Science.gov

Sample records for bare bones pattern

  1. Bare Bones Pattern Formation: A Core Regulatory Network in Varying Geometries Reproduces Major Features of Vertebrate Limb Development and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yong-Tao; Alber, Mark S.; Newman, Stuart A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Major unresolved questions regarding vertebrate limb development concern how the numbers of skeletal elements along the proximodistal (P-D) and anteroposterior (A-P) axes are determined and how the shape of a growing limb affects skeletal element formation. There is currently no generally accepted model for these patterning processes, but recent work on cartilage development (chondrogenesis) indicates that precartilage tissue self-organizes into nodular patterns by cell-molecular circuitry with local auto-activating and lateral inhibitory (LALI) properties. This process is played out in the developing limb in the context of a gradient of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) emanating from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER). Results We have simulated the behavior of the core chondrogenic mechanism of the developing limb in the presence of an FGF gradient using a novel computational environment that permits simulation of LALI systems in domains of varying shape and size. The model predicts the normal proximodistal pattern of skeletogenesis as well as distal truncations resulting from AER removal. Modifications of the model's parameters corresponding to plausible effects of Hox proteins and formins, and of the reshaping of the model limb, bud yielded simulated phenotypes resembling mutational and experimental variants of the limb. Hypothetical developmental scenarios reproduce skeletal morphologies with features of fossil limbs. Conclusions The limb chondrogenic regulatory system operating in the presence of a gradient has an inherent, robust propensity to form limb-like skeletal structures. The bare bones framework can accommodate ancillary gene regulatory networks controlling limb bud shaping and establishment of Hox expression domains. This mechanism accounts for major features of the normal limb pattern and, under variant geometries and different parameter values, those of experimentally manipulated, genetically aberrant and evolutionary early forms, with no

  2. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

  3. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Even in normal gravity, bioactive glass particles enhance bone growth in laboratory tests with flat tissue cultures. Ducheyne and his team believe that using the bioactive microcarriers in a rotating bioreactor in microgravity will produce improved, three-dimensional tissue cultures. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering.

  4. Bare-Bones Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms. PMID:25013844

  5. Bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms.

  6. Reliability Optimization of Radial Distribution Systems Employing Differential Evolution and Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kela, K. B.; Arya, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a methodology for determination of optimum failure rate and repair time for each section of a radial distribution system. An objective function in terms of reliability indices and their target values is selected. These indices depend mainly on failure rate and repair time of a section present in a distribution network. A cost is associated with the modification of failure rate and repair time. Hence the objective function is optimized subject to failure rate and repair time of each section of the distribution network considering the total budget allocated to achieve the task. The problem has been solved using differential evolution and bare bones particle swarm optimization. The algorithm has been implemented on a sample radial distribution system.

  7. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    PubMed

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness.

  8. Evolutionary Patterns of Bone Histology and Bone Compactness in Xenarthran Mammal Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Straehl, Fiona R.; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Forasiepi, Analía M.; MacPhee, Ross D.; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  9. Bone Marrow Nails Created by Percutaneous Osteoplasty for Long Bone Fracture: Comparisons Among Acrylic Cement Alone, Acrylic-Cement-Filled Bare Metallic Stent, and Acrylic-Cement-Filled Covered Metallic Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Kouhei; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Cao, Guang; Sahara, Shinya; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the strength among bone marrow nails created to treat long bone fractures using interventional procedures. Methods: Twelve resected intact tibiae of healthy swine were used. A circumferential bone fracture was made in nine tibiae and restored with the following created bone marrow nails: acrylic cement alone (ACA) (n = 3), acrylic-cement-filled bare metallic stent (AC-FBMS) (n = 3), and acrylic-cement-filled covered metallic (AC-FCMS) stent (n = 3). The remaining intact tibiae (n = 3) were used as controls. Results: A bone marrow nail was successfully achieved within 30 min in all swine. The maximum injection volume of acrylic cement for creating ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS was 1.7 {+-} 0.3, 3.2 {+-} 0.4, and 2.9 {+-} 0.4 mL, respectively. The thickness of bone marrow nail created in the ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS groups was 3.6 {+-} 1.0, 10.3 {+-} 0.26, and 9.6 {+-} 0.32 mm, respectively (AC-FBMS group versus AC-FCMS group, p = 0.038), probably because of leakage of acrylic cement surrounding the interstices. The maximum bending power (kilonewton) and bending strength (newton/mm{sup 2}) in the normal long bone, ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS groups were: 1.70 {+-} 0.25 and 79.2 {+-} 16.1; 0.21 {+-} 0.11 and 8.8 {+-} 2.8; 0.46 {+-} 0.06 and 18.2 {+-} 1.6; and 0.18 {+-} 0.04 and 7.8 {+-} 2.7, respectively. Conclusions: Although the maximum bending power and bending strength of AC-FBMS were not satisfactory, it was the most robust of the three marrow nails for restoring fractured long bone.

  10. Trabecular bone pattern factor--a new parameter for simple quantification of bone microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Hahn, M; Vogel, M; Pompesius-Kempa, M; Delling, G

    1992-01-01

    The stability of trabecular bone depends not only on the amount of bone tissue, but also on the three-dimensional orientation and connectedness of trabeculae, which is summarized as trabecular microarchitecture. In previous studies we could demonstrate that in three-dimensional bone tissue the relation of trabecular plates to rods is reflected in the ratio of concave to convex surfaces of the bone pattern in two-dimensional bone sections. For the quantification of the connectedness of these bone patterns we developed a new histomorphometric parameter called Trabecular Bone Pattern factor (TBPf). The basic idea is that the connectedness of structures can be described by the relation of convex to concave surfaces. A lot of concave surfaces represent a well connected spongy lattice, whereas a lot of convex surfaces indicate a badly connected trabecular lattice in two-dimensional sections. By means of an automatic image analysis system we measure trabecular bone area (A1) and perimeter (P1). A second measurement of these two parameters (now A2 and P2) is done after a simulated dilatation of trabeculae on the screen. This dilatation results in a characteristic change of bone area and perimeter depending on the relation of convex to concave surfaces. TBPf is defined as a quotient of the difference of the first and the second measurement: TBPf = (P1 - P2)/(A1 - A2). First measurements of TBPf in 192 iliac crest bone biopsies of autopsy cases show that there is not only age-related loss of bone volume, but also a decrease of trabecular connectedness. By means of TBPf we can demonstrate a significant difference in the age-related loss of trabecular connectivity between male and female individuals.

  11. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  12. Occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures in growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Mogha, I V; Aithal, H P; Kinjavdekar, P; Singh, G R; Pawde, A M; Kushwaha, R B

    2007-11-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to record the occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures, and the efficacy of Intramedullary (IM) Steinmann pin fixing in growing dogs. All the records of growing dogs during a 10-year-period were screened to record the cause of trauma, the age and sex of the animal, the bone involved, the type and location of the fracture, the status of fixation, alignment, maintenance of fixation and fracture healing. The results were analysed and comparisons were made between growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones. Among the 310 cases of fractures recorded, the bones were osteopenic in 91 cases (29%). Minor trauma was the principal cause of fracture in dogs with osteopenia (25%), and indigenous breeds were most commonly affected (38%). Fractures in dogs with osteopenic bones were most commonly recorded in the age group of 2-4 months (53%), whereas fractures in normal dogs were almost equally distributed between 2 and 8 months of age. Male dogs were affected significantly more often in both groups. In osteopenic bones, most fractures were recorded in the femur (56%), and they were distributed equally along the length of the bone. Whereas in normal bones, fractures were almost equally distributed in radius/ulna, femur and tibia, and were more often recorded at the middle and distal third of long bones. Oblique fractures were most common in both groups; however, comminuted fractures were more frequent in normal bones, whereas incomplete fractures were more common in osteopenic bones. Ninety-nine fracture cases treated with IM pinning (66 normal, 33 osteopenic) were evaluated for the status of fracture reduction and healing. In a majority of the cases (61%) with osteopenic bones, the diameter of the pin was relatively smaller than the diameter of the medullary cavity (<70-75%), whereas in 68% of the cases in normal bones the pin diameter was optimum. The status of fracture fixing was satisfactory to good in significantly more

  13. Patterned silk film scaffolds for aligned lamellar bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Lee W.; Gil, Eun Seok; Park, Sang-Hyug; Mandal, Biman B.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Various porous biomaterial scaffolds have been utilized for bone tissue engineering; however, they are often limited in their ability to replicate the structural hierarchy and mechanics of native cortical bone. In this study, the alignment and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on patterned silk films (PF) was investigated as a bottom-up, biomimetic approach toward engineering cortical bone lamellae. Screening films cast with nine different micro and nano scale groove patterns showed that cellular alignment was mediated by an interplay between the width and depth of the patterns. MSCs were differentiated in osteogenic medium for four weeks on the PF that induced the highest degree of alignment, while flat films (FF) served as controls. Gene expression analysis and calcium quantification indicated that the PF supported osteogenic differentiation while also inducing robust lamellar alignment of cells and matrix deposition. A secondary alignment effect was noted on the PF where a new layer of aligned cells grew over the first layer, but rotated obliquely to the underlying pattern direction and first layer orientation. This layering and rotation of the aligned MSCs resembled the characteristic structural organization observed in native lamellar bone. The ability to control multilayered lamellar structural hierarchy from the interplay between a patterned 2D surface and cells suggests intriguing options for future biomaterial scaffolds designed to mimic native tissue structures. PMID:23070941

  14. Long bone histology of the subterranean rodent Bathyergus suillus (Bathyergidae): ontogenetic pattern of cortical bone thickening.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Sanhueza, Germán; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2017-02-01

    Patterns of bone development in mammals are best known from terrestrial and cursorial groups, but there is a considerable gap in our understanding of how specializations for life underground affect bone growth and development. Likewise, studies of bone microstructure in wild populations are still scarce, and they often include few individuals and tend to be focused on adults. For these reasons, the processes generating bone microstructural variation at intra- and interspecific levels are not fully understood. This study comprehensively examines the bone microstructure of an extant population of Cape dune molerats, Bathyergus suillus (Bathyergidae), the largest subterranean mammal endemic to the Western Cape of South Africa. The aim of this study is to investigate the postnatal bone growth of B. suillus using undecalcified histological sections (n = 197) of the femur, humerus, tibia-fibula, ulna and radius, including males and females belonging to different ontogenetic and reproductive stages (n = 42). Qualitative histological features demonstrate a wide histodiversity with thickening of the cortex mainly resulting from endosteal and periosteal bone depositions, whilst there is scarce endosteal resorption and remodeling throughout ontogeny. This imbalanced bone modeling allows the tissues deposited during ontogeny to remain relatively intact, thus preserving an excellent record of growth. The distribution of the different bone tissues observed in the cortex depends on ontogenetic status, anatomical features (e.g. muscle attachment structures) and location on the bone (e.g. anterior or lateral). The type of bone microstructure and modeling is discussed in relation to digging behavior, reproduction and physiology of this species. This study is the first histological assessment describing the process of cortical thickening in long bones of a fossorial mammal.

  15. Non-Linear Pattern Formation in Bone Growth and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here – chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) – which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of “group intelligence” exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called “particle swarm optimization” (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating “socially” in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or “feedback” between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the

  16. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  17. Multiscale patterned transplantable stem cell patches for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangho; Bae, Won-Gyu; Choung, Han-Wool; Lim, Ki Taek; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Khap-Yang; Jeon, Noo Li; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Stem cell-based therapy has been proposed as an enabling alternative not only for the treatment of diseases but also for the regeneration of tissues beyond complex surgical treatments or tissue transplantation. In this study, we approached a conceptual platform that can integrate stem cells into a multiscale patterned substrate for bone regeneration. Inspired by human bone tissue, we developed hierarchically micro- and nanopatterned transplantable patches as synthetic extracellular matrices by employing capillary force lithography in combination with a surface micro-wrinkling method using a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer. The multiscale patterned PLGA patches were highly flexible and showed higher tissue adhesion to the underlying tissue than did the single nanopatterned patches. In response to the anisotropically multiscale patterned topography, the adhesion and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sensitively controlled. Furthermore, the stem cell patch composed of hMSCs and transplantable PLGA substrate promoted bone regeneration in vivo when both the micro- and nanotopography of the substrate surfaces were synergistically combined. Thus, our study concludes that multiscale patterned transplantable stem cell patches may have a great potential for bone regeneration as well as for various regenerative medicine approaches.

  18. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: typical patterns of bone involvement in whole-body bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Gunsel; Averill, Lauren W

    2014-08-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease of unknown etiology. It affects children and adolescents predominantly and occurs mostly in the female population. It is characterized by the insidious onset of pain and swelling, with a fluctuating clinical course of relapses and remissions. Typically, several bones are affected, either synchronously or metachronously, and bilateral involvement is common. CRMO most commonly affects the metaphysis of long bones, especially the tibia, femur, and clavicle. The spine, pelvis, ribs, sternum, and mandible may also be affected. Although lesions are mostly multiple, patients may present with a single symptomatic focus. Radiographic findings may be negative early in the course of the disease. Bone scintigraphy is useful in determining the presence of abnormality and the extent of disease. The imaging and clinical features of CRMO overlap with those of infectious osteomyelitis, bone malignancy, and inflammatory arthritis. Nonetheless, CRMO can be confidently diagnosed with the recognition of typical imaging patterns in the appropriate clinical setting. This article reviews imaging findings with special emphasis on bone scintigraphy and specific disease sites.

  19. Influence of Fatigue Loading and Bone Turnover on Bone Strength and Pattern of Experimental Fractures of the Tibia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Gerbaix, Maude; Ominsky, Michael; Ammann, Patrick; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2016-07-01

    Bone fragility depends on bone mass, structure, and material properties, including damage. The relationship between bone turnover, fatigue damage, and the pattern and location of fractures, however, remains poorly understood. We examined these factors and their integrated effects on fracture strength and patterns in tibia. Adult male mice received RANKL (2 mg/kg/day), OPG-Fc (5 mg/kg 2×/week), or vehicle (Veh) 2 days prior to fatigue loading of one tibia by in vivo axial compression, with treatments continuing up to 28 more days. One day post fatigue, crack density was similarly increased in fatigued tibiae from all treatment groups. After 28 days, the RANKL group exhibited reduced bone mass and increased crack density, resulting in reduced bone strength, while the OPG-Fc group had greater bone mass and bone strength. Injury repair altered the pattern and location of fractures created by ex vivo destructive testing, with fractures occurring more proximally and obliquely relative to non-fatigued tibia. A similar pattern was observed in both non-fatigued and fatigued tibia of RANKL. In contrast, OPG-Fc prevented this fatigue-related shift in fracture pattern by maintaining fractures more distal and transverse. Correlation analysis showed that bone strength was predominantly determined by aBMD with minor contributions from structure and intrinsic strength as measured by nanoindentation and cracks density. In contrast, fracture location was predicted equally by aBMD, crack density and intrinsic modulus. The data suggest that not only bone strength but also the fracture pattern depends on previous damage and the effects of bone turnover on bone mass and structure. These observations may be relevant to further understand the mechanisms contributing to fracture pattern in long bone with different levels of bone remodeling, including atypical femur fracture.

  20. Coping patterns among bone marrow transplant patients: a hermeneutical inquiry.

    PubMed

    Shuster, G F; Steeves, R H; Onega, L; Richardson, B

    1996-08-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has recently become the treatment of choice for a number of malignancies. This procedure is highly technical, involving the use of radiation and chemotherapy to destroy the patient's diseased bone marrow and with it functions of the entire immune system. It is a process with toxic effects that are experienced by all patients to varying degrees. A great deal of research related to the physiological aspects of this procedure has already been done, but considerably fewer studies have examined the psychosocial aspects of the BMT procedure from the patient's perspective. Knowledge about how BMT patients understand this process and cope with its effects is important information for nurses taking care of these patients. The purpose of the study was to describe in depth the patterns of meaning employed by patients in the hospital as they coped with the experience of their BMT. Eleven patients were interviewed from one to four times a week throughout their hospitalization. Hermeneutic analysis was used to identify five major themes: physiological functioning, alertness, attitude, social relationships, and spirituality. Implications from the findings for nursing practice are discussed.

  1. Computational model-informed design and bioprinting of cell-patterned constructs for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Aurélie; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Hafezi, Forough; Ferraris, Eleonora; Patterson, Jennifer; Koç, Bahattin; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly advancing tissue engineering technology that holds great promise for the regeneration of several tissues, including bone. However, to generate a successful 3D bone tissue engineering construct, additional complexities should be taken into account such as nutrient and oxygen delivery, which is often insufficient after implantation in large bone defects. We propose that a well-designed tissue engineering construct, that is, an implant with a specific spatial pattern of cells in a matrix, will improve the healing outcome. By using a computational model of bone regeneration we show that particular cell patterns in tissue engineering constructs are able to enhance bone regeneration compared to uniform ones. We successfully bioprinted one of the most promising cell-gradient patterns by using cell-laden hydrogels with varying cell densities and observed a high cell viability for three days following the bioprinting process. In summary, we present a novel strategy for the biofabrication of bone tissue engineering constructs by designing cell-gradient patterns based on a computational model of bone regeneration, and successfully bioprinting the chosen design. This integrated approach may increase the success rate of implanted tissue engineering constructs for critical size bone defects and also can find a wider application in the biofabrication of other types of tissue engineering constructs.

  2. Healing pattern of reamed bone following bone harvesting by a RIA device.

    PubMed

    Devine, D M; Arens, D; Thalhauser, M; Schiuma, D; Zeiter, S; Nehrbass, D

    2015-01-29

    Intramedullary nailing has been used for decades to treat fractures of the long bones. However, complications related to the increase in medullary pressure culminated in the development of the Reamer Irrigator Aspirator (RIA). Since its first clinical use, the RIA has moved from a reaming device to a cell and autologous bone-harvesting tool. This increase in use brings with it further clinical questions; namely, does the endosteal bone regenerate sufficiently to allow subsequent reaming procedures. In the current study, endosteal bone regeneration post reaming was assessed in an ovine model. The study included six animals that had one tibia reamed, while the contralateral tibia acted as an intact control. Animals were administered fluorochrome labels in vivo, and bone regeneration was assessed using radiographical analysis. The endpoint of the study was 12 weeks post-surgery, at which time ex vivo analysis consisted of computed tomography and histological assessments. In vivo radiographs indicated limited healing of the reamed bone. However, ex vivo computer tomographical analysis indicated no significant differences in terms of bone volume between the reamed bone and the intact bone. Histological assessment of these regions indicated new bone formation. Fluorescent labelling indicates strong bone formation from 9 weeks post-surgery and as such, the bone formed at 12 weeks was immature in nature and was actively undergoing remodelling. These results indicate that bone regeneration post-reaming was continuing at three months. Therefore, given more time it may have sufficiently healed to allow a surgeon to use the intramedullary canal for a re-reaming procedure.

  3. Long bone histology and growth patterns in ankylosaurs: implications for life history and evolution.

    PubMed

    Stein, Martina; Hayashi, Shoji; Sander, P Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ankylosaurs are one of the major dinosaur groups and are characterized by unique body armor. Previous studies on other dinosaur taxa have revealed growth patterns, life history and evolutionary mechanisms based on their long bone histology. However, to date nothing is known about long bone histology in the Ankylosauria. This study is the first description of ankylosaurian long bone histology based on several limb elements, which were sampled from different individuals from the Ankylosauridae and Nodosauridae. The histology is compared to that of other dinosaur groups, including other Thyreophora and Sauropodomorpha. Ankylosaur long bone histology is characterized by a fibrolamellar bone architecture. The bone matrix type in ankylosaurs is closest to that of Stegosaurus. A distinctive mixture of woven and parallel-fibered bone together with overall poor vascularization indicates slow growth rates compared to other dinosaurian taxa. Another peculiar characteristic of ankylosaur bone histology is the extensive remodeling in derived North American taxa. In contrast to other taxa, ankylosaurs substitute large amounts of their primary tissue early in ontogeny. This anomaly may be linked to the late ossification of the ankylosaurian body armor. Metabolically driven remodeling processes must have liberated calcium to ossify the protective osteodermal structures in juveniles to subadult stages, which led to further remodeling due to increased mechanical loading. Abundant structural fibers observed in the primary bone and even in remodeled bone may have improved the mechanical properties of the Haversian bone.

  4. Long Bone Histology and Growth Patterns in Ankylosaurs: Implications for Life History and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Martina; Hayashi, Shoji; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ankylosaurs are one of the major dinosaur groups and are characterized by unique body armor. Previous studies on other dinosaur taxa have revealed growth patterns, life history and evolutionary mechanisms based on their long bone histology. However, to date nothing is known about long bone histology in the Ankylosauria. This study is the first description of ankylosaurian long bone histology based on several limb elements, which were sampled from different individuals from the Ankylosauridae and Nodosauridae. The histology is compared to that of other dinosaur groups, including other Thyreophora and Sauropodomorpha. Ankylosaur long bone histology is characterized by a fibrolamellar bone architecture. The bone matrix type in ankylosaurs is closest to that of Stegosaurus. A distinctive mixture of woven and parallel-fibered bone together with overall poor vascularization indicates slow growth rates compared to other dinosaurian taxa. Another peculiar characteristic of ankylosaur bone histology is the extensive remodeling in derived North American taxa. In contrast to other taxa, ankylosaurs substitute large amounts of their primary tissue early in ontogeny. This anomaly may be linked to the late ossification of the ankylosaurian body armor. Metabolically driven remodeling processes must have liberated calcium to ossify the protective osteodermal structures in juveniles to subadult stages, which led to further remodeling due to increased mechanical loading. Abundant structural fibers observed in the primary bone and even in remodeled bone may have improved the mechanical properties of the Haversian bone. PMID:23894321

  5. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  6. Current Evidence on the Association of Dietary Patterns and Bone Health: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Movassagh, Elham Z; Vatanparast, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Nutrition is an important modifiable factor that affects bone health. Diet is a complex mixture of nutrients and foods that correlate or interact with each other. Dietary pattern approaches take into account contributions from various aspects of diet. Findings from dietary pattern studies could complement those from single-nutrient and food studies on bone health. In this study we aimed to conduct a scoping review of the literature that assessed the impact of dietary patterns (derived with the use of both a priori and data-driven approaches) on bone outcomes, including bone mineral status, bone biomarkers, osteoporosis, and fracture risk. We retrieved 49 human studies up to June 2016 from the PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL databases. Most of these studies used a data-driven method, especially factor analysis, to derive dietary patterns. Several studies examined adherence to a variety of the a priori dietary indexes, including the Mediterranean diet score, the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI). The bone mineral density (BMD) diet score was developed to measure adherence to a dietary pattern beneficial to bone mineral density. Findings revealed a beneficial impact of higher adherence to a "healthy" dietary pattern derived using a data-driven method, the Mediterranean diet, HEI, AHEI, Dietary Diversity Score, Diet Quality Index-International, BMD Diet Score, Healthy Diet Indicator, and Korean Diet Score, on bone. In contrast, the "Western" dietary pattern and those featuring some aspects of an unhealthy diet were associated inversely with bone health. In both a priori and data-driven dietary pattern studies, a dietary pattern that emphasized the intake of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, poultry and fish, nuts and legumes, and low-fat dairy products and de-emphasized the intake of soft drinks, fried foods, meat and processed products, sweets and desserts, and refined grains showed a beneficial impact on bone health. Overall

  7. Bone weathering patterns of metatarsal v. femur and the postmortem interval in Southern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Janjua, Martyna A; Rogers, Tracy L

    2008-06-10

    Twenty-five defleshed pig femora and 25 metatarsals were placed outdoors and observed over 291 days to establish: (1) bone weathering patterns for use in estimating time since death in Southern Ontario and (2) whether larger (femora) or smaller (metatarsals) bones provide a better indicator of time since death. Pig hind limbs were observed to determine a timeline for decomposition of soft tissues during the fall and winter. Ambient air temperature, humidity, precipitation, sunlight, soil pH, and freezing and thawing were considered as factors affecting the breakdown of bone. Weathering patterns were observed based on the extent of bleaching, amount of periosteum and soft tissues present, as well as the appearance of greasiness, cracking and flaking of cortical bone. Both entomological activity and climatic conditions affected soft tissue decomposition. Animal activity affected both the process of bone weathering and soft tissue decomposition, causing variability in sample decomposition and bone breakdown. The variation in microenvironment, partially caused by soil composition, introduced variability in bone weathering rates. Four bone weathering stages were established based on patterns observed. Femora proved to be more resilient and showed more degrees of change due to weathering, thus proving to be a better indicator of time since death than metatarsals.

  8. Multidisciplinary characterization of the long-bone cortex growth patterns through sheep's ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Cambra-Moo, Oscar; Nacarino-Meneses, Carmen; Díaz-Güemes, Idoia; Enciso, Silvia; García Gil, Orosia; Llorente Rodríguez, Laura; Rodríguez Barbero, Miguel Ángel; de Aza, Antonio H; González Martín, Armando

    2015-07-01

    Bone researches have studied extant and extinct taxa extensively trying to disclose a complete view of the complex structural and chemical transformations that model and remodel the macro and microstructure of bone during growth. However, to approach bone growth variations is not an easy task, and many aspects related with histological transformations during ontogeny remain unresolved. In the present study, we conduct a holistic approach using different techniques (polarized microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction) to examine the histomorphological and histochemical variations in the cortical bone of sheep specimens from intrauterine to adult stages, using environmentally controlled specimens from the same species. Our results suggest that during sheep bone development, the most important morphological (shape and size) and chemical transformations in the cortical bone occur during the first weeks of life; synchronized but dissimilar variations are established in the forelimb and hind limb cortical bone; and the patterns of bone tissue maturation in both extremities are differentiated in the adult stage. All of these results indicate that standardized histological models are useful not only for evaluating many aspects of normal bone growth but also to understand other important influences on the bones, such as pathologies that remain unknown.

  9. Effect of soil type patterns on the variability of bare soil evaporation within a field: comparison of eddy covariance measurements with potential and actual evaporation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderborght, J.; Graf, A.; Steenpass, C.; Scharnagl, B.; Prolingheuer, N.; Herbst, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation was measured with the eddy-covariance method at the Selhausen field site. The site has a distinct gradient in soil texture with a considerably higher stone content at the upper part of the field. Because of this gradient, a spatial variation in evaporation fluxes in the field is expected. Because of the higher stone content at the upper part of the field, it is expected that the water that is stored in the soil surface layer and can be evaporated at a maximal evaporation rate, which is determined by the energy that is available for evaporation, is considerable smaller in the upper than in the lower part of the field. We investigated whether this hypothesis is supported by eddy covariance (EC) measurements of the evaporation fluxes at the field site. The EC measurements were combined with a footprint model that predicts the location of the soil surface that contributes to the measured evaporation flux. In this way, evaporation measurements of the two parts of the field site could be distinguished. However, since only one EC station was available, simultaneous evaporation measurements for the two field parts were not available. As a consequence, the datasets of measurements had to be interpreted and put into context of the meteorological and soil hydrological conditions. The potential evapotranspiration was calculated using the FAO method (Allen et al., 1998) to represent the meteorological conditions whereas a simple soil evaporation model (Boesten and Stroosnijder, 1986) was used to represent the influence of the precipitation and soil hydrological conditions on the actual evaporation rate. Since different soil parameters were required to describe the evaporation measurements for the upper and lower part of the plot, our starting hypothesis that more water is evaporated in the lower part of the field could be confirmed. Allen, R. G., L. S. Pereira, D. Raes, and M. Smith (1998), Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelines for computing crop water

  10. Apparent density patterns in subchondral bone of the sloth and anteater forelimb.

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Carlson, Kristian J

    2008-10-23

    Vertebrate morphologists often are interested in inferring limb-loading patterns in animals characterized by different locomotor repertoires. Because bone apparent density (i.e. mass per unit volume of bone inclusive of porosities) is a determinant of compressive strength, and thus indicative of compressive loading, recent comparative studies in primates have proposed a structure-function relationship between apparent density of subchondral bone and locomotor behaviours that vary in compressive loading. If such patterns are found in other mammals, then these relationships would be strengthened further. Here, we examine the distal radius of suspensory sloths that generally load their forelimbs (FLs) in tension and of quadrupedal anteaters that generally load their FLs in compression. Computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry was used to visualize the patterns in subchondral apparent density. Suspensory sloths exhibit relatively smaller areas of high apparent density than quadrupedal anteaters. This locomotor-based pattern is analogous to the pattern observed in suspensory and quadrupedal primates. Similarity between xenarthran and primate trends suggests broad-scale applicability for analysing subchondral bone apparent density and supports the idea that bone functionally alters its material properties in response to locomotor behaviours.

  11. Bone histology. Evolution of growth pattern in birds.

    PubMed

    Chinsamy, A; Elzanowski, A

    2001-07-26

    Living (neornithine) birds grow up rapidly and without interruption, terminating their growth within one year and, with a few secondary exceptions, starting to fly only after or near the completion of growth. Bone histology has revealed that pre-avian theropods also grew fast for most of the postnatal period, but that this growth was usually intermittent and probably extended for more than one year. We have found surprising evidence for an early postnatal slowing-down of growth in two lineages of flying basal birds, which suggests that birds may have started their evolution as precocious fliers.

  12. Dietary patterns and bone mineral status in young adults: the Northern Ireland Young Hearts Project.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Claire R; Woodside, Jayne V; Cardwell, Chris R; McCourt, Hannah J; Young, Ian S; Murray, Liam J; Boreham, Colin A; Gallagher, Alison M; Neville, Charlotte E; McKinley, Michelle C

    2012-10-28

    Studies of individual nutrients or foods have revealed much about dietary influences on bone. Multiple food or nutrient approaches, such as dietary pattern analysis, could offer further insight but research is limited and largely confined to older adults. We examined the relationship between dietary patterns, obtained by a posteriori and a priori methods, and bone mineral status (BMS; collective term for bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD)) in young adults (20-25 years; n 489). Diet was assessed by 7 d diet history and BMD and BMC were determined at the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN). A posteriori dietary patterns were derived using principal component analysis (PCA) and three a priori dietary quality scores were applied (dietary diversity score (DDS), nutritional risk score and Mediterranean diet score). For the PCA-derived dietary patterns, women in the top compared to the bottom fifth of the 'Nuts and Meat' pattern had greater FN BMD by 0·074 g/cm(2) (P = 0·049) and FN BMC by 0·40 g (P = 0·034) after adjustment for confounders. Similarly, men in the top compared to the bottom fifth of the 'Refined' pattern had lower FN BMC by 0·41 g (P = 0·049). For the a priori DDS, women in the top compared to the bottom third had lower FN BMD by 0·05 g/cm(2) after adjustments (P = 0·052), but no other relationships with BMS were identified. In conclusion, adherence to a 'Nuts and Meat' dietary pattern may be associated with greater BMS in young women and a 'Refined' dietary pattern may be detrimental for bone health in young men.

