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Sample records for bardet-biedl syndrome case

  1. Pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luis Jesuino de Oliveira; Andrade, Rafael; França, Caroline Santos; Bittencourt, Alcina Vinhaes

    2009-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. This syndrome was first described by Laurence and Moon in 1866 and additional cases were described by Bardet and Biedl between 1920 and 1922. The main features are obesity, polydactyly, pigmentary retinopathy, learning disabilities, various degrees of intellectual impairment, hypogonadism, and renal abnormalities. Bardet-Biedl syndrome is both phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of 4 of the 5 cardinal features. The authors present a typical case of pigmentary retinopathy due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome and made a brief commentary about the disease's cardinal manifestations.

  2. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suspitsin, Evgeny N.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder. It is characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations including primary features of the disease (rod-cone dystrophy, polydactyly, obesity, genital abnormalities, renal defects, and learning difficulties) and secondary BBS characteristics (developmental delay, speech deficit, brachydactyly or syndactyly, dental defects, ataxia or poor coordination, olfactory deficit, diabetes mellitus, congenital heart disease, etc.); most of these symptoms may not be present at birth but appear and progressively worsen during the first and second decades of life. At least 20 BBS genes have already been identified, and all of them are involved in primary cilia functioning. Genetic diagnosis of BBS is complicated due to lack of gene-specific disease symptoms; however, it is gradually becoming more accessible with the invention of multigene sequencing technologies. Clinical management of BBS is largely limited to a symptomatic treatment. Mouse experiments demonstrate that the most debilitating complication of BBS, blindness, can be rescued by topical gene therapy. There is a published case report describing the delay of BBS symptoms by nutritional compensation of the disease-related biochemical deficiencies. Progress in DNA testing technologies is likely to rapidly resolve all limitations in BBS diagnosis; however, much slower improvement is expected with regard to BBS treatment. PMID:27385962

  3. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision. Individuals with Bardet-Biedl also experience central vision loss during childhood or adolescence. RP symptoms progress rapidly and usually lead to severe visual impairment by early adulthood. In addition to RP, polydactyly ( ...

  4. Laurence Moon Bardet Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, A B; Niloy, Ahmed Al Muntasir; Shah, Tazin Afrose; Biswas, Sunil Kumar; Imran, A Khan; Murshed, Khaled Mahbub; Ahmed, Mashrafi

    2009-01-01

    A 14 year old Bangladeshi boy presented with obesity, reduced vision, mental retardation, hypogonadism, delayed development and learning difficulty. On examination, he had polydactyly, moon face, bilateral gynaecomastia, small penis and undescended testes. Retinitis pigmentosa was found on fundoscopy. With typical features, he was diagnosed as a case of Laurence-Moon-Bardet-Biedl syndrome. It is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with mutation in 6 loci identified so far. It is commonly found in communities with high inter-family marriage. Clinical features appear early in childhood and diagnosis is usually done by puberty. Prominent features include rod-cone dystrophy leading to blindness, postaxial polydactyly, central obesity, learning disability, hypogonadism in males and renal dysfunction. Relatives with a single affected gene may have obesity, hypertension, diabetes and renal disease. There is increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. There is no definite treatment. Early diagnosis and symptomatic, supportive and rehabilitative measures can reduce the disability. These include dietary modification, oral hypoglycaemic drugs, testosterone supplement etc. Relatives of the patient should be screened for renal abnormality.

  5. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Rajendrakumar; Nairy, Dhananjaya Matapadi

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the rare autosomal recessive disorders that affect multiple organs of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. We present a case of BBS with features of hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient had end stage renal disease and managed with dialysis. This case also exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases. PMID:27853335

  6. Renal abnormalities in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tieder, M; Levy, M; Gubler, M C; Gagnadoux, M F; Broyer, M

    1982-09-01

    Four cases of BARDET-Biedl syndrome (BBS) are described which all suffer from renal abnormalities. Polyuria or polydipsia with impairment of renal concentration capacity were the earliest signs of renal dysfunction. Renal insufficiency developed in 3 cases and hypertension in two. Urographic abnormalities were demonstrated in all patients. The most remarkable features were cystic spaces communicating with the calices and lobulation of kidney. Caliceal clubbing and caliectasis surrounded by narrowed, unscarred parenchyma were frequent findings. Previous investigators reported various renal histological pictures in BBS. We found tubulo- interstitial lesions in all cases. Features of dysplasia and cystic formations were less frequent. Mesangial proliferation was not noted. Ultra-structural changes in the glomerular basement membrane were not observed in this study. Thirty-one of 32 recently reported cases of BBS included renal lesions which are the major cause of death. It is therefore suggested that renal abnormalities are accepted as the cardinal feature of this syndrome.

  7. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: A rare genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Sheila; Álvarez-Satta, María; Valverde, Diana

    2013-06-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare multisystem genetic disease, with high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Rod-cone dystrophy, obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, cognitive impairment and renal abnormalities have been established as primary features. There are 17 BBS genes (BBS1-BBS17) described to date, which explain 70-80% of the patients clinically diagnosed, therefore more BBS genes remain to be identified. BBS belongs to a group of diseases known as ciliopathies. In general, ciliopathies and BBS in particular share a partial overlapping phenotype that makes them complicated to diagnose. We present an up-to-date review including clinical, epidemiologic and genetic aspects of the syndrome.

  8. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies.

  9. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Genetics, molecular pathophysiology, and disease management.

    PubMed

    Priya, Sathya; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Sen, Parveen; Sripriya, S

    2016-09-01

    Primary cilia play a key role in sensory perception and various signaling pathways. Any defect in them leads to group of disorders called ciliopathies, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, OMIM 209900) is one among them. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with various primary and secondary clinical manifestations, and shows autosomal recessive inheritance and highly prevalent in inbred/consanguineous populations. The disease mapped to at least twenty different genes (BBS1-BBS20), follow oligogenic inheritance pattern. BBS proteins localizes to the centerosome and regulates the biogenesis and functions of the cilia. In BBS, the functioning of various systemic organs (with ciliated cells) gets deranged and results in systemic manifestations. Certain components of the disease (such as obesity, diabetes, and renal problems) when noticed earlier offer a disease management benefit to the patients. However, the awareness of the disease is comparatively low and most often noticed only after severe vision loss in patients, which is usually in the first decade of the patient's age. In the current review, we have provided the recent updates retrieved from various types of scientific literature through journals, on the genetics, its molecular relevance, and the clinical outcome in BBS. The review in nutshell would provide the basic awareness of the disease that will have an impact in disease management and counseling benefits to the patients and their families.

  10. Risk Factors for Severe Renal Disease in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sparks, Kathryn; Best, Sunayna; Borrows, Sarah; Hoskins, Bethan; Sabir, Ataf; Barrett, Timothy; Williams, Denise; Mohammed, Shehla; Goldsmith, David; Milford, David V; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Foggensteiner, Lukas; Beales, Philip L

    2017-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive, multisystem disease characterized by retinal dystrophy, renal malformation, obesity, intellectual disability, polydactyly, and hypogonadism. Nineteen disease-causing genes (BBS1-19) have been identified, of which mutations in BBS1 are most common in North America and Europe. A hallmark of the disease, renal malformation is heterogeneous and is a cause of morbidity and mortality through the development of CKD. We studied the prevalence and severity of CKD in 350 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome-related renal disease attending the United Kingdom national Bardet-Biedl syndrome clinics to further elucidate the phenotype and identify risk indicators of CKD. Overall, 31% of children and 42% of adults had CKD; 6% of children and 8% of adults had stage 4-5 CKD. In children, renal disease was often detected within the first year of life. Analysis of the most commonly mutated disease-associated genes revealed that, compared with two truncating mutations, two missense mutations associated with less severe CKD in adults. Moreover, compared with mutations in BBS10, mutations in BBS1 associated with less severe CKD or lack of CKD in adults. Finally, 51% of patients with available ultrasounds had structural renal abnormalities, and 35% of adults were hypertensive. The presence of structural abnormalities or antihypertensive medication also correlated statistically with stage 3b-5 CKD. This study describes the largest reported cohort of patients with renal disease in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and identifies risk factors to be considered in genetic counseling.

  11. Genetic linkage analysis in 26 families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.F.; Bruford, E.A.; Mansfield, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism, retinitis pigmentosa, renal anomalies and mental retardation. Clinical heterogeneity is quite marked both within and between families. Linkage has been reported between Bardet-Biedl syndrome and the D16408 marker in chromosomal region 16q21 in an extended Bedouin kindred and, more recently, in a subset of 17 out of 31 families using the PYGM/D11S913 markers in chromosomal region 11q13. We have analyzed linkage to the 16q21 and 11q13 regions and used markers covering chromosomes 2, 3, 17 and 18 in a set of 26 Bardet-Biedl families, each containing at least two affected individuals, with a total of 57 affected members. Evidence of linkage to the D11S527 locus has been identified assuming linkage homogeneity with a lod score of 2.72 at a recombination fraction of 0.11 (95% limits 0.03-0.25).

  12. [Elizabethkingia meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Burcu; Fıncanci, Muzaffer; Bınay, Umut Devrim; Çımen, Cansu; Özkantar Ünlügüneş, Gülay Ulkü

    2014-07-01

    Elizabethkingia meningosepticum, a gram-negative opportunistic pathogen may cause life-threatening nosocomial infections especially in newborns and immunosuppressive patients. This bacterium has a peculiar antibiotic resistance profile. It is resistant to most of the antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria and susceptible to antibiotics that are used to treat gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (SXT). For this reason appropriate treatment of E.meningosepticum infections are based on the proper identification of bacteria. In this report, a case of catheter-related E.meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with chronic renal failure due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by multiorgan dysfunction, was presented. A 25-year-old male patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome was admitted to the emergency room with the complaints of high fever with shivers that started the day before. The patient had a femoral dialysis catheter. Venous blood samples drawn at the time of administration were cultured immediately. Two days later, blood cultures which yielded positive signals were passaged onto blood and MacConkey agar plates and after incubation at 37°C for 16 hours, wet-raised colonies with clear margin, gray colour and large size similar to gram-negative bacterial colonies were detected on blood agar medium. No growth was observed on MacConkey agar plate at the end of five days. The isolate was found positive for KOH, oxidase, catalase, urease, esculine and MOI (Motility Indole Ornithine) tests, whereas it was citrate negative. Gram staining revealed faintly stained thin gram-negative bacilli. The isolate was identified as E.meningosepticum by Vitek® 2 system (bioMérieux, USA), and confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S RNA gene region amplified with PCR method. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the strain was detected by the Vitek 2 system, while vancomycin susceptibility was investigated by Kirby

  13. New criteria for improved diagnosis of Bardet-Biedl syndrome: results of a population survey

    PubMed Central

    Beales, P; Elcioglu, N; Woolf, A; Parker, D; Flinter, F

    1999-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by rod-cone dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, central obesity, mental retardation, hypogonadism, and renal dysfunction. BBS expression varies both within and between families and diagnosis is often difficult. We sought to define the condition more clearly by studying 109 BBS patients and their families, the largest population surveyed to date. The average age at diagnosis was 9 years, which is late for such a debilitating condition, but the slow development of the clinical features of BBS probably accounts for this. Postaxial polydactyly had been present in 69% of patients at birth, but obesity had only begun to develop at around 2-3 years, and retinal degeneration had not become apparent until a mean age of 8.5 years. Our study identified some novel clinical features, including neurological, speech, and language deficits, behavioural traits, facial dysmorphism, and dental anomalies. In the light of these features we propose a revision of the diagnostic criteria, which may facilitate earlier diagnosis of this disorder. We present evidence for an overlapping phenotype with the Laurence-Moon syndrome and propose a unifying, descriptive label be adopted (polydactyly-obesity-kidney-eye syndrome).
  We report an increased prevalence of renal malformations and renal cell carcinoma in the unaffected relatives of BBS patients and suggest that these may be a consequence of heterozygosity for BBS genes. Our findings have important implications for the care of BBS patients and their unaffected relatives.


Keywords: Bardet-Biedl syndrome; diagnosis; renal malformation; heterozygotes PMID:10874630

  14. Phenotypic differences among patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome linked to three different chromosome loci

    SciTech Connect

    Carmi, R.; Elbedour, K.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C.

    1995-11-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of mental retardation, obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, and hypogenitalism. Renal and cardiac abnormalities are also frequent in this disorder. Previous clinical suggestions of heterogeneity of BBS were confirmed recently by the identification of four different chromosome loci linked to the disease. In this study we compared clinical manifestations of the syndrome in patients form 3 unrelated, extended Arab-Bedouin kindreds which were used for the linkage mapping of the BBS loci to chromosomes 3, 15, and 16. The observed differences included the limb distribution of the postaxial polydactyly and the extent and age-association of obesity. It appears that the chromosome 3 locus is associated with polydactyly of all four limbs, while polydactyly of the chromosome 15 type is mostly confined to the hands. On the other hand, the chromosome 15 type is associated with early-onset morbid obesity, while the chromosome 16 type appears to present the {open_quotes}leanest{close_quotes} form of BBS. Future cloning of the various BB genes will contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of limb development and the identification of human obesity-related genes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Genetic and clinical characterization of Pakistani families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome extends the genetic and phenotypic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Maleeha; Lamers, Ideke J. C.; Schmidts, Miriam; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jaffar, Sulman; Ullah, Ehsan; Mustafa, Bilal; Ahmad, Shakeel; Nazmutdinova, Katia; Hoskins, Bethan; van Wijk, Erwin; Koster-Kamphuis, Linda; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Beales, Phil L.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Roepman, Ronald; Azam, Maleeha; Arts, Heleen H.; Qamar, Raheel

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous. To date 19 genes have been associated with BBS, which encode proteins active at the primary cilium, an antenna-like organelle that acts as the cell’s signaling hub. In the current study, a combination of mutation screening, targeted sequencing of ciliopathy genes associated with BBS, and whole-exome sequencing was used for the genetic characterization of five families including four with classic BBS symptoms and one BBS-like syndrome. This resulted in the identification of novel mutations in BBS genes ARL6 and BBS5, and recurrent mutations in BBS9 and CEP164. In the case of CEP164, this is the first report of two siblings with a BBS-like syndrome with mutations in this gene. Mutations in this gene were previously associated with nephronophthisis 15, thus the current results expand the CEP164-associated phenotypic spectrum. The clinical and genetic spectrum of BBS and BBS-like phenotypes is not fully defined in Pakistan. Therefore, genetic studies are needed to gain insights into genotype-phenotype correlations, which will in turn improve the clinician’s ability to make an early and accurate diagnosis, and facilitate genetic counseling, leading to directly benefiting families with affected individuals. PMID:27708425

  16. Ciliopathy is differentially distributed in the brain of a Bardet-Biedl syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Khristofor; Patel, Milan; Agassandian, Marianna; Steren, Karina E; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sheffield, Val C; Card, J Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited human disorder displaying a pleotropic phenotype. Many of the symptoms characterized in the human disease have been reproduced in animal models carrying deletions or knock-in mutations of genes causal for the disorder. Thinning of the cerebral cortex, enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles, and structural changes in cilia are among the pathologies documented in these animal models. Ciliopathy is of particular interest in light of recent studies that have implicated primary neuronal cilia (PNC) in neuronal signal transduction. In the present investigation, we tested the hypothesis that areas of the brain responsible for learning and memory formation would differentially exhibit PNC abnormalities in animals carrying a deletion of the Bbs4 gene (Bbs4-/-). Immunohistochemical localization of adenylyl cyclase-III (ACIII), a marker restricted to PNC, revealed dramatic alterations in PNC morphology and a statistically significant reduction in number of immunopositive cilia in the hippocampus and amygdala of Bbs4-/- mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. Western blot analysis confirmed the decrease of ACIII levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of Bbs4-/- mice, and electron microscopy demonstrated pathological alterations of PNC in the hippocampus and amygdala. Importantly, no neuronal loss was found within the subregions of amygdala and hippocampus sampled in Bbs4-/- mice and there were no statistically significant alterations of ACIII immunopositive cilia in other areas of the brain not known to contribute to the BBS phenotype. Considered with data documenting a role of cilia in signal transduction these findings support the conclusion that alterations in cilia structure or neurochemical phenotypes may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in the Bbs4-/- mouse mode.

  17. IFT27, encoding a small GTPase component of IFT particles, is mutated in a consanguineous family with Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Li, Yuanyuan; Alhashem, Amal; Anazi, Shams; Alkuraya, Hisham; Hashem, Mais; Awaji, Ali A; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkharashi, Abdullah; Alzahrani, Saeed; Al Hazzaa, Selwa A; Xiong, Yong; Kong, Shanshan; Sun, Zhaoxia; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-06-15

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy with multisystem involvement. So far, 18 BBS genes have been identified and the majority of them are essential for the function of BBSome, a protein complex involved in transporting membrane proteins into and from cilia. Yet defects in the identified genes cannot account for all the BBS cases. The genetic heterogeneity of this disease poses significant challenge to the identification of additional BBS genes. In this study, we coupled human genetics with functional validation in zebrafish and identified IFT27 as a novel BBS gene (BBS19). This is the first time an intraflagellar transport (IFT) gene is implicated in the pathogenesis of BBS, highlighting the genetic complexity of this disease.

  18. Mesoaxial polydactyly is a major feature in Bardet-Biedl syndrome patients with LZTFL1 (BBS17) mutations.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, E; Lauer, J; Durand, M; Pelletier, V; Obringer, C; Claussmann, A; Braun, J-J; Redin, C; Mathis, C; Muller, J; Schmidt-Mutter, C; Flori, E; Marion, V; Stoetzel, C; Dollfus, H

    2014-05-01

    Ciliopathies are heterogeneous disorders sharing different clinical signs due to a defect at the level of the primary cilia/centrosome complex. Postaxial polydactyly is frequently reported in ciliopathies, especially in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). Clinical features and genetic results observed in a pair of dizygotic twins with BBS are reported. The following manifestations were present: retinitis pigmentosa, bilateral insertional polydactyly, cognitive impairment and renal dysfunction. X-rays of the hands confirmed the presence of a 4th mesoaxial extra-digit with Y-shaped metacarpal bones. The sequencing of LZTFL1 identified a missense mutation (NM_020347.2: p.Leu87Pro; c.260T>C) and a nonsense mutation (p.Glu260*; c.778G>T), establishing a compound heterozygous status for the twins. A major decrease of LZTFL1 transcript and protein was observed in the patient's fibroblasts. This is the second report of LZTFL1 mutations in BBS patients confirming LZTFL1 as a BBS gene. Interestingly, the only two families reported in literature thus far with LZTFL1 mutations have in common mesoaxial polydactyly, a very uncommon feature for BBS. This special subtype of polydactyly in BBS patients is easily identified on clinical examination and prompts for priority sequencing of LZTFL1 (BBS17).

  19. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in an adolescent patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome, a monogenic obesity disorder.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Markos; Till, Holger; Kiess, Wieland; Weiner, Rudolf A

    2010-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by a wide range of phenotypic variability and associated with the development of life-threatening obesity. Birth weight tends to be normal, but rapid weight gain begins after the first year, probably due to polyphagia rather than abnormalities in energy metabolism. A morbidly obese 16-year-old male patient with BBS was referred to our institution, after nonsurgical methods of weight control had failed, for surgical treatment of his obesity. His preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 52.28 kg/m(2) (height, 1.84 m; weight, 177 kg) and was above the 99th centile for age and gender. The patient underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). The postoperative period was uneventful. Three and a half years after the operation, the patient's weight has decreased to 118 kg (BMI, 34.85 kg/m(2)), while significant improvement in his hypertension, hyperuricemia, and mobility has been noted. In our BBS patient, RYGBP proved to be safe and effective; nevertheless, longer follow-up is required to evaluate the weight loss durability and to assess the lasting beneficial effect of surgical intervention on genetically determined co-morbidities.

  20. C8orf37 is mutated in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and constitutes a locus allelic to non-syndromic retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif O; Decker, Eva; Bachmann, Nadine; Bolz, Hanno J; Bergmann, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a pleiotropic and clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Primary features are early-onset retinal dystrophy that is typically rod-cone, obesity, polydactyly, renal abnormalities, hypogonadism, and learning difficulties, but most patients do not present with the full clinical picture. In a BBS patient from a consanguineous marriage we performed next-generation sequencing targeting all known BBS genes and other genes known or hypothesized to cause ciliopathies. While no mutation was present in any of the recognized genes for BBS, we were able to identify the homozygous non-conservative mutation c.529C>T (p.Arg177Trp) in C8orf37 that segregated with the phenotype, affects an evolutionarily highly conserved residue, and is bioinformatically predicted to be pathogenic. The same mutation has been described in unrelated patients with non-syndromic cone-rod dystrophy and other C8orf37 changes were found in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa. We conclude that C8orf37 should be added to BBS screening panels as a probable rare cause of the disease and that individuals with C8orf37-related retinal dystrophy should be screened for BBS features.

  1. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Mapping of a new locus to chromosome 3 and fine-mapping of the chromosome 16 linked locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T.; Nishimura, D.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, post-axial polydactyly, obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism. Other features of this disease include renal and cardiovascular abnormalities and an increased incidence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The molecular etiology for BBS is not known. We previously linked BBS to chromosome 16q13 in a large inbred Bedouin family, and excluded this locus in a second large inbred Bedouin family. We now report linkage of this second family to markers on chromosome 3q, proving non-allelic, genetic heterogeneity in the Bedouin population. A third large inbred Bedouin family was excluded from the 3q and 16q BBS loci. In addition to the identification of a new BBS locus on chromosome 3, we have identified and utilized additional short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) in the 16q BBS region to narrow the candidate interval to 3 cM. Additional recombinant individuals will allow further refinement of the interval. Identification of genes causing BBS has the potential to provide insight into diverse genetic traits and disease processes including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, retinal degeneration, and abnormal limb, renal and cardiac development.

  2. Renal phenotype in Bardet-Biedl syndrome: a combined defect of urinary concentration and dilution is associated with defective urinary AQP2 and UMOD excretion.

    PubMed

    Zacchia, Miriam; Zacchia, Enza; Zona, Enrica; Capolongo, Giovanna; Raiola, Ilaria; Rinaldi, Luca; Trepiccione, Francesco; Ingrosso, Diego; Perna, Alessandra; Di Iorio, Valentina; Simonelli, Francesca; Moe, Orson W; Capasso, Giovambattista

    2016-10-01

    The renal phenotype in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is highly variable. The present study describes renal findings in 41 BBS patients and analyzes the pathogenesis of hyposthenuria, the most common renal dysfunction. Five of 41 patients (12%) showed an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2) Urine protein and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio were over 200 and 30 mg/g in 9/24 and 7/23 patients, respectively. Four of 41 patients showed no renal anomalies on ultrasound. Twenty of 34 patients had hyposthenuria in the absence of renal insufficiency. In all 8 of the hyposthenuric patients studied, dDAVP failed to elevate urine osmolality (Uosm), suggesting a nephrogenic origin. Interestingly, water loading (WL) did not result in a significant reduction of Uosm, indicating combined concentrating and diluting defects. dDAVP infusion induced a significant increase of plasma Factor VIII and von Willebrand Factor levels, supporting normal function of the type 2 vasopressin receptor at least in endothelial cells. While urinary aquaporin 2 (u-AQP2) abundance was not different between patients and controls at baseline, the dDAVP-induced increased u-AQP2 and the WL-induced reduction of u-AQP2 were blunted in patients with a combined concentrating and diluting defect, suggesting a potential role of AQP2 in the defective regulation of water absorption. Urine Uromodulin excretion was reduced in all hyposthenuric patients, suggesting a thick ascending limb defect. Interestingly, renal Na, Cl, Ca, but not K handling was impaired after acute WL but not at basal. In summary, BBS patients show combined urinary concentration and dilution defects; a thick ascending limb and collecting duct tubulopathy may underlie impaired water handling.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... signaling pathways. Cilia are also necessary for the perception of sensory input (such as sight, hearing, and ... during development and lead to abnormalities of sensory perception. Researchers believe that defective cilia are responsible for ...

  4. Interaction with the Bardet-Biedl Gene Product TRIM32/BBS11 Modifies the Half-life and Localization of Glis2/NPHP7*

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Haribaskar; Schäfer, Tobias; Kim, Yunhee; Herfurth, Konstantin; Hoff, Sylvia; Lienkamp, Soeren S.; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Walz, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Although the two ciliopathies Bardet-Biedl syndrome and nephronophthisis share multiple clinical manifestations, the molecular basis for this overlap remains largely unknown. Both BBS11 and NPHP7 are unusual members of their respective gene families. Although BBS11/TRIM32 represents a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase also involved in hereditary forms of muscular dystrophy, NPHP7/Glis2 is a Gli-like transcriptional repressor that localizes to the nucleus, deviating from the ciliary localization of most other ciliopathy-associated gene products. We found that BBS11/TRIM32 and NPHP7/Glis2 can physically interact with each other, suggesting that both proteins form a functionally relevant protein complex in vivo. This hypothesis was further supported by the genetic interaction and synergist cyst formation in the zebrafish pronephros model. However, contrary to our expectation, the E3 ubiquitin ligase BBS11/TRIM32 was not responsible for the short half-life of NPHP7/Glis2 but instead promoted the accumulation of mixed Lys48/Lys63-polyubiquitylated NPHP7/Glis2 species. This modification not only prolonged the half-life of NPHP7/Glis2, but also altered the subnuclear localization and the transcriptional activity of NPHP7/Glis2. Thus, physical and functional interactions between NPHP and Bardet-Biedl syndrome gene products, demonstrated for Glis2 and TRIM32, may help to explain the phenotypic similarities between these two syndromes. PMID:24500717

  5. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Sheetal; Panigrahi, Inusha; Marwaha, Ram Kumar

    2011-01-01

    There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  6. Screening for hormonal, monogenic, and syndromic disorders in obese infants and children.

    PubMed

    Mason, Kelly; Page, Laura; Balikcioglu, Pinar Gumus

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obesity in the United States is nearly 17%. Most cases are "exogenous", resulting from excess energy intake relative to energy expenditure over a prolonged period of time. However, some cases of obesity are "endogenous", associated with hormonal, genetic, or syndromic disorders such as hypothyroidism, Cushing's syndrome, growth hormone deficiency, defective leptin signaling, mutations in the melanocortin 4 receptor, and Prader-Willi and Bardet-Biedl syndromes. This article reviews the hormonal, monogenic, and syndromic causes of childhood obesity and identifies critical features that distinguish "endogenous" obesity disorders from the more common exogenous obesity. Findings that raise suspicion for endogenous obesity include onset in infancy, lack of satiety, poor linear growth, dysmorphic features, and cognitive dysfunction. Selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory tests and indications for subspecialist referral are also discussed.

  7. Screening for Hormonal, Monogenic, and Syndromic Disorders in Obese Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kelly; Page, Laura; Balikcioglu, Pinar Gumus

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obesity in the United States is nearly 17%. Most cases are “exogenous”, resulting from excess energy intake relative to energy expenditure over a prolonged period of time. However, some cases of obesity are “endogenous”, associated with hormonal, genetic, or syndromic disorders such as hypothyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, growth hormone deficiency, defective leptin signaling, mutations in the melanocortin 4 receptor, and Prader-Willi and Bardet-Biedl syndromes. This article reviews the hormonal, monogenic, and syndromic causes of childhood obesity and identifies critical features that distinguish “endogenous” obesity disorders from the more common exogenous obesity. Findings that raise suspicion for endogenous obesity include onset in infancy, lack of satiety, poor linear growth, dysmorphic features, and cognitive dysfunction. Selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory tests and indications for subspecialist referral are also discussed. PMID:25198446

  8. Syndromic ciliopathies: From single gene to multi gene analysis by SNP arrays and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Knopp, C; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Eggermann, T; Bergmann, C; Begemann, M; Schoner, K; Zerres, K; Ortiz Brüchle, N

    2015-10-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) and related disorders (JSRD), Meckel syndrome (MKS) and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) are autosomal recessive ciliopathies with a broad clinical and genetic overlap. In our multiethnic cohort of 88 MKS, 61 JS/JSRD and 66 BBS families we performed genetic analyses and were able to determine mutation frequencies and detection rates for the most frequently mutated MKS genes. On the basis of determined mutation frequencies, a next generation gene panel for JS/JSRD and MKS was established. Furthermore 35 patients from 26 unrelated consanguineous families were investigated by SNP array-based homozygosity mapping and subsequent DNA sequencing of known candidate genes according to runs of homozygosity size in descending order. This led to the identification of the causative homozygous mutation in 62% of unrelated index cases. Based on our data we discuss various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection in the syndromic ciliopathies JS/JSRD, MKS and BBS.

  9. A novel test for recessive contributions to complex diseases implicates Bardet-Biedl syndrome gene BBS10 in idiopathic type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Elaine T; Liu, Yangfan P; Chan, Yingleong; Tiinamaija, Tuomi; Käräjämäki, AnnMari; Madsen, Erik; Altshuler, David M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Groop, Leif; Flannick, Jason; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Katsanis, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J

    2014-11-06

    Rare-variant association studies in common, complex diseases are customarily conducted under an additive risk model in both single-variant and burden testing. Here, we describe a method to improve detection of rare recessive variants in complex diseases termed RAFT (recessive-allele-frequency-based test). We found that RAFT outperforms existing approaches when the variant influences disease risk in a recessive manner on simulated data. We then applied our method to 1,791 Finnish individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 2,657 matched control subjects. In BBS10, we discovered a rare variant (c.1189A>G [p.Ile397Val]; rs202042386) that confers risk of T2D in a recessive state (p = 1.38 × 10(-6)) and would be missed by conventional methods. Testing of this variant in an established in vivo zebrafish model confirmed the variant to be pathogenic. Taken together, these data suggest that RAFT can effectively reveal rare recessive contributions to complex diseases overlooked by conventional association tests.

  10. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  11. High incidence of malformation syndromes in a series of 1,073 children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Merks, Johannes Hans M; Caron, Huib N; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2005-04-15

    Constitutional molecular defects are known to play a role in oncogenesis, as shown by the increased incidence of embryonic cancers in children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or of leukemia in children with Down syndrome. To establish the incidence and spectrum of malformation syndromes associated with childhood cancer we performed a clinical morphological examination on a series of 1,073 children with cancer. We diagnosed a syndrome in 42 patients (3.9%) and suspected the presence of a syndrome in another 35 patients (3.3%), for a total of 7.2%. This incidence of patients with a proven or suspected syndrome is high, and points to a possible association. We describe new syndrome-tumor associations in several entities: cleidocranial dysostosis (Wilms tumor), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) (acute lymphoblastic leukemia), Kabuki syndrome (neuroblastoma), LEOPARD syndrome (neuroblastoma), Poland anomaly (osteosarcoma; Hodgkin disease), and blepharophimosis epicanthus inversus syndrome (Burkitt lymphoma). Twenty of the 42 syndrome diagnoses were not recognized in the patients prior to this study, indicating that these diagnoses are commonly missed. We propose that all children with a malignancy should be examined by a clinical geneticist or a pediatrician skilled in clinical morphology to determine if the patients have a malformation syndrome.

  12. BBS genotype-phenotype assessment of a multiethnic patient cohort calls for a revision of the disease definition.

    PubMed

    Deveault, Catherine; Billingsley, Gail; Duncan, Jacque L; Bin, Jenea; Theal, Rebecca; Vincent, Ajoy; Fieggen, Karen J; Gerth, Christina; Noordeh, Nima; Traboulsi, Elias I; Fishman, Gerald A; Chitayat, David; Knueppel, Tanja; Millán, José M; Munier, Francis L; Kennedy, Debra; Jacobson, Samuel G; Innes, A Micheil; Mitchell, Grant A; Boycott, Kym; Héon, Elise

    2011-06-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a ciliopathy characterized by retinal degeneration, obesity, polydactyly, renal abnormalities, and cognitive impairment for which 15 causative genes have been identified. Here we present the results of a mutational analysis of our multiethnic cohort of 83 families (105 cases); 75.9% of them have their mutations identified including 26 novel changes. Comprehensive phenotyping of these patients demonstrate that the spectrum of clinical features is greater than expected and overlapped with the features of other ciliopathies; specifically Alström and McKusick-Kauffman syndromes.

  13. Clinical and genetic aspects of primary ciliary dyskinesia/Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Margaret W; Pittman, Jessica E; Carson, Johnny L; Ferkol, Thomas W; Dell, Sharon D; Davis, Stephanie D; Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2009-07-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia. Most of the disease-causing mutations identified to date involve the heavy (dynein axonemal heavy chain 5) or intermediate(dynein axonemal intermediate chain 1) chain dynein genes in ciliary outer dynein arms, although a few mutations have been noted in other genes. Clinical molecular genetic testing for primary ciliary dyskinesia is available for the most common mutations. The respiratory manifestations of primary ciliary dyskinesia (chronic bronchitis leading to bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, and chronic otitis media)reflect impaired mucociliary clearance owing to defective axonemal structure. Ciliary ultrastructural analysis in most patients (>80%) reveals defective dynein arms, although defects in other axonemal components have also been observed. Approximately 50% of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia have laterality defects (including situs inversus totalis and, less commonly, heterotaxy, and congenital heart disease),reflecting dysfunction of embryological nodal cilia. Male infertility is common and reflects defects in sperm tail axonemes. Most patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia have a history of neonatal respiratory distress, suggesting that motile cilia play a role in fluid clearance during the transition from a fetal to neonatal lung. Ciliopathies involving sensory cilia, including autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and Alstrom syndrome, may have chronic respiratory symptoms and even bronchiectasis suggesting clinical overlap with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

  14. Clinical and Molecular Investigations Into Ciliopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli's Disease; Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Cerebro-Oculo-Renal Syndromes; COACH Syndrome; Senior-Loken Syndrome; Dekaban-Arima Syndrome; Cogan Oculomotor Apraxia; Nephronophthisis; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Alstrom Syndrome; Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome

  15. A female with complete lack of Müllerian fusion, postaxial polydactyly, and tetralogy of fallot: genetic heterogeneity of McKusick-Kaufman syndrome or a unique syndrome?

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Dutra, Amalia; Kpodzo, Dzifa; Pak, Evgenia; Nakane, Takaya; Turner, Joyce; Whiteford, Margo; Biesecker, Leslie G; Stratton, Pamela

    2004-08-15

    We report a 19-year-old, non-Amish Caucasian female patient with primary amenorrhea caused by complete lack of Müllerian fusion with vaginal agenesis or Müllerian aplasia (MA), postaxial polydactyly (PAP), and tetralogy of Fallot. The genital tract anomaly of MA with and without renal or skeletal anomalies comprises Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome, which has not been reported with tetralogy of Fallot. The phenotypic triad of anomalies most closely resembled McKusick-Kaufman syndrome (MKS; OMIM 236700), a rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprised of hydrometrocolpos (HMC), PAP, and congenital heart malformation that is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. While upper reproductive tract anomalies have not been reported with MKS, they have been reported with Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a syndrome that significantly overlaps with MKS. Both MKS and BBS can be caused by mutations in the MKKS or BBS6 gene on chromosome 20p12 and BBS is also associated with mutations in other genes (BBS1, BBS2, BBS4, and BBS7). To address this heterogenity, we sequenced the causative genes in MKS and BBS but no mutations in these five genes were identified. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) excluded large deletions of chromosome 20p12 and microsatellite marker studies confirmed biparental inheritance for all of the known BBS loci. The dual midline fusion defects of tetralogy of Fallot and MA suggests that either this patient has a unique syndrome with a distinct genetic etiology or that she has a genetically heterogeneous or variant form of MKS.

  16. [Chilaidity syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Candela, Stefano; Candela, Giancarlo; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Argano, Francesco; Romano, Ornella; Iannella, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Chilaidity syndrome is a mal position by bowel mal rotation o malfissation. It is more common in right side expecially in obese people. If asyimptomatic, the syndrome is an occasional comparison by radiology, surgical exploration by laparoscopy or autopsy, otherwise, if symptomatic, there are obstructive symptoms,abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, flatulence, breath, constipation and anorexia. Diagnosis is radiological. We present a rare case of this syndrome in a man with serious obstructive symptoms.

  17. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  18. Klinefelter syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    CAPASSO, F.; PANETTA, F.; IERARDO, G.; PARISELLA, V.; POLIMENI, A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. The aim of this work is to describe the problems of child dentistry affected by Klinefelter's syndrome. Methodos. Through the presentation of a clinical case that was followed by a Pediatric Dentistry, University Sapienza of Rome. Result. Interceptive therapy aims to eliminate the functional interference that occurs during growth. Conclusion. For this reason it’s a must for the dentist to carefully monitor the oral health of the small patient immediately. PMID:23285366

  19. HALLGREN'S SYNDROME: TWO CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, S.; Gurunadh, V.S.; Singh, G.P.; Sundari, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of Hallgren's syndrome presenting with retinitis pigmentosa, sensory-neural hearing loss along with schizophrenia in one patient and major depression in the other, are reported along with a brief description of this rare syndrome. PMID:21743702

  20. Cilium transition zone proteome reveals compartmentalization and differential dynamics of ciliopathy complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Leite, Flavia; Varga, Vladimir; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The transition zone (TZ) of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is a structural intermediate between the basal body and the axoneme that regulates ciliary traffic. Mutations in genes encoding TZ proteins (TZPs) cause human inherited diseases (ciliopathies). Here, we use the trypanosome to identify TZ components and localize them to TZ subdomains, showing that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) is more distal in the TZ than the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex. Several of the TZPs identified here have human orthologs. Functional analysis shows essential roles for TZPs in motility, in building the axoneme central pair apparatus and in flagellum biogenesis. Analysis using RNAi and HaloTag fusion protein approaches reveals that most TZPs (including the MKS ciliopathy complex) show long-term stable association with the TZ, whereas the BBSome is dynamic. We propose that some Bardet-Biedl syndrome and MKS pleiotropy may be caused by mutations that impact TZP complex dynamics. PMID:27519801

  1. A case of Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Sung; Yoo, Jae Eon; Chung, Jaiho; Yoon, Soo Han

    2006-04-01

    Pfeiffer Syndrome is as rare as Apert syndrome in the Western population. This condition is very rare in the Asian population and has not been previously reported in Korea. The authors report with a review of literature the case of a newborn baby with Pfeiffer syndrome, manifested by bicoronal craniosynostosis, broad thumbs, and big toes. The infant also had bilateral syndactyly of the fingers and toes, mild proptosis, choanal hypoplasia and maxillary hypoplasia.

  2. Gradenigo syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, S; Uran, N; Kavas, I; Ozgur, T

    1993-01-01

    The case is presented of a 13-year-old boy with recurrent episodes of otitis media who developed Gradenigo syndrome. Mastoid and petrous bone involvement were demonstrated by CT. Symptoms resolved with antibiotic treatment.

  3. Rare case of nephrotic syndrome: Schimke syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Anna Kelly Krislane de Vasconcelos; Torres, Luiz Fernando Oliveira; Silva, Ana Corina Brainer Amorim da; Dantas, Adrianna Barros Leal; Zuntini, Káthia Liliane da Cunha Ribeiro; Aguiar, Lia Cordeiro Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Schimke syndrome corresponds to dysplasia of bone and immunity, associated with progressive renal disease secondary to nephrotic syndrome cortico-resistant, with possible other abnormalities such as hypothyroidism and blond marrow aplasia. It is a rare genetic disorder, with few reports in the literature. The most frequent renal involvement is nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. The objective of this study was to report a case of Schimke syndrome, diagnostic investigation and management of the case. Resumo A síndrome Schimke corresponde à displasia imuno-óssea, associada à doença renal progressiva secundária à síndrome nefrótica córtico-resistente, podendo haver outras anormalidades como hipotireoidismo e aplasia de medula óssea. Trata-se de uma patologia genética rara, com poucos relatos na literatura. O acometimento renal mais frequente é uma síndrome nefrótica por glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal e falência renal progressiva. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar um caso de síndrome de Schimke, investigação diagnóstica e condução do caso.

  4. "Moebius syndrome": a case report.

    PubMed

    Shashikiran, N D; Subba Reddy, V V; Patil, R

    2004-09-01

    Moebius syndrome is an extremely rare disorder characterized by a lifetime facial paralysis, involving sixth and seventh cranial nerves with malformations of orofacial structures and the limbs. In this case, an 8 year old girl with Moebius syndrome is presented, clinical findings are described and management aspects are discussed. Early dental evaluation and parental counselling as a part of preventive dental regimen can go a long way in providing complete psychosocial rehabilitation for such physically disabled children.

  5. The eye as a window to rare endocrine disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Rupali; Chander, Ashish; Jacob, Jubbin J.

    2012-01-01

    The human eye, as an organ, can offer critical clues to the diagnosis of various systemic illnesses. Ocular changes are common in various endocrine disorders such as diabetes mellitus and Graves’ disease. However there exist a large number of lesser known endocrine disorders where ocular involvement is significant. Awareness of these associations is the first step in the diagnosis and management of these complex patients. The rare syndromes involving the pituitary hypothalamic axis with significant ocular involvement include Septo-optic dysplasia, Kallman's syndrome, and Empty Sella syndrome all affecting the optic nerve at the optic chiasa. The syndromes involving the thyroid and parathyroid glands that have ocular manifestations and are rare include Mc Cune Albright syndrome wherein optic nerve decompression may occur due to fibrous dysplasia, primary hyperparathyroidism that may present as red eye due to scleritis and Ascher syndrome wherein ptosis occurs. Allgrove's syndrome, Cushing's disease, and Addison's disease are the rare endocrine syndromes discussed involving the adrenals and eye. Ocular involvement is also seen in gonadal syndromes such as Bardet Biedl, Turner's, Rothmund's, and Klinefelter's syndrome. This review also highlights the ocular manifestation of miscellaneous syndromes such as Werner's, Cockayne's, Wolfram's, Kearns Sayre's, and Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. The knowledge of these relatively uncommon endocrine disorders and their ocular manifestations will help an endocrinologist reach a diagnosis and will alert an ophthalmologist to seek specialty consultation of an endocrinologist when encountered with such cases. PMID:22629495

  6. [Fraser syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Saraceno, Janaína; Lopes, Tâmara; Pinheiro, Regina Helena Rathsam; Lima, Humberto Castro; Chaves, Alessandra Pinheiro

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a systemic condition characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia, which may be associated with urinary tract, ear, nose, larynx and skeletal abnormalities. Cryptophthalmos can be an isolated finding (that has been reported as an autosomal dominant trait) or associated with other congenital anomalies (reported as an autosomal recessive disorder). RMSA, female, 3 m.o., evaluated in the general clinic of the Instituto Brasileiro de Oftalmologia e Prevenção à Cegueira. Child of consanguineous parents. The same finding was observed in an uncle and one of her brothers. Her physical examination showed total unilateral cryptophthalmos (right side), depressed nasal bridge, low set ears, atresia of the external auditory canal, enlarged clitoris, prominent labia majora and syndactyly of the fingers and toes. Ultrasonography of the abdomen showed renal agenesis (left side). Ocular ultrasonography showed a reduced anterior-posterior ocular diameter, anterior segment disorganization, absence of the lens and total retinal detachment in the right eye. The pathogenesis of cryptophthalmia has not as yet been determined, but consanguinity has been reported by many authors as a very important factor. Doctors should be attentive to the clinical findings and the correct diagnosis in order to offer these patients a thorough follow-up and realistic genetic counseling to their parents.

  7. The KBG syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Morghen, Ilaria; Ferri, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The KBG syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, first described by Hermann et al. in 1975. Fundamental findings are: mild development delay, short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Case presentation A 32 years old woman, Caucasian race, weight 57 Kg, affected by KBG syndrome was sent to our clinics for preoperative anaesthesia evaluation. She was schedules for left ossicular reconstruction under general anaesthesia for bilateral hearing loss. A psycho-motor retardation was associated to morphological anomalies such as short neck, hyperlordosis without neck extension imparirment, craniofacial anomalies and dento-skeletal abnormalities. An echocardiography showed the presence of interatrial defect with left-to-right shunt. The patient was sent to a cardiac surgery centre. Conclusion Perioperative evaluation of patients affected by KBG syndrome must take into consideration the management of difficult airways, due to the associated craniofacial dysmorphism. The possible presence of cardiac anomalies in the KBG syndrome is currently being evalueted. In this report the finding of cardiomegaly and congestion of the pulmonary circulation was attributed to presence of an interatrial defect with left-to-right shunt. The risk of cardiopulmonary failure led us to ask for a cardiac surgery consult. Perioperative management of these patients should be extremely accurate, even in the case of minor surgery, and should include also chest X-rays and echocardiography evaluation. PMID:18822138

  8. Witkop's syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Varuni; Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Mishra, Apurva; Chandra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Witkop's syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tooth and nail abnormalities. It is a variant of ectodermal dysplasia, which is thought to occur in approximately 1 in 100,000 live births. Thus, such a low occurrence and paucity of clearly delineating features make its identification in general population a real challenge. This case report aims to add to the existing literature a commonsense approach of identifying the uncommon thing. PMID:26937375

  9. Kousseff syndrome: A fifth case?

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, R.A.; Hamilton, W.; Pinette, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kousseff originally described three siblings with an open sacral myelomeningocele, conotruncal cardiac malformations, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, retrognathia, a short neck with a low posterior hairline, and renal agenesis as a new autosomal recessive condition. Open neural tube lesions and complex conotruncal cardiac defects are relatively common malformations, both as isolated defects and individually as components of syndromes, but they have been found together only rarely, as part of chromosomal syndromes or following maternal exposures. Toriello et al. reported a fourth case and suggested the eponym Kousseff syndrome for myelomeningcocele, conotruncal defects and minor facial abnormalies. We report a fifth probable case. This male infant was born by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 38 weeks gestation to a 23-year-old G{sub 2}P{sub 1001} mother. Pregnancy was complicated by an elevated alpha-fetoprotein at 16 weeks gestation, followed by an ultrasound diagnosis of an open disease. After birth, physical examination also revealed dysmorphic facies, with a bulbous nose and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly and hypotonia. Echocardiogram demonstrated complex conotruncal malformations. The patient underwent closure of the myelomeningocele but died at one month of age. Chromosomal analysis was normal (46,XY). Because conotruncal heart defects have been associated with deletions on chromosome 22, FISH analysis using a probe for the DiGeorge syndrome on the long arm of chromosome 22 was performed. It indicated no detectable deletion within this critical region on 22q11. Nonetheless there remains the possibility of a gene (or genes) located on 22q that could produce findings of this rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome when disrupted. Therefore, further investigation on this chromosome is warranted.

  10. Dropped head syndrome. Three case-reports.

    PubMed

    Chaouat, D; Belange, G

    1999-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome is characterized by gradual forward sagging of the head due to weakness of the neck extensor muscles. We report three cases in elderly patients seen by rheumatologists at our institution. There was some evidence suggestive of a neurogenic process, whereas most reported cases of dropped head syndrome have been ascribed to myopathy. Dropped head syndrome can probably be produced by multiple causes. The close ties between dropped head syndrome and acquired camptocormia in adults are discussed.

  11. [Fraser syndrome. A case report].

    PubMed

    Allali, B; Hamdani, M; Lamari, H; Rais, L; Benhaddou, M; Kettani, A; Lahbil, D; Amraoui, A; Zaghloul, K

    2006-02-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder; the most consistent features are cryptophthalmos, syndactyly of fingers and toes, laryngeal stenosis, and urogenital abnormalities. We report a newborn case at day 1 of life who had multiple abnormalities, born from a consanguineous marriage. Clinically, the newborn had an ankyloblepharon on the left side, a cryptophthalmos on the right side, a syndactyly, anorectal abnormalities with ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal stenosis, and ear malformations. TDM of the cranium and orbits and the transfontanel ultrasound were normal. The abdominal ultrasound showed renal abnormalities. Right eye surgery showed a reduced cornea to an opaque thin plate clinging to the iris without an anterior chamber and a nonindividualized eyeball. The authors discuss the morphological abnormalities, the clinical and paraclinical aspects of this syndrome, its multispecialized clinical management, and the importance of prenatal diagnosis.

