to the ancorinid genus Stelletta. Based on the similarity of the megascleres and their structure-less arrangement, we predict that the two reviewed genera will be found to be closely related and eventually will need to be accomodated in a single family, but independent molecular evidence is awaited before changes in the family classification, including a verdict on the validity of the family Calthropellidae, will be proposed. Our review included 38 valid species among which fourteen species and one subspecies appear to be new to science. Four of these were represented by insufficient material for a proper description, but the remaining ten are described as new species: Dercitus (Stoeba) senegalensis sp. n., Dercitus (Stoeba) verdensis sp. n., Dercitus (Stoeba) fijiensis sp. n., Dercitus (Stoeba) bahamensis sp. n., Dercitus (Halinastra) berau sp. n., Dercitus (Halinastra) japonensis sp. n., Dercitus (Halinastra) arubensis sp. n., Dercitus (Halinastra) sibogae sp. n., Calthropella (Calthropella) xavierae sp. n., and Calthropella (Pachataxa) pyrifera sp. n. The new subspecies, Dercitus (Dercitus) bucklandi lusitanicus ssp. n. is described for southern East Atlantic populations of the nominal species. Several specimens assigned to existing species were found to be deviating to the extent that they are likely members of further undescribed species. These are briefly discussed to facilitate further studies of the diversity of the two genera. Species of both genera and the six subgenera, including deviating or insufficiently characterized specimens belonging to species not yet

  1. The formation of ultrafine iodine particles from coastal macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFiggans, G.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Saunders, R.

    2003-04-01

    We will present the first direct evidence for iodine-containing ultrafine particle (ufp) production from macroalgae in the intertidal zone. Ultrafine particles in the coastal environment have been the subject of intense interest(1,2,3) due to their potentially important contributions to both the direct radiation scattering budget and, by activation to form cloud droplets, to the indirect radiative effect. Based on a variety of laboratory studies, it has recently been proposed that photochemical production of condensable iodine oxides is responsible for their formation(4-9). This work shows that previous studies investigating the mechanisms and kinetics of particle formation due to iodine photochemistry are largely untargeted in that they assume gaseous iodocarbons are the precursor material. Models aiming to simulate coastal new particle formation suffer from the same lack of basic understanding of the formation mechanisms (and indeed precursor identities)(7-9). Following measurements of iodine monoxide(10,11) and iodocarbons(12) in the coastal atmosphere, modelling studies have demonstrated the importance of inorganic iodine in gaseous photochemical cycles(13). Volatile iodocarbons have a number of sources, but intertidal macroalgal beds(14) appear to dominate in the coastal zone(15). However, no direct evidence for a relationship between the macroalgae and iodine-containing particle formation have been reported. During the NERC-funded NAMBLEX field project at Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland in August 2002, we conducted a series of experiments on macroalgae in the intertidal zone. A reactor containing Laminaria digitata cropped from an intertidal rock pool was exposed to an ozonised stream of initially particle-free air. Using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to sample the reactor output, it was found that extremely large numbers of particles were formed. By increasing the exposure time to the airstream, the particles were allowed to grow above the