  13. Inter-dependent tissue growth and Turing patterning in a model for long bone development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Simon; Iber, Dagmar

    2013-10-01

    The development of long bones requires a sophisticated spatial organization of cellular signalling, proliferation, and differentiation programs. How such spatial organization emerges on the growing long bone domain is still unresolved. Based on the reported biochemical interactions we developed a regulatory model for the core signalling factors IHH, PTCH1, and PTHrP and included two cell types, proliferating/resting chondrocytes and (pre-)hypertrophic chondrocytes. We show that the reported IHH-PTCH1 interaction gives rise to a Schnakenberg-type Turing kinetics, and that inclusion of PTHrP is important to achieve robust patterning when coupling patterning and tissue dynamics. The model reproduces relevant spatiotemporal gene expression patterns, as well as a number of relevant mutant phenotypes. In summary, we propose that a ligand-receptor based Turing mechanism may control the emergence of patterns during long bone development, with PTHrP as an important mediator to confer patterning robustness when the sensitive Turing system is coupled to the dynamics of a growing and differentiating tissue. We have previously shown that ligand-receptor based Turing mechanisms can also result from BMP-receptor, SHH-receptor, and GDNF-receptor interactions, and that these reproduce the wildtype and mutant patterns during digit formation in limbs and branching morphogenesis in lung and kidneys. Receptor-ligand interactions may thus constitute a general mechanism to generate Turing patterns in nature.

  14. Life Course Dietary Patterns and Bone Health in Later Life in a British Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Ann; Kuh, Diana L; Adams, Judith E; Ambrosini, Gina L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Evidence for the contribution of individual foods and nutrients to bone health is weak. Few studies have considered hypothesis‐based dietary patterns and bone health. We investigated whether a protein‐calcium‐potassium–rich (PrCaK‐rich) dietary pattern over the adult life course, was positively associated with bone outcomes at 60 to 64 years of age. Diet diaries were collected at ages 36, 46, 53, and 60 to 64 years in 1263 participants (661 women) from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development. DXA and pQCT measurements were obtained at age 60 to 64 years, including size‐adjusted bone mineral content (SA‐BMC) and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD). A food‐based dietary pattern best explaining dietary calcium, potassium, and protein intakes (g/1000 kcal) was identified using reduced rank regression. Dietary pattern Z‐scores were calculated for each individual, at each time point. Individual trajectories in dietary pattern Z‐scores were modeled to summarize changes in Z‐scores over the study period. Regression models examined associations between these trajectories and bone outcomes at age 60 to 64 years, adjusting for baseline dietary pattern Z‐score and other confounders. A consistent PrCaK‐rich dietary pattern was identified within the population, over time. Mean ± SD dietary pattern Z‐scores at age 36 years and age 60 to 64 years were –0.32 ± 0.97 and 2.2 ± 1.5 (women) and –0.35 ± 0.98 and 1.7 ± 1.6 (men), respectively. Mean trajectory in dietary pattern Z‐scores ± SD was 0.07 ± 0.02 units/year. Among women, a 0.02‐SD unit/year higher trajectory in dietary pattern Z‐score over time was associated with higher SA‐BMC (spine 1.40% [95% CI, 0.30 to 2.51]; hip 1.35% [95% CI, 0.48 to 2.23]), and vBMD (radius 1.81% [95% CI, 0.13 to 3.50]) at age 60 to 64 years. No statistically significant associations were found in men. During adulthood, an increasing score for a dietary

  15. Inverse immunostaining pattern for synthesized versus endocytosed alpha-granule proteins in human bone marrow megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    de Larouzière, V; Brouland, J P; Souni, F; Drouet, L; Cramer, E

    1998-06-01

    The time of appearance and pattern of expression of several alpha-granule proteins, von Willebrand factor (VWF), fibrinogen and immunoglobulins (Ig) were examined and compared in human bone marrow megakaryocytes (MK) using an immunocytochemical approach. VWF is synthesized by immature MK, whereas it has been shown that fibrinogen is incorporated from the plasma into alpha-granules. The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether there are chronological and morphological differences in the expression of VWF and fibrinogen in vivo in human MK. Seven paraffin-embedded biopsies of normal human bone marrow were labelled with specific antibodies for VWF and for fibrinogen, detected by the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method. and analysed by immunomorphometry. We found a clear, statistically significant. difference in the labelling pattern of VWF and fibrinogen. The expression of other endocytosed alpha-granule proteins, immunoglobulins G and A, was therefore studied in bone marrow MK from two patients with multiple myeloma, one with monoclonal IgG and one with monoclonal IgA. The immunostaining pattern was similar to that of fibrinogen and different from VWF, and characteristic of endocytosed alpha-granule proteins. This study demonstrates that: (i) immunohistochemical staining of MK alpha-granules proteins distinguishes the peripheral cockade distribution pattern of endocytosed protein from the perinuclear pattern of endogenously synthesized proteins; (ii) VWF is present in human bone marrow MK when fibrinogen is not yet detectable: (iii) VWF synthesis ceases while fibrinogen is still being incorporated: (iv) immunoglobulins can be detected in MK cytoplasm, with a staining pattern resembling that of fibrinogen.

  16. Acquisition of Structure and Interpretation: Cases from Mandarin Bare and Non-Bare Noun Phrases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Children's production of bare nominals is universal. When acquiring languages disallowing bare nominals, children will develop from the bare to the non-bare stage. However, Mandarin nominals may appear bare or non-bare in various positions with all kinds of interpretations. This dissertation conducts two acquisition studies to examine the…

  17. Maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy and childhood bone mass: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Cole, Zoe A; Gale, Catharine R; Javaid, M Kassim; Robinson, Sian M; Law, Catherine; Boucher, Barbara J; Crozier, Sarah R; Godfrey, Keith M; Dennison, Elaine M; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-04-01

    Maternal nutrition is a potentially important determinant of intrauterine skeletal development. Previous studies have examined the effects of individual nutrients, but the pattern of food consumption may be of greater relevance. We therefore examined the relationship between maternal dietary pattern during pregnancy and bone mass of the offspring at 9 yr of age. We studied 198 pregnant women 17-43 yr of age and their offspring at 9 yr of age. Dietary pattern was assessed using principal component analysis from a validated food frequency questionnaire. The offspring underwent measurements of bone mass using DXA at 9 yr of age. A high prudent diet score was characterized by elevated intakes of fruit, vegetables, and wholemeal bread, rice, and pasta and low intakes of processed foods. Higher prudent diet score in late pregnancy was associated with greater (p < 0.001) whole body and lumbar spine BMC and areal BMD in the offspring, after adjustment for sex, socioeconomic status, height, arm circumference, maternal smoking, and vitamin D status. Associations with prudent diet score in early pregnancy were weaker and nonsignificant. We conclude that dietary patterns consistent with current advice for healthy eating during pregnancy are associated with greater bone size and BMD in the offspring at 9 yr of age.

  18. Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Tian-Jiao; Bai, Ming-Jie

    2016-09-06

    China is an urban and rural social model country. In the past three decades, the developing speed of rural areas has been much slower than urban areas, which may lead to the differences in dietary patterns. This study aimed to investigate the disparities of dietary structures from urban and rural children, and to analyze the effects of different dietary patterns on their adverse outcome. Among 1590 students, aged 11 years to 17 years, from primary and middle schools, a cross-sectional study was conducted. There were three dietary patterns recognized: Westernization structure, meat diet structure, and Western and Chinese structure. Compared with rural students, more urban students were in the highest categories of the whole dietary patterns (p < 0.001). Overweight/obesity and central adiposity were more prevailing among urban students, while rural students had a more prevailing risk of bone fracture (p < 0.05). Through the adjustment for all confounding factors, the Westernization structure could increase the risk of overweight/obesity and central adiposity, the meat structure could increase the risk of elevated blood pressure/hypertension, while the risk of low bone mineral quality could be reduced by the Chinese and Western structure. In conclusion, a rural-urban disparity in dietary patterns was found in our study, and different dietary patterns were associated with the risk of some adverse outcomes. Therefore, there were different prevalences of the adverse outcomes between rural and urban students.

  19. Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Tian-Jiao; Bai, Ming-Jie

    2016-01-01

    China is an urban and rural social model country. In the past three decades, the developing speed of rural areas has been much slower than urban areas, which may lead to the differences in dietary patterns. This study aimed to investigate the disparities of dietary structures from urban and rural children, and to analyze the effects of different dietary patterns on their adverse outcome. Among 1590 students, aged 11 years to 17 years, from primary and middle schools, a cross-sectional study was conducted. There were three dietary patterns recognized: Westernization structure, meat diet structure, and Western and Chinese structure. Compared with rural students, more urban students were in the highest categories of the whole dietary patterns (p < 0.001). Overweight/obesity and central adiposity were more prevailing among urban students, while rural students had a more prevailing risk of bone fracture (p < 0.05). Through the adjustment for all confounding factors, the Westernization structure could increase the risk of overweight/obesity and central adiposity, the meat structure could increase the risk of elevated blood pressure/hypertension, while the risk of low bone mineral quality could be reduced by the Chinese and Western structure. In conclusion, a rural-urban disparity in dietary patterns was found in our study, and different dietary patterns were associated with the risk of some adverse outcomes. Therefore, there were different prevalences of the adverse outcomes between rural and urban students. PMID:27608038

  20. Postnatal changes in the growth dynamics of the human face revealed from bone modelling patterns

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Rosas, Antonio; Nieto-Díaz, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Human skull morphology results from complex processes that involve the coordinated growth and interaction of its skeletal components to keep a functional and structural balance. Previous histological works have studied the growth of different craniofacial regions and their relationship to functional spaces in humans up to 14 years old. Nevertheless, how the growth dynamics of the facial skeleton and the mandible are related and how this relationship changes through the late ontogeny remain poorly understood. To approach these two questions, we have compared the bone modelling activities of the craniofacial skeleton from a sample of subadult and adult humans. In this study, we have established for the first time the bone modelling pattern of the face and the mandible from adult humans. Our analyses reveal a patchy distribution of the bone modelling fields (overemphasized by the presence of surface islands with no histological information) reflecting the complex growth dynamics associated to the individual morphology. Subadult and adult specimens show important differences in the bone modelling patterns of the anterior region of the facial skeleton and the posterior region of the mandible. These differences indicate developmental changes in the growth directions of the whole craniofacial complex, from a predominantly downward growth in subadults that turns to a forward growth observed in the adult craniofacial skeleton. We hypothesize that these ontogenetic changes would respond to the physiological and physical requirements to enlarge the oral and nasal cavities once maturation of the brain and the closure of the cranial sutures have taken place during craniofacial development. PMID:23819603

  1. Meteorin-Like Shows Unique Expression Pattern in Bone and Its Overexpression Inhibits Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Weiyan; Liu, Yong; Wu, Zhihong; Wang, Shaohai; Qiu, Guixing; Lin, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to identify and characterize genes involved in osteoblasts function. Firstly, we constructed and sequenced a human osteoblast full-length cDNA library to screen for genes whose functions have not been reported and further identify these candidate genes through detecting the relationship with the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex using a dual luciferase reporter system. Only one gene, namely METRNL (Meteorin, glial cell differentiation regulator-like) has been screened out. We performed immunohistochemistry to analyze expression patterns in bone and established a stable transfection MG63 cell line of METRNL-EGFP fusion protein overexpression to analyze the function of METRNL in mineralized nodule formation. Immunohistochemistry showed METRNL expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts lining trabecular bone surfaces. Overexpression of METRNL inhibited mineralized nodule formation by the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line. Thus, the identified gene, METRNL, which is associated with AP-1 transcription factor complex activity, has a unique expression pattern in bone. In addition, the anomalous expression of METRNL may inhibit bone cell differentiation. PMID:27716826

  2. Strain measurement of a mouse bone by 3D-electronic speckle pattern interferometry (3D-ESPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Praveen R.; Su, Min; Liu, Sheng; Jiang, Hui H.; Yokota, Hiroki; Yang, Lianxiang

    2005-08-01

    Bone is a mechanosensitive tissue that adapts its mass, architecture and mechanical properties to mechanical loading. Appropriate mechanical loads provide an effective means to stimulate bone remodeling and prevent from bone loss. It is controversial whether in situ strain in bone is a critical determinant in enhancement of bone formation, and it is therefore important to evaluate load-driven strain in bone. Using electronic speckle pattern interferometry, we determined high-resolution three-dimensional strains on the mouse femur in response to two loading modalities: an axial loading modality (ALM) and a knee loading modality (KLM). We demonstrated that these two loading modalities induced a different pattern of strain distributions. ALM generated strain in the midshaft of cortical bone, while strains with KLM were concentrated on the distal epiphysis of the mouse femur. Since KLM is capable of enhancing bone formation in cortical bone distant from the knee, the current results indicate that in situ strain is not always necessary for load-driven bone formation.

  3. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  4. Use of electronic speckle pattern interferometry to study the biomechanics of human bone and prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras-Palov, Carlos; Tyrer, John R.; Petzing, Jon N.; Stoyle, Tom F.; Gregg, P. J.

    1995-02-01

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is a laser based technique developed for the study of stresses and strains in complex structures. This method consists of the projection of two laser beams onto the object of study. This produces a visible pattern that is recorded by a video camera. When the structure is stressed in a jig, the pattern changes depending on the in- plane and out-of-plane deformation and movement of the surface observed. This allows us to qualify and quantify strain in the whole area under study, in real time. We describe the method of application of ESPI to the study of the biomechanics of the proximal femur, before and after the implantation of the femoral component of a total hip replacement in cadaveric femora, under physiological loads and tensions, and report our preliminary results. The information obtained with this technique should provide a better understanding of the biomechanics of bone after joint replacement.

  5. Patterns of Care Among Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases at a Large Academic Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Alcorn, Sara R.; Hales, Russell K.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates outcomes and patterns of care among patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases at a high-volume academic institution. Methods and Materials: Records of all patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases from April 2007 to July 2012 were identified from electronic medical records. Chart review yielded demographic and clinical data. Rates of complicated versus uncomplicated bone metastases were not analyzed. Results: We identified 339 patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases. Of these, 52.2% were male; median age was 65 years old. The most common primary was non-small-cell lung cancer (29%). Most patients (83%) were prescribed ≤10 fractions; 8% received single-fraction RT. Most patients (52%) had a documented goals of care (GOC) discussion with their radiation oncologist; hospice referral rates were higher when patients had such discussions (66% with vs 50% without GOC discussion, P=.004). Median life expectancy after RT was 96 days. Median survival after RT was shorter based on inpatient as opposed to outpatient status at the time of consultation (35 vs 136 days, respectively, P<.001). Hospice referrals occurred for 56% of patients, with a median interval between completion of RT and hospice referral of 29 days and a median hospice stay of 22 days. Conclusions: These data document excellent adherence to American Society for Radiation Oncolology Choosing Wisely recommendation to avoid routinely using >10 fractions of palliative RT for bone metastasis. Nonetheless, single-fraction RT remains relatively uncommon. Participating in GOC discussions with a radiation oncologist is associated with higher rates of hospice referral. Inpatient status at consultation is associated with short survival.

  6. Camurati-Engelmann disease in a family from Croatian Island: an old bone scan confirmed pattern of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Baretić, Maja; Korsić, Mirko; Potocki, Kristina; Horvatić, Gordana Herceg; Orlić, Zeljka Crncević

    2014-06-01

    34-year old patient had history of muscular wasting, easy fatigability, pain in extremities and waddling gait since age of four. During the time, neuromuscular disease was suspected, but not confirmed. Elevated bone alkaline phosphatase as well as other bone turnover markers (osteocalcin, procollagen, telopeptide) indicated further skeletal evaluation. Symmetrical enhanced uptake on technetium methylene diphosphonate [99mTc]MPD bone scintigraphy at diaphyses of longitudinal bones and scull matched cortical thickening of long bones and sclerosis of the scull seen at radiograms. Those findings pointed to Camurati-Engelmann disease misdiagnosed for the long time. This rare genetic autosomal dominant disorder was retrospectively diagnosed in asymptomatic father too on the basis of bone scans done long time ago. Old family member scans confirmed heredity pattern of the disease.

  7. Speckle shearing pattern interferometry to assess mechanical strain in the human mandible jaw bone under physiological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, V.; Vázquez-Vázquez, C.; Gallas, M.; Crespo, J.

    2011-05-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) has been used in experiments to measure displacement on the surface of bones undergoing external forces. However in order to asses directly the derivative of the displacements a related technique, Shearography, is used. This technique has been applied in biomechanical experiments although limited to small pieces of bone to determine their elastic properties. In this work we propose the use of Shearing Speckle Interferometry to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of the human mandible under compressive stress, simulating masticatory forces or impacts, in order to analyze the strain distribution on mandibular bone.

  8. The remodeling pattern of human mandibular alveolar bone during prenatal formation from 19 to 270mm CRL.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert; Tsengelsaikhan, Nyamdorj; Schuster, Felix; Zimmermann, Camilla A

    2016-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of human bone morphogenesis leading to a topologically specific shape remain unknown, despite increasing knowledge of the basic molecular aspects of bone formation and its regulation. The formation of the alveolar bone, which houses the dental primordia, and later the dental roots, may serve as a model to approach general questions of bone formation. Twenty-five heads of human embryos and fetuses (Radlanski-Collection, Berlin) ranging from 19mm to 270mm (crown-rump-length) CRL were prepared as histological serial sections. For each stage, virtual 3D-reconstructions were made in order to study the morphogenesis of the mandibular molar primordia with their surrounding bone. Special focus was given to recording the bone-remodeling pattern, as diagnosed from the histological sections. In early stages (19-31mm CRL) developing bone was characterized by appositional only. At 41, in the canine region, mm CRL bony extensions were found forming on the bottom of the trough. Besides general apposition, regions with resting surfaces were also found. At a fetal size of 53mm CRL, septa have developed and led to a compartment for canine development. Furthermore, one shared compartment for the incisor primordia and another shared compartment for the molars also developed. Moreover, the inner surfaces of the dental crypts showed resorption of bone. From this stage on, a general pattern became established such that the compartmentalizing ridges and septa between all of the dental primordia and the brims of the crypts were noted, and were due to appositional growth of bone, while the crypts enlarged on their inner surfaces by resorption. By 160mm CRL, the dental primordia were larger, and all of the bony septa had become reduced in size. The primordia for the permanent teeth became visible at 225mm CRL and shared the crypts of their corresponding deciduous primordia.

  9. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma.

  10. The topologic and chronologic patterns of hematopoietic cell seeding in host femoral bone marrow after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jeremiah; Yaniv, Isaac; Farkas, Daniel L

    2003-08-01

    The early stages of homing, seeding, and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are poorly characterized. We have developed an optical technique that allows in vivo tracking of transplanted, fluorescent-tagged cells in the host femurs. In this study we used fluorescence microscopy to monitor the topologic and chronologic patterns of hematopoietic cell seeding in the femoral bone marrow (BM) of mice. PKH-labeled cells homed to the femur within minutes after injection into a peripheral vein. Most cells drifted within the marrow space and gradually seeded in clusters close to the endosteal surface of the epiphyseal cortex. Three days after transplantation 85% to 94% (14%) of PKH-labeled cells in the femoral marrow were located within 100 microm of the epiphyseal bone surface (P <.001 versus the more central cells), whereas labeled cells were absent in the femoral diaphysis. Primary seeding of juxtaendosteal, epiphyseal marrow occurred independently of recipient conditioning (myeloablated and nonconditioned hosts), donor-recipient antigen disparity, or the phenotype of the injected cells (whole BM and lineage-negative cells) and was consistently observed in secondary recipients of BM-homed cells. Seeding in regions close to the epiphyseal bone was also observed in freshly excised femurs perfused ex vivo and in femurs assessed without prior placement of optical windows, indicating that the site of primary seeding was not affected by surgical placement of optical windows. Four to 5 days after transplantation, cellular clusters appeared in the more central regions of the epiphyses and in the diaphyses. Centrally located cells showed decreased PKH fluorescence, suggesting that they were progeny of the seeding cells, and brightly fluorescent cells (quiescent first-generation seeding cells) were observed close to the bone surface for as long as 24 days after transplantation. These data indicate that the periphery of the femoral marrow hosts primary seeding

  11. Inhomogeneity of human vertebral cancellous bone: systematic density and structure patterns inside the vertebral body.

    PubMed

    Banse, X; Devogelaer, J P; Munting, E; Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Grynpas, M

    2001-05-01

    In the spine, cancellous bone quality is usually assessed for the whole vertebral body in a transverse central slice. Correct identification and assessment of the weakest parts of the cancellous bone may lead to better prediction of fracture risk. The density and structural parameters were systematically investigated inside the thoracic (T-9), thoracolumbar (T12-L1), and lumbar (L-4) vertebral bodies of nine subjects. On both sides of the median sagittal plane, anterior and posterior 8.2 mm vertical cores were harvested in the thoracic vertebra. In the thoracolumbar and lumbar vertebrae, external samples were also cored. Peripheral quantitative computed tomographic (pQCT) density analysis of the 136 cores was performed at four different levels, from the lower to the upper endplate. The relatively thin slice thickness (300 microm) and small pixel size (70 microm x 70 microm) was considered sufficient to investigate the structural parameters on the four transverse slices and in the sagittal and coronal planes (total of 816 images). Using a constant threshold a binary image was generated and the morphometric data were extracted. The binary image was further skeletonized and classical strut analysis was performed. Cancellous bone density was 20% higher in the posterior cores than in the anterior and external cores. Moreover, clear vertical inhomogeneity was noted because the lowest half of the vertebral body presented lower density than the upper half (differences ranging from 25% to 15%). All structural parameters were strongly dependent on the location of the measurement. Structural differences between anterior, posterior, and external areas were mild and followed the density patterns. On the other hand, vertical inhomogeneity of the structural parameters was important. For example, in the thoracolumbar and lumbar vertebrae, the numbers of nodes or node-to-node struts were almost twofold higher in the inferior half than in the superior half (p < 0.01), whereas

  12. Patterns in the bony skull development of marsupials: high variation in onset of ossification and conserved regions of bone contact

    PubMed Central

    Spiekman, Stephan N. F.; Werneburg, Ingmar

    2017-01-01

    Development in marsupials is specialized towards an extremely short gestation and highly altricial newborns. As a result, marsupial neonates display morphological adaptations at birth related to functional constraints. However, little is known about the variability of marsupial skull development and its relation to morphological diversity. We studied bony skull development in five marsupial species. The relative timing of the onset of ossification was compared to literature data and the ossification sequence of the marsupial ancestor was reconstructed using squared-change parsimony. The high range of variation in the onset of ossification meant that no patterns could be observed that differentiate species. This finding challenges traditional studies concentrating on the onset of ossification as a marker for phylogeny or as a functional proxy. Our study presents observations on the developmental timing of cranial bone-to-bone contacts and their evolutionary implications. Although certain bone contacts display high levels of variation, connections of early and late development are quite conserved and informative. Bones that surround the oral cavity are generally the first to connect and the bones of the occipital region are among the last. We conclude that bone contact is preferable over onset of ossification for studying cranial bone development. PMID:28233826

  13. A systematic examination of the bone destruction pattern of the two-shot technique

    PubMed Central

    Stoetzer, Marcus; Stoetzer, Carsten; Rana, Majeed; Zeller, Alexander; Hanke, Alexander; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; von See, Constantin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The two-shot technique is an effective stopping power method. The precise mechanisms of action on the bone and soft-tissue structures of the skull; however, remain largely unclear. The aim of this study is to compare the terminal ballistics of the two-shot and single-shot techniques. Materials and Methods: 40 fresh pigs’ heads were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10). Either a single shot or two shots were fired at each head with a full metal jacket or a semi-jacketed bullet. Using thin-layer computed tomography and photography, the diameter of the destruction pattern and the fractures along the bullet path were then imaged and assessed. Results: A single shot fired with a full metal jacket bullet causes minor lateral destruction along the bullet path. With two shots fired with a full metal jacket bullet, however, the maximum diameter of the bullet path is significantly greater (P < 0.05) than it is with a single shot fired with a full metal jacket bullet. In contrast, the maximum diameter with a semi-jacketed bullet is similar with the single-shot and two-shot techniques. Conclusion: With the two-shot technique, a full metal jacket bullet causes a destruction pattern that is comparable to that of a single shot fired with a semi-jacketed bullet. PMID:24812454

  14. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vinay Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med.; Wahab, Sherif Abdel; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Ngoma, Twalib; Vanderpuye, Verna; Sowunmi, Anthonia; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph; Jeremic, Branislav

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  15. 'Universal' microstructural patterns in cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular bone materials: micromechanics-based prediction of anisotropic elasticity.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian

    2007-02-21

    Bone materials are characterized by an astonishing variability and diversity. Still, because of 'architectural constraints' due to once chosen material constituents and their physical interaction, the fundamental hierarchical organization or basic building plans of bone materials remain largely unchanged during biological evolution. Such universal patterns of microstructural organization govern the mechanical interaction of the elementary components of bone (hydroxyapatite, collagen, water; with directly measurable tissue-independent elastic properties), which are here quantified through a multiscale homogenization scheme delivering effective elastic properties of bone materials: at a scale of 10nm, long cylindrical collagen molecules, attached to each other at their ends by approximately 1.5nm long crosslinks and hosting intermolecular water inbetween, form a contiguous matrix called wet collagen. At a scale of several hundred nanometers, wet collagen and mineral crystal agglomerations interpenetrate each other, forming the mineralized fibril. At a scale of 5-10microm, the extracellular solid bone matrix is represented as collagen fibril inclusions embedded in a foam of largely disordered (extrafibrillar) mineral crystals. At a scale above the ultrastructure, where lacunae are embedded in extracellular bone matrix, the extravascular bone material is observed. Model estimates predicted from tissue-specific composition data gained from a multitude of chemical and physical tests agree remarkably well with corresponding acoustic stiffness experiments across a variety of cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular materials. Besides from reconciling the well-documented, seemingly opposed concepts of 'mineral-reinforced collagen matrix' and 'collagen-reinforced mineral matrix' for bone ultrastructure, this approach opens new possibilities in the exploitation of computer tomographic data for nano-to-macro mechanics of bone organs.

  16. International Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Evidence-Based Practice?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Alysa; Barnes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Sunita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William; Holt, Tanya; Wu, Jackson; Janjan, Nora; Chow, Edward

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. Methods and Materials: The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. Results: A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Conclusion: Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of

  17. Characterizing felid tooth marking and gross bone damage patterns using GIS image analysis: an experimental feeding study with large felids.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Jennifer A; Plummer, Thomas; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been much disagreement over the nature of carnivore involvement in Early Pleistocene zooarchaeological assemblages. This partially reflects the lack of reliable ways to identify the taphonomic signatures of different large carnivore taxa. It is often unclear which carnivore taxon or taxa may have played a role in forming or modifying faunal assemblages found associated with stone tools, and this lack of clarity impacts reconstructions of hominin behavior. The mode, frequency and nutritional yield of carcasses acquired by hominins, and the extent to which hominin foraging impinged on or was constrained by the guild of large predators are topics of great importance. This paper characterizes the taphonomic signature of large felids using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) image analysis method to study tooth marking and gross bone damage on neotaphonomic experiments carried out with tigers (Panthera tigris) and African lions (Panthera leo) at the Carolina Tiger Rescue (Pittsboro, North Carolina). This sample of over 400 bones significantly increases the size of current neotaphonomic samples modeling felid feeding traces, more than doubling the number of felid-modified specimens described in the literature. We identify a typical pattern of bone damage resulting from large felid carcass modification, which can be distinguished from bone damage patterns produced by hyaenids and canids. In summary, this pattern consists of tooth marking largely restricted to limb bone ends and minimal bone fragmentation. The frequency of tooth marking imparted by large felids in this study is lower than that produced by hyaenids, while canid tooth mark frequencies fall between the two. Investigation of the FLK Zinj assemblage from Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, has documented several specimens with surface damage similar to our neotaphonomic sample. This may signal early access to carcasses through 'power scavenging' by hominins.

  18. Different ossification patterns of intermuscular bones in fish with different swimming modes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenjie; Lv, Yaoping; Gong, Xiaoling; Wu, Jiaming; Bao, Baolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intermuscular bones are found in the myosepta in teleosts. However, there is very little information on the development and ossification of these intermuscular bones. In this study, we performed an in-depth investigation of the ossification process during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica). In Japanese eel, a typical anguilliform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the anterior to the posterior. By contrast, in the zebrafish, a sub-carangiform or carangiform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the posterior to the anterior regions of the fish. Furthermore, tail amputation affected the ossification of the intermuscular bones. The length of the intermuscular bones in the posterior area became significantly shorter in tail-amputated zebrafish and Japanese eels, and both had less active and lower swimming speeds; this indicates that swimming might induce the ossification of the intermuscular bones. Moreover, when a greater length of tail was amputated in the zebrafish, the intermuscular bones became even shorter. Tail amputation affected the length and ossification of intermuscular bones in the anterior part of the fish, close to the head, differently between the two fish: they became significantly shorter in the zebrafish, but did not in the Japanese eel. This might be because tail amputation did not significantly affect the undulations in the anterior of the Japanese eel, especially near the head. This study shows that the ossification of intermuscular bones might be induced through mechanical force loadings that are produced by swimming. PMID:26603470

  19. Tailored Surface Treatment of 3D Printed Porous Ti6Al4V by Microarc Oxidation for Enhanced Osseointegration via Optimized Bone In-Growth Patterns and Interlocked Bone/Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Jia, Zhaojun; Lv, Jia; Yin, Chuan; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Song, Chunli; Leng, Huijie; Zheng, Yufeng; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-07-20

    3D printed porous titanium (Ti) holds enormous potential for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Although the 3D printing technique has good control over the macro-sturctures of porous Ti, the surface properties that affect tissue response are beyond its control, adding the need for tailored surface treatment to improve its osseointegration capacity. Here, the one step microarc oxidation (MAO) process was applied to a 3D printed porous Ti6Al4V (Ti64) scaffold to endow the scaffold with a homogeneous layer of microporous TiO2 and significant amounts of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Following the treatment, the porous Ti64 scaffolds exhibited a drastically improved apatite forming ability, cyto-compatibility, and alkaline phosphatase activity. In vivo test in a rabbit model showed that the bone in-growth at the untreated scaffold was in a pattern of distance osteogenesis by which bone formed only at the periphery of the scaffold. In contrast, the bone in-growth at the MAO-treated scaffold exhibited a pattern of contact osteogenesis by which bone formed in situ on the entire surface of the scaffold. This pattern of bone in-growth significantly increased bone formation both in and around the scaffold possibly through enhancement of bone formation and disruption of bone remodeling. Moreover, the implant surface of the MAO-treated scaffold interlocked with the bone tissues through the fabricated microporous topographies to generate a stronger bone/implant interface. The increased osteoinetegration strength was further proven by a push out test. MAO exhibits a high efficiency in the enhancement of osteointegration of porous Ti64 via optimizing the patterns of bone in-growth and bone/implant interlocking. Therefore, post-treatment of 3D printed porous Ti64 with MAO technology might open up several possibilities for the development of bioactive customized implants in orthopedic applications.

  20. Bone biopsy practice patterns across Europe: the European renal osteodystrophy initiative-a position paper.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, Pieter; D'Haese, Patrick; Bacchetta, Justine; Cannata-Andia, Jorge; Ferreira, Anibal; Haarhaus, Mathias; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Lafage Proust, Marie-Helene; Salam, Syazrah; Spasovski, Goce; Cozzolino, Mario

    2017-03-03

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a heterogeneous group of metabolic bone diseases complicating progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Bone biomarkers and bone imaging techniques may help to assess bone health and predict fractures in CKD but do have important inherent limitations. By informing on bone turnover and mineralization, a bone biopsy may help to guide prevention and treatment of ROD and its consequences. According to a recent survey conducted among European nephrologists, bone biopsies are performed rather exceptionally, both for clinical and research purposes. Obviously, clinical research in the field of ROD is threatened by vanishing clinical and pathological expertise, small patient cohorts and scientific isolation. In March 2016, the European Renal Osteodystrophy (EU-ROD) initiative was created under the umbrella of the ERA-EDTA CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD) Working Group to revitalize bone biopsy as a clinically useful tool in the diagnostic workup of CKD-MBD and to foster research on the epidemiology, implications and reversibility of ROD. As such, the EU-ROD initiative aims to increase the understanding of ROD and ultimately to improve outcomes in CKD patients.