  12. [Case report: bilateral Cushing's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cheikhrouhou, Héla; Khiari, Karima; Chérif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Néjib; Ben Maïz, Hédi

    2003-04-01

    The authors report a case of a 49-year-old woman presenting a Cushing's syndrome (January 1997). The Magnetic Resonance Image of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma without extension in the cavernous sinus and a partial empty sella. The computed tomography scan showed a discreet bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with a left nodule (23 mm in diameter) a second nodule was noted. These data suggested the eventuality of maconodular adrenocortical hyperplasia in long-standing Cushing's disease. We discuss the implications of this finding for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  13. Haglund's syndrome. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Martín, Florencio; Alonso Valdazo, María Dolores; Díaz Peña, Gara; Fernández Leroy, Julia; Hernández Herrero, David; Díaz García, Fermín

    Haglund's syndrome produces posterior impingement of the heel, which is caused by a posterosuperior calcaneal exostosis, known as Haglund's deformity, associated with Achilles tendinitis and retrocalcaneal bursitis. Its pathogenesis is unknown. We report two cases that were diagnosed clinically and confirmed radiographically. One patient was treated conservatively and the other underwent surgery. The diagnosis is based on clinical signs and radiological images, using the measurement of the parallel pitch lines, in a lateral radiograph of the ankle. Initial treatment is usually conservative and includes anti-inflammatory or analgesic agents, physiotherapy and low-heeled, open-heeled shoes. If conservative treatment does not relieve the pain, surgery may be necessary.

  14. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Lalosevic, Jovan; Zivanovic, Dubravka; Skiljevic, Dusan; Medenica, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare, acquired disorder characterized by lenticular hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia. We present the case of a 63-year-old female with progressive, asymptomatic hyperpigmentation of buccal mucosa and a 7-year history of hyperpigmentation in several fingernails. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical features presented, dermoscopic findings and exclusion of underlying systemic diseases. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is regarded as a diagnosis of exclusion. By identifying Laugier-Hunziker syndrome, other, more severe syndromes associated with hyperpigmentations can be excluded, namely Addison’s disease and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:26312723

  15. [Gerstmann's syndrome: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rosati, G; de Bastiani, P; Pinna, L

    1979-01-01

    In recent years, several authors have questioned the reliaty of Gerstmann syndrome and have claimed that "aphasia might be regarded as the true Grundstörung of the Gerstmann symptoms". This paper describes a case of Gerstmann syndrome ictally risen with aphasia in a patient suffering from a tumour of the left PTO region. After the remission of aphasia, the syndromic association typical of the Gerstmann syndrome lasted up the exitus.

  16. Kartagener's syndrome: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Mayank; Kumar, Naresh; Jaiswal, Ashish; Verma, Ajay K.; Kant, Surya

    2012-01-01

    Kartagener's syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic ciliary disorder comprising the triad of situs inversus, chronic sinusitis, and bronchiectasis. The basic problem lies in the defective movement of cilia, leading to recurrent chest infections, ear/nose/throat symptoms, and infertility. We hereby report three unusual cases of this rare entity – an infertile male with azoospermia in whom Bochdalek's diaphragmatic hernia coexisted, another case of an infertile female, and a third of an infertile male with oligospermia. The need for a high index of suspicion to make an early diagnosis cannot be overemphasized in such patients so that wherever possible, options for timely treatment of infertility may be offered and unnecessary evaluation of symptoms is avoided. PMID:23243352

  17. Serotonin Syndrome With Fluoxetine: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipen Dineshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serotonin syndrome is a rare but serious complication of treatment with serotonergic agents. In its severe manifestations, death can ensue. Early recognition and aggressive management are crucial to mitigating the syndrome. Often the presentation can be subtle and easy to miss. Case Reports: We present 2 cases of serotonin syndrome seen in the psychiatric consultation service of a busy academic hospital. Both patients had favorable outcomes because of early recognition and aggressive management. Conclusion: Physicians should carefully consider and rule out the clinical diagnosis of serotonin syndrome when presented with an agitated or confused patient who is taking serotonergic agents. PMID:27999518

  18. [Genetic diagnostic testing in inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Biskup, S

    2013-03-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are clinically and genetically highly heterogeneous. They can be divided according to the clinical phenotype and course of the disease, as well as the underlying mode of inheritance. Isolated retinal dystrophies (i.e., retinitis pigmentosa, Leber's congenital amaurosis, cone and cone-rod dystrophy, macular dystrophy, achromatopsia, congenital stationary nightblindness) and syndromal forms (i.e., Usher syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome) can be differentiated. To date almost 180 genes and thousands of distinct mutations have been identified that are responsible for the different forms of these blinding illnesses. Until recently, there was no adequate diagnostic genetic testing available. With the development of the next generation sequencing technologies, a comprehensive genetic screening analysis for all known genes for inherited retinal dystrophies has been established at reasonable costs and in appropriate turn-around times. Depending on the primary clinical diagnosis and the presumed mode of inheritance, different diagnostic panels can be chosen for genetic testing. Statistics show that in 55-80 % of the cases the genetic defect of the inherited retinal dystrophy can be identified with this approach, depending on the initial clinical diagnosis. The aim of any genetic diagnostics is to define the genetic cause of a given illness within the affected patient and family and thereby i) confirm the clinical diagnosis, ii) provide targeted genetic testing in family members, iii) enable therapeutic intervention, iv) give a prognosis on disease course and progression and v) in the long run provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches and personalised medicine.

  19. Gorlin-goltz syndrome: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Satyaki; Jaykar, Kranti C; Kumar, Rajesh; Jha, Abhijeet Kumar; Banerjee, P K

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is characterized by multiple basocellular epitheliomas, keratocysts in the jaws, bifid ribs, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. We describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome illustrating the importance of a thorough examination including the examination of palms and soles and detailed investigations in a patient having lesions suggestive of basal cell carcinoma and multiple naevi.

  20. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  1. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  2. Stiff person syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia A; Kuberski, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    The case report features a patient who had a diagnosis of a common type of breast cancer with an uncommon neurologic syndrome. She had extreme pain and progressive stiffness with cognitive and functional decline. This article includes the pathogenesis and treatment options for a rare, but treatable, autoimmune disorder of malignancy called stiff person syndrome.

  3. A new case of MOMO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert; Sugalski, Rachel D

    2010-01-01

    MOMO syndrome, a condition described in three earlier patients, is a constellation of macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly, and ocular abnormalities as the main findings. We report a 6-year-old child with these findings as well as significant developmental issues, delayed bone age, clavicular pseudoarthrosis, and straight femurs. We believe that this child should be considered as having MOMO syndrome. Careful consideration of his facial features shows some overlap with Kabuki syndrome. Description of this case may help to better elucidate the clinical features of MOMO syndrome.

  4. A pediatric case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Moon Souk; Kim, Seung Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Soo Jin; You, Chur Woo; Kim, Jon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome, which is a rare disorder caused by dysfunction of the autonomic system, manifests as asymmetric facial flushing and sweating in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The syndrome may be primary (idiopathic) with a benign course, or can occur secondary to structural abnormalities or iatrogenic factors. The precise mechanism underlying idiopathic harlequin syndrome remains unclear. Here, we describe a case of a 6-year-old boy who reported left hemifacial flushing and sweating after exercise. He had an unremarkable birth history and no significant medical history. Complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations were performed, and no other abnormalities were identified. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude lesions of the cerebrum and cervicothoracic spinal cord, and no abnormalities were noted. His final diagnosis was classic idiopathic harlequin syndrome. Herein, we report the first pediatric case of idiopathic harlequin syndrome in Korea. PMID:28018464

  5. Goldenhar Syndrome: A Case Report with Review

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Jangra, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is a rare condition which is characterized by a multitude of anomalies involving craniofacial structures, vertebrae, internal organs and usually occurs unilaterally. The etiology of this syndrome is unclear since it varies genetically and is linked to a plethora of reasons. Herein, we report a case of Goldenhar syndrome with hemifacial microsomia and microtia along with systemic involvement which was clinically and radio-graphically assessed. Many classical signs of the syndrome were present in the patient along with few rare ones. The various aspects of this rare disease have been discussed with emphasis on timely diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach to manage it. How to cite this article Goswami M, Bhushan U, Jangra B. Goldenhar Syndrome: A Case Report with Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):278-280. PMID:27843263

  6. A new case of Okamoto syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert; Shih, Ling-yu; Fong, Mei-Heung; Zheng, Sharon; Poon, Eric

    2005-04-01

    We report a 6 month old boy with congenital hydronephrosis, cleft palate, severe hypotonia, congenital heart defect, developmental delay, and characteristic facial features with an open mouthed appearance and full lower lip, who we believe is the third reported case of Okamoto syndrome. Okamoto syndrome is a recently described distinctive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome encompassing the above features for which an etiologic factor has not yet been identified. Our patient also had idiopathic splenomegaly and non-specific MRI changes in the brain, not reported in the first two cases.

  7. Three Cases of Exotropic Moebius Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Feizi, Mohaddese

    2017-02-14

    Moebius syndrome is characterized by congenital facial palsy and limitation in horizontal gaze. The surgical results of the exotropic pattern are rare and have not been published before. The authors report three cases of exotropic Moebius syndrome. Maximal weakening of the lateral rectus muscles followed by strengthening of the medial recti in exotropic Moebius syndrome can improve exotropia significantly. Most of these cases also need some measures to relieve the often associated severe dry eye. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54:e9-e12.].

  8. Sotos syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Silva, Jaciara Miranda; Ruviére, Denise Belucio; Segatto, Regina Aparecida Saiani; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; de Freitas, Aldevina Campos

    2006-01-01

    Sotos Syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by accelerated bone development, abnormal craniofacial morphology and psychomotor developmental retardation. The behavioral problems usually associated with the syndrome include poor social skills, anxiety and/or irritability. Oral findings include prognathism and a high-arched palate with premature eruption of the teeth. Delayed psychomotor development increases the risk for caries. A personalized preventive treatment plan with close supervision of the patient's oral health care is required. This paper documents a child diagnosed with Sotos Syndrome and describes the primary clinical features, the disease-specific craniofacial, oral and dental findings, and dental care management of this patient.

  9. [Scimitar syndrome--case report].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Radomyski, Adam; Burakowska, Barbara; Mojkowski, Włodzimierz; Torbicki, Adam

    2004-04-01

    Scimitar syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly. This syndrome is characterized by partial or complete anomalous pulmonary venous drainage of the right lung to the inferior vena cava. There is a characteristic abnormal radiographic shadow which descends along the right cardiac border (scimitar sign). We examined 71-year old woman with severe pulmonary hypertension due to a large shunt between pulmonary veins and right atrium. Other cause of pulmonary hypertension is atrial septum defect. Our patient required permanent pacemaker implantation for tachy-brady syndrome.

  10. Unraveling the Genetics of Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, David M; Clément, Karine

    2006-01-01

    The use of modern molecular biology tools in deciphering the perturbed biochemistry and physiology underlying the obese state has proven invaluable. Identifying the hypothalamic leptin/melanocortin pathway as critical in many cases of monogenic obesity has permitted targeted, hypothesis-driven experiments to be performed, and has implicated new candidates as causative for previously uncharacterized clinical cases of obesity. Meanwhile, the effects of mutations in the melanocortin-4 receptor gene, for which the obese phenotype varies in the degree of severity among individuals, are now thought to be influenced by one's environmental surroundings. Molecular approaches have revealed that syndromes (Prader-Willi and Bardet-Biedl) previously assumed to be controlled by a single gene are, conversely, regulated by multiple elements. Finally, the application of comprehensive profiling technologies coupled with creative statistical analyses has revealed that interactions between genetic and environmental factors are responsible for the common obesity currently challenging many Westernized societies. As such, an improved understanding of the different “types” of obesity not only permits the development of potential therapies, but also proposes novel and often unexpected directions in deciphering the dysfunctional state of obesity. PMID:17196040

  11. Serotonin syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Likasitwattanakul, Surachai

    2005-07-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication of drugs that have effects on central nervous system serotonin. It is characterized by sudden onset of altered mental status, increased neuromuscular activity and autonomic instability. The author reports a child with suprasellar region tumor who presented with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder and received a combination of sertaline (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and clomipramine (tricyclic antidepressant). Symptoms of serotonin syndrome occurred within 24 hours after increasing the dose of sertaline. The patient's symptoms resolved rapidly with discontinuation of the offending drugs and supportive care.

  12. Cri du Chat syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina Paes; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Lessa, Fernanda Campos Rosetti; Orsi, Iara Agusta

    2005-01-01

    Cri du Chat Syndrome occurs as a result of a partial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 5. Among the consequent abnormalities are low birth weight, a striking catlike cry in infancy, mental retardation, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism and dental malocclusions. This paper presents a case report on the dental treatment of a 23-year-old patient who received multidisciplinary treatment, including special education and precocious stimulation for carriers of this syndrome.

  13. Primary Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kadeli, Deepak K; Hanjagi, Siddaraya Y

    2015-10-01

    Primary Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rare disease associated with thromboembolic events which may affect either the arterial or the venous vasculature. It presents with an increased risk of thrombosis in pregnant woman leading to repeated fetal losses. We present here a case of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in young women who had previous event of gangrene of toes leading to their amputation and repeated fetal losses.

  14. Filippi Syndrome: Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Lata; Bhakhri, Bhanu Kiran; Chug, Ashi

    2015-01-01

    Filippi syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by syndactyly of fingers and toes, microcephaly, growth retardation and abnormal facies. We are describing a boy who presented with syndactyly, mental retardation, microcephaly, depressed nasal bridge and growth retardation. In addition he had some dental abnormalities like missing bilateral lateral incisors and delayed eruption of teeth. We concluded it to be Filippi syndrome by studying pathognomic clinical features and reviewed the literature. This is the second case report from India. PMID:26813917

  15. MOMO syndrome: a possible third case.

    PubMed

    Zannolli, R; Mostardini, R; Hadjistilianou, T; Rosi, A; Berardi, R; Morgese, G

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a 5-year-old girl, mildly mentally retarded, with the following characteristics: macrocephaly; severe obesity; ocular abnormalities (right optic disk coloboma and left choroidal coloboma); short stature; and recurvation of the femur. The case is sporadic with no consanguinity between the parents. The condition was diagnosed tentatively as MOMO syndrome (Macrosomia, Obesity, Macrocephaly, and Ocular Abnormalities) (MIM, 157980), because of the presence of short stature, in contrast with the large stature of the only two previously described cases. It is the third possible example of this rare syndrome to be described in the literature, with some new clinical findings presented.

  16. [Personage-Turner syndrome--case report].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stepień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek

    2011-08-01

    Personage-Turner syndrome or acute brachial radiculitis is rare syndrome. In typical cases it was manifested by strong pain of shoulder region and the weakness of muscles which are supplies by individual nerves or part of brachial plexus and in longer time with atrophy. Aetiology of this disease is unknown, probably on the autoimmuno-inflammatory background. Diagnosis is made on the typical clinical picture and in exclusion many illness with impairment brachial plexus. In presented case the course of disease as well as executed investigations suggested that discopathy could be the reason of paresis, however renewed estimation caused the change of the diagnosis.

  17. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome: two cases.

    PubMed

    Carroll, B T; Goforth, H W; Raimonde, L A

    2001-04-01

    Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder that may be characterized by visual agnosia, placidity, altered sexual activity, hypermetamorphosis, and hyperorality. Patients with KBS present with a complex behavioral syndrome. KBS is usually associated with lesions of the amygdala or amygdaloid pathways. However, partial KBS may occur in the absence of the classic bilateral temporal lesions. Pharmacologic treatment options have been developed from the results of case reports, which suggest that carbamazepine and antipsychotics may be helpful. We present the cases of two patients with partial KBS who responded favorably to antipsychotic medication.

  18. Rapunzel Syndrome: A Rare Postpartum Case

    PubMed Central

    Tegene, Teshome; Foda, Yahia; Hussain, Omar; Manikonda, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman. PMID:24171124

  19. Rapunzel syndrome: a rare postpartum case.

    PubMed

    Tegene, Teshome; Foda, Yahia; Hussain, Omar; Oloniyo, Kolawole; Ha, Ngoc-Tram; Manikonda, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman.

  20. Kleine–Levin Syndrome: A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Lima, Taís Figueiredo; da Silva Behrens, Nilce Sanny Costa; Lopes, Eduardo; Pereira, Danielle; de Almeida Fonseca, Hassana; Cavalcanti, Paola Oliveira; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Castro, Juliana; Tufik, Sergio; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho Santos

    2014-01-01

    The Kleine–Levin Syndrome is a differential diagnosis for patients with diurnal excessive sleepiness and a suspicion of narcolepsy. It is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of diurnal excessive sleepiness, associated with one or more symptoms of hyperphagia, hypersexuality, coprolalia and copropraxia. During crisis intervals, there are no symptoms. This pathology predominantly manifests itself in teenagers, being more frequent among males. The course of this disease is unpredictable, with variable duration and frequency. The most accepted physiopathology is that of a hypothalamic dysfunction, although and recently, there has appeared a hypothesis of a post-infectious autoimmune disorder. These patients show an elevated body mass index, which can predispose to association with comorbidities such as the sleep obstructive apnea syndrome. Treatment involves medications with different effects, but there is no specific and effective therapy. Our article shows a classic case of Kleine–Levin Syndrome associated with sleep obstructive apnea syndrome, a rare association in the literature. PMID:26483915

  1. The sensory cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Peter N; Ou, Guangshuo; Leroux, Michel R; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2007-03-08

    The non-motile cilium, once believed to be a vestigial cellular structure, is now increasingly associated with the ability of a wide variety of cells and organisms to sense their chemical and physical environments. With its limited number of sensory cilia and diverse behavioral repertoire, C. elegans has emerged as a powerful experimental system for studying how cilia are formed, function, and ultimately modulate complex behaviors. Here, we discuss the biogenesis, distribution, structures, composition and general functions of C. elegans cilia. We also briefly highlight how C. elegans is being used to provide molecular insights into various human ciliopathies, including Polycystic Kidney Disease and Bardet-Biedl Syndrome.

  2. Angelman Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Sadrnabavi, Arianeh; Akhondian, Javad; Beiraghi Toosi, Mehran; Mohammadi, Mohammadhassan; Hassanpour, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder presented by jerky movement, speech delay and cognitive disability epilepsy as well as dysmorphic features. It occurs due to an expression deletion in 15q11-q13 chromosome. In this article, we present an eight yr boy referred to Pediatrics Neurologic Clinic Mashhad, Iran for speech delay. He had abnormal behavior ataxia unusual laughing facial expression intellectual disability and mandibular prognathism. Metabolic screening tests and brain MRI were normal. Genetic analysis was pathognomonic for AS. PMID:27247589

  3. Middle aortic syndrome: an atypical case--a case report.

    PubMed

    Adovasio, R; Canci, U

    2000-06-01

    This case concerns a 61-year-old woman presenting with middle aortic syndrome treated by an aortoaortic thoracoabdominal polytetrafluoroethylene bypass and a right renal Dacron bypass. The case was atypical because of the patient's advanced age at the time of clinical presentation.

  4. [Kearns-Sayre syndrome: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Zago Filho, Luiz Alberto; Shiokawa, Naoye

    2009-01-01

    Two cases in which patients had progressive loss of visual acuity in four years and eight months respectively are described. Clinical examination revealed fundoscopic alterations of the retina, pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris showing marked atrophy. The clinical picture resembles Kearns-Sayre syndrome. Etiological investigation is fundamental, because most of time this condition is associated with more serious systemic complications which need specific care.

  5. [Atypical Cogan's syndrome. Based on a case].

    PubMed

    Nandu, A; Salu, P; Caspers, L; Gordts, F; Sennesael, J

    2004-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disease that associates typical (interstitial keratitis) and atypical (such as anterior uveitis) ocular manifestations to vestibulo-auditory dysfunction. It has also a systemic vascular association of vasculitis type. We report a case of a 64 years old woman who presented an atypical form with anterior uveitis.

  6. [One case report of SAPHO syndrome and literature review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiang Yuan

    2008-12-18

    To study the clinical features and diagnosis of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) syndrome. One case of SAPHO syndrome was reported and the related data of SAPHO syndrome were reviewed. The main clinical features of the patient were articulatio carpi synovitis, acne, cervical rib hyperostosis, articulatio sternoclavicularis and osteitis, So the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was made. Though SAPHO syndrome is rare with yet unknown prevalence, it still can be seen in clinical practice, and can be diagnosed by careful examination.

  7. Ascher's syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Chandravanshi, Shivcharan Lal; Mishra, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old Indian girl with upper lip deformity presented with on and off painless swelling of her both upper eyelids for 3 years. Clinical evaluation revealed bilateral blepharochalasis, narrowing of horizontal palpebral fissure, decreased outer intercanthal distance, iris coloboma, cleft soft palate, bifid uvula, sensorineural deafness and double upper lip. Clinical examination of the thyroid, thyroid hormone assay and ultrasonography revealed normal thyroid gland structure and function. Ascher's syndrome was diagnosed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Ascher's syndrome associated with iris coloboma, heterochromia iridum, and narrowing of horizontal palpebral fissure and decreased outer intercanthal distance secondary to lengthening of lateral canthal ligament. PMID:25971175

  8. Harlequin syndrome in childhood - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Juliano de Avelar; Hartmann, Mariana; Freire, Cristiano Firpo; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira

    2012-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome happens in only one side of the face. In the affected half, the face does not sweat or flush even with simulation. Arms and trunk could also be affected. This condition is induced by heat, exercise and emotional factors. The article reports a case of a nine-year-old female with a 3-year history of unilateral flushing and sweating after exercise; a brief literature review is included. Despite the rarity of this syndrome, dermatologists should recognize this condition and refer these patients to ophthalmological and neurological examination. PMID:23197213

  9. Sturge-Weber syndrome: A case study.

    PubMed

    Welty, Linda D

    2006-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare, sporadic, progressive, congenital syndrome. In its complete trisymptomatic form, SWS is physically characterized by port-wine stains over the trigeminal area, leptomeningeal angiomas usually over the parieto-occipital region, and eye abnormalities. Clinical manifestation for infants with SWS depends on the affected organs, but can include seizures, mental retardation, and glaucoma. This article begins with a case presentation of an infant with SWS and then presents the etiology, embryology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis of SWS.

  10. [Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Valderrama Escudero, Felipe; Montoya González, Laura Elisa

    2014-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (skin reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is an idiosyncratic drug reaction characterized by rash, fever, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ dysfunction. This case report is on a patient with bipolar affective disorder who presented with a systemic inflammatory response associated with the use of valproic acid, and an important activation of symptoms when used with other drugs with a different pharmacological action mechanism. The diagnosis of DRESS syndrome is primarily by exclusion, and its detection may be difficult, which could potentially become fatal for the patient.

  11. Ascher's syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Chandravanshi, Shivcharan Lal; Mishra, Vinay

    2015-03-01

    An 18-year-old Indian girl with upper lip deformity presented with on and off painless swelling of her both upper eyelids for 3 years. Clinical evaluation revealed bilateral blepharochalasis, narrowing of horizontal palpebral fissure, decreased outer intercanthal distance, iris coloboma, cleft soft palate, bifid uvula, sensorineural deafness and double upper lip. Clinical examination of the thyroid, thyroid hormone assay and ultrasonography revealed normal thyroid gland structure and function. Ascher's syndrome was diagnosed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Ascher's syndrome associated with iris coloboma, heterochromia iridum, and narrowing of horizontal palpebral fissure and decreased outer intercanthal distance secondary to lengthening of lateral canthal ligament.

  12. [Siemens I syndrome--a case history].

    PubMed

    Köhler, U; Müller, W; Schubert, H; Lukassek, B

    1981-08-01

    Report on a patient suffering from keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (Siemens I syndrome). This ia a very rare clinical picture, at least in its complete form. The patient's father and brother are suffering from an abortive Siemens I syndrome. The condition is a form of hereditary parakeratosis, a spinulose keratosis with typical localization in the eyes and on the skin. Causal therapy is not possible; attempts at conservative and surgical treatment are described. Prognostically, the condition will probably come to a standstill at puberty. The description of this case is intended to illustrate the necessity of close cooperation between dermatologist and ophthalmologist.

  13. Case Report: Atypical Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leanza, Vito; Rubbino, Gabriella; Leanza, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) (also called Bushy Syndrome or Amsterdam dwarfism), is a genetic disorder that can lead to several alterations. This disease affects both physical and neuropsychiatric development. The various abnormalities include facial dysmorphia (arched eyebrows, synophrys, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, down-turned angles of the mouth), upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, and gastrointestinal alterations. The prevalence of this syndrome is approximately one per 15,000. Ultrasound is not the perfect means to diagnose CdLS, however, many abnormalities can be detected prenatally by scrupulous image observation. We report an atypical CdLS case characterized by increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester, normal karyotype, saddle nose, micrognathia with receding jaw, low set ears, facies senilis, arthrogryposis of the hands, absence of the Aranzio ductus venous, dilatation of gallbladder and bowel, a unique umbilical artery, increased volume of amniotic fluid, and intrauterine growth retardation ending with the interruption of pregnancy. PMID:26834972

  14. [Chilaiditi's sign and syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-García, César Raúl; García-Acosta, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The interposition of a portion of the colon between the liver and the diaphragm is called Chilaiditi sign and discovered incidentally during radiological study for other reasons and usually asymptomatic presentation. When the discovery is accompanied by clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, constipation called Chilaiditi Syndrome. The Chilaiditi sign is a very rare condition, and the Chilaiditi syndrome is even more, especially if associated with other acute diseases. We report the case of a man of 41 years was admitted with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, difficulty was diagnosed with radiographic and tomographic images making the differential diagnosis with lung abscess and diaphragmatic hernia. The final diagnosis was Chilaiditi Syndrome associated with acute pancreatitis and penumonia.

  15. PLATEAU IRIS SYNDROME--CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Feraru, Crenguta Ioana; Pantalon, Anca Delia; Chiselita, Dorin; Branisteanu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Plateau iris is characterized by closing the anterior chamber angle due to a large ciliary body or due to its anterior insertion that alters the position of iris periphery in respect to the trabecular meshwork. There are two aspects that need to be differentiated: plateau iris configuration and plateau iris syndrome. The first describes a situation when the iris root is flat and the anterior chamber is not shallow, the latter refers to a post laser iridotomy condition in which a patent iridotomy has removed the relative pupillary block, but goniscopically confirmed angle closure recurs without central shallowing of the anterior chamber. Isolated plateau iris syndrome is rare compared to plateau iris configuration. We hereby present two case reports of plateau iris syndrome in young patients who came to an ophthalmologic consult by chance.

  16. Intrapartum diagnostic of Roberts syndrome - case presentation.

    PubMed

    Socolov, Răzvan Vladimir; Andreescu, Nicoleta Ioana; Haliciu, Ana Maria; Gorduza, Eusebiu Vlad; Dumitrache, Florentin; Balan, Raluca Anca; Puiu, Maria; Dobrescu, Mihaela Amelia; Socolov, Demetra Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Roberts syndrome is a rare disease, with multiple limb and skeletal abnormalities (called "pseudothalidomide disease"). There are only around 150 cases described in literature. We present a case of Roberts syndrome, diagnosed in moment of delivery, after a pregnancy without prenatal follow-up. The stillborn baby was naturally delivered by a 17-year-old primiparous woman at 38 weeks of amenorrhea. The pregnancy was not followed due to socioeconomic and family situation, and no prenatal ultrasound was performed. The male baby has 2650 g and presented several morphological abnormalities and tight double umbilical abdominal loop. The macroscopic evaluation showed: dolichocephaly, hypoplastic inferior maxilla with micrognathia, antimongoloid palpebral slant, pterygium colli, abnormal and lower implanted ears, superior limbs phocomelia, syndactyly at lower left limb and tetradactyly in all limbs, bilateral cryptorchidism, pancreatic aplasia. Roberts syndrome is a rare genetic disease with recessive autosomal transmission generated by mutations in ESCO2 gene, located on chromosome 8. The disease should be easy to diagnose by antenatal ultrasound examination, but in our case, the lack of prenatal follow-up determined the diagnostic at term. We believe consider this case is an argument towards introducing ultrasound-screening compulsory to all pregnancies. To identify a possible genetic mutation, further investigations of the parents are in progress, but classically the disease has a recessive autosomal transmission.

  17. Waardenburg's syndrome: case reports in two Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Amoni, S S; Abdurrahman, M B

    1979-01-01

    We saw two cases of Waardenburg's syndrome in Nigerian children. A 9-year-old girl had congenital deaf-mutism, high-arched palate, complete heterochromia iridis with pigment mottling in the posterior pole of the eye with the hypochromic iris, dyspigmented frontal scalp hair, a history of vitiligo, but with no dystopia canthorum. An 11-year-old boy had a harelip with cleft palate, heterochromia iridis, blonde fundus on the eye with blue iris, and dystopia canthorum.

  18. A Pediatric Case of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Derin, Serhan; Derin, Hatice; Sahan, Murat; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) is characterized by facial paralysis, inner ear dysfunction, periauricular pain, and herpetiform vesicles. The reported incidence in children is 2.7/100,000. The pathogenesis involves the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. The recovery rate is better in children than in adults. This paper discusses a 12-year-old girl with a rare case of peripheral facial paralysis caused by RHS and reviews the literature. PMID:25276457

  19. [Sheehan's syndrome - case report and review].

    PubMed

    Kristjánsdóttir, Hallgerdur Lind; Bödvarsdóttir, Sigrún Perla; Sigurjónsdóttir, Helga Agústa

    2010-05-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is a pituitary failure after delivery. Symptoms depend on which hormonal axis are affected, failure to lactate and resume menstruation is most frequent but cortisol deficiency is most dangerous and may lead to death if undiagnosed. We present a 38 year old female that was diagnosed with SS after repeated visits to health care professionals with typical symptoms of SS. The purpose of this case report is to draw attention to SS and the symptoms of cortisol deficiency.

  20. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started.

  1. Moebius syndrome and narcolepsy: A case dissertation☆

    PubMed Central

    Sabaneeff, Lídia; Mendes Motta, Henrique; Castro, Juliana; Tufik, Sergio; Santos Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho

    2014-01-01

    Moebius syndrome (MS) is a congenital syndrome characterized by unilateral or bilateral aplasia of the VI and VII cranial nerves, with consequent convergent strabismus and bilateral peripheral facial paralysis. This syndrome might be associated with diurnal excessive sleepiness and muscular hypotony, mimetizing in this manner, narcolepsy. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy depend on the presence of REM sleep during the day. As with patients with MS we do not have ocular movements due to the VI nerve paralysis, the absence of horizontal ocular movements might make it difficult to confirm narcolepsy in these patients. The common clinical characteristics of these patients are due to a possible impairment of the same structures that are affected in the central nervous system. However, the mechanism by which it occurs remains to be fully understood. Further electrophysiological researches are necessary to better clarify the association of these two diseases. The objective of this dissertation is to describe and discuss a case of Moebius syndrome with diurnal excessive sleepiness as a differential diagnosis for narcolepsy. PMID:26483899

  2. Moebius syndrome and narcolepsy: A case dissertation.

    PubMed

    Sabaneeff, Lídia; Mendes Motta, Henrique; Castro, Juliana; Tufik, Sergio; Santos Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho

    2014-03-01

    Moebius syndrome (MS) is a congenital syndrome characterized by unilateral or bilateral aplasia of the VI and VII cranial nerves, with consequent convergent strabismus and bilateral peripheral facial paralysis. This syndrome might be associated with diurnal excessive sleepiness and muscular hypotony, mimetizing in this manner, narcolepsy. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy depend on the presence of REM sleep during the day. As with patients with MS we do not have ocular movements due to the VI nerve paralysis, the absence of horizontal ocular movements might make it difficult to confirm narcolepsy in these patients. The common clinical characteristics of these patients are due to a possible impairment of the same structures that are affected in the central nervous system. However, the mechanism by which it occurs remains to be fully understood. Further electrophysiological researches are necessary to better clarify the association of these two diseases. The objective of this dissertation is to describe and discuss a case of Moebius syndrome with diurnal excessive sleepiness as a differential diagnosis for narcolepsy.

  3. Cases Report the Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi Qun; Whorwell, Peter James; Wang, Lin Heng; Li, Jun Xiang; Chang, Qing; Meng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a rare nongenetic polyposis syndrome first reported by Cronkhite and Canada in 1955.1 Up to the present time, the literature consists of ∼400 cases of CCS with the majority being reported from Japan2 although 49 cases have been described in China.3 CCS is characterized by diffuse polyposis of the digestive tract in association with ectodermal changes, such as onychomadesis, alopecia, and cutaneous hyperpigmentation. The principal symptoms of CCS are diarrhea, weight loss, abdominal pain, and other gastrointestinal complications, such as protein-losing enteropathy and malnutrition. It has been traditional to consider that CCS is associated with a poor prognosis. This paper describes a relatively mild case and reviews the literature, which more recently, suggests that it may be a more benign condition that might actually be reversible with treatment. There is some evidence that infection or disturbed immunity may be involved in the pathophysiology and that targeting such abnormalities could have therapeutic potential. A strong case could be made for establishing an international case registry for this disease so that the pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis could become much better understood. PMID:26717374

  4. A case of Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Cesur, Y; Tombul, T; Uner, A; Kirimi, E; Tuncer, O; Odabaş, D

    2002-01-01

    Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) is characterized by the triad of recurrent facial palsy, lingua plicata, and facial edema. Herein, we report a case of MRS associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to rare presentation. To the best of our knowledge only one case of MRS associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome has been reported in the literature until now.

  5. De Lange Syndrome: Report of 20 Cases

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, R. G.; Edwards, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Typus Degenerativus Amstelodamensis or Amsterdam dwarfism, a syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by mental retardation, a distinctive face, characteristic hands and feet, defective growth and other minor malformations, was first described by Cornelia de Lange in 1933. Approximately 69 cases, including nine autopsies, have been reported in the literature. In this paper we present a further 20, with illustrations of the syndrome from infancy to puberty (including de Lange's original three cases). The historical, physical, laboratory and radiographic findings of de Lange's three patients and our 20 are tabulated. Autopsy findings in one of our patients are reported and the literature is briefly reviewed. Although some observers have recently reported chromosome abnormalities in de Lange's syndrome, we feel that the diagnosis is made from the history and physical examination and that there are no definitive laboratory aids which can confirm the diagnosis. Chromosome studies in all 20 of our patients were normal and the genetic implications are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 9Fig. 11p1197-a PMID:6022788

  6. Cockayne's syndrome: a case report. Literature review.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz; Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Montoya-Pérez, Luis Alberto; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz Catalina

    2006-05-01

    Cockayne s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a recessive autosomal inheritance, described first by Cockayne in 1936. Patients with this syndrome present failure to thrive, short stature, premature aging, neurological alterations, photosensitivity, delayed eruption of the primary teeth, congenitally absent of some permanent teeth, partial macrodontia, atrophy of the alveolar process and caries. It could be caused by two gene mutations, CNK1 (ERCC8) and ERCC6, located on the 5 and 10 chromosomes respectively, causing two variations of Cockayne s syndrome, CS-A, secondary to a ERCC8 mutation and CS-B with ERCC6 mutation, the last one causes hypersensitivity to the ultraviolet light secondary to a DNA repair defect. The syndrome is also associated with mutations of the XPB, XPD and XPG genes. In this report we present a 9 year and 4 month old patient. He had a height of 94 cm, weight of 8.6 Kg, head circumference of 42 cm. and blood pressure of 120/80. Cachectic habitus, kyphosis, microcephaly, oval face, sunken eyes, a thin and beaklike nose, lack of subcutaneous facial fat (especially in the middle of the face), and large ears give the patient a birdlike appearance. It is notorious the photosensitivity in all the sun-exposed skin. The patient also displays delayed psychomotor skills and mental retardation. In the oral cavity we found deficient hygiene, gingivitis, cervical caries, enamel hipoplasia, abnormal position of the upper and inferior lateral incisors, macrodontia of the upper central teeth, the left one presented a caries. In the x-ray we observed congenital absence of 14, 23 and 24 teeth and mandibular hipoplasia. The aim of this review is to show the dentistry community the characteristics of the Cockayne s syndrome by means of a clinical case.

  7. The Brugada syndrome. Outcome of one case.

    PubMed

    Maia, I G; Soares, M W; Boghossian, S H; Sá, R

    2000-05-01

    The Brugada syndrome is a rare condition, and due to its mutating manner of presentation it may be difficult to diagnose. We report one case and discuss the diagnostic aspects and the clinical outcome of one patient with characteristic findings of this syndrome. These findings are especially defined by J-ST elevation in the right leads of serial electrocardiographic records, wide oscillations of J points and ST segments during 24-hour Holter monitoring, and nocturnal sudden death. We stress the importance of the Holter monitor findings for diagnostic complementation. Through this method it is possible to establish a correlation between vigil activities and sleep and the variability of the degree of impairment in ventricular repolarization.

  8. The Rapunzel syndrome. Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    CAIAZZO, P.; DI LASCIO, P.; CROCOLI, A.; DEL PRETE, I.

    2016-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare pathology in which swallowed hairs accumulate in the stomach. An unusual form of bezoar extending from the stomach to the small intestine or beyond has been described as Rapunzel syndrome. Trichobezoars typically cause abdominal pain and nausea, but can also present as an asymptomatic abdominal mass, progressing to abdominal obstruction and perforation. Trichobezoar with Rapunzel syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis. It is predominantly found in emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded young people. The diagnosis may be suspected in young females with abdominal pain, epigastric mass and malnutrition, who have a history of trichophagia. The Authors present a case of successful laparotomy removal of a giant gastro-duodenal trichobezoar in a 9-year-old girl with a history of trichotillophagia. Physical examination revealed diffuse abdominal pain and an epigastric mass. Psychodynamic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapautic strategies are discussed. PMID:27381697

  9. Neonatal Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ng, D K; Chau, K W; Black, C; Thomas, T M; Mak, K L; Boxer, M

    1999-06-01

    A case of neonatal Marfan syndrome is presented. The patient was noted to have cardiomegaly and tricuspid regurgitation on antenatal ultrasound scan. She was born with long, slender fingers and toes, an aged appearance and non-paralytic hypotonia. Echocardiogram revealed a dilated right atrium, right ventricle, dysplastic tricuspid valve and severe tricuspid regurgitation. She subsequently died of severe heart failure. Post-mortem examination showed the pathological features of lobar emphysema and cystic medial necrosis of the aorta. These features supported the diagnosis of neonatal Marfan syndrome. Nucleotide sequencing showed substitution of G by A at codon 1032 in exon 25 located in the long arm of chromosome 15. This resulted in the substitution of a cysteine by a tyrosine. A de novo mutation is suggested by the absence of affected family members.

  10. Concurrent Van der Woude syndrome and Turner syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Los, Evan; Baines, Hayley; Guttmann-Bauman, Ines

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of Van der Woude syndrome are caused by a mutation to interferon regulatory factor 6 on chromosome 1. Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome in girls. We describe a unique case of the two syndromes occurring concurrently though apparently independently in a girl with Van der Woude syndrome diagnosed at birth and Turner syndrome at 14 years 9 months. Short stature was initially misattributed to Van der Woude syndrome and pituitary insufficiency associated with clefts before correctly diagnosing Turner syndrome. We discuss the prevalence of delayed diagnosis of Turner syndrome, the rarity of reports of concurrent autosomal chromosome mutation and sex chromosome deletion, as well as the need to consider the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in all girls with short stature regardless of prior medical history.

  11. Concurrent Van der Woude syndrome and Turner syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Los, Evan; Baines, Hayley; Guttmann-Bauman, Ines

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of Van der Woude syndrome are caused by a mutation to interferon regulatory factor 6 on chromosome 1. Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome in girls. We describe a unique case of the two syndromes occurring concurrently though apparently independently in a girl with Van der Woude syndrome diagnosed at birth and Turner syndrome at 14 years 9 months. Short stature was initially misattributed to Van der Woude syndrome and pituitary insufficiency associated with clefts before correctly diagnosing Turner syndrome. We discuss the prevalence of delayed diagnosis of Turner syndrome, the rarity of reports of concurrent autosomal chromosome mutation and sex chromosome deletion, as well as the need to consider the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in all girls with short stature regardless of prior medical history. PMID:28228961

  12. SAPHO syndrome in childhood. A case report.

    PubMed

    Vargas Pérez, Manuel; Sevilla Pérez, Belén

    2016-12-16

    The acronym of SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) combines a cluster of cutaneous and musculoskeletal manifestations, such as hyperostosis of bones of the anterior chest wall associated with acne fulminans and hidradenitis suppurativa. There are no validated diagnostic criteria in children. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not always sufficient, and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying agents, tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors or bisphosphonates may be necessary. We present the case of a child with polyarticular involvement, osteoarthritis of the sternoclavicular joint with severe inflammatory disorders and acne conglobata, with an excellent response to intravenous pamidronate.

  13. Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: The Syndrome and a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, Byron P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents syndrome of nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) and model developed to encompass its complex manifestations. Includes history of development of syndrome, types of children in whom its principal features are manifest, hypothesized neurological bases of syndrome, and test of its developmental dimensions. Provides case study and discusses…

  14. Asperger syndrome related suicidal behavior: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Kocourkova, Jana; Dudova, Iva; Koutek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Asperger syndrome hinders adaptation to developmental challenges during childhood and adolescence, particularly with regard to interpersonal relationships. Individuals with Asperger syndrome display lack of empathy and limited ability to understand social and emotional exchanges with other people. Individuals with Asperger syndrome are significantly exposed to the risk of suicidal behavior, especially during adolescence. The authors describe cases of suicidal behavior in two adolescent boys with Asperger syndrome.

  15. Asperger syndrome related suicidal behavior: two case studies

    PubMed Central

    Kocourkova, Jana; Dudova, Iva; Koutek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Asperger syndrome hinders adaptation to developmental challenges during childhood and adolescence, particularly with regard to interpersonal relationships. Individuals with Asperger syndrome display lack of empathy and limited ability to understand social and emotional exchanges with other people. Individuals with Asperger syndrome are significantly exposed to the risk of suicidal behavior, especially during adolescence. The authors describe cases of suicidal behavior in two adolescent boys with Asperger syndrome. PMID:24294002

  16. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in children with nephrotic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-da; Shen, Qing-min; Lv, Chun-feng

    2014-03-01

    REVERSIBLE posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by headache, altered mental status, seizures, and visual disturbance, associated with reversible white matter changes.1 It has been commonly reported in patients with severe hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Here we report a case with nephrotic syndrome complicated by RPLS.

  17. [Dropped head plus syndrome; a case report].

    PubMed

    Morino, Kotaro; Kita, Yasusi; Yoneda, Yukihiro; Tabuchi, Masayasu; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya

    2003-09-01

    We reported a patient with so-called "dropped head plus syndrome", a non-progressive myopathy characterized by striking neck extensor weakness followed by progressive limb weakness which is well controlled by azathioprine. This 74-year-old man complained of neck and shoulder fatigue followed by progressive neck extensor weakness over 7 months. On physical examination, neck extensor strength was 4/5 on the MMT scale, but the remainder of the neurological examination and blood tests were normal. Needle EMG showed myopathic changes in the right trapezius and biceps brachialis muscles. Without any treatment, he developed weakness of upper and lower limb muscles about 8 months later, and Gowers' sign was positive. Blood test and needle EMG was unchanged. Muscle biopsy of the left trapezius, deltoid and supraspinatus muscles disclosed nonspecific myopathic changes consisting of variation in fiber size with disorganized intermyofibrillar networks in all the fibers, and there were rimmed vacuoles in some fibers of the deltoid muscle. There was no change on corticosteroids, but there was a dramatic improvement with azathioprine and his muscle symptoms disappeared. We, therefore, made the diagnosis of "dropped head plus syndrome". This appears to be the first such case in Japan.

  18. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome in pregnancy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Pecorino, Basilio; Teodoro, Maria Cristina; Scollo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome is a multiple endocrine disorders disease determined by autoimmunity; it can be diagnosed if a patient is affected by Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and another autoimmune disease, except Addison Disease, for example Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis or Celiac Disease. R.D., 34-year-old woman (gravida 2 para 1), was referred to the High Risk Pregnancy Outpatient Clinic at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania at 8 weeks' gestation. She was affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Disease (Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Celiac Disease). Pre-conception glycated hemoglobin and thyrotropin levels were normal. This pregnancy was characterized by glycemic instability and the need to increase the insulin units every month. The patient was hospitalized at 32+6 weeks for monitoring fetus and mother health because of inadequate glycemic control and the high insulin dosage required. She was delivered by caesarean section at 36+6 weeks because of uterine contractions, the previous cesarean section, glycemic instability and the gestational age. She delivered a baby boy, birth-weight 3300 g, Apgar 8-9. She was discharged in the fourth day after delivery with good maternal and child prognosis. Literature data and the experience derived by this case report suggest some recommendations to improve obstetrics and neonatologist outcome in the patients affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome: pre-conception counseling, thyrotropin assay every 4-6 weeks, gluten-free diet, fasting and post-prandial blood glucose level targets. PMID:27917035

  19. Congenital Melanocytic Nevus Syndrome: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Recio, A; Sánchez-Moya, A I; Félix, V; Campos, Y

    2017-01-19

    Congenital melanocytic nevus syndrome (CMNS) is the result of an abnormal proliferation of melanocytes in the skin and central nervous system caused by progenitor-cell mutations during embryonic development. Mutations in the NRAS gene have been detected in many of these cells. We present 5 cases of giant congenital melanocytic nevus, 3 of them associated with CMNS; NRAS gene mutation was studied in these 3 patients. Until a few years ago, surgery was the treatment of choice, but the results have proved unsatisfactory because aggressive interventions do not improve cosmetic appearance and only minimally reduce the risk of malignant change. In 2013, trametinib was approved for use in advanced melanoma associated with NRAS mutations. This drug, which acts on the intracellular RAS/RAF/MEK/pERK/MAPK cascade, could be useful in pediatric patients with CMNS. A better understanding of this disease will facilitate the development of new strategies.

  20. [Post-polio syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Post-polio syndrome occurs 30-40 years after polio virus infection. The main symptoms of PPS are slowly progressive muscle limbs paresis with muscle atrophy, joints pain, paresthesia. In 90% of patients the main symptom is fatigue that leads to physical and mental activity deterioration. The cause of disease remains unknown. Probably it is an effect of motoneurons damage during acute virus polio infection, their overloading and degeneration of remaining ones. In this study we described a case of man who developed PPS 36 years after Heine-Medin disease. The main symptom was intensification of right limb paresis and muscle atrophy. In electromyography there were damage features of muscle clinically affected and unaffected. Changes in lifestyle made possible to continue occupational activity.

  1. [Prune-Belly Syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Fabio; De Prisco, Ornella; Gherzi, Maurizio; Falconi, Daniela; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Formica, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Prune-Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by the absence of abdominal muscles, anomalies in the urinary tract, megaureter, cryptorchidism or testicular agenesis, hypertension and worsening chronic kidney disease (CKD). The incidence is estimated between 1 out of 35,000 and 1 out of 50,000 born alive, and it affects males in prevalence (97%). In the present study we describe the case of a 38 year old male patient (followed since May 2011) affected by PBS, CKD, one functional kidney at the scintigraphy, pediatric testicular implants, bladder surgery and correction of pectus excavatum. At the beginning of the observation, renal function was deteriorated, with a creatinine 3.3 mg/dl, GFR calculated at MDRD 23 ml/min, proteinuria in nephrotic range (4 g/day), high blood pressure, anemia and hyperparathyroidism. In the following examinations renal function framework worsened, despite the adoption of a low-protein diet. Due to the functional trend, the patient was prescribed hemodialysis as substitute treatment. In January 2013 a first attempt of artero-venous fistula (AVF) did not succeed, while a new AVF in March 2013 resulted effective. In July hemodialysis was started. In the future, we expect to insert the patient in the Kidney Transplant List (since surgical feasibility has already been positively evaluated). Our case is quite peculiar due to the late beginning of substitute treatment. Further, SPB represents a challenge that, in the absence of a prompt and effective treatment, inevitably it leads to terminal uremia; nevertheless, given a proper treatment, a transplant with good chances of success can be envisaged.