  1. Patterns of variation and covariation in the shapes of mandibular bones of juvenile salmonids in the genus Oncorhynchus

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sawyer; Couture, Ryan B.; McKibben, Natasha S.; Nichols, James T.; Richardson, Shannon E.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY What is the nature of evolutionary divergence of the jaw skeleton within the genus Oncorhynchus? How can two associated bones evolve new shapes and still maintain functional integration? Here, we introduce and test a ‘concordance’ hypothesis, in which an extraordinary matching of the evolutionary shape changes of the dentary and angular articular serves to preserve their fitting together. To test this hypothesis, we examined morphologies of the dentary and angular articular at parr (juvenile) stage, and at three levels of biological organization – between salmon and trout, between sister species within both salmon and trout, and among three types differing in life histories within one species, O. mykiss. The comparisons show bone shape divergences among the groups at each level; morphological divergence between salmon and trout is marked even at this relatively early life history stage. We observed substantial matching between the two mandibular bones in both pattern and amount of shape variation, and in shape covariation across species. These findings strongly support the concordance hypothesis, and reflect functional and/or developmental constraint on morphological evolution. We present evidence for developmental modularity within both bones. The locations of module boundaries were predicted from the patterns of evolutionary divergences, and for the dentary, at least, would appear to facilitate its functional association with the angular articular. The modularity results suggest that development has biased the course of evolution. PMID:26372063

  2. Technology of Bare Tether Current Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.; Sanmartin, Juan R.; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    The outstanding problem for useful applications of electrodynamic tethers is obtaining sufficient electron current from the ionospheric plasma. Bare tether collectors, in which the conducting tether itself, left uninsulated over kilometers of its length, acts as the collecting anode, promise to attain currents of 10 A or more from reasonably sized systems. Current collection by a bare tether is also relatively insensitive to drops in electron density, which are regularly encountered on each revolution of an orbit. This makes nighttime operation feasible. We show how the bare tether's high efficiency of current collection and ability to adjust to density variations follow from the orbital motion limited collection law of thin cylinders. We consider both upwardly deployed (power generation mode) and downwardly deployed (reboost mode) tethers, and present results that indicate how bare tether systems would perform as their magnetic and plasma environment varies in low earth orbit.

  3. Age-related differences in the bone mineralization pattern of rats following exercise

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of 12 weeks of treadmill exercise on the mineralization of trabecular and cortical bone was studied in rats 7, 14, and 19 months of age. Bone mineralization was evaluated by measuring concentrations of Ca, Mg, and hydroxyproline as well as uptake of 45Ca concentration in the femur, humerus, rib and calvaria. The 7- and 14-month-old rats increased mineralization in those cortical bones directly involved in exercise. The 19-month animal responded to exercise by increasing mineralization in all bones examined, including the nonweight bearing trabecular calvaria and cortical rib. From these data, it is apparent that the older animals undergo a total skeletal mineralization in response to exercise compared with local adaptation in the younger animal. Further, we provide evidence to support the use of the rat as a model in which to study mammalian bone physiology during the aging process.

  4. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  5. Bare Bones Young Adult Services: Tips for Public Library Generalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillancourt, Renee J.

    This book is a hands-on guide to the philosophy and practice of young adult services in the public libraries. The following chapters are included: (1) "Young Adult Services Philosophy," including reasons to serve teens, why teens are the way they are, who serves young adults, and how to interact with teens; (2) "Youth Participation," including…

  6. Fishbone Diagrams: Organize Reading Content with a "Bare Bones" Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    Fishbone diagrams, also known as Ishikawa diagrams or cause-and-effect diagrams, are one of the many problem-solving tools created by Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa, a University of Tokyo professor. Part of the brilliance of Ishikawa's idea resides in the simplicity and practicality of the diagram's basic model--a fish's skeleton. This article describes how…

  7. Clinton delivers bare bones plan for 1997 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    1996-02-01

    Congress and the White House have yet to finish negotiating and haggling over the U.S. federal budget for 1996, but the calendar and the law say that they ought to start thinking about 1997. On February 5, President Bill Clinton issued a preliminary budget plan for 1997 that reflected his fiscal priorities as they were last stated in January, before budget talks with congressional Republicans broke down. Required by law to propose a spending plan by the first Monday in February, Clinton delivered to Congress what he termed a "thematic document," one that gives a minimally detailed outline of how the federal government should spend the taxpayers' money in 1997.

  8. Heterogeneous rare earth element (REE) patterns and concentrations in a fossil bone: Implications for the use of REE in vertebrate taphonomy and fossilization history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Celina A.; Macpherson, G. L.; González, Luis A.; Grandstaff, David E.

    2010-05-01

    A bone fragment (CGDQ-3) of Falcariusutahensis, a therizinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, contained within a carbonate nodule, was analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) in order to investigate REE variability within a thin-walled phalanx. Previous studies have found depth-related REE pattern variations; however, in CGDQ-3 variation occurs along the circumference of the bone. NASC-normalized REE patterns and concentrations vary between two apparent end members. A light-REE enriched (LREE) pattern, similar to solution ICP-MS analysis of this bone, characterizes approximately two-thirds of the bone fragment. Total REE concentrations are high and do not vary significantly from the periosteal surface to the medullar surface. Conversely, the remaining one-third of the bone has REE patterns that are MREE-depleted and low in total REE concentrations. REE concentrations in this part of the bone do not vary significantly from the periosteal to the medullar surface. A positive Ce anomaly is found throughout the entire bone, and is greatest within the LREE-enriched portion of the bone. This, in combination with the LREE-enrichment, suggests that the bone fossilized under reducing conditions. The distance between the LREE-enriched and MREE-depleted regions is less than 1 mm. Isotopic and petrographic analyses of the bone and surrounding carbonate matrix suggest the REE patterns in the bone were the result of partial fossilization/incomplete filling of micro-pore spaces around bone crystallites in an environment with changing redox conditions. The lower, MREE-depleted part of the bone fossilized contemporaneously with a pendant cement that formed on the underside of the bone in the vadose zone. Formation of the pendant cement restricted water flow through the bone, isolating the lower portion, which incorporated a MREE-depleted pattern. The upper part of the bone (LREE-enriched side) fossilized under

  9. Associations of breast-feeding patterns and introduction of solid foods with childhood bone mass: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    van den Hooven, Edith H; Gharsalli, Mounira; Heppe, Denise H M; Raat, Hein; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-03-28

    Breast-feeding has been associated with later bone health, but results from previous studies are inconsistent. We examined the associations of breast-feeding patterns and timing of introduction of solids with bone mass at the age of 6 years in a prospective cohort study among 4919 children. We collected information about duration and exclusiveness of breast-feeding and timing of introduction of any solids with postnatal questionnaires. A total body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan was performed at 6 years of age, and bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), area-adjusted BMC (aBMC) and bone area (BA) were analysed. Compared with children who were ever breast-fed, those never breast-fed had lower BMD (-4·62 mg/cm2; 95 % CI -8·28, -0·97), BMC (-8·08 g; 95 % CI -12·45, -3·71) and BA (-7·03 cm2; 95 % CI -12·55, -1·52) at 6 years of age. Among all breast-fed children, those who were breast-fed non-exclusively in the first 4 months had higher BMD (2·91 mg/cm2; 95 % CI 0·41, 5·41) and aBMC (3·97 g; 95 % CI 1·30, 6·64) and lower BA (-4·45 cm2; 95 % CI -8·28, -0·61) compared with children breast-fed exclusively for at least 4 months. Compared with introduction of solids between 4 and 5 months, introduction <4 months was associated with higher BMD and aBMC, whereas introduction between 5 and 6 months was associated with lower aBMC and higher BA. Additional adjustment for infant vitamin D supplementation did not change the results. In conclusion, results from the present study suggest that ever breast-feeding compared with never breast-feeding is associated with higher bone mass in 6-year-old children, but exclusive breast-feeding for 4 months or longer was not positively associated with bone outcomes.

  10. Evaluation of opening pattern and bone neoformation at median palatal suture area in patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SALGUEIRO, Daniel Gomes; RODRIGUES, Vitor Hugo Leite de Oliveira; TIEGHI, Victor; de MENEZES, Carolina Carmo; GONÇALES, Eduardo Sanches; FERREIRA, Osny

    2015-01-01

    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) is the treatment of choice to adult patients even with severe transversal maxillary discrepancies. However, the adequate retention period to achieve the bone remodeling, thus assuring treatment stability, is controversial. Objective To evaluate the opening pattern and bone neoformation process at the midpalatal suture in patients submitted to surgically assisted (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods Fourteen patients were submitted to SARME through subtotal Le Fort I osteotomy. Both the opening pattern and the mean bone density at midpalatal suture area to evaluate bone formation were assessed pre- and post-operatively (15, 60 and 180 days) through CBCT. Results Type I opening pattern (from anterior to posterior nasal spine) occurred in 12 subjects while type II opening pattern (from anterior nasal spine to transverse palatine suture) occurred in 2 individuals. The 180-day postoperative mean (PO 180) of bone density value was 49.9% of the preoperative mean (Pre) value. Conclusions The opening pattern of midpalatal suture is more related to patients’ age (23.9 years in type I and 33.5 years in type II) and surgical technique. It was not possible to observe complete bone formation at midpalatal suture area at the ending of the retention period studied (180 days). PMID:26398512

  11. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  12. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  14. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  15. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  16. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  17. Grazing intensity and spatial heterogeneity in bare soil in a grazing-resistant grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial patterns in rangeland vegetation serve as indicators of rangeland condition and are an important component of wildlife habitat. We illustrate the use of very-large-scale aerial photography (VLSA) to quantify spatial patterns in bare soil of the northeastern Colorado shortgrass steppe. Using ...

  18. Cross-sex pattern of bone mineral density in early onset gender identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Haraldsen, I R; Haug, E; Falch, J; Egeland, T; Opjordsmoen, S

    2007-09-01

    Hormonally controlled differences in bone mineral density (BMD) between males and females are well studied. The effects of cross-sex hormones on bone metabolism in patients with early onset gender identity disorder (EO-GID), however, are unclear. We examined BMD, total body fat (TBF) and total lean body mass (TLBM) in patients prior to initiation of sex hormone treatment and during treatment at months 3 and 12. The study included 33 EO-GID patients who were approved for sex reassignment and a control group of 122 healthy Norwegians (males, n=77; females, n=45). Male patients (n=12) received an oral dose of 50 mug ethinylestradiol daily for the first 3 months and 100 mug daily thereafter. Female patients (n=21) received 250 mg testosterone enantate intramuscularly every third week. BMD, TBF and TLBM were estimated using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In male patients, the DXA measurements except TBF were significantly lower compared to their same-sex control group at baseline and did not change during treatment. In female patients, the DXA measurements were slightly higher than in same-sex controls at baseline and also remained unchanged during treatment. In conclusion, this study reports that body composition and bone density of EO-GID patients show less pronounced sex differences compared to controls and that bone density was unaffected by cross-sex hormone treatment.

  19. Autofilet.pro: An Improved Method for Automated Removal of Herring-bone Pattern Noise from CCD Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, R. A.; Collins, N. R.; Windhorst, R. A.

    We present an improved method for the automatic removal of the highly variable pattern-noise that was introduced in HST/STIS CCD data when it was switched to its redundant (``Side-2'') electronics in July 2001. While mainly a cosmetic nuisance for work on bright objects, this ``herring-bone'' noise severely limits the sensitivity at optical wavelengths for projects that aim to push STIS to its design limits. We build on the Fourier filtering technique described by Brown (2001) and present a method to automatically find and remove the power associated with the noise patterns in frequency space, while avoiding the introduction of ringing (aliasing) around genuine astronomical signal--in particular around stellar images, spectroscopic (emission) lines, and cosmic ray hits. We implement this method as an IDL procedure and show several applications. Details of the method will be discussed in Jansen et al. 2003.

  20. Bone microstructure and the evolution of growth patterns in Permo-Triassic therocephalians (Amniota, Therapsida) of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Huttenlocker, Adam K; Botha-Brink, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Therocephalians were a speciose clade of nonmammalian therapsids whose ecological diversity and survivorship of the end-Permian mass extinction offer the potential to investigate the evolution of growth patterns across the clade and their underlying influences on post-extinction body size reductions, or 'Lilliput effects'. We present a phylogenetic survey of limb bone histology and growth patterns in therocephalians from the Middle Permian through Middle Triassic of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Histologic sections were prepared from 80 limb bones representing 11 genera of therocephalians. Histologic indicators of skeletal growth, including cortical vascularity (%CV) and mean primary osteon diameters (POD), were evaluated in a phylogenetic framework and assessed for correlations with other biologically significant variables (e.g., size and robusticity). Changes in %CV and POD correlated strongly with evolutionary changes in body size (i.e., smaller-bodied descendants tended to have lower %CV than their larger-bodied ancestors across the tree). Bone wall thickness tended to be high in early therocephalians and lower in the gracile-limbed baurioids, but showed no general correlation with cross-sectional area or degree of vascularity (and, thus, growth). Clade-level patterns, however, deviated from previously studied within-lineage patterns. For example, Moschorhinus, one of few therapsid genera to have survived the extinction boundary, demonstrated higher %CV in the Triassic than in the Permian despite its smaller size in the extinction aftermath. Results support a synergistic model of size reductions for Triassic therocephalians, influenced both by within-lineage heterochronic shifts in survivor taxa (as reported in Moschorhinus and the dicynodont Lystrosaurus) and phylogenetically inferred survival of small-bodied taxa that had evolved short growth durations (e.g., baurioids). These findings mirror the multi-causal Lilliput patterns described in marine faunas, but

  1. Bone microstructure and the evolution of growth patterns in Permo-Triassic therocephalians (Amniota, Therapsida) of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Botha-Brink, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Therocephalians were a speciose clade of nonmammalian therapsids whose ecological diversity and survivorship of the end-Permian mass extinction offer the potential to investigate the evolution of growth patterns across the clade and their underlying influences on post-extinction body size reductions, or ‘Lilliput effects’. We present a phylogenetic survey of limb bone histology and growth patterns in therocephalians from the Middle Permian through Middle Triassic of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Histologic sections were prepared from 80 limb bones representing 11 genera of therocephalians. Histologic indicators of skeletal growth, including cortical vascularity (%CV) and mean primary osteon diameters (POD), were evaluated in a phylogenetic framework and assessed for correlations with other biologically significant variables (e.g., size and robusticity). Changes in %CV and POD correlated strongly with evolutionary changes in body size (i.e., smaller-bodied descendants tended to have lower %CV than their larger-bodied ancestors across the tree). Bone wall thickness tended to be high in early therocephalians and lower in the gracile-limbed baurioids, but showed no general correlation with cross-sectional area or degree of vascularity (and, thus, growth). Clade-level patterns, however, deviated from previously studied within-lineage patterns. For example, Moschorhinus, one of few therapsid genera to have survived the extinction boundary, demonstrated higher %CV in the Triassic than in the Permian despite its smaller size in the extinction aftermath. Results support a synergistic model of size reductions for Triassic therocephalians, influenced both by within-lineage heterochronic shifts in survivor taxa (as reported in Moschorhinus and the dicynodont Lystrosaurus) and phylogenetically inferred survival of small-bodied taxa that had evolved short growth durations (e.g., baurioids). These findings mirror the multi-causal Lilliput patterns described in marine faunas

  2. Characterization of the cytokine pattern of porcine bone marrow-derived cells treated with 1alpha,25(OH)D.

    PubMed

    Sipos, W; Duvigneau, J C; Schmoll, F; Exel, B; Hofbauer, G; Baravalle, G; Hartl, R T; Dobretsberger, M; Pietschmann, P

    2005-10-01

    The biologically active form of vitamine D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)] has recently been described not only to influence bone metabolism but also to exert immunomodulating activities, which may have an impact on bone formation/resorption as well. In this study, we analysed the effects of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) on the cytokine pattern of porcine bone marrow-derived cells from piglets aged 1-3 weeks. After culture for 1 week, the number of osteoclasts was determined, with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive, multinucleated cells being considered osteoclasts. Cultured bone marrow cell-derived mRNA was subjected to semiquantitative RT-PCR specific for a panel of porcine cytokines (IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha). In addition, an immunofluorescence analysis using anti-porcine mAbs specific for IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was performed. In order to prove the existence of a porcine homologue of the receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) bone marrow cell- as well as porcine white blood cell-derived mRNA was investigated by RT-PCR using primer pairs specific for murine RANKL. Cell culture supernatant was analysed for soluble RANKL by means of an ELISA designed for quantification of human RANKL. By means of RT-PCR, expression of IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-alpha mRNA could be found in cells cultured with and without 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3). Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha were produced by both stromal cells and osteoclasts. Besides its known osteoclastogenic effects, 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) tended to downregulate the respective cytokines, but significantly upregulated RANKL expression. The homology between the porcine RANKL-specific sequence and the corresponding human RANKL sequence was 79%. The data found support the idea that porcine bone marrow cell cultures may provide a suitable alternative to murine systems in human osteological research.

  3. Computed tomography of temporal bone pneumatization. 1. Normal pattern and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Virapongse, C.; Sarwar, M.; Bhimani, S.; Sasaki, C.; Shapiro, R.

    1985-09-01

    The pneumatization of 141 normal temporal bones on computed tomography (CT) was evaluated in 100 patients. Because of the controversy surrounding the sclerotic squamomastoid (mastoid), temporal bones with this finding were discarded. A CT index of pneumatization was based on the pneumatized area and the number of cells seen within a representative scanning section. Results suggest that squamomastoid pneumatization follows the classic normal distribution and does not correlate with age, gender, or laterality. A high degree of symmetry was found in 41 patients who had both ears examined. Air-cell configuration was variable. Air-cell size tended to increase progressively from the mastoid antrum. The scutum pseudotumor appearance caused by incomplete pneumatization was seen frequently, and should not be mistaken for mastoiditis or an osteoma. Thick sections producing partial-volume effect may also produce this spurious finding. Therefore, when searching for mucosal thickening due to mastoiditis, large air cells should preferably be analyzed.

  4. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates Amifostine induced preservation of bone mineralization patterns in the irradiated murine mandible

    PubMed Central

    Poushanchi, Behdod; Donneys, Alexis; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of head and neck cancer remains severely debilitating. Fortunately, newly developed agents aimed at decreasing radiation-induced damage have shown great promise. Amifostine (AMF) is a compound, which confers radio-protection to the exposed normal tissues, such as bone. Our intent is to utilize Raman spectroscopy to demonstrate how AMF preserves the mineral composition of the murine mandible following human equivalent radiation. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into 3 experimental groups: control (n=5), XRT (n=5), and AMF–XRT (n=5). Both XRT and AMF groups underwent bioequivalent radiation of 70 Gy in 5 fractions to the left hemimandible. AMF–XRT received Amifostine prior to radiation. Fifty-six days post-radiation, the hemimandibles were harvested, and Raman spectra were taken in the region of interest spanning 2 mm behind the last molar. Bone mineral and matrix-specific Raman bands were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, with statistical significance at p<0.05. Results The full-width at half-maximum of the primary phosphate band (FWHM) and the ratio of carbonate/phosphate intensities demonstrated significant differences between AMF–XRT versus XRT (p<0.01) and XRT versus control (p<0.01). There was no difference between AMF–XRT and control (p>0.05) in both Raman metrics. Computer-aided spectral subtraction further confirmed these results where AMF–XRT was spectrally similar to the control. Interestingly, the collagen cross-link ratio did not differ between XRT and AMF–XRT (p<0.01) but was significantly different from the control (p<0.01). Conclusion Our novel findings demonstrate that AMF prophylaxis maintains and protects bone mineral quality in the setting of radiation. Raman spectroscopy is an emerging and exceptionally attractive clinical translational technology to investigate and monitor both the destructive effects of radiation and the therapeutic remediation of AMF on the structural, physical

  5. Rietveld Refinement on X-Ray Diffraction Patterns of Bioapatite in Human Fetal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Meneghini, Carlo; Dalconi, Maria Chiara; Nuzzo, Stefania; Mobilio, Settimio; Wenk, Rudy H.

    2003-01-01

    Bioapatite, the main constituent of mineralized tissue in mammalian bones, is a calcium-phosphate-based mineral that is similar in structure and composition to hydroxyapatite. In this work, the crystallographic structure of bioapatite in human fetuses was investigated by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (XRD) and microdiffraction (μ-XRD) techniques. Rietveld refinement analyses of XRD and μ-XRD data allow for quantitative probing of the structural modifications of bioapatite as functions of the mineralization process and gestational age. PMID:12609904

  6. Water Accommodation on Bare and Coated Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui

    2015-04-01

    A good understanding of water accommodation on ice surfaces is essential for quantitatively predicting the evolution of clouds, and therefore influences the effectiveness of climate models. However, the accommodation coefficient is poorly constrained within the literature where reported values vary by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, the complexity of the chemical composition of the atmosphere plays an important role in ice phase behavior and dynamics. We employ an environmental molecular beam (EMB) technique to investigate molecular water interactions with bare and impurity coated ice at temperatures from 170 K to 200 K. In this work, we summarize results of water accommodation experiments on bare ice (Kong et al., 2014) and on ice coated by methanol (Thomson et al., 2013), butanol (Thomson et al., 2013) and acetic acid (Papagiannakopoulos et al., 2014), and compare those results with analogous experiments using hexanol and nitric acid coatings. Hexanol is chosen as a complementary chain alcohol to methanol and butanol, while nitric acid is a common inorganic compound in the atmosphere. The results show a strong negative temperature dependence of water accommodation on bare ice, which can be quantitatively described by a precursor model. Acidic adlayers tend to enhance water uptake indicating that the system kinetics are thoroughly changed compared to bare ice. Adsorbed alcohols influence the temperature dependence of the accommodation coefficient and water molecules generally spend less time on the surfaces before desorbing, although the measured accommodation coefficients remain high and comparable to bare ice for the investigated systems. We conclude that impurities can either enhance or restrict water uptake in ways that are influenced by several factors including temperature and type of adsorbant, with potential implications for the description of ice particle growth in the atmosphere. This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council and

  7. Frequency and patterning of bone trauma in the late medieval population (13th-16th century) from Dugopolje, southern Croatia.

    PubMed

    Novak, Mario; Slaus, Mario

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the hypothesis of an increased level of interpersonal violence in Dugopolje during the late medieval period as testified by written sources. In order to accomplish this, an analysis and comparison of frequencies and patterning of long bone and craniofacial fractures between sex and age categories in the Dugopolje skeletal sample was performed. In total 209 excellently preserved adult skeletons were analysed: 111 males and 98 females. The total long bone fracture frequency is 1.5% (29/1910) with a significantly higher frequency in males compared to females. Most of the long bone injuries occurred as a result of accidents, probably due to rugged mountainous terrain, while a certain portion of trauma resulted from deliberate violence. Significantly higher fracture frequencies in males could be a result of a strict sexual division of labour where males performed more physically demanding and risky tasks, as witnessed by historical sources. 26 out of 119 complete adult crania (21.8%) exhibit skeletal trauma with significantly higher frequencies in males. Perimortem trauma was observed in one individual while antemortem healed sharp force lesions were registered in five individuals (all males). The predominance of frontal craniofacial injuries, as well as the presence ofperimortem trauma and sharp force lesions, suggests the presence of deliberate violence in this community. Although the indicators of deliberate violence were recorded predominantly in males, suggesting that intentional violence in Dugopolje was exclusively males' prerogative, the presence of nasal fracture in a female skeleton might point to a male towards female violence. Presented bioarchaeological data are in accordance with the written documents thus corroborating the claims of an increased level of deliberate interpersonal violence in the late medieval population from Dugopolje.

  8. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to contact by persons shall not...

  9. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to contact by persons shall not...

  10. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  11. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to contact by persons shall not...

  12. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  14. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to contact by persons shall not...

  15. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  16. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  17. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to contact by persons shall not...

  18. [Musculoskeletal rehabilitation and bone. A novel approach to mechanotransduction using cell-adhesion-patterned cells].

    PubMed

    Katanosaka, Yuki; Naruse, Keiji

    2010-04-01

    Human vascular endothelial cells form the interface between the bloodstream and vessel walls and are continuously subjected to mechanical stimulation. When endothelial cells are stretched cyclically, along one axis, they align perpendicular to the axis of stretch. We previously reported that applying a cyclic, uni-axial strain to cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase. However, it is difficult to quantify and analyze the spatial distribution of tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells, as they form focal adhesions randomly. Recently, we developed a system to overcome this problem by preparing individual, uniform, patterned cells that could be stretched cyclically and uni-axially. In this system we were able to statistically analyze cellular responses in these patterned cells, when subjected to a cyclic, uni-axial strain, using fluorescent microscopy.

  19. Bare Conductive Tether for Decelerating a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Ballance, Judy; Carroll, Joe; Lorenzini, Enrico; Estes, bob; Schuler, Pete; Mojazza, hamid; Lennhoff, John

    2007-01-01

    A document describes a prototype of electrically conductive tethers to be used primarily to decelerate spacecraft and/or generate electric power for the spacecraft. Like prior such tethers, this tether is designed so that when it is deployed from a spacecraft in orbit, its motion across the terrestrial magnetic field induces an electric current. The Lorentz force on the current decelerates the spacecraft. Optionally, the current can be exploited to convert some orbital kinetic energy to electric energy for spacecraft systems. Whereas the conductive portions of prior such tethers are covered with electrical insulation except for end electrodes that make contact with the ionosphere, this tether includes a conductive portion that is insulated along part of its length but deliberately left bare along a substantial remaining portion of its length to make contact with the ionosphere. The conductive portions of the tether are made of coated thin aluminum wires wrapped around strong, lightweight aromatic polyamide braids. The main advantages of the present partly-bare-tether design over the prior all-insulated-tether design include greater resistance to degradation by the impact of monatomic oxygen at orbital altitude and speed and greater efficiency in collecting electrons from the ionosphere.

  20. Cell Fusion Reprogramming Leads to a Specific Hepatic Expression Pattern during Mouse Bone Marrow Derived Hepatocyte Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arza, Elvira; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fabregat, Isabel; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Meza, Nestor W.; Segovia, Jose C.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells with hepatocytes to generate BM derived hepatocytes (BMDH) is a natural process, which is enhanced in damaged tissues. However, the reprogramming needed to generate BMDH and the identity of the resultant cells is essentially unknown. In a mouse model of chronic liver damage, here we identify a modification in the chromatin structure of the hematopoietic nucleus during BMDH formation, accompanied by the loss of the key hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1/Sfpi1 (SFFV proviral integration 1) and gain of the key hepatic transcriptional regulator HNF-1A homeobox A (HNF-1A/Hnf1a). Through genome-wide expression analysis of laser captured BMDH, a differential gene expression pattern was detected and the chromatin changes observed were confirmed at the level of chromatin regulator genes. Similarly, Tranforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and neurotransmitter (e.g. Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 [Ptger4]) pathway genes were over-expressed. In summary, in vivo BMDH generation is a process in which the hematopoietic cell nucleus changes its identity and acquires hepatic features. These BMDHs have their own cell identity characterized by an expression pattern different from hematopoietic cells or hepatocytes. The role of these BMDHs in the liver requires further investigation. PMID:22457803

  1. Do Bare Rocks Exist on the Moon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Bandfield, Joshua; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Hayne, Paul; Leader, Frank; Paige, David

    2017-01-01

    Astronaut surface observations and close-up images at the Apollo and Chang'e 1 landing sites confirm that at least some lunar rocks have no discernable dust cover. However, ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) measurements as well as astronaut and LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) orbital observations and laboratory experiments possibly suggest that a fine fraction of dust is levitated and moves across and above the lunar surface. Over millions of years such dust might be expected to coat all exposed rock surfaces. This study uses thermal modeling, combined with Diviner (a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter experiment) orbital lunar eclipse temperature data, to further document the existence of bare rocks on the lunar surface.

  2. Comparison of interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Khumsarn, Nattida; Patanaporn, Virush; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated and compared interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Pretreatment CBCT images of 24 Thai orthodontic patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns were included in the study. Three measurements were chosen for investigation: the mesiodistal distance between the roots, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness. All distances were recorded at five different levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Descriptive statistical analysis and t-tests were performed, with the significance level for all tests set at p<0.05. Results Patients with a Class II skeletal pattern showed significantly greater maxillary mesiodistal distances (between the first and second premolars) and widths of the buccolingual alveolar process (between the first and second molars) than Class I skeletal pattern patients at 10 mm above the CEJ. The maxillary buccal cortical bone thicknesses between the second premolar and first molar at 8 mm above the CEJ in Class II patients were likewise significantly greater than in Class I patients. Patients with a Class I skeletal pattern showed significantly wider mandibular buccolingual alveolar processes than did Class II patients (between the first and second molars) at 4, 6, and 8 mm below the CEJ. Conclusion In both the maxilla and mandible, the mesiodistal distances, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness tended to increase from the CEJ to the apex in both Class I and Class II skeletal patterns. PMID:27358819

  3. Prenatal development of the human mandible. 3D reconstructions, morphometry and bone remodelling pattern, sizes 12-117 mm CRL.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert; Klarkowski, Marie C

    2003-10-01

    Human embryos and fetuses ( n=25) ranging from 12 to 117 mm CRL (crown-rump-length) were serially sectioned and the mandibles were reconstructed in 3D. In addition, characteristic areas of apposition, resorption and resting zones were projected onto the surface of the mandibular reconstructions after histological evaluation of the remodeling processes. Furthermore, morphometric data were taken to describe growth processes in horizontal views. In this way the changing outlines as seen in 3D could be correlated with the remodeling patterns and with the changes in growth. In these stages the mandible showed a general appositional growth, but resorption areas were found at the posterior margins of the mental foramen and at the lateral and medial posterior bony planes at concave surfaces. The bulging of bone underneath and over Meckel's cartilage could be recognized as active appositional growth areas. Meckel's cartilage itself lay in a trough which could be characterized by less apposition and even resorption. Questions were raised in how much the gap between our present knowledge of genetic expression of signaling molecules and the precise morphologic description of the mandibles can be bridged.

  4. Routine use of antibiotic laden bone cement for primary total knee arthroplasty: impact on infecting microbial patterns and resistance profiles.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Erik N; Adeli, Bahar; Kenyon, Robert; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic-laden bone cement (ALBC) is used in primary arthroplasties throughout Europe. In North America, ALBC is only FDA approved for revision arthroplasty after periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). No article has evaluated whether infecting microbial profile and resistance has changed with the introduction of ALBC. We hypothesized that prophylactic use of ALBC in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has not had a significant impact on infecting pathogens, and antibiotic resistance profiles. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted of all PJI patients undergoing primary TKA and total hip arthroplasty (THA) between January 2000 and January 2009. No significant change in the patterns of infecting PJI pathogens, and no notable increase in percentage resistance was found among organisms grown from patients with PJI that had received prophylactic antibiotic-loaded cement in their primary joint arthroplasty. Early findings suggest that routine prophylactic use of ALBC has not led to changes in infecting pathogen profile, nor has led to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance at our institution.

  5. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  6. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  7. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  8. The Semantics of Proper Names and Other Bare Nominals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izumi, Yu

    2012-01-01

    This research proposes a unified approach to the semantics of the so-called bare nominals, which include proper names (e.g., "Mary"), mass and plural terms (e.g., "water," "cats"), and articleless noun phrases in Japanese. I argue that bare nominals themselves are monadic predicates applicable to more than one…

  9. Reduction of Rhizoctonia bare patch win wheat with barley rotations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia bare patch caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 is a major fungal root disease in no-till cropping systems. In an 8-year experiment comparing various dryland no-till cropping systems near Ritzville, Washington, Rhizoctonia bare patch first appeared in year 3 and continued through year 8. ...

  10. Role of water in the tribochemical removal of bare silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Xiao, Chen; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lei; Qi, Yaqiong; Qian, Linmao

    2016-12-01

    Nanowear tests of bare silicon against a SiO2 microsphere were conducted in air (relative humidity [RH] = 0%-89%) and water using an atomic force microscope. Experimental results revealed that the water played an important role in the tribochemical wear of the bare silicon. A hillock-like wear trace with a height of 0.7 nm was generated on the bare silicon surface in dry air. As the RH increased, the wear depth increased and reached the maximum level in water. Analysis of frictional dissipated energy suggested that the wear of the bare silicon was not dominated by mechanical interactions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy detection demonstrated that the silicon atoms and crystal lattice underneath the worn area maintained integral perfectly and thus further confirmed the tribochemical wear mechanism of the bare silicon. Finally, the role of water in the tribochemical wear of the bare silicon may be explained by the following three aspects: the hydroxylation by hydroxyl ions auto-ionized in water, the hydrolytic reaction of water molecules, and the dissolution of the tribochemical product SiOmHn in liquid water. With increasing RH, a greater water amount would adsorb to the Si/SiO2 interface and induce a more serious tribochemical wear on the bare silicon surface. The results of this paper may provide further insight into the tribochemical removal mechanism of bare monocrystalline silicon and furnish the wider reaction cognition for chemical mechanical polishing.

  11. Delineation of patterns of bone marrow mast cell infiltration in systemic mastocytosis: value of CD25, correlation with subvariants of the disease, and separation from mast cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Krokowski, Manuela; Sotlar, Karl; Krauth, Maria-Theresa; Födinger, Manuela; Valent, Peter; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2005-10-01

    In most cases, the diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis (SM) is based on histomorphologic evaluation of the bone marrow. We analyzed mast cell (MC) infiltration patterns in 57 cases of SM and 31 cases of mast cell hyperplasia (MCH). Tryptase immunohistochemical analysis was used for MC detection and CD25 to distinguish neoplastic from normal MCs. The following infiltration patterns were found: I, diffuse interstitial; II, focal, dense; III, focal, dense with an additional diffuse component, located preferentially around focal infiltrates; IV, focal, dense with an additional diffuse component evenly distributed throughout; and V, diffuse, dense. In 29 cases of MCH, MCs formed the type I pattern. The majority of SM cases exhibited patterns II to V; type IV was the most frequent (n = 36). Type V was seen in 3 cases of MC leukemia and 1 case of smoldering SM. In 1 case of SM, type I infiltration was found; the SM diagnosis was based on 3 minor SM criteria. Our data show that the infiltration pattern in SM correlates with the disease subtype and should be recognized as an important aspect in the histomorphologic evaluation of the bone marrow.

  12. Bone graft

    MedlinePlus

    Autograft - bone; Allograft - bone; Fracture - bone graft; Surgery - bone graft; Autologous bone graft ... Fuse joints to prevent movement Repair broken bones (fractures) that have bone loss Repair injured bone that ...

  13. Chloride-hydrogen antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5 drive osteoblast mineralization and regulate fine-structure bone patterning in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larrouture, Quitterie C; Nelson, Deborah J; Robinson, Lisa J; Liu, Li; Tourkova, Irina; Schlesinger, Paul H; Blair, Harry C

    2015-11-01

    Osteoblasts form an epithelium-like layer with tight junctions separating bone matrix from extracellular fluid. During mineral deposition, calcium and phosphate precipitation in hydroxyapatite liberates 0.8 mole of H(+) per mole Ca(+2). Thus, acid export is needed for mineral formation. We examined ion transport supporting osteoblast vectorial mineral deposition. Previously we established that Na/H exchangers 1 and 6 are highly expressed at secretory osteoblast basolateral surfaces and neutralize massive acid loads. The Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1), a pdz-organizing protein, occurs at mineralizing osteoblast basolateral surfaces. We hypothesized that high-capacity proton transport from matrix into osteoblast cytosol must exist to support acid transcytosis for mineral deposition. Gene screening in mineralizing osteoblasts showed dramatic expression of chloride-proton antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5. Antibody localization showed that ClC-3 and ClC-5 occur at the apical secretory surface facing the bone matrix and in membranes of buried osteocytes. Surprisingly, the Clcn3(-/-) mouse has only mildly disordered mineralization. However, Clcn3(-/-) osteoblasts have large compensatory increases in ClC-5 expression. Clcn3(-/-) osteoblasts mineralize in vitro in a striking and novel trabecular pattern; wild-type osteoblasts form bone nodules. In mesenchymal stem cells from Clcn3(-/-) mice, lentiviral ClC-5 shRNA created Clcn3(-/-), ClC-5 knockdown cells, validated by western blot and PCR. Osteoblasts from these cells produced no mineral under conditions where wild-type or Clcn3(-/-) cells mineralize well. We conclude that regulated acid export, mediated by chloride-proton exchange, is essential to drive normal bone mineralization, and that CLC transporters also regulate fine patterning of bone.

  14. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D; Dharmshaktu, P; Aggarwal, A; Gaurav, K; Bansal, R; Devru, N; Garga, UC; Kulshreshtha, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) loss in endocrinopathies [Graves’ disease (GD), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH), hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH), hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT)] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO), andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126) were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (79.59%) compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001). The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (59.26%) compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT) was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67%) and HypoH (54.55%) compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting. PMID:27241810

  15. Analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, C G; Forestiero, A; Carniel, E L; Natali, A N

    2013-04-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate the interaction phenomena occurring between foot and footwear during the heel strike phase of the gait. Two force platforms are utilised to evaluate the ground reaction forces of a subject in bare and shod walking. The reaction forces obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as loading conditions for the numerical analyses using three dimensional models of the heel region and of the running shoe. The heel pad region, as fat and skin tissues, is described by visco-hyperelastic and fibre-reinforced hyperelastic formulations respectively and bone region by a linear orthotropic formulation. Different elastomeric foams are considered with regard to the outsole, the midsole and the insole layers. The mechanical properties are described by a hyperfoam formulation. The evaluation of the mechanical behaviour of the heel pad tissues at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions is performed considering different combinations of materials for midsole and insole layers. Results allow for the definition of the influence of different material characteristics on the mechanical response of the heel pad region, in particular showing the compressive stress differentiation in the bare and shod conditions.

  16. Markers of bone resorption and calcium metabolism are related to dietary intake patterns in male and female bed rest subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. r.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary potassium and protein intakes predict net endogenous acid production in humans. Intracellular buffers, including exchangeable bone mineral, play a crucial role in balancing chronic acid-base perturbations in the body; subsequently, chronic acid loads can potentially contribute to bone loss. Bone is lost during space flight, and a dietary countermeasure would be desirable for many reasons. We studied the ability of diet protein and potassium to predict levels of bone resorption markers in males and females. Identical twin pairs (8 M, 7 F) were assigned to 2 groups: bed rest (sedentary, SED) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (EX). Diet was controlled for 3 d before and 30 d of bed rest (BR). Urinary Ca, N-telopeptide (NTX), and pyridinium crosslinks (PYD) were measured before and on days 5, 12, 19, and 26 of BR. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation (P<0.05). The ratio of dietary animal protein/potassium intake was not correlated with NTX before BR for males or females, but they were positively correlated in both groups of males during bed rest. Dietary animal protein/potassium and urine Ca were correlated before and during bed rest for the males, and only during bed rest for the females. Conversely, the ratio of dietary vegetable protein/potassium intake was negatively correlated with urinary calcium during bed rest for the females, but there was no relationship between vegetable protein/potassium intake and bone markers for the males. These data suggest that the ratio of animal protein/potassium intake may affect bone, particularly in bed rest subjects. These data show that the type of protein and gender may be additional factors that modulate the effect of diet on bone metabolism during bed rest. Altering this ratio may help prevent bone loss on Earth and during space flight.

  17. Energy Availability and Dietary Patterns of Adult Male and Female Competitive Cyclists With Lower Than Expected Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Viner, Rebecca T; Harris, Margaret; Berning, Jackie R; Meyer, Nanna L

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess energy availability (EA) and dietary patterns of 10 adult (29-49 years) male (n = 6) and female (n = 4) competitive (USA Cycling Category: Pro, n = 2; 1-4, n = 8) endurance cyclists (5 road, 5 off-road), with lower than expected bone mineral density (BMD; Z score < 0) across a season. Energy intake (EI) and exercise energy expenditure during preseason (PS), competition (C), and off-season (OS) were estimated from 3-day dietary records, completed once per month, across a cycling season. BMD was measured by DXA at 0 months/5 months/10 months. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) was used to assess cognitive dietary restraint. Seventy percent of participants had low EA [(LEA); < 30 kcal · kg fat-free mass (FFM) (-1) · day(-1)] during PS, 90% during C, and 80% during OS (range: 3-37 kcal · kg FFM(-1) · day(-1)). Ninety percent of cyclists had LEA during ≥ 1 training period, and 70% had LEA across the season. Seventy percent of cyclists were identified as restrained eaters who consciously restrict EI as a means of weight control. Mean daily carbohydrate intake was below sport nutrition recommendations during each training period (PS: 3.9 ± 1.1 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p < .001; C: 4.3 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .005; OS: 3.7 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .01). There were no differences in EA and EI · kg(-1) between male and female cyclists and road and off-road cyclists. Low EI, and specifically low carbohydrate intake, appears to be the main contributor to chronic LEA in these cyclists. Adult male and female competitive road and off-road cyclists in the United States may be at risk for long-term LEA. Further studies are needed to explore strategies to prevent and monitor long-term LEA in these athletes.

  18. Resolving the anomaly of bare habitable ground in Daisyworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Robin K. S.; Mitchell, Neil

    2011-02-01

    The parable of Daisyworld places biological homeostasis on a non-teleological basis. However, one feature of Daisyworld is that, at equilibrium, the system appears to require habitable but bare ground. The presence of bare ground is an unavoidable consequence of the death rate parameter γ. Here, we simplify Watson and Lovelock's original formulation by removing γ and allowing instead the black and white daisies to infiltrate each others' territory. This device furnishes a model in which the area of bare ground asymptotically approaches zero. The infiltration process is modelled in terms of a parameter that is ecologically interpretable as a quantification of the incumbent advantage enjoyed by the dominant species.

  19. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Antlers on the Arctic Refuge: capturing multi-generational patterns of calving ground use from bones on the landscape.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua H; Druckenmiller, Patrick; Bahn, Volker

    2013-05-22

    Bone accumulations faithfully record historical ecological data on animal communities, and owing to millennial-scale bone survival on high-latitude landscapes, have exceptional potential for extending records on arctic ecosystems. For the Porcupine Caribou Herd, maintaining access to calving grounds on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR, Alaska) is a central management concern. However, variability in calving ground geography over the 30+ years of monitoring suggests establishing the impacts of climate change and potential petroleum development on future calving success could benefit from extended temporal perspectives. Using accumulations of female antlers (shed within days of calving) and neonatal skeletons, we test if caribou calving grounds develop measureable and characteristic bone accumulations and if skeletal data may be helpful in establishing a fuller, historically integrated understanding of landscape and habitat needs. Bone surveys of an important ANWR calving area reveal abundant shed antlers (reaching 10(3) km(-2)) and high proportional abundance of newborn skeletal individuals (up to 60% neonate). Openly vegetated riparian terraces, which compose less than 10 per cent of ANWR calving grounds, yield significantly higher antler concentrations than more abundant habitats traditionally viewed as primary calving terrain. Differences between habitats appear robust to potential differences in bone visibility. The distribution of antler weathering stages mirrors known multi-decadal calving histories and highlights portions of the antler accumulation that probably significantly extends records of calving activity. Death assemblages offer historically integrated ecological data valuable for the management and conservation of faunas across polar latitudes.

  1. Antlers on the Arctic Refuge: capturing multi-generational patterns of calving ground use from bones on the landscape

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joshua H.; Druckenmiller, Patrick; Bahn, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Bone accumulations faithfully record historical ecological data on animal communities, and owing to millennial-scale bone survival on high-latitude landscapes, have exceptional potential for extending records on arctic ecosystems. For the Porcupine Caribou Herd, maintaining access to calving grounds on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR, Alaska) is a central management concern. However, variability in calving ground geography over the 30+ years of monitoring suggests establishing the impacts of climate change and potential petroleum development on future calving success could benefit from extended temporal perspectives. Using accumulations of female antlers (shed within days of calving) and neonatal skeletons, we test if caribou calving grounds develop measureable and characteristic bone accumulations and if skeletal data may be helpful in establishing a fuller, historically integrated understanding of landscape and habitat needs. Bone surveys of an important ANWR calving area reveal abundant shed antlers (reaching 103 km–2) and high proportional abundance of newborn skeletal individuals (up to 60% neonate). Openly vegetated riparian terraces, which compose less than 10 per cent of ANWR calving grounds, yield significantly higher antler concentrations than more abundant habitats traditionally viewed as primary calving terrain. Differences between habitats appear robust to potential differences in bone visibility. The distribution of antler weathering stages mirrors known multi-decadal calving histories and highlights portions of the antler accumulation that probably significantly extends records of calving activity. Death assemblages offer historically integrated ecological data valuable for the management and conservation of faunas across polar latitudes. PMID:23536601

  2. High levels of periostin correlate with increased fracture rate, diffuse MRI pattern, abnormal bone remodeling and advanced disease stage in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Christoulas, D; Kastritis, E; Bagratuni, T; Gavriatopoulou, M; Roussou, M; Papatheodorou, A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Liakou, C; Panagiotidis, I; Migkou, M; Kokkoris, P; Moulopoulos, L A; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is implicated in the biology of normal bone remodeling and in different cancer cell growth and metastasis. However, there is no information on the role of periostin in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, we evaluated periostin in six myeloma cell lines in vitro; in the bone marrow plasma and serum of 105 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM (NDMM) patients and in the serum of 23 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 33 smoldering MM (SMM) patients, 30 patients at the plateau phase post-first-line therapy, 30 patients at first relapse and 30 healthy controls. We found high levels of periostin in the supernatants of myeloma cell lines compared with ovarian cancer cell lines that were not influenced by the incubation with the stromal cell line HS5. In NDMM patients the bone marrow plasma periostin was almost fourfold higher compared with the serum levels of periostin and correlated with the presence of fractures and of diffuse magnetic resonance imaging pattern of marrow infiltration. Serum periostin was elevated in NDMM patients compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients and correlated with advanced disease stage, high lactate dehydrogenase, increased activin-A, increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Patients at first relapse had also elevated periostin compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients, while even patients at the plateau phase had elevated serum periostin compared with healthy controls. These results support an important role of periostin in the biology of myeloma and reveal periostin as a possible target for the development of antimyeloma drugs. PMID:27716740

  3. 5. American elevator looking east barely visible behind American malt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. American elevator looking east barely visible behind American malt house with Russell-Miller flour mill to right (now Eonacara and idle). - American Elevator, 87 Childs Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  4. Retrotransposon BARE-1 is a major, dispersed component of the barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Suoniemi, A; Anamthawat-Jónsson, K; Arna, T; Schulman, A H

    1996-03-01

    The barley BARE-1 is a transcribed, copia-like retroelement with well-conserved functional domains, an active promoter, and a copy number of at least 3 x 10(4). We examined its chromosomal localization by in situ hybridization. The long terminal repeat (LTR) probe displayed a uniform hybridization pattern over the whole of all chromosomes, excepting paracentromeric regions, telomeres, and nucleolar organizer (NOR) regions. The integrase probe showed a similar pattern. The 5'-untranslated leader (UTL) probe, expected to be the most rapidly evolving component, labeled chromosomes in a dispersed and non-uniform manner, concentrated in the distal regions, possibly indicating a targe site preference.

  5. Bone trace element pattern in an 18th century population sample of Tenerife (Canary Islands): comparison with a prehistoric one.

    PubMed

    Arnay-de-la-Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Reimers, E; Velasco-Vazquez, J; Barros-Lopez, N; Galindo-Martin, L

    1998-10-01

    We have determined bone strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), and zinc (Zn) content in 24 samples belonging to adult individuals who died toward the end of the 18th century and were interred in a church's floor on the island of Tenerife, comparing the results with those obtained in 14 prehistoric samples of the same island and also with those of 7 modern controls. No differences were observed between the two ancient groups, which showed higher bone strontium and barium than the modern sample, and a slightly lower Ba/Sr ratio, thus pointing to consumption of marine sources.

  6. Giant Cell Tumor with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Shows Heterogeneous Metabolic Pattern on (18)F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  7. Novel 3D scaffold with enhanced physical and cell response properties for bone tissue regeneration, fabricated by patterned electrospinning/electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Fatemeh; Mirzadeh, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Developing three dimensional scaffolds mimicking the nanoscale structure of native extracellular matrix is a key parameter in tissue regeneration. In this study, we aimed to introduce a novel 3D structures composed of nanofibers (NF) and micro particles (MP) and compare their efficiency with 2D nanofibrous scaffold. The conventional nanofibrous PCL scaffolds are 2D mats fabricated by the electrospinning technique, whereas the NF/MP and patterned NF/MP PCL scaffolds are three dimensional structures fabricated by a modified electrospinning/electrospraying technique. The mentioned method was carried out by varying the electrospinning solution parameters and use of a metal mesh as the collector. Detailed fabrication process and morphological properties of the fabricated structures is discussed and porosity, pore size and PBS solution absorption value of the prepared structures are reported. Compared with the 2D structure, 3D scaffolds possessed enhanced porosity and pore size which led to the significant increase in their water uptake capacity. In vitro cell experiments were carried out on the prepared structures by the use of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line. The fabricated 3D structures offered significantly increased cell attachment, spread and diffusion which were confirmed by SEM analysis. In vitro cytocompatibility assessed by MTT colorimetric assay indicated a continuous cell proliferation over 21 days on the innovative 3D structure, while on 2D mat cell proliferation stopped at early time points. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of the seeded MG-63 cells on 3D scaffold was confirmed by the remarkable ALP activity together with increased and accelerated calcium deposition on this structure compared to 2D mat. Massive and well distributed bone minerals formed on patterned 3D structure were shown by EDX analysis. In comparison between NF/MP quasi-3D and Patterned NF/MP 3D scaffolds, patterned structures proceeded in all of the above properties. As such, the

  8. Near-edge wrack effects on bare sediments: Small scale variation matters in the monitoring of sandy beaches.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Mitchell R; Tummon Flynn, Paula; Duarte, Cristian; Quijón, Pedro A

    2016-12-01

    The influence of wrack on sandy beach communities is well-documented but its effect on bare sediments located immediately beyond its edge has not yet been tested. This study aimed to explore these effects by surveying bare sediments located at increasing distances (0.5-2 m) from the wrack in five sandy beaches on Prince Edward Island, Atlantic Canada. In addition, we tested the influence of wrack with a field manipulation using wrack patches made up of rockweed bundles. The survey indicated that a modest but significant number of amphipods and beetles occupied bare sediments located 0.5 m from the edge of the wrack, but that those numbers dropped in sediments 1 m away and farther. The outcome of the field manipulation showed a similar pattern. Although small in spatial scale, our results have implications for the monitoring sandy beaches affected by scattered as well as heavy wrack input.

  9. Gene Deletion in Barley Mediated by LTR-retrotransposon BARE

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yi; Yang, Fei; Schulman, Alan H.; Zhu, Jinghuan; Jia, Yong; Wang, Junmei; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Jia, Qiaojun; Hua, Wei; Yang, Jianming; Li, Chengdao

    2017-01-01

    A poly-row branched spike (prbs) barley mutant was obtained from soaking a two-rowed barley inflorescence in a solution of maize genomic DNA. Positional cloning and sequencing demonstrated that the prbs mutant resulted from a 28 kb deletion including the inflorescence architecture gene HvRA2. Sequence annotation revealed that the HvRA2 gene is flanked by two LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons (BARE) sharing 89% sequence identity. A recombination between the integrase (IN) gene regions of the two BARE copies resulted in the formation of an intact BARE and loss of HvRA2. No maize DNA was detected in the recombination region although the flanking sequences of HvRA2 gene showed over 73% of sequence identity with repetitive sequences on 10 maize chromosomes. It is still unknown whether the interaction of retrotransposons between barley and maize has resulted in the recombination observed in the present study. PMID:28252053

  10. Development of a 'bare-earth' SRTM DEM product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Paiva, Rodrigo; Durand, Michael; Alsdorf, Douglas; Bates, Paul

    2015-04-01

    We present the methodology and results from the development of a near-global 'bare-earth' Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. Digital Elevation Models are the most important input for hydraulic modelling, as the DEM quality governs the accuracy of the model outputs. While SRTM is currently the best near-globally [60N to 60S] available DEM, it requires adjustments to reduce the vegetation contamination and make it useful for hydrodynamic modelling over heavily vegetated areas (e.g. tropical wetlands). Unlike previous methods of accounting for vegetation contamination, which concentrated on correcting relatively small areas and usually applied a static adjustment, we account for vegetation contamination globally and apply a spatial varying correction, based on information about canopy height and density. In creating the final 'bare-earth' SRTM DEM dataset, we produced three different 'bare-earth' SRTM products. The first applies global parameters, while the second and third products apply parameters that are regionalised based on either climatic zones or vegetation types, respectively. We also tested two different canopy density proxies of different spatial resolution. Using ground elevations obtained from the ICESat GLA14 satellite altimeter, we calculate the residual errors for the raw SRTM and the three 'bare-earth' SRTM products and compare performances. The three 'bare-earth' products all show large improvements over the raw SRTM in vegetated areas with the overall mean bias reduced by between 75 and 92% from 4.94 m to 0.40 m. The overall standard deviation is reduced by between 29 and 33 % from 7.12 m to 4.80 m. As expected, improvements are higher in areas with denser vegetation. The final 'bare-earth' SRTM dataset is available at 3 arc-second with lower vertical height errors and less noise than the original SRTM product.

  11. Immunohistochemical study of Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 (UEA-1) binding of megakaryocytes in bone marrow biopsy specimens: demonstration of heterogeneity in staining pattern reflecting the stages of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, S M; Li, C Y

    1996-01-01

    During differentiation, megakaryocytes undergo nuclear endoreplication, an increase in cell size, cytoplasmic granulation, and release of platelets. The changes in highly lobulated nuclei with varying degree of polyploidy and increasing cell size are easily recognized morphologically. However, the actual cytoplasmic changes are more difficult to perceive morphologically. With the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method using UEA-1 as the binding protein to the alpha-L-fucose of glycoprotein synthesized by megakaryocytes, we observed significant variation in cytoplasmic staining of megakaryocytes in routinely processed bone marrow biopsy sections. A total of 3344 megakaryocytes in bone marrow sections from 10 patients with nonhematologic diseases and from 10 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was studied. According to the intensity and pattern of cytoplasmic staining, we divided megakaryocytes into at least six groups: (1) low granular (LG), (2) diffuse granular (DG), (3) diffuse dense granular (DDG), (4) marginal granular (MG), (5) denuded (DMK), and (6) endomitotic (EndoM). Most of the megakaryocytes were DG (mean, 42.75% +/- 19.21%) and DDG (mean, 50.25% +/- 21.23%). In correlation with nuclear morphology and cell size, it appears that substances binding to UEA-1 are located in the paranuclear region in early megakaryocytes and produce a low granular focal staining pattern (LG cells). Next, the granules spread throughout the cytoplasm (DG cells) and increase in quantity (DDG). This is followed by migration of granules to the periphery of the cytoplasm (MG cells) and is associated with the liberation of platelets and eventual formation of DMK megakaryocytes. Endomitosis, regulated by unknown factors, occurred in the MG stage. In comparing the group with nonhematologic disease (mean DG, 35.4% +/- 18.48%; DDG, 58.4% +/- 21.8%) and the group with ITP (mean DG, 50.1% +/- 17.82%; DDG, 42.1% +/- 18.12%), we found an increasing proportion of DG

  12. A Management Information System for Bare Base Civil Engineering Commanders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    initial beddown stage. The purpose of this research was to determine the feasibility of developing a microcomputer based management information system (MIS...the software best suited to synthesize four of the categories into a prototype field MIS. Keyword: Management information system , Bare bases, Civil engineering, Data bases, Information retrieval.

  13. BARE Retrotransposons Are Translated and Replicated via Distinct RNA Pools

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei; Jääskeläinen, Marko; Li, Song-ping; Schulman, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon. PMID:23940808

  14. Bone densitometric assessment and management of fracture risk in Indian men of prostate cancer on androgen deprivation therapy: Does practice pattern match the guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Manas R.; Mandhani, Anil; Chipde, Saurabh S.; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Manmeet; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Estimation of baseline bone mineral density (BMD) at the time of instituting androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic prostate cancer is recommended by several specialty groups and expert panels. The present study was carried out to analyze the practice pattern of Indian urologists with regard to bone densitometric assessment and management of fracture risk in men of prostate cancer on ADT, and their degree of adherence to currently available guidelines Materials and Methods: Telephonic interviews of 108 qualified urologists, randomly selected from the member database of Urological Society of India was carried out with a predefined questionnaire. The responses were analyzed and compared with the available evidences and recommendations. Results: Only 19.4% urologists routinely perform a baseline BMD before starting ADT. Although majority of them prescribe calcium and vitamin D supplementation, only few tell regarding fracture risk and life-style modification to their patients. While 59.6% of the respondents use Zoledronic acid (ZA) in their patients on ADT, half of them prescribe it without knowing the BMD status, which may lead to overuse of ZA. Conclusion: Majority of the urologists in India do not follow the guidelines for BMD measurement in prostate cancer. A baseline BMD may help in reducing the unnecessary use of ZA. PMID:23450674

  15. Evaluation of Bare Ground on Rangelands using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins

    2011-01-01

    Attention is currently being given to methods that assess the ecological condition of rangelands throughout the United States. There are a number of different indicators that assess ecological condition of rangelands. Bare Ground is being considered by a number of agencies and resource specialists as a lead indicator that can be evaluated over a broad area. Traditional methods of measuring bare ground rely on field technicians collecting data along a line transect or from a plot. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an alternative to collecting field data, can monitor a large area in a relative short period of time, and in many cases can enhance safety and time required to collect data. In this study, both fixed wing and helicopter UAVs were used to measure bare ground in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. The data were collected with digital imagery and read using the image analysis software SamplePoint. The approach was tested over seven different plots and compared against traditional field methods to evaluate accuracy for assessing bare ground. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho in locations where there is very little disturbance by humans and the area is grazed only by wildlife. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  16. Bone Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  17. Different temporal patterns in the expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins and noggin during astroglial scar formation after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Kang, Jihee Lee; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Eun-Mi

    2012-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their antagonists have roles in scar formation and regeneration after central nervous system injuries. However, temporal changes in their expression during astroglial scar formation in the ischemic brain are unknown. Here, we examined protein levels of BMP2, BMP7, and their antagonist noggin in the ischemic brain up to 4 weeks after experimental stroke in mice. BMP2 and BMP7 levels were increased from 1 to 4 weeks in the ischemic brain, and their expression was associated with astrogliosis. BMP7 expression was more intense and co-localized in reactive astrocytes in the ischemic subcortex at 1 week. Noggin expression began to increase after 2 weeks and was further increased at 4 weeks only in the ischemic subcortex, but the intensity was weak compared to the intensity of BMPs. Noggin was co-localized mainly in activated microglia. These findings show that expression of BMPs and noggin differed over time, in intensity and in types of cell, and suggest that BMPs and noggin have different roles in the processes of glial scar formation and neurorestoration in the ischemic brain.

  18. Terrain classification of ladar data for bare earth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Magruder, Lori A.

    2011-06-01

    Terrain classification, or bare earth extraction, is an important component to LADAR data analysis. The terrain classification approach presented in this effort utilizes an adaptive lower envelope follower (ALEF) with an adaptive gradient operation for accommodations of local topography and roughness. In order to create a more robust capability, the ALEF was modified to become a strictly data driven process that facilitates a quick production of the data product without the subjective component associated with user inputs. This automated technique was tested on existing LADAR surveys over Wyoming's Powder River Basin and the John Starr Memorial Forest in Mississippi, both locations with dynamic topographic features. The results indicate a useful approach in terms of operational time and accuracy of the final bare earth recovery with the advantage of being fully data driven.

  19. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-01-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

  20. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; ...

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), displaymore » less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.« less

  1. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  2. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  3. Next Generation Bare Base Waste Processing System (Phase 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Generation in the United States in 1994 ............. 10 Table 5.3.1.2 Estimated Bare Base Solid Waste Generation...with municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates reported in contemporary literature. Liquid waste stream estimates were made using generally...Therefore, information regarding municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in the United States was also used to derive estimates of the amount and nature ofthe

  4. Geological map of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Monsen, S.A.; Carr, M.D.; Reheis, M.C.; Orkild, P.P.

    1992-12-31

    Bare Mountain comprises the isolated complex of mountain peaks southeast of the town of Beatty in southern Nye County, Nevada. This small mountain range lies between the alluvial basins of Crater Flat to the east and the northern Amargosa Desert to the southwest. The northern boundary of the range is less well defined, but for this report, the terrane of faulted Miocene volcanic rocks underlying Beatty Mountain and the unnamed hills to the east are considered to be the northernmost part of Bare Mountain. The southern tip of the mountain range is at Black Marble, the isolated hill at the southeast corner of the map. The main body of the range, between Fluorspar Canyon and Black Marble, is a folded and complexly faulted, but generally northward-dipping (or southward-dipping and northward-overturned), sequence of weakly to moderately metamorphosed upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic marine strata, mostly miogeoclinal (continental shelf) rocks. The geology of Bare Mountain is mapped at a scale of 1:24,000.