  2. Intermittent horizontal saccade failure ('ocular motor apraxia') in children.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C M; Shawkat, F; Russell-Eggitt, I; Wilson, J; Taylor, D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ocular motor apraxia (OMA) in childhood is a poorly understood condition involving a failure of horizontal saccades. OMA is thought to be rare but the literature indicates wide clinical associations. OMA is often identified by abnormal head movements, but failure of reflexive quick phases has been reported in all but a few patients. The extent of this oculomotor disorder was examined in a large group of children with diverse clinical backgrounds. METHODS: The degree of quick phase failure during horizontal vestibular and optokinetic nystagmus was measured using DC electro-oculography and video in 74 affected children, aged 17 days to 14 years. RESULTS: All children showed an intermittent failure of nystagmic quick phases, except for total failure in one case. Other visuomotor abnormalities were common including saccadic hypometria (85%), low gain smooth pursuit (70%), neurological nystagmus (28%), strabismus (22%), and vertical abnormalities (11%). Non-ocular abnormalities were common including infantile hypotonia (61%), motor delay (77%), and speech delay (87%). There was a wide range of clinical associations including agenesis of the corpus callosum, Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, microcephaly, hydrocephalus, vermis hypoplasia, porencephalic cyst, megalocephaly, Krabbe leucodystrophy, Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease, infantile Gaucher disease, GM1 gangliosidosis, infantile Refsum's disease, propionic acidaemia, ataxia telangiectasia, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, vermis astrocytoma, vermis cyst, carotid fibromuscular hypoplasia, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and microphthalmos. Perinatal and postnatal problems were found in 15% including perinatal hypoxia, meningitis, periventricular leucomalacia, athetoid cerebral palsy, perinatal septicaemia and anaemia, herpes encephalitis, and epilepsy. Only 27% were idiopathic. CONCLUSION: Quick phase failure is a constant feature of OMA, whereas abnormal head movements were detected in only about half

  3. Aromatase deficiency, a rare syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Baykan, Emine Kartal; Erdoğan, Mehmet; Özen, Samim; Darcan, Şükran; Saygılı, L Füsun

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase deficiency (AD) is a rare autosomal recessive inheritance syndrome. Its worldwide incidence is unknown, and there are few case reports in the literature. Aromatase dysfunction develops due to CYP19A1 gene mutation and a decrease in estrogen synthesis. Estrogen deficiency can induce delayed epiphyseal closure, eunuchoid body habitus, osteopenia, and osteoporosis in both genders. Our patient was a 27-year-old male who presented with bone pain, recurrent bone fractures associated with minimal trauma starting in puberty, and a progressive increase in height. Laboratory tests revealed that the blood levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were above normal, testosterone level was normal, and estrogen was undetectable. Plain bone radiography of the left wrist and hand demonstrated that the epiphyses were still unfused. Lumbar osteoporosis was detected in bone densitometry. In the genetic analysis, homozygous R375H guanine-adenine (G-A) mutation was detected in the CYP19A1 gene, and a diagnosis of AD was reached. Treatment with 25 μg transdermal estradiol was started. All family members were examined. Homozygous R375H G-A mutation was detected in the patient's younger brother. Heterozygous R375H G-A mutation was found in his mother, father, and older brother. In conclusion, this AD patient requires lifetime estrogen replacement in order to provide sufficient bone mineralization, to reduce the risk of bone fractures, and to lead a healthy life. The best method to prevent the possible complications is to diagnose the AD syndrome at early ages and to provide adequate estrogen replacement starting at puberty.

  4. Anesthetic management in a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikkiliineni, Venkata Rama Rao; Panidapu, Nagarjuna; Parasa, Mrunalini; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody (APLA) syndrome is one of the most common thrombocytophilias but, unfortunately, goes unrecognized most often. It is an auto-immune disorder in which thrombotic events and a recurrent fetal loss occur in the presence of antibodies to phospholipids. It is the most common acquired hyper-coagulable state. There is a limited literature on peroperative management of patients with this syndrome. We report a case of APLA syndrome in a parturient due to its rarity and complexity.

  5. First confirmed case of the bovine brachyspina syndrome in Canada.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; DeLay, Josepha; Hicks, Bryan; Fredholm, Merete

    2010-12-01

    Brachyspina syndrome is a congenital inherited lethal defect in Holstein cattle. Although cases have previously been reported from Europe, the first confirmed North American case is reported herein. This case was genetically related to the European cases, but pedigree analysis indicates that the founder may be more remote than previously expected.

  6. Down-Turner syndrome: case report and review.

    PubMed Central

    Van Buggenhout, G J; Hamel, B C; Trommelen, J C; Mieloo, H; Smeets, D F

    1994-01-01

    We present a male patient with Down-Turner mosaicism (45,X/46,X,+21/47,XY,+21) and review 27 similar cases reported so far. Clinical features of Down's syndrome were present in all cases, whereas a combination of features of both Ullrich-Turner syndrome and Down's syndrome was reported in 61% of the patients. However, one has to bear in mind that several stigmata of Ullrich-Turner syndrome can also be present in patients with Down's syndrome and vice versa. In most of the patients two different cell lines were encountered, although cases with one, three, and even four different cell lines have been reported. Of 28 patients, 21 showed female external genitalia, four were phenotypically male, and three showed ambiguous genitalia. Only six patients (21%) carried a Y chromosome, which is far less than expected. Images PMID:7837259

  7. A Communication System in Cases of "Locked-In" Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rechlin, T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-assisted communication system successfully used in three cases of "locked in syndrome" (in which the only reliable motor functions are eye movements). The paper concludes that patients who survive locked in syndrome for several weeks should be given the chance to communicate via a suitable system. (DB)

  8. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Wael; Panigrahy, Ashok; Bartoletti, Stefano C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare syndrome that includes a constellation of mandibular hypoplasia and posterior rib defects as its basic features. Additional features can include hearing loss, tracheal cartilage abnormalities, scoliosis, elbow hypoplasia, and spina bifida. Here we report two cases of CCMS and discuss the reported long-term outcome of the disease.

  9. MOMO syndrome associated with autism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Giunco, C T; Moretti-Ferreira, D; Silva, A E; Rocha, S S; Fett-Conte, A C

    2008-11-04

    This is a case report of macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly and ocular abnormalities (MOMO syndrome) associated with autism. Studies on genetic or environmental syndromes associated with autism can provide genetic markers or uncover relevant events, and are very important for the definition of autism subgroups in future molecular research.

  10. Fryns anophthalmia-plus syndrome: two rare cases.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, O; Bidev, D; Sari, F N; Dizdar, E A; Ulu, H O; Uras, N; Oguz, S S; Canpolat, F E; Dilmen, U

    2014-01-01

    Fryns anophthalmia-plus syndrome is a rare syndrome with clinical diversity primarily including anophthalmia/microphthalmia, facial clefts, cleft lip/palate, ear and nasal deformities. Here we present two different cases of APS with anopthalmia/microphthalmia, cleft palate, low set ears, ventriculomegaly and one of which had intestinal non-fixation anomaly not described in the literature before.

  11. Anesthetic management of a case of Sanjad-Sakati syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alshoaiby, AN; Rafiq, M; Jan, R; Shahbaz, M; Faqeeh, A; Alsohaibani, MA

    2016-01-01

    Sanjad-Sakati syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder first described in Saudi Arabia. Anesthetic management of these patients is challenging due to airway difficulties, electrolyte imbalance, growth and mental retardation, and seizures. The anesthetic management of the syndrome is described in this case report. PMID:27833494

  12. Unusual manifestation of the yellow nail syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Papaiordanou, Francine; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Miyaoka, Mariana Yumi; Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2014-01-01

    The yellow nail syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the classic triad of yellow and dystrophic nails, lymphedema and pleural effusion. We report in this paper a case of yellow nail syndrome, presenting the classic triad of the disease, associated with an unusual lymph accumulation in the abdomen region. PMID:24937826

  13. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A series of three cases.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Amod P; Kshirsagar, Rajesh A; Dugal, Arun; Mishra, Akshay; Ram, Hari

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is characterized by multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormities. The syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist during the routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This article reports the series of 3 cases, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestations of GGS.

  14. [Munchausen's syndrome: a factitious disorder? A case report].

    PubMed

    Reich, E; Kajosh, H; Verbanck, P; Kornreich, C

    2013-01-01

    Munchausen's syndrome is classified as a chronic factitious disorder with predominant physical signs and symptoms. Several symptoms are specific to this disorder, such as travelling and pseudologia fantastica. Others symptoms, such as multiple physical complaints with no organic substrate, are shared with somatoform disorders. We report a case showing how difficult it is to diagnose a Munchausen syndrome. We discuss also the opportunity to classify such a syndrome as a factitious disorder. Indeed, several authors suggest classifying Munchausen syndrome as a subtype of somatoform disorders, as those two disorders share a lot of characteristics.

  15. [Yunis-Varon syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Dueñaz, Ricardo; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Marcos Abdala, Hernán; López-Altamirano, Marcelo; Martínez-Menchaca, Héctor R

    2012-01-01

    In 1980, Yunis-Varon described this disease. Yunis-Varon syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease. This cleidocranial dysplasia is characterized by bone and tooth disorders, in addition tends to affect the cardiovascular system and tissues from ectoderm. This report describes the radiologic image of a patient with Yunis-Varon syndrome.

  16. [Moebius syndrome: therapeutic proposals from 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Braye, F; Souchere, B; Franc, C; Freidel, M

    1996-12-01

    Moebius syndrome is a congenital bilateral palsy of the sixth and seventh cranial nerves. It results a total absence of facial expression and a severe strabismus. Social life is greatly disturbed. Other anomalies may be associated, especially other cranial palsies and Poland syndrome. The etiology of this syndrome isn't clearly established. Stem necrosis secondary to a vascular deficiency is often admitted. We report two observations. We emphasize the importance of a complete maxillo-facial treatment including maxillo-mandibular anomaly. Both patient underwent orthognathic surgery. The first one for class II and the second for class III anomaly. One patient underwent a facial reanimation by temporal muscle transfer. Orthognathic surgery must be realized prior to facial reanimation. A correction of the strabismus is possible. Moebius syndrome is a rare (200 observations) but very severe malformation. Maxillofacial surgery is able to improve the morphological and relational aspect of Moebius syndrome.

  17. A case of immune reconstitution syndrome to disseminated histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Halima

    2011-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an uncommon cause of hepatosplenomegaly in South Africa. A case of immune reconstitution syndrome (IRS) to disseminated histoplasmosis in a patient presented to a tertiary hospital in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa, is described.

  18. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palla, Viktoria-Varvara; Karaolanis, Georgios; Pentazos, Panagiotis; Ladopoulos, Alexios; Papageorgiou, Evaggelos

    2015-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a clinical entity that includes loss of energy, fluid, electrolytes or micronutrient balance because of inadequate functional intestinal length. This case report demonstrates the case of a woman who compensated for short bowel syndrome through intestinal adaptation, which is a complex process worthy of further investigation for the avoidance of dependence on total parenteral nutrition and of intestinal transplantation in such patients.

  19. Gorlin syndrome with bilateral polydactyly: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sonu; Panda, Swagatika; Singh Dhull, Kanika; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Ray, Prayas

    2013-09-01

    Gorlin's syndrome is a rare disorder transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by multiple disorders involving multiple systems. We present a case of 11-year-old male child presenting with multiple odontogenic keratocyst to the dental clinic. Retrograde diagnosis of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome was made after clinical and radiological investigation. How to cite this article: Acharya S, Panda S, Dhull KS, Sahoo SR, Ray P. Gorlin Syndrome with Bilateral Polydactyly: A Rare Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):208-212.

  20. A case of Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Miho; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Noriko; Miyamoto, Yusaku

    2007-09-01

    We report the case of a 19-month-old boy with Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome. The child was born at term to a healthy mother after an uneventful pregnancy. He was born by cesarean section because of fetal macrosomia. He was observed to have nystagmus, craniofacial dysmorphism, and mental retardation. Intractable epileptic spasms developed 17 months after birth, and electroencephalography revealed a modified hypsarrhythmia. The seizures were uncontrollable with sodium valproate monotherapy. At the age of 19 months, the child was diagnosed with Pallister-Killian syndrome of mosaic tetrasomy 12p by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Combination treatment with high-dose pyridoxal phosphate and sodium valproate eliminated seizures and improved the electroencephalographic abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Pallister-Killian syndrome associated with West syndrome.

  1. [Normotensive HELLP syndrome: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Garrido, María Fernanda; Carvajal, Jorge Andrés

    2013-11-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets) represents a severe form of preeclampsia associated with serious maternal and fetal morbidities and even death. Usually HELLP syndrome appears during the evolution of a severe preeclampsia; however HELLP syndrome can have atypical clinical manifestations. We report a 22-year-old female who consulted at 20 weeks of pregnancy for lumbar pain, dysuria and fever. A urinalysis revealed the presence of white blood cells. The patient was admitted to hospital and treated with antimicrobials. Forty eight hours after admission a proteinuria of 440 mg/24 h was detected. A severe pre eclampsia-HELLP syndrome was diagnosed. However the patient remained with normal blood pressure. An elevation of liver enzymes and creatinine were observed. Five days later fetal death was confirmed and an abortion was induced. The patient required a platelet transfusion. Four days after the abortion, the patient was discharged in good conditions.

  2. The Medich giant platelet syndrome: two new cases.

    PubMed

    Gunning, William; Dole, Mukund; Brecher, Martin; White, James G

    2013-01-01

    Hypogranular platelet disorders in human subjects are relatively rare. They include the gray platelet syndrome, αδ storage pool deficiency, the Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and the white platelet syndrome. Perhaps the rarest of them all is the Medich giant platelet disorder. No additional cases of this condition have been reported since description of the first case in 2004. This study describes two children with thrombocytopenia and giant, hypogranular platelets found shortly after birth. Electron microscopic study of their platelets revealed sheets of membrane wrapped into tubes resembling scrolls. The scroll-like structures were open at both ends and often filled with glycogen particles. The abnormal structures are identical to those found in the initial case. As a result, the disorder can now be referred to as the Medich giant platelet syndrome.

  3. [Skin reaction to carbamazepine or DRESS syndrome: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fundora, Emigdio Jesús; Cabrera Osorio, Yuliet; Cabrera Osorio, Claudia

    2016-02-25

    Carbamazepine is a frequently used drug that can produce adverse reactions like vertigo, somnolence and severe skin reactions like Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Syndrome (DRESS Syndrome). This syndrome is characterized by a late-appearing, slow-progressing cutaneous eruption accompanied by atypical lymphocytes, eosinophilia, and systemic symptoms such as fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatic compromise, and renal dysfunction that can be severe enough to cause death. We present a case that aims to highlight the importance of an early diagnosis of DRESS syndrome to adjust therapy and improve survival. The patient is a female patient prescribed carbamazepine for trigeminal neuralgia who presented with skin lesions, which were initially attributed to a hypersensitivity reaction. The lesions worsened in spite of treatment and systemic symptoms ensued. A diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was proposed and steroid treatment was initiated with rapid improvement.

  4. FGFR1 Pfeiffer syndrome without craniosynostosis: an additional case report.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Anna; Rowe, Lindsay

    2006-10-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition classically encompassing both craniosynostosis and digital abnormalities of the hands and feet. Individuals with Pfeiffer syndrome may have mutations within either fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene (FGFR1) or FGFR2. FGFR1 mutations often result in less severe craniofacial involvement and hand abnormalities. We report a four-generation family with an FGFR1 P252R mutation, who have typical hand and feet skeletal features of Pfeiffer syndrome without craniofacial involvement. This is the third family in the literature in which no family members have craniofacial features of Pfeiffer syndrome. The absence of craniosynostosis should not preclude the consideration of FGFR mutation analysis in cases in which digital features are characteristic of the craniosynostosis syndromes.

  5. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed.

  6. A Case of hereditary spherocytosis coexisting with Gilbert's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Jae; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Kang, Seung Hwa; Mun, Se Kwon; Kim, Heyjin; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, Jin; Kang, Hye Jin

    2013-03-25

    We recently encountered a case of hereditary spherocytosis coexisting with Gilbert's syndrome. Patient was initially diagnosed with Gilbert's syndrome and observed, but other findings suggestive of concurrent hemolysis, such as splenomegaly and gallstones were noted during the follow-up period. Therefore, further evaluations, including a peripheral blood smear, osmotic fragility test, autohemolysis test, and red blood cell membrane protein test were performed, and coexisting hereditary spherocytosis was diagnosed. Genotyping of the conjugation enzyme uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase was used to confirm Gilbert's syndrome. Because of the high prevalence rates and similar symptoms of these 2 diseases, hereditary spherocytosis can be masked in patients with Gilbert's syndrome. In review of a case and other article, the possibility of the coexistence of these 2 diseases should be considered, especially in patients with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia who also have splenomegaly and gallstones.

  7. Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome: first Brazilian case reports.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, A V; Filardi, S; Fernandes, S R; Marques-Neto, J F; Samara, A M

    2000-01-01

    Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome was first described in 1954 and is defined by an anterior curvature of the bones of the lower limbs, usually bilateral and symmetrical. Since its initial description, 82 cases were reported, including only 14 pediatric patients. The authors report two cases of this syndrome. One patient was an adult who presented with almost all the characteristic features of the disease. The second case was a 12-year-old girl who also presented with severe bone deformities of the upper limbs. Weismann-Netter-Stuhl syndrome is probably more common than previously reported and must be included in the differential diagnosis of rickets/osteomalacia, congenital syphilis and some cases of Paget's disease.

  8. Adolescent with Tourette Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome consists of multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics. Psychopathology occurs in approximately 90% of Tourette syndrome patients, with attention-deficit/hyperactivity, mood, and obsessive-compulsive disorders being common. Additionally, Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder may be related in some individuals. However, it is unclear why bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in Tourette syndrome patients, and more research is needed. Herein, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder, whose symptoms improved with aripiprazole, atomoxetine, and valproate. The patient was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome at 8 years of age when he developed tics and experienced his first depressive episode. The patient had a poor response to a variety of antidepressants and anti-tic medications. A combination of valproate and aripiprazole stabilized both the patient's tics and mood symptoms. It is important to assess individuals with Tourette syndrome for other disorders, including bipolar disorder. The treatment of children and adolescents with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder is an important clinical issue. PMID:25598829

  9. [Weaver syndrome. 1st case reported in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, O; Boufajreldin, S; Oranges, C; Orta, C; Guerra, D

    1997-03-01

    A 2 years and 9 months old female patient, with the diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is reported. The proband presents persistent pre and post-natal overgrowth, asynchronic advanced bone age, particular facies, (macrocephaly, ocular hypertelorism, micrognathia, large ears), bilateral widening of the distal femoral metaphysis, bilateral tibia vara, prominent fetal fingerpads, clinodactyly, development delay, low pitched and hoarse cry, nonspecific cortical atrophy, dilation of the ventricles and vermix hypoplasia. The differential diagnosis with other overgrowth syndromes is discussed. The possibility of uniparental disomy and genetic imprinting as the basic genetic defect in the Weaver syndrome is suggested. The patient reported here appears to be the first case in the Venezuelan literature.

  10. Dorsal dimelia in patau syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fattah, A; Pickford, M A

    2007-10-01

    We present a case of a child with Patau syndrome that exhibits features consistent with congenital palmar nail syndrome. The literature is reviewed and evidence presented to demonstrate that this is a defect in the dorso-ventral patterning of the limb and thus a form of dorsal dimelia. In order to differentiate this from other instances of ectopic nail tissue we suggest congenital palmar nail syndrome should be more specifically defined as duplicated nails, absent flexion creases, non-glabrous skin on the palmar surface, reduced movement at the interphalangeal joints and hypoplastic terminal phalanges.

  11. Dual intersection syndrome of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhari, Bouchra; Edderai, Meryem; Boumdine, Hassan; Amil, Touriya; En-nouali, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The intersection syndrome, described since the 19th century, is an uncommon disorder associated with rubbing at the crossing point between the first dorsal compartment muscles and the radial wrist extensor muscles. Imaging modalities used to diagnosis this syndrome includes ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. We reported a case of a 60-year-old man presented to our formation with painful swelling on the dorsum of the wrist and forearm. An MRI and an ultrasound were performed, and objectified a dual cross syndrome of the forearm. PMID:26587172

  12. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Pol, Chetan A; Ghige, Suvarna K; Kalaskar, Ritesh R; Gosavi, Suchitra R

    2013-10-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and musculoskeletal malformations. A rare case of this syndrome observed in a 13-year-old male patient is presented in which multiple OKCs were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the teeth. Early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome is important to reduce the severity of complications including cutaneous and cerebral malignancy and oromaxillofacial deformation and destruction due to jaw cysts.

  13. [A case of palmoplantar dysesthesia syndrome caused by capecitabine].

    PubMed

    Elmas, Ömer Faruk; Metin, Mahmut Sami; Kızılyel, Okan; Aktaş, Akın; Birdal, Canan

    2016-01-01

    Palmoplantar dysesthesia is a dermatologic toxic reaction caused by chemotherapeutics. Also known as hand-foot syndrome, it is not life-threatening, but does decrease quality of life. Dysesthesia, erythema, edema, and desquamation on palmoplantar region are observed clinically. Palmoplantar dysesthesia syndrome may be caused by chemotherapeutics including cytarabine, doxorubicin, capecitabine, epirubicin, docetaxel, vinorelbine, and 5-fluorouracil. The case of a 62-year-old woman who presented with diffuse erythema on palmoplantar area after use of capecitabine for metastatic breast carcinoma is described in the present report. Palmoplantar dysesthesia syndrome caused by capecitabine may affect patient compliance.

  14. Pallister-Killian syndrome: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chung; Lin, Lung-Huang; Tsai, Li-Ping; Huang, Cheng-Hung; Hung, Kun-Long; Liao, Hung-Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Pallister-Killian Syndrome (PKS) is a rare sporadic congenital anomaly disorder, characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, especially craniofacial dysmorphism. It is also associated with mental retardation, seizure, skin pigmentation, and visceral malformations such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart defect, anorectal anomalies, and genital malformation. This syndrome usually presents with tissue-limited mosaicism of supernumerary 12p isochromosome i (12p). Moreover, diagnosis of Pallister-Killian Syndrome (PKS) is difficult because the ratio of abnormal to normal karyotyping is much lower in peripheral lymphocytes than in skin fibroblasts. We report the first case in Taiwan, who has tetrasomy 12p mosaic in peripheral lymphocytes.

  15. Megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Radmanesh, Farid; Rezayi, Ali-Reza; Tonekaboni, Seyed-Hasan; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2013-05-01

    This report describes a case of megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome in a 1-year-old boy, born to healthy nonconsanguineous parents. Megalencephaly and bilateral postaxial polydactyly of upper and lower limbs were noted at birth. He had profound developmental delay and moderate hypotonia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed hydrocephalus, polymicrogyria in both frontal lobes and perisylvian regions, and thin corpus callosum. Array-comparative genomic hybridization was normal. The patient's clinical and radiologic findings fit the classic description of megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome. The possible overlap between megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome and other similar conditions is discussed.

  16. Glucagonoma syndrome: a case report with focus on skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sheng; Li, Shuang; Cai, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Glucagonoma syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic phenomenon. Necrolytic migratory erythema is often one of the first presenting symptoms. We report a case of a 55-year-old man with a 2-year history of recalcitrant eruption. Abdominal computer tomography was performed, which revealed a tumor in the tail of the pancreas. After pancreatectomy, his cutaneous lesions vanished in a few days. Skin symptoms are important, as they are often essential for early diagnosis of glucagonoma syndrome and may prevent metastatic disease; hence, in this report, we focus on skin disorders in glucagonoma syndrome. PMID:25152626

  17. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Maya; Krishnan, Ramesh; Chalakkal, Paul; Paul, George

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an infrequent multisystemic disease with an autosomal dominant trait, with complete penetrance and variable expressivity, though sporadic cases have been described. This article includes a case report and an extensive review of the GGS with regard to its history, incidence, etiology, features, investigations, diagnostic criteria, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and treatment modalities.

  18. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Maya; Krishnan, Ramesh; Chalakkal, Paul; Paul, George

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an infrequent multisystemic disease with an autosomal dominant trait, with complete penetrance and variable expressivity, though sporadic cases have been described. This article includes a case report and an extensive review of the GGS with regard to its history, incidence, etiology, features, investigations, diagnostic criteria, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and treatment modalities. PMID:26604511

  19. A new case of Grange syndrome without cardiac findings.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert; Augustyn, Ann Marie; Wallerstein, Donna; Elton, Leslie; Tejeiro, Beatriz; Johnson, Valerie; Lieberman, Kenneth

    2006-06-15

    Grange syndrome comprises arterial stenoses with hypertension, brachysyndactyly, bone fragility, learning disability, and cardiac defects. To date, we know of two reported families with five affected individuals. We report on one of the youngest cases, in a third family, a 3-year-old girl with brachysyndactyly, renal artery stenosis with hypertension, and bone fragility. She does not have apparent cardiac disease, suggesting cardiac anomalies may not be an obligatory finding in this syndrome.

  20. Piriformis muscle syndrome: a recurrent case after surgical release.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Motalebi, Hassan

    2015-08-18

    We report a recurrent Piriformisc muscle syndrome after surgical release. After the primary neurolysis, a second operation was performed to release adhesions. This case shows a different type of sciatic nerve entrapment by an abnormal thin muscle slip. Results of the revision surgery guide us to the point that revision surgery for Piriformis muscle syndrome should be meticulously selected, and after considering medical and interventional therapies.

  1. Piriformis muscle syndrome: a recurrent case after surgical release

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Motalebi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We report a recurrent Piriformisc muscle syndrome after surgical release. After the primary neurolysis, a second operation was performed to release adhesions. This case shows a different type of sciatic nerve entrapment by an abnormal thin muscle slip. Results of the revision surgery guide us to the point that revision surgery for Piriformis muscle syndrome should be meticulously selected, and after considering medical and interventional therapies. PMID:26286539

  2. Sturge–Weber syndrome – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Shahid M.; Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS), also called as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis is an uncommon congenital neurological disorder & frequent among the neurocutaneous syndromes specifically with vascular predominance. This disorder is characterized by facial capillary malformation & other neurological condition. The oral manifestations are gingival hemangiomatosis restricting to either side in upper and lower jaw, sometimes bilateral. We report a case of SWS with oral, ocular and neurological features. PMID:25853049

  3. [A case of Wilm's tumor with full symptomatic WAGR syndrome].

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D; Daszkiewicz, P

    1995-03-01

    The authors of this paper presented a case of a baby with full-symptomatic WAGR syndrome (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genital tract malformation and mental retardation) treated in the I Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Pediatrics, Medical Academy Poznań. The etiology of this syndrome was discussed (deletion of the 13th band of the 11th chromosome short arm). The reason for treatment failure was analysed.

  4. Anesthetic considerations for patients with postpolio syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Donna

    2011-10-01

    Postpolio syndrome is a disorder related to the recurrence of neuromuscular symptoms in survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis. A comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary for the anesthesia provider to develop a safe anesthetic plan. This case report discusses the anesthetic challenges and considerations in patients with postpolio syndrome, focusing on the importance of careful pharmacologic dosing of opioids, and neuromuscular agents as well as perioperative and postoperative issues related to aspiration risks, cold intolerance, and positioning.

  5. [Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome. A report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arámbula, Adriana; Arenas-Velázquez, Elsa; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    Patients in treatment with allopurinol are in risk of having life threatening adverse reactions particularly at the beginning of the treatment. Two percent of the patients prescribed with this drug have associated severe cutaneous adverse reactions. We present two cases of allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome in mexican patients in which asymptomatic hyperuricemia was the indication to its use. The general physician and the specialist must be alert of this syndrome that causes elevate morbidity and mortality.

  6. [Sarcoidosis presenting with Raynaud's syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nigro, A; Iannone, F; Grattagliano, V; Sanguedolce, F; Lapadula, G

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of association between sarcoidosis and Raynaud's syndrome. A 39 year old female presented fatigue, Raynaud's syndrome, IgG and erithrosedimentation rate (ESR) increase, polyarthralgy in which disseminated micronodular infiltration in the chest X-ray and histological demonstration of non-caseating epitheloid microgranulomas led to a diagnosis of concomitant sarcoidosis. Clues to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis coexisting with autoimmune disease are discussed.

  7. Bronchiolitis as a feature of kartagener syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Sevket; Sahin, Unal; Gumus, Aziz; Taşç, Filiz; Cnarka, Halit; Yavuz, Asiye

    2011-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome (KS), also known as immotile cilia syndrome or as a primary ciliary dyskinesia, is characterized by the triad of situs inversus, bronchiectasis, and chronic pansinusitis. A few studies reported that diffuse bronchiolitis might be one of the characteristic features of the lung in KS. We aimed to present the radiologic characteristics of KS, including diffuse bronchiolitis, sinus aplasia, and situs inversus totalis in a single case.

  8. Early onset marfan syndrome: Atypical clinical presentation of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurt, A; Baykan, A; Argun, M; Pamukcu, O; Halis, H; Korkut, S; Yuksel, Z; Gunes, T; Narin, N

    2015-01-01

    Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS) is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS). The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system. PMID:26929908

  9. Sheehan's Syndrome A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Errarhay, S; Kamaoui, I; Bouchikhi, C; Châara, H; Bouguern, H; Tizniti, S; Melhouf, A; Banani, A

    2009-06-01

    Post-partum pituitary necrosis (Sheehan's syndrome) is a rare complication of post-partum hemorrhage. The diagnosis can be erratic and often delayed. In this case report of Sheehan's syndrome in the post-partum period, the signs were characterized by agalactia, severe hypoglycemia, and low serum levels of thyroid hormones, cortico-adrenal hormones, and gonadotrophin (FSH, LH). The hypophyseal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of hypopituitarism secondary to pituitary necrosis.

  10. Kasabach – Merritt syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is characterised by the combination of rapidly growing vascular tumour, thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and consumptive coagulopathy. The blood clotting disorder results from platelets and other clotting factors of the blood being used up within the tumor. We report a two- and- half month old Saudi female infant who presented with epistaxis, conjunctival haemorrage and bilateral periorbital ecchymosis. PMID:27493358

  11. Postpolio Syndrome: Using a Single Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John; Elrod, G. Franklin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major characteristics of postpolio syndrome (PPS), investigate physical and psychological limitations, and comprehensively review current medical interventions through a single subject design. The study addresses the symptoms and characteristics, the effect on life style, and the current recommended…

  12. [Turner-like syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Velletri, M R; Valenzise, M; Wasniewska, M; Arasi, S; Santisi, A; Romeo, M; Pitrolo, E; Santucci, S; Corica, D; Crisafulli, R; Zirilli, G

    2013-01-01

    A prepubescent 11 year-old girl came to our attention for short stature. Auxological evaluation showed peculiar phenotype. In order to exclude Turner syndrome standard karyotype was performed with normal result. Because of anemia and selective deficiency of the erythroid lineage further investigations were performed and a diagnosis of Blackfan-Diamond anemia was made.

  13. Rett Syndrome: A Longitudinal Developmental Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Norman; Veydt, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The clinical course of development of a 14-year-old girl with Rett Syndrome is outlined. Results indicated a general stagnation in gross and fine motor skills, self-help skills, communication, and cognition, beginning at approximately 15 months. No skills progressed beyond the 2-year level despite several years of intensive intervention.…

  14. [Fibromyalgia (fibrositis) syndrome--a case report].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Iijima, K; Tanaka, M; Tamura, N; Hashimoto, H; Hirose, S

    1991-04-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted in our hospital with back pain and both hip joint pain. Pain was abruptly occurred from the beginning of March 1990. Physical examination revealed wide spread pain (occipital area, both shoulder, lumber area, bilateral gluteal area, inguinal area, both Achilles-plantar area) and more than 12 tender points (occiput, trapezius, second rib, supraspinatus, gluteal, greater trochanter, hip joints, pubic bone). Laboratory examination showed no abnormal findings except ANF (1:160). Any examination including X-ray, bone scintigraphy, CT and MRI did not disclose spondylitis, sacroiliitis and enthesopathy. She was diagnosed as primary fibromyalgia/fibrositis syndrome. Treatment with maprotine hydrochloride (30 mg/day) and phenobarbital (120 mg/day) brought approximately 1/3 reduction of pain and tenderness. Psychoanalysis revealed that she had psychological conflicts against her parents and her colleagues at the work. EEG showed a borderline record with irregular basic pattern and 14 & 6 Hz positive burst at the sleep stage. Although the newly proposed criteria for the classification of fibromyalgia was proposed by ACR, fibromyalgia/fibrositis syndrome has been seldom discussed in the Japanese literature. As this syndrome is frequently associated with various rheumatic diseases, hypothyroidism and malignant diseases, we should pay much more attention to understand this syndrome.

  15. Ehlers Danlos Syndrome – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaurani, Pragati; Marwah, Nikhil; Kaurani, Mayank; Padiyar, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a hereditary collagen disorder which primarily manifests in the skin and joints. Clinically, it is characterized by hyperelasticity of skin and joint hypermobility. This article has described a rare condition seen in a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed with EDS, based on the clinical, radiographic and histological findings. PMID:24783151

  16. Sjögren's syndrome complicated with Fanconi syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingmin; Chen, Lei

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique case of Sjögren's syndrome complicated with Fanconi syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in a 53-year-old Chinese woman, initially found to have proteinuria, fatigue and multiple old costal fractures. Distal tubular dysfunction is the most common renal damage in Sjögren's syndrome, while Fanconi syndrome (which is caused by proximal tubular dysfunction) and Hypothyroidism are rare complications of Sjögren's syndrome.

  17. Wissler–Fanconi syndrome and related diagnoses: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Albustani, Mustafa Q; Howard, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wissler–Fanconi syndrome is a rare rheumatic syndrome that was first described during the 1940s in Europe. Since then, many papers have been written that cover all aspects of this syndrome, most of which are in French and German language, with only a very few in English (none of them recent). We report here a case that fulfils the criteria for Wissler–Fanconi syndrome. Under the more general descriptive umbrella of Wissler–Fanconi syndrome, our patient also fulfils the Modified Jones criteria, and the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and was interpreted by other internists and another rheumatologist as fulfilling the Yamaguchi criteria for adult onset Still’s disease. Case presentation A middle-aged female presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath and chest pain associated with fever, polyarthritis, and had a chronic polymorphic rash on the back and lower extremities. Blood analysis showed highly elevated inflammatory markers and rheumatoid factor. After ruling out other possible deferential diagnoses and reviewing the medical literature, the patient was diagnosed with Wissler–Fanconi syndrome. A combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids achieved complete remission. Conclusion This case report highlights the important differential diagnosis that may be included under the nomenclature of Wissler–Fanconi syndrome (subsepsis hyperergica). Features of Wissler–Fanconi syndrome can be found in a differential diagnosis that includes true sepsis, acute rheumatic fever, rheumatoid arthritis, and adult onset Still’s disease. PMID:27843372

  18. Sjögren syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Dellafiore, C; Villa, A; Zibera, F

    2012-06-01

    Sjögren syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disorder that affects the exocrine glands. The authors present the case of a 50-year-old woman diagnosed with this syndrome on the basis of clinical and serological findings. Sonography of the major salivary glands revealed normal-sized glands with echo structures that were diffusely inhomogeneous due to the presence of multiple hypoechoic areas. Parenchymal vascularization was significantly increased on color Doppler imaging. These findings confirmed the diagnosis and revealed active disease manifested by glandular hypervascularization. This represents a typical case of Sjögren syndrome and illustrates the diagnostic value in these cases of salivary gland sonography, which is effective, noninvasive, and repeatable and provides accurate information on the vascularization status of the glands.

  19. Asperger's syndrome: a report of two cases from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kasmini, K; Zasmani, S

    1995-12-01

    Asperger's Syndrome is a distinct variant of autism, with a prevalence rate of 10 to 26 per 10,000 of normal intelligence, and 0.4 per 10,000 in those with mild mental retardation. The syndrome now has its own clinical entity and diagnostic criteria. It is being officially listed in the ICD-10 under pervasive developmental disorder. Two such cases are described in this article. Case One lacked the ability to relate to others, was excessively preoccupied with the late actor P. Ramlee and demonstrated a peculiar behaviour of holding on to toothbrushes in his early childhood. Cognitively, he was unable to synthesise words into meaningful sentences. Similarly, Case Two was unable to relate well to others and was preoccupied with the planets and its constellations. Though he appeared intelligent with an IQ score of 101, he was unable to follow instructions at school. Both children had motor clumsiness and fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome.

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae associated opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome in three cases.

    PubMed

    Huber, Benedikt Maria; Strozzi, Susi; Steinlin, Maja; Aebi, Christoph; Fluri, Simon

    2010-04-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare acquired movement disorder occurring in all age groups, predominantly in infants. Although the exact pathogenesis is still undefined, there is strong evidence for a paraneoplastic or parainfectious immune process resulting in central nervous system dysfunction. Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been implicated in a number of immune-mediated neurologic diseases [28]. However, the association of M. pneumoniae and opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome is not well established so far. We present three cases with opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome in adolescents following an infection with M. pneumoniae. Monophasic disease course and full recovery correspond to the favorable prognosis known from parainfectious cases in young adults. This should affect therapeutic consideration. OMS should be added to the spectrum of M. pneumoniae-associated neurologic complications. Nevertheless, neuroblastoma has to be ruled out in all cases of OMS.

  1. Alagille syndrome case report: implications for forensic pathology and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Petaros, Anja; Miletic, Damir; Stifter, Sanja; Slaus, Mario; Stemberga, Valter

    2015-05-01

    This case report offers a multidisciplinary interpretation of the violent death of a 4-year-old girl suffering from Alagille syndrome who died after a low-height fall that resulted in temporal bone fracture and a large epidural hematoma. The article evidences the macroscopical and microscopical characteristics of the syndrome, focusing especially on the skeletal findings that emerged during autopsy. In the case report, distinction is made between a possible accidental or non-accidental nature of the injuries and the characteristics of the injury have been interpreted in the light of the existing data on Alagille syndrome. In conclusion, the death was documented as accidental since abnormalities in the skeletal system evidenced during autopsy have predisposed the death of the child albeit through a very mild head trauma. The case report evidences the importance of studying features of skull macro- and microstructure in patients with Alagille syndrome, which have been, until now, underreported in literature and which might contribute to fracture vulnerability in these patients. Although rare, Alagille syndrome is a condition that should be known to forensic medicine practitioners and whose features and peculiarities must be taken into consideration in pediatric autopsy and suspected child abuse cases.

  2. Mouse models of ciliopathies: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Norris, Dominic P; Grimes, Daniel T

    2012-05-01

    The ciliopathies are an apparently disparate group of human diseases that all result from defects in the formation and/or function of cilia. They include disorders such as Meckel-Grüber syndrome (MKS), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Alström syndrome (ALS). Reflecting the manifold requirements for cilia in signalling, sensation and motility, different ciliopathies exhibit common elements. The mouse has been used widely as a model organism for the study of ciliopathies. Although many mutant alleles have proved lethal, continued investigations have led to the development of better models. Here, we review current mouse models of a core set of ciliopathies, their utility and future prospects.

  3. [Case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Kojiro; Hayashida, Yasushi; Hakariya, Hironobu; Ichinose, Syunsuke; Naitou, Shinji

    2009-05-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome, gonadectomy, estrogen supplementation a 23-year-old single female visited our gynecological clinic because of primary amenorrhea. The patient's breast development was good. However the patient had thin pubic hair and blind-ending vagina. Serum levels of estrogen E2, testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follide stimulating hormone (FSH) were 37.0, 497 pg/ml, 22.0 and 8.7 mIU/ml, respectively. Chromosomal analysis was a karyotype of 46, XY. There was no uterus and no ovaries. However, there were bilateral inguinal elastic masses which were gonads. The patient was diagnosed with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and bilateral gonadectomy was performed. The postoperative course was good and the patient is receiving estrogen replacement therapy.

  4. [Stiff person syndrome--case report].

    PubMed

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Pastuszak, Zanna; Staszewski, Jacek; Stepień, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is the rare disease and cause great inefficient. It is characterized by progressive stiffness muscles of trunk and the limbs on which the cramps of muscles overlap. In the electrophysiological investigation of the patients the involuntary discharge of motor unit potentials find and also simultaneous contraction agonistic and antagonistic muscles. SPS is presented with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus often or is the symptom of the paraneoplastic syndrome. It is commonly associated with high anti-glutamic acid decarboxylaze (GAD) antibody titters in the serum of the blood of patients. Establishing the diagnosis can cause difficulties. We observed the patient in the last period about the atypical course the disease. The diagnosis was confirmed occurrences of the high titters of antibodies anti-GAD, the discharge of motor unit potential in paraspinal muscles in the rest and good response the treatment with diazepamem.

  5. The Steven Johnson syndrome. A case study.

    PubMed

    Baby, S; Doris, S

    1999-07-01

    Steven Johnson's Syndrome is a serious systemic disorder in which there are vesicobullous lesions involving the skin and mucous membranes. It can result as an immune response to an antigen or as a drug reaction. Most often it is considered as an allergic reaction. It is a self-limiting condition which responds to immediate management or may result in fluid loss, sepsis and death.

  6. Waardenburg Syndrome type 1: A case report.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Atıs, Guldehan; Altunay, Ilknur Kıvanc

    2011-11-15

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is a rare hereditary disorder that is characterized by the clinical manifestations of oculocutaneous anomalies of pigmentation, congenital deafness, dystopia canthorum, and broad nasal root. It demonstrates both genetically and clinically heterogenous characteristics. In this article, we report an 11-month-old boy with WS1, one of four clinicat types of WS. He exhibited white forelock, hypopigmented macules and patches, heterochromia irides, and dystopia canthorum.

  7. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome: An Update Illustrated by a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hermus, Ingeborg P. M.; Willems, Stacey J. B.; Bogman, Aimée C. C. F.; Janssen, Paddy K. C.; Brabers, Leonie; Schieveld, Jan N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article presents an update on cyclic vomiting syndrome, a potentially exhausting disorder that can occur in children, adolescents, and adults and and has a huge impact on the quality of life. A structured literature search was conducted to explore the current knowledge about antipsychotics in the treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome. A case report is presented of a 15-year-old boy with refractory cyclic vomiting syndrome (ICD-10 criteria), who finally responded to a unique combination of risperidone and amitriptyline. Data Sources: A literature search of English articles was performed in November 2015 using PubMed and the Cochrane Library with cyclic vomiting syndrome, cyclic vomiting, risperidone, and antipsychotics as key words. All types of publications were included. The publication period covered a span from 1976 to 2014. Study Selection and Data Extraction: In total, 13 articles were found. After screening the title and abstract, only 2 were selected. Results: In the current literature, only the use of chlorpromazine in the treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome is mentioned. The possible underlying working mechanism of chlorpromazine is not clarified. Conclusions: Antipsychotics are hardly mentioned in the literature with regard to their antiemetic properties. Antipsychotics like risperidone, and its unique combination with amitriptyline, might be an important alternative to achieve a satisfactory treatment result in refractory cases of cyclic vomiting syndrome. PMID:27733950

  8. Isochromosome Xq in Klinefelter syndrome: Report of 7 new cases

    SciTech Connect

    Arps, S.; Koske-Westphal, T.; Meinecke, P.

    1996-09-06

    In this collaborative study we report on 2 prenatally and 5 postnatally diagnosed cases with a 47,X,i(Xq),Y chromosomal constitution. Excepting tall stature, the 5 adult patients showed all typical manifestations of Klinefelter syndrome. Taken together with previously reported cases, these data suggest that Klinefelter syndrome with isochromosome Xq has a favorable prognosis with normal mental development, and with normal-to-short stature. The prevalence of this Klinefelter variant is calculated to be between 0.3-0.9% in males with X chromosome polysomies. 25 refs., 1 tab.

  9. An unusual case of KBG syndrome with unique oral findings.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Abdul; Mufeed, Abdulla; Ismael, Mohamad; Alam, Mheboob

    2015-07-17

    KBG syndrome is a condition characterised by macrodontia, neurological disturbance, short stature, a distinct cranio-facial appearance, and skeletal anomalies. The authors describe what appears to be the first case of KBG syndrome reported from the Indian subcontinent. Meticulous evaluation of the dental findings helps to identify such cases which may otherwise remain undiagnosed. Further research is warranted to determine the classic and variant presentations of this condition, with follow-up data providing valuable insights into its natural history and long-term prognosis.

  10. Gestational Diabetes Insipidus Associated with HELLP Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gambito, Renela; Chan, Michael; Sheta, Mohamed; Ramirez-Arao, Precious; Gurm, Harmeet; Tunkel, Allan; Nivera, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus is a rare, but well recognized, complication of pregnancy. It is related to excess vasopressinase enzyme activity which is metabolized in the liver. A high index of suspicion of gestational diabetes insipidus is required in a correct clinical setting especially in the presence of other risk factors such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and twin pregnancies. We are presenting a case of gestational diabetes insipidus in a patient with HELLP syndrome. The newborn in this case also had hypernatremia thereby raising possibilities of vasopressinase crossing the placenta.

  11. Langer-Giedion Syndrome: a Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Katge, Farhin Ali; Rusawat, Bhavesh Dahyabhai; Shivasharan, Pooja Ravindra; Patil, Devendra Pandurang

    2016-01-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome is a very uncommon autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by the deletion of chromosomal material. It is characterized by multiple bony exostosis, short stature, mental retardation, and typical facial features. The characteristic appearance of individuals includes sparse scalp hair, rounded nose, prominent philtral area and thin upper lip. Some cases with this condition have loose skin in childhood which typically resolves with age. Oral and dental manifestations include micrognathia, retrognathia, hypodontia, and malocclusion based on cephalometric analysis. This report presents a case of Langer-Giedion syndrome in a 10-year-old child. PMID:27602401

  12. Eagle syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther; Hansen, Karla; Frizzi, James

    2008-11-01

    Eagle syndrome, which is an uncommon sequela of elongation of the styloid process, can manifest as pain in the anterolateral neck, often with referred pain to the ear. In most cases, the elongation is an acquired condition, often occurring as a result of a traumatic incident, including tonsillectomy. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who experienced unremitting right neck pain for several years following an accidental fall. A multidisciplinary investigation identified an elongated styloid process. Surgical shortening of the structure provided definitive relief of the patient's symptoms. We review the anatomy of the peristyloid structures and discuss the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Eagle syndrome.