  5. Increase of T and B cells and altered BACH2 expression patterns in bone marrow trephines of imatinib-treated patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Von Laffert, Maximilian; Hänel, Mathias; Dietel, Manfred; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of imatinib on T and B cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is not well understood. An upregulation of the transcription factor Broad-complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-Brac and Cap‘n’collar 1 bZip transcription factor 2 (BACH2), which is involved in the development and differentiation of B cells, was demonstrated in a CML cell line treated with imatinib. The present study retrospectively analysed the expression and distribution of cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD20 and BACH2 (per 1,000 cells), as well as the co-expression of CD20 and BACH2, using immunohistochemistry in serial bone marrow trephines obtained from 14 CML patients treated with imatinib in comparison to 17 patients with newly diagnosed CML and 6 control trephines. Bone marrow trephines of CML patients in remission under imatinib therapy exhibited significantly higher numbers of CD3 and CD20 infiltrates (partly ordered in aggregates) compared with patients with newly diagnosed CML and control individuals. Similarly, nuclear expression of BACH2 in granulopoietic cells was increased in CML patients treated with imatinib, which may represent the histological correlate of the positive treatment effect. Furthermore, since BACH2 is involved in B cell development, its altered expression patterns by imatinib may be one explanation for high B cell numbers, as revealed by CD20/BACH2 (nuclear)-positive cells. As the present data are preliminary, future prospective studies are required to assess the prognostic and predictive role of BACH2 in patients with CML under targeted therapy. PMID:27698808

  6. Assembly and integration of thin bare die using laser direct-write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Ray C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott A.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-based direct-write (LDW) processes offer unique advantages for the transfer of unpackaged semiconductor bare die for microelectronics assembly applications. Using LDW it is possible to release individual devices from a carrier substrate and transfer them inside a pocket or recess in a receiving substrate using a single UV laser pulse, thus per-forming the same function as pick-and-place machines currently employed in microelectronics assembly. However, conventional pick-and-place systems have difficulty handling small (< 1mm2) and thin (< 100 μm) components. At the Naval Research Laboratory, we have demonstrated the laser release and transfer of intact 1 mm2 wafers with thicknesses down to 10 microns and with high placement accuracy using LDW techniques. Furthermore, given the gentle nature of the laser forward transfer process it is possible to transfer semiconductor bare die of sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm2 without causing any damage to their circuits. Once the devices have been transferred, the same LDW system can then be used to print the metal patterns required to interconnect each device. The implementation of this technique is ideally suited for the assembly of microelectronic components and systems while allowing the overall circuit design and layout to be easily modified or adapted to any specific application or form factor including 3-D architectures. This paper describes how the LDW process can be used as an effective laser die transfer tool and will present analysis of the laser-driven release process as applied to various types of silicon bare dies.

  7. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  8. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  10. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  11. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  12. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to bare or covered...

  13. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  14. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  15. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  16. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  18. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  19. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  20. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to bare or covered...

  1. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to bare or covered...

  2. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  3. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  4. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  5. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  6. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  7. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  8. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  9. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  10. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  11. The Facial Growth Pattern and the Amount of Palatal Bone Deficiency Relative to Cleft Size Should Be Considered in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to determine the best surgical/orthodontic treatment plan for the complete bilateral and unilateral cleft lip and palate patient to achieve all treatment goals of facial aesthetics, speech, dental function, and psychosocial development. Methods: Review of 40 years of serial complete bilateral cleft lip and palate and complete unilateral cleft lip and palate dental casts and photographs from birth to adolescence, with serial cephs starting at 4 years. This was part of a multicenter international 3-dimensional palatal growth study of serial dental casts of patients who developed good speech, occlusion, and facial growth. Results: Nasoalveolar molding and gingivoperiosteoplasty were introduced without proven longitudinal benefits. The procedure bodily retruded the premaxilla, which “telescoped” backward causing synostosis at the premaxillary vomerine suture. The resulting midfacial recessiveness with an anterior dental crossbite can only be corrected by midfacial protraction or a Le Fort I surgery. Conclusions: Staged orthodontic/surgical treatment limiting premaxillary retraction forces to lip adhesion or forces that cause only premaxillary ventroflexion produce the best results. The palatal cleft should be closed between 18 and 24 months when the ratio of the cleft to the palatal size medial to the alveolar ridge is at least 10%. The protruding premaxilla should only be ventroflexed but never bodily retruded. The facial growth pattern and degree of palatal bone deficiency are the main items to be considered in treatment planning. PMID:27579230

  12. Bone development

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the vertebrate skeleton reflects its evolutionary history. Cartilage formation came before biomineralization and a head skeleton evolved before the formation of axial and appendicular skeletal structures. This review describes the processes that result in endochondral and intramembranous ossification, the important roles of growth and transcription factors, and the consequences of mutations in some of the genes involved. Following a summary of the origin of cartilage, muscle, and tendon cell lineages in the axial skeleton, we discuss the role of muscle forces in the formation of skeletal architecture and assembly of musculoskeletal functional units. Finally, ontogenetic patterning of bones in response to mechanical loading is reviewed. PMID:26453494

  13. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  14. A Bare Bones Reference Collection for Small and Medium-Sized Public Libraries in Maine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Maine Library District, Portland.

    This reference list was compiled to offer Maine librarians who serve communities with the resources of small- or medium-sized libraries a starting point to assess their reference collections for breadth and depth. Initially based on a list distributed by the Vermont Department of Libraries in 1987, this guide evaluates reference materials on the…

  15. These Small Schools Pooled Resources to Beef Up Bare-Bones Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditzler, Lolita

    1984-01-01

    In the Midwest, three types of cooperation among rural school districts have supplemented rural schools' limited curricula and facilities: (1) shared classes, with cooperative transportation between schools; (2) shared classes via cable television; and (3) shared extracurricular activities. (JW)

  16. Laser impingement on bare and encased high explosives: safety limits

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1999-03-15

    During the course of experiments involving high explosives, (HE), alignment lasers are often employed where the laser beam impinges upon a metal encased HE sample or on the bare HE itself during manned operations. While most alignment lasers are of low enough power so as not to be of concern, safety questions arise when considering the maximum credible power output of the laser in a failure mode, or when multiple laser spots are focused onto the experiment simultaneously. Safety questions also arise when the focused laser spot size becomes very small, on the order of 100 {micro}m or less. This paper addresses these concerns by describing a methodology for determining safety margins for laser impingement on metal encased HE as well as one for bare HE. A variety of explosives encased in Al, Cu, Ta and stainless steel were tested using the first of these techniques. Additional experiments were performed using the second method where the laser beam was focused directly on eight different samples of pressed-powder HE.

  17. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Emrah Unalan, Husnu

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq-1 and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm-2 reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  18. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-11-04

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq(-1) and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm(-2) reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  19. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  20. The Integrity bare-metal stent made by continuous sinusoid technology.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    The Integrity Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular, CA, USA) is a low-profile, open-cell, cobalt-chromium-alloy advanced bare-metal iteration of the well-known Driver/Micro-Driver Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular). The Integrity stent is made with a process called continuous sinusoid technology. This process allows stent construction via wrapping a single thin strand of wire around a mandrel in a sinusoid configuration, with laser fusion of adjacent crowns. The wire-forming process and fusion pattern provide the stent with a continuous preferential bending plane, intended to allow easier access to, and smoother tracking within, distal and tortuous vessels while radial strength is maintained. Continuous sinusoid technology represents innovation in the design of stent platforms and will provide a future stent platform for newer technology, including drug-eluting stent platforms, drug-filled stents and core wire stents.

  1. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  2. The bare lymphocyte syndrome and the regulation of MHC expression.

    PubMed

    Reith, W; Mach, B

    2001-01-01

    The bare lymphocyte syndrome (BLS) is a hereditary immunodeficiency resulting from the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) expression. Considering the central role of MHCII molecules in the development and activation of CD4(+) T cells, it is not surprising that the immune system of the patients is severely impaired. BLS is the prototype of a "disease of gene regulation." The affected genes encode RFXANK, RFX5, RFXAP, and CIITA, four regulatory factors that are highly specific and essential for MHCII genes. The first three are subunits of RFX, a trimeric complex that binds to all MHCII promoters. CIITA is a non-DNA-binding coactivator that functions as the master control factor for MHCII expression. The study of RFX and CIITA has made major contributions to our comprehension of the molecular mechanisms controlling MHCII genes and has made this system into a textbook model for the regulation of gene expression.

  3. Turbulence-induced thermal signatures over evaporating bare soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-07-01

    Soil wetness and airflow turbulence are key factors affecting surface energy balance components thereby influencing surface skin temperature. Turbulent eddies interacting with evaporating surfaces often induce localized and intermittent evaporative and sensible heat fluxes that leave distinct thermal signatures. These surface thermal fluctuations observable by infrared thermography (IRT) offer a means for characterization of overlaying turbulent airflows and remote quantification of surface wetness. We developed a theoretical and experimental methodology for using rapid IR surface temperature measurements to deduce surface wetness and evaporative fluxes from smooth bare soils. The mechanistic model provides theoretical links between surface thermal fluctuations, soil, and aerodynamic properties enabling thermal inferences of soil wetness with explicit consideration of soil thermal capacity and airflow turbulence effects. The method potentially improves accuracy of soil wetness assessment by IRT-based techniques whose performance is strongly influenced by surface-turbulence interactions and offers new ways for quantifying fluxes directly at their origin.

  4. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Casstevens, J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 {angstrom}, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29-100 mm{sup -1}. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufactureability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible for its unusual stability and polishability.

  5. Shock initiation of bare and covered explosives by projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, K L; Vantine, H C; Weingart, R C

    1981-04-22

    Shock initiation thresholds of bare and covered PBX-9404 and an HMX/TATB explosive called RX-26-AF were measured. The shocks were produced by the impact of flat-nosed and round-nosed steel projectiles in the velocity range of 0.5 to 2.2 km/s. Three types of coverings were used, 2 or 6 mm of tantalum, and a composite of aluminum and plastic. An Eulerian code containing material-strength and explosive-initiation models was used to evaluate our ability to calculate the shock initiation thresholds. These code calculations agreed well with the flat-nosed experimental data, but not so well with the round-nosed data.

  6. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  7. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  8. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  9. Bone Metastasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... metastasis, surgeons can stabilize the bone using metal plates, screws and nails (orthopedic fixation). Orthopedic fixation can ... that can't be easily reinforced with metal plates or screws, such as pelvic bones and bones ...

  10. Expression pattern of receptor activator of NFκB (RANK) in a series of primary solid tumors and related bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Santini, Daniele; Perrone, Giuseppe; Roato, Ilaria; Godio, Laura; Pantano, Francesco; Grasso, Donatella; Russo, Antonio; Vincenzi, Bruno; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Sabbatini, Roberto; Della Pepa, Chiara; Porta, Camillo; Del Conte, Alessandro; Schiavon, Gaia; Berruti, Alfredo; Tomasino, Rosa Maria; Papotti, Mauro; Papapietro, Nicola; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Denaro, Vincenzo; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    Receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), RANK, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) represent the key regulators of bone metabolism both in normal and pathological conditions, including bone metastases. To our knowledge, no previous studies investigated and compared RANK expression in primary tumors and in bone metastases from the same patient. We retrospectively examined RANK expression by immunohistochemistry in 74 bone metastases tissues from solid tumors, mostly breast, colorectal, renal, lung, and prostate cancer. For 40 cases, tissue from the corresponding primary tumor was also analyzed. Sixty-six (89%) of the 74 bone metastases were RANK-positive and, among these, 40 (59.5%) showed more than 50% of positive tumor cells. The median percentage of RANK-positive cells was 60% in primary tumors and metastases, without any statistically significant difference between the two groups (P=0.194). The same percentage was obtained by considering only cases with availability of samples both from primary and metastasis. Our study shows that RANK is expressed by solid tumors, with high concordance between bone metastasis and corresponding primary tumor. These data highlight the central role of RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway as potential therapeutic target not only in bone metastasis management, but also in the adjuvant setting.

  11. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of a passive and friction fit implant abutment interface and the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress distribution pattern on the implant and surrounding bone

    PubMed Central

    Sarfaraz, Hasan; Paulose, Anoopa; Shenoy, K. Kamalakanth; Hussain, Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the stress distribution pattern in the implant and the surrounding bone for a passive and a friction fit implant abutment interface and to analyze the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress generated. Materials and Methods: CAD models of two different types of implant abutment connections, the passive fit or the slip-fit represented by the Nobel Replace Tri-lobe connection and the friction fit or active fit represented by the Nobel active conical connection were made. The stress distribution pattern was studied at different occlusal dimension. Six models were constructed in PRO-ENGINEER 05 of the two implant abutment connection for three different occlusal dimensions each. The implant and abutment complex was placed in cortical and cancellous bone modeled using a computed tomography scan. This complex was subjected to a force of 100 N in the axial and oblique direction. The amount of stress and the pattern of stress generated were recorded on a color scale using ANSYS 13 software. Results: The results showed that overall maximum Von Misses stress on the bone is significantly less for friction fit than the passive fit in any loading conditions stresses on the implant were significantly higher for the friction fit than the passive fit. The narrow occlusal table models generated the least amount of stress on the implant abutment interface. Conclusion: It can thus be concluded that the conical connection distributes more stress to the implant body and dissipates less stress to the surrounding bone. A narrow occlusal table considerably reduces the occlusal overload. PMID:26929518

  12. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  13. Nitrogen controls spatial and temporal variability of substrate-induced respiration within seven years of bare fallow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Bornemann, Ludger; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2015-04-01

    Bare fallow management goes along with lacking supply of new C sources; yet, little is known on the spatio-temporal controls of microbial adaptation processes. Here we hypothesized that microbial activity parameters decline upon bare fallow but that their spatial patterns are increasingly controlled by nutrient status as fallow management proceeds. To test these hypotheses, we investigated spatial and temporal patterns of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration curves in an arable field after 1, 3, and 7 years of bare fallow but with large within-field heterogeneity of physicochemical soil parameters. The analyses comprised the contents of SOC, mineral nitrogen (Nmin), particulate organic matter (POM), texture of the fine earth, and the proportion of rock fragments as well as basal respiration and several SIR fitting parameters (microbial biomass, microbial growth rates, peak respiration rates, cumulative CO2 release) each with and without additions of mineral N and P. We also repeated substrate (i.e. glucose) additions following the first SIR measurement. The results revealed that most respiration parameters like basal respiration, microbial biomass, and growth rates showed no or inconsistent responses to spatial and temporal patterns of basic soil properties like SOC, Nmin or texture. However, bare fallow changed the shape of the SIR curves; it developed two distinct microbial growth peaks at advanced stages of fallow, i.e. a delayed CO2 release. Likewise, the maximum respiration rate during the first growth phase declined during 7 years of fallow by 47% but its spatial distribution was always correlated with Nmin contents (r = 0.43 - 0.79). The nutrient additions suggested that these changes in SIR curves were caused by N deficiency; the first peak increased after N additions while the second growth phase diminished. Intriguingly, a repeated glucose addition had a similar effect on the SIR curves as the glucose+N addition. Thus, N deficiency

  14. Probing surface plasmons by bare V-shaped tips: modeling by geometrical optics and rigorous diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Gaurav; Hyvärinen, Heikki J.; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2017-02-01

    We consider probing inhomogeneous waves in the near fields of metallic nanostructures with the aid of a dielectric V-shaped wedge connected to a waveguide. A geometrical model based on the local plane interface approach is proposed to describe the interaction of the wedge with the inhomogeneous field. The fundamental ideas behind the geometrical model are validated by comparison with the results given by rigorous diffraction analysis, and applied to probing plasmonic interference patterns generated by metallic gratings with very narrow slits. The model explains intuitively why a bare wedge with a large apex angle is capable of subwavelength resolution in the spirit of scanning near-field microscopy.

  15. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of select barrier islands and peninsular regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, acquired on June 27-30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using

  16. EAARL Topography - Vicksburg National Military Park 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi, acquired on March 6, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed

  17. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey, acquired April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the

  19. EAARL Coastal Topography-Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nagle, David B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and submerged topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, acquired March 3, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  20. Incidence and risk factors for hip or other bone fractures among hemodialysis patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study.

    PubMed

    Jadoul, M; Albert, J M; Akiba, T; Akizawa, T; Arab, L; Bragg-Gresham, J L; Mason, N; Prutz, K-G; Young, E W; Pisoni, R L

    2006-10-01

    The available data on bone fractures in hemodialysis (HD) patients are limited to results of a few studies of subgroups of patients in the United States. This study describes the prevalence of hip fractures and the incidence and risk factors associated with hip and other fractures in representative groups of HD facilities (n=320) and patients (n=12 782) from the 12 countries in the second phase of the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (2002-2004). Among prevalent patients, 2.6% had a prior hip fracture. The incidence of fractures was 8.9 per 1000 patient years for new hip fractures and 25.6 per 1000 for any new fracture. Older age (relative risk (RR)(HIP)=1.91, RR(ANY)=1.33, P<0.0001), female sex (RR(HIP)=1.41, P=0.02; RR(ANY)=1.59, P<0.0001), prior kidney transplant (RR(HIP)=2.35, P=0.04; RR(ANY)=1.76, P=0.007), and low serum albumin (RR(HIP)=1.85, RR(ANY)=1.45, per 1 g/dl lower, P<0.0001) were predictive of new fractures. Elevated risk of new hip fracture was observed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and combination narcotic medications (RR=1.63, RR=1.74, respectively, P<0.05). Several medications were associated with risk of any new fracture: narcotic pain medications (RR=1.67, P=0.02), benzodiazepines (RR=1.31, P=0.03), adrenal cortical steroids (RR=1.40, P<0.05), and combination narcotic medications (RR=1.72, P=0.001). Parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels >900 pg/ml were associated with an elevated risk of any new fracture (RR=1.72, P<0.05) versus PTH 150-300. The results suggest that greater selectivity in prescribing several classes of psychoactive drugs and more efficient treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism may help reduce the burden of fractures in HD patients.

  1. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  2. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  3. Analysis of thermionic bare tether operation regimes in passive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Chen, Xin; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2017-01-01

    A thermionic bare tether (TBT) is a long conductor coated with a low work-function material. In drag mode, a tether segment extending from anodic end A to a zero-bias point B, with the standard Orbital-motion-limited current collection, is followed by a complex cathodic segment. In general, as bias becomes more negative in moving from B to cathodic end C, one first finds space-charge-limited (SCL) emission covering up to some intermediate point B*, then full Richardson-Dushman (RD) emission reaching from B* to end C. An approximate analytical study, which combines the current and voltage profile equations with results from asymptotic studies of the Vlasov-Poisson system for emissive probes, is carried out to determine the parameter domain covering two limit regimes, which are effectively controlled by just two dimensionless parameters involving ambient plasma and TBT material properties. In one such limit regime, no point B* is reached and thus no full RD emission develops. In an opposite regime, SCL segment BB* is too short to contribute significantly to the current balance.

  4. Electron capture by bare ions on water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivarola, Roberto; Montenegro, Pablo; Monti, Juan; Fojón, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Single electron capture from water molecules by impact of bare ions is theoretically investigated at intermediate and high collision energies. This reaction is of fundamental importance to determine the deposition of energy in biological matter irradiated with ion beams (hadrontherapy), dominating other ionizing processes of the target at low-intermediate impact velocities and giving principal contributions to the energetic region where electronic stopping power maximizes. The dynamics of the interaction between the aggregates is described within the one active-electron continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. The orbitals of the target in the ground state are represented using the approximate self-consistent complete neglect of differential orbitals (SC-CNDO) model. The contribution of different molecular orbitals on the partial cross sections to selected n-principal quantum number projectile states is discriminated as well as the collaboration of these n-states on total cross sections. The latter ones are dominated by capture to n=1 states at high enough energies decreasing their contribution as n increases.

  5. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  6. Osteocyte and bone structure.

    PubMed

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Nijweide, Peter J; Burger, Elisabeth H

    2003-06-01

    The osteocyte is the most abundant cell type of bone. There are approximately 10 times as many osteocytes as osteoblasts in adult human bone, and the number of osteoclasts is only a fraction of the number of osteoblasts. Our current knowledge of the role of osteocytes in bone metabolism is far behind our insight into the properties and functions of the osteoblasts and osteoclasts. However, the striking structural design of bone predicts an important role for osteocytes in determining bone structure. Over the past several years, the role of osteocytes as the professional mechanosensory cells of bone, and the lacunocanalicular porosity as the structure that mediates mechanosensing have become clear. Strain-derived flow of interstitial fluid through this porosity seems to mechanically activate the osteocytes, as well as ensure transport of cell signaling molecules, nutrients, and waste products. This concept explains local bone gain and loss--as well as remodeling in response to fatigue damage--as processes supervised by mechanosensitive osteocytes. Alignment during remodeling seems to occur as a result of the osteocyte's sensing different canalicular flow patterns around the cutting cone and reversal zone during loading, therefore determining the bone's structure.

  7. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  8. Mineral bone disorder and its management among hemodialysis patients in the Gulf Cooperation Council: Initial findings from the dialysis outcomes and practice patterns study (2012-2015).

    PubMed

    Al Salmi, Issa; AlRukhaimi, Mona; AlSahow, Ali; Shaheen, Faisal A M; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed M G; AlAli, Fadwa; AlGhareeb, Sumaya; Al Maimani, Yacoub; AlGhonaim, Mohammed; Bieber, Brian; Tentori, Francesca; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2016-11-01

    The prospective cohort Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) initiated data collection in national samples of hemodialysis (HD) units (total of 41 study sites) in all six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates) in late 2012. Here, we report initial results regarding mineral bone disorders (MBDs) and its management in the GCC countries. Forty-one randomly selected HD facilities, treating >23 HD patients each, were sampled and represent care for >95% of GCC HD patients. Descriptive results for the GCC countries based on a random sample of 20-30 HD patients in each study facility. Initial results for the GCC are from 931 HD patients treated at 41 dialysis units (ranging from 1 unit in Bahrain to 21 in Saudi Arabia). Results are presented as weighted estimates, accounting for the sampling fraction in each unit. Baseline descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, median, or percentage), weighted by facility sampling fraction were calculated for the study sample. For analyses examining the percent of facility patients having (a) serum phosphorus >6.0 mg/dL or (b) parathyroid hormone (PTH) >600 pg/mL, analyses were restricted to facilities having at least 10 HD patients with a reported serum phosphorus or PTH measurement, respectively. Logistic regression analyses of the indicated binary outcomes were based on the use of generalized estimating equations and were adjusted for GCC country, patient age category (<45 years, 45-65 years, and >65 years old), sex, and whether the patient was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Logistic models accounted for clustering of patients within facilities, assuming an exchangeable working correlation matrix. Mean age of HD patients in the GCC countries was 53 years vs. 61-64 years in the three other DOPPS regions. MBD markers showed slightly lower mean serum Calcium in the GCC countries, similar mean serum phosphorus, and intermediate median PTH levels

  9. Are “Treatment” Bare Metal Stents Superior to “Control” Bare Metal Stents? A meta-analytic approach

    PubMed Central

    Kent, David M; Trikalinos, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the benefits of drug-eluting stents compared to bare metal stents (BMS) have been over-estimated in part because target lesion/vessel revascularization (TLR/TVR) rates in the BMS control group of these trials were spuriously high. Methods We used meta-analytic techniques to systematically compare clinical event rates among patients treated with BMS in trials where BMS were the experimental (BMSexperimental) rather than the control (BMScontrol) intervention. MEDLINE searches were performed to identify eligible randomized trials comparing either drug-eluting stents with BMScontrol, or BMSexperimental with balloon angioplasty in patients with non-acute coronary artery disease. Trial characteristics and 6 to 12 month rates for death, myocardial infarction, TLR/TVR and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were extracted and assessed. Results Eligible trials yielded 50 BMS cohorts: 19 in the BMScontrol group (4 046 patients) and 31 in the BMSexperimental group (5 068 patients). Summary death and infarction rates did not differ between groups. The summary TLR/TVR rates were 16.2% (95% confidence interval, CI: 13.5, 19.3) versus 13.8% (95% CI: 12.0, 15.7) in BMScontrol versus BMSexperimental groups, respectively (p=0.15). Among 39 BMS cohorts with ≤250 patients, TLR/TVR rates were significantly higher in BMScontrol versus BMSexperimental groups (18.9% [95% CI: 16.0, 22.2] versus 13.7% [95% CI: 11.5, 16.3], p=0.01). There were no between-group differences among larger BMS cohorts (p=0.98). Conclusions While overall clinical event rates did not differ in the BMScontrol and the BMSexperimental groups, a higher rate of TVR/TLR was seen in the BMScontrol group among smaller trials. PMID:18371468

  10. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse.

  11. Bone Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several ... you're nursing. A bone scan is a nuclear imaging procedure. In nuclear imaging, tiny amounts of ...

  12. Bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Matthew J W

    2002-09-01

    Bone grafts are used in musculoskeletal surgery to restore structural integrity and enhance osteogenic potential. The demand for bone graft for skeletal reconstruction in bone tumor, revision arthroplasty, and trauma surgery, couple with recent advances in understanding and application of the biology of bone transplantation, has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of bone-grafting procedures performed over the last decade. It is estimated that 1.5 million bone-grafting procedures are currently performed worldwide each year, compared to a fraction of that number 20 years ago. Major developments also have resulted in the harvesting, storage, and use of bone grafts and production of graft derivatives, substitutes, and bone-inducing agents.

  13. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  14. Bone Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The danger of disuse osteoporosis under weightless condition in space led to extensive research into measurements of bone stiffness and mass by the Biomedical Research Division of Ames and Stanford University. Through its Technology Utilization Program, NASA funded an advanced SOBSA, a microprocessor-controlled bone probe system. SOBSA determines bone stiffness by measuring responses to an electromagnetic shaker. With this information, a physician can identify bone disease, measure deterioration and prescribe necessary therapy. The system is now undergoing further testing.

  15. [Bare Soil Moisture Inversion Model Based on Visible-Shortwave Infrared Reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-po; Sun, Yue-jun; Qin, Qi-ming; Ren, Hua-zhong; Gao, Zhong-ling; Wu, Ling; Meng, Qing-ye; Wang, Jin-liang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Soil is the loose solum of land surface that can support plants. It consists of minerals, organics, atmosphere, moisture, microbes, et al. Among its complex compositions, soil moisture varies greatly. Therefore, the fast and accurate inversion of soil moisture by using remote sensing is very crucial. In order to reduce the influence of soil type on the retrieval of soil moisture, this paper proposed a normalized spectral slope and absorption index named NSSAI to estimate soil moisture. The modeling of the new index contains several key steps: Firstly, soil samples with different moisture level were artificially prepared, and soil reflectance spectra was consequently measured using spectroradiometer produced by ASD Company. Secondly, the moisture absorption spectral feature located at shortwave wavelengths and the spectral slope of visible wavelengths were calculated after analyzing the regular spectral feature change patterns of different soil at different moisture conditions. Then advantages of the two features at reducing soil types' effects was synthesized to build the NSSAI. Thirdly, a linear relationship between NSSAI and soil moisture was established. The result showed that NSSAI worked better (correlation coefficient is 0.93) than most of other traditional methods in soil moisture extraction. It can weaken the influences caused by soil types at different moisture levels and improve the bare soil moisture inversion accuracy.

  16. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent injury to the bone. You may also be at risk if you are having hemodialysis. Symptoms of bone infections include Pain in the infected area Chills and ...

  17. Free Energy of Bare and Capped Gold Nanoparticles Permeating through a Lipid Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Mhashal, Anil R; Roy, Sudip

    2016-11-04

    Herein, we study the permeation free energy of bare and octane-thiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) translocating through a lipid membrane. To investigate this, we have pulled the bare and capped AuNPs from bulk water to the membrane interior and estimated the free energy cost. The adsorption of the bare AuNP on the bilayer surface is energetically favorable but further loading inside it requires energy. However, the estimated free-energy barrier for loading the capped AuNP into the lipid membrane is much higher compared to bare AuNP. We also demonstrate the details of the permeation process of bare and capped AuNPs. Bare AuNP induces the curvature in the lipid membrane whereas capped AuNP creates an opening in the interacting monolayer and get inserted into the membrane. The insertion of capped AuNP induces a partial unzipping of the lipid bilayer, which results in the ordering of the local lipids interacting with the nanoparticle. However, bare AuNP disrupts the lipid membrane by pushing the lipid molecules inside the membrane. We also analyze pore formation due to the insertion of capped AuNP into the membrane, which results in water molecules penetrating the hydrophobic region.

  18. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  19. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates.

    PubMed

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-11-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite ("gouge") at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn ) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed.

  20. Malignant lymphoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Hans Roland; Müller, Peter Ernst; Hiller, Erhard; Maier, Markus; Baur, Andrea; Jansson, Volkmar; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2002-02-01

    Malignant lymphoma of bone is rare. In many cases, its diagnosis is delayed because of unspecific clinical signs and equivocal radiographs. Therapy in general is multimodal, including surgery and radio- and chemotherapy. Our objective was to demonstrate the clinical and radiological aspects of the lesion to optimize diagnostic approaches and to evaluate treatment and prognostic factors. Thirty-six patients with malignant lymphoma of bone who were surgically treated over a 15-year-period were retrospectively reviewed. Seventeen of them showed a singular bone non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) which was classified as primary lymphoma of the bone (PLB). In 13 cases, dissemination of the disease with multiple bone or visceral involvement was apparent (dNHL). Six patients suffered from bone involvement due to Hodgkin's disease (HD). Surgical treatment was indicated for diagnostic reasons or complications due to the disease. Radiation and chemotherapy were part of the oncological treatment. The patients' mean age was 57 years. The main symptom in malignant bone lymphoma in 33 patients was pain, with an average duration of 8 months. In the secondary cases, bone involvement appeared on average 57 months after the initial diagnosis. An osteolytic pattern was seen in 58% of the lesions. Soft-tissue involvement was seen in 71% of cases (PLB 80%, dNHL 73%, HD 40%) and was the primary diagnostic sign associated with this disease. The 5-year survival rate was 61% (PLB 88%, dNHL 38%, HD 50%). Multiple vs solitary bone involvement was the most significant factor in the prognosis. Extraskeletal involvement significantly decreased survival. No correlation was found between gender, age, location, or histological subtypes and survival. Bone involvement in NHL appears late in the extraskeletal disease. The clinical appearance is nonspecific, and the delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis is often long. One of the major radiologic signs is the existence of a soft-tissue tumor

  1. Growth and bone development.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Javaid, Kassim; Hanson, Mark; Dennison, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through its association with age-related fractures. Although most effort in fracture prevention has been directed at retarding the rate of age-related bone loss, and reducing the frequency and severity of trauma among elderly people, evidence is growing that peak bone mass is an important contributor to bone strength during later life. The normal patterns of skeletal growth have been well characterized in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. It has been confirmed that boys have higher bone mineral content, but not volumetric bone density, than girls. Furthermore, there is a dissociation between the peak velocities for height gain and bone mineral accrual, in both genders. Puberty is the period during which volumetric density appears to increase in both axial and appendicular sites. Many factors influence the accumulation of bone mineral during childhood and adolescence, including heredity, gender, diet, physical activity, endocrine status, and sporadic risk factors such as cigarette smoking. In addition to these modifiable factors during childhood, evidence has also accrued that fracture risk might be programmed during intrauterine life. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between birthweight, weight in infancy, and adult bone mass. This appears to be mediated through modulation of the set-point for basal activity of pituitary-dependent endocrine systems such as the hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axes. Maternal smoking, diet (particularly vitamin D deficiency), and physical activity also appear to modulate bone mineral acquisition during intrauterine life; furthermore, both low birth size and poor childhood growth are directly linked to the later risk of hip fracture. The optimization of maternal nutrition and intrauterine growth should also be included within preventive strategies against osteoporotic fracture, albeit for future

  2. Bone poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Cowin, S C

    1999-03-01

    Poroelasticity is a well-developed theory for the interaction of fluid and solid phases of a fluid-saturated porous medium. It is widely used in geomechanics and has been applied to bone by many authors in the last 30 years. The purpose of this work is, first, to review the literature related to the application of poroelasticity to the interstitial bone fluid and, second, to describe the specific physical and modeling considerations that establish poroelasticity as an effective and useful model for deformation-driven bone fluid movement in bone tissue. The application of poroelasticity to bone differs from its application to soft tissues in two important ways. First, the deformations of bone are small while those of soft tissues are generally large. Second, the bulk modulus of the mineralized bone matrix is about six times stiffer than that of the fluid in the pores while the bulk moduli of the soft tissue matrix and the pore water are almost the same. Poroelasticity and electrokinetics can be used to explain strain-generated potentials in wet bone. It is noted that strain-generated potentials can be used as an effective tool in the experimental study of local bone fluid flow, and that the knowledge of this technique will contribute to the answers of a number of questions concerning bone mineralization, osteocyte nutrition and the bone mechanosensory system.