  13. Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (Haberland syndrome): A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jagati, Ashish; Shah, Bela J.; Joshi, Rima; Gajjar, Trusha

    2016-01-01

    Haberland syndrome or Fishman syndrome also known as encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a rare, congenital neurocutaneous disorder. It is characterized by unilateral involvement of skin, eyes and central nervous system. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman who presented with soft lipomatous swelling over right temporal area with nonscarring alopecia of part of frontal and parietal region. The patient had a history of seizures and ipsilateral scleral dermoid. Computed tomography scan findings were suggestive of lipomas and calcification of falx. Magnetic resonance imaging showed right-sided hemi atrophy and two intracranial cysts. We report this case because of its rarity. PMID:27990391

  14. Poland-Moebius syndrome: a case with oral anomalies.

    PubMed

    Domingos, A C; Lopes, S L C P; Almeida, S M; Boscolo, F N; Whaites, E J

    2004-11-01

    The combination of Moebius and Poland anomalies is rarely described in the literature. While some authors believe this association is an independent syndrome, others think that Poland, Moebius and Poland-Moebius syndromes are variations of the same condition. We report a case of Poland-Moebius syndrome in a 6-year-old girl who presented with bilateral convergent strabismus, the inability to abduct her eyes beyond the midline and brachydactyly of her right hand. Oral manifestations included incompetent lips and an abnormal tongue. Other facial features included hypoplasia of her mandible and her left ear at a slightly lower level than her right ear. Panoramic and lateral skull radiographs confirmed the absence of certain teeth and the hypoplastic mandible. The diagnosis of Poland-Moebius syndrome was made on the basis of cranial nerve involvement and oro-facial manifestations.

  15. Apert syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Tuba Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Apert syndrome is the rare acrocephalosyndactyly syndrome type 1, characterized by craniosynostosis, severe syndactyly of hands and feet, and dysmorphic facial features. It demonstrates autosomal dominant inheritance assigned to mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor gene. Presently described is case of a 19-year-old female patient diagnosed on physical examination with Apert syndrome based on acrocephaly, prominent forehead, ocular hypertelorism, proptosis, short and broad nose, pseudoprognathism, dental crowding and ectopia, maxillar hypoplasia, low hairline, webbed neck, pectus excavatum, and severe, bilateral syndactyly of hands and feet. The multiple phenotypic signs of Apert syndrome make multidisciplinary team, including dentist, neurosurgeon, plastic surgeon, physiatrist, ophthalmologist, perinatalogist and geneticist, essential for successful management. PMID:28058401

  16. Natal molars in Pfeiffer syndrome type 3: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M P; Crespi, P V; Shanske, A L

    1993-01-01

    The following report is the first documented case of natal teeth associated with a recently described new entity, Pfeiffer syndrome type 3. The clinical manifestations consistent with the spectrum of this rare disorder are described with an emphasis on the concomitant natal teeth. Pfeiffer syndrome type 3 is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes and has been described in only two patients to date. Both mandibular incisors and maxillary molar natal teeth were found. Natal teeth are teeth, which are present in the oral cavity at birth. They are often associated with developmental abnormalities and recognized syndromes. Their incidence ranges from 1 in 2,000 to 3,500 births. The natal teeth found in this infant included both the mandibular primary incisors and maxillary primary first molars bilaterally. The clinical and histological considerations of natal teeth and their management are discussed. The presence of multiple natal teeth is extremely rare.

  17. Six case studies depicting the deliberate self-harm syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S; Collins, K J

    1993-04-01

    This article comprises information on self-mutilation (and specifically on the Deliberate Self-harm Syndrome) which obtained from a study of mainly American and British literature. Included is data obtained from interviews conducted with a sample of South Africans suffering from the syndrome. Etiology was explained from both a psychological and biological perspective. The former highlighted deficiencies in coping and communication skills while the latter highlighted the compulsive and pain-killer role that endorphines play. From case studies and literature it was possible to clearly distinguish the Deliberate Self-harm Syndrome as a distinct disorder-a syndrome consisting of deliberate, repetitive and private acts of self-harm in the form of cutting, burning and banging oneself. This culminates in extreme tension release.

  18. Multidisciplinary surgical management of Cowden syndrome: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, Edoardo; Gallenzi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Cowden’s Syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital autosomal dominant disorder that affects around 1/200000 patients with an incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity, characterized by alterations in a tumor suppressor gene. A 14-year-old Caucasian male patient came to the attention of the authors complaining of palm nodules, gingival bleeding and painful pedunculated lesions on the lips and on the labial side of anterior sextants. After genetic investigation the final diagnosis of a Cowden Syndrome was made. The lesions were surgically removed under general anesthesia and no clinical signs of recurrence were found three months after surgical excision. Considering the severe symptoms of the syndrome and the strong tendency to malignant development of the associated lesions all clinicians should focus their efforts to the early diagnosis and, when possible, multidisciplinary treatment. Key words:Early diagnosis, multiple hamartoma syndrome, oral papillomatosis, cancer predisposition, case report. PMID:27703620

  19. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26–28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed. PMID:26321847

  20. [Charles Bonnet syndrome: case reports and short review].

    PubMed

    Lagoudis, A; Bozikas, V

    2011-01-01

    Charles Bonnet first described visual hallucinations in a ground of visual deprivation in the 18th century. In this paper, two case reports with the syndrome are presented (female 83 years old, male 68 years old) along with a short literature review. The distinction of the syndrome from other psychiatric disorders (delirium, dementia), where visual hallucinations are also present, demands the presence of the diagnostical triad: visual hallucinations, visual impairment, intact cognitive status. The hallucinations are rich in colors and tension, people usually have the "leading roles" and patients mostly are curious, enjoy the hallucinations and are not afraid of them. More often hallucinations appear after acute visual impairment and in older patients. There are several theories concerning the mechanisms that lead to the syndrome. The Charles Bonnet syndrome appears to be self-restricted and there are no clear guidelines regarding its treatment.

  1. [Use of bevacizumab (Avastin) in KID syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Caye, Luiza; Scheid, Karin; Pizzol, Melissa Manfroi Dal; Freda, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    KID syndrome is a congenital ectodermal dysplasia characterized by the association of keratitis, hyperkeratotic skin lesions and neurosensorial hearing loss. Ocular involvement occurs in 95% of patients. Although KID syndrome cutaneous manifestations have been studied in-depth, the treatment and prognosis of ophthalmic impairment have not been described in detail. At present, the treatment of the ocular damage caused by the syndrome is symptomatic and there are no studies defining a treatment that could change the disease course. In this case, ophthalmologic findings of a patient with KID syndrome and the use of subconjunctival bevacizumab to treat corneal neovascularization are described. In spite of the absence of improvement in this patient and the few reports of this disease, additional studies with bevacizumab to treat corneal deep neovascularization are suggested.

  2. Piriformis syndrome: a case with non-discogenic sciatalgia.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Adem; Aytekin, Aykut; Develi, Sedat; Ekinci, Safak

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a clinical picture of non-discogenic sciatica caused by compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle. It has variable etiologies and the patho-physiology is not fully understood. The major etiology was known to be the spasm, edema and inflammation of the piriformis muscle and sciatic nerve compression of the muscle later on. Patients can be diagnosed immediately with a comprehensive clinical examination and early diagnosis makes the treatment much easier. Diagnosis of the piriformis syndrome, a very rare cause of low back pain, first requires that this syndrome is remembered, and then a differential diagnosis should be performed. A case of piriformis syndrome diagnosed in a patient who presented with low back pain is reported in this study.

  3. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. Case Report In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Conclusions Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression. PMID:27354882

  4. Surveillance case definitions for work related upper limb pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, J. M.; Carter, J. T.; Birrell, L.; Gompertz, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish consensus case definitions for several common work related upper limb pain syndromes for use in surveillance or studies of the aetiology of these conditions. METHODS: A group of healthcare professionals from the disciplines interested in the prevention and management of upper limb disorders were recruited for a Delphi exercise. A questionnaire was used to establish case definitions from the participants, followed by a consensus conference involving the core group of 29 people. The draft conclusions were recirculated for review. RESULTS: Consensus case definitions were agreed for carpal tunnel syndrome, tenosynovitis of the wrist, de Quervain's disease of the wrist, epicondylitis, shoulder capsulitis (frozen shoulder), and shoulder tendonitis. The consensus group also identified a condition defined as "non-specific diffuse forearm pain" although this is essentially a diagnosis made by exclusion. The group did not have enough experience of the thoracic outlet syndrome to make recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: There was enough consensus between several health professionals from different disciplines to establish case definitions suitable for use in the studies of several work related upper limb pain syndromes. The use of these criteria should allow comparability between studies and centres and facilitate research in this field. The criteria may also be useful in surveillance programmes and as aids to case management.   PMID:9624281

  5. Gingival Enlargement in a Case of Variant Jones Syndrome: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    DA, Roopa; Singh, Shinkhala; Gupta, Ira; Gopal, Saumiya

    2016-01-01

    Gingival enlargement can be caused by a variety of etiological factors like inflammation, drugs, and systemic diseases or can be presented as a part of a syndrome. One such syndrome is Jones Syndrome, which is associated with gingival enlargement and progressive hearing loss. We present here a case of fifteen-year-old boy with gingival enlargement, hearing loss, and generalized alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as Jones syndrome. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. Gingival enlargement was surgically managed using gingivectomy and no recurrence was observed. The patient showed remarkable esthetical and functional improvement. PMID:26966711

  6. Shwachman's syndrome. A review of 21 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Aggett, P J; Cavanagh, N P; Matthew, D J; Pincott, J R; Sutcliffe, J; Harries, J T

    1980-01-01

    21 patients (10 male, 11 female) aged between 11 months and 29 years with Shwachman's syndrome are reviewed. All patients had exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Haematological features included neutropenia in 19 (95%), anaemia in 10 (50%), and thrombocytopenia in 14 (70%); one patient developed erythroleukaemia. Severe infections occurred in 17 (85%) from which 3 (15%) died. Only one child exceeded the 3rd centile for height, and growth retardation was particularly evident in the older patients. All had skeletal abnormalities or delayed skeletal maturation, or both. Metaphyseal dyschondroplasia affected 13 of the older patients and was associated with skeletal deformities. Eight of 9 children under 2 1/2 years had rib abnormalities. Respiratory function tests in children under 2 years demonstrated reduced thoracic gas volume and chest wall compliance. Older patients had reduced forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity. Neurological assessment showed developmental retardation or reduced IQ assessments, or both, in 85% of patients studied. Other neurological abnormalities included hypotonia, deafness, and retinitis pigmentosa. Neonatal problems had been present in 16 (80%) of the patients and 5 were of low birthweights. Hepatomegaly with biochemical evidence of liver involvement occurred in the younger patients and resolved with age. Other associated features included dental abnormalities, renal dysfunction, an icthyotic maculopapular rash in 13 (65%), delayed puberty, diabetes mellitus, and various dysmorphic features. These findings stress the diverse manifestations of the syndrome and extend knowledge on a number of aspects. Sibship segregation ratios support an autosomal mode of inheritance and an hypothesis for the pathophysiological basis of this syndrome is advanced. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4(a) Fig. 4(b) Fig. 5 PMID:7436469

  7. Diabetes mellitus with Laron syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Agladıoglu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Cetınkaya, Semra; Savas Erdeve, Senay; Onder, Asan; Kendırcı, Havva Nur Peltek; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Aycan, Zehra

    2013-01-01

    There are different opinions concerning changes in glucose metabolism in patients with Laron syndrome. In this paper we discuss the treatment results of our patient with Laron syndrome who developed diabetes during late adolescence. A 19-year-old boy with Laron syndrome was referred to our clinic for follow-up. He had been diagnosed with Laron syndrome (LS) at 4 years old and rIGF-1 therapy was initiated. After 4 months the treatment was discontinued. At the age of 17, rIGF-1 therapy was restarted. A height gain of 8.8 cm. was observed during the 2-year treatment period. He was admitted to our hospital at the age of 19 years following discontinuation of the therapy. At that time, his height was 142 cm, and weight for height was 136%. His blood glucose was 85 mg/dL (4.72 mmol/L), insulin was 26.39 pmol/L, and HbA1c was 5.4%. At the age of 20, when he has not been receiving IGF-1 therapy for 1 year, his weight for height was 143 cm. Laboratory evaluation revealed that fasting blood glucose was 176 mg/dL (9.77 mmol/L), fasting insulin was 29.86 pmol/L, and HbA1c was 7.5%. Primary insulin therapy was then initiated. His parents both had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Insulin therapy was switched to oral antidiabetic (OAD) therapy at the end of the second year because of a normal C-peptide level of 0.8 nmol/L under insulin therapy. After 6 months of OAD, HbA1c was 5.7%. The treatment was then switched to IGF-1 therapy, but his blood glucose profile was impaired and OAD therapy was restarted. In conclusion, we observed that genetic susceptibility and abdominal obesity caused type 2 diabetes in this patient. We believe that oral antidiabetic agents and life-style changes may be the appropriate approach when diabetes is developed in LS patients.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of SAPHO syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinghua; Sun, Wenwen; Meng, Zhaowei; Gong, Lu; Tan, Jian; Jia, Qiang; Yu, Chunshui; Yu, Tielian

    2014-08-01

    The present study reports a rare case of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome in an adult male. The 42-year-old man complained of skin lesions, chest pain and lumbago. Laboratory evaluations demonstrated an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and increased levels of C-reactive protein. Computerized tomography, bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple bone lesions. A diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was made. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alendronate sodium and steroids were administered, which resulted in clinical improvement. The current case study demonstrates that skin manifestation and multiple imaging modalities are important in generating a definite diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome, and that early treatment is vital for a positive outcome.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of SAPHO syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SONG, XINGHUA; SUN, WENWEN; MENG, ZHAOWEI; GONG, LU; TAN, JIAN; JIA, QIANG; YU, CHUNSHUI; YU, TIELIAN

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports a rare case of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome in an adult male. The 42-year-old man complained of skin lesions, chest pain and lumbago. Laboratory evaluations demonstrated an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and increased levels of C-reactive protein. Computerized tomography, bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple bone lesions. A diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was made. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alendronate sodium and steroids were administered, which resulted in clinical improvement. The current case study demonstrates that skin manifestation and multiple imaging modalities are important in generating a definite diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome, and that early treatment is vital for a positive outcome. PMID:25009594

  10. Case of polyhydramnios complicated by Opitz G/BBB syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Hiroko; Itoh, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Ayako; Nakamura, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Hirai, Kyuya; Suzuki, Kazunao; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Ohishi, Akira; Ohzeki, Takehiko; Kanayama, Naohiro

    2010-08-01

    Opitz G/BBB syndrome is a congenital disorder characterized by midline defects, such as hypertelorism, cleft lip and/or palate, hypospadias, and by dysphagia often caused by laryngo-tracheo-esophageal abnormalities. We experienced a case of polyhydramnios in a male dichorionic diamniotic (DD) twin, who was diagnosed with Opitz G/BBB syndrome after birth. It is suggested that severe dysphagia was causatively associated with the development of polyhydramnios. In cases of Opitz G/BBB syndrome, boys are usually more heavily affected than girls, who generally manifest only hypertelorism. In the differential diagnosis of polyhydramnios of unidentified cause in male fetuses, it may be helpful to consider maternal facial characteristics, especially hypertelorism.

  11. Cowden syndrome- Clinico-radiological illustration of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prashant B; Sreenivasan, V; Goel, Sumit; Nagaraju, K; Vashishth, Shirin; Gupta, Swati; Garg, Kanika

    2013-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an infrequent genodermatoses, which is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait resulting from the mutation in the Phosphatase and Tensin homolog gene on the arm 10q and is principally characterized by multiple hamartomas with an increased risk of development of malignancies. Facial and oral signs are remarkable in the form of multiple papules and trichilemmomas on the face. We report one such rare case of CS in a 19-year-old patient who was diagnosed on the basis of her oral mucosal lesions and was further investigated and diagnosed with other hamartomas. The present case report signifies the responsibility of the oral physician in the early diagnosis of this progressive pathological syndrome as it leaves its footmark in the oral cavity in the form of oral mucosal lesions.

  12. Case Report: Cervical chondrocalcinosis as a complication of Gitelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zahra; Mead, Paul; Sayer, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy leading to a hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. Most cases are due to mutations in SLC12A3, encoding the apical thiazide sensitive co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule. Musculoskeletal effects of Gitelman syndrome are common, including muscle weakness, tetany and cramps. Chronic hypomagnesaemia can lead to chondrocalcinosis, which often affects knees but can affect other joints. Here we present a case of Gitelman syndrome complicated by cervical chondrocalcinosis leading to neck pain and numbness of the fingers. Treatments directed at correcting both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia were initiated and allowed conservative non-surgical management of the neck pain. Recognition of chondrocalcinosis is important and treatments must be individualised to correct the underlying hypomagnesaemia. PMID:27303630

  13. [Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with chronic myeloproliferative syndromes: analysis of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Cobo, F; Cervantes, F; García-Pagán, J C; Bosch, J; Rozman, C; Montserrat, E

    1996-11-16

    The chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD) are considered the main etiology of Budd-Chiari syndrome in Western countries. Moreover, an occult CMPD has been recently identified in most patients with idiopathic hepatic vein thrombosis. In order to determine the frequency of the association between the above entities and to analyze the clinical and hematologic features of such patients, fourteen cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome diagnosed at a single institution over a five year period were reviewed. In 6 patients a CMPD was identified, with this being the first cause of the syndrome. Median age of the later six patients was 32 years (range: 14-54), and 4 were females. In all cases the CMPD was suspected due to the presence of hematological abnormalities, including a high hematocrit (5 cases), leucocytosis (4 cases) and thrombocytosis (3 cases). Five patients had polycythemia vera (PV) and one idiopathic myelofibrosis. In an additional Budd-Chiari patient with polycythemia, PV was ruled out on the basis of high serum erythropoietin and the absence of endogenous growth of erythroid colonies in the hematopoietic progenitor culture. The CMPD treatment included phlebotomies and hydroxiurea, whereas the Budd-Chiari syndrome was treated in most patients with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt. One patient died from a gastrointestinal hemorrhage at 48 months from Budd-Chiari diagnosis, and the remaining five are alive after a median follow-up of 28 months.

  14. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome: Case report of three cases with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gutch, Manish; Kumar, Sukriti; Razi, Syed Mohd; Saran, Sanjay; Gupta, Keshav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pickardt syndrome (Pickardt-Fahlbusch syndrome) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by tertiary hypothyroidism caused by the interruption of the portal veins between hypothalamus and adenohypophysis. Typical features of this syndrome are tertiary hypothyroidism with low thyroid stimulating hormone, hyperprolactinemia and other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome is characterized by a triad of thin or interrupted pituitary stalk, aplasia or hypoplasia of the anterior pituitary and absent or ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP) seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a congenital anomaly of pituitary whose exact prevalence is unknown. In some cases, it is restricted to EPP or pituitary stalk interruption. We are presenting the case history along with MRI finding of three children's who presented with short stature and delayed puberty. PMID:25250085

  15. Consonants in Cri du Chat Syndrome: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal case study of consonant productions in one Norwegian girl with Cri du chat syndrome from age 4;6 to age 9;4. It was shown that she had many articulation errors throughout the period of observation. Furthermore, these errors were shown to fall into three main categories: (1) errors of differentiation and…

  16. Ortner’s syndrome: a case report and literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Bruno Landim; Campos, Lenilton da Costa; Marques, Hélder de Castro; Vilela, Vagner Moysés; Carvalho, Rodolfo Elias Diniz da Silva; Duque, André Geraldo da Silva

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 55-year-old female, hypertensive, smoker patient presenting with dysphonia, dysphagia and persistent dry cough. Laryngoscopy diagnosed left vocal cord paralysis. Computed tomography demonstrated saccular aneurysm of the inferior wall of the aortic arch, stretching the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, a finding compatible with Ortner’s syndrome. PMID:26379325

  17. Savant Syndrome: Case Studies, Hypotheses, and Implications for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Susan Klug; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The concept of savant syndrome, encompassing those individuals historically known as "idiot savants," is reviewed. Case studies demonstrating special abilities in the areas of calendar calculating, musical ability, artistic talent, memorization, mathematical skills, mechanical achievement, and fine sensory discrimination are discussed,…

  18. Anaesthetic Management in Brugada Syndrome - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pragathee, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Brugada Syndrome (BS) is a rare congenital cardiac disorder involving cardiac sodium channels, sometimes presenting with ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Here, we are reporting a case of BS who presented for laparotomy due to obstructed inguinal hernia which was managed satisfactorily with combined epidural and general anaesthesia without any complications. PMID:28384965

  19. A case of Kartagener syndrome with rhinolalia clausa.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Sator, Hicham; Lahma, Jawad; El Ayoubi, Ali; Nitassi, Sophia; Oujilal, Abdelilah; Benbouzid, Mohammed Anas; Essakalli, Leila; Elouazzani, Hanane; Rhorfi, Ismail Abderrahmane; Abid, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic ciliary disorder comprising of a classic triad of sinusitis, situs inversus and bronchiectasis. It's the one of primary ciliary dyskinesia disorders with manifestations present from childhood. Most patients of PCD have situs inversus. We present a case of 18 year-old women with recurrent lower and upper respiratory tracts infections, and rhinolalia clausa.

  20. A case of Kartagener syndrome with rhinolalia clausa

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Sator, Hicham; Lahma, Jawad; El Ayoubi, Ali; Nitassi, Sophia; Oujilal, Abdelilah; Benbouzid, Mohammed Anas; Essakalli, Leila; Elouazzani, Hanane; Rhorfi, Ismail Abderrahmane; Abid, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic ciliary disorder comprising of a classic triad of sinusitis, situs inversus and bronchiectasis. It's the one of primary ciliary dyskinesia disorders with manifestations present from childhood. Most patients of PCD have situs inversus. We present a case of 18 year-old women with recurrent lower and upper respiratory tracts infections, and rhinolalia clausa. PMID:27375831

  1. A case of poststreptococcal opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dassan, Pooja; Clarke, Charles; Sharp, David J

    2007-07-30

    High antistreptococcal antibody titer (ASOT) was measured in a 31-year-old Caucasian lady presenting with opsoclonus and myoclonus. She was treated with oral steroids and 8 weeks after the onset of symptoms she had a normal ASOT and only mild residual symptoms. This is one of the first cases of opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome developing, following a streptococcal infection in adults.

  2. Lemierre's syndrome after evacuation of the uterus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hedengran, Katrine Kaare; Hertz, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Even minor surgical interventions can have serious complications. Lemierre's syndrome is rare and to our best knowledge never before described after gynecological surgery; however, it should be considered in case of rapidly developing respiratory problems after even simple surgical procedures. PMID:25356246

  3. Case Report: A Behavioral Approach to Tourette's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Marvin; Wesner, Chester

    1973-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome, which includes the compulsive vocalization of obscene words, has been attributed to both organic and psychological factors. Although no conclusions about the etiology of the behavior could be drawn, the operant nature of the symptoms was demonstrated in the present case study in the manipulation of responses by varying…

  4. A Case of Cardiac Amyloidosis Initially Misdiagnosed as Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hyung Rae; Song, Bong Gun; Jeong, Seong Yeon; Hong, Su-Min; Jung, Hyun Gul; Jung, Hye-Jin; Cho, Wook-Hyun; Choi, Suk-Koo

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac infiltration of amyloid fibril results in progressive cardiomyopathy with a grave prognosis and results in cardiac diseases such as congestive heart disease, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and arrhythmias. We present a rare case of cardiac amyloidosis initially misdiagnosed as syndrome X in which recurrent chest pain and progressive heart failure could be managed finally by heart transplantation.

  5. Naegeli–Franceschetti–Jadassohn syndrome: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bela J.; Jagati, Ashish K.; Gupta, Neha P.; Dhamale, Suyog S.

    2015-01-01

    Naegeli–Franceschetti–Jadassohn Syndrome (NFJS) is a rare, autosomal dominant inherited form of ectodermal dysplasia, caused by mutation in the KRT14 gene. We report here a case of NFJS in a 27-year-old male who presented with reticulate hyperpigmentation over skin, dental changes, absence of dermatoglyphics, hypohidrosis, and hair changes. PMID:26753140

  6. Maffucci syndrome and soft tissue sarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lissa, Fernando César Toniazzi; Argente, Juliana Sonego; Antunes, Geórgia Nunes; Basso, Franciani de Oliveira; Furtado, Janara

    2009-01-01

    Background Maffucci syndrome, a congenital mesodermal dysplasia characterized by multiple enchondromas and hemangiomas, was first described in 1881, and 200 cases have been reported in the literature since then. Its etiology is unknown, there is no predilection for race or sex, and the development of lesions usually occurs in puberty. The risk of sarcomatous transformation is about 25%. Case presentation The initial investigation of the case reported here focused on the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy, and the first diagnostic hypothesis was thrombosed hemangioma. After histopathologic confirmation of soft tissue sarcoma, examinations were performed to stage the tumor and enchondromas were found in ribs. The final diagnosis was Maffucci syndrome with malignant transformation. Conclusion Treatment should aim at symptom relief and early detection of malignancies; no therapy is indicated for asymptomatic patients. As in the case reported here, bone or soft tissue lesions that grow or become painful should be biopsied. PMID:19144147

  7. Antisynthetase Syndrome: two case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Theilacker, Lívia Regina; Brandão, Fabíola Sampaio; Goulart, Fernanda Velloso; Vaz, João Luiz Pereira; D'Almeida, Luiz Octávio Dias; da Fonseca Salgado, Maria Cecília

    2015-01-01

    Antissintetase Syndrome (ASS) is characterized by myositis, Raunaud's phenomenon, fever, intertitial lung disease, mechanic's hands and arthropathy associated with the presence of antibodies against tRNA synthetase, especially anti-Jo-1. This article aims to review the literature on ASS and report two cases where the first is a patient with polymyositis who developed subluxation on the proximal interphalangeal joint of bilateral first right finger after a few years of the disease, associated with pulmonary manifestations and positive anti-JO-1. In the second case, we present a patient with dermatomyositis, who developed a subluxation of the two first fingers, anti-Jo1 positive and chest CT changes, but without clinical evidence of pulmonary involvement. These cases reveal the importance of performing early diagnosis. The authors describe two cases of this rare syndrome, emphasizing the severity of interstitial lung disease and arthritis.

  8. Cornelia De-Lange Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cornelia de-Lange syndrome is a congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphism, primordial short stature, hirsutism, and upper limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly. Craniofacial features include synophrys, arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, small widely spaced teeth and microcephaly. IQ ranges from between 30 and 102 with an average of 53. Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. It is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by specific gene mutations and occurrence is one in 30,000 to 50,000 children. This article describes a report of a classical case of the syndrome of a 10-year-old boy and emphasizes the oral and systemic findings. The role of the pediatric dentist, with his expertize in prevention, skills of behavior management and timely referral to medical speciality, is of paramount importance in the management of children with this syndrome. How to cite this article: Mehta DN, Bhatia R. Cornelia De-Lange Syndrome: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):115-118. PMID:25206204

  9. Edentulous child with Allgrove syndrome: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, Mohammad; Allahbakhshi, Hanif

    2016-01-01

    Triple-A syndrome, also known as Allgrove syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. The 3 features of this syndrome are achalasia, adrenal insufficiency, and alacrima. Achalasia could be the first manifestation of the triple-A syndrome; however, its etiology is unclear. Alacrima is generally asymptomatic but can be detected by obtaining patient history. Although adrenal insufficiency could have manifestations such as asthenia, it might be wrongly diagnosed as muscle fatigue. Vitamin D and calcium supplements are usually prescribed for the prevention of osteoporosis. Neurologic manifestations could be present in adults. In some individuals with this disorder, genetic examination indicates mutations in both alleles of the AAAS gene, which encodes a special 546-amino-acid protein designated ALADIN, and in chromosome 12q13. The genetic cause of the triple A syndrome in some patients who do not have an identified mutation is unknown. While very few such cases have been reported till date, one such case was presented to us as an edentulous child. PMID:27895694

  10. Concurrent insulinoma with mosaic Turner syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoyun; Yang, Lijuan; Li, Jie; Mu, Yiming

    2015-03-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which the majority of patients have a 45XO karyotype, while a small number have a 45XO/47XXX karyotype. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia has been previously reported in patients with Turner syndrome. Although insulinomas are the most common type of functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and have been reported in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasias, the tumors have not been reported in patients with mosaic Turner syndrome. The present study reports the first case of an insulinoma in a patient with 45XO/47XXX mosaic Turner syndrome. The patient suffered from recurrent hypoglycemia, which was relieved following ingestion of glucose or food. A 5-h glucose tolerance test was performed and the levels of glucose, C-Peptide and insulin were detected. In addition, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound scanning were performed to evaluate the possibility of an insulinoma. Pathological examination and karyotyping were performed on a surgical specimen and a whole blood sample, respectively. The patient was found to suffer from premature ovarian failure, and a physical examination was consistent with a diagnosis of Turner syndrome. An ultrasound scan demonstrated streak ovaries and the patient was found to have a 45XO/47XXX karyotype. Furthermore, a lesion was detected in the pancreas following CT scanning, which was identified as an insulinoma following surgical removal and histological examination. In conclusion, the present study reports the first case of an insulinoma in a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome. Since mosaic Turner syndrome and insulinoma are rare diseases, an association may exist that has not been previously identified.

  11. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome presenting with pulmonary hemorrhage: case report.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tony; Tsang, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) involving the rare manifestation of pulmonary hemorrhage. This rare variant of APLS is frequently life threatening despite medical therapy. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hemorrhage in catastrophic APLS remains incompletely understood. The optimal approach to managing pulmonary hemorrhage in the setting of catastrophic APLS is still unclear, however this case report demonstrates the success of combination therapy with anticoagulation, corticosteroids and plasma exchange.

  12. [Considerations regarding one particular case of Rett syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sireteanu, Adriana; Rusu, Cristina; Anton, Dana; Covic, M

    2005-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a form of X-linked mental retardation limited to females, expressed by postnatal microcephaly, moderate/severe mental retardation and prominent autistic features. We present a case to illustrate this rare entity, but also to discuss the suggestive behaviour and to underline the importance of diagnostic criteria. Our case associates porencephaly and positive CMV test that raised diagnostic difficulties in the beginning.

  13. Cutis Laxa syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hbibi, Mohamed; Abourazzak, Sana; Idrissi, Mounia; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Cutis laxa (CL) is a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired connective tissue disorders characterized by a loose skin and variable systemic involvement (inguinal hernia, cardiopulmonary disease, and emphysema). Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and x-linked recessive patterns have been described in the inherited forms. Acquired forms of this disease have been associated with a previous inflammatory skin disorder (urticaria…). The characteristic symptomatological pattern is resulting from paucity of elastic fibers. We report an 18 months old baby boy with a congenital cutis laxa. He was admitted in pediatric unit for respiratory disorders. The diagnosis of CL syndrome is based on clinical assessment of typical skin features and the associated extracutaneous finding. PMID:25995800

  14. [Cotard's syndrome: Case report and a brief review of literature].

    PubMed

    Moschopoulos, N P; Kaprinis, S; Nimatoudis, J

    2016-01-01

    The term "Cotard's syndrome" is used to describe a number of clinical features, mostly hypochondriac and nihilistic delusions, the most characteristic of which are the ideas "I am dead" and "my internal organs do not exist". Besides, anxious and depressed mood, delusions of damnation, possession and immortality, suicidal and self-mutilating behavior are included. The first description of the syndrome was made in 1880 by Cotard, who presented the case of a female patient in a lecture. He originally named it "hypochondriac delusion", and some years later "delusion of negations", while it was named "Cotard delusion" after his death. In international literature, the terms "nihilistic delusion" and "Cotard's syndrome" prevailed over "delusion of negations" and "Cotard delusion". In the present study we report the case of a 59 year-old woman, who was admitted to our department after a suicide attempt, and who showed symptoms of Cotard's syndrome for about two years, namely depressed mood, hypochondriac and nihilistic delusions, delusions of immortality and damnation, suicidal ideation, severe psychomotor retardation, diminished motivation and tendency to stay in bed. She never took the medication she was prescribed, and at times she refused to eat. During her hospitalization, there was performed a full blood panel and medical imaging, that showed chronic ischemic infarctions, periventricular leukoencephalopathy and diffuse cerebral atrophy in MRI. All the other test results were normal. She was administered treatment with haloperidol, mirtazapine and venlafaxine. Gradually, her psychomotor ability, motivation and mood improved, she didn't express suicidal ideation, her delusions were less intense and she was able to question them, but they weren't eliminated. She was discharged in improved condition, after 44 days. Cotard's syndrome isn't mentioned in the current classification systems (ICD-10, DSM-5). In literature though, it has been divided into three types, according

  15. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver–Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver–Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, and memory disturbances. Here, we report a case of an adult stroke patient who suffered from bilateral anterior opercular syndrome accompanied by partial Kluver–Bucy syndrome. PMID:27446793

  16. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver-Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ah-Ra; Lim, Young-Ho; Chung, Sae-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-06-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, and memory disturbances. Here, we report a case of an adult stroke patient who suffered from bilateral anterior opercular syndrome accompanied by partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome.

  17. The Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Russo-Menna, I; Arancibias, C

    2010-02-01

    The HGPS (Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome) is a rare genetic disorder with an incidence of 1 per 8 million live births. Originally described in 1886, less than 100 cases have been reported. The syndrome is characterized by premature aging with changes in many organs. The diagnosis is usually made by age 2, the mean survival age is 13.4 years and the most common cause of death is myocardial infarction. Recent genetic advances have identified the cause as a defect in the LMNA gene of chromosome 1.

  18. Six cases of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, S J

    1976-05-01

    Six cases of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are discussed in the light of conflicting views on the aetiology of the condition. It is hypothesized that the onset of coprolalia in patients with persistent childhood tics indicates a disturbances of the normal balance between a need for tension relief by swearing and a capacity to control such vocal activity. Some conclusions are drawn on the management of the syndrome by the use of butyrophenones, massed practice of tics, and the promotion of personality development. A flexible approach geared to the individual patient's particular needs is recommended.

  19. Dermato-neuro syndrome in a case of scleromyxedema.

    PubMed

    Savran, Yusuf; Akarsu, Sevgi

    2015-12-01

    Scleromyxedema is an uncommon connective tissue disease characterized by mucin deposits, fibrosis, and proliferation of fibroblasts in the dermis. Although it shares similar sclerodermoid features, it is a different clinical entity than scleroderma. A monoclonal gammopathy is almost always present; however, progression to multiple myeloma is rare. It may have many systemic manifestations, of which the most notable being the dermato-neuro syndrome because of its rarity and potential fatal outcome. We present a case of a 50-year-old woman with scleromyxedema in whom the dermato-neuro syndrome developed.

  20. A case of Jacobsen syndrome with multifocal white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Carter, John E; Bazan, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare disorder caused by partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 11. The phenotype is variable with involvement of multiple organ systems, resulting in congenital heart defects, blood dyscrasias, and impaired growth. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man with multiple ophthalmic manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that was remarkable for multiple T2-hyperintense subcortical white matter lesions. It is important to be aware that patients with Jacobsen syndrome may have nonspecific white changes seen on MRI.

  1. Aarskog-scott syndrome: a review and case report.

    PubMed

    Closs, Luciane Q; Tovo, Maximiano; Dias, Caroline; Corradi, Daniele P; Vargas, Ivana A

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the treatment and 12-year follow-up of a patient 7 years old who had been diagnosed with Aarskog-Scott syndrome. The patient had a history of premature multiple tooth loss, vertical dimension loss and severe dentoalveolar discrepancy. Orthopedic and orthodontic rehabilitation treatments were performed to improve the patient's esthetic, functional and psychological condition. How to cite this article: Closs LQ, Tovo M, Dias C, Corradi DP, Vargas IA. Aarskog-Scott Syndrome: A Review and Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):209-212.

  2. Early surgical treatment in a case of myoclonus dystonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Andrea A; Krause, Patricia; Lauritsch, Katharina; Zentner, Christian; Brücke, Christof; Schneider, Gerd-Helge

    2014-11-01

    Myoclonus dystonia syndrome is often misdiagnosed in young children and appropriate treatment is delayed, which has a negative impact on motor development, participation, and emotional well-being. In severely affected patients, deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus has been used successfully to treat both dystonia and myoclonus. Here, the authors present a case of early successful treatment of myoclonus dystonia syndrome by pallidal deep brain stimulation in a patient at the age of 17 years leading to 83% reduction in dystonia score and 89% reduction in myoclonus. The patient gained significant improvement in motor function as well as increased participation and reduced stigma.

  3. Cutaneous Manifestations in POEMS Syndrome: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Flauberto Sousa; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Nogueira, Renata; Cuzzi, Tullia; Sodré, Celso Tavares; Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of sensorimotor polyneuropathy, diffuse cutaneous hyperpigmentation, skin sclerodermiform thickening and papular lesions in the infraclavicular and abdominal region. Besides weight loss, there were diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. The alterations were consistent with POEMS (Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal gammopathy and Skin changes) syndrome, which is a rare systemic disease with monoclonal proliferation of plasmacytes and slow progression. Cutaneous alterations are present in 68% of patients with diffuse cutaneous hyperpigmentation, plethora and acrocyanosis. Leukonychia, necrotizing vasculitis, hypertrichosis and cutaneous thickening of sclerodermiform type are also cited. The onset of multiple cutaneous angiomas in this syndrome has been observed in 24–44% of patients. PMID:26034475

  4. Morbihan syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Rossana Cantanhede Farias de; Eid, Natália Trefiglio; Eid, Renata Trefiglio; Moriya, Fabíolla Sih; Braga, Bruna Backsmann; Michalany, Alexandre Ozores

    2016-01-01

    Morbihan syndrome is a rare entity that more commonly affects women in the third or fourth decade of life. It is considered a special form of rosacea and its pathogenesis is not fully known. It is clinically characterized by the slow appearance of erythema and solid edemas on the upper portion of the face, with accentuation in the periorbital region, forehead, glabella, nose, and cheeks. We report the case of a patient presented with edema on the upper eyelid for a year. These findings suggested the diagnosis of Morbihan syndrome. We aim to report a rare, particularly refractory and chronic form of rosacea, which has received little attention in the literature.

  5. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome: a case report of a teenager*

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Renata Leite; Leal, Juliana Martins; Silvestre, Keline Jácome; Lisboa, Alice Paixão; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Gianotti-Crosti syndrome is a rare disease characterized by acral papular eruption with symmetrical distribution. It is a benign and self-limited disease; the symptoms disappear after two to eight weeks, without recurrences or scars. Skin lesions are usually asymptomatic. Prodrome might occur, suggesting upper respiratory infection, or constitutional symptoms. Diagnosis is eminently clinical, and this disease is associated with viral infections. Due to its rarity and low occurrence in adolescents and adults, we report a case of Gianotti-Crosti syndrome of a teenager.

  6. [Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Observation of a case].

    PubMed

    Ortalli, G; Tiberio, I; Mammana, G

    1991-04-01

    A young girl (16 years old) came to our attention because she needed dental surgery for multiple cysts; she was affected by Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and by a partial deficit of clotting factor V. This syndrome is characterized by many alterations, some of which can interfere with a normal conduct of anesthesia, especially at intubation (prognathism, kyphoscoliosis, incomplete segmentation of cervical-thoracic vertebrae). Moreover this patient was heterozygote for factor V (it was reduced to 48%), so that she had some clotting alteration. We present therefore this case and the treatment undertaken.

  7. Morbihan syndrome: a case report and literature review*

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Rossana Cantanhede Farias; Eid, Natália Trefiglio; Eid, Renata Trefiglio; Moriya, Fabíolla Sih; Braga, Bruna Backsmann; Michalany, Alexandre Ozores

    2016-01-01

    Morbihan syndrome is a rare entity that more commonly affects women in the third or fourth decade of life. It is considered a special form of rosacea and its pathogenesis is not fully known. It is clinically characterized by the slow appearance of erythema and solid edemas on the upper portion of the face, with accentuation in the periorbital region, forehead, glabella, nose, and cheeks. We report the case of a patient presented with edema on the upper eyelid for a year. These findings suggested the diagnosis of Morbihan syndrome. We aim to report a rare, particularly refractory and chronic form of rosacea, which has received little attention in the literature. PMID:28300928

  8. Reported Cases of HPS (Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir HPS in the United States Through January 6, 2016, a total of 690 ... west of the Mississippi River. HPS in the United States Case Maps and Charts State of Exposure Reporting ...

  9. [Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Ávila-Vergara, Marco Antonio; León-Álvarez, Damián Alfredo; López-Villegas, Miriam Nayeli; Quintero-Medrano, Samantha Melissa; Angulo-Bueno, Gladys Fabiola; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    Agenesia of the Müllerian ducts is a low-frequency congenital disease but with devastating effects on women's reproductive health. In this paper we present two cases of women affected by Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH). First case was a 17-year-old woman with aplasia of the upper vagina and absence of uterus. No other defects were found and was classified as type 1-MRKH. Second case was 18-year-old woman with absence of uterus, escoliosis and polycystic ovary syndrome, classified as type II-MRKH. Patients were seen at the Hospital with primary amenorrhea and fully developed secondary sexual characteristics. A clinical follow-up protocol, including the use of high-resolution image studies was used for diagnosis. Diagnostic procedures and current medical approaches to the treatment of MRKH are discussed, including psychological advisory, surgical procedures and new tissue-engineering techniques.

  10. Sirenomelia: The mermaid syndrome: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Sirenomelia (mermaid syndrome) is a rare congenital fetal anomaly with characteristic feature of complete or partial fusion of lower limbs. Although, this syndrome is incompatible with life due to the association of several congenital visceral abnormalities; however, there are few reports of surviving infants. Our first case was a live born, normally delivered at term by a 27-year-old third gravida of lower socioeconomic status with history of tobacco use. Examination of the baby revealed caudal dysgenesis having fusion of lower limbs, single leg with 1 foot and 5 toes. There was no identifiable external genitalia and anus. The second case was a 34 week, 1.6 kg preterm infant of unidentified sex born to a 28-year-old primigravida mother with overt diabetes mellitus. Incidentally, both the infants died few hours after birth and we report these cases due to their rarity and term live birth.

  11. Kluver-Bucy syndrome -- an experience with six cases.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjeev; Patel, R

    2004-09-01

    The Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is a neurobehavioral syndrome and can be seen in association with a variety of neurological disorders. Case records of 6 patients with KBS seen during a period of 5 years in a university hospital were reviewed. During the study period 6 patients with KBS, aged between 4 and 14 years, were seen. Hyperorality, hypersexuality, and abnormal behavior were the most common manifestations. Of the 6 patients, 5 had recurrent unprovoked seizures. The associated neurological disorders included anoxia-ischemic encephalopthy (2), herpes simplex encephalitis (1), neurocysticercosis (NCC) (1), traumatic brain injury with gliosis (1 case) and tuberculous meningitis (1 case). Prognosis was poor in all the patients except in the patient with NCC.

  12. [Hodgkin disease revealed by a nephrotic syndrome: A case report].

    PubMed

    Cheptou, M; Pichault, V; Campagni, R; Vodoff, M-V; Fischbach, M; Paillard, C

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric nephrotic syndrome (NS) is most often idiopathic or primary but in rare cases, it can be secondary to neoplasia. We report on a case of steroid-resistant NS revealing as a paraneoplastic syndrome of Hodgkin disease (HD) in a 12-year-old boy. The onset of the NS can be earlier, later, or simultaneous to the HD. Treatment of the lymphoma allows the disappearance of the NS. In the case we observed, the diagnosis of HD was delayed because HD presented with an isolated, hilar adenopathy in the absence of retroperitoneal or peripheral locations. In children aged 10 years or more presenting with NS, steroid-resistant or otherwise, a possible paraneoplastic origin such as Hodgkin lymphoma should always be taken into consideration and eventually eliminated.

  13. Karewsky syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ploneda-Valencia, César Felipe; Sainz-Escárrega, Victor Hugo; Gallo-Morales, Mariana; Navarro-Muñiz, Eliseo; Bautista-López, Carlos Alfredo; Valenzuela-Pérez, Jesús Alonso; López-Lizárraga, Carlos René

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gallstone ileus can be a lethal disease, rarely suspected in the clinical scenario. It represents about 25% of all bowel obstruction cases in patients older than 65. There is a classification of gallstone ileus based on the onset time: acute, subacute and chronic (Karewsky syndrome). We describe the first reported case of chronic gallstone ileus. Case presentation A 78-year-old female was admitted to the ER with a 15-day case of consistent bowel obstruction. The subject reported a five-year history of recurrent hospital admissions that resolved spontaneously after non-surgical management. Karewsky syndrome was diagnosed and managed with enterolithotomy. After five days of postoperative evolution the patient was discharged, and at six months follow up, no other hospital admission or relapse has been registered. Discussion The gallstone ileus diagnosis demands a higher clinical suspicion, there is no biochemical marker, and an abdominal CT is ideal for imaging-based diagnosis. There is no consensus on the optimal surgical approach. Conclusion We describe the first case of Karewsky syndrome and a gastro-jejune and gastric-choledochus double fistula. We emphasize the importance of higher clinical suspicion for patients with bowel obstruction older than 65 years old and make evident that although there are not evidence-based guidelines for this treatment, enterolithotomy is a recommended approach. PMID:26073917

  14. The York Platelet Syndrome: a third case.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Our present study has described a third patient with the York Platelet Syndrome (YPS). The condition consists of a mitochondrial myopathy associated with unique platelet pathology. Their mitochondrial myopathy has not been completely delineated and will be the subject of further study. Platelet pathology in the new patient is essentially identical to that described in the first two patients. Thin sections of her thrombocytes reveal a normal complement of α and δ granules (dense bodies) in some, a decreased number in others and complete absence in a few. The unique pathological feature is the presence of giant organelles, including an intensely electron dense, huge body, the opaque organelle (OO) and a multilayered large body, the target organelle. In addition platelets from the new patient contain large masses and coils of smooth endoplasmic reticulum present infrequently in platelets of the first two patients. The giant opaque and target organelles appear to develop in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the parent megakaryocyte and mature in the dense tubular system of circulating platelets. The relationship of the unique platelet pathology and mitochondrial myopathy has not been defined.

  15. Dent's disease complicated by nephrotic syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    He, Guohua; Zhang, Hongwen; Cao, Shanshan; Xiao, Huijie; Yao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dent's disease is an X-linked recessive proximal tubular disorder that mostly affects male patients in childhood or early adult life. The condition is caused by mutations in the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1) or OCRL (Dent disease 2) genes located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. In most male patients, proteinuria is subnephrotic but may reach nephrotic levels. Here, we report the first case of Dent's disease complicated by nephrotic syndrome. Dent's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome, and especially in male patients with early onset of nephrotic syndrome. A urinary α1-microglobulin/albumin ratio > 1 may provide the first clue to a tubulopathy. PMID:27904828

  16. Klinefelter syndrome and acute basophilic leukaemia--case report.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Nives; Lang, Nada; Skelin, Ika Kardum; Lasan, Ruzica; Dominis, Mara; Perković, Leila; Zupanić-Krmek, Dubraka; Grgurević-Batinica, Anita

    2010-06-01

    Patients with 47, XXY karyotype (Klinefelter syndrome) appear to have increased risk of developing cancer, especially male breast cancer, germ cell tumours and non Hodgkin lymphomas, but rarely acute myeloid leukaemia. We report a patient with acute basophilic leukaemia with 47, XXY karyotype in both the tumour and constitutional cells. Acute basophilic leukaemia is very rare disease comprising less than 1% of all acute myeloid leukaemias. Morphological characteristic of leukaemic blast cells is moderately basophilic cytoplasm containing a variable number of coarse basophilic granules. The most characteristic cytochemical reaction is metachromatic positivity with toluidine blue. Blast are myeloperoxidase negative. Also leukemic blasts express myeloid and monocyte markers. There is no consistent chromosomal abnormality identified in this leukaemia. This is the first reported case of acute basophilic leukaemia in patient with Klinefelter syndrome. In this article the medical history of the patient is given and the possible connection between Klinefelter syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia is discussed.