  3. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  4. Exploiting Defect Clustering to Screen Bare Die for Infant Mortality Failure: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, David R., II; Singh, Adit D.

    1999-01-01

    We present the first experimental results to establish that a binning strategy based on defect clustering can be used to screen bare die for early life failures. The data for this study comes from the SEMATECH test methods experiment.

  5. Bone Metastases in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Associations between Morphologic CT Patterns, Glycolytic Activity, and Androgen Receptor Expression on PET and Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wassberg, Cecilia; Fox, Josef J.; Wibmer, Andreas; Goldman, Debra A.; Kuk, Deborah; Gonen, Mithat; Larson, Steven M.; Morris, Michael J.; Scher, Howard I.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the features of bone metastases at computed tomography (CT) to tracer uptake at fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorine 18 16β-fluoro-5-dihydrotestosterone (FDHT) PET and to determine associations between these imaging features and overall survival in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective study of 38 patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Two readers independently evaluated CT, FDG PET, and FDHT PET features of bone metastases. Associations between imaging findings and overall survival were determined by using univariate Cox proportional hazards regression. Results In 38 patients, reader 1 detected 881 lesions and reader 2 detected 867 lesions. Attenuation coefficients at CT correlated inversely with FDG (reader 1: r = −0.3007; P < .001; reader 2: r = −0.3147; P < .001) and FDHT (reader 1: r = −0.2680; P = .001; reader 2: r = −0.3656; P < .001) uptake. The number of lesions on CT scans was significantly associated with overall survival (reader 1: hazard ratio [HR], 1.025; P = .05; reader 2: HR, 1.021; P = .04). The numbers of lesions on FDG and FDHT PET scans were significantly associated with overall survival for reader 1 (HR, 1.051–1.109; P < .001) and reader 2 (HR, 1.026–1.082; P ≤ .009). Patients with higher FDHT uptake (lesion with the highest maximum standardized uptake value) had significantly shorter overall survival (reader 1: HR, 1.078; P = .02; reader 2: HR, 1.092; P = .02). FDG uptake intensity was not associated with overall survival (reader 1, P = .65; reader 2, P = .38). Conclusion In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, numbers of bone lesions on CT, FDG PET, and FDHT PET scans and the intensity of FDHT uptake are significantly associated with overall survival. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:24475817

  6. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare..., and bare signal wires shall be adequately guarded: (a) At all points where men are required to work...

  7. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare..., and bare signal wires shall be adequately guarded: (a) At all points where men are required to work...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. Trolley wires, trolley feeder wires, and bare signal wires shall be...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. Trolley wires, trolley feeder wires, and bare signal wires shall be...

  10. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite (“gouge”) at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed. Key Points Gouge friction approaches that of bare surfaces at high normal stress Dehydration reactions and bulk melting in serpentinite in < 1 m of slip Flash heating causes dynamic frictional weakening in gouge and bare surfaces PMID:26167425

  11. Updates in biological therapies for knee injuries: bone.

    PubMed

    Kfuri, Mauricio; de Freitas, Rafael Lara; Batista, Bruno Bellaguarda; Salim, Rodrigo; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; Tavares, Ricardo Antonio; Araújo, Paulo Henrique

    2014-09-01

    Bone is a unique tissue because of its mechanical properties, ability for self-repair, and enrollment in different metabolic processes such as calcium homeostasis and hematopoietic cell production. Bone barely tolerates deformation and tends to fail when overloaded. Fracture healing is a complex process that in particular cases is impaired. Osteoprogenitor cells proliferation, growth factors, and a sound tridimensional scaffold at fracture site are key elements for new bone formation and deposition. Mechanical stability and ample vascularity are also of great importance on providing a proper environment for bone healing. From mesenchymal stem cells delivery to custom-made synthetic scaffolds, many are the biological attempts to enhance bone healing. Impaired fracture healing represents a real burden to contemporary society. Sound basic science knowledge has contributed to newer approaches aimed to accelerate and improve the quality of bone healing.

  12. Scintigraphy of aneurysmal bone cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.

    1984-04-01

    Bone scintigrams with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals of 25 aneurysmal bone cysts showed abnormal activity in every case. In 22 cases, the activity was correlated with the true pathologic extent of the lesions; only three exhibited a false-positive extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor margins. Sixteen scintigrams (64%) revealed increased uptake, chiefly around the periphery of the lesions, with less activity in their centers. This feature could not be explained simply by the cystic nature of the lesions, since aneurysmal bone cysts may contain considerable fibrous tissue septa containing trabeculae of reactive new bone. However, there was no correlation between any specific anatomic or histologic pattern and the intensity and pattern of abnormal scintigraphic activity.

  13. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  14. Bone cutting.

    PubMed

    Giraud, J Y; Villemin, S; Darmana, R; Cahuzac, J P; Autefage, A; Morucci, J P

    1991-02-01

    Bone cutting has always been a problem for surgeons because bone is a hard living material, and many osteotomes are still very crude tools. Technical improvement of these surgical tools has first been their motorization. Studies of the bone cutting process have indicated better features for conventional tools. Several non-conventional osteotomes, particularly ultrasonic osteotomes are described. Some studies on the possible use of lasers for bone cutting are also reported. Use of a pressurised water jet is also briefly examined. Despite their advantages, non-conventional tools still require improvement if they are to be used by surgeons.

  15. Adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells display different osteogenic differentiation patterns in 3D bioactive glass-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Rath, Subha N; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P; Strobel, Leonie A; Brandl, Andreas; Roether, Judith A; Horch, Raymund E; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Kneser, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells can be isolated from a variety of different sources, each having their own peculiar merits and drawbacks. Although a number of studies have been conducted comparing these stem cells for their osteo-differentiation ability, these are mostly done in culture plastics. We have selected stem cells from either adipose tissue (ADSCs) or bone marrow (BMSCs) and studied their differentiation ability in highly porous three-dimensional (3D) 45S5 Bioglass®-based scaffolds. Equal numbers of cells were seeded onto 5 × 5 × 4 mm(3) scaffolds and cultured in vitro, with or without osteo-induction medium. After 2 and 4 weeks, the cell-scaffold constructs were analysed for cell number, cell spreading, viability, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene expression. The scaffolds with ADSCs displayed osteo-differentiation even without osteo-induction medium; however, with osteo-induction medium osteogenic differentiation was further increased. In contrast, the scaffolds with BMSCs showed no osteo-differentiation without osteo-induction medium; after application of osteo-induction medium, osteo-differentiation was confirmed, although lower than in scaffolds with ADSCs. In general, stem cells in 3D bioactive glass scaffolds differentiated better than cells in culture plastics with respect to their ALP content and osteogenic gene expression. In summary, 45S5 Bioglass-based scaffolds seeded with ADSCs are well-suited for possible bone tissue-engineering applications. Induction of osteogenic differentiation appears unnecessary prior to implantation in this specific setting. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Degradation pattern of porous CaCO3 and hydroxyapatite microspheres in vitro and in vivo for potential application in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qiwei; Li, Wenhua; Su, Xiuping; Li, Geng; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    Despite superior clinical handling, excellent biocompatibility, biodegradation property of calcium phosphate needs to be improved to coincide with the rate of new bone formation. In this study, spherical CaCO3 are fabricated in the presence of the silk sericin and then transformed into porous hydroxyapatite (HAP) microspheres via hydrothermal method. The degradation behavior of obtained CaCO3, HAP and their mixture is first investigated in vitro. The result demonstrates that the weight loss of HAP microspheres are almost 24.3% after immersing in pH 7.40 Tris-HCl buffer solution for 12 weeks, which is far slower than that of spherical CaCO3 (97.5%). The degradation speed of the mixtures depends on the proportion of CaCO3 and HAP. The mixture with higher content of CaCO3 possesses a quicker degradation speed. The obtained CaCO3 and HAP microspheres are injected into subcutaneous tissue of ICR mice with the assistance of sodium alginate. The result in vivo also shows an obvious difference of degradation speed between the obtained CaCO3 and HAP microspheres, implying it is feasible to modulate the degradation property of the mixture through changing the proportion of CaCO3 and HAP The good cytocompatibility of the two kinds of microspheres is proved and a mild inflammation response is observed only at early stage of implantation. The job offers a simple method to modify the degradation properties of biomaterial for potential use in bone tissue engineering.

  17. Your Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder blade or scapula (say: SKA-pyuh-luh), a large triangular bone on the upper back corner of each side of the ribcage. The arm is made up of three bones: the humerus (say: HYOO-muh-rus), which is above your elbow, and the radius (say: RAY-dee-us) and ulna (say: UL- ...

  18. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  19. Dynamics of indigenous microbial populations of butter head lettuce grown in mulch and on bare soil.

    PubMed

    Ponce, A G; Agüero, M V; Roura, S I; Del Valle, C E; Moreira, M R

    2008-08-01

    The native microflora of lettuce cultivated in mulch and on bare soil and its evolution during storage at optimal condition were evaluated. Inner, mid, and outer leaves of the lettuce heads were analyzed separately and the evolution of the microbial populations were fitted to Gompertz and logistic models. The cultivation method (bare soil and mulch) introduced differences in the initial counts, evolution, and tolerance to refrigeration temperatures for some of the microbial populations under study. Most microbial populations from mulch lettuce presented a decline or little growth under refrigerated storage. However, populations from bare soil lettuce presented some growth phase during storage. Lactic acid bacteria from bare soil lettuce presented significant growth after 8 d of storage while LAB from mulch grown lettuce did not. Concurrently with the LAB growth, there was a decline in the coliform counts in bare soil grown lettuce. At the end of storage, the inner and mid leaves of mulch lettuce presented lower counts of psychrotrophic bacteria, LAB, and yeast and molds.

  20. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on bare and coated ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, S. Hussain, A.M.P.; Ahmed, G.A.; Singh, F.; Avasthi, D.K.; Choudhury, A.

    2008-12-01

    The present study compares structural and optical modifications of bare and silica (SiO{sub 2}) coated ZnS quantum dots under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. Bare and silica coated ZnS quantum dots were prepared following an inexpensive chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the dielectric host matrix. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the samples show the formation of almost spherical ZnS quantum dots. The UV-Vis absorption spectra reveal blue shift relative to bulk material in absorption energy while photoluminescence (PL) spectra suggests that surface state and near band edge emissions are dominating in case of bare and coated samples, respectively. Swift heavy ion irradiation of the samples was carried out with 160 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion beam with fluences 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Size enhancement of bare quantum dots after irradiation has been indicated in XRD and TEM analysis of the samples which has also been supported by optical absorption spectra. However similar investigations on irradiated coated quantum dots revealed little change in quantum dot size and emission. The present study thus shows that the coated ZnS quantum dots are stable upon SHI irradiation compared to the bare one.

  1. The Life Cycle of Bare Branch Families in China---A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, Quanbao; GUO, Zhen; LI, Shuzhuo; FELDMAN, Marcus W.

    2013-01-01

    China is and will be characterized by a large number of men who are unable to marry: these men are often referred to as “bare branches.” In this paper we define the bare branch family and divide its life cycle into three stages: the unmarried co-resident with both parents, co-resident with a surviving parent, and living alone. Using life tables and probability methods, we find that up to age 60, the bare branch male faces cumulative probabilities of 0.8 and 0.6, for his father's and mother's death, respectively. The definition of the age at which bare branch status is initialized influences the length of these stages. As the childbearing age of parents increases, the age of a bare branch at the death of his parents decreases, and the duration of his living alone lengthens. An increase in the mother's childbearing age, holding that of the father constant, shortens the stage of co-residence with both parents, and lengthens the stage of living alone. PMID:24174704

  2. Drinking water fluoridation and bone.

    PubMed

    Allolio, B; Lehmann, R

    1999-01-01

    Drinking water fluoridation has an established role in the prevention of dental caries, but may also positively or negatively affect bone. In bone fluoride is incorporated into hydroxylapatite to form the less soluble fluoroapatite. In higher concentrations fluoride stimulates osteoblast activity leading to an increase in cancellous bone mass. As optimal drinking water fluoridation (1 mg/l) is widely used, it is of great interest, whether long-term exposition to artificial water fluoridation has any impact on bone strength, bone mass, and -- most importantly -- fracture rate. Animal studies suggest a biphasic pattern of the effect of drinking water fluoridation on bone strength with a peak strength at a bone fluoride content of 1200 ppm followed by a decline at higher concentrations eventually leading to impaired bone quality. These changes are not paralleled by changes in bone mass suggesting that fluoride concentrations remain below the threshold level required for activation of osteoblast activity. Accordingly, in most epidemiological studies in humans bone mass was not altered by optimal drinking water fluoridation. In contrast, studies on the effect on hip fracture rate gave conflicting results ranging from an increased fracture incidence to no effect, and to a decreased fracture rate. As only ecological studies have been performed, they may be biased by unknown confounding factors -- the so-called ecological fallacy. However, the combined results of these studies indicate that any increase or decrease in fracture rate is likely to be small. It has been calculated that appropriately designed cohort studies to solve the problem require a sample size of >400,000 subjects. Such studies will not be performed in the foreseeable future. Future investigations in humans should, therefore, concentrate on the effect of long-term drinking water fluoridation on bone fluoride content and bone strength.

  3. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGEZ production. Therefore it is possible that the

  4. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  5. Bone densitometry.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kwang J

    2011-05-01

    Conventional radiographic methods allow physicians to visualize bone structure. However, they do not offer information on the bone mineral density (BMD), which can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Bone densitometry, by contrast, helps to detect bone mineral loss at an early stage because it provides accurate quantitative measurement of BMD. With an emphasis on quantification, shorter scanning time and precision, scientists have been developing BMD measurement devices that use absorption technique. They first developed single-energy absorptiometry (single-photon absorptiometry) by using I-125, which could measure BMD of peripheral bones. Single-photon absorptiometry was replaced by dual-energy absorptiometry (dual photon absorptiometry [DPA]) that used gadolinium-153. DPA had greater accuracy in measuring the BMD of central skeletal bones. Single-energy x-ray absorptiometry was also developed but it had limitations in measuring central skeletal BMD. In the mid-1980s, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was introduced and widely accepted for the early detection, treatment, and follow-up study of osteoporosis. There are several reasons for the popularity. DXA can measure BMD of posteroanterior spine and hip in a much shorter time than DPA while being capable of measuring BMD of peripheral bones. Other advantages include very low radiation doses to the patients, high image resolution, precision, and stable calibration of the instruments. In recent years, DXA has also been applied to lateral spine for the density of trabecular bone, to the whole body for the measurement of total body bone density and for the body composition, and to the spine for the vertebral fracture assessment. Still, posteroanterior spine and hip scans remain the most common applications of DXA because data on the normal range of BMD of the skeletal sites for different age, sex, and ethnic groups are compiled and made available with the devices, which gives the physician

  6. Patches of bare ground as a staple commodity for declining ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael; Martinez, Nicolas; Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Maurer, Melanie L; Reichlin, Thomas S; Abadi, Fitsum; Zbinden, Niklaus; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2010-10-06

    Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart) inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30-70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds.

  7. Overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) in the epidermis of transgenic mice: inhibition or stimulation of proliferation depending on the pattern of transgene expression and formation of psoriatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) belongs to the family of TGF-beta- related growth factors. In the developing epidermis, expression of BMP- 6 coincides with the onset of stratification. Expression persists perinatally but declines after day 6 postpartum, although it can still be detected in adult skin by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. We constitutively overexpressed BMP-6 in suprabasal layers of interfollicular epidermis in transgenic mice using a keratin 10 promoter. All mice expressing the transgene developed abnormalities in the skin, indicating an active transgene-derived factor. Depending on the pattern of transgene expression, the effects on proliferation and differentiation were completely opposite. Strong and uniform expression of the BMP-6 transgene resulted in severe repression of cell proliferation in embryonic and perinatal epidermis but had marginal effects on differentiation. Weaker and patchy expression of the transgene evoked strong hyperproliferation and parakeratosis in adult epidermis and severe perturbations of the usual pattern of differentiation. These perturbations included changes in the expression of keratins and integrins. Together with an inflammatory infiltrate both in the dermis and in the epidermis, these aspects present all typical histological and biochemical hallmarks of a human skin disease: psoriasis. PMID:8858176

  8. Estimating Vegetation Height and Bare-Earth Topography from SRTM Data using Fourier Spectral Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Liu, D.; Alsdorf, D.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, LiDAR vegetation topography (bare-earth + vegetation height), LiDAR bare-earth topography, the National Elevation Data (NED) set, and Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission (SRTM) measurements are used to develop a statistical model to explore the possibility of extracting vegetation height measurements and accurate high resolution bare-earth topography from SRTM data. The key innovation is to obtain the statistical signature of the vegetation height measurements in the Fourier domain by taking advantage of the well-known linearity in additive properties of the Fourier transform. We demonstrate that the power-law relationship, P(k) α k^(-β), as shown by the bare-earth topography, breaks down approximately at a cross-over wavenumber, k=k_c, due to the vegetation height effect using four different topographic and vegetation study locations in the United States. We document that the vegetation effect mainly dominates the high-frequency contents of the vegetation topography from 2-180 m, 1-60 m, and 1-70 m for the South Fork Eel River, California; Flathead Lake, Montana; and Tenderfoot Creek, Montana, LiDAR data, respectively, and from 1-240 m for 30 m SRTM data for the Jesup, Georgia site. Finally, we demonstrate our ability to obtain a high resolution bare-earth topography with RMSE of 9.6 m, 2.2 m, and 2.9 m and vegetation height with RMSE of 11.0 m (11% error), 4.5 m (12% error), and 1.6 m (8% error) for LiDAR data study sites, whereas for the SRTM data, bare-earth topography and vegetation height are obtained with RMSE values of 5.4 m and 3.1 m, respectively, for the Jesup site. Model Vegetation height

  9. Health in post-Black Death London (1350-1538): age patterns of periosteal new bone formation in a post-epidemic population.

    PubMed

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2014-10-01

    Previous research has shown that the Black Death targeted older adults and individuals who had been previously exposed to physiological stressors. This project investigates whether this selectivity of the Black Death, combined with post-epidemic rising standards of living, led to significant improvements in patterns of skeletal stress markers, and by inference in health, among survivors and their descendants. Patterns of periosteal lesions (which have been previously shown, using hazard analysis, to be associated with elevated risks of mortality in medieval London) are compared between samples from pre-Black Death (c. 1,000-1,300, n = 464) and post-Black Death (c. 1,350-1,538, n = 133) London cemeteries. To avoid the assumptions that stress markers alone provide a direct measure of health and that a change in frequencies of the stress marker by itself indicates changes in health, this study assesses age-patterns of the stress marker to obtain a more nuanced understanding of the population-level effects of an epidemic disease. Age-at-death in these samples is estimated using transition analysis, which provides point estimates of age even for the oldest adults in these samples and thus allows for an examination of physiological stress across the lifespan. The frequency of lesions is significantly higher in the post-Black Death sample, which, at face value, might indicate a general decline in health. However, a significant positive association between age and periosteal lesions, as well as a significantly higher number of older adults in the post-Black Death sample more likely suggests improvements in health following the epidemic.

  10. Bare Fiber Bragg Gratings embedded into concrete buffer Supercontainer concept for nuclear waste storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kinet, Damien; Chah, Karima; Megret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe; Gusarov, Andrei; Faustov, Alexey; Areias, Lou

    2015-07-01

    We present the preliminary results obtained with bare fiber Bragg grating-based sensors embedded into half-scale Belgian Supercontainer concept. Being temperature and strain sensitive, some sensors were placed into aluminum tubes to monitor only temperature and results were compared with thermocouples data. The utility of using bare fiber Bragg gratings, knowing that these ones are very fragile, is to have a direct contact between the high alkaline environment of the concrete and silica fibers and to determine its impact over a very long time. (authors)

  11. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex Plant - part I: Bare pits

    SciTech Connect

    Knief, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    This paper briefly describes criticality investigations for weapon assembly and dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. Results are summarized for calculations performed for safety analyses, radiological hazards assessments, and a study to justify the criticality alarm exemption. Pits and pits in containers were modeled in their most reactive configuration. Criticality calculations were performed with the KENO and MCNP code packages. Configurations involving bare pits were subcritical by a substantial amount even with very conservative model assumptions. Thus, it is concluded that a critical configuration involving the bare pits is not credible.

  12. Bare Stent Implantation in Iatrogenic Dissecting Pseudoaneurysm of the Superior Mesenteric Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kutlu, Ramazan Ara, Cengiz; Sarac, Kaya

    2007-02-15

    Iatrogenic arterial dissection leading to the development of dissecting pseudoaneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare complication of angiography. Surgical and endovascular treatment options exist for this important condition. We report a case of bare stent implantation in dissecting pseudoaneurysm of the SMA that developed after angiography in a patient with acute mesenteric ischemia. Although it is rarely published, iatrogenic arterial dissection causing pseudoaneurysm can occur after diagnostic and interventional angiography. Bare stent implantation in dissecting pseudoaneurysm of the SMA could be an advantageous endovascular treatment option in selected cases due its to potential preservation of important side branches of the SMA.

  13. Microgravity and Bone Cell Mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R.; Veldhuijzen, J.; van Loon, J.

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone.The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction.Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, has catabolic effects on the skeleton of astronauts, and on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGE2 production. Therefore it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions

  14. Interpreting Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weymouth, Patricia P.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an activity which introduces students to the nature and challenges of paleoanthropology. In the exercise, students identify diagrammed bones and make interpretations about the creature. Presents questions and tasks employed in the lesson. (ML)

  15. Bone and bone marrow: the same organ.

    PubMed

    Del Fattore, Andrea; Capannolo, Marta; Rucci, Nadia

    2010-11-01

    Interplays between bone and bone marrow are not limited to merely anatomic and histological connections, but include a tight functional correlation. Bone marrow resides within the medullary cavity of the bones and the process of hematopoiesis is regulated, at least in part, by bone cells. Moreover, osteoclasts and osteoblasts derive from precursors of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, respectively, both residing within the bone marrow. Alterations in one of these components typically cause impairment in the other, so diseases of the bone marrow compartment often affect the bone and vice versa. All these findings could make us to speculate that bone and bone marrow are not two separate districts, but can be considered as the two elements of the same unique functional unit, the bone-bone marrow organ. Here we will describe histological and functional interplays between bone and bone marrow, and will illustrate some diseases in which this tight correlation is evident.

  16. Bone healing around nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bovine bone mineral, biphasic calcium phosphate, and autogenous bone in mandibular bone defects.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Nina; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S; Bornstein, Michael M; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Buser, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The individual healing profile of a given bone substitute with respect to osteogenic potential and substitution rate must be considered when selecting adjunctive grafting materials for bone regeneration procedures. In this study, standardized mandibular defects in minipigs were filled with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA-SiO (34.47%), followed by BCP 60/40 (23.64%)) was significantly higher than the more rapidly substituted autogenous bone (17.1%). Autogenous bone yielded significantly more new bone (21.81%) over all test groups (4.91%-7.74%) and significantly more osteoid (5.53%) than BCP 60/40 (3%) and DBBM (2.25%). At 8 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (31.6%), HA-SiO (31.23%), followed by BCP 60/40 (23.65%)) demonstrated a similar pattern and was again significantly higher as compared to autogenous bone (9.29%). Autogenous bone again exhibited statistically significantly greater new bone (55.13%) over HA-SiO (40.62%), BCP 60/40 (40.21%), and DBBM (36.35%). These results suggest that the osteogenic potential of HA-SiO and BCP is inferior when compared to autogenous bone. However, in instances where a low substitution rate is desired to maintain the volume stability of augmented sites, particularly in the esthetic zone, HA-SiO and DBBM may be favored.

  17. [Bone disease in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Roca Espiau, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    The exposition aims, is to review the pathophysiological mechanisms of bone marrow involvement and the patterns of marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. We have reviewed the different methods of assessment of bone marrow infiltration and its temporal development. Qualitative methods include simple radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and radioisotope. The simple radiography is the basic element, but its sensitivity is limited and only allows for assessing changes and trabecular bone remodeling MRI allows us to appreciate the bone marrow infiltration, detection of complications and response to therapy. Radioisotopes can contribute to the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and bone crises. Among the quantitative methods are the QCSI (quantitative chemical shift imaging) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as well as new quantitative techniques of CT, MRI and ultrasound densitometry. The QCSI performed an assessment of fat content of bone marrow in the spine. DEXA quantifies bone density by measuring the attenuation coefficient. The semiquantitative methods have various "scores" to establish criteria for generalized bone disease endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.

  18. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and display the bone density measurements on a computer monitor. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... passed over the area, generating images on a computer monitor. You must hold very still and may be ...

  19. Employing UAVs to Acquire Detailed Vegetation and Bare Ground Data for Assessing Rangeland Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.; Laliberte, A.; Herrick, J. E.; Winters, C.

    2007-12-01

    Because of its value as a historical record (extending back to the mid 1930s), aerial photography is an important tool used in many rangeland studies. However, these historical photos are not very useful for detailed analysis of rangeland health because of inadequate spatial resolution and scheduling limitations. These issues are now being resolved by using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over rangeland study areas. Spatial resolution improvements have been rapid in the last 10 years from the QuickBird satellite through improved aerial photography to the new UAV coverage and have utilized improved sensors and the more simplistic approach of low altitude flights. Our rangeland health experiments have shown that the low altitude UAV digital photography is preferred by rangeland scientists because it allows, for the first time, their identification of vegetation and land surface patterns and patches, gap sizes, bare soil percentages, and vegetation type. This hyperspatial imagery (imagery with a resolution finer than the object of interest) is obtained at about 5cm resolution by flying at an altitude of 150m above the surface of the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico. Additionally, the UAV provides improved temporal flexibility, such as flights immediately following fires, floods, and other catastrophic disturbances, because the flight capability is located near the study area and the vehicles are under the direct control of the users, eliminating the additional steps associated with budgets and contracts. There are significant challenges to improve the data to make them useful for operational agencies, namely, image distortion with inexpensive, consumer grade digital cameras, difficulty in detecting sufficient ground control points in small scenes (152m by 114m), accuracy of exterior UAV information on X,Y, Z, roll, pitch, and heading, the sheer number of images collected, and developing reliable relationships with ground-based data across a broad

  20. Bone regenerate formation in cortical bone during distraction lengthening. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Delefortrie, G; Coutelier, L; Vincent, A

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the pattern of bone regeneration from cortical bone segments during distraction lengthening. The lengthening procedure was applied for various periods through the Ilizarov system on the forearms of mature dogs. Bone was sectioned either by corticotomy, preserving the nutrient artery integrity, or by osteotomy. When an osteotomy was performed, the marrow cavity was in some cases plugged with either resorbable bone wax or nonresorbable material. Under distraction, both periosteal and medullary callus on either side of the gap gave rise to new bone trabeculae. The trabeculae on either side were oriented along the direction of distraction and progressively approached one another. This striated callus emerging from both sides was the most characteristic pattern of bone regeneration subsequent to distraction lengthening. Fusion was achieved approximately four weeks after the end of the lengthening period. Most of the new bone was formed by membranous ossification; some cartilaginous nodules developed. Corticalization of the bone trabeculae that had begun at three months was not fully achieved at five months after the lengthening period. There were no differences found in the pattern of bone healing and the amount of newly formed bone after corticotomy or osteotomy with or without resorbable bone wax plugging.

  1. Soil carbon dioxide fluxes with time and depth in a bare field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. The amount of CO2 emitted from soil to the atmosphere has significant effects on the soil-atmosphere system. The objectives of this study are 1) to determine bare soil CO2 fluxes continuously with time and de...

  2. In vivo comparative study of tissue reaction to bare and antimicrobial polymer coated transcutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Calliess, Tilman; Bartsch, Ivonne; Haupt, Maike; Reebmann, Mattias; Schwarze, Michael; Stiesch, Meike; Pfaffenroth, Cornelia; Sluszniak, Magda; Dempwolf, Wibke; Menzel, Henning; Witte, Frank; Willbold, Elmar

    2016-04-01

    We coated transcutaneous implants made of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V with copolymer dimethyl (2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) phosphonate and 4-vinylpyridine and investigated the tissue reaction with respect to its biocompatible and antimicrobial properties in vivo. We distinguished between clinically observable superficial inflammations and histologically detectable deep infections. The vinylpyridine moieties were transferred into cationic pyridinium groups by reaction with hexyl bromide. Thus polymers with both antimicrobial capacity and good biocompatibility were obtained. In a short-term study, we implanted specially designed bare or coated implants in hairless but immunocompetent mice and analyzed the tissue reaction histologically. No difference was found between bare and coated implants in the initial healing phase of up to 14 days; however, after 21 days the scar tissue formation was higher in the bare implant group. The degree of epithelial downgrowth was comparable in both groups at any time point. In a long-term study of up to 168 days, we analyzed resistance to infection. In the bare implant group, 7 of the 12 implantation sites became infected deep whereas in the coated implant group only two deep infections were observed. The other implantation sites showed only superficial signs of inflammation. These results generally accord with previous in-vitro studies.

  3. Introducing the Notion of Bare and Effective Mass via Newton's Second Law of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here I discuss how these concepts may be introduced together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion. The…

  4. Distribution of Rhizoctonia Bare Patch and Root Rot in Eastern Washington and Relation to Climatic Variables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia is a fungus that attacks the roots of wheat and barley, causing a root rot and bare patch in the dryland wheat cropping area of the inland Pacific Northwest. Over the last 7 years, we have been investigating the distribution of this pathogen, using molecular methods based on extracting a...

  5. Bare Forms and Lexical Insertions in Code-Switching: A Processing-Based Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Bare forms (or [slashed O] forms), uninflected lexical L2 insertions in contexts where the matrix language expects morphological marking, have been recognized as an anomaly in different approaches to code-switching. Myers-Scotton (1997, 2002) has explained their existence in terms of structural incongruity between the matrix and embedded…

  6. Bare Pedagogy and the Scourge of Neoliberalism: Rethinking Higher Education as a Democratic Public Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2010-01-01

    A new form of bare pedagogy is emerging in higher education focused on market-driven competitiveness and even militaristic goal-setting, while critical pedagogy, with its emphasis on the hard work of critical analysis, moral judgments, and social responsibility (critical pedagogy that goes to the very heart of what it means to address real…

  7. 3D laser measurements of bare and shod feet during walking.

    PubMed

    Novak, Boštjan; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new system for 3D foot-shape measurements during walking. It is based on the laser-triangulation, multiple-line-illumination and color-modulation techniques. It consists of a walking stage and four measuring modules that simultaneously acquire the foot shape from the top, bottom and side views. The measuring speed is 30 fps. Custom-developed software makes it possible to analyze the foot's dimensions at an arbitrary cross-section by means of the width, height, girth and section orientation. Six subjects were measured during bare and shod walking, and the bare foot and the outside dimensions of the footwear during the entire stance phase are presented. The relative measurement repeatability of a single subject is 0.5% for bare foot and 1% for shod foot. This means that it is possible to study the differences between various influences on the foot-shape dynamics, such as a bare/shod foot, different loading conditions and the shoe's stiffness condition.

  8. Analyses of protein corona on bare and silica-coated gold nanorods against four mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Minakshi; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxic effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs). Here, a comprehensive study was performed by examining the effects of bare (uncoated) AuNRs and AuNRs functionalized with silica (SiO2-AuNRs) against various mammalian cell lines, including cervical cancer cells, fibroblast cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and neuroblastoma cells. The interactions between AuNRs and mammalian cells were investigated with cell viability and mortality assays. Dihydrorhodamine-123 assay was carried out for evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, along with mass spectroscopy analysis for determining the composition of the protein corona. Our results suggest that even the lowest concentrations of AuNRs (0.7 μg/mL) induced ROS production leading to cell mortality. On the other hand, cellular viability and ROS production were maintained even at a higher concentration of SiO2-coated AuNRs (12 μg/mL). The increased production of ROS by AuNRs seemed to cause the toxicity observed in all four mammalian cell types. The protein corona on the bare AuNRs did not appear to reduce ROS generation; however, different compositions of the protein corona on bare and SiO2-coated AuNRs may affect cellular behavior differently. Therefore, it was determined that SiO2-coated AuNRs would be more advantageous than bare AuNRs for cellular applications.

  9. The Bare Facts about the Listener's Responsibility in Understanding Semantic Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlken, Bob

    The bare fact is that the speaker's words are nothing until the listener gives them meaning. The denotation of a word is developed through association with other words. The connotation is the more difficult concept to establish for the critical/comprehensive listener studying word meaning. The common explanation is that "connotation refers to…

  10. Using Micro-CT Derived Bone Microarchitecture to Analyze Bone Stiffness – A Case Study on Osteoporosis Rat Bone

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuchin; Adeeb, Samer; Doschak, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) images can be used to quantitatively represent bone geometry through a range of computed attenuation-based parameters. Nonetheless, those parameters remain indirect indices of bone microarchitectural strength and require further computational tools to interpret bone structural stiffness and potential for mechanical failure. Finite element analysis (FEA) can be applied to measure trabecular bone stiffness and potentially predict the location of structural failure in preclinical animal models of osteoporosis, although that procedure from image segmentation of Micro-CT derived bone geometry to FEA is often challenging and computationally expensive, resulting in failure of the model to build. Notably, the selection of resolution and threshold for bone segmentation are key steps that greatly affect computational complexity and validity. In the following study, we evaluated an approach whereby Micro-CT derived grayscale attenuation and segmentation data guided the selection of trabecular bone for analysis by FEA. We further correlated those FEA results to both two- and three-dimensional bone microarchitecture from sham and ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n = 10/group). A virtual cylinder of vertebral trabecular bone 40% in length from the caudal side was selected for FEA, because Micro-CT based image analysis indicated the largest differences in microarchitecture between the two groups resided there. Bone stiffness was calculated using FEA and statistically correlated with the three-dimensional values of bone volume/tissue volume, bone mineral density, fractal dimension, trabecular separation, and trabecular bone pattern factor. Our method simplified the process for the assessment of trabecular bone stiffness by FEA from Micro-CT images and highlighted the importance of bone microarchitecture in conferring significantly increased bone quality capable of resisting failure due to increased mechanical loading. PMID:26042089

  11. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  12. Chondroblastoma of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Levine, Jennifer M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the presentation and clinical course of two patients with temporal bone chondroblastoma, and to review the literature on temporal bone chondroblastoma to identify characteristic clinical and radiological presentations, and optimal treatment regimens. MEDLINE literature searches covering the period from 1966 to January 1998, in all languages, were performed as well as a review of the bibliographies of the identified studies. Strict inclusion criteria were upheld, In total 18 studies had patients whose data could be analyzed. From the 18 studies, 34 patients were identified, but only 21 cases met the inclusion criteria. Demographic, clinical presentation, radiological, operative and treatment parameters were analyzed in this cohort of patients. Ninety-five percent of patients were found to have invasion of the middle cranial fossa and 76% were found to have erosion into the superior aspect of the external auditory canal by temporal bone chondroblastoma. The characteristic growth pattern of temporal bone chondroblastoma may result from embryonal or cartilagenous rests entrapped in the tympanosquamous suture line in the middle fossa floor. Temporal bone chondroblastoma represents a pathology that does not arise from, or have a growth pattern resembling other pathologies in the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171120

  13. Modelling emergent patterns of dynamic desert ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many desert ecosystems vegetation is both patchy and dynamic: vegetated areas are interspersed with patches of bare ground, and both the positioning and the species composition of the vegetated areas exhibit change through time. These characteristics lead to the emergence of multi-scale patterns ...

  14. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones Print A A ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ...

  15. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  16. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  17. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... amputation. This is called limb-salvage or limb-sparing surgery . In going over treatment options, it is ... 2016 Treating Bone Cancer Surgery for Bone Cancer Radiation Therapy for Bone Cancer Chemotherapy for Bone Cancer Targeted ...

  18. Facts about Broken Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Kids > Broken Bones Print A A ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  19. Implications of climate change for evaporation from bare soils in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet; Yano, Tomohisa; Evrendilek, Fatih; Uygur, Veli

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict quantitative changes in evaporation from bare soils in the Mediterranean climate region of Turkey in response to the projections of a regional climate model developed in Japan (hereafter RCM). Daily RCM data for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ETr) and soil evaporation were obtained for the periods of 1994--2003 and 2070--2079. Potential evaporation (Ep) from bare soils was calculated using the Penman-Monteith equation with a surface resistance of zero. Simulation of actual soil evaporation (Ea) was carried out using Aydin model (Aydin et al., Ecological Modelling 182:91-105, 2005) combined with Aydin and Uygur (2006, A model for estimating soil water potential of bare fields. In Proceedings of the 18th International Soil Meeting (ISM) on Soils Sustaining Life on Earth, Managing Soil and Technology, Sanliurfa, 477-480pp.) model of predicting soil water potential at the top surface layer of a bare soil, after performances of Aydin model (R2 = 94.0%) and Aydin and Uygur model (R2 = 97.6) were tested. The latter model is based on the relations among potential soil evaporation, hydraulic diffusivity, and soil wetness, with some simplified assumptions. Input parameters of the model are simple and easily obtainable such as climatic parameters used to compute the potential soil evaporation, average diffusivity for the drying soil, and volumetric water content at field capacity. The combination of Aydin and Aydin and Uygur models appeared to be useful in estimating water potential of soils and Ea from bare soils, with only a few parameters. Unlike ETr and Ep projected to increase by 92 and 69 mm (equivalent to 8.0 and 7.3% increases) due to the elevated evaporative demand of the atmosphere, respectively, Ea from bare soils is projected to reduce by 50 mm (equivalent to a 16.5% decrease) in response to a decrease in rainfall by 46% in the Mediterranean region of Turkey by the 2070s predicted by RCM, and consequently

  20. Runoff and Sediment Delivery from Bare and Graveled Forest Road Approaches to Stream Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. R.; McGuire, K. J.; Aust, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    Forested watersheds are typically associated with high quality water yield, yet forest roads and trails can adversely impact water quality draining forested watersheds. Increased stream sedimentation from forest road stream crossings often represents the most significant water quality threat associated with forestry operations. Quantification of sediment delivery rates is essential for the prescription of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that adequately address forest road stormwater runoff. Two different field experiments were implemented in the Virginia Piedmont to achieve the objectives of quantifying sediment delivery from forest roads where the road meets the stream (the road approach) and evaluating the sediment reduction efficacy of partially graveling road approaches. A forest operational experiment that included sediment traps and differential leveling was used to measure sediment delivery from five bare and four fully graveled road approaches for one year (August 2011 through July 2012). Rainfall simulation experiments were performed on six additional approaches to measure stormwater runoff volume, infiltration, and sediment delivery for 10 to 50-minute rain events with rainfall recurrence intervals of < 1 to 5-year return periods. Rainfall simulations were performed on newly-reopened bare approaches, with subsequent simulations on partially graveled approaches. The sediment trap study provides annual sediment delivery rates for bare and fully graveled road approaches. The rainfall simulation experiments characterize sediment delivery during storm events and provide an evaluation of different levels of Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation (i.e. ¼ to full gravel coverage) to minimize sediment inputs from road approaches. Sediment delivery from both experiments was related to rainfall amount, timing, and intensity, as well as road approach characteristics such as length, slope, and percentage of bare soil through stepwise multiple regression

  1. Impact of obesity on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Juan J; Pérez Castrillón, José L; de Luis Román, Daniel A

    2016-12-01

    High weight is a protective factor against osteoporosis and risk of fracture. In obesity, however, where overweight is associated to excess fat, this relationship does not appear to be so clear, excess weight has sometimes been associated to decreased bone mass. Obesity interferes with bone metabolism through mechanical, hormonal, and inflammatory factors. These factors are closely related to weight, body composition, and dietary patterns of these patients. The net beneficial or harmful effect on bone mass or risk of fracture of the different components of this condition is not well known. We need to recognize patients at a greater risk of bone disease related to obesity to start an adequate intervention.

  2. Effects of lidar point density on bare earth extraction and DEM creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puetz, Angela M.; Olsen, R. Chris; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    Data density has a crucial impact on the accuracy of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In this study, DEMs were created from a high point-density LIDAR dataset using the bare earth extraction module in Quick Terrain Modeler. Lower point-density LIDAR collects were simulated by randomly selecting points from the original dataset at a series of decreasing percentages. The DEMs created from the lower resolution datasets are compared to the original DEM. Results show a decrease in DEM accuracy as the resolution of the LIDAR dataset is reduced. Some analysis is made of the types of errors encountered in the lower resolution DEMs. It is also noted that the percentage of points classified as bare earth decreases as the resolution of the LIDAR dataset is reduced.

  3. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Controlled ground-based passive microwave radiometric measurements on soil moisture were conducted to determine the effects of terrain surface roughness and vegetation on microwave emission. Theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and with some recent airborne radiometric measurements. The relationship of soil moisture to the permittivity for the soil was obtained in the laboratory. A dual frequency radiometer, 1.41356 GHz and 10.69 GHz, took measurements at angles between 0 and 50 degrees from an altitude of about fifty feet. Distinct surface roughnesses were studied. With the roughness undisturbed, oats were later planted and vegetated and bare field measurements were compared. The 1.4 GHz radiometer was less affected than the 10.6 GHz radiometer, which under vegetated conditions was incapable of detecting soil moisture. The bare surface theoretical model was inadequate, although the vegetation model appeared to be valid. Moisture parameters to correlate apparent temperature with soil moisture were compared.

  4. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  5. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on soil moisture remote sensing was conducted during July to September 1981 on bare, grass, and alfalfa fields at frequencies of 0.6, 1.4, 5.0, and 10.6 GHz with radiometers mounted on mobile towers. The results confirm the frequency dependence of sensitivity reduction due to the presence of vegetation cover. For the type of vegetated fields reported here, the vegetation effect is appreciable even at 0.6 GHz. Measurements over bare soil show that when the soil is wet, the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest at 0.6 GHz, a result contrary to the expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil-water mixtures and the current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  6. Towards new methodology for improvement of topographic and anisotropic correction of desert bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomran, Ali

    Desert bare soil has been found in literature to exhibit anisotropic reflectance behaviour. Anisotropy is described by Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution function (BRDF). Literature studies have limited their investigations to the behaviour of the topographic corrections of Minnaert and C models (simple forms of the empirical type of BRDF) with terrain variables (slope and orientation). Yet, none of these studies, especially for desert bare soil, has investigated the behaviour of the coefficient values of Minnaert and C with terrain variables. The investigation in this study has revealed that the relation between terrain slope (derived from both DEM level-1 and level-2) of desert bare soil in Saudi Arabia and K and C values follow closely a 2nd order polynomial trend. K curves have taken convex shapes, whereas C curves were concave. The Minnaert (K) and C coefficients trends have shown that surface Lambertian behaviour is more pronounced on slopes facing away from the sun than on sun facing slopes. Unlike the Minnaert K and C coefficients derived from four spectral classes, this author's newly developed terrain slope, aspect and phase angle dependant's C and Minnaert coefficients produced promising results compared to the global K and C. Induced BRDF effects in the desert bare soil is found the more probable dominating cause for the scatter/jitter in the radiance/cos(i) regression plots that remained after radiometric correction. Though its high topographic correction efficiency and unlike Minnaert model, C model tends to maintain the uncorrected radiance values unchanged after correction (i.e. not amplified to compensate for low sun angle).

  7. Optical coupling of bare optoelectronic components and flexographically printed polymer waveguides in planar optronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yixiao; Wolfer, Tim; Lange, Alex; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-05-01

    Large scale, planar optronic systems allowing spatially distributed functionalities can be well used in diverse sensor networks, such as for monitoring the environment by measuring various physical quantities in medicine or aeronautics. In these systems, mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric foils, e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), are employed as carrier materials. A benefit of using these materials is their low cost. The optical interconnections from light sources to light transmission structures in planar optronic systems occupy a pivotal position for the sensing functions. As light sources, we employ the optoelectronic components, such as edgeemitting laser diodes, in form of bare chips, since their extremely small structures facilitate a high integration compactness and ensure sufficient system flexibility. Flexographically printed polymer optical waveguides are deployed as light guiding structures for short-distance communication in planar optronic systems. Printing processes are utilized for this generation of waveguides to achieve a cost-efficient large scale and high-throughput production. In order to attain a high-functional optronic system for sensing applications, one of the most essential prerequisites is the high coupling efficiency between the light sources and the waveguides. Therefore, in this work, we focus on the multimode polymer waveguide with a parabolic cross-section and investigate its optical coupling with the bare laser diode. We establish the geometrical model of the alignment based on the previous works on the optodic bonding of bare laser diodes and the fabrication process of polymer waveguides with consideration of various parameters, such as the beam profile of the laser diode, the employed polymer properties of the waveguides as well as the carrier substrates etc. Accordingly, the optical coupling of the bare laser diodes and the polymer waveguides was simulated

  8. Transportable Waste-to-Energy System (TWES) Energy Recovery From Bare Base Waste

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    removed and/or partially burned. Instead the furnace, coupled with a shredder , will completely burn the waste and provide heat for water or other...Photos from Ali Al Salem, AF bare base Nov 1998, FOUO-for official use only 8 8 TWES Fuel Processing Bulk Trash Shredder Shredded Fuel TWES Furnace...Program (FEMP) to initiate the conversion. • Will install and test electricity production at Tyndall AFB 15 15 TWES Process Diagram Shredders Useful

  9. Soft Landing of Bare Nanoparticles with Controlled Size, Composition, and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    A kinetically-limited physical synthesis method based on magnetron sputtering and gas aggregation has been coupled with size-selection and ion soft landing to prepare bare metal nanoparticles on surfaces with controlled coverage, size, composition, and morphology. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it is demonstrated that the size and coverage of bare nanoparticles soft landed onto flat glassy carbon and silicon as well as stepped graphite surfaces may be controlled through size-selection with a quadrupole mass filter and the length of deposition, respectively. The bare nanoparticles are observed with AFM to bind randomly to the flat glassy carbon surface when soft landed at relatively low coverage (1012 ions). In contrast, on stepped graphite surfaces at intermediate coverage (1013 ions) the soft landed nanoparticles are shown to bind preferentially along step edges forming extended linear chains of particles. At the highest coverage (5 x 1013 ions) examined in this study the nanoparticles are demonstrated with both AFM and SEM to form a continuous film on flat glassy carbon and silicon surfaces. On a graphite surface with defects, however, it is shown with SEM that the presence of localized surface imperfections results in agglomeration of nanoparticles onto these features and the formation of neighboring depletion zones that are devoid of particles. Employing high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in the high angular annular dark field imaging mode (STEM-HAADF) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) it is demonstrated that the magnetron sputtering/gas aggregation synthesis technique produces single metal particles with controlled morphology as well as bimetallic alloy nanoparticles with clearly defined core-shell structure. Therefore, this kinetically-limited physical synthesis technique, when combined with ion soft landing, is a versatile complementary method for preparing a wide range of

  10. Toward new methodology for improvement of topographic and anisotropic correction of desert bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomran, Ali I.; McCullagh, M. J.

    2008-10-01

    Desert bare soil has been found in literature to exhibit anisotropic reflectance behaviour. Anisotropy is described by Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution function (BRDF). Literature studies have limited their investigations to the behaviour of the topographic corrections of Minnaert and C models (simple forms of the empirical type of BRDF) with terrain variables (slope and orientation). Yet, none of these studies, especially for desert bare soil, has investigated the behaviour of the coefficient values of Minnaert and C with terrain variables. The investigation in this study has revealed that the relation between terrain slope (derived from both DEM level-1 and level-2) of desert bare soil in Saudi Arabia and K and C values follow closely a 2nd order polynomial trend. K curves have taken convex shapes, whereas C curves were concave. The Minnaert (K) and C coefficients trends have shown that surface Lambertian behaviour is more pronounced on slopes facing away from the sun than on sun facing slopes. This author's newly developed terrain slope, aspect and phase angle dependant's C and Minnaert coefficients produced promising results compared to the global K and C.

  11. Oxidation, Creep and Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Phillip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. In addition to cyclic oxidation testing in dry and humid air at 800°C, creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. The coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives, as long as the specimens were annealed according to the 31V standard heat treatment before testing. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bare alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  12. Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, Matthew V.; Hagen, Scott C.

    2013-02-01

    This study is focused on the integration of bare earth lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data into unstructured (triangular) finite element meshes and the implications on simulating storm surge inundation using a shallow water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th percentile of vertical elevation errors using four different interpolation methods (linear, inverse distance weighted, natural neighbor, and cell averaging) to resample bare earth lidar and lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) onto unstructured meshes at different resolutions. The results are consolidated into a table of optimal interpolation methods that minimize the vertical elevation error of an unstructured mesh for a given mesh node density. The cell area averaging method performed most accurate when DEM grid cells within 0.25 times the ratio of local element size and DEM cell size were averaged. The methodology is applied to simulate inundation extent and maximum water levels in southern Mississippi due to Hurricane Katrina, which illustrates that local changes in topography such as adjusting element size and interpolation method drastically alter simulated storm surge locally and non-locally. The methods and results presented have utility and implications to any modeling application that uses bare earth lidar.

  13. Patches of Bare Ground as a Staple Commodity for Declining Ground-Foraging Insectivorous Farmland Birds

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael; Martinez, Nicolas; Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Maurer, Melanie L.; Reichlin, Thomas S.; Abadi, Fitsum; Zbinden, Niklaus; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2010-01-01

    Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart) inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30–70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds. PMID:20949083

  14. An evaluation of the simulated bare soil evaporation of an atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Jan-Peter; Vogel, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Land surface processes have a significant impact on near-surface atmospheric phenomena. They determine, among others, near-surface sensible and latent heat fluxes and the radiation budget, and thus influence atmosphere and land characteristics, such as temperature and humidity, the structure of the planetary boundary layer, and even cloud formation processes. It is therefore important to simulate the land surface processes in atmospheric models as realistically as possible. Verifications have shown that the bare soil evaporation computed by the land surface scheme TERRA of the COSMO atmospheric model is systematically overestimated. Since this flux is part of the surface water and energy balance it affects, for instance, the other components of the turbulent heat fluxes as well as the soil water content and the surface temperature. Data from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Meteorological Service were used to analyse this model behaviour. In the standard model configuration of TERRA, the formulation of bare soil evaporation is based on the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), following the work by R. E. Dickinson. In order to reduce the excessive evaporation simulated by BATS, other formulations for the bare soil evaporation were tested in TERRA. In turned out that a scheme based on a resistance formulation efficiently reduces the simulated vapour flux, leading to a better agreement with the measurements.

  15. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  16. Percutaneous Creation of Bare Intervascular Tunnels for Salvage of Thrombosed Hemodialysis Fistulas Without Recanalizable Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Wang, Yen-Chi; Weng, Mei-Jui

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThis study aimed to retrospectively assess the efficacy of a bare intervascular tunnel for salvage of a thrombosed hemodialysis fistula. We examined the clinical outcomes and provided follow-up images of the bare intervascular tunnel.Materials and MethodsEight thrombosed fistulas lacked available recanalizable outflow veins were included in this study. These fistulas were salvaged by re-directing access site flow to a new outflow vein through a percutaneously created intervascular tunnel without stent graft placement. The post-intervention primary and secondary access patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method.ResultsThe procedural and clinical success rates were 100 %. Post-intervention primary and secondary access patency at 300 days were 18.7 ± 15.8 and 87.5 ± 11.7 %, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 218.7 days (range 10–368 days). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction 10 days after the procedure. No other major complications were observed. Minor complications, such as swelling, ecchymosis, and pain around the tunnel, occurred in all of the patients.ConclusionsPercutaneous creation of a bare intervascular tunnel is a treatment option for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas without recanalizable outflow in selected patients.

  17. Bare Shear Viscosity and Anomalous Fall Rate of Oil Droplets in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, Rodney

    2011-11-01

    Experimental evidence of Kim and Fedele (1982) indicates a breakdown of the Millikan Law for the fall rate of oil droplets in Nitrogen gas over a pressure range of 1-15 atm. The discrepancy is most pronounced for smallest, 0.1 micron radius droplets for which the fall rate increases with pressure. The opposite behavior was observed by Millikan with larger drops in air of pressure at most one atm. We explain these results by arguing that the particle's motion, in particular Stokes' drag formula, is determined by the so-called bare shear viscosity which applies to micro fluid flows. This is in contrast with the usual theory which uses a renormalized shear viscosity and which is well approximated by the Enskog value. A mode coupling formula for the bare shear viscosity is discussed and a graphical comparison is made with the experimental results. Basically an increase in gas pressure produces a decrease in the bare shear viscosity and thus the fall rate increases. The idea that the shear viscosity is smaller for micro flows is consistent with the intuitive belief that on small enough spatial and time scales, fluid flows are conservative without dissipation.

  18. Initial bacterial deposition on bare and zeolite-coated aluminum alloy and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gexin; Beving, Derek E; Bedi, Rajwant S; Yan, Yushan S; Walker, Sharon L

    2009-02-03

    In this study, the impact of zeolite thin film coatings on bacterial deposition and "biofouling" of surfaces has been investigated in an aqueous environment. The synthesis of two types of zeolite coatings, ZSM-5 coated on aluminum alloy and zeolite A coated on stainless steel, and the characterization of the coated and bare metal surfaces are described. The extent of cell deposition onto the bare and zeolite-coated aluminum alloy and stainless steel surfaces is investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber system under a laminar flow conditions. The initial rates of bacterial transfer to the various surfaces are compared by utilizing a marine bacterium, Halomonas pacifica g, under a range of ionic strength conditions. H. pacifica g deposited onto bare metal surfaces to a greater extent as compared with cells deposited onto the zeolite coatings. The surface properties found to have the most notable effect on attachment are the electrokinetic and hydrophobicity properties of the metal and zeolite-coated surfaces. These results suggest that a combination of two chemical mechanisms-hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions-contribute to the antifouling nature of the zeolite surface. Additional observations on the relative role of the hydrodynamic and physical phenomena are also discussed.

  19. Remnant Woven Bone and Calcified Cartilage in Mouse Bone: Differences between Ages/Sex and Effects on Bone Strength

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Victoria; Toth, Zacharie; Chibnall, John; McBride-Gagyi, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mouse models are used frequently to study effects of bone diseases and genetic determinates of bone strength. Murine bones have an intracortical band of woven bone that is not present in human bones. This band is not obvious under brightfield imaging and not typically analyzed. Due to the band’s morphology and location it has been theorized to be remnant bone from early in life. Furthermore, lamellar and woven bone are well known to have differing mechanical strengths. The purpose of this study was to determine (i) if the band is from early life and (ii) if the woven bone or calcified cartilage contained within the band affect whole bone strength. Woven Bone Origin Studies In twelve to fourteen week old mice, doxycycline was used to label bone formed prior to 3 weeks old. Doxycycline labeling and woven bone patterns on contralateral femora matched well and encompassed an almost identical cross-sectional area. Also, we highlight for the first time in mice the presence of calcified cartilage exclusively within the band. However, calcified cartilage could not be identified on high resolution cone-beam microCT scans when examined visually or by thresholding methods. Mechanical Strength Studies Subsequently, three-point bending was used to analyze the effects of woven bone and calcified cartilage on whole bone mechanics in a cohort of male and female six and 13 week old Balb/C mice. Three-point bending outcomes were correlated with structural and compositional measures using multivariate linear regression. Woven bone composed a higher percent of young bones than older bones. However, calcified cartilage in older bones was twice that of younger bones, which was similar when normalized by area. Area and/or tissue mineral density accounted for >75% of variation for most strength outcomes. Percent calcified cartilage added significant predictive power to maximal force and bending stress. Calcified cartilage and woven bone could have more influence in genetic

  20. Micro-CT evaluation of bone defects: applications to osteolytic bone metastases, bone cysts, and fracture.

    PubMed

    Buie, Helen R; Bosma, Nick A; Downey, Charlene M; Jirik, Frank R; Boyd, Steven K

    2013-11-01

    Bone defects can occur in various forms and present challenges to performing a standard micro-CT evaluation of bone quality because most measures are suited to homogeneous structures rather than ones with spatially focal abnormalities. Such defects are commonly associated with pain and fragility. Research involving bone defects requires quantitative approaches to be developed if micro-CT is to be employed. In this study, we demonstrate that measures of inter-microarchitectural bone spacing are sensitive to the presence of focal defects in the proximal tibia of two distinctly different mouse models: a burr-hole model for fracture healing research, and a model of osteolytic bone metastases. In these models, the cortical and trabecular bone compartments were both affected by the defect and were, therefore, evaluated as a single unit to avoid splitting the defects into multiple analysis regions. The burr-hole defect increased mean spacing (Sp) by 27.6%, spacing standard deviation (SpSD) by 113%, and maximum spacing (Spmax) by 72.8%. Regression modeling revealed SpSD (β=0.974, p<0.0001) to be a significant predictor of the defect volume (R(2)=0.949) and Spmax (β=0.712, p<0.0001) and SpSD (β=0.271, p=0.022) to be significant predictors of the defect diameter (R(2)=0.954). In the mice with osteolytic bone metastases, spacing parameters followed similar patterns of change as reflected by other imaging technologies, specifically bioluminescence data which is indicative of tumor burden. These data highlight the sensitivity of spacing measurements to bone architectural abnormalities from 3D micro-CT data and provide a tool for quantitative evaluation of defects within a bone.

  1. Architecture and microstructure of cortical bone in reconstructed canine mandibles after bone transport distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Uriel; Halvachs, Emily K; Dechow, Paul C; Elsalanty, Mohammed E; Opperman, Lynne A

    2011-11-01

    Reconstruction of the canine mandible using bone transport distraction osteogenesis has been shown to be a suitable method for correcting segmental bone defects produced by cancer, gunshots, and trauma. Although the mechanical quality of the new regenerate cortical bone seems to be related to the mineralization process, several questions regarding the microstructural patterns of the new bony tissue remain unanswered. The purpose of this study was to quantify any microstructural differences that may exist between the regenerate and control cortical bone. Five adult American foxhound dogs underwent unilateral bone transport distraction of the mandible to repair bone defects of 30-35 mm. Animals were killed 12 weeks after the beginning of the consolidation period. Fourteen cylindrical cortical samples were extracted from the superior, medial, and inferior aspects of the lingual and buccal plates of the reconstructed aspect of the mandible, and 21 specimens were collected similarly from the contralateral aspect of the mandible. Specimens were evaluated using histomorphometric and micro-computed tomographic techniques to compare their microstructure. Except for differences in haversian canal area, histomorphometric analyses suggested no statistical differences in microstructure between regenerate and control cortical bone. Morphological evaluation suggested a consistent level of anisotropy, possibly related to the distraction vector. After 12 weeks' consolidation, bone created during bone transport distraction osteogenesis was comparable to native bone in microstructure, architecture, and mechanical properties. It is proposed that, after enough time, the properties of the regenerate bone will be identical to that of native bone.

  2. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  3. Bone Vascularization in Normal and Disease Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Bone vasculature is essential for many processes, such as skeletal development and growth, bone modeling and remodeling, and healing processes. Endothelium is an integral part of bone tissue, expressing a physiological paracrine function via growth factors and chemokines release, and interacting with several cellular lines. Alterations of the complex biochemical interactions between vasculature and bone cells may lead to various clinical manifestations. Two different types of pathologies result: a defect or an excess of bone vasculature or endothelium metabolism. Starting from the molecular basis of the interactions between endothelial and bone cells, the Authors present an overview of the recent acquisitions in the physiopathology of the most important clinical patterns, and the modern therapeutic strategies for their treatments. PMID:23986744

  4. Molecular characterisation of growth differentiation factor 9 (gdf9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (bmp15) and their patterns of gene expression during the ovarian reproductive cycle in the European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Halm, S; Ibañez, A J; Tyler, C R; Prat, F

    2008-09-10

    Members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), have crucial roles in primary follicle growth in mammals. To initiate investigations into their significance in teleost oogenesis, we set out to clone and characterise the cDNAs of gdf9 and bmp15 and analysed their patterns of gene expression during the ovarian reproductive cycle in the European sea bass (Dicentrachus labrax). Sea bass gdf9 and bmp15 cDNAs were 2200 and 2049 bp long, coding for 438 and 459 amino acids (aas), respectively, and were most similar to zebrafish gdf9 and bmp15 (64.4 and 56.1%, respectively). By Northern analysis, sea bass gdf9 and bmp15 mRNA transcripts were detected in the ovary only of the tissues analysed and their sizes were 2.2 and 2.1 kb, respectively. Dot-blot analysis revealed high levels of gdf9 and bmp15 expression in the ovary during primary oocyte growth and previtellogenesis (July to October), with a significant decline at the onset of vitellogenesis (November) and remaining low until the beginning of new oocyte growth (April/May). There was a highly significant positive correlation (r=0.939) between gdf9 and bmp15 gene expression in individual samples. The high levels of gdf9 and bmp15 mRNA transcripts in the ovary, especially during the previtellogenic growth period suggest an important role for these factors in early primary oocyte growth in the European sea bass.

  5. Connecting mechanics and bone cell activities in the bone remodeling process: an integrated finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.'s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  6. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  7. Engineering anatomically shaped human bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Warren L; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Chan, M Ete; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Wan, Leo Q; Liu, X Sherry; Guo, X Edward; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-02-23

    The ability to engineer anatomically correct pieces of viable and functional human bone would have tremendous potential for bone reconstructions after congenital defects, cancer resections, and trauma. We report that clinically sized, anatomically shaped, viable human bone grafts can be engineered by using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and a "biomimetic" scaffold-bioreactor system. We selected the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar bone as our tissue model, because of its clinical importance and the challenges associated with its complex shape. Anatomically shaped scaffolds were generated from fully decellularized trabecular bone by using digitized clinical images, seeded with hMSCs, and cultured with interstitial flow of culture medium. A bioreactor with a chamber in the exact shape of a human TMJ was designed for controllable perfusion throughout the engineered construct. By 5 weeks of cultivation, tissue growth was evidenced by the formation of confluent layers of lamellar bone (by scanning electron microscopy), markedly increased volume of mineralized matrix (by quantitative microcomputer tomography), and the formation of osteoids (histologically). Within bone grafts of this size and complexity cells were fully viable at a physiologic density, likely an important factor of graft function. Moreover, the density and architecture of bone matrix correlated with the intensity and pattern of the interstitial flow, as determined in experimental and modeling studies. This approach has potential to overcome a critical hurdle-in vitro cultivation of viable bone grafts of complex geometries-to provide patient-specific bone grafts for craniofacial and orthopedic reconstructions.