  17. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  18. Spondylodiscitis in SAPHO syndrome. A series of eight cases

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, E; Dupond, J; Wendling, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the frequency, clinical features, and radiological and bone scintigraphic changes of spondylodiscitis in patients with SAPHO (synov-itis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis).
METHODS—The study was retrospective. Data from patients with the diagnostic criteria of SAPHO syndrome were analysed for clinical features, biological data (HLA B antigen), and pelvic and spine x rays. Spine computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were also examined in some cases.
RESULTS—25 patients with a diagnosis of SAPHO were seen since 1985. Eight had spondylodiscitis. These included five with palmoplantar pustulosis, one with pustular psoriasis, one with psoriasis vulgaris, and one with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis without skin disease. The skin lesion occurred before the spondylodiscitis in four cases. Chest wall involvement was observed in four cases and sacroiliac joint lesions only in the case with osteomyelitis. HLA B27 was always negative and HLA B8 was found in four cases. Radiological findings consisted of erosive or sclerosing remodelling of endplates with a narrowed disc space; a reduced height of the vertebral body was also observed in some cases. These spinal lesions occurred in the three vertebral segments. Multiple sites of spondylodiscitis in the same patient were common. Bone scan showed mildly increased uptake and CT and MRI were useful for detecting signs of infection such as abscess. Enhanced signals on T2 weighted sequence or after injection of gadolinium were often observed. Follow up study of most of these patients suggests that the prognosis of spondylodiscitis in the SAPHO syndrome is favourable.
CONCLUSIONS—Despite few description in the literature, spondylodiscitis in the SAPHO syndrome is common (32% in this series). These radiological findings are similar to the discovertebral changes of spondylodiscitis in ankylosing spondylitis, thus giving support to the relations between

  19. Case Report: Bazex Syndrome Associated With Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Xilin; Chen, Zhuo; Wu, Jian-hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bazex syndrome, a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by psoriasiform eruptions, palmoplantar keratosis, and symmetric onychodystrophy, is most prevalent with squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract. Here, we reported an uncommon case of Bazex syndrome about an 83-year-old man with pulmonary adenocarcinoma and osseous metastasis, Physical examination found psoriasiform eruptions on the nose, cheeks, ears, knees, and the dorsa of interphalangeal joints, along with plantar keratosis and symmetric onychodystrophy involving hands and feet. Imaging analyses pulmonary adenocarcinoma with both local metastatic nodules and osseous metastasis. Symptomatic treatment with topical corticosteroids and oral retinoids showed no improvement. A 4-month follow-up showed that Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, successfully reduced primary tumor size and alleviated cutaneous lesions. Our report here highlighted a potential correlation between pulmonary adenocarcinoma and Bazex syndrome, which is characterized by hallmark nail destruction and preferential involvement of body extremities. Moreover, etiological therapy against underlying malignancy is essential for treating paraneoplastic Bazex syndrome. PMID:26765420

  20. A forensic case of Munchausen's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canogullari, Gulsin; Ulupinar, Emel; Teyin, Muharrem; Balci, Yasemin

    2007-04-01

    The case of a 37-year-old cleaning worker, who applied to the court with a claim of being fired from her job due to permanent functional loss of her left arm triggered by a stroke following a work accident, is presented. The court has forwarded the case to the forensic medicine department for further evaluation and documentation of the judicial report. Examination of the medical files has revealed that the person applied to our and other hospitals with various symptoms simulating urologic, neurological, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disorders. The person had been hospitalized for extensive, costly, and often invasive medical examinations and/or treatment, and deceived the physicians into carry out unnecessary diagnostic procedures. No objective signs or evidence related to a work accident or stroke was obtained from the medical records. She has been followed up with the diagnosis of lymphangitis, thrombophlebitis and repeated cellulities since 2001, and the infection had been caused by intentional insertion of glass pieces into her left arm. The reason why she was unable to use her left arm was because of contraction related to the repeated soft tissue infection rather than the claimed work accident. This case was not only trying the medical personnel to make errors and confusion, but also attempting to mislead the judgment. Therefore, in forensic cases, medical history of patient must be evaluated carefully.

  1. Fraser syndrome: a new case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Bishoy S; Shehata, Bahig M

    2008-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos and cutaneous syndactyly. We present a case of Fraser syndrome with bilateral cryptophthalmos and other common features of Fraser syndrome including syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with clitoromegaly, vaginal atresia, and unilateral renal agenesis. We also present the major and minor diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and the frequency of associated malformations.

  2. Gorlin and goltz syndrome: a case report with surgical review.

    PubMed

    Namdeoraoji Bahadure, Rakesh; Surendraji Jain, Eesha; P Badole, Gautam

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin and Goltz syndrome are a very complex syndrome and a multisystemic process that is characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Along with these major features a great number minor features have also been described which involves numerous skeletical, dermatology related, neurological, ophthalmological and reproductive anomalies. It exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. Presented here is the case of Gorlin-Goltz in a 12 years old male patient which was diagnosed through its oral and maxillofacial manifestations. Treatment of odontogenic keratocyst was done by enucleation without primary suturing. Iodoform dressing was kept to enhance the healing and to reduce the recurrence of the lesion. It is important to provide the early diagnosis for detection of clinical and radiological manifestations in young patients and for provision of advice concerning preventive treatment like protection of the skin from the sunlight and genetic sensitivity testing so that possible complications associated with this syndrome can be prevented. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Jain ES, Badole GP. Gorlin and Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report with Surgical Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):104-108.

  3. [A case of Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hidenori; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Torii, Takako; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2011-08-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome refers to visual hallucinations in patients with visual acuity loss or visual field loss without dementia. We report a case of Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital suffering acute bilateral visual loss in a few months. On admission, he was almost blind and his optic discs were found to be atrophic on fundoscopy. In addition to increased cell counts and protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serum and CSF rapid plasma reagin tests were positive. A diagnosis of syphilitic optic neuritis was made and he was treated with intravenous penicillin G (24 million units per day for 14 days) without any recovery. After treatment finished, he began to experience complex, vivid, elaborate and colored visual hallucinations. He recognized these visions as unreal and felt distressed by them. No cognitive impairment was observed on several neuropsychological tests. We diagnosed the patient as suffering from Charles Bonnet syndrome. Brain MRI revealed diffuse mild atrophy of the cerebral cortex and multiple T2 high signal intensity lesions in the deep cerebral white matter. Single photon emission computed tomography revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in bilateral medial occipital lobes. Administration of olanzapine resulted in a partial remission of visual hallucinations. Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis is rare. In the present case, visual loss and dysfunction of bilateral medial occipital lobes may have triggered the visual hallucinations, which were alleviated by olanzapine.

  4. Gorlin and Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report with Surgical Review

    PubMed Central

    Surendraji Jain, Eesha; P Badole, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gorlin and Goltz syndrome are a very complex syndrome and a multisystemic process that is characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Along with these major features a great number minor features have also been described which involves numerous skeletical, dermatology related, neurological, ophthalmological and reproductive anomalies. It exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. Presented here is the case of Gorlin-Goltz in a 12 years old male patient which was diagnosed through its oral and maxillofacial manifestations. Treatment of odontogenic keratocyst was done by enucleation without primary suturing. Iodoform dressing was kept to enhance the healing and to reduce the recurrence of the lesion. It is important to provide the early diagnosis for detection of clinical and radiological manifestations in young patients and for provision of advice concerning preventive treatment like protection of the skin from the sunlight and genetic sensitivity testing so that possible complications associated with this syndrome can be prevented. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Jain ES, Badole GP. Gorlin and Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report with Surgical Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):104-108. PMID:25206202

  5. Aqueous misdirection syndrome: an interesting case presentation

    PubMed Central

    Moinul, Prima; Hutnik, Cindy ML

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report a case of an aqueous misdirection-like presentation in a pseudophakic patient. Design Retrospective case review. Participant An 84-year-old pseudophakic gentleman presented with bilateral blurred vision 8 years after cataract surgery. A refractive shift with shallow anterior chambers and elevated intraocular pressures were noted. No corneal edema was noted. Although aqueous suppression and topical atropine would relieve the signs and symptoms, the effect was temporary with fluctuating and variable changes in refraction, anterior chamber depth, and intraocular pressure. The presence of patent iridotomies had no effect on the fluctuations. A pars plana vitrectomy and surgical iridectomy were successful in preventing further fluctuations. Conclusion Aqueous misdirection is a form of secondary angle closure glaucoma marked by elevated intraocular pressures, myopic shift in refraction, and central shallowing of the anterior chamber. Here, a case of a pseudophakic patient experiencing bilateral and fluctuating signs and symptoms resembling aqueous misdirection is presented. Surgical intervention with a pars plana vitrectomy and iridectomy prevented further fluctuations. PMID:25678765

  6. Paternal origin of FGFR2 mutations in sporadic cases of Crouzon syndrome and Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R L; Jiang, W; Boyadjiev, S A; Tran, A K; Zachary, A A; Van Maldergem, L; Johnson, D; Walsh, S; Oldridge, M; Wall, S A; Wilkie, A O; Jabs, E W

    2000-03-01

    Crouzon syndrome and Pfeiffer syndrome are both autosomal dominant craniosynostotic disorders that can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. To determine the parental origin of these FGFR2 mutations, the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) was used. ARMS PCR primers were developed to recognize polymorphisms that could distinguish maternal and paternal alleles. A total of 4,374 bases between introns IIIa and 11 of the FGFR2 gene were sequenced and were assayed by heteroduplex analysis, to identify polymorphisms. Two polymorphisms (1333TA/TATA and 2710 C/T) were found and were used with two previously described polymorphisms, to screen a total of 41 families. Twenty-two of these families were shown to be informative (11 for Crouzon syndrome and 11 for Pfeiffer syndrome). Eleven different mutations in the 22 families were detected by either restriction digest or allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization of ARMS PCR products. We molecularly proved the origin of these different mutations to be paternal for all informative cases analyzed (P=2. 4x10-7; 95% confidence limits 87%-100%). Advanced paternal age was noted for the fathers of patients with Crouzon syndrome or Pfeiffer syndrome, compared with the fathers of control individuals (34. 50+/-7.65 years vs. 30.45+/-1.28 years, P<.01). Our data on advanced paternal age corroborates and extends previous clinical evidence based on statistical analyses as well as additional reports of advanced paternal age associated with paternal origin of three sporadic mutations causing Apert syndrome (FGFR2) and achondroplasia (FGFR3). Our results suggest that older men either have accumulated or are more susceptible to a variety of germline mutations.

  7. Construction of a YAC contig in the region of three retinal degeneration genes in 11q13

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, J.; Wang, J.

    1994-09-01

    We have previously isolated a large number of bacteriophage clones specific for human chromosome 11. Seventy-two clones map to distal 11q13, a region haboring a number of human disease genes. Among them are genes for Best macular degeneration (BMD), Usher`s syndrome type 1B, autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV) and a form of Bardet-Biedl syndrome; all diseases involve retinal degenerations. From the genetic mapping it is clear the BMD and Bardet-Biedl syndrome are located in the proximal portion of the band, while Usher`s syndrome 1B and ADNIV are in the distal portion of 11q13. As the first step towards the cloning of the latter two disease genes, we set out to isolate this region of the chromosome as yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The 72 clones, as well as two transcribed genes, were assigned into 4 segregation groups with radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrids. We have shown previously that this high probe density can result in the development of large YAC contigs. We chose to use two complementing strategies to screen three different YAC libraries. The two strategies are: (1) the generation of Alu-primed products from the bacteriophage clones that are then used as probes against filters from individual YAC library pools; (2) the sequencing of the bacteriophage clones, STS development and screening YAC libraries by the method of Green and Olson (1990). The former has the advantage of speed, while the latter of specificity. We have identified a total of 140 YACs from 50 screens. Approximately 50% of the markers are already in small contigs. The largest contig has 10 markers and is {approximately}1 mbp. This approach results in fairly rapid development of YAC contigs without additional application of labor-intensive, locus-specific manipulation. We expect to complete the contig within a year.

  8. [A case of acute coronary syndrome following the use of parenteral penicillin: Kounis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tok, Derya; Ozcan, Fırat; Sentürk, Bihter; Gölbaşı, Zehra

    2012-10-01

    Kounis syndrome refers to the concurrence of acute coronary events and allergic or hypersensitivity reactions. In this report, we describe the case of a male patient, in whom acute ST-segment elevation and myocardial infarction developed immediately after injection of depot penicillin, and we discuss the Kounis syndrome. A 52-year-old male patient had chest pain, hypotension and ST-elevation on leads DI and aVL of electrocardiography 30 minutes after intramuscular penicillin injection due to cryptic tonsillitis. Kounis syndrome was considered as a possible diagnosis according to the presentation. Histamine and tryptase levels were not studied due to the delay on arrival to the emergency department. The patient promptly underwent coronary angiography, which revealed only diffuse plaques in all main coronary arteries without any obstructive lesion. We found only increased immunoglobulin (Ig) E, which is associated with the syndrome. With this report, we remind clinicians to consider Kounis syndrome in patients who are subjected to allergenic substances and demonstrate acute chest pain.

  9. A Case of Capgras Syndrome Related to Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hines, Aisha; Stewart, Jonathan T; Catalano, Glenn

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism is commonly associated with a variety of psychiatric conditions, most commonly depression and cognitive impairment, but up to 5% to 15% of symptomatically hypothyroid patients may develop a nonaffective psychosis, classically referred to as "myxedema madness." We report the case of a woman who developed Capgras syndrome in the context of hypothyroidism, and whose psychosis rapidly resolved with levothyroxine supplementation. To date, very few cases of Capgras syndrome related to hypothyroidism have been reported. The pathophysiology of this condition remains unclear but it may be related to global cerebral hypometabolism or possibly to increased cerebral dopamine. Given the robust response of "myxedema madness" to thyroid replacement, psychiatrists should remain vigilant for covert hypothyroidism in patients with psychosis and atypical histories or presentations.

  10. Lyell's Syndrome and Antimalarials: A Case Report and Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Joana Miranda; Santareno, Sofia; Guerreiro, Lina; Margalho, Ana Filipa

    2017-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) or Lyell's syndrome is a rare, however, life-threatening mucocutaneous disorder with an epidermal detachment of a total body surface area (TBSA) of >30%. It is triggered by an idiosyncratic immune-allergic reaction to a drug, with many possible drugs implicated. Treatment success relies on early diagnosis and withdrawal of suspected/causative drug(s) and supportive care. Clinical evidence for specific therapies is still sparse. It is described a case of Lyell syndrome by sulfonamides for chemoprophylaxis of malaria. The patient presented with an extensive, rapidly evolving skin detachment, which progressed, despite supportive therapy, involving about 80% of TBSA. This led us to initiate a course of immunoglobulin with good clinical response. The aim of this work is to provide a discussion of the case and simultaneously make a practical literature review of TEN. PMID:28250622

  11. Bi-opercular Syndrome: A Case Report and Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, K

    2014-01-01

    Opercular syndrome is a well known but neglected entity and is quite common, but it is difficult for non-neurologists to diagnose this entity because of lack of awareness. Inability to speak and swallow with dissociation of automatic voluntary movements in the affected muscles are the essential features of this syndrome. The aetiology in most of the reported cases is vascular (thrombosis or embolism) involving branches of middle cerebral artery supplying the opercular area. We are reporting a case of “bilateral opercular syndrome” caused by stroke in a young patient. He had sudden onset of bilateral facial and tongue palsy, inability to speak and swallow, but with preserved automatic functions. He was mute but verbal comprehension was normal. CT head revealed bilateral perisylvian infarcts. PMID:25121016

  12. Oculoectodermal syndrome: twentieth described case with new manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Figueiras, Daniela de Almeida; Leal, Deborah Maria de Castro Barbosa; Kozmhinsky, Valter; Querino, Marina Coutinho Domingues; Regueira, Marina Genesia da Silva; Studart, Maria Gabriela de Morais

    2016-01-01

    Oculoectodermal syndrome is a rare disease characterized by the association of aplasia cutis congenita, epibulbar dermoids, and other abnormalities. This report describes the twentieth case of the disease. We report a 4-year-old female child who presented with the classical features of the syndrome: aplasia cutis congenita and epibulbar dermoids. Our case expands the clinical spectrum of the disease to include: diffuse hyperpigmentation (some following the Blaschko´s lines); hypopigmented skin areas on the trunk; arachnoid cyst on the right fronto-parietal border; rounded left side of the hippocampus; and dermoid cyst underlying the bulb-medullary transition. Our patient also reported infantile hemangioma on the right wrist and verrucous hemangioma on the left leg, the latter not previously described in the literature.

  13. [Cushing's syndrome with pregnancy. Report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Shi, F C; Huang, H S; Huang, M J; Juang, J H; Chen, G W

    1992-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome with pregnancy is rare, and only about 60 cases have been reported. In the recent 4 years, 3 cases were diagnosed in Chang Gang Memorial Hospital. They presented with serious maternal complications early in the second month of pregnancy, including hypertension, proteinuria and lower leg edema. Unfortunately it was not diagnosed until the 20th week of pregnancy. They had the same hormone profile as other Cushing's syndrome patients who were not pregnant. Under the supportive treatment they had outcomes of two premature deliveries and one still birth. Just after delivery all patients received left adrenalectomy and pathology showed adenoma. All of them had good recovery courses. According to the literature, early treatment (surgical operation, medical treatment, or irradiation) could decrease maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate.

  14. An Unusual Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hemophagocytic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharmeen, Saika; Hussain, Nazia

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HS) or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune mediated phenomenon that can occur in the setting of an autoimmune disease, chronic immunosuppression, malignancy, or infection. It has been more commonly described in the pediatric population and less commonly in adults. We describe a case of a 52-year-old male who presented with a rash. He simultaneously met the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the diagnostic criteria of HS as described in the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) 2004 trial. The bone marrow on autopsy showed the presence of abundant hemosiderophages with focal hemophagocytosis. SLE-associated HS might be underdiagnosed due to the overlap in clinical findings. This case represents the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment of such a potentially fatal clinical syndrome. PMID:26981305

  15. Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Bulent; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is rarely seen, and presents with recurrent episodes of hypotension, shock, hemoconcentration, and hypoproteinemia. The main pathology is the dysfunction of the vascular endothelium, and it is characterized by an increase of capillary permeability that is accompanied by the loss of intravascular fluid and protein. Case Presentation We present a 58-year-old female who presented with peripheral edema, leg pain, and syncope at the emergency department. Interestingly demyemilising neuropathy, which is a rare finding, ensued on day 4. She is still being treated using intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Conclusions The early signs and symptoms of ISCLS may be subtle; therefore the diagnosis can easily be missed and prompt treatment of the syndrome may be postponed. Thus, the clinician must consider ISCLS in differential diagnosis in cases of hypotension, hemoconcentration, and hypoalbuminemia. PMID:27195144

  16. Omenn syndrome: a rare case of neonatal erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Puzenat, E; Rohrlich, P; Thierry, P; Girardin, P; Taghian, M; Ouachee, M; Plouvier, E; Fischer, A; Humbert, P; Aubin, F

    2007-01-01

    Omenn syndrome is a severe combined immunodeficiency characterized by erythroderma, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and failure to thrive, with activated oligoclonal T lymphocytes and an absence of circulating B cells.A 3 day-old boy presented with a congenital erythroderma. Investigations revealed a marked neutropenia and lymphopenia and the absence of a thymus. Genetic studies showed RAG 1 mutations. He was successfully treated with an HLA identical bone marrow transplantation. Omenn syndrome is a rare severe combined immunodeficiency. Most cases are due to mutations in the RAG genes with autosomal recessive transmission. Our observation is original because of an incomplete clinical presentation. During the course of the disease, the child had no failure to thrive, no organomegaly and no recurrent infection. Immunodeficiency must be excluded in every case of neonatal erythroderma and an immunological assessment should be performed without delay.

  17. A Case of Femoral Fracture in Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  18. Smith-Magenis syndrome in Puerto Rico: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jardón, Javier; Izquierdo, Natalio J

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 17. Systemic findings in patients with the syndrome include: dysmorphic facies and skeletal deformities. Ophthalmic findings in patients with the SMS include: strabismus, refractive errors, microcornea, iris anomalies, microphthalmos, and coloboma. A 14-year-old boy with cytogenetic studies confirming the SMS underwent a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination. The patient has a history of strabismus surgery. Clinical findings in this patient include: developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, enamel hypoplasia, short broad hands, clinodactyly, and scoliosis. Ocular findings in our patient include: myopia, iris nodules, loose zonules, and ectopia lentis. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of SMS in the Caribbean basin and the first case that report ectopia lentis in SMS. There is a possibility that lens subluxation in our patient is due to self inflicted trauma.

  19. Hyperferritinemic syndrome: Still's disease and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome triggered by fulminant Chikungunya infection: a case report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Juan-Felipe; Navarro, Erika-Paola; Echeverry, Alex; Moncada, Pablo A; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    There are four medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still' s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), and septic shock, that share similar clinical and laboratory features, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. This common syndrome entity is termed "the hyperferritinemic syndrome." Here, we describe two different cases of hyperferritinemic syndrome triggered by Chikungunya fever virus infection: a 21-year-old female with SLE and a 32-year-old male patient who developed AOSD after the coinfection of dengue and Chikungunya viruses.

  20. [Periodic fever, aphtosus stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenopathy syndrome (PFAPA syndrome) in 4-years old girl--case report].

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, Agnieszka; Rusek-Zychma, Małgorzata; Barć-Czarnecka, Małgorzata; Roszkowska, Dagmara

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic feature of PFAPA syndrome is periodic episodes of fever recurring in 21-28 days in infants and young children. Fever is accompanied by aphtosus stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenopathy. Diagnosis of this syndrome are based on typical clinical manifestations, because there are no characteristic changes in laboratory findings. The reason of this syndrome is unknown. We described a case of 4 years old girl with typical manifestations of this syndrome. We excluded others reasons of periodic fever. PFAPA syndrome passed after 2 years of duration after adenothomy.

  1. Psychogenic Foreign Accent Syndrome: A New Case

    PubMed Central

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; De Page, Louis; Jonkers, Roel; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 33-year-old, right-handed, French-speaking Belgian lady who was involved in a car accident as a pedestrian. Six months after the incident she developed a German/Flemish-like accent. The patient's medical history, the onset of the FAS and the possible psychological causes of the accent change are analyzed. Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed. The psychodiagnostic interview and testing will receive special attention, because these have been underreported in previous FAS case reports. Furthermore, an accent rating experiment was carried out in order to assess the foreign quality of the patient's speech. Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS. Several findings were considered essential in the diagnosis of psychogenic FAS: the psychological assessments as well as the clinical interview confirmed the presence of psychological problems, while neurological damage was excluded by means of repeated neuroimaging and neurological examinations. The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Moreover, the indifference of the patient toward her condition may also suggest a psychogenic etiology, as the opposite is usually observed in neurogenic FAS patients. PMID:27148003

  2. Hypoglossia-Hypodactyly Syndrome with Short Stature - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Manisha; Singh, Ankur; Singh, Pratiksha

    2014-01-01

    The Oromandibular Limb Hypogenesis Syndromes (OLHS) comprises a spectrum of disorders involving the tongue, mandible, and the limbs and are characterized by hypoplastic mandible, absence of the lower incisors, hypoglossia, digits and limbs abnormalities ranges from syndactyly to amelia. In this report, we report a case of OLHS with growth hormone deficiency as a cause of short stature, which has not been described previously to the best of our knowledge. PMID:24959494

  3. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a case with congenital onset.

    PubMed

    Kahwash, Samir B; Fung, Bonita; Savelli, Stephanie; Bleesing, Jack J; Qualman, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is very unusual with regard to a clinical onset soon after birth, and a clinical picture dominated by splenomegaly, jaundice, and consumptive peripheral blood cytopenias, with minimal lymphadenopathy. Our documented close follow up demonstrated initial involvement of the spleen, followed by involvement of the bone marrow and the peripheral blood. The patient underwent bone marrow transplant and is alive and well 20 months after diagnosis.

  4. Crouzon syndrome: clinico-radiological illustration of a case.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Raviprakash Sasankoti; Vemanna, Naveen Shanker; Verma, Sankalp; Agarwal, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome, also called craniofacial dysostosis, is an autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Described by a French neurosurgeon in 1912, it is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closure of cranial sutures, midfacial hypoplasia, and orbital defects. Here, we report a case of this rare entity. The patient presented with brachycephaly, maxillary hypoplasia, exophthalmos, mandibular prognathism, along with dental and orbital abnormalities.

  5. Cochlear abnormality in a case of Pallister-Hall syndrome.

    PubMed

    Avula, Shivaram; Alam, Nusrat; Roberts, Elaine

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS) is a rare condition characterised by anomalies including hypothalamic hamartoma, bifid epiglottis and postaxial polydactyly. Hearing loss has been recognised in this condition. Cochlear abnormalities have been described in mouse models of PHS, but there are no reports of similar findings in humans to date. This report describes a case of PHS with bilateral cochlear hypoplasia as seen on MRI.

  6. A case of 18p deletion syndrome after blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-juan; Wu, Lv-xian; Yuan, Qing; Lv, Zhi-gang; Jiang, Xue-yan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is thought to be one of the rare chromosomal aberrations. Here, we report a case to review this disease. Case report The proband is a five-and-a-half-year-old girl who has had phenotypes manifested mainly by ptosis, broad face, broad neck with low posterior hairline, mental retardation, short stature, and other malformations. Chromosomal analysis for her mother showed a normal karyotype. Her father and younger brother were phenotypically normal. Result Phenotypical features were quite similar throughout other cases and in accordance with the usual phenotype of del(18p) suggested within the same cases and among the del(18p) cases described. She underwent blepharoplasty, which improved her appearance. Conclusion 18p deletion syndrome is diagnosed by gene analysis. Plastic surgeries for improving the appearance might be an option for these patients. PMID:28138267

  7. Moyamoya syndrome with antiphospholipid antibodies: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Fu, Z; Wang, J; Cui, H; Zhang, Z; Zhang, B

    2014-10-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is a term applied to typical moyamoya vasculopathy with well-recognized associated conditions. Several systematic studies on the entities of moyamoya syndrome with autoimmune disease have been reported. We report a case of moyamoya syndrome with antiphospholipid antibodies and provide a review of relevant cases from the literature, describing the clinical characteristics and treatments.

  8. Melnick-Needles Syndrome: report of a case associated with bilateral hypoplasia of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Belfield, J C; Witana, J S; Connolly, D J A

    2007-01-01

    Melnick-Needles Syndrome is a rare disorder associated with many abnormalities. This case report describes a patient with Melnick-Needles Syndrome who was found to have bilateral hypoplasia of the cochlea, a finding not previously described in the literature. The case report describes the syndrome and demonstrates the findings on CT and MR imaging of temporal bones.

  9. A case of Norman-Roberts syndrome identified from postnatal diagnosis of microlissencephaly.

    PubMed

    Tosello, Barthélémy; Brévaut-Malaty, Véronique; Chaumoître, Kathia; Gire, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Lissencephaly is a rare brain malformation. What differentiates microlissencephaly from classical lissencephaly and other variants is the presence of severe microcephaly. Very few postnatal cases of Norman-Roberts syndrome are described in the literature. We report a case of microlissencephaly with a polymalformative syndrome that prompted postnatal diagnosis of Norman-Roberts syndrome.

  10. Focal conduction block in a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Diogo F; Scremin, Luciano; Zúniga, Sérgio F; Oh, Shin J

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) with focal conduction block across the tarsal tunnel (TT). A 46-year-old woman had pain in the left foot, sensory loss on the plantar surface, and positive Tinel sign over the TT. TTS was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and surgery. Motor nerve conduction studies showed focal conduction block across the TT. Conduction block has rarely been reported in TTS. In this case, conduction block provides evidence for focal demyelination as the primary pathological process in TTS.

  11. Lance–Adams syndrome: A special case of a mother

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Gaurav Bhaskar; Babu, Sachin Suresh; Peter, C. Sudhir; Peter, C. Shobhna

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the neurological outcome in survivors of cardiorespiratory arrest is difficult. A distinction has been made between acute and chronic posthypoxic myoclonus, called myoclonic status epilepticus and Lance–Adams syndrome (LAS), respectively, with the acute condition carrying a bad prognosis. Here, we report a case of a 37-year-old female who developed seizures after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The available literature on such cases is very rare and has generally mentioned a poor outcome. However, our patient was successfully managed and showed clinical features of LAS. Thus, making an early diagnosis and proper management of hypoxic brain insults is positively related to improving the patient's functional outcome. PMID:27688633

  12. One glasses too many: A case report of Benson's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Shivani; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Kumari, Namita

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Benson's Syndrome, a form of occipital Alzheimer's disease, with posterior cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, in a 62-year-old male, who presented with visual problems, ascribed to the eyes, and had even undergone cataract/intraocular lens surgery in the right eye; and change of glasses 21 times over the past 2 years, with no apparent benefit. This case is of interest both on account of its rarity, and to highlight its features since the diagnosis may be missed in an ophthalmological setting where such patient may go for first consult. PMID:25971180

  13. [Alcohol withdrawal syndrome showing various progress: A case report].

    PubMed

    Nakata, Chihiro; Nara, Keinosuke; Kinoshita, Fumihiko; Kikuchi, Ken; Asai, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We experienced a case showing various psychotic symptoms following cessation of alcohol consumption. The symptoms included depressive state, delusion, confusion, psychomotor excitement and delirium, all of which disappeared in about two months. At first, we regarded all the symptoms as alcoholic hallucinosis, by a clinical standpoint, in spite of no auditory hallucination in this case. However, taking the overall clinical course into consideration, withdrawal syndrome could have been affected by some factors. One of the possibilities is that delusion might have been induced by aripiprazole. There still may be some other unknown influential factors on withdrawal, which are indicated by previous papers.

  14. Tuberculosis in a case of hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, Renuka; Shah, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome (HIES) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by elevated serum IgE, dermatitis, and immunodeficiency that predisposes to multiple skin and lung infections. The most frequent pathogen responsible for infections in these patients is Staphylococcus aureus. Tuberculosis (TB) in patients with HIES is an uncommon finding, and there are only a few reports of mycobacterial infections in known cases of HIES. We present a case of abdominal TB that developed in a 15-year-old boy who also had HIES.

  15. The laparoscopic management of Swyer syndrome: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Neena; Dadhwal, Vatsla; Sharma, Kandala Aparna; Gupta, Deepika; Agarwal, Sumita; Deka, Dipika

    2015-01-01

    Swyer syndrome, also known as 46 XY pure gonadal dysgenesis, is a rare endocrine disorder. Affected individuals are phenotypically female with female genitalia, normal Mullerian structures, absent testicular tissue, and a 46 XY chromosomal constitution. We report a series of eight cases of Swyer syndrome, of which six were managed by laparoscopic gonadectomy. The two other cases had to undergo an exploratory laparotomy in view of their presentation with adnexal masses. Two of the girls were siblings. The chief presenting complaint was primary amenorrhea. Four girls also presented with a history of poor development of secondary sexual characters. The average age at presentation was 16.19±2.85 years. The average height was 158.33 ±4.63 cm, and the average weight was 49.33±8.44 kg. Breast development was either Tanner 2 or 3 in four girls, whereas three girls had a Tanner 1 underdeveloped breasts. Axillary and pelvic hair was sparse in all the girls. The vagina was well canalized in all the girls. Hormonal evaluation revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with a mean follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) level of 95.81 mIU/L and a mean luteinizing (LH) level of 24.15 mIU/L. Imaging analysis revealed the presence of a small uterus in all the cases, except one. Bilateral ovaries were either not visualized or streak gonads were present. Adnexal mass was detected in two of the six cases with raised carcinoembryonic antigen (CA) 125 levels in one case. Genetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 46 XY in six girls, 46 XY/45 X in one, and the culture repeatedly failed in one girl. Because of the risk of malignancy, bilateral gonadectomy was performed in all cases. Histopathological analysis revealed that three of the six cases had dysgerminoma. The patients have been started on hormone replacement therapy. Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive modality for the definitive diagnosis and treatment of cases with Swyer syndrome. An early diagnosis of Swyer syndrome is possible

  16. Cubital tunnel syndrome secondary to gouty tophi: A case report.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Hatice; Zateri, Coskun; Akbal, Ayla; Gokmen, Ferhat; Adam, Gurhan; Bilim, Serhad; Bozkurt, Emre

    2017-03-01

    Gout is a chronic rheumatic disease resulting from accumulation of monosodium urate crystals in tissues. The most important risk factor for the disease is hyperuricaemia. Precipitation of uric acid in the joint in the form of monosodium urate crystals is the main factor responsible for triggering attacks of arthritis. Tophi occur as a result of urate crystals that precipitate into joints and surrounding tissues. Tophi can erode the bone where they are located and cause compression in soft tissue due to a mass effect. The following case report describes a case of cubital tunnel syndrome developed in association with tophaceous compression and resolved with surgical decompression in a patient with chronic gouty arthritis.

  17. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  18. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: considerations regarding six cases of Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Hugo Alejandro Vega; Vega, Nelson de Araujo; Santos, Bruno Quirino Dos; Maia, Guilherme Tavares da Silva

    2007-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), previously known as immotile cilia syndrome, is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease that includes various patterns of ciliary ultrastructural defects. The most serious form is Kartagener syndrome (KS), which accounts for 50% of all cases of PCD. The incidence of PCD ranges from 1:20,000 to 1:60,000. Since PCD causes deficiency or even stasis of the transport of secretions throughout the respiratory tract, it favors the growth of viruses and bacteria. As a result, patients have lifelong chronic and recurrent infections, typically suffering from bronchitis, pneumonia, hemoptysis, sinusitis, and infertility. Bronchiectasis and other chronic conditions infections can be the end result of the irreversible bronchial alterations, leading to chronic cor pulmonale and its consequences. Only half of the patients affected by PDC present all of the symptoms, a condition designated complete KS, compared with incomplete KS, typically defined as cases in which situs inversus does not occur. The diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed through transmission electron microscopy. Since there is no specific therapy for PCD, it is recommended that, upon diagnosis, secondary infections be treated with potent antibiotics and prophylactic interventions be implemented. In this paper, we report six cases of PCD (five cases of complete KS and one case of KS) and review the related literature, focusing on the diagnostic, therapeutic and clinical aspects of this disease.

  19. [Antiphospolipid syndrome related chorea gravidarum case with psychotic symptoms misdiagnosed as conversion disorder: case report].

    PubMed

    Kuz Tekşut, Tuba; Özcan, Halil; Işık, Mein; Karslı, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    Chorea gravidarum (CG) is a rare movement disorder characterized by rapid, irregular randomly distributed involuntary movements during pregnancy. Similar to Sydenham chorea, psychiatric symptoms may be observed in cases of CG. CG may be idiopathic or secondary to an underlying cause. One of the most common causes of CG is antiphospholipid syndrome. Herein we present a case of recurrent CG that was considered to be due to antiphospholipid syndrome. The patient had a history of 3 pregnancy losses and her fourth pregnancy was treated appropriately, resulting in the birth of healthy full-term baby. During the patient's first pregnancy CG was accompanied by psychotic symptoms and was misdiagnosed as conversion disorder.

  20. Polyneuropathy as Novel Initial Manifestation in a Case of “Nonsecretory” POEMS Syndrome with Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Minrui; Jiang, Zhixing; Lin, Zhiguang; Chen, Bobin; Zou, Hejian

    2017-01-01

    POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes) is a paraneoplastic syndrome driven by plasma cell dyscrasias. We report a patient with novel initial manifestation of polyneuropathy, which was considered due to Sjögren's syndrome but with poor response to methylprednisolone (120 mg/d) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Further investigation by imaging tests and following biopsy eventually confirmed the diagnosis of POEMS syndrome secondary to solitary plasmocytoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of POEMS syndrome with Sjögren's syndrome occurring in the absence of a peripheral monoclonal gammopathy, highlighting the diagnostic challenges posed by this disease and reviewing the diagnostic role of (18) F-FDG PET/CT in POEMS syndrome. PMID:28133484

  1. A Case of Beare-Stevenson Syndrome with Unusual Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Nitin; Leung, Samuel; Carney, Erin; Gerber, Alexis; David, Karen Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: — Final Diagnosis: Beare-Stevenson syndrome Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Genetic analysis Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Beare-Stevenson syndrome (BSS) is an extremely rare genetic disorder, with fewer than 25 cases reported worldwide. This autosomal dominant syndrome has been linked to two mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2), Tyr375Cys and Ser372Cys, both causing amino acid changes. Case Report: BSS is characterized by a range of morphological features, some more classically associated than others, of which craniosynostosis has been almost uniformly present. Other common features include cutis gyrata, acanthosis nigricans, ear and eye defects, skin/mucosal tissue tags, prominent umbilical stump, and anogenital anomalies. This account reports what we believe to be the 25th case of BSS, and exhibits a constellation of the characteristic features similar to those previously described, including the presence of cutis gyrata, proptosis, a bifid scrotum, and hypospadias. However, craniosynostosis was not detected prenatally by ultrasound or at birth. Prenatal ultrasound may detect some dysmorphic features of BSS. Many of these features have also been associated with other genetic disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Our case presented with the unusual features of a natal tooth and absence of craniosynostosis at birth. At birth, a diagnosis of BSS was suspected based on clinical features despite the absence of craniosynostosis. This was later confirmed with the use of molecular analysis, revealing a Tyr375Cys mutation of exon 9 of the FGFR2 gene. Conclusions: We suggest that a normal antenatal ultrasound scan and the absence of craniosynostosis at birth should not preclude further workup for BSS if this possibility is clinically suspected. PMID:27079505

  2. [Hepatic retransplant and acute Budd Chiari syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Savio-López, Andrés M; Lara-Molina, Evelin E; Soliva-Domínguez, Ramón; Capo-Jorge, José A; Gala-López, Boris; González-Castillo, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic retransplant constitutes 10-20% of all orthotopic hepatic transplants. The piggy-back technique was used in hepatectomy with conservation of the retrohepatic vena cava. A side-to-side cavo-cavostomy technique is described in the case of hepatic congestion or acute Budd Chiari syndrome post-transplant. This is an extremely serious condition and can result in death. We present the first case of hepatic retransplant performed in Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in a patient who received who received his first transplant due to non-resectable hepatocarcinoma and who required retransplant due to acute rejection and graft dysfunction. During retransplant, the Belghiti side-to-side anastomosis technique was used to resolve the acute Budd Chiari syndrome that presented itself. Post-surgical evolution at 18 months was satisfactory without evidence of complications of the graft. Acute Budd Chiari syndrome post-transplant can satisfactorily be resolved with the Belghiti technique, although it is preferable to take prophylactic measures to avoid it.

  3. Small bowel adenocarcinoma in Lynch syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-Kang; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma is part of the tumor spectrum of Lynch syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The present study describes the case of a 51-year-old man fulfilling the Amsterdam II criteria for Lynch syndrome, who had a 15-mm early-stage colorectal cancer resected endoscopically from the ascending colon. Due to upper abdominal discomfort after eating and consequent anorexia, a computed tomography scan performed 1 month later showed a tumoral mass of the upper jejunum with local lymphadenopathy. The laparotomy revealed a completely obstructing mass. Intraoperative frozen section showed a small bowel adenocarcinoma. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the germline mutation of mutL homolog 1. The patient received 6 cycles of an adjuvant folinic acid, fluorouracil and ocaliplatin chemotherapy regimen. The latest CT scan, 16 months after the chemotherapy, did not show any recurrence. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with upper bowel obstruction, particularly for patients with Lynch syndrome. PMID:27446478

  4. A Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS)  was first recognized by James Collier in 1932 as a clinical triad of ataxia, areflexia, and ophthalmoplegia. Later, it was described in 1956 by Charles Miller Fisher as a possible variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Here, we write a case of a patient with atypical presentation of this clinical triad as the patient presented with double vision initially due to unilateral ocular involvement that progressed to bilateral ophthalmoplegia. He developed weakness of the lower extremities and areflexia subsequently. A diagnosis of MFS was made due to the clinical presentation and the presence of albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) along with normal results of brain imaging and blood workup. The patient received intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), and his symptoms improved. The initial diagnosis of MFS is based on the clinical presentation and is confirmed by cerebral spinal fluid analysis and clinical neurophysiology studies. This case which emphasizes the knowledge of a rare syndrome can help narrow down the differentials to act promptly and appropriately manage such patients. PMID:28367386

  5. [Cri-du-chat syndrome. A case report].

    PubMed

    Diop, I B; Sy Signate, H; Ba, S A; Sarr, M; Hane, L; Diame, H; Kane, A; Dieye, O; Sow, D; Diouf, S M; Fall, M

    2000-01-01

    We report a documented case in Senegal with cri-du-chat syndrome diagnosed in a 3 months old girl. Our patient benefited from clinical examination, ECG (15 derivations), chest X ray and standard laboratory tests. The cry has been recorded on a magnetic band. We performed also a pulsed-Doppler, two dimensional and TM echocardiography. Chromosomal analysis has been realized. These data are discussed and compared to the literature. At admission this patient presents characteristic cat like cry. At examination, there is a facial dysmorphy, important growth retardation and feeding dyspnea. Auscultation shows a 3/6 left sub-clavicular systolic murmur. Laboratory tests show anemia (hemoglobin = 7.8 g/dl). Chest x-ray showed a cardio-thoracic ratio at 0.61 with increased pulmonary vascular markings. ECG showed right ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography-Doppler revealed persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Chromosomal analysis shows deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. After treatment with digitalis and diuretics there was an improvement of cardiac failure. Diagnosis of cri-du-chat syndrome is easy when characteristic cat-like-cry is present. Cardiovascular abnormalities are unfrequent in this syndrome (20% of the cases). They are dominated by ventricular septal defect and PDA. Hemodynamic failure and related growth retardation can lead to cardiac surgery.

  6. [General anesthesia in Cohen syndrome. Report of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, F; Cormaci, S; Cormaci, M; Alberti, A

    1995-04-01

    The case of a 23 years old woman, affected by the Cohen syndrome, who underwent general anesthesia for extensive dental surgery, is reported. The Cohen syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome that causes mental retardation, obesity, short stature as well as oral, ocular, and limb anomalies. The problems the anesthesiologist could deal with include the capacity of the patient to cooperate; difficult intubation because of maxillary hypoplasia, micrognathia, narrow and high-arched palate, and prominent maxillary central incisors; generalized muscular hypotonia; moderate leukopenia, that could theoretically increase the risk of infection: and, finally, possible associated mitral valve prolapse or hiatus hernia. In the case reported the presence of mitral valve prolapse or hiatus hernia was ruled out echographically. The patient was premedicated with diazepam and atropine i.m.; general anesthesia was carried out by propofol-fentanyl association and myorelaxation was obtained with atracurium. Nasotracheal intubation was performed easily in spite of oral anomalies so that the usefulness of thyromental distance, which was 7 cm long, as a clinical test to evaluate a potentially difficult intubation was confirmed. Noteworthy, the thyromental distance was the only test which was suitable for the uncooperative patient. At the end of surgery muscular tone recovered promptly and the endotracheal tube could be regularly removed. No complication was registered postoperatively.

  7. [Oral-facial-digital syndrome type I. A case report].

    PubMed

    Leonardi, R; Gallone, M; Sorge, G; Greco, F

    2004-04-01

    Oral-facial-digital syndrome type I (OFDI) is a congenital X-linked dominant disorder characterized by anomalies of the oral cavity, face and digits sometimes associated to cerebral malformations and polycystic kidney disease. The gene, responsible for this syndrome, is ofd1. Clinically it is seen only in females. Lesions of the mouth include median pseudoclefting of the upper lip, clefts of the palate and tongue, and dental anomalies (missing or supernumerary teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and teeth malpositions). Dysmorphic features affecting the head include hypertelorism, frontal bossing, micrognathia, facial asymmetry and broadened nasal ridge. The digital abnormalities are syndactyly, clinodactyly, brachydactyly and, rarely, pre or post-axial polydactyly. Less frequently ex-pressed phenotypic anomalies include skin milia, alopecia, deafness and trembling. Sometimes the diagnosis of OFDI can be difficult because there is an overlap with other types of oral-facial-digital syndromes. A sporadic case of OFDI, with 7 lower incisors, both in the primary and permanent dentition, is reported. This dental anomaly is very unusual because in literature only supernumerary cuspids are reported. In the light of this case, the authors discuss the oral phenotypic expression of ofd1 gene and its role in human odontogenesis.

  8. [The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Milants, C; Wang, F C; Gomulinski, L; Ledon, F; Petrover, D; Bonnet, R; Crielaard, J M; Kaux, J F

    2015-01-01

    The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the inferior extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It is frequently unrecognized and may lead to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. We report the case of a 77 year old patient complaining of symptoms of an anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome with neuropathic pain located at the dorsal part of the foot, without any sensorimotor loss. The ENMG was in favour of a motor impairment of the deep peroneal nerve. MRI exploration of the ankle showed a millimetric bony overgrowth of the upper pole of the navicular bone, irritative to the deep peroneal nerve. Infiltration at overgrowth of the navicular provided a partial and temporary decrease in pain symptoms. Surgical nerve decompression was then considered.

  9. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Mikhail; Castillo, Carlos Cuellar; Barber, Melissa S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be comorbidities that are difficult to treat. In this patient, an evidence-informed treatment pathway guided by laboratory biomarkers was used to address both conditions. Case Presentation A 69-y-old female patient presented with a 50-y history of sinusitis that was worse in the winter, postnasal drip, frequent sore throats, gastrointestinal complaints, headaches, and yeast infections. Two sinus surgeries (in years 2000 and 2002) and multiple courses of antibiotics had not resolved her sinus symptoms. In addition to CRS and IBS, this patient was noted to have intestinal overgrowth of Candida albicans, multiple food sensitivities, and leaky gut syndrome. Conclusion Antifungal medication and dietary changes in the course of 8 mo resulted in the resolution of her CRS and IBS. PMID:27547167

  10. A case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Murata, K; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H; Ishikawa, Y; Kawaguchi, N; Goto, M

    1999-10-01

    We described a case of Werner's syndrome associated with osteosarcoma. A 37-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed as having Werner's syndrome by the presence of juvenile cataracts, skin sclerosis and hyperpigmentation of the feet, high-pitched voice, characteristic bird-like appearance of the face with beak-shaped nose, thinning of the entire skin and hyperkeratoses on soles, hyperlipemia, hyperuricemia, diabetes melitus, and the mutated responsible gene (WRN). He had a 3-month history of a tumor on his left forearm. Histologically, the tumor included four histological patterns; a malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like, a desmoid-like, a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans-like, and a chondrosarcoma-like pattern. Tumoral osteoid formation was also found in the tumor. Therefore, the tumor was diagnosed as osteosarcoma.

  11. Lemmel Syndrome Secondary to Duodenal Diverticulitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wermers, Joshua D; Beteselassie, Nebiyu

    2017-01-01

    Lemmel syndrome occurs when a duodenal diverticulum causes obstructive jaundice due to a mechanical obstruction of the common bile duct. Additional pathophysiologic processes may also contribute to the development of Lemmel syndrome. These include duodenal diverticula causing dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi as well as compression of the common bile duct by duodenal diverticula. It is uncommon for duodenal diverticulum to become inflamed. We report the case of a 25-year-old female presenting with unintentional weight loss and fatigue. Since her initial labs were concerning for possible infection with hepatobiliary abnormalities, a contrast-enhanced CT was obtained. This study revealed a large periampullary diverticulum with mucosal enhancement and fat stranding consistent with diverticulitis.

  12. Congenital hypertrichosis (Were Wolf Syndrome): a case report.

    PubMed

    Alam, S T; Rahman, M M; Akhter, S; Hossain, M A; Islam, K A

    2012-07-01

    Hypertrichosis is abnormal increase in body hair, when it becomes extensive known as Were Wolf Syndrome. Any part of body can be affected and body hairs are longer and darker. Hairs may be of any type like lanugo, vellous or terminal. It may be present since birth or may occur later in life. A 8 years old boy was admitted in our hospital with excess body hair, he was diagnosed as a case of Were Wolf syndrome after excluding possible acquired causes of hypertrichosis. He had history of delayed developmental milestone and has been suffering from epilepsy. He was treated with developmental stimulation and anti epileptic drug. Then he was discharged after proper counseling.

  13. A case of Klippel-Feil and Turner syndromes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Tai, Kiyoshi; Sato, Yasumori; Nishiyama, Akiyoshi; Shin, Je-Won

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the clinical case of a 12-year-old female patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) combined with Turner syndrome (TS) and a submucous cleft palate (CP). The patient's general appearance was characterized by KFS, a clinical triad consisting of congenital fusion of at least 2 of 7 cervical vertebrae with a short neck, limited head motion, and a low posterior hairline. Three-dimensional images from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed cervical vertebrae anomalies and submucous CP. It was reported that the patient had TS and has been administered growth hormone (GH) therapy. Due to a skeletal class III pattern with a steep mandibular plane angle, facial asymmetry, and fused cervical vertebrae, GH's effects on the craniofacial complex should be considered before orthopedic/orthodontic treatment is started.

  14. Metronidazole Toxicity in Cockayne Syndrome: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian T; Strong, Andrew; O'Kelly, Sean; Munkley, Jennifer; Stark, Zornitza

    2015-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by small stature, intellectual disability, and accelerated pathologic aging. Through the Cockayne Syndrome Natural History Study, we have identified 8 cases of acute hepatic failure after metronidazole administration (8% of our cohort), 3 of which were fatal. The interval between initial administration and death was 6 to 11 days. Two of these patients also experienced acute neurologic deficit. Both hepatotoxicity and acute neurologic deficit have been reported previously as extremely rare adverse events after metronidazole administration. However, we have not identified any patients with CS who have received metronidazole without serious adverse effects. We recommend that a diagnosis of CS be considered an absolute contraindication to the use of metronidazole.

  15. [A special case of 'deafness'; Landau-Kleffner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stroink, H; Van Dongen, H R; Meulstee, J; Scheltens-de Boer, M; Geesink, H H

    1997-08-16

    A boy aged 5 had displayed from the age of 3 a fluctuating deficit in understanding spoken language. Audiometric testing proved his hearing to be normal. After 18 months, the parents noticed minor attacks of 'absence'. An EEG showed a normal background pattern and frequent spikes and spike waves complexes; CT-scanning of the brain revealed no abnormalities. On the basis of the acquired language disorder, the seizures and the features of the nocturnal EEG, the diagnosis the syndrome of Landau-Kleffner was made. After treatment with ethosuximide a temporary improvement of the aphasia occurred. A permanent improvement however was realized by treatment with prednisone. The boy could attend a primary school. The syndrome runs a fluctuating course; the patient may recover, but he may also undergo general mental deterioration. Antiepileptic agents only may have a brief favorable effect on the aphasia. In case of failure corticosteroids or even subpial cortical transsection are indicated.

  16. Pervasive refusal syndrome. Three German cases provide further illustration.

    PubMed

    Jans, Thomas; Ball, Juliane; Preiss, Maike; Haberhausen, Michael; Warnke, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J

    2011-09-01

    Pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS) has been proposed as a new diagnostic entity among child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. It is characterized by a cluster of life-threatening symptoms including refusal of hood intake, decreased or complete lack of mobilization, and lack of communication as well as retreat from normal life activities. Active refusal to accept help as well as neglect of personal care have been core features of PRS in the limited number of cases reported in the last decade. There have, however; been cases with predominantly passive resistance, indicating the possibility that there may be a continuum from active refusal to passive resistance within PRS. Postulating this continuum allows for the integration of "depressive devitalization" -- a refusal syndrome mainly characterized by passive resistance -- into the concept of PRS. Here, three case vignettes of adolescent patients with PRS are presented. The patients' symptomatology can be allocated on this continuum of PRS. PRS and dissociative disorders are compared in greater detail and contrasted within this discussion of differential diagnoses at the poles of such a continuum. PRS is a useful diagnosis for cases involving symptoms of predominating refusal and retreat which cannot satisfactorily be classified by existing diagnostic categories, and which can mostly clearly be separated from dissociative disorder.

  17. A case of newly diagnosed klippel trenaunay weber syndrome presenting with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Egemen; Demir, Secil; Gursu, Meltem; Sumnu, Abdullah; Yamak, Mehmet; Doner, Barıs; Karadag, Serhat; Uzun, Sami; Behlul, Ahmet; Ozkan, Oktay; Ozturk, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Klippel Trenaunay Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare disease characterized by hemihypertrophy, variceal enlargement of the veins, and arteriovenous (AV) malformations. Renal involvement in KTWS is not known except in rare case reports. Herein, we present a case of KTWS with nephrotic syndrome. A 52-year-old male was admitted due to dyspnea and swelling of the body for the last three months. The pathological physical findings were diffuse edema, decreased lung sounds at the right basal site, increased diameter and decreased length of the left leg compared with the right one, diffuse variceal enlargements, and a few hemangiomatous lesions on the left leg. The pathological laboratory findings were hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, increased creatinine level (1.23 mg/dL), and proteinuria (7.6 g/day). Radiographic pathological findings were cystic lesions in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, splenomegaly, AV malformation on the left posterolateral thigh, and hypertrophy of the soft tissues of the proximal left leg. He was diagnosed to have KTWS with these findings. Renal biopsy was performed to determine the cause of nephrotic syndrome. The pathologic examination was consistent with focal segmental sclerosis (FSGS). He was started on oral methylprednisolone at the dosage of 1 mg/kg and began to be followedup in the nephrology outpatient clinic.

  18. A Case of Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Presenting With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung-Suk; Ko, Jaehoon; Lee, Seong Soo; Shin, Beomsu; Choi, Dong-Chull

    2014-01-01

    Although idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome(IHES) commonly involves the lung, it is rarely associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here we describe a case of IHES presented in conjunction with ARDS. A 37-year-old male visited the emergency department at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, with a chief complaint of dyspnea. Blood tests showed profound peripheral eosinophilia and thrombocytopenia. Patchy areas of consolidation with ground-glass opacity were noticed in both lower lung zones on chest radiography. Rapid progression of dyspnea and hypoxia despite supplement of oxygen necessitated the use of mechanical ventilation. Eosinophilic airway inflammation was subsequently confirmed by bronchoalveolar lavage, leading to a diagnosis of IHES. High-dose corticosteroids were administered, resulting in a dramatic clinical response. PMID:24404401

  19. Rare Case of Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Acute Chest Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniel; El-Sherif, Yasir

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 29/m with a history of sickle cell disease who presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of chest, trunk, extremity, and back pain, consistent in quality and severity with the patient's usual pain crises. Soon after admission to the medical unit for acute chest syndrome (ACS), the patient developed sudden onset of hypertension associated with left sided hemiplegia, lethargy, dysarthria, aphasia, and left sided facial droop. Neuroimaging revealed that on MRI Brain there was multifocal extensive signal abnormality and a small focal areas of hemorrhage compatible with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Patient was treated with levetiracetam and phenytoin and improved soon afterwards, with resolution seen on follow-up MRI two months later. PMID:27957377

  20. A case of Robinow-Sorauf syndrome (Craniosynostosis-Bifid Hallux Syndrome): The allelic variant of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Arpita Rai; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G

    2014-01-01

    The clinical classification of Robinow-Sorauf syndrome has changed over the last few decades. Robinow-Sorauf syndrome is characterized by facies similar to those of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome with bifid or partially duplicated halluces. The current outlook is that the ‘Robinow-Sorauf’ families are examples of variable expression of the TWIST mutant phenotype and that the ‘Robinow-Sorauf’ syndrome lies within the spectrum of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. We present a case of 19-year-old female patient exhibiting classical clinical and radiological features of Robinow-Sorauf phenotype of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. A brief review of previously reported cases and nosology has been presented. PMID:25565733

  1. Leg Weakness Caused by Bilateral Piriformis Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee Bong; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Chang Jae

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder caused by the piriformis muscle (PM) compressing the sciatic nerve (SN). The main symptom of PS is sciatica, which worsens with certain triggering conditions. Because the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there are no definite diagnostic and therapeutic choices for PS. This case report presents a young woman who mainly complained of bilateral leg weakness. Electromyography revealed bilateral sciatic neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed structural lesions causing entrapment of the bilateral SNs. After a laborious diagnosis of bilateral PS, she underwent PM releasing surgery. Few PS cases present with bilateral symptoms and leg weakness. Therefore, in such cases, a high level of suspicion is necessary for accurate and prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26798622

  2. Leg Weakness Caused by Bilateral Piriformis Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee Bong; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Chang Jae

    2015-12-01

    Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder caused by the piriformis muscle (PM) compressing the sciatic nerve (SN). The main symptom of PS is sciatica, which worsens with certain triggering conditions. Because the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there are no definite diagnostic and therapeutic choices for PS. This case report presents a young woman who mainly complained of bilateral leg weakness. Electromyography revealed bilateral sciatic neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed structural lesions causing entrapment of the bilateral SNs. After a laborious diagnosis of bilateral PS, she underwent PM releasing surgery. Few PS cases present with bilateral symptoms and leg weakness. Therefore, in such cases, a high level of suspicion is necessary for accurate and prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  3. A Pediatric Case of Cowden Syndrome with Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Vera; Martins, Sofia; Antunes, Ana; Marques, Olinda; Carvalho, José Luís; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Meireles, Carla; Ferreira, Ana Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is a rare dominantly inherited multisystem disorder, characterized by an extraordinary malignant potential. In 80% of cases, the human tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is mutated. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy with genetically confirmed CS and Graves' disease (GD). At the age of 15, he presented with intention tremor, palpitations, and marked anxiety. On examination, he had macrocephaly, coarse facies, slight prognathism, facial trichilemmomas, abdominal keratoses, leg hemangioma, and a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland. He started antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy with methimazole and, after a 2-year treatment period without achieving a remission status, a total thyroidectomy was performed. Diagnosis and management of CS should be multidisciplinary. Thyroid disease is frequent, but its management has yet to be fully defined. The authors present a case report of a pediatric patient with CS and GD and discuss treatment options. PMID:28251007

  4. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Surveillance: Age of Syndrome Manifestation in Case Ascertainment

    PubMed Central

    Moberg, D. Paul; Bowser, John; Burd, Larry; Elliott, Amy J.; Punyko, Judy; Wilton, Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a leading cause of developmental disability. Active public health surveillance through medical record abstraction has been employed to estimate FAS prevalence rates, typically based on birth cohorts. There is an extended time for FAS characteristics to become apparent in infants and young children, and there are often delays in syndrome recognition and documentation. This methodological paper analyzes the age at case ascertainment in a large surveillance program. Methods The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Surveillance (FASSLink) Project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sought to estimate FAS prevalence rates in eight U.S. states. FASSLink used linked abstractions from multiple health care records of suspected cases of FAS. The present paper analyzed data from this effort to determine the child’s age in months at confirming abstraction. Results The average age at abstraction for confirmed/probable FAS cases (n=422) was 48.3 (±19.5) months with a range of 0 to 94 months. Age of ascertainment varied by state and decreased with each birth year; the number of cases ascertained also decreased in a steep stepwise gradient over the six birth years in the study. Discussion FAS surveillance efforts should screen records of children who are much older than is typical in birth defects surveillance. To best establish rates of FAS using medical records abstraction, surveillance efforts should focus on one-year birth cohorts followed for a fixed number of years or, if using multi-year cohorts, should implement staggered end dates allowing all births to be followed for up to eight years of age. PMID:24737611

  5. A case of bilateral frontal tumors without "frontal syndrome".

    PubMed

    Plaza, M; du Boullay, V; Perrault, A; Chaby, L; Capelle, L

    2014-01-01

    We report the longitudinal case study of a right-handed patient harboring two frontal tumors that benefited from bilateral simultaneous surgery. The tumors were WHO Grade II gliomas located in the left inferior frontal area (including the cingulate gyrus) and the right anterior superior frontal gyrus. The double tumor resection was guided by direct electrical stimulation of brain areas while the patient was awake. Neuropsychological assessments were administered before and after the surgery to analyse how the brain functions in the presence of two frontal gliomas that affect both hemispheres and reacts to a bilateral resection, which can brutally compromise the neuronal connectivity, progressively established during the infiltrating process. We showed that both the tumor infiltration and their bilateral resection did not lead to a "frontal syndrome" or a "dysexecutive syndrome" predicted by the localization models. However, a subtle fragility was observed in fine-grain language, memory and emotional skills. This case study reveals the significance of brain plasticity in the reorganization of cognitive networks, even in cases of bilateral tumors. It also confirms the clinical relevance of hodotopical brain models, which considers the brain to be organized in parallel-distributed networks around cortical centers and epicenters.

  6. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Multiple Embolic Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Cindy W.; Lee, Eungseok; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Park, Hee-Kwon; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of Turner syndrome (TS) with ischemic stroke have been reported. Various arteriopathies of the cerebral arteries, including fibromuscular dysplasia, congenital hypoplasia, moyamoya syndrome, and premature atherosclerosis have been assumed to be the cause of ischemic stroke in TS. There has been no case report of a TS patient presenting with an embolic stroke pattern without any cerebral arteriopathy. A 28-year-old woman with TS was referred to our hospital because of abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. She underwent brain MRI at the referring hospital because she experienced sudden-onset diffuse headache. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed multiple acute embolic infarcts in different vascular territories. Intracranial and extracranial arterial disease was not detected on cerebral magnetic resonance angiography and carotid sonography. Embolic source workups, including transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, Holter monitoring, and transcranial Doppler shunt study, were all negative. Hypercoagulability and vasculitis panels were also negative. Our patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic embolic stroke. This is the first report of a TS patient with an embolic stroke pattern. Our case shows that ischemic stroke in TS could be due to embolism as well as the various cerebral arteriopathies documented in previous reports. PMID:27790125

  7. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Multiple Embolic Infarcts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Cindy W; Lee, Eungseok; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Park, Hee-Kwon; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of Turner syndrome (TS) with ischemic stroke have been reported. Various arteriopathies of the cerebral arteries, including fibromuscular dysplasia, congenital hypoplasia, moyamoya syndrome, and premature atherosclerosis have been assumed to be the cause of ischemic stroke in TS. There has been no case report of a TS patient presenting with an embolic stroke pattern without any cerebral arteriopathy. A 28-year-old woman with TS was referred to our hospital because of abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. She underwent brain MRI at the referring hospital because she experienced sudden-onset diffuse headache. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed multiple acute embolic infarcts in different vascular territories. Intracranial and extracranial arterial disease was not detected on cerebral magnetic resonance angiography and carotid sonography. Embolic source workups, including transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, Holter monitoring, and transcranial Doppler shunt study, were all negative. Hypercoagulability and vasculitis panels were also negative. Our patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic embolic stroke. This is the first report of a TS patient with an embolic stroke pattern. Our case shows that ischemic stroke in TS could be due to embolism as well as the various cerebral arteriopathies documented in previous reports.

  8. Choledochal cyst mimicking Mirizzi's syndrome A case report.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Fabrizio Maria; Coiro, Saverio; Nunziale, Aldo; De Lucia, Francesco; Frattaroli, Jacopo Maria; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Choledochal cysts are cystic dilatations of the intra or extra-hepatic biliary tract with an incidence of 1 case per 150.000 live births. Cysts usually are diagnosed in childhood, but diagnosis can be delayed until adulthood in the 20-50% of cases. Clinical manifestations comprise abdominal pain with biliary or pancreatic features. Mirizzi's syndrome is a late and rare complication, that occurs in 1% of patients with cholelithiasis due to extrinsic compression of the common bile duct by stones impacted either in the gallbladder or in the cystic duct. Clinical symptoms include extrahepatic obstructive jaundice, ascending cholangitis, or, in the later course, cholecystocholedocal fistula. For both pathologies the Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio Pancreatography and the Magnetic Resonance Cholangio Pancreatography should lead to the diagnosis with a sensibility and a specificity up to 100%. We report the case of a 66 year old patient admitted to the Emergency Department of our hospital for jaundice and abdominal pain, whom both the endoscopic and radiologic examination showed a Mirizzi's syndrome but surgery revealed a type I choledocal cyst.

  9. Choledochal cyst mimicking Mirizzi's syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Fabrizio Maria; Coiro, Saverio; Nunziale, Aldo; De Lucia, Francesco; Frattaroli, Jacopo Maria; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

    2014-05-19

    Choledochal cysts are cystic dilatations of the intra or extra-hepatic biliary tract with an incidence of 1 case per 150.000 live births. Cysts usually are diagnosed in childhood, but diagnosis can be delayed until adulthood in the 20-50% of cases. Clinical manifestations comprise abdominal pain with biliary or pancreatic features. Mirizzi's syndrome is a late and rare complication, that occurs in 1% of patients with cholelithiasis due to extrinsic compression of the common bile duct by stones impacted either in the gallbladder or in the cystic duct. Clinical symptoms include extrahepatic obstructive jaundice, ascending cholangitis, or, in the later course, cholecystocholedocal fistula. For both pathologies the Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio Pancreatography and the Magnetic Resonance Cholangio Pancreatography should lead to the diagnosis with a sensibility and a specificity up to 100%. We report the case of a 66 year old patient admitted to the Emergency Department of our hospital for jaundice and abdominal pain, whom both the endoscopic and radiologic examination showed a Mirizzi's syndrome but surgery revealed a type I choledocal cyst.

  10. [A case of hypothyroidism displaying "dropped head" syndrome].

    PubMed

    Furutani, Rikiya; Ishihara, Kenji; Miyazawa, Yumi; Suzuki, Yoshio; Shiota, Jun-Ichi; Kawamur, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    We describe a patient with hypothyroidism displaying "dropped head" syndrome. A 50-year-old man visited our clinic because he was unable to hold his head in the natural position. He had weakness and hypertrophy of the neck extensor muscles. Tendon reflexes were diminished or absent in all limbs. Mounding phenomena were observed in the bilateral upper extremities. Blood biochemical analysis revealed hypothyroidism, hyperlipidemia, and elevated levels of muscle-derived enzymes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the neck demonstrated swelling and hyperintensity of the neck extensor muscles on T2-weighted images. The result of biopsy of the right biceps brachii muscle suggested mild atrophy of type 2 fibers. The diameters of the muscle fibers exhibited mild variation. No inflammatory changes were observed. We diagnosed hin as having "dropped head" syndrome due to hypothyroidism. Administration of thyroid hormone agent gradually improved his condition, and he became able to hold his head in the natural position. Levels of muscle-derived enzymes normalized and his hyperlipidemia remitted. Neck MRI also revealed improvement. Our findings suggest that hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of "dropped head" syndrome, although only a few cases like ours have been reported.

  11. Femoral neck's fracture in Fahr's Syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Sallì, Marcello; D'Arienzo, Antonio; Bonanno, Mariella; Morello, Salvatore; Sanfilippo, Antonino; Mauro, Giulia Letizia; D'Arienzo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Fahr's syndrome, also known as "Bilateral Striopallidodentate Calcinosis" (BSPDC) primitive, is a rare neurological disease characterized by the presence of idiopathic, bilateral, symmetrical and abnormal deposition of calcium in areas of the brain that control movements including the basal ganglia, dentate nuclei of the cerebellum, nuclei of thalamus and semi-oval center. We describe a case of a 76-year-old male patient underwent reduction and fixation of a subtrochanteric fracture with intramedullary nail. During post-operative rehabilitation therapists's patient management was difficult due to obvious extrapyramidal symptoms characterized by dysarthria, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability. A CT scan, performed for the onset of stiffness and confusion before the operation, showed: IV ventricle eumorphic and in axis; expansion in atrophic sense of supratentorial ventricular system; bilateral, diffuse and coarse calcifications of the basal ganglia in the cerebellar and occipital cortex, elements compatible with Fahr's syndrome. The patient presented repeated postural instability episodes in the upright position, with loss balance tendency and recurrent falls. Fahr's syndrome patient is a "weak" patient, which requires a multi-disciplinary approach in order to prevent the mobility reduction, to improve the condition of postural instability, thus reducing the risk of fractures using preventive measures in domestic environment.

  12. Genitourinary anomaly in congenital varicella syndrome: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hisayo; Yoshii, Akira; Maeda, Jun; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Shishido, Seiichiro; Nakai, Hideo; Awazu, Midori

    2004-05-01

    We describe a 1-year-old boy with congenital varicella syndrome who had vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and neurogenic bladder. His mother had varicella during the 3rd month of pregnancy. At birth the patient presented with right microphthalmia, right microcornea, and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous of the right eye. He had chronic constipation from 3 months of age. He had urinary tract infection at 1 year of age. Urological investigation revealed left grade V VUR and neurogenic bladder. His varicella zoster virus IgG titer measured by ELISA was 39.4 antibody index (normal <0.1). He had repeated episodes of urinary tract infection despite antibiotic prophylaxis and clean intermittent catheterization, and underwent a uretero-vesiconeostomy at 2 years of age. Maternal infection during early pregnancy and the serological evidence of varicella zoster IgG antibodies without a history of varicella after birth led to the diagnosis of congenital varicella syndrome. Urogenital anomalies have previously been described in 14 cases of congenital varicella syndrome. Most of these patients had neurogenic bladder, the pathophysiology of which could be explained by the known neurotropic nature of the virus.

  13. A Case of IFAP Syndrome with Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Catarina; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Resende, Cristina; Vieira, Ana Paula; Brito, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The IFAP syndrome is a rare X-linked genetic disorder characterized by the triad of follicular ichthyosis, atrichia, and photophobia. Case Report. A three-month-old Caucasian, male patient was observed with noncicatricial universal alopecia and persistent eczema from birth. He had dystrophic nails, spiky follicular hyperkeratosis, and photophobia which became apparent at the first year of life. Short stature and psychomotor developmental delay were also noticed. Histopathological examination of skin biopsy on left thigh showed epidermis with irregular acanthosis, lamellar orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and hair follicles fulfilled by parakeratotic hyperkeratosis. The chromosomal study showed a karyotype 46, XY. Total IgE was 374 IU/mL. One missense mutation c.1360G>C (p.Ala454Pro) in hemizygosity was detected on the MBTPS2 gene thus confirming the diagnosis of IFAP syndrome. Conclusions. We describe a boy with a typical clinical presentation of IFAP syndrome and severe atopic manifestations. A novel missense mutation c.1360G>C (p.Ala454Pro) in MBTPS2 gene was observed. The phenotypic expression of disease is quantitatively related to a reduced function of a key cellular regulatory system affecting cholesterol and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. It can cause epithelial disturbance with failure in differentiation of epidermal structures and abnormal skin permeability barrier. However, no correlation phenotype/genotype could be established. PMID:25685152

  14. Marfan syndrome and symptomatic sacral cyst: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Paul M.; Teuber, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Context Meningeal abnormalities such as dural ectasia are seen in Marfan syndrome, but spinal meningeal cysts are rarely seen. These cysts usually asymptomatic and often found incidentally on magnetic resonance imaging, large cysts may cause neurological deficits and pain secondary to nerve root compression. Design Case reports. Findings Two patients with Marfan syndrome presented with urinary symptoms secondary to dural ectasia and sacral cysts. Patient 1 had a history of low back pain, erectile dysfunction, and occasional urinary incontinence and groin pain with recent symptom worsening. He underwent L5 partial laminectomy and S1-S2 laminectomy with sacral cyst decompression. Nine weeks later, he underwent drainage of a sacral pseudomeningocele. Pain and urinary symptoms resolved, and he remains neurologically normal 2 years after surgery. Patient 2 presented after a fall on his tailbone, complaining of low back pain and difficulty urinating. Physical therapy was implemented, but after 4 weeks, urinary retention had not improved. He then underwent resection of the sacral cyst and S1-S3 laminectomy. Pain and paresthesias resolved and bowel function returned to normal. Other than needing intermittent self-catheterization, all other neurologic findings were normal 30 months after surgery. Conclusion/clinical relevance Surgical goals for sacral cysts include resection as well as closure of the dura, which can be challenging due to thinning from ectasia. Neurosurgical intervention in Marfan syndrome is associated with a high risk of dural tears and osseous complications, and should be performed only when symptoms are severe. PMID:23941798

  15. [A case report on Waardenburg syndrome with cleft lip].

    PubMed

    Traoré, H; Traoré, D; Ouane, O; Simpara, B; Ongoiba, N

    2011-01-01

    The syndrome of Waardenburg is a congenital plurimal formatif unit rare described and individualized for the first time by Waardenburg in 1951. It associates in its form most typical dystopie canthale intern, a widening of the base of the nose, disorders of the pigmentation. We wanted brought back this case because of its scarcity. It was about a 18 month old infant without particular antecedents, which was drawn up to us for correction of congenital malformation. The interrogation did not make it possible to find signs functional notable. With the examination it had a general good state. t presented a bilateral iridal hypochromy, a dystopie canthale, a canitie, a bilateral labial slit. The diagnosis of presumption was the Syndrome of Waardenburg because of the description of at least 2 major signs: dystopie canthale and disorders of the pigmentation. The complementary examinations carried out were those of the preoperative assessment which returned normal. The biological diagnosis which rests on the search for change of gene was not made for reasons of technical order and financier. The surgery is centered on the treatment of the labial slit. A chéiloplastie according to Millard was carried out. The continuations were simple. The Syndrome of Waardenburg is a rare, hereditary entity. A neurosensory deafness, musculo-skeletal anomalies, thus qu' a disease of Hirschsprung will have to be systematically required. The surgery of the slit or the télécanthus allows an social integration of the subjects reached.

  16. Tinea Incognita in a Patient with Crest Syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gorgievska-Sukarovska, Biljana; Skerlev, Mihael; Žele-Starčević, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophytic infection that is difficult to diagnose, usually modified by inappropriate topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. We report an extensive case of tinea incognita caused by the zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes (var. granulosa) in a 49-year-old female patient with CREST (Calcinosis; Raynaud phenomenon; Esophageal involvement; Sclerodactyly; Teleangiectasia) syndrome. Immunocompromised patients, as well as patients with keratinization disorders, seem to be especially susceptible to dermatophytic infections with atypical clinical presentation that is sometimes bizarre and difficult to recognize. Therefore, close monitoring and mycological skin examination is recommended in order to avoid misdiagnosis and to give the patient the best chance of recovery.

  17. Guillain-Barré syndrome following chickenpox: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, P; Garnero, M; Del Bono, V; Camera, M; Schenone, A; Grandis, M; Benedetti, L; Viscoli, C

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy, usually triggered by an infectious episode, mostly of viral origin. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a rare cause of GBS, mainly in the case of latent infection reactivation. We report on three adult patients who developed GBS following chickenpox, after a short period of latency. They were promptly treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, and the first one with plasma exchange additionally. All the patients experienced almost complete clinical recovery. Our experience suggests that primary VZV infection constitutes a GBS triggering event.

  18. Bronchoscopic concerns in Proteus syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung-Min; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Hae-Kyu; Jeon, Soeun; Kim, Hyae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is a rare congenital hamartomatous disorder with multisystem involvement. PS shows highly clinical variability due to overgrowth of the affected areas, and several features can make anesthetic management challenging. Little is known about the airway problem associated with anesthesia in PS patients. An 11-year-old girl with PS was scheduled for ear surgery under general anesthesia. She had features complicating intubation including facial asymmetry and disproportion, abnormal teeth, limitation of neck movement due to torticollis, and thoracolumbar scoliosis. This study reports on a case of deformed airway of a PS patient under fiberoptic bronchoscopy. PMID:27703636

  19. [Crossed aphasia or dysexecutive syndrome? A case report].

    PubMed

    Tabeling, S; Kopp, B; Braun, M; Moschner, C; Wessel, K

    2007-08-01

    The case of a female dextral patient (MN) is reported. MN sustained a partial frontotemporal infarction in the right hemisphere. Clinically, MN presented herself mainly with aphasic symptoms. The dextrality of the patient and the laterality of the lesion as well as the nature of language deficits would legitimate the diagnosis of a crossed aphasia, implying paradoxical lateralization of language in MN. However, comprehensive neuropsychological assessment revealed the presence of a global dysexecutive syndrome in MN, suggesting a general cognitive impairment, part of which must be the aphasic symptoms. General issues regarding the relationship between language and cognition and the lateralization of cognitive functions are discussed.

  20. Fetal Valproate Syndrome with Limb Defects: An Indian Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok; Sharma, Manish; Mathur, Priyanshu; Bansal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common disorder and exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy increases the risk of teratogenicity. Older AEDs such as valproate and phenobarbital are associated with a higher risk of major malformations in the fetus than newer AEDs like lamotrigine and levetiracetam. Exposure to valproic acid during first trimester can result in fetal valproate syndrome (FVS), comprising typical facial features, developmental delay, and a variety of malformations such as neural tube defects, cardiac and genitourinary malformations, and limb defects. We are presenting an Indian case of FVS with major limb defects. PMID:28003925

  1. Nicolau syndrome in patient following diclofenac administration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Kyoun

    2011-11-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare adverse reaction to a variety of intra-muscular drug preparations. The typical presentation is pain around the injection site soon after injection, followed by erythema, livedoid patch, hemorrhagic patch, and finally, necrosis of skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle tissue. The phenomenon has been related to the administration of a variety of drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and penicillin. We report a case with typical features associated with diclofenac injection for pain control in a patient who had undergone bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

  2. Fryns syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Gulseren; Cakiroglu, Yigit; Caliskan, Eray

    2008-06-01

    Fryns syndrome (FS) is a rare malformation. We report a case of FS referred to our clinic at 27 weeks' gestation with a diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Sonographic examination of the fetus revealed a left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary hypoplasia, and a median orofacial cleft. The diagnosis of FS was made after exclusion of chromosome aberrations and delivery of the fetus. Macroscopic inspection revealed a coarse face (hypertelorism and broad and flat nasal bridge, anteverted nostrils, median cleft lip/palate, poorly shaped auricles with attached earlobes, facial hirsutism), a narrow thorax, nail hypoplasia, and hypoplastic, widely spaced nipples.

  3. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome: A Rare Case of Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Aamar, Ali; Madhani, Kamraan; Virk, Hafeezulhassan; Butt, Zeeshan

    2016-01-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is caused by hypersecretion of gastrin from duodenal or pancreatic gastrinomas. We report a case of a 57-year-old female who presented with chronic diarrhea. CT abdomen showed multiple liver masses. Liver biopsy suggested metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. Serum gastrin level was markedly elevated. MRI abdomen, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and endoscopic ultrasound failed to reveal primary site of the tumor. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed hyperplastic gastric folds and multiple duodenal ulcers consistent with ZES. Patient was started on high-dose omeprazole and octreotide resulting in improvement in diarrhea. PMID:28058079

  4. Malouf Syndrome with Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism and Cardiomyopathy: Two-Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Şilfeler, Dilek Benk; Karateke, Atilla; Keskin Kurt, Raziye; Aldemir, Özgür; Buğra Nacar, Alper; Baloğlu, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Malouf syndrome is a very rarely encountered syndrome which was first diagnosed in 1985 upon the examination of two sisters, with findings of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, dilated cardiomyopathy, blepharoptosis, and broad nasal base. Later on, Narahara diagnosed another sporadic case with the same findings. A survey of relevant literature leads us to three women cases in total. Here we present two cases of Malouf syndrome and literature review. PMID:25544917

  5. [A case report of a patient with FATCO syndrome: fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia and oligosyndactyly].

    PubMed

    D'Amato Gutiérrez, Mónica; Palacio Díaz, Felipe A

    2016-06-01

    The FATCO syndrome, (Fibular Aplasia, Tibial Campomelia and Oligosyndactyly) are bone malformations with main alteration in lower limbs. It is a rare entity and there are few cases reported in international literature, and so far there are not published cases in Colombia. Here we present a case of a male newborn with prenatal and postnatal signs consistent with FATCO syndrome without other organs malformations, and there is a brief discussion about this syndrome and other different malformations associated with it.

  6. Anesthetic management of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ambi, Uday S.; Adarsh, E. S.; Hatti, Ramesh; Samalad, Vijaymahantesh

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases. PMID:22754447

  7. [Kartagener syndrome and hemangiomatous proliferation of lung capillaries: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Słodkowska, J; Słupek, A; Burakowski, J; Bestry, I; Filipecki, S; Radomski, P

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a case of Kartagener syndrome complicated by pulmonary hypertension accompanied by the lung capillaries haemangiomatous proliferation (post mortem diagnosis). Review of a literature (23 published cases) of the haemangiomatous proliferation of lung capillaries emphasizes clinico-pathological aspects and differential diagnosis. A rarity of Kartagener syndrome is another interesting point of a published case.

  8. Burning-Feet Syndrome: Case Due to Malabsorption and Responding to Riboflavine

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C. S.; Ransome, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    A woman with the burning-feet syndrome was found on investigation to have malabsorption. The syndrome responded rapidly to intramuscular injections of 6 mg. of riboflavine daily. It is suggested that deficiency of this substance, due to malabsorption and aggravated by a defective diet and repeated pregnancies, was responsible for the syndrome in this case. PMID:5440597

  9. Cerebral venous thrombosis and secondary polycythemia in a case of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Bairy, Manohar; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu; Sambhaji, Charudutt Jayant

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and polycythemia are considered as rare and life threatening complications of nephrotic syndrome. We report an unusual combination of both these complications in a case of nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change disease that was treated successfully. There was prompt and complete remission of nephrotic syndrome with steroid therapy, concurrent with complete resolution of polycythemia and CVT.

  10. Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome in siblings: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Gokulraj, Sabitha; Mohan, N.; Raj, J. Babususai; Ahamed, S. Yasmeen; Arokiaraj, C. J. Stephen; Subbulakshmi, A. Cicilia

    2016-01-01

    Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome or chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting several skeletal manifestations and congenital heart malformations. Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome comprises of a tetrad of clinical manifestations of chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac defects. Here, we are presenting a very rare case of Ellis–Van Creveld syndrome in siblings. PMID:27829775

  11. PHACES syndrome--report of two cases and their evolution over time.

    PubMed

    Browne, Fiona; Rickard, Caroline; Smith, Robert A; Lyon, Calum

    2009-01-01

    We describe two cases of PHACES syndrome that illustrate the importance of recognizing this rare syndrome. As children with this syndrome can present to general pediatricians, dermatologists, pediatric cardiologists, ophthalmologists, and neurologists, it is important that all are aware of the spectrum of associated abnormalities.

  12. Four Case Histories and a Literature Review of Williams Syndrome and Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; Rasmussen, Peder

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the case histories of four young children with concurrent autistic disorder and Williams syndrome. Williams syndrome comprises a peculiar facial appearance, learning disorder, and often hypercalcemia, mild microcephaly, large blood vessel stenosis, and a specific behavioral phenotype. Literature on Williams syndrome is…

  13. Aspiration pneumonia in the child with DiGeorge syndrome -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Han, Yun-Joung

    2011-06-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is associated with a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and manifests with variable clinical findings. Aspiration pneumonia can be a perioperative complication of great concern in this syndrome. In this report, we present a case of a 16-month old child with DiGeorge syndrome undergoing cranioplasty. He developed perioperative aspiration pneumonia but was managed successfully.

  14. Antithyroid Arthritis Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Natsumi; Hiyoshi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with antithyroid arthritis syndrome who experienced severe migratory polyarthritis after the initiation of thiamazole therapy. The patient's symptoms promptly disappeared without any sequelae after the withdrawal of the drug. Antithyroid arthritis syndrome is poorly characterized, and the findings from our literature review indicate that this syndrome exhibits serological features that are distinct from those of antithyroid agent-induced vasculitis syndrome. The absence of autoantibodies, especially anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, may help characterize and diagnose antithyroid arthritis syndrome. Furthermore, physicians' awareness of this syndrome is essential for its diagnosis in clinical practice. PMID:27980264

  15. Acute thigh compartment syndrome post femoral vein catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    This case report presents a previously unreported etiology of acute thigh compartment syndrome following ipsilateral femoral vein catheterization, including clinical results and a brief review of the literature.

  16. Stevens Johnson syndrome after carbamazepine and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome after amoxicillin: case reports and a review.

    PubMed

    Romańska-Gocka, Krystyna; Gocki, Jacek; Placek, Waldemar; Zegarska, Barbara; Krause, Paweł

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of Stevens Johnson syndrome in a child after carbamazepine application and Stevens Johnson/TEN overlap syndrome in an adult after amoxicillin application. On the basis of two reported cases we review the most commonly associated drugs, the postulated pathogenesis, clinical manifestation and management in these severe life-threatening diseases. We especially discuss the controversial systemic corticosteroid therapy. Topical care is also discussed.

  17. Stevens Johnson syndrome after carbamazepine and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome after amoxicillin: case reports and a review

    PubMed Central

    Gocki, Jacek; Placek, Waldemar; Zegarska, Barbara; Krause, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of Stevens Johnson syndrome in a child after carbamazepine application and Stevens Johnson/TEN overlap syndrome in an adult after amoxicillin application. On the basis of two reported cases we review the most commonly associated drugs, the postulated pathogenesis, clinical manifestation and management in these severe life-threatening diseases. We especially discuss the controversial systemic corticosteroid therapy. Topical care is also discussed. PMID:22371734

  18. Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia. Report on a new case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, L; Brayer, C; Attali, T; Samperiz, S; Tiran-Rajaofera, I; Ramful, D; Pilorget, H

    2005-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by coarse facies, diaphragmatic hernia, distal limb hypoplasia and malformations of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and central nervous systems. Diaphragmatic hernia is a leading diagnostic feature in Fryns syndrome, recorded in more than 80% of cases. We report a newborn with clinical features of Fryns syndrome except the diaphragmatic hernia. Cases of Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia are reviewed. Even in the absence of diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary anomalies are described in Fryns syndrome, especially pulmonary hypoplasia. Fetal mice, exposed to nitrofen, have a high incidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and other malformations similar to that seen in Fryns syndrome. Nitrofen might target molecular mechanisms similar to those involved in Fryns syndrome.

  19. A Case of Cushing Syndrome Diagnosed by Recurrent Pathologic Fractures in a Young Woman

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju Young; Lee, Jungjin; Kim, Gyung Eun; Yeo, Jin Yeob; Kim, So hun; Nam, Moonsuk; Kim, Yong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome is characterized by central obesity, fatigability, weakness, amenorrhea, hirsutism, edema, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, and osteoporosis due to excessive production of steroids. Cushing's syndrome is an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. Patients with Cushing's syndrome have a high incidence of osteoporotic fractures. At least, 30-50% of patients with Cushing's syndrome experience fractures, particularly in the vertebral body. And it is consistent with the 50% prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with Cushing's syndrome. However, reports of multiple pathological fractures in young patients with Cushing's syndrome are rare. Thus, we describe the case of a 26-year-old woman with Cushing's syndrome accompanied with recurrent multiple osteoporotic fractures and being treated by parathyroid hormone. Careful consideration for the possibility of Cushing's syndrome will be necessary in case of young patients with a spontaneous multiple compression fractures in spine. PMID:24524047

  20. [Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders as initial presentation of Sjögren's syndrome: A case report].

    PubMed

    Alva Díaz, Carlos; Andamayo Villalba, Luis; Mori, Nicanor; Ventura Chilón, Jésica Janet; Romero, Roberto

    2016-02-29

    Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD) is a rare systemic autoimmune disease which is sometimes found in association with other autoimmune disorders including Sjogren's syndrome. Neurological manifestations occur in 20% to 25% of diagnosed cases of Sjögren's syndrome; however, less than 5% of patients with Sjögren's syndrome have neurological manifestations as the initial presenting feature of Sjögren's syndrome. We report the case of an elderly female with longitudinal myelitis as a presenting feature who had positive antibody to aquaporin-4 (NMO-IgG) and Sjögren's syndrome.

  1. Pathological gambling plus hypersexuality in restless legs syndrome: a new case.

    PubMed

    d'Orsi, Giuseppe; Demaio, Vincenzo; Specchio, L M

    2011-08-01

    Emerging clinical data indicate that dopaminergic agonists used to treat restless legs syndrome may be associated with dopamine dysregulation syndrome, particularly pathological gambling. We report a new case with pathological gambling plus hypersexuality and impotence in an old patient treated with a small dose (0.18 mg daily at bedtime) of pramipexole for restless legs syndrome for 5 months. The time relationship and the resolution upon discontinuation of dopaminergic agonists suggest a causative association. Our new case confirms that restless legs syndrome patients should be cautioned about potential dopamine dysregulation syndrome coinciding with dopaminergic agonists, as it can be reversed by drug withdrawal.

  2. Reversible Pisa syndrome associated to subdural haematoma: case-report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pisa Syndrome or Pleurothotonus is a relatively rare truncal dystonia, characterized by tonic flexion of the trunk and head to one side with slight rotation of the body. Since frequently associated to specific drugs such as antipsychotics and cholinesterase inhibitors or to Parkinson Disease, a pathophysiological role of cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested. We report here the first case of Pisa Syndrome due to an extracerebral pathology as subdural haematoma. Case presentation A hypertensive patient was admitted to Our Department for subacute onset of tonic flexion and slight rotation of the trunk associated to progressive motor deficit in left upper limb after a mild head trauma without loss of consciousness occurred around three month before. No previous or current pharmacological interventions with antidepressant, neuroleptic or anticholinergic drugs were anamnestically retrieved. Familiar and personal history was negative for neurological disorders other than acute cerebrovascular diseases. Acutely performed cerebral MRI with DWI showed a voluminous right subdural haematoma with mild shift of median line. After surgical evacuation, both motor deficit and truncal dystonia were dramatically resolved. At one-year follow up, the patient did not develop any extrapyramidal and cognitive signs or symptoms. Conclusions According to many Authors, the occurrence of truncal dystonia during several pharmacologic treatments and neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer disease and parkinsonian syndromes) supported the hypothesis that a complex dysregulation of multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved. We suggest a possible role of basal ganglia compression in pathogenesis of truncal dystonia by means of thalamo-cortical trait functional disruption and loss of proprioceptive integration. A further contribution of the subcortical structure displacement that alters motor cortex connectivity to basal ganglia may be postulated. PMID

  3. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Nandipati, Sirisha; Rucker, Janet C.; Frucht, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints. PMID:24386607

  4. Refeeding syndrome in a vegan patient with stage IV gastric cancer: a novel case.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teresa V; Moss, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    The refeeding syndrome encompasses the complex physiologic state that occurs in malnourished patients who receive nutrition after a period of decreased oral intake. The hallmark of the syndrome is hypophosphatemia, though other electrolyte imbalances and severe fluid shifts are commonly involved. Patients with newly diagnosed malignancies and those undergoing treatment for malignancies are at increased risk for developing the refeeding syndrome, however there are few reported cases or other data in the oncology literature regarding this syndrome in cancer patients.

  5. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    PubMed

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (<3 days) were prospectively enrolled. Clinical assessment was performed by calculation of the 'AHDS index' (0-18). The hospital population and 21 healthy dogs served as control groups. Dogs with AHDS had a significantly lower body weight (median 9.8 kg) and age (median five years) than other dogs of the hospital population (20 kg; 10 years) (P<0.001). Predisposed breeds were Yorkshire terrier, miniature pinscher, miniature schnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours.

  6. Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G

    1985-05-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members.

  7. [Tarsal tunnel syndrome secondary to venous insufficiency. Case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Villaseñor, S; Martin-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Vázquez-Escamilla, J; Parra-Téllez, P; López-Gavito, E

    2015-01-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome is defined as an extrinsic and/or intrinsic compressive neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its branches. Its causes include venous insufficiency. Clinical case: 51 year-old female patient from León, Guanajuato. Hypertensive, with Guillain-Barré syndrome for eight years, vascular insufficiency and obesity. Her condition started with left ankle and heel pain; she was treated with NSAIDs and rehabilitation and achieved partial improvement. X-rays and MRI of the left ankle showed posterior impingement. She underwent arthroscopy and improved but one month later she presented with severe pain in the left ankle and sole and dysesthesias. Electromyography showed a lesion of the posterior tibial nerve. We had the patient's case history, preoperative tests, and dorsoplantar and lateral X-ray views. The arthroscopic diagnosis was Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL) tendinitis, synovitis and posterior ankle impingement. Synovectomy, decompression and smoothening of the FHL tendon were performed. The patient did poorly and underwent electromyography with axonotmesis of the medial plantar branch. After the nerve was released, Lazorthes venous plexus was found to be tortuous and compressing the entire nerve tract. The possible causes for this include intrinsic compression secondary to tumors, and anatomical changes of the tarsal tunnel. However, less often varices may confound the diagnosis and cause irreversible damage if not treated timely. The patient is currently pain free and can walk, has mild dysesthesias of the first toe and limited flexion.

  8. [A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chaabane, M; Bidat, E; Chevallier, B

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) with milk whose signs of milk intolerance began in the 1st days of life, consisting in minor and nonspecific symptoms. The 3 foods in question were cow's milk, soja, and wheat. The diagnosis of FPIES was suspected at the age of 9 months, after 3 hospitalizations for vomiting, sometimes associated with lethargy and hypotension, which occurred around 2h after cow's milk ingestion. Symptoms were not associated with positive specific IgE and cutaneous tests. Signs then occurred with soja and wheat. Because of the late diagnosis, 3 anaphylactic shock episodes occurred. FPIES is an uncommon cell-mediated food allergy reaction. This syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, especially severe vomiting, sometimes associated with anaphylactic shock. Usually signs occur 2h after ingestion. These reactions begin early, in the 1st months of life, and regress by the age of 3 years in 38-100% of cases depending on the responsible food. They are usually induced by cow's milk and soy proteins. Diagnosis is difficult and delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Oral food challenge is the only examination that confirms the diagnosis. Treatment involves the exclusion of the specific food involved. Severe reactions require treatment of shock and adjunction of corticosteroids.

  9. Special cases in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: The Spanish experience.

    PubMed

    Pié, Juan; Puisac, Beatriz; Hernández-Marcos, Maria; Teresa-Rodrigo, Maria Esperanza; Gil-Rodríguez, Maria; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Ramos-Cáceres, Maria; Bernal, Maria; Ayerza-Casas, Ariadna; Bueno, Inés; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ramos, Feliciano J

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is an autosomal dominant (NIPBL, SMC3, and RAD21) or X-linked (SMC1A and HDAC8) disorder, characterized by distinctive craniofacial appearance, growth retardation, intellectual disability, and limb anomalies. In 2005, the Spanish CdLS Reference Center was started and now we have more than 270 cases in our database. In this special issue, we describe some of the unique or atypical patients studied by our group, whose clinical features have contributed to the expansion of the CdLS classical phenotype, helping clinicians to diagnose it. We include the case of a male with unilateral tibial hypoplasia and peroneal agenesis who had a mutation in NIPBL; we also describe one patient with a mutation in NIPBL and somatic mosaicism identified by new generation sequencing techniques; we also include one patient with CdLS and Turner syndrome; and last, an interesting patient with a duplication of the SMC1A gene. Finally, we make a short review of the splicing mutations we have found in NIPBL regarding the new knowledge on the physiological variants of the gene. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Capillary leakage syndrome: a case report and a review.

    PubMed

    Garcês, S; Araújo, F; Rego, F; Soares, J L Ducla; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-12-01

    Capillary leakage Syndrome (CLS) is a rare clinical syndrome, that was first described in 1960, characterized by acute episodes of generalized edema, hemoconcentration, hypoproteinemia and monoclonal gammopathy, in the vast majority of cases. We describe a 39-year-old man with anasarca, bilateral pleural and pericardial effusions, ascites and diffuse alveolo-intersticial edema. Clinical and laboratory findings were consistent with an acute episode of CLS. Treatment with prednisone, furosemide and aminophylline was started, which lead to a gradual improvement in 48 hours. Pathophysiologically there is an increase in capillary permeability with the extravasation of fluid and plasmatic proteins to the extravascular space that can lead to hypovolaemic shock. In the second phase there is a reentry of the fluid overload leading to pulmonary edema. The etiology of this hyperpermeability still remains unclear. The role of cytokines has become central in the comprehension of pathophysiology of CLS. Adhesion molecules are probably also involved in the genesis of capillary leakage. CLS treatment remains empirical. However, at present it seems that the association of steroids with furosemide, aminophylline and terbutaline are capable of controlling the clinical manifestation of the acute episodes in most cases. To our knowledge no prophylatic therapy has clearly proven its efficacy. There are only a few series analyzing the long-term evolution of patients with CLS. Further studies are necessary with the objective to collect enough patients with CLS to observe natural history of the disease and evaluate the efficacy of empiric treatments.

  11. Case of Cronkhite Canada syndrome shows improvement with enteral supplements.

    PubMed

    Lipin, S P; Paul, Baby; Nazimudeen, E; Jacob, Baiju Sam

    2012-04-01

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a rare nonfamilial syndrome characterized by marked epithelial disturbances in the GI tract and epidermis. Cronkhite and Canada described the first 2 cases in 1955. Since then only about 450 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we report a 33 year old Indian male admitted with history of loose stools and abdominal pain, loose stools associated with weight loss, generalized weakness, significant amount of hair loss as well as hyperpigmentation of his palms and soles. On subsequent days of the stay in the hospital he developed hypogeusia and showed onychodystrophy. Endoscopy of Upper GI and Lower GI tract revealed severe gastroduodenitis with polyp in duodenum and multiple polyps whole throughout the colon respectively. Biopsy report showed eosinophilic gastritis and hamartomatous polyps in colon as well as in duodenum. He was started on high protein supplement, proton pump inhibitors and zinc-vitamin supplement and he showed a complete recovery in symptoms within 5 months of initiation of treatment. Hence, early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment helped the patient to improve in symptoms from such a rare disease.

  12. Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G

    1985-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members. PMID:3859204

  13. A case report of pornography addiction with dhat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, M. S.; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Manickam, Sam; Tandon, Abhinav; Ram, Dushad

    2014-01-01

    A case of pornography addiction with dhat syndrome was diagnosed applying the existing criteria for substance dependence in International Classification for Diseases-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition, Text Revision. There is a lack of clear-cut criteria for identifying and defining such behavioural addictions and also lack of medical documents on pornography addiction. An applied strategy in lines with any substance addiction is used, and we found it helped our patient to gradually deaddict and then completely quit watching pornography. This is one of the few cases being reported scientifically, and we hope more work will be carried out in this ever increasing pornography addiction problem. PMID:25568482

  14. Incomplete androgen insensitivity (Reifenstein syndrome) - a case report.

    PubMed

    Turan, Volkan; Yeniel, Ozgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete; Terek, Coşan; Ulukuş, Murat

    2010-01-01

    We report a 20 year old case of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome, referred to our clinic with complaints concerning external genital organs and left undescended testicle. The phenotypically male case was first evaluated for secondary sex development. Axillary hair was scanty and no pubic hair was found. There was no breast development. In the gynecological examination, the clitoris was hypertrophic (4.6 cm) and a blind vagina with intact hymen was seen. Abdominopelvic ultrasonography revealed the absence of an uterus and adnexes which was supported by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There was a palpable mass in the left inguinal canal (cryptorchism), seen as atrophic tissue under the skin in MRI. Although the other testis was in the labioscrotal fold, it was atrophic. The Karyotype was 46 XY after genetic investigation.

  15. Paracetamol induced Steven-Johnson syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Rajan; Sagari, Shitalkumar; Durgavanshi, Astha; Kanwar, Alpana

    2015-09-01

    In the contemporary era, use of drugs is the dominant paradigm of health care. The most quotidian drug used for fever and pain is paracetamol. Although adverse reactions to paracetamol in India are rare, at times they can cause life-threatening situations. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is one such potentially lethal adverse drug reaction. The most reported cases of analgesic-induced SJS were due to oxicams or propionic acid derivatives. There are very few detailed reports of SJS due to the use of paracetamol. We report a case of SJS, which occurred due to the use of paracetamol. The clinical features of this condition and multidisciplinary management of the patient are described in brief.

  16. Preejaculatory illness syndrome: Two cases of a rare psychosomatic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Adel; Elawdy, Mohamed Mohamed; Faix, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Human ejaculation happens in the orgasmic phase of the human sexual response cycle. Among psychosomatic ejaculatory disorders that may happen before ejaculation, we present two cases of preejaculatory illness syndrome. The two cases shared common symptoms of sympathetic over activity, the sensation of impending death, and muscle atonia with subsequent failure to ejaculate. Depression, anxiety disorders, and family histories of psychiatric problems were noticed as risk factors. Medical conditions that may lead to panic attack type symptoms were eliminated before the final diagnosis. After the failure of empirical medications, symptoms became controlled with fluoxetine. Patients reported a recurrence of the symptoms on trying to stop the prescribed medication. On the last follow-up, they still take fluoxetine on a regular base with satisfactory sexual life. PMID:26834413

  17. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Arash; Izadpanah, Ali; Karunanayake, Mihiran; Petropolis, Christian; Deckelbaum, Dan L.; Luc, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery. PMID:25190927

  18. Abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Izadpanah, Arash; Izadpanah, Ali; Karunanayake, Mihiran; Petropolis, Christian; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Luc, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Abdominoplasty is among the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. Despite high complication rate, abdominal contouring procedures are expected to rise in popularity with the advent of bariatric surgery. Patients with a history of gastric bypass surgery have an elevated incidence of small bowel obstruction from internal herniation, which is associated with non-specific upper abdominal pain, nausea, and a decrease in appetite. Internal hernias, when subjected to elevated intra-abdominal pressures, have a high-risk of developing ischemic bowel. We present a case report of patient with previous laparoscopic Roux-en-y gastric bypass who developed acute ischemic bowel leading to abdominal compartment syndrome following abdominoplasty. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature. We herein emphasise on the subtle symptoms and signs that warrant further investigations in prospective patients for an abdominal contouring procedure with a prior history of gastric bypass surgery.

  19. Incomplete androgen insensitivity (Reifenstein syndrome) - a case report

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Volkan; Yeniel, Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete; Terek, Coşan; Ulukuş, Murat

    2010-01-01

    We report a 20 year old case of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome, referred to our clinic with complaints concerning external genital organs and left undescended testicle. The phenotypically male case was first evaluated for secondary sex development. Axillary hair was scanty and no pubic hair was found. There was no breast development. In the gynecological examination, the clitoris was hypertrophic (4.6 cm) and a blind vagina with intact hymen was seen. Abdominopelvic ultrasonography revealed the absence of an uterus and adnexes which was supported by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There was a palpable mass in the left inguinal canal (cryptorchism), seen as atrophic tissue under the skin in MRI. Although the other testis was in the labioscrotal fold, it was atrophic. The Karyotype was 46 XY after genetic investigation. PMID:24591911

  20. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, B; Ashok, L; Sujatha, G P

    2008-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a disease complex, where all the three embryonic layers appear to be involved. This disorder is also called as Chondroectodermal dysplasia. EvC is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in these patients. Mutations in the two genes EVC and EVC2, have been identified to cause the condition. It has been considered as a skeletal dysplasia with an incidence of approximately 1 out of 1,50,000 live births. A high prevalence has been reported among certain populations like Amish and Arabs of Gaza strip. There are more than 300 cases of EvC reported into the literature. About 50-60% of cases have been reported with congenital cardiac malformations.

  1. [Middle aortic syndrome: a report of three pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez León, M I; Alcaide Martín, D; García-Herrera Taillefer, P; Ramos Rodríguez, R

    2013-09-01

    The middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is caused by stenosis of the abdominal aorta, often accompanied by concomitant stenosis of the renal or visceral arteries. Although MAS is uncommon (0.5-2%), it is an important cause of hypertension in children and adolescents. It is thought to originate in a failure of the two dorsal aortas to fuse during embryological development, and a high percentage of cases are idiopathic. MAS affects the segment of the aorta between the renal arteries in 54% of cases. Clinically, it courses with symptomatic or asymptomatic arterial hypertension. On physical examination, findings include an abdominal bruit, diminished or absent femoral pulses, and a difference between the arterial pressure of the upper and lower limbs. Angiography is the technique of choice, although noninvasive MR angiography and CT angiography have similar diagnostic accuracy. Ultrasonography is the primary screening technique. Medical treatment consists of a combination of different antihypertensives. Surgical treatment can be curative.

  2. Pediatric Ramsay Hunt Syndrome: Analysis of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğdu, İmran; Ataç, Enes; Saltürk, Ziya; Atar, Yavuz; Özdemir, Erdi; Uyar, Yavuz; Arslanoğlu, Ahmet; Berkiten, Güler

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) is a disorder characterized by herpetic eruptions on the auricle, facial paralysis, and vestibulocochlear dysfunction and is attributed to varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in the geniculate ganglion. Although it is a common cause of acute peripheral facial paralysis, children are not usually affected. The diagnosis is based on history and physical findings. Treatment of RHS uses a combination of high-dose corticosteroids and acyclovir. This paper presents three cases diagnosed as RHS in the pediatric age group in association with the literature review. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the importance of careful examination and early initiation of therapy in suspected cases of RHS. PMID:26435868

  3. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Soo-Hoo, Sarah; Porten, Brandon R; Engstrom, Bjorn I; Skeik, Nedaa

    2016-04-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) encompasses a group of rare genetic connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (type IV) poses the most serious risk to patients. Diagnosis is usually difficult, especially if patients lack a family history. Life-threatening vascular emergency such as dissection or rupture can be the first presenting symptom. Management of the disease can pose a clinical challenge due to the emergency of presentation, tissue friability, and lack of clear management recommendations. We report a unique case of a 40-year-old man who presented with a ruptured celiac artery and a strong family history of EDS. This case highlights the difficulties and complications associated with treating this uncommon and serious disease.

  4. [Genetic analysis of Turner syndrome: 89 cases in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Kammoun, I; Chaabouni, M; Trabelsi, M; Ouertani, I; Kraoua, L; Chelly, I; M'rad, R; Ben Jemaa, L; Maâzoul, F; Chaabouni, H

    2008-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) affects about 1/2500 female infants born alive. The syndrome results from total or partial absence of one of the two X chromosomes normally present in females. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of 89 cases of TS observed during a six-year period (2000-2005). The patients' age ranged from two days to 51 years at the time of this analysis. Most patients were adults (48%). The aim of this study is to ascertain the principal clinical features leading to a request for a karyotype, searching for a possible relationship between chromosomal anomalies and clinical expression of TS. Pediatric patients were referred for statural retardation or dysmorphic features, while reproduction anomalies were the main indication for karyotyping in patients aged over 20 years. Mosaicism was prevalent (47%), whereas the homogeneous karyotype 45,X was found in only 32% of the patients; structural anomalies were found in 21%. Regarding the advanced age of our patients, we established a relationship between chromosome anomalies and the clinical expression of TS, based on an analysis of stature and reproduction disorders. Short stature and primary amenorrhea were correlated with total deletion of one chromosome X or imbalanced gene dosage due to structural X anomalies. Whereas cases of infertility, recurrent miscarriages and secondary amenorrhea were associated with a mosaic karyotype pattern (45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX ...), with a slight mosaicism in most cases. Thus, chromosome investigations should be performed in cases of reproduction failure even for women with normal stature.

  5. Cortical thickness in a case of congenital unilateral perisylvian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kotini, A; Camposano, S; Hara, K; Salat, D; Cole, A; Stufflebeam, S; Halgren, E

    2004-11-30

    In congenital perisylvian syndrome, there is polymicrogyric cortex distributed in variable extensions around the sylvian fissure. Unilateral cases usually present with congenital hemiparesis, while bilateral cases have pseudobulbar paralysis of the oropharingoglossal region. Both unilateral and bilateral cases have a high rate of epilepsy. Polymicrogyric cortex is characterized by too many small convolutions. Often there are no intervening sulci, and almost no white matter can be seen under them. On MRI they appear to have increased thickness. Bilateral and symmetric polimycrogiria can be hard to recognize on standard MRIs. Accurate and automated methods for measuring the thickness of cerebral cortex are available. They have mainly been used to study a variety of disorders with diminished cortical thickness. We studied a case of right perisylvian polymicrogyria, who presented in adult life with epilepsy and had a normal neurological exam. Fischl and Dale's automated cortical thickness analysis rendered a very clear picture of increased cortical thickness with values up to 9 mm in the affected areas (normal cortical thickness varies between 1 and 4.5 mm). The thickest areas were seen over grossly abnormal gyri on the reconstructed cerebral cortex. On MEG he presented a prominent and monotonous 9 Hz activity that was located within the limits of a thick gyrus. There was a significant difference of thickness between homologous hemispheric areas. To our surprise some areas of the left hemisphere also appeared to have increased thickness, raising the question of a bilateral asymmetric case.

  6. [Analysis of a case series of workers with mobbing syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marinoni, B; Minelli, C M; Franzina, B; Martellosio, V; Scafa, F; Giorgi, I; Mazzacane, F; Stancanelli, M; Mennoia, N V; Candura, S M

    2007-01-01

    Mobbing represents nowadays a major challenge for Occupational Medicine. We examined, during the last seven years, 253 patients who asked medical assistance for psychopathological problems by them ascribed to mobbing in the working environment. All patients underwent occupational health visit, psychological counselling (including personality tests administration), and psychiatric evaluation. A clinical picture probably due to mobbing was diagnosed in 37 workers: 2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), 33 of Adjustment Disorder (AD), and 2 of anxiety disorder. Regarding mobbing typology, we found 19 cases of vertical mobbing (by an employer/manager to employees), 14 cases of strategic mobbing, 3 cases of horizontal mobbing (among colleagues), and one non intentional mobbing. In conclusion, a pure mobbing syndrome was diagnosed in a lower proportion than that reported by other investigators. The described interdisciplinary approach appears useful for the diagnostic assessment of suspect mobbing cases, that in turn is crucial for prognosis and treatment, as well as in relation to medico-legal issues and work-related compensation claims.

  7. Craniocervical arachnoid cyst in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome: a unique case: case report.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imad Saeed; Ahmed, Osama; Thakur, Jai Deep; Shorter, Cedric D; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2013-02-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome, or brevicollis, is a complex congenital disorder caused by the improper segmentation of the cervical vertebrae. The authors present the very rare case of a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome who presented with an intradural arachnoid cyst at the craniocervical junction. They also examine possible factors contributing to this association. A 46-year-old woman presented with complaints of progressively worsening headaches and dizziness of 18 months' duration. She also demonstrated mild bilateral upper-extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed fused cervical vertebrae and a dorsal intradural arachnoid cyst at the craniocervical junction, extending down to the fourth cervical level. Because of worsening myelopathy and the presence of brainstem compression, the patient underwent surgical excision of the arachnoid cyst, which was approached via a midline posterior suboccipital/upper cervical route. An endoscope was introduced through a gap between the occiput and fused upper cervical vertebrae, and the arachnoid cyst was widely fenestrated. Postoperatively, the patient has remained symptom free for more than 2 years with evidence of good radiological decompression. The authors report a unique association between craniocervical arachnoid cyst and Klippel-Feil syndrome. To their knowledge, no other cases of this association have been reported in the literature. Arachnoid cysts should be part of the differential diagnosis in the presence of worsening myelopathic symptoms or pain in patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  8. The eleventh reported case of Mulvihill-Smith syndrome in the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Mulvihill-Smith Syndrome was first recognized in 1975. After the recognition of the Mulvihill-Smith Syndrome, ten cases have been described. Case presentation This article describes the eleventh case of this syndrome in a male patient, 24 years-old with short stature and microcephaly with mild cognitive impairment, deafness and allergic conjunctivitis. The patient was hospitalized several times for repeated infections, and the presence of multiple melanocytic nevi on his skin was noticed. Conclusions Based on the entire set of signs and symptoms presented in our study, it was diagnosed the patient with Mulvihill-Smith Syndrome. PMID:24397283

  9. Coronary artery bypass surgery in a patient with Kartagener syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bougioukas, Ioannis; Mikroulis, Dimitrios; Danner, Bernhard; Lawal, Lukman; Eleftheriadis, Savvas; Bougioukas, George; Didilis, Vassilios

    2010-08-26

    Kartagener syndrome consists of congenital bronchiectasis, sinusitis, and total situs inversus in half of the patients. A patient diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome was referred to our department due to 3-vessel coronary disease. An off-pump coronary artery bypass operation was performed using both internal thoracic arteries and a saphenous vein graft. We performed a literature review for cases with Kartagener syndrome, coronary surgery and dextrocardia. Although a few cases of dextrocardia were found in the literature, no case of Kartagener syndrome was mentioned.

  10. Recurrent miller fisher syndrome with abnormal terminal axon dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tomcík, Jan; Dufek, Michal; Hromada, Jan; Rektor, Ivan; Bares, Martin

    2007-12-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a localized variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), characterized by ophthalmoplegia, areflexia, and ataxia. Recent neurophysiological studies have suggested that abnormal terminal axon dysfunction occurs in some cases of Miller Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barrd syndrome. We present a rare case report of recurrent MFS with abnormal terminal axon dysfunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent MFS with terminal axon dysfunction that persisted up to nine months after the initial presentation of the second attack with positive antiganglioside antibodies and full clinical recovery.

  11. Like Father, Like Daughter-inherited cutis aplasia occurring in a family with Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Islam, Yasmin Florence Khodeja; Williams, Charles A; Schoch, Jennifer Jane; Andrews, Israel David

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn with co-occurrence of Marfan syndrome and aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and a family history significant for Marfan syndrome and ACC in the father. This case details a previously unreported mutation in Marfan syndrome and describes a novel coinheritance of Marfan syndrome and ACC.

  12. Crouzon syndrome with primary optic nerve atrophy and normal brain functions: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Uma Shankar; Gupta, Chandan; Chellappa, Arul A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background This report and review of literature aimed to assess an unusual case of Crouzon syndrome characterized by distinctive disfigurement of craniofacial skeletal and soft tissue structures with primary optic nerve atropy. Methods We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with Crouzon syndrome displaying classic facial abnormalities with reduced vision and hearing loss. Conclusion Crouzon syndrome should be managed as early as possible as it results in airway obstruction, decreased vision, mental retardation and poor cosmetic appearance. PMID:25737846

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a child with nephrotic syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Bhoobun, Shalinee; Jalloh, Alhaji Alusaine; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), a rare and life threatening complication of nephrotic syndrome, has a variable and non-specific presentation, posing diagnostic challenges. We describe a case of CVT in a Sierra Leonean child with nephrotic syndrome who was successfully treated for the condition despite the resource limitations of the hospital. This case highlights the importance of considering cerebral venous thrombosis as a complication of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome in children presenting with neurological symptoms.

  14. Multiple abdominal cysts in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haenen, F; Hubens, G; Creytens, D; Vaneerdeweg, W

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of symptomatic mesenteric cysts in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, associated with various neoplasms, is presented. The patient, known with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, consulted with increasingly severe abdominal pain and large abdominal cysts. At surgery, the cysts were excised and the postoperative course was uneventful. In conclusion, this case reminds clinicians to always maintain a wide differential diagnosis when dealing with patients known with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  15. Ganser syndrome after solitary confinement in prison: a short review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H S; Sestoft, D; Lillebaek, T

    2001-01-01

    A short review of the Ganser syndrome is given. The condition is a rare, probably dissociative, disorder with transient Vorbeireden as the central symptom. The case of a middle-aged man developing a transient Ganser syndrome after long-term solitary confinement in a remand prison is presented. Systematic investigation of 268 remand prisoners confirms the rarity of the syndrome, as only the case subject had this disorder.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Magno Pereira, Vítor; Marote Correia, Luís; Rodrigues, Tiago; Serrão Faria, Gorete

    2016-09-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a neurological syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures associated with identifiable areas of cerebral edema on imaging studies. The authors report the case of a man, 33 years-old, leukodermic with a history of chronic alcohol and tobacco consumption, who is admitted to the emergency department for epigastric pain radiating to the back and vomiting with about six hours of evolution and an intense holocranial headache for two hours. His physical examination was remarkable for a blood pressure of 190/100 mmHg and tenderness in epigastrium. His analytical results revealed emphasis on amylase 193 U/L and lipase 934 U/L. During the observation in the emergency department,he presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed and suggestive of pancreatitis withoutgallstones signals. Head computed tomography showed subarachnoid haemorrhage and a small right frontal cortical haemorrhage. The brain magnetic resonance imaging done one week after admission showed areas of a bilateral and symmetrical T2 / FLAIR hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter of the parietal and superior frontal regions, suggesting a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography (10 days after admission) demonstrated a thickened pancreas in connection with inflammation and two small hypodense foci in the anterior part of the pancreas body, translating small foci of necrosis. The investigation of a thrombophilic defect revealed a heterozygous G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The patient was discharged without neurological sequelae and asymptomatic. The follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the reversal of the lesions, confirming the diagnosis.

  17. Classic Case Report of Donohue Syndrome (Leprechaunism; OMIM ∗246200)

    PubMed Central

    Nijim, Yousif; Awni, Youssef; Adawi, Amin; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Donohue syndrome ([DS]; leprechaunism) describes a genetic autosomal recessive disorder that results from the presence of homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the insulin receptor gene (INSR; 19p13.3–p13.2). Donohue syndrome is associated with a fatal congenital form of dwarfism with features of intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, exaggerated hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinism and dysmorphic abnormalities. We present a case of DS owing to the rarity of this syndrome (1 case in every million births). We discuss how the disease presents, its genetic underpinning, and its prevention. The case was encountered in an Arab male born on 1 September, 2014, for consanguineous parents. The delivery was via cesarean section at 37 weeks gestation due to severe intrauterine growth restriction and nonprogress labor term. The patient was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit due to infection, and jaundice. Dysmorphic features, abnormalities of the craniofacial region, low birth weight, skin abnormalities, abdominal distension and hypertrichosis were observed. Laboratory examinations showed, hyperinsulinism, increased C-peptide, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and anemia. The diagnosis of DS was done based on the combinations of typical dysmorphic characteristics, clinical evaluation, supported by genetic analysis and exaggerated biochemical results. Genetic diagnosis of DS was performed through analysis of DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A qualitative real-time PCR was used, to monitor the amplification of a targeted DNA molecule during the PCR. Other technique using sequencing of the INSR gene, which permits genetic diagnosis, counseling, and antenatal diagnoses in subsequent pregnancies, were also performed. Treatment of DS is supportive and requires the combined efforts of a multidisciplinary team, which include pediatricians, endocrinologists, dermatologists, and other health care professionals. Currently, treatment with

  18. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Rare Case Report of a 11-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Sandeep; Chauhan, Yashwant; Sharma, Meenakshi; Jain, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an autosomal dominant trait caused due to mutations in the patched tumor suppressor gene (PTCH) gene found on the long arm of chromosome 9. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), basal cell carcinomas, and skeletal malformations. Early diagnosis of the syndrome can be done by pedodontist as OKC is one of the early manifestations of the syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment is important for long-term prognosis of the syndrome by reducing the severity of cutaneous carcinomas and deformities due to jaw cyst. The present case describes an 11-year-old patient with some typical features of NBCCS, which were diagnosed through its oral and maxillofacial manifestations. This case emphasizes the importance of pedodontist in early recognition of the syndrome.

  19. Cardiovascular Malformations in CHARGE Syndrome with DiGeorge Phenotype: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazushi; Morihana, Eiji; Fusazaki, Naoki; Ishikawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Both CHARGE syndrome and DiGeorge anomaly are frequently accompanied by cardiovascular malformations. Some specific cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B and truncus arteriosus are frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, while conotruncal defects and atrioventricular septal defects are overrepresented in patients with CHARGE syndrome. CHD7 gene mutation is identified in approximately two-thirds of patients with CHARGE syndrome, and chromosomal microdeletion at 22q11.2 is found in more than 95% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is occasionally accompanied by DiGeorge phenotype. We report two patients with dysmorphic features of both CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Although both of the two cases did not have 22q11.2 deletion, they had typical dysmorphic features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B. They also had characteristic features of CHARGE syndrome including ear malformation, genital hypoplasia, limb malformation, and endocrinological disorders. CHD7 gene mutation was confirmed in one of the two cases. When a patient with cardiovascular malformations frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome does not have 22q11.2 deletion, we suggest that associated malformations characteristic of CHARGE syndrome should be searched for.

  20. Cardiovascular Malformations in CHARGE Syndrome with DiGeorge Phenotype: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Morihana, Eiji; Fusazaki, Naoki; Ishikawa, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Both CHARGE syndrome and DiGeorge anomaly are frequently accompanied by cardiovascular malformations. Some specific cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B and truncus arteriosus are frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, while conotruncal defects and atrioventricular septal defects are overrepresented in patients with CHARGE syndrome. CHD7 gene mutation is identified in approximately two-thirds of patients with CHARGE syndrome, and chromosomal microdeletion at 22q11.2 is found in more than 95% of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is occasionally accompanied by DiGeorge phenotype. We report two patients with dysmorphic features of both CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Although both of the two cases did not have 22q11.2 deletion, they had typical dysmorphic features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including cardiovascular malformations such as interrupted aortic arch type B. They also had characteristic features of CHARGE syndrome including ear malformation, genital hypoplasia, limb malformation, and endocrinological disorders. CHD7 gene mutation was confirmed in one of the two cases. When a patient with cardiovascular malformations frequently associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome does not have 22q11.2 deletion, we suggest that associated malformations characteristic of CHARGE syndrome should be searched for. PMID:27957375

  1. A Boy with a Mild Case of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome with Above Average Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacassie, Yves; Bobadilla, Olga; Cambias, Ron D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of an 11-year-old boy who represents the only documented case of an individual with Cornelia de Lange syndrome who also has above average cognitive functioning. Major diagnostic criteria for de Lange syndrome and comparisons with other severe and mild cases are discussed. (Author/CR)

  2. Anticholinergic Toxic Syndrome Caused by Atropa Belladonna Fruit (Deadly Nightshade): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirhan, Abdullah; Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar; Yıldız, İsa; Korkmaz, Tanzer; Bilgi, Murat; Akkaya, Akcan; Koçoğlu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Atropa Belladonna poisoning may lead to anticholinergic syndrome. Ingestion of high amounts of the plant may cause lethargy, coma, and even a serious clinical picture leading to death. In this case report, we aimed to present a case with anticholinergic syndrome that developed after ingestion of the fruit called “Deadly Nightshade” in our country. PMID:27366377

  3. Brown's syndrome with ocular albinism: Case report of a rare presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Soumya; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Swaminathan, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of Brown's syndrome associated with ocular albinism in a 10-year-old boy. This report highlights the importance of further analysis of cases of Brown's syndrome and throws some light on the etiology and association of this rare condition.

  4. Reduction of Stereotypical Hand Movements in Girls with Rett Syndrome: Two Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, Meir; Roth, Dana

    This study explains the characteristics and treatment of individuals with Rett Syndrome and presents two case studies that investigated the use of interventions in reducing stereotypical hand movements (SHM). The case studies involve two girls (ages 5 and 7) with Rett Syndrome who were enrolled in a special education school. Information was…

  5. Christ Siemens Touraine syndrome: Two case reports and felicitous approaches to prosthetic management.

    PubMed

    Renahan, Navanith; Raj, Renju; Varma, R Balagopal; Kumar, J Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, which exhibit a classic triad of hypohydrosis, hypotrichosis, and hypodontia. Hypohidrotic or anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia or Christ Siemens Touraine syndrome is the most common condition among ectodermal dysplasia patients. This is a case report on two Christ Siemens Touraine syndrome cases and two different approaches to prosthetic management.

  6. A case of serotonin syndrome associated with methadone overdose.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Terry T; Martinez, Daniel N

    2008-01-01

    A chronic pain patient prescribed 20 mg of methadone per day was seen at the Emergency Department within one hour following a witnessed intentional 200 mg ingestion. In addition, he was taking the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressant drugs, sertraline and venlafaxine as prescribed. Methadone is also a serotonin re-uptake inhibitor which has been involved in serotonin toxicity reactions. Initially, no symptoms of narcotic overdose (depressed central nervous system, respiration, or blood pressure) could be distinguished, and the standard narcotic urine screen was negative. No decontamination or antagonist therapy was given, and the patient was discharged to a psychiatric unit for observation. At 5 hours post-ingestion he presented in a panic with hallucinations and elevated blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. These symptoms are characteristic of serotonin syndrome which is often described as mental status changes, autonomic hyperactivity, and neuromuscular abnormalities. At 10 hours post-ingestion the patient was found unconscious. He had aspirated stomach contents into his lungs. His respiration, blood pressure, and pulse were all severely depressed. He never regained conciousness, and he died 5 days later. The medical examiner's finding was probable acute methadone intoxication. In this case serotonin syndrome appears to have opposed and delayed typical narcotic symptoms. Methadone has additional pharmacologic and toxicologic properties which may complicate the assessment and treatment in overdose situations.

  7. First bite syndrome after deep lobe parotidectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Houle, Ashley; Mandel, Louis

    2014-08-01

    First bite syndrome (FBS) has recently been recognized in published medical studies; however, only 2 cases have been reported in dental studies. The syndrome was defined by Netterville and Civantos and Netterville et al as originating from a postoperative complication after parapharyngeal space (PPS) surgery. The most frequent reason for PPS surgery is the presence of a deep lobe parotid gland (PG) neoplasm, with cervical schwannoma the second most common lesion mandating surgery in this space. Surgical therapeutic procedures in the PPS for these tumors can inadvertently ablate the sympathetic nerve supply to the PG. Subsequently, with the first introduction of food into the mouth, severe intense and debilitating pain will develop and radiate through the upper neck, PG, and auricular regions on the ipsilateral surgical side. The intense pain will last approximately 5 seconds.With continued mastication, the pain will subside, but not totally abate. After the meal, the pain will gradually disappear, only to return with the next masticatory period. The pain is initiated by salivation, whether by food or the thought of food and will be accentuated by acidic sialogogic foods. Usually, with the passage of time, some gradual improvement in the intensity and frequency of the pain episodes can be anticipated.

  8. Treatment of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome, is characterized by various embryological deformities and carcinoma formation. It is caused by PTCHI gene mutations and is autosomal dominantly inherited. Some of the main symptoms of NBCCS are multiple basal cell carcinomas, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) of the mandible, hyperkeratosis of the palmar and plantar, skeletal deformity, calcification of the falx cerebri, and facial defomity. Recurrent KCOT is the main symptom of NBCCS and is present in approximately 90% of patients. In NBCCS, KCOTs typically occur in multiples. KCOTs can be detected in patients under the age of 10, and new and recurring cysts develop until approximately the age of 30. The postoperation recurrence rate is approximately 60%. This case report presents a 14-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of a cyst found in the maxilla and mandible. The patient was diagnosed with NBCCS, and following treatment of marsupialization and enucleation, the clinical results were satisfactory. PMID:27847737

  9. Fat Embolism Syndrome After Femur Fracture Fixation: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Craig C; Schick, Cameron; Otero, Jesse; Karam, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a multi-organ disorder with potentially serious sequelae that is commonly seen in the orthopaedic patient population after femur fractures. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary dysfunction, mental status changes, petechiae, tachycardia, fever, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. Due to technological advances in supportive care and intramedullary reaming techniques, the incidence of FES has been reported as low as 0.5 percent. Here, we present a rare case of FES with cerebral manifestations. A previously healthy 24-year old nonsmoking male was admitted to our hospital after an unrestrained head-on motor vehicle collision. The patient's injuries included a left olecranon fracture and closed bilateral comminuted midshaft femur fractures. The patient went on to develop cerebral fat embolism syndrome (CFES) twelve hours after immediate bilateral intramedullary nail fixation. His symptoms included unresponsiveness, disconjugate gaze, seizures, respiratory distress, fever, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and visual changes. Head computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed pathognomonic white-matter punctate lesions and watershed involvement. With early recognition and supportive therapy and seizure therapy, the patient went on to have complete resolution of symptoms without cognitive sequelae. PMID:25328460

  10. Platybasia and Klippel Feil-syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Alajbegović, Azra; Kovac, Fehma; Delilović-Vranić, Jasminka; Tirić-Campara, Merita; Alajbegović, Salem

    2012-06-01

    A case is presented of a 35-year-old woman diagnosed with platybasia associated with Klippel-Feil syndrome type I. She was admitted to University Department of Neurology for clinical examination because of walking difficulties, dizziness, and intermittent vision disturbances. Neurological examination revealed a predominance of cerebellar symptomatology. Relevant diagnostic work-up included craniogram, cervical spine x-ray, computed tomography (CT) of the brain and craniocervical junction, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, electroencephalography, ophthalmologic examination, urinary tract ultrasonography, laboratory tests, and psychological testing. CT of the craniocervical junction showed platybasia, congenital fusion of the second and third cervical vertebrae, and basilar invagination of dens axis. Platybasia is leveling of the angle between the floor of the anterior cranial fossa and posterior cranial fossa in the area of sella turcica, which is normally at 115-140 degrees. Basilar impression or invagination is moving up of the basis of the occiput and occipital condyles into the cranium, which means that the borders of the foramen magnum, condyles and adjacent bone are invaginated into the posterior fossa. Klippel-Feil syndrome type II is massive fusion of two of seven cervical vertebrae associated with short neck and low hair line.

  11. A Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome, Thromboembolic Disease, and Angioedema: Association or Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Nooshin; Choi, Eric D.; Garrison, Roger C.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 32 Final Diagnosis: Miller Fisher syndrome Symptoms: Ataxia • headache • ophthalmoplegia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Plasmapheresis Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Miller Fisher Syndrome is characterized by the clinical triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia, and is considered to be a variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Miller Fisher Syndrome is observed in approximately 1–5% of all Guillain-Barre cases in Western countries. Patients with Miller Fisher Syndrome usually have good recovery without residual deficits. Venous thromboembolism is a common complication of Guillain-Barre Syndrome and has also been reported in Miller Fisher Syndrome, but it has generally been reported in the presence of at least one prothrombotic risk factor such as immobility. A direct correlation between venous thromboembolism and Miller Fisher Syndrome or Guillain-Barre Syndrome has not been previously described. Case Report: We report the case of a 32-year-old Hispanic male who presented with acute, severe thromboembolic disease and concurrently demonstrated characteristic clinical features of Miller Fisher Syndrome including ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Past medical and family history were negative for thromboembolic disease, and subsequent hypercoagulability workup was unremarkable. During the course of hospitalization, the patient also developed angioedema. Conclusions: We describe a possible association between Miller Fisher Syndrome, thromboembolic disease, and angioedema. PMID:28090073

  12. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaskararao, G; Himabindu, Y; Nayak, Samir Rajan; Sriharibabu, M

    2014-07-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  13. Christ-siemens-touraine syndrome: case report of 2 brothers.

    PubMed

    Vora, Rita V; Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Chaudhari, Arvind; Pilani, Abhishek P

    2014-10-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a rare disorder. Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome (Hypohidrotic Ectodermal dysplasia (HED)) is a diffuse, non-progressive disease present at birth and involves at least two tissues of ectodermal origin. It is caused by mutation in gene ectodysplasin (EDA, EDA1) located at Xq12-13. Main clinical feature of HED is sparse or absent eccrine gland as well as hypotrichosis, nail, and teeth abnormality with characteristic faces. The absence or diminished activity of sweat gland results in patients having more chances of developing hyperthermia and with intolerance to warm environment. Most do well with simple measures such as wet clothes, air conditioning, wet bands etc. We present cases of two brothers, born of non-consanguineous marriage, who presented to us with complaints of heat intolerance and abnormal facial features.

  14. A case of pervasive refusal syndrome: a diagnostic conundrum.

    PubMed

    McNicholas, Fiona; Prior, Cara; Bates, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    A case is presented of an 11-year-old girl with pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS) who ultimately recovered acutely and completely after an 18-month paediatric hospitalisation. There was an apparent absence of previously proposed important aetiological factors in PRS, such as family pathology and markedly traumatic or abusive experiences, and her recovery was sudden and complete. The authors consider the differential diagnoses of PRS paying particular attention to the possibility of a conversion disorder or catatonia, given the absence of PRS in the North American literature. Consideration of catatonia is important as it has a diagnostic test and responds rapidly to appropriate treatment, in contrast to conventional treatment for PRS and conversion disorder.

  15. Consonants in Cri du chat syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal case study of consonant productions in one Norwegian girl with Cri du chat syndrome from age 4;6 to age 9;4. It was shown that she had many articulation errors throughout the period of observation. Furthermore, these errors were shown to fall into three main categories: (1) errors of differentiation and tuning, (2) errors of coordination and sequencing, and (3) missing gestures. Also, omissions of segments were reported to be frequent. In sum, the consonant productions by this girl were found to be both delayed and deviant, as compared to normally developing children. The number of errors, however, decreased as she grew older, resulting in more accurate renditions of the target words.

  16. Subdeltoid lipoma causing shoulder impingement syndrome – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lenza, Mario; Lenza, Miguel Vicente; Carrerra, Eduardo da Frota; Ferretti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is defined by the compression of the rotator cuff tendons against the coracoacromial arch. Several factors contribute to this condition and they are classified as structural or functional factors. The former are changes in the coracoacromial arch, proximal humerus, bursa and rotator cuff, and the latter are related to the mechanism of the upper limb by means of synchronized activity and balanced between the rotator cuff and scapular girdle muscles. The authors report here a case of parosteal lipoma of the proximal humerus, located between the muscles deltoid, teres minor and infraspinatus causing clinical signs of impingement. It is a rare occurrence, characterized as a structural cause for the onset of this symptom. PMID:25167335

  17. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning.

  18. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-12-18

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail.

  19. Hepatorenal Syndrome with Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mocarzel, Luis; Lanzieri, Pedro; Nascimento, Juliana; Peixoto, Clara; Ribeiro, Mário; Mesquita, Evandro

    2015-01-01

    The hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a potentially reversible kidney failure in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. An association of HRS and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy has been reported recently, but there are no result studies about the use of positive inotropes as part of the acute phase treatment. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with HRS, with high levels of NT pro-BNP, but with normal ejection fraction of the left ventricle, which showed abnormalities in systolic function through speckle tracking in echocardiography, reversible after the infusion of dobutamine. The patient showed clinical and laboratory improvement of his renal function after the infusion of dobutamine. Clinical studies are needed on HRS therapeutic approach taking into account the myocardial dysfunction as a major contributing factor to renal dysfunction. PMID:25874140

  20. Trichuris dysentery syndrome: Do we learn enough from case studies?

    PubMed

    Zeehaida, M; Zueter, A; Zairi, N Z; Zunulhisham, S

    2015-09-01

    Trichuris Dysentery Syndrome (TDS) is a severe persistent trichuriasis associated with heavy worm build-up in the colon that continues to be neglected and underestimated in endemic countries. Trichuriasis is most prevalent in children in tropical countries, and that increases the risk of TDS. We reported a series of four preschool children of both genders chronically having TDS over a period ranging from several months to years presenting with anaemia. The hemoglobin levels ranged from 4.6 to 9.1 g/dl on first admissions. Despite treatment, the cases were reported to have failure to thrive with persistent anaemia. It was concluded that TDS should be considered in endemic areas among children presenting with chronic bloody diarrhea and anaemia.

  1. [Parsonage-Turner syndrome in childhood and adolescence: case report].

    PubMed

    Pérez-de la Cruza, Sagrario

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old male whose diagnosis is Parsonage-Turner syndrome relapsing in the right arm. In his medical record, he was diagnosed as having amyotrophic neuralgia of the upper limb in three previous occasions. The diagnosis was similar in all episodes, although the affected upper limb was alternating. He was treated in the Rehabilitation Services of two hospitals. At physical examination, in every relapse, he showed acute pain in both, shoulder and arm, and loss of strength in the shoulder blade and the affected upper limb. The aim of his treatment combines the healing of the pain and, together with physiotherapy, fighting against muscular atrophy. The patient evolved favourably in each of the episodes. Nowadays, he does not show any symptom, and he has been discharged from the rehabilitation service.

  2. Anterior elbow dislocation with potential compartment syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Queipo-de-Llano Temboury, Alfonso; Lara, Jorge Mariscal; Fernadez-de-Rota, Antonio; Queipo-de-Llano, Enrique

    2007-03-01

    Anterior elbow dislocation is an infrequent lesion, usually produced by direct trauma to the proximal ulna after a fall on the elbow in flexion, and is often associated with soft tissue injuries. The authors report a case of a complex injury produced by a high-energy trauma in the right arm of a 65-year-old patient. His limb was trapped inside an industrial spin-dryer, resulting in a closed anterior elbow dislocation, diaphyseal ulnar shaft, radial styloid process fractures, and an associated compartment syndrome. The injury mechanism and its treatment are described to better manage the soft tissue injury and early elbow mobilization using the FEARM hinged external fixator. A good result was achieved, with almost complete restoration of the patient's arm functions, and he has returned to his previous working activities.

  3. [Paradoxical transtentorial herniation, extreme trephined syndrome sign: A case report].

    PubMed

    Narro-Donate, Jose Maria; Huete-Allut, Antonio; Escribano-Mesa, Jose A; Rodríguez-Martínez, Virginia; Contreras-Jiménez, Ascensión; Masegosa-González, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The current increasing use of decompressive craniectomy carries the implicit appearance of complications due to alterations in both intracranial pressure and in the hydrostatic-hemodynamic equilibrium. Paradoxical transtentorial herniation represents a rare manifestation, included in "trephine syndrome", extremely critical but with relatively simple treatment. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman with no interesting medical history, who, after an olfactory groove meningioma surgery, presented a haemorrhage located in the surgical area with an important oedema. The patient required a second emergency surgery without any chance of conserving the cranial vault. During the post-operational period, great neurological deterioration in orthostatic position was noticed, which resolved spontaneously in decubitus. This deficit was resolved with bone replacement afterwards. We discuss possible predisposing factors and aetiologies of this pathology.

  4. Asperger's disorder and Williams syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kilinçaslan, Ayse; Tanidir, Canan; Tutkunkardaş, Mustafa Deniz; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder caused by the hemizygous microdeletion in chromosome 7q11.23. It is characterized by dysmorphic face, cardiovascular disease, idiopathic hypercalcemia, mental retardation, and an uneven profile of cognitive-linguistic abilities and deficits. The presence of autistic features in individuals with WS is a controversial issue. While there are reports that describe them as overly friendly with excessive sociability and good empathic skills, some recent studies focus more on the qualitative impairment of their social abilities. Here, we report the clinical presentation and follow-up of an eight-year-old boy with WS and clear problems in his social interaction, non-verbal communication and circumscribed interests. To our knowledge, this is the first case report on the coexistence of WS and Asperger's disorder. It also differs from previous papers on the comorbidity of WS and autism spectrum disorders, by depicting a highly verbal, nonretarded child followed for seven years through adolescence.

  5. Zinsser-Cole-Engman Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Bezawada, Sushma; Birapu, Uday Kumar Chowdary; Radharapu, Vasantha Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Zinsser-Cole-Engmann syndrome also called Dyskeratosis Congenita (DKC) is a rare genodermatosis first described by Zinsser in 1906. Mutations in DKC1 gene is responsible for DKC. It is usually inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, resulting in a striking male predilection. It is characterized by a triad of reticular skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and mucosal leukoplakia. Complications include predisposition to malignancy and bone marrow failure. Here, we report a case of DKC in a 9-year-old boy with classic triad of signs. Special investigations like endoscopy, barium swallow and bone-marrow aspiration study confirmed the diagnosis. There is no effective treatment for DKC. Some preventive measures can be adopted and the only long term cure for the haematological abnormalities is allogenic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27504423

  6. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail. PMID:24351514

  7. Neuropsychological characteristics of encephalopathy in Susac's Syndrome - Case report.

    PubMed

    Roessler-Górecka, Magdalena; Mendel, Tadeusz; Wiśniowska, Justyna; Seniów, Joanna

    Susac's Syndrome (SS) is a rare, autoimmune angiopathy characterized by hearing loss, retinal artery occlusions and encephalopathy, which is usually expressed in multifocal neurological signs and symptoms, confusion state and cognitive impairment. There have been few descriptions of neuropsychological assessment of SS. We present a case study of 29-year-old woman who developed full SS. During the post-acute stage of disease, she was admitted to neurorehabilitation ward to improve her cognitive-behavioral and motor functioning. The initial assessment revealed attention, memory and executive dysfunctions, as well as behavioral changes including impulsivity, affective dysregulation and reduced self-awareness of disease deficits. After five weeks recovery process supported by rehabilitation program, improvement was observed, although some cognitive-behavioral deficits were still present in the follow-up assessment.

  8. [A case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with ileocecal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Tetsuyoshi; Saruta, Masayuki; Sawada, Ryoichi; Ide, Daisuke; Arihiro, Seiji; Matsuoka, Mika; Katoh, Tomohiro; Tajiri, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ileocecal ulcer. A 31-year-old man was admitted with chief complaints of decreased body weight and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy revealed a round punched-out ulcer on the ileocecal valve. Initially, we suspected entero-Behçet's disease and simple ulcer as the cause of the ileocecal ulcer. However, after histologic examination of tissue biopsies obtained during colonoscopy, we diagnosed the patient as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Based on the patient's white blood cell depletion and CMV enteritis, we performed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test. The test was positive, and the diagnosis of AIDS was established. The number of patients with AIDS has been increasing in Japan; thus, we should consider the possibility of CMV enteritis and AIDS in young adult patients affected by ileocecal ulcer with no notable history.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIIC: A Mexican Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Arce, Irma Elia; Tostado-Rabago, Enrique Alejandro; Vargas, Alberto; Padilla-Gómez, Luis Alfredo; Bolaños, Alejandro; Barrios-Guyot, Selenne; Anguiano-Alvarez, Víctor Manuel; Ledezma-Rodríguez, Víctor Chistian; Islas-Carbajal, María Cristina; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; Dávalos, Nory Omayra

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders whose primary clinical features include soft and extensible skin, articular hypermobility and tissue fragility. EDS type VIIC or ‘human dermatosparaxis’ is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by severe skin fragility and sagging redundant skin (major criteria) with a soft, doughy texture, easy bruising, premature rupture of fetal membranes and large hernias (minor criteria). Dermatosparaxis (meaning ‘tearing of skin’), which has been described in several non-human species, is a disorder of the connective tissue resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme that cleaves the registration peptide off the N-terminal end of collagen after it has been secreted from fibroblasts. We describe a Mexican case from consanguineous parents with all the phenotypical characteristics previously described, plus skeletal abnormalities. PMID:22787447

  10. A case of Sheehan's syndrome that manifested as bilateral ptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sil; Moon, Seong Su

    2011-04-01

    Hypothyroidism can cause a variety of signs and symptoms of the neuromuscular system. However, ptosis in a patient with hypothyroidism is very rare. We report here on a case of central hypothyroidism that was due to Sheehan's syndrome and it manifested as bilateral ptosis in a 51-yr-old woman. She complained of exertional dyspnea and weakness. About 25-yr ago, she had a history of severe postpartum vaginal bleeding. The laboratory studies demonstrated hypopituitarism with secondary hypothyroidism. The ptosis was improved by replacement of thyroid hormone. Hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who manifest with ptosis and that prompt replacement of hormone can lead to a complete recovery.

  11. Primary adrenal insufficiency in case of antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debmalya; Raychaudhuri, Moutusi

    2013-01-01

    Addison's disease or primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is a rare manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). PAI is the most common among the endocrinologic manifestations and can also rarely be the presenting symptom of APS. Venous thrombosis and/or adrenal hemorrhage are the leading cause of PAI in APS. Autoimmune adrenal failure is postulated to be another possible mechanism. We report a case of PAI in a 44-year-old lady preceding primary APS, probably autoimmune, without any evidence of adrenal hemorrhage or infarction. High index of clinical suspicion for PAI in APS is needed; conversely APS should be considered as a possible pathogenetic process in patients presenting with Addison's disease where the etiology is not obvious. PMID:24251177

  12. Famotidine-induced reversal of meperidine-related serotonin syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Soohyun; Park, Junyi; Lee, Dongwon; Son, Jongchul; Kim, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is an unexpected fatal adverse event related to serotonergic medication. This case report is the first report describing the possible treatment effect of famotidine on serotonin syndrome. Furthermore, this is the first case report of serotonin syndrome induced by meperidine alone in a patient with no previous history suggesting a susceptibility to serotonin syndrome. A 70-year-old male with no recent history of serotonergic drug use presented with severe serotonin syndrome following ureteroscopy, possibly due to postoperative meperidine administration. The patient's symptoms included hypertension, tachycardia, tachypnea, hyperthermia, myoclonus, diaphoresis, retching, nausea, agitation, and semicoma mentality with no pupillary light reflex. Symptoms began to subside immediately after the administration of intravenous famotidine for prevention of aspiration pneumonia, with mental and neurological symptoms showing improvement initially, followed by autonomic symptoms. This case report suggests that the histamine type 2 receptor antagonist famotidine may be an effective emergency treatment for serotonin syndrome. PMID:28367296

  13. Three clinical cases of the DiGeorge syndrome manifested with the biliary system disease.

    PubMed

    Tabutsadze, T; Pachkoria, Kh; Atuashvili, G

    2007-11-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a rare congenital disease that affects the baby's immune system. Its symptoms vary greatly between individuals but commonly include a history of recurrent infection, heart defects, and characteristic facial features. Few cases of DiGeorge syndrome have been reported in adults. The article describes rare (three cases of DiGeorge syndrome) in adults (18, 32 and 34 years old patients) in Georgia (Caucasus). In clinical practice DiGeorge syndrome may proceed under the course of gastroenterologic, endocrine, nervous and surgical symptoms. 3 cases of DiGeorge syndrome are reported in the article. The authors describe DiGeroge syndrome as a multidisciplinary disorder; it is masqueraded by acute surgical diseases; with sharp immunodeficiency and endocrine, cardiologic and neurologic semiotics.

  14. Drop episodes improved after tracheotomy: a case of Coffin-Lowry syndrome associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imataka, G; Nakajima, I; Goto, K; Konno, W; Hirabayashi, H; Arisaka, O

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of Coffin-Lowry syndrome recognized episodic drops and it tended to be intractable for medical treatment. We reported here a patient with the Coffin-Lowry syndrome associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The patient had epileptic seizures and drop attacks only during night-time and it was not recognized during the daytime. His sleep-induced electroencephalogram was normal. At 12-years old of his age, his OSAS was worse, so we performed a tracheotomy. Notably after the operation, his epileptic episodes were disappeared.

  15. A case of intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Fournier's syndrome is the fulminant necrotizing fasciitis of the external genitalia. The occurrence of Fournier's syndrome in patients with hematologic malignancies has been reported. Here we report a case of an intravascular lymphoma complicated with Fournier's syndrome due to multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP). A 71-year-old Japanese man received intensive chemotherapy for recurring intravascular lymphoma. Blood culture revealed MDRP, and physical examination led to the diagnosis of Fournier's syndrome. Aggressive treatment that comprised granulocyte transfusion, granulocyte stimulating factor, endotoxin filtration, appropriate antibiotic coverage, and aggressive surgical therapy was administered, and this lead to the successful recovery from sepsis and Fournier's syndrome.

  16. A case of Meigs syndrome mimicking metastatic breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanitis, Sophocles; Sivakumar, Sivahamy; Behranwala, Kasim; Zacharakis, Emmanouil; Al Mufti, Ragheed; Hadjiminas, Dimitri J

    2009-01-01

    Background Adnexal masses are not uncommon in patients with breast cancer. Breast cancer and ovarian malignancies are known to be associated. In patients with breast cancer and co-existing pleural effusions, ascites and adnexal masses, the probability of disseminated disease is high. Nevertheless, benign ovarian masses can mimic this clinical picture when they are associated with Meigs' syndrome making the work-up and management of these patients challenging. To our knowledge, there are no similar reports in the literature and therefore we present this case to highlight this entity. Case presentation A 56-year old woman presented with a 4 cm, grade 2, invasive ductal carcinoma of her left breast. Pre-treatment staging investigations showed a 13.5 cm mass in her left ovary, a small amount of ascites and a large right pleural effusion. Serum tumour markers showed a raised CA125 supporting the malignant nature of the ovarian mass. The cytology from the pleural effusion was indeterminate but thoracoscopic biopsy failed to show malignancy. The patient was strongly against mastectomy and she was commenced on neo-adjuvant Letrozole 2.5 mg daily with a view to perform breast conserving surgery. After a good response to the hormone manipulation, the patient had breast conserving surgery, axillary sampling and laparoscopic excision of the ovarian mass which was eventually found to be a benign ovarian fibroma. Conclusion Despite the high probability of disseminated malignancy when an ovarian mass associated with ascites if found in a patient with a breast cancer and pleural effusion, clinicians should be aware about rare benign syndromes, like Meigs', which may mimic a similar picture and mislead the diagnosis and management plan. PMID:19161612

  17. Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome: case report and clinicopathogenic review of the Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome and RAS-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Reig, Irela; Boixeda, Pablo; Fleta, Beatriz; Morenoc, Carmen; Gámez, Lucía; Truchuelo, Mayte

    2011-04-15

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome is an entity that combines both features of Noonan syndrome and Neurofibromatosis type 1. This phenotypic overlap can be explained by the involvement of the RAS-MAPK pathway (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in both disorders. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy with Neurofibromatosis 1 with Noonan-like features, who complained of the progressive appearance of blue-gray lesions on his back.

  18. Piriformis syndrome in an incomplete paraplegic patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Misirlioglu, TO; Palamar, D; Akgun, K

    2015-01-01

    Study design: Single case report. Objectives: We present an incomplete paraplegic patient with lower back and hip pain, diagnosed and treated as the piriformis syndrome (PS). Setting: University hospital, Turkey. Case: A 62-year-old woman with T3 paraplegia of American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade D presented with lower back and right hip pain accompanied by pain and numbness radiating to her right leg. After detailed anamnesis and physical examination, she was pre-diagnosed as having PS. The marked relief of pain following the ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection of 4 cc of lidocaine 2%+1 cc of betametazone confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: Although the compressive neuropathies and musculoskeletal injuries of the upper limb leading to neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are well described in literature, there is limited information regarding those of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PS in a patient with SCI. PS should be kept in mind as a pain generator, especially in active and ambulatory SCI patients. PMID:28053713

  19. Odontogenic Keratocysts in Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Satheesh; Marudhamuthu, Karthikeyan; Riaz, R; Balasubramaniam, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition comprising the principle triad of basal cell carcinomas, multiple jaw keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. The presence of jaw cysts are the early diagnostic feature of this syndrome, and this can be incidentally identified by routine radiographs. A patient presented with signs and symptoms of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome to us in her early stages.

  20. Pallister-Killian syndrome: case report with pineal tumor.

    PubMed

    Mauceri, L; Sorge, G; Incorpora, G; Pavone, L

    2000-11-06

    Pallister-Killian syndrome, an aneuploidy syndrome, comprises a characteristic facial appearance, mental retardation, and multiple other anomalies. It is caused by mosaicism with a supernumerary isochromosome 12p. This chromosomal abnormality has been reported also in human germ cell tumors. We report on a 15-year-old girl with Pallister-Killian syndrome and pineal tumor.

  1. Dancing with Down Syndrome: A Phenomenological Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Nicole; Bryden, Pamela J.; Fletcher, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    "Dance for individuals with Down syndrome has many benefits; however, there is little research on this topic." Down syndrome is the most common "genetic condition," resulting in psychological, physical, and social impairments. There is research to suggest that dance may be a beneficial activity for people with Down syndrome;…

  2. Naturalistic Intervention for Asperger Syndrome: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Serene Hyun-Jin; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of their cognitive abilities, children with Asperger syndrome are attractive candidates for inclusive education and, in Australia, most are in integrated settings. However, social interaction between children with Asperger syndrome and their peers remains problematic, with the children with Asperger syndrome often being left alone…

  3. A dominant-hereditary variation of the Pena-Shokeir syndrome; a case report.

    PubMed

    Vlaanderen, W; Manschot, T A; Vermeulen-Meiners, C

    1991-07-01

    Four children with the Pena-Shokeir syndrome are described. Apart from the classical manifestations of the syndrome: camptodactyly, ankyloses, facial anomalies, pulmonary hypoplasia, all four children had an extremely rigid skin. Possibly this rigidness of unknown origin led in these cases to fetal akinesia, which seems to be the explanation of the clinical manifestations of the syndrome. All children were born to one man, three in his first marriage, one in his second. Therefore this case report almost certainly presents a dominant-hereditary variation of the syndrome.

  4. Exercise-induced Pediatric Lumbar Paravertebral Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Verena M; Ward, W Timothy

    2015-09-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is described as an elevation of interstitial pressure in a closed fascial compartment that can lead to damage of the microvasculature with subsequent tissue necrosis. Although paravertebral compartment syndrome has been described there is no case of paravertebral compartment syndrome that has been described in the pediatric population. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who presented at our institution with severe, acute-onset low back pain that started shortly after a rigorous 4-hour workout. He was diagnosed with acute lumbar paravertebral compartment syndrome and underwent emergent fasciotomy with 2 more debridements.

  5. Evaluation of Retinal Changes Using Optical Coherence Tomography in a Pediatric Case of Susac Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Mehmet; Erdöl, Hidayet; Ertuğrul Atasoy, Sevil; Türk, Adem

    2017-01-01

    Susac syndrome is a rare occlusive vasculopathy affecting the retina, inner ear and brain. The cause is unknown, although it generally affects young women. This syndrome can be difficult to diagnose because its signs can only be revealed by detailed examination. These signs are not always concomitant, but may appear at different times. This report describes a pediatric case who was diagnosed with Susac syndrome when retinal lesions were identified in the inactive period with the help of optical coherence tomography (OCT). The purpose of this case report is to emphasize the importance of OCT in clarifying undefined retinal changes in Susac syndrome. PMID:28182173

  6. Platelet peroxidase deficiency in a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, M; Jarry, M T; Tulliez, M; Breton-Gorius, J

    1983-01-01

    Morphological and functional abnormalities of the megakaryocytic series have been well described in myelodysplastic syndromes. Platelet peroxidase has always been demonstrated in abnormal megakaryocytes and early megakaryoblasts in such syndromes. We have studied a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with marked morphological abnormalities of megakaryocytes in which ultrastructural studies showed the coexistence of platelet peroxidase positive and platelet peroxidase negative megakaryocytes. This enzymatic deficiency was confirmed by the ultrastructural study of circulating platelets. This case appears to be the first report of a partial platelet peroxidase deficiency. It adds to the enzymatic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome already described for the red cells and the granulocytic cells. Images PMID:6630573

  7. Sheehan's syndrome with pancytopenia--complete recovery after hormone replacement (case series with review).

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Bhat, Javid Rasool; Mir, Shahnaz Ahmad; Khan, Raja Sultan Zaman; Lone, Mohd Iqbal; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-03-01

    Reports of pancytopenia in patients with Sheehan's syndrome are rare, because the disorder is not commonly seen in western countries. A case series of pancytopenia in three patients of Sheehan's syndrome is presented. Three women aged 22, 30, and 34 years developed Sheehan's syndrome preceded by post partum hemorrhage. During investigations, they were found to have pancytopenia with hypocellular marrow. Treatment with thyroxine and glucocorticoids resulted in complete recovery after attaining euthyroid and eucortisolemic state. Review of literature revealed the rarity of the disorder, with only four cases reported so far. Multiple anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies in Sheehan's syndrome are responsible for pancytopenia; replacement of thyroid and cortisol hormones results in complete recovery.

  8. A Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome, Thromboembolic Disease, and Angioedema: Association or Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Salehi, Nooshin; Choi, Eric D; Garrison, Roger C

    2017-01-16

    BACKGROUND Miller Fisher Syndrome is characterized by the clinical triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia, and is considered to be a variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Miller Fisher Syndrome is observed in approximately 1-5% of all Guillain-Barre cases in Western countries. Patients with Miller Fisher Syndrome usually have good recovery without residual deficits. Venous thromboembolism is a common complication of Guillain-Barre Syndrome and has also been reported in Miller Fisher Syndrome, but it has generally been reported in the presence of at least one prothrombotic risk factor such as immobility. A direct correlation between venous thromboembolism and Miller Fisher Syndrome or Guillain-Barre Syndrome has not been previously described. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 32-year-old Hispanic male who presented with acute, severe thromboembolic disease and concurrently demonstrated characteristic clinical features of Miller Fisher Syndrome including ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Past medical and family history were negative for thromboembolic disease, and subsequent hypercoagulability workup was unremarkable. During the course of hospitalization, the patient also developed angioedema. CONCLUSIONS We describe a possible association between Miller Fisher Syndrome, thromboembolic disease, and angioedema.

  9. Dissociations in mathematical knowledge: case studies in Down's syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally J; Temple, Christine M

    2013-02-01

    A study is reported of mathematical vocabulary and factual mathematical knowledge in PQ, a 22 year old with Down's syndrome (DS) who has a verbal mental age (MA) of 9 years 2 months and ST, a 15 year old with Williams syndrome (WS) who has a verbal MA of 9 years 6 months, matched to typically developing controls. The number of mathematical words contained within PQ's lexical stores was significantly reduced as reflected by performance on lexical decision. PQ was also impaired at both naming from descriptions and describing mathematical words. These results contrast with normal lexical decision and item descriptions for concrete words reported recently for PQ (Robinson and Temple, 2010). PQ's recall of mathematical facts was also impaired, whilst his recall of general knowledge facts was normal. This performance in DS indicates a deficit in both lexical representation and semantic knowledge for mathematical words and mathematical facts. In contrast, ST, the teenager with WS had good accuracy on lexical decision, naming and generating definitions for mathematical words. This contrasted with the atypical performance with concrete words recently reported for ST (Robinson and Temple, 2009). Knowledge of addition facts and general knowledge facts was also unimpaired for ST, though knowledge of multiplication facts was weak. Together the cases form a double dissociation and provide support for the distinct representation of mathematical and concrete items within the lexical-semantic system during development. The dissociations between mathematical and general factual knowledge also indicate that different types of factual knowledge may be selectively impaired during development. There is further support for a modular structure within which mathematical vocabulary and mathematical knowledge have distinct representations. This supports the case for the independent representation of factual and language-based knowledge within the semantic system during development.

  10. Persistent Hyperinsulinism in Kabuki Syndrome 2: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gole, Hobia; Chuk, Raymond; Coman, David

    2016-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous congenital malformation syndrome with protean clinical manifestations. This reflects the important epigenetic role in embryonic development of the two genes currently known to be associated with Kabuki syndrome i.e., KMT2D and KDM6A, which are responsible for Kabuki syndrome 1 and Kabuki syndrome 2, respectively. Hypoglycemia is thought to be a rare manifestation of Kabuki syndrome; however it may be under diagnosed. Herein we describe the case of a 5-year-old girl with Kabuki syndrome 2 in whom persistent hyperinsulinism was diagnosed at 4 years of age. We postulate an epigenetic mechanism for hyperinsulinism where specific loss KDM6A demethylation of the H3K27me3/me2 mark may lead to deregulated pancreatic ß-cell development. PMID:27777708

  11. Bilateral phlegmasia dolens associated with Trousseau's syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Toguchida, Junya; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    Phlegmasia dolens is a rare disorder caused by massive venous thrombosis. The clinical condition is subclassified as phlegmasia cerulea dolens (PCD) and phlegmasia alba dolens. The 2 forms differ in the venous area affected and remaining blood flow, causing arterial involvement and resulting in a difference in therapeutic strategy and prognosis. In PCD, the mortality rate is high, and amputation for venous gangrene is needed. Phlegmasia alba dolens is a mild form of PCD; the collateral venous system is intact, and the prognosis is better than for PCD. We experienced a rare case of bilateral phlegmasia dolens associated with Trousseau's syndrome. The patient was diagnosed with phlegmasia alba dolens because the artery was not occluded. She was treated with anticoagulant therapy, the placement of a vena cava filter, and a rehabilitation program. The bilateral soleus muscles underwent necrosis, and the occurrence of equinus foot disturbed her walking, but careful rehabilitation with stretching, a range of passive motion exercises by a physical therapist, a tilting table, and ergometer training strengthened the muscles and allowed the patient to walk unaided 8 months after onset. Through this case, we hope to learn more about the pathogenesis of phlegmasia dolens and clinical treatment measures.

  12. Adrenal adenocarcinoma with Kartagener's syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HU, WANLI; CHENG, LONG; CHENG, BEI; ZHANG, PENG; XIAO, HE; WU, WENBO; WANG, XINGHUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with an adrenal tumor, complicated by Kartagener's syndrome (KS). The patient was admitted to Zhongnan Hospital (Wuhan, China), and presented with an 8-week history of vertigo and extended history of a recurrent cough, accompanied by sputum and a congested nose. Computed tomography indicated a mass on the right adrenal gland and situs inversus. A right adrenal tumor combined with KS was diagnosed, and resection of the tumor was performed following relief of respiratory symptoms and control of blood pressure. During six months of follow up the patient recovered well from surgery and blood pressure remained stable. This case revealed that patients exhibiting KS may suffer from serious respiratory infections as a result of impaired defense mechanisms against microbes in the airway. Therefore, comprehensive management of infection, safe anesthesia and appropriate surgical procedures for the avoidance of inflammation and trauma are the most significant factors required for the success of the treatment. PMID:26788182

  13. Hypereosinophilic syndrome in cats: a report of three cases.

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, S A; Valli, V E; Hulland, T J

    1985-01-01

    The clinical, clinicopathological and pathological findings in three cats with hypereosinophilic syndrome are described. The cats chosen for the study had marked eosinophilia and evidence of tissue infiltration by eosinophils. Necropsies were performed on two cats, biopsy and blood samples were provided for the third cat. At necropsy, there was diffuse reddening of femoral bone marrow with ulceration and thickening of the duodenum. The livers had an enhanced lobular pattern with multiple, white, 1-3 mm nodules throughout the parenchyma. One cat had splenomegaly and the other had several enlarged, white, firm lymph nodes. Histopathologically, there was eosinophil infiltration of intestine, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, adrenal medulla and beneath the endocardium. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophils from lymph node and bone marrow of cat II were morphologically normal. The rigid criteria for eosinophilic leukemia were not fulfilled by these cases and the etiology of the eosinophilia in each case is not known. Possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4041970

  14. Combination of Klinefelter Syndrome and Acromegaly: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongjuan; Xu, Jian; Wu, Huanwen; Fan, Hong; Zhong, Liyong

    2016-04-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most common chromosomal aneuploidy in male population, which demonstrates an unusual association with acromegaly. We herein present a rare case involving the confirmation of KS 2 years after surgical treatment for acromegaly.A 27-year-old man presented with an acromegalic appearance. Endocrinological examination revealed a high growth hormone (GH) concentration, low testosterone concentration, and high follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone concentration. Brain imaging revealed a 9 × 6 × 7- mm sellar low-density nodule suggestive of a microadenoma. Trans-sphenoidal surgery was undertaken, and immunohistochemistry revealed GH positivity. Two years after surgery, the patient underwent examination for infertility. He presented with diminished pubic hair, and small and firm testes. Hormonal assay revealed hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism on the basis of decreased serum total testosterone (<0.2 ng/mL), and elevated luteinizing hormone (14.71 mIU/mL) and follicle-stimulating hormone (21.8 mIU/mL). A chromosomal karyotype examination showed 47,XXY, confirming the diagnosis of KS. Replacement therapy with oral testosterone undecanoate was begun. Brain imaging showed no delayed enhancement in the saddle region of the pituitary gland, but the concentration of plasma insulin-like growth factor maintained a high level. The patient's GH concentration was not significantly suppressed by the GH glucose suppression test. In this consideration, he was referred for postoperative somatostatin analogue treatment to control GH hypersecretion.The misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of KS is mainly because of substantial variations in clinical presentation and insufficient professional awareness of the syndrome itself. As the simultaneous occurrence of KS and acromegaly is rare, and the association between them remains unclear, we suggest that complete pituitary hormonal screening and conventional pituitary MRI should be

  15. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  16. [Radiculopathy in patients with Heerfordt's syndrome: two case presentations and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Kousuke; Fukuhara, Aika; Tsugawa, Jun; Oma, Shinji; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2013-08-01

    As a subtype of the clinical presentations associated with sarcoidosis, the combination of uveitis, parotid gland swelling, and facial nerve palsy is known as Heerfordt's syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare disorder that has been estimated to affect only 4.1-5.6% of patients with sarcoidosis. We present 2 cases of Heerfordt's syndrome associated with radiculopathy in the trunk. The 2 patients experienced unilateral or bilateral radiculopathy in the trunk and in the trigeminal nerve area associated with Heerfordt's syndrome. Radiculopathy is also a rare manifestation in patients with neurosarcoidosis. A literature review revealed that only 51 cases of radiculopathy associated with sarcoidosis have been documented. A diagnosis of Heerfordt's syndrome was observed in 7 out of these 51 cases. Together with our 2 cases, 9 out of 53 patients with radiculopathy associated with sarcoidosis have been diagnosed as having Heerfordt's syndrome (estimated frequency, 16.9%). In conclusion, radiculopathy is a common neurological manifestation in patients with Heerfordt's syndrome. On the basis of our experience, we suggest that physicians consider the possibility of Heerfordt's syndrome in cases of radiculopathy with unknown cause.

  17. A case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome presented with Angelman-like syndromic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Syuan-Yu; Chou, I-Ching; Lin, Wei-De; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2016-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), caused by a TCF4 gene mutation, is a condition characterized by intellectual disability and developmental delay, breathing anomalies, epilepsy, and distinctive facial dysmorphism [1]. Its diverse clinical appearance causes pediatricians to confuse it with Angelman syndrome, which is considered one of the family members of Angelman-like syndrome. Herein, we report on a 4 y/o boy with PTHS and discuss its similarities and differences with Angelman syndrome. In doing so we hope to provide a feasible pathway to diagnose rare diseases, especially Angelman-like syndrome.

  18. Successful treatment of SAPHO syndrome with severe spinal disorder using entercept: a case study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L L; Zhao, J X; Liu, X Y

    2012-07-01

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is a rare disease. Presently, there is no treatment guideline for this illness. Several studies suggested entercept, a novel biological agent against tumor necrosis factor-alpha, is effective in treating SAPHO syndrome. We report a case in which the clinical conditions of a middle-aged female patient diagnosed with SAPHO syndrome, with noted spinal disorder, improved significantly after receiving entercept treatment. The patient remained stable after 3-month follow-up.

  19. Idiopathic Harlequin Syndrome Manifesting during Exercise: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Raghad; Alkahtani, Abdulah

    2017-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome is a rare autonomic disorder characterized by unilateral facial flushing and sweating with contralateral anhidrosis induced by exercise, heat, and emotion. It is usually idiopathic but could be the first manifestation of several serious underlying medical conditions. Medical or surgical treatments are not required for idiopathic Harlequin syndrome, but social and psychological factors may indicate sympathectomy or botulinum toxin injection. In this article, we report a case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome and review the literature. PMID:28316628

  20. A Case of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Healthy Active Duty Marine.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Portouw, Steven J; Bruner, David I

    2015-10-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon disorder that can lead to small bowel obstructions or perforations. Typical populations include young females with anorexia. However, there have been a few reports of healthy males with acute vomiting reported to have SMA syndrome. Our case report highlights an active duty Marine who developed SMA syndrome and the importance of recognizing this disease given the severity in delay of diagnosis in population of young healthy active duty members.

  1. Dental findings in patients with West syndrome: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita; Tyagi, Rishi; Baweja, Mani; Khandelwal, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    West syndrome a rare, severe form of epilepsy occurs in early infancy. It is characterized by a triad consisting of infantile spasms that occurs in clusters, arrest of psychomotor development and hypsarrhythmia on electroencephalogram. We present here two cases of west syndrome where patients required dental care due to the presence of certain dental findings. Preventive measurements such as controlled diet and proper oral hygiene along with professional dental management are recommended in patients with west syndrome to avoid dental problems.

  2. Aspiration pneumonia in the child with DiGeorge syndrome -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun-Joung

    2011-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is associated with a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and manifests with variable clinical findings. Aspiration pneumonia can be a perioperative complication of great concern in this syndrome. In this report, we present a case of a 16-month old child with DiGeorge syndrome undergoing cranioplasty. He developed perioperative aspiration pneumonia but was managed successfully. PMID:21738851

  3. Sick sinus syndrome associated with hypopituitarism: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Jingping; Zhang, Gang; Lu, Huihe; Huang, Jianfei; Shan, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Though an association between autoimmune diseases and sick sinus syndrome has been reported, there has been no report on the association of hypopituitarism and sick sinus syndrome. Herein, we provide the first case report of hypopituitarism accompanying sick sinus syndrome in a 51-year-old woman presented to our hospital with syncope due to cardiac arrest. The patient was successfully managed by pacemaker installation and hormone replacement therapy. PMID:25332716

  4. A case report of Sheehan's syndrome with acute onset, hyponatremia and severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Anfuso, Salvatore; Patrelli, Tito Silvio; Soncini, Emanuele; Chiodera, Paolo; Fadda, Giovanni Maria; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2009-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is a well-known cause of panhypopituitarism secondary to pituitary apoplexy, that generally occurs after an intra- or postpartum bleeding episode characterized by severe hypertension or hemorrhagic shock. The diagnosis can be difficult and is often formulated after some years from the syndrome occurrence. We report the case of a woman with an early diagnosis of early-onset Sheehan's syndrome associated with severe hyponatremia following dystocic childbirth complicated by postpartum hemorrhage.

  5. The KBG syndrome, characteristic dental findings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dowling, P A; Fleming, P; Gorlin, R J; King, M; Nevin, N C; McEntagart, M

    2001-03-01

    Short stature and developmental delay may be observed in many genetic conditions and well-defined syndromes. A 7-year-old girl presented with the non-specific findings of subtle dysmorphism, short stature and developmental delay. Although a genetic syndrome was suspected, a definitive diagnosis was not made until the dental findings of KBG syndrome were recognised, namely grossly enlarged maxillary permanent central incisors and hypodontia.

  6. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alves-Pereira, Daniela; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2009-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is a genetic disorder that was first described by Richard Ellis and Simon van Creveld in 1940. The four principal characteristics are chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and congenital heart defects. The orofacial manifestations include multiple gingivolabial musculofibrous fraenula, dental anomalies, hypodontia and malocclusion. The disease can be diagnosed at any age, even during pregnancy. The differentiation should be made between Jeune syndrome and other orofaciodigital syndromes.

  7. A case of HELLP syndrome with multiple complications.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshiaki; Kan'o, Tomomichi; Hattori, Jun; Konno, Shingo; Imai, Hiroshi; Kitahara, Takao; Soma, Kazui

    2012-01-01

    Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome is a rare complication of pregnancy. The mortality rate associated with HELLP syndrome increases when life-threatening complications occur. A 37-year-old woman at 37 weeks of gestation developed severe cerebral hemorrhage at the beginning of labor induction and was transferred to our hospital, where HELLP syndrome was diagnosed. She developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), hepatic hematoma, and cerebral infarction after surgery. On day 68, she was transferred to her local hospital. Careful observation and rapid management can save patients with severe complications of HELLP syndrome.

  8. Cardiofaciocutaneous Syndrome: Case Report of a Rare Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tanmoy; Biswas, Biswajit; Roy, Atanu; Datta, Asok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome or CFC syndrome is a rare genetic disorder first described in 1986. It is one of the RASopathies involving multiple organs particularly the heart, skin and face affecting males and females equally. The phenotypic features overlap with 2 other conditions, the Noonan and Costello syndrome. We report on a 22-month-old boy with CFC syndrome presenting with typical craniofacial appearance, heart defects, ectodermal abnormalities, growth failure and developmental delay. Estimated population of affected individuals worldwide is a few hundreds. PMID:28050463

  9. Harbinger of plague: a bad case of gay bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scarce, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1976, a group of physicians in private proctologic practice in New York City coined the illness "Gay Bowel Syndrome" in reference to a constellation of gay male anorectal disorders. Through analysis of biomedical discourse and popular media, it is apparent that Gay Bowel Syndrome is an essentialized category of difference that is neither gay-specific, confined to the bowel, nor a syndrome. The use and diagnosis of Gay Bowel Syndrome must be abandoned before it further lends itself to the formation of social policies and governing practices that seek to force gay male bodies into positions of social, cultural, and political subordination.

  10. Familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers - Danlos syndrome: A report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue, while familial gigantiform cementoma is a condition that usually manifests as multiple radiopaque cementum-like masses throughout the jaws. This case report discusses the oral management and prosthetic rehabilitation of two patients presenting familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. PMID:25932318

  11. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease.

  12. Grammatical Constructions in Cri du Chat Syndrome--Findings from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2009-01-01

    The literature on grammatical skills in persons with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS) is very limited, and the need for more knowledge in this area is thus evident, in particular for speech and language therapists working with individuals with this syndrome. This case study report describes the syntactic skills of a 14-year-old Norwegian girl with CCS.…

  13. Angiosarcoma associated with a Kasabach-Merritt syndrome: report of two cases treated with paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Grellety, Thomas; Italiano, Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare, aggressive vascular malignancies of endothelial cell differentiation. Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is a rare condition defined by the association of thrombocytopenia and consumption coagulopathy with specific vascular tumors, such as tufted angioma or kaposiform hemangioendothelioma. We report here two cases of angiosarcomas complicated by a Kasabach-Merritt syndrome and their outcome after treatment with paclitaxel.

  14. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a case of patau syndrome: a rare association.

    PubMed

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  15. A new case of acromegaloid facial appearance (AFA) syndrome with an expanded phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zelante, L; Gasparini, P; Savoia, A; Lomuto, M; Pellicano, R

    2000-07-01

    A patient presenting with the findings of Acromegaloid Facial Appearance (AFA) syndrome is reported. This case also shows pericardial effusion and skin lesions that both enlarge the spectrum of the phenotype and lump AFA syndrome with another proposed distinct condition [Irvine et al., (1996) J med Genet 33:972-974].

  16. Dropped head syndrome induced by chemoradiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yaichiro; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Izumi, Sachiko; Motegi, Atsushi; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2012-11-01

    'Dropped head syndrome' (DHS) is characterized by severe weakness of the muscles of the back of the neck, resulting in chin-on-chest deformity. Dropped head syndrome induced by radiotherapy is very rare. We report a case of DHS following chemoradiotherapy with a total of 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  17. Brain hemorrhages in Jacobsen syndrome: A retrospective review of six cases and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Grossfeld, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by distal deletions in the long arm of chromosome 11. All patients with Jacobsen syndrome have Paris-Trousseau syndrome, a bleeding disorder that causes neonatal thrombocytopenia, and persistent platelet dysfunction. Despite that, to date there are no reported cases of hemorrhagic strokes occurring in patients with Jacobsen syndrome. In the last 6 years at least six cases of brain hemorrhages in patients with Jacobsen syndrome have occurred. In this report, we perform a retrospective review of these six cases. The analysis indicates that the etiology of brain hemorrhages in Jacobsen syndrome is likely multifactorial. A likely cause (or causes) was identified in three of the cases, and additional potential risk factors were identified. Based on these findings, clinical recommendations are provided that should aid in the identification of those individuals with Jacobsen syndrome that are at increased risk for brain hemorrhages, and will hopefully decrease the occurrence of this devastating complication in people with Jacobsen syndrome.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Manifestations, Treatment Implications and Speech-Language Consideration in Gorlin Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Alice E.; Stonestreet, Ruth H.

    This paper presents a case study of Gorlin Syndrome, also known as Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by widespread developmental defects. Criteria for diagnosis are listed, noting the presence of frequent basal cell carcinomas at a relatively young age and multiple cysts of the jaw. Speech and/or language impairments…

  19. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities. PMID:26034714

  20. Case report, aetiology, and treatment of an acquired long-QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Asbroeck, P J; Huybrechts, W; De Soir, R

    2014-04-01

    Acquired long-QT syndrome is an iatrogenic disorder, usually induced by drugs, which can cause life-threatening arrhythmias. We present a case report on an acquired long-QT syndrome with an interesting confluence of circumstances, and comment on aetiology and treatment.

  1. Pertussis-like syndrome associated with adenovirus presenting with hyperleukocytosis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Sarbay, Hakan; Polat, Aziz; Mete, Emin; Balci, Yasemin Isik; Akin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is an infectious viral agent that causes variety of clinical presentations such as respiratory disease, conjunctivitis, and gastroenteritis. Hepatitis, pancreatitis, myocarditis, encephalitis, and disseminated infection are primarily seen in immunocompromised patients. Rarely, adenovirus infection can present with pertussis-like syndrome. Described here is case of pertussis-like syndrome associated with adenovirus presenting with hyperleukocytosis. PMID:28058402

  2. Treatment of Hyperthyroidism in Down Syndrome: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Fawzi E.; Al-Busairi, Waleed A.; Al-Mulla, Fatema A.

    1999-01-01

    A case of an institutionalized adult male with Down syndrome and hyperthyroidism is reported. After treatment with radioactive iodine, he was found to be markedly hypothyroid when he was reviewed 11 weeks later. Three treatment options for hyperthyroidism in Down syndrome are reviewed: surgery, medical treatments, and radiotherapy. (Author/CR)

  3. [The Melnick-Needless syndrome (osteodysplasia). Report of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Tripi, T R

    1997-12-01

    The case of a girl with Melnick-Needles syndrome is reported. The face is characterized by prominent sopraorbital ridges, prominent eyes, full cheeks, large pinna, marked micrognathia, strabism, blue sclerae. Lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric measurements are presented and odontostomatologic features of the syndrome are described.

  4. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome with humoral and cellular defects: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Villella, A.; Bialostocky, D.; Lori, E.; Meyerson, H.; Hostoffer, R.

    2000-01-01

    THE FIRST ASSOCIATION OF RUBINSTIEN—Taybi syndrome with immunodeficiency and the successful prevention of infection with intravenous IgG is reported in a 4 year old boy. This case suggests that immunodeficiency maybe a prominent feature of this syndrome and may predispose these patients to recurrent infections.

 PMID:10999879

  5. A pregnancy-associated nonfamilial case of PAPA (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Isao; Fukatsu, Yuko; Ushijima, Junko; Nakamura, Eishin; Samajima, Koki; Kadowaki, Kanako; Takagi, Kenjiro

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the influence of pregnancy on pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) syndrome. We experienced a rare case of pregnancy complicated with PAPA syndrome. The patient had various histories of skin and joint disorders and experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage during pregnancy; however, her skin lesion was unaffected.

  6. Familial occurrence of Danish and Dutch cases of the bovine brachyspina syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Peperkamp, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    Background The bovine brachyspina syndrome is a recently reported malformation in the Holstein breed. The aetiology of this syndrome is unknown, but its occurrence following breeding between genetically related and phenotypically normal cattle may indicate that it is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder. Three cases are reported and compared to the originally reported case. Case presentation Two Danish cases and a Dutch case are described. The calves were delivered following a slightly prolonged gestation period. Gross lesions consisted of growth retardation, significant shortening of the entire spine and long and slender limbs. Additionally, inferior brachygnatism and defects of several internal organs were recorded. The cases were diagnosed as having the brachyspina syndrome based on the presence of essential lesions. The parents of each case were genetically related and linked to the first reported case by a common ancestor. Conclusion The findings support the hypothesis that the brachyspina syndrome in Holstein cattle is inherited autosomal recessively and illustrate some of the assumed phenotypical variation of this syndrome. The brachyspina syndrome may be an emerging disease in the Holstein breed. PMID:17488494

  7. Neuropathology of a fatal case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kheir, John N; Lawlor, Michael W; Ahn, Edward S; Lehmann, Leslie; Riviello, James J; Silvera, V Michelle; McManus, Michael; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2010-01-01

    The pathology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is undefined, since it is rarely fatal and is biopsied in only exceptional circumstances. We describe rapidly progressive PRES following stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. After development of altered mental status, this 8-year-old girl had T2 prolongation of the white matter in a posterior-dominant distribution, eventually developing cerebellar edema, hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and herniation. Despite surgical and medical management, she died 36 hours later. At autopsy, the occipital and cerebellar white matter and focal occipital cortical gray matter showed a spectrum of microvascular changes, including dilated perivascular spaces containing proteinaceous exudates and macrophages, as well as fibrinoid necrosis and acute hemorrhage, in a distribution corresponding to the neuroimaging abnormalities and reminiscent of those seen in patients with acute hypertensive encephalopathy. Of note, similar microvascular changes were not seen in the kidney or other systemic sites. Thus, the findings indicate a brain-specific microvascular compromise as the substrate of PRES, at least in the rare instance of cases progressing to fatal outcome.

  8. Radiation Fibrosis Syndrome Imitating Breast Cancer Recurrence; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Aktepe, Fatma; Özmen, Vahit

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the most frequently used modalities in the treatment of breast cancer. It is very well-known that some severe complications may result from after these treatments. Early and late complications of radiotherapy are well known. The complications of radiation therapy may be seen in (early) or after three months (late-delayed) of periods. These complications may be related with direct or indirect effect of radiation. The radiation fibrosis syndrome is a progressive fibrotic tissue sclerosis together with various clinical symptoms in the irradiation field. It is usually a late finding of radiation therapy and may be seen weeks or even years after the treatment. Many systems such as musculo-skeletal, soft tissue, neural tissue and cardiopulmonary system may be affected. In this report, we present a case of a breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy twelve years ago. The patient had ipsilateral lymphedema, right axillary mass, and pain during arm and shoulder mobilization. Her physical examination and radiologic findings revealed a big mass invading right thoracic wall, thoracic cavity and the axilla. Histopathological evaluation performed after tru-cut and open biopsy from the mass showed fibrosis resulting from radiation therapy.

  9. Acquired Constriction Ring: A Case of Rubber Band Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rahel; Haug, Luzian; Surke, Carsten; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2017-03-13

    Rubber band syndrome is a rare entity seen in younger children mainly in communities where rubber bands are worn around the wrist for decorative purposes. When the band is worn for a long duration, it burrows through the skin and soft tissues resulting in distal edema, loss of function, and even damage to the neurovascular structures. These symptoms are difficult to relate to this rare but typical condition. We report a case of a 2¾-year-old girl with the history of a linear circumferential scar at the right wrist combined with the limited use of a swollen hand for several weeks. The child was taken to surgery with the purpose to release the red, indurated scar and eliminate the lymphatic congestion. A rubber band was found lying in a plane superficial to the flexor tendons but had cut through the superficial branch of the radial nerve and partially through the abductor pollicis longus tendon. The band was removed and the lacerated structures were repaired. The child had excellent recovery postoperatively. The cardinal features of a linear constricting scar around the wrist in the presence of a swollen hand should always alert the clinician to the possibility of a forgotten band around the wrist, which might have burrowed into the soft tissues for a period. Early recognition may be important to prevent further damage of essential structures.

  10. Serial transverse enteroplasty for short bowel syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Bae; Lee, Patricia W; Garza, Jennifer; Duggan, Christopher; Fauza, Dario; Jaksic, Tom

    2003-06-01

    The patient is a 2-year-old boy born with gastroschisis and midgut volvulus that left him dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). At 11 months of age, a Bianchi procedure was performed increasing the total length of bowel from 72 cm to 130 cm. Although he appeared to have sufficient bowel length, he continued to have malabsorption and could only tolerate 10% of his caloric requirement enterally. A barium study found significant dilatation of the lengthened small bowel. At 23 months, we performed a novel bowel lengthening procedure that we have reported previously in an animal model. The serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) operation increased the 83 cm of dilated and previously lengthened bowel to 147 cm, making the total small bowel length 200 cm. The patient tolerated the procedure well and began to have semisolid bowel movements. Small intestinal absorptive capacity measured by D-xylose absorption showed a substantial increase from 5 to 12 mg/dL (normal range, >20), implying improved but not completely normal small bowel function. This case shows that the STEP procedure increases intestinal length, can be used after a prior Bianchi, and may result in improved intestinal absorptive capacity. The STEP procedure should be considered a surgical option for children with short bowel syndrome.

  11. Sheehan syndrome: clinical and laboratory evaluation of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Yusuf; Colak, Ramis

    2005-06-01

    Sheehan syndrome (SS) or post-partum pituitary necrosis is a pituitary insufficiency secondary to excessive post-partum blood losses. SS is a very significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries although it is a rarity in developed countries in which obstetrical care has been improved. In this study, we reviewed 20 cases retrospectively who were diagnosed as SS in our clinic. The patients aged 40 to 65 years with a mean age of 51.12 +/- 9.44 years (mean +/- SD). Time to make a definitive diagnosis of the disease ranged between 5 and 25 years with a mean of 16.35 +/- 4.74 years. Three of our patient (15%) had a previous diagnosis of SS. Three patients (15%) were referred to emergency service for hypoglycemia, three patients (15%) for hypothyroidism and one patient (5%) for hyponatremia. Dynamic examination of the pituitary revealed GH, Prolactin, FSH, TSH and ACTH insufficiency in all of the patients. One of our patients had a sufficient LH response to LHRH challenge. All of the patients were imaged with pituitary MRI. Eleven patients had empty sella and 9 patients had partial empty sella. SS is still a common problem in our country, especially in rural areas. Considering the duration of disease, important delays occur in diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  12. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome as a Consequence of Delusional Food Refusal: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, David D; Schroeder, Ryan W; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E

    2015-12-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, typically resulting from malnutrition secondary to chronic alcohol abuse. Less often, other conditions can lead to malnutrition and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old man who developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with a typical neurologic and neuropsychological presentation after somatic delusions led him to refuse to eat. Cases like his serve to heighten awareness of the interplay between psychiatric and neurologic conditions, their sometimes atypical pathogenesis, and the value to primary care providers of consulting with psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists when managing patients with possible Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  13. Holoprosencephaly-polydactyly (pseudotrisomy 13) syndrome: case report and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Consolato; Gekas, Jean; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2012-10-01

    We report a new case of a fetus with holoprosencephaly-polydactyly syndrome, also known as pseudo-trisomy 13 syndrome, and no other apparent abnormalities except for septal agenesis of the left lung. The fetal karyotype was normal. Mutational analysis of five genes (SHH, SIX3, TGIF, ZIC2, and GLI3), which are major genes associated with holoprosencephaly, did not disclose any mutational findings. We therefore propose that the abnormalities of our fetus support the demarcation of this syndrome as an autonomous phenotype. Specific diagnostic criteria for holoprosencephaly-polydactyly syndrome need to be complemented by the absence of mutations in the major holoprosencephaly genes.

  14. A Rare Case of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome in a Preterm Infant

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Shahrzad; Shakiba, Marjan; Alaei, Mohammad Reza; Saneifard, Hedieh

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a rare disease among preterm infants. This syndrome was first described in 1985 in four infants with a gestational age of <30 weeks. Several explanations for this syndrome have been suggested namely the immaturity of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal (HPG) axis, lack of negative feedback, increased sensitivity of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) receptors due to mutation and high level of estradiol. In this report, a case of hyperstimulation syndrome in a newborn with gestational age of 30 weeks is presented and the probable mechanisms in the literature are discussed. PMID:28050466

  15. Aortic arch tortuosity with PHACE syndrome – a rare case scenario

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, AK; Ganigara, M; Baidwan, A; Vyas, YS; Rao, NK

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterised by an association of infantile haemangiomas with structural anomalies of brain, cerebral vasculature, eye, aorta and chest wall.1 Coarctation of aorta (COA) is most the common cardiac anomaly reported in PHACE syndrome. COA or interrupted aortic arch in PHACE is unique and complex both in location and character compared to the typical coarctation anatomy. Arterial tortuosity of the cerebral vasculature has been well described in literature in PHACE syndrome. We present a rare case of tortuous aortic arch continuing as descending aorta in an infant with PHACE syndrome.

  16. [Proteus syndrome: Case report of bladder vascular malformation causing massive hematuria].

    PubMed

    Abbo, O; Bouali, O; Galinier, P; Moscovici, J

    2012-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic disorder consisting of disproportionate overgrowth of multiple tissues, vascular malformations, and connective tissue or epidermal nevi. Due to mosaic pattern of distribution, the phenotypes are variable and diverse. Vascular malformations are part of the major criteria used to define and diagnose this syndrome. It can involve the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, or the urinary tract but bladder malformations are rare. We report here a case of bladder vascular malformation in a 12-year-old boy known to have Proteus syndrome and review the literature on bladder malformations or tumors in this syndrome.

  17. Imaging Findings in Dysgerminoma in a Case of 46 XY, Complete Gonadal Dysgenesis (Swyer syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Khaladkar, Sanjay; Gujrati, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    A 46 XY pure gonadal dysgenesis also known as Swyer syndrome. These patients are phenotypic females with normal female external genitalia and absent testicular tissue. The patients with swyer syndrome have streak gonads and increased risk of dysgerminoma and gonadoblastoma. We present a case of dysgerminoma in dysgenetic gonads of swyer syndrome. A 23-year-old female had come with complaints of primary amenorrhea, pelvic mass and abdominal pain. Clinical findings, pathology investigation and imaging findings revealed swyer syndrome. On MRI it showed a large lobulated mass in the pelvis. Mass was excised and dysgerminoma was given on the histopathology. PMID:27790550

  18. A case of type I variant Kounis syndrome with Samter-Beer triad

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Jayesh S; Virpariya, Kapil M; Thakkar, Ashok S; Abhyankar, Atul D

    2013-01-01

    Kounis syndrome is defined as the coexistence of acute coronary syndromes with situations associated with allergy or hypersensitivity, as well as anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions, to a variety of medical conditions, environmental and medication exposures. We report a case of Kounis-Zavras syndrome type I variant in the setting of aspirin-induced asthma, or the Samter-Beer triad of asthma, nasal polyps and aspirin allergy. When there is a young individual with no predisposing factors of atherosclerosis and apparent coronary lesion, with or without electrocardiography and biochemical markers of infarction, the possibility of Kounis syndrome should be kept in mind. PMID:23675559

  19. A swollen hand with blisters: a case of compartment syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Rios-Alba, Tonatiuh; Ahn, James

    2015-06-01

    The accurate identification of compartment syndrome in the emergency department is essential to timely treatment and prevention of long-term sequela. Recognizing compartment syndrome is not straightforward, especially in the pediatric population. In addition to communication barriers that exist with children, the classic signs of pain, pallor, paresthesia, paralysis, and pulselessness are not always present, making its diagnosis a challenge. We report a case of a child with compartment syndrome to the left hand due to compression from an ACE wrap. The existing literature on compartment syndrome in children is reviewed.

  20. Remission of Episodic Sweating Attacks and Comorbid Depression in Shapiro Syndrome: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BOZKURT ZİNCİR, Selma; ZİNCİR, Serkan; KABAK, Sevgi Gül

    2014-01-01

    Shapiro syndrome, a rare disorder originally described by Shapiro and Plum in 1967, is characterized by episodic hypothermia and hyperhydrosis associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Proposed hypotheses to explain the clinical features of this syndrome include changes in the set point of the hypothalamic thermostat, increased norepinephrine (NE) release, and decreased plasma NE clearance. It was emphasized that the recognition of Shapiro syndrome in the evaluation of episodic hyperhydrosis is important. Here, we described a case with Shapiro syndrome who presented to our psychiatry clinic with recurrent episodic profuse sweating and depression. Sweating attacks and depression remitted after successful treatment with amitriptyline.