  8. Bone Density Test

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Bone density test By Mayo Clinic Staff A bone density test determines if you have osteoporosis — a disease that causes bones to ... your bones could be quite weak. A bone density test enhances the accuracy of calculating your risk ...

  9. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Proximal Tibial Bone Graft Page Content What is a bone graft? Bone grafts may be needed for various ... the proximal tibia. What is a proximal tibial bone graft? Proximal tibial bone graft (PTBG) is a ...

  10. Bone scan in metabolic bone diseases. Review.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazek, Saeid; Szumowski, Piotr; Rogowski, Franciszek; Kociura-Sawicka, Agnieszka; Mojsak, Małgorzata; Szorc, Małgorzata

    2012-08-25

    Metabolic bone disease encompasses a number of disorders that tend to present a generalized involvement of the whole skeleton. The disorders are mostly related to increased bone turnover and increased uptake of radiolabelled diphosphonate. Skeletal uptake of 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate depends primarily upon osteoblastic activity, and to a lesser extent, skeletal vascularity. A bone scan image therefore presents a functional display of total skeletal metabolism and has valuable role to play in the assessment of patients with metabolic bone disorders. However, the bone scan appearances in metabolic bone disease are often non-specific, and their recognition depends on increased tracer uptake throughout the whole skeleton. It is the presence of local lesions, as in metastatic disease, that makes a bone scan appearance obviously abnormal. In the early stages, there will be difficulty in evaluating the bone scans from many patients with metabolic bone disease. However, in the more severe cases scan appearances can be quite striking and virtually diagnostic.

  11. Comparison of different methods of image analysis for quantifying bare soil in rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido Fernández, M.; Lavado Contador, J. F.; Schnabel, S.; Gómez Gutiérrez, Á.

    2009-04-01

    Many authors emphasize the importance of vegetation in maintaining low levels of soil loss by means of its positive influence in reducing erosion. In some low-vegetated Mediterranean rangelands, especially those with high livestock densities, water erosion can ultimately lead to a partial or total loss of soils, particularly at the beginning of the rainy season, when the surface cover is reduced after the dry summer period. In relation with this, it is essential to develop accurate methods allowing the quantification of bare soil which, in turn, can inform about the influence of different livestock management alternatives over the land system. The main goal of this work is the comparison of the ability of various pixel-based as well as object-oriented methods of image classification for the quantification of bare soil at a fine spatial resolution. The study area is a farm located in a woody rangeland (dehesa) in SW Spain covering a surface area of 1,024 hectare. A three bands (RGB) orthophoto image with a pixel size of 0,4 metres was used, together with its brightness component, to compare the classification of bare soil vs covered soil by means of the following methods: unsupervised classification (k-means algorithm), supervised classification (maximum likelihood classification, minimum distance or nearest neighbour and Mahalanobis distance) and object oriented classification through a multiresolution segmentation. The results of classification were tested using 700 to 1000 points of field validation. Different combinations of image layers as well as validation algorithms were applied to assess for the better classification results. The best unsupervised classification was obtained from a combination of the RGB layers with the brightness component of the image. A total of 93.1 % of the field data were correctly classified and the Area Under the Curve (AUC) obtained with the ROC (Receiving Operating Characteristic) validation technique amounted to 0.91. With this

  12. Bone scan appearances following bone and bone marrow biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow and bone biopsies are performed not infrequently in patients referred for bone scans and represent a potential cause of a ''false positive'' focal abnormality on the bone scan. The authors have therefore examined the scan appearances in a series of patients who had undergone either sternal marrow biopsy, (Salah needle, diameter 1.2 mm) trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy (Jamshidi 11 gauge needle, diameter 3.5 mm) or a transiliac bone biopsy (needle diameter 8 mm). Of 18 patients studied 1 to 45 days after sternal marrow 17 had normal scan appearances at the biopsy site and 1 had a possible abnormality. None of 9 patients studied 4 to 19 days after trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy had a hot spot at the biopsy site. A focal scan abnormality was present at the biopsy site in 9/11 patients studied 5 to 59 days after a trans iliac bone biopsy. No resultant scan abnormality was seen in 4 patients imaged within 3 days of the bone biopsy or in 3 patients imaged 79 to 138 days after the procedure. Bone marrow biopsy of the sternum or iliac crest does not usually cause bone scan abnormalities. A focal abnormality at the biopsy site is common in patients imaged 5 days to 2 months after bone biopsy. The gauge of the needle employed in the biopsy and thus the degree of bone trauma inflicted, is likely to be main factor determining the appearance of bone scan abnormalities at the biopsy site.

  13. [Amelioration of secondary bare alkali-saline patches in Songnen Plain through inserting cornstalk].

    PubMed

    He, Nianpeng; Wu, Ling; Jiang, Shicheng; Zhou, Daowei

    2004-06-01

    Based on the field experiment on Songnen grassland, a new method was established to ameliorate the secondary bare alkali-saline patches (SAP) through inserting cornstalk. The experiment was rested on the assumption that through inserting cornstalk in the secondary bare alkali-saline patches (SAP) to retain seeds moving over its surface, the necessary seed source could be gained; and these seeds should be able to germinate and survive successfully on the cornstalk itself or in its neighborhood, where should be more fit to grow than other sites in SAP, due to the decomposition of cornstalk and its special role, so that, the aim to restore vegetation of SAP could be achieved at a pretty low cost and rapid speed. The results showed that the seed bank in soil was increased significantly, owing to the inserted cornstalk and its operating processes. The seed number in ameliorated soil was 4020.0 +/- 1773.6 seeds x m(-2), while that in the secondary bare alkali-saline patches (SAP) was only 10.0 +/- 31.6 seeds x m(-2). Although the soil chemical and physical characters in ameliorated zone were improved to some extent, the overall situation of soil was still bad for plant growth, as the pH, soluble saline ion and organic matter were concerned. Most of Chloris virgata grew around or on the cornstalk, the plants around each cornstalk being 3.9 +/- 2.2, and the total being 48.64 +/- 38.72 g x m(-2). Therefore, this method demanded a few resources, and needed simple technology and low cost, which is potentially deserved to popularize.

  14. Occupation of bare habitats, an evolutionary precursor to soil specialization in plants

    PubMed Central

    Cacho, N. Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y.

    2014-01-01

    Plant soil specialists contribute greatly to global diversity; however, the ecoevolutionary forces responsible for generating this diversity are poorly understood. We integrate molecular phylogenies with descriptive and experimental ecological data, creating a powerful framework with which to elucidate forces driving soil specialization. Hypotheses explaining edaphic specialization have historically focused on costs of adaptation to elements (e.g., nickel, calcium/magnesium) and accompanying tradeoffs in competitive ability in benign soils. We combine in situ microhabitat data for 37 streptanthoid species (Brassicaceae), soil analyses, and competition experiments with their phylogeny to reconstruct selective forces generating serpentine soil endemism, which has four to five independent origins in this group. Coupling ancestral state reconstruction with phylogenetic independent contrasts, we examine the magnitude and timing of changes in soil and habitat attributes relative to inferred shifts to serpentine. We find large changes in soil chemistry at nodes associated with soil shifts, suggesting that elemental changes occurred concomitantly with soil transitions. In contrast, the amount of bare ground surrounding plants in the field (“bareness”), which is greater in serpentine environments, is conserved across soil-type shifts. Thus, occupation of bare environments preceded shifts to serpentine, and may serve as an evolutionary precursor to harsh elemental soils and environments. In greenhouse experiments, taxa from barer environments are poorer competitors, a tradeoff that may contribute to soil endemism. The hypothesis of occupation of bare habitats as a precursor of soil specialization can be tested in other systems with a similar integrative ecophylogenetic approach, thereby providing deeper insights into this rich source of biodiversity. PMID:25267640

  15. Ecotoxicity of bare and coated silver nanoparticles in the aquatic midge, Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Young; Chung, Jiwoong; Colman, Benjamin P; Matson, Cole W; Kim, Younghun; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Phil-Je; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Jinhee

    2015-09-01

    Although sediment is generally considered to be the major sink for nanomaterials in aquatic environments, few studies have addressed the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials in the presence of sediment. In the present study, the ecotoxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a range of organic coatings was examined in a freshwater sediment-dwelling organism, Chironomus riparius, using acute and chronic ecotoxicity endpoints, including molecular indicators. The toxicity of AgNPs coated with different organic materials, such as polyvinylpyrrolidone, gum arabic, and citrate, to C. riparius was compared with that of bare-AgNPs and AgNO3 (ionic silver). Total silver concentration was also measured to monitor the behavior of the AgNPs in water and sediment and to determine how ion dissolution affects the toxicity of all AgNPs. The coated- and bare-AgNPs caused DNA damage and oxidative stress-related gene expression. In addition, the bare-AgNPs and AgNO3 had a significant effect on development and reproduction. The surface coatings generally mitigated the toxicity of AgNPs to C. riparius, which can be explained by the reduced number of ions released from coated-AgNPs. Citrate-AgNPs caused the most significant alteration at the molecular level, but this did not translate to higher-level effects. Finally, comparing previously conducted studies on AgNP-induced gene expression without sediments, the authors show that the presence of sediment appears to mitigate the toxicity of AgNPs.

  16. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Aiello, B R; Iriarte-Diaz, J; Blob, R W; Butcher, M T; Carrano, M T; Espinoza, N R; Main, R P; Ross, C F

    2015-07-07

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar-canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction.

  17. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, B. R.; Iriarte-Diaz, J.; Blob, R. W.; Butcher, M. T.; Carrano, M. T.; Espinoza, N. R.; Main, R. P.; Ross, C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar–canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. PMID:26063842

  18. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Charles Y. Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  19. Haptic roughness perception of linear gratings via bare finger or rigid probe.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael A; Kitada, Ryo; Klatzky, Roberta L; Lederman, Susan J

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of perceived roughness was haptically estimated as subjects freely explored linear gratings with either the bare finger or a rigid stylus-shaped probe. A considerably expanded range of ridge and groove width was investigated, relative to the extant literature. The four experiments collectively indicate that, for both finger and probe-end effectors, the variance in the estimates of perceived roughness was predominantly predicted by a single parameter: groove width. The functions relating perceived roughness to groove width increased over a narrow band relative to the full range of values, then flattened. These data have archival values for models of roughness perception involving both direct and indirect touch.

  20. The origins of French boxing: bare-knuckle duelling, savate and chausson, 1820-45.

    PubMed

    Loudcher, J F

    2001-01-01

    Savate, also called chausson, or French boxing is a combat activity characterized by kicking and punching. Its inception reaches back to the Restoration and the monarchy of Louis-Philippe (1818-48) although it was not recognised as a combat sport until the twentieth century. This article, based on a variety of rich sources (police reports, newspapers, books, etc.) demonstrates how, on the one hand, the origins of savate can be traced back to the bare-fisted duels of the Restoration and, on the other hand, its emergence corresponds to the mutation of structural order as put forth by M. Foucault.

  1. A numerical simulation of soil temperature and moisture variations for a bare field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schieldge, J. P.; Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The diurnal variations of soil temperature and moisture content were simulated for a bare agricultural field in the San Joaquin Valley in California. The simulation pertained to the first 72 hours of drying, from saturation, of a sandy, clay loam soil. The results were compared with measurements of soil temperature and moisture content made at the field. Calculated and measured values of soil temperature trends agreed in general, but model results of moisture trends did not replicate observed diurnal effects evident at depths 4 centimeters or more below the surface.

  2. Bare metal or drug-eluting stent implantation in last remaining vessel PCI? A serious dilemma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Jianhua; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of an old male diabetic patient with last remaining vessel coronary artery disease and poor left ventricular function. In presence of an old occlusion of the left main coronary artery, a subtotal stenosis of a dominant right coronary artery required angioplasty. After ample consideration it was decided to implant a bare metal stent (BMS) instead of a drug-eluting stent (DES). The major reason was the fear for early discontinuation of clopidogrel in case a drug-eluting stent was placed. The procedure and follow-up are described followed by an overview of current literature concerning similar pathology.

  3. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  4. Interventional Treatment of LVAD Outflow Graft Stenosis by Introduction of Bare Metal Stents.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schlöglhofer, Thomas; Haberl, Thomas; Riebandt, Julia; Dimitrov, Kamen; Schima, Heinrich; Kastner, Johannes; Matzek, Wolfgang; Laufer, Günther; Zimpfer, Daniel

    2017-02-09

    LVAD outflow graft stenosis is a rare but life-threatening complication of MCS-therapy. Current treatment modalities (pump exchange or systemic thrombolytic therapy) are associated with significant mortality and morbidity.Implantation of bare metal stents within the stenosed outflow graft is an alternative. Herein we describe a series of 3-cases with successful stent placement. This seems to be safe and successful however correct and early diagnosis of outflow stenosis can be challenging. Information provided by the HeartWare HVAD logfiles are extremely helpful for diagnosis.

  5. Data documentation for the bare soil experiment at the University of Arkansas, June - August 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the relationships between soil moisture and reflectivity of a bare soil, using microwave techniques. A drainage experiment was conducted on a Captina silt loam in cooperation with personnel in the Electrical Engineering Department. Measurements included soil moisture pressures at various depths, neutron probe measurements, gravimetric moisture samples, and reflectivity of the soil surface at selected frequencies including 1.5 and 6.0 GHz and at the incident angle of 45 deg. All measurements were made in conjuction with that of reflectivity data.

  6. Single ionization and capture cross sections from biological molecules by bare projectile impact*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Michele A.; Monti, Juan M.; Montenegro, Pablo D.; Fojón, Omar A.; Champion, Christophe; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2017-02-01

    We report calculations on single differential and total cross sections for single ionization and single electron capture from biological targets, namely, vapor water and DNA nucleobasese molecules, by bare projectile impact: H+, He2+, and C6+. They are performed within the Continuum Distorted Wave - Eikonal Initial State approximation and compared to several existing experimental data. This study is oriented to the obtention of a reliable set of theoretical data to be used as input in a Monte Carlo code destined to micro- and nano- dosimetry.

  7. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  8. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  9. Dietary restrictions, bone density, and bone quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-hai; Ables, Gene P

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), protein restriction (PR), and specific amino acid restriction (e.g., methionine restriction (MR)) are different dietary interventions that have been confirmed with regard to their comprehensive benefits to metabolism and health. Based on bone densitometric measurements, weight loss induced by dietary restriction is known to be accompanied by reduced areal bone mineral density, bone mass, and/or bone size, and it is considered harmful to bone health. However, because of technological advancements in bone densitometric instruments (e.g., high-resolution X-ray tomography), dietary restrictions have been found to cause a reduction in bone mass/size rather than volumetric bone mineral density. Furthermore, when considering bone quality, bone health consists of diverse indices that cannot be fully represented by densitometric measurements alone. Indeed, there is evidence that moderate dietary restrictions do not impair intrinsic bone material properties, despite the reduction in whole-bone strength because of a smaller bone size. In the present review, we integrate research evidence from traditional densitometric measurements, metabolic status assays (e.g., energy metabolism, oxidative stresses, and inflammatory responses), and biomaterial analyses to provide revised conclusions regarding the effects of CR, PR, and MR on the skeleton.

  10. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruoxun; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  11. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  12. Chernozem aggregate waterstability loss investigation in a long-term bare fallow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, N. A.; Milanovskiy, E. Y.

    2009-04-01

    The research is focused on mechanisms of aggregate waterstability controlled by soil organic matter (SOM). The objects of the research are two contrast variants of typical chernozem - under native grassland and under a 60-year bare fallow experimental plot (100 m2) on the territory of Central Chernozem Biosphere Reserve, Russia. Seasonal plowing and deficiency of fresh plant residues (due to weeding out) resulted in a rapid mineralization of SOM. The Corg content in the 0-20 cm topsoil under native grassland is 6-4.5 %. For the last two decades Corg content under bare fallow has stabilized on the 2.6% level and is therefore assumed to represent stable SOM pool. However excellent aggregate waterstability of chernozem is completely lost under bare fallow. Therefore the aim of our study is to reveal the role of different SOM pools spatial and functional organization in aggregate waterstability formation. Bulk soil samples were collected from 2 m grassland profile and 1.5 m bare fallow profile with 10 cm interval and simultaneous measurements of soil field density and moisture. Following samples were analysed: bulk samples, dry and wet-sieving aggregates, undisturbed and pulverized aggregates, granule-densimetric fractions obtained by sedimentation of bulk samples (clay 5 mkm) with following densimetric fractionation in bromoform (light ? 2.4 g/cm3), and above mentioned samples after removal of SOM by hydrogen peroxide. Isolation of aggregates and granule-densimetric fractionation were carried out for bulk soils at 0-20, 40-50 and 80-90 cm depth. We use elemental analysis (C, H, N), size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction chromatography of humic substances (HS), laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area (SSA) measurements by nitrogen adsorption and micromorphological examination of thin sections. Detailed characteristics obtained for aggregates and granule-densimetric fractions from a typical chernozem soil under native grassland and under 60

  13. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  14. Oralloy (93.2 235U) Bare Metal Annuli And Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, Andrew John

    2015-09-01

    A multitude of critical experiments with highly enriched uranium metal were conducted in the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments served to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant while also providing data for verification of different calculation methods and associated cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included both solid cylinders and annuli of various diameters, interacting cylinders of various diameters, parallelepipeds, and reflected cylinders and annuli. The experiments described here involve a series of delayed critical stacks of bare oralloy HEU annuli and disks. Three of these experiments consist of stacking bare HEU annuli of varying diameters to obtain critical configurations. These annuli have nominal inner and outer diameters (ID/OD) including: 7 inches (") ID – 9" OD, 9" ID – 11" OD, 11" ID – 13" OD, and 13? ID – 15" OD. The nominal heights range from 0.125" to 1.5". The three experiments themselves range from 7" – 13", 7" – 15", and 9" – 15" in diameter, respectively. The fourth experiment ranges from 7" – 11", and along with different annuli, it also includes an 11" disk and several 7" diameter disks. All four delayed critical experiments were configured and evaluated by J. T. Mihalczo, J. J. Lynn, and D. E. McCarty from December of 1962 to February 1963 with additional information in their corresponding logbook.

  15. Preliminary study of quaternary faulting on the east side of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Reheis, M.C.

    1986-12-31

    Active faults bound the east side of Bare Mountain. Geomorphic features, stratigraphy, and soil development indicate that two 3-km-long segments of the range-front fault probably last moved in Holocene or late Pleistocene time. Other segments of the fault have been quiescent since the late Pleistocene. Both late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits bury many faults east of the northern end of Bare Mountain. Two prospect pits on the range-front fault reveal evidence of recurrent late Quaternary movements. Both older and younger deposits in one pit are faulted, but fractures in the older unit do not extend up into the younger unit. Based on soil development, the older and younger fault episodes respectively are probably late Pleistocene and Holocene in age. Another pit shows carbonate-cemented fractures with slickensides in a late Pleistocene deposit, suggesting at least two late Pleistocene or Holocene fault movements. Middle to early Pleistocene and Tertiary deposits show evidence of recurrent faulting in many locations. Faults in these deposits are pervaded by secondary CaCO{sub 3} and silica that commonly exhibit slickensides.

  16. Genetic relationships between dagginess, breech bareness, and wool traits in New Zealand dual-purpose sheep.

    PubMed

    Pickering, N K; Blair, H T; Hickson, R E; Dodds, K G; Johnson, P L; McEwan, J C

    2013-10-01

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters were estimated for dagginess, breech, wool, and fiber traits from approximately 29,500 progeny born in 2009 and 2010 in New Zealand dual-purpose ram breeding sheep flocks. Dagginess is adherence of fecal matter to the wool, and this study investigates the genetic and phenotypic correlations between dagginess and breech and wool traits. Estimates for heritability were moderate (0.21 to 0.44) for the following traits: dag score at 3 and 8 mo (DAG3, DAG8), breech bareness, wool length, wool bulk (BULK), mean fiber diameter, mean fiber diameter SD, mean fiber diameter CV, curvature (CURV), weaning weight at 3 mo, and autumn BW. Heritability estimates for fleece weight at 12 mo and proportion of medullated fibers were high (0.49 and 0.53, respectively). Dag score at 3 mo and DAG8 had low genetic and phenotypic correlations with all traits. Breech bareness had positive genetic and phenotypic correlations with CURV and BULK and mostly negative genetic correlations with all other wool traits. In summary the quantity and attributes of wool were not primary causative factors in fecal accumulation, leaving fecal consistency and composition as the major factors.

  17. Discovery Of Transient Iron Fluorescence In The Bare Seyfert Ark 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardini, Emanuele; Porquet, D.; Reeves, J.; Braito, V.; Lobban, A.; Matt, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results from an X-ray observational campaign on the bare Seyfert galaxy Ark 120 jointly carried out with XMM- Newton, Chandra, and NuSTAR. The favourable line of sight to this source, devoid of any significant absorbing material, provides an incomparably clean view to the nuclear regions of an AGN, down to the the immediate surroundings of the radiatively efficient, accreting supermassive black hole. Here we focus on the nature, properties, and variability of the emission-line complex due to iron fluorescence detected in the 6-7 keV band. The narrow K-alpha feature from neutral iron at 6.4 keV is resolved by Chandra/HETG to a width of 5000 km/s, consistent with origin from the optical broad-line region. However, excess components are seen on both sides of this core. The excess emission map computed over the 7.5 days of XMM-Newton monitoring and the following, time-resolved spectral analysis show that both the red and blue features are highly variable on timescales of 10-15 hours. Any explanation (orbiting hotspots, coronal clumps, disc instabilities) requires a highly dynamic, inhomogeneous disc/coronal system. These observations thus prove the unique potential of a bare source like Ark 120 to better understand the physics of the accretion disc/X-ray corona system in AGN.

  18. Drug-eluting versus bare-metal coronary stents: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Nicholas S; Bangalore, Sripal

    2012-11-01

    Drug-eluting stents have dramatically reduced the risk of restenosis, but concerns of an increased risk of stent thrombosis have provided uncertainty about their use. Recent studies have continued to show improved procedural and clinical outcomes with drug-eluting stents both in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary artery disease. Newer generation drug-eluting stents (especially everolimus-eluting stents) have been shown to be not only efficacious but also safe with reduced risk of stent thrombosis when compared with bare-metal stents, potentially changing the benchmark for stent safety from bare-metal stents to everolimus-eluting stents. While much progress is being made in the development of bioabsorbable polymer stents, nonpolymer stents and bioabsorbable stent technology, it remains to be seen whether these stents will have superior safety and efficacy outcomes compared with the already much improved rates of revascularization and stent thrombosis seen with newer generation stents (everolimus-eluting stents and resolute zotarolimus-eluting stents).

  19. Inversion of Electromagnetic Models for Bare Soil Parameter Estimation from Multifrequency Polarimetric SAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Castracane, Paolo; Pulvirenti, Luca

    2008-01-01

    The potentiality of polarimetric SAR data for the estimation of bare soil geophysical parameters (i.e., roughness and soil moisture) is investigated in this work. For this purpose, two forward models available in the literature, able to simulate the measurements of a multifrequency radar polarimeter, have been implemented for use within an inversion scheme. A multiplicative noise has been considered in the multidimensional space of the elements of the polarimetric Covariance Matrix, by adopting a complex Wishart distribution to account for speckle effects. An additive error has been also introduced on the simulated measurements to account for calibration and model errors. Maximum a Posteriori Probability and Minimum Variance criteria have been considered to perform the inversion. As for the algorithms to implement the criteria, simple optimization/integration procedures have been used. A Neural Network approach has been adopted as well. A correlation between the roughness parameters has been also supposed in the simulation as a priori information, to evaluate its effect on the estimation accuracy. The methods have been tested on simulated data to compare their performances as function of number of looks, incidence angles and frequency bands, thus identifying the best radar configuration in terms of estimation accuracy. Polarimetric measurements acquired during MAC Europe and SIR-C campaigns, over selected bare soil fields, have been also used as validation data. PMID:27873982

  20. Optical properties of plasmon-resonant bare and silica-coated nanostars used for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Bibikova, Olga; Popov, Alexey; Bykov, Alexander; Prilepskii, Artur; Kinnunen, Matti; Kordas, Krisztian; Bogatyrev, Vladimir; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Vainio, Seppo; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-07-01

    We synthesized and characterized gold nanostars and their silica-coated derivatives with 7- to 50-nm shell thicknesses as contrast agents for optical imaging. The scattering and absorption coefficients of the nanoparticles (NPs) were estimated by means of collimated transmittance and diffuse reflectance/transmittance analyses. The contrasting properties of the nanostructures were studied in optical coherence tomography glass capillary imaging. The silica-coated nanostars with the thickest shell have higher scattering ability in comparison with bare nanostars. Viability assays confirmed weak in vitro toxicity of nanostructures at up to ∼200-μg/mL concentrations. We showed real-time visualization of nanostars in both agarose and cultured cells by analyzing the backscattering signal using a conventional laser confocal microscope. The signal intensity detected from the silica-coated NPs was almost 1.5 times higher in comparison with bare nanostars. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that conventional laser confocal microscopy was applied in combined scattering and transmitted light modes to detect the backscattered signal of gold nanostars, which is useful for direct monitoring of the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of NPs in living cells.

  1. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by Sarcocystis falcatula in bare-faced ibis (Phimosus infuscatus).

    PubMed

    Konradt, Guilherme; Bianchi, Matheus Viezzer; Leite-Filho, Ronaldo Viana; da Silva, Bruna Zafalon; Soares, Rodrigo Martins; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Driemeier, David

    2017-02-01

    The infection by S. falcatula is commonly associated with respiratory disease in captive psittacine birds, with a few case reports of this protozoan causing encephalitis in wild birds. We describe the clinical, pathological, and molecular aspects of an infection by S. falcatula in a bare-faced ibis (Phimosus infuscatus). Clinically, wing paralysis and mild motor incoordination were observed. At necropsy, the telencephalic cortex showed multifocal to coalescing yellowish soft areas. Histologically, multifocal to coalescent nonsuppurative necrotizing meningoencephalitis of telencephalic cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem was observed. Necrotic areas showed multiple protozoan organism characteristics of Sarcocystis sp. schizonts in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells or lying free in the neuropil. Partial genetic sequences of the gene encoding cytochrome b (CYTB), the gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (RPOB) and the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) from Sarcocystis sp. schizonts revealed that the parasite had ITS-1 sequences that were 100% identical to the homologous alleles from Sarcocystis sp. shed by Didelphis albiventris in Brazil. RPOB and CYTB sequences were 100% identical to homologous of S. falcatula available in Genbank. Thus, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by S. falcatula in bare-faced ibis (P. infuscatus).

  2. Laser damage of HR, AR-coatings, monolayers and bare surfaces at 1064 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnov, S. V.; Klimentov, S. M.; Said, A. A.; Soileau, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced damage thresholds and morphologies were investigated in a variety of uncoated and coated surfaces, including monolayers and multi-layers of different chemical compositions. Both antireflective (AR) and highly reflective (HR) were tested. Testing was done at 1064 nm with 25 picosecond and 8 nanosecond YAG/Nd laser single pulses. Spot diameter in the experiments varied from 0.09 to 0.22 mm. The laser damage measurement procedure consisted of 1-on-1 (single laser pulse in the selected site) and N-on-1 experiments including repeated irradiation by pulses of the same fluence and subsequently raised from pulse to pulse fluence until damage occurred. The highest picosecond damage thresholds of commercially available coatings averaged 12 - 14 J/sq cm, 50 percent less than thresholds obtained in bare fused silica. Some coatings and bare surfaces revealed a palpable preconditioning effect (an increase in threshold of 1.2 to 1.8 times). Picosecond and nanosecond data were compared to draw conclusions about pulse width dependence. An attempt was made to classify damage morphologies according to the type of coating, class of irradiating, and damage level.

  3. Similar Success Rates with Bivalirudin and Unfractionated Heparin in Bare-Metal Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hallak, Omar; Shams, S. Ali; Broce, Mike; Lavigne, P. Scott; Lucas, B. Daniel; Elhabyan, Abdul-Karim; Reyes, Bernardo J.

    2007-09-15

    Background. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the traditional agent utilized during percutaneous peripheral interventions (PPIs) despite its well-known limitations. Bivalirudin, a thrombin-specific anticoagulant, overcomes many of the limitations of UFH and has consistently demonstrated comparable efficacy with significantly fewer bleeding complications. The purpose of this study was to compare procedural success in patients undergoing bare-metal stent implantation for atherosclerotic blockage of the renal, iliac, and femoral arteries and receiving either bivalirudin (0.75 mg/kg bolus/1.75 mg/kg/hr infusion) or UFH (50-70 U/kg/hr bolus) as the primary anticoagulant. Methods. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized retrospective registry with the primary endpoint of procedural success. Secondary endpoints included incidence of: death, myocardial infarction (MI), urgent revascularization, amputation, and major and minor bleeding. Results. One hundred and five consecutive patients were enrolled (bivalirudin = 53; heparin = 52). Baseline demographics were comparable between groups. Patients were pretreated with clopidogrel (approx. 71%) and aspirin (approx. 79%). Procedural success was achieved in 97% and 96% of patients in the bivalirudin- and heparin-treated groups, respectively. Event rates were low and similar between groups. Conclusion. Bivalirudin maintained an equal rate of procedural success in this cohort without sacrificing patient safety. Results of this study add to the growing body of evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of bivalirudin as a possible substitute for UFH in anticoagulation during peripheral vascular bare-metal stent implantation.

  4. Gamma-ray bursts and the birthrate of bare neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dar, A.; Nussinov, S.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1992-01-01

    Accretion of matter onto the surface of a white dwarf in a binary system can push it over the Chandrasekhar mass limit and may cause it to collapse into a neutron star without mass ejection or with the ejection of only a small mass. Such an optically quiet stellar collapse should be accompanied by a neutrino burst which could be detected with underground neutrino detectors if the collapse took place in our own Galaxy or in very close nearby galaxies. However, the frequency of such collapses is not known. Here we show that, if the ejected mass is less than 3 x 10 exp -4 solar mass, the electron-positron pairs resulting from neutrino-antineutrino annihilations outside the neutrinosphere produce a gamma-ray burst which could be observed out to distances of at least 300 Mpc, and that the observed rate of gamma-ray bursts sets stringent upper limits on the frequency of bare or nearlly bare neutron star births.

  5. Matching the BtA line to the bare-AGS (Part 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Glenn, J. W.; Huan, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Raparia, D.; Zeno, K.

    2008-11-01

    The Booster to AGS (BtA) transfer line [Ref for BtA line] transports the beam bunches from the AGS-Booster to the AGS synchrotron, and also matches the beam parameters ({beta}{sub x,y}, {alpha}{sub x,y}) and dispersion functions ({eta}{sub x,y}, {eta}{prime}{sub x,y}) of the transported beam to the corresponding quantities of the circulating beam in AGS, at the AGS injection point. In this technical note we describe in details, the calculations of the matching procedure of the BtA line to the bare-AGS, and provide magnet settings for the MAD-model of the BtA transfer line which is 'matched' to the bare-AGS. In a separate but more concise technical note (Part II) we will present results on the beam optics of the BtA beam line which is 'matched' to the AGS with two helical snakes.

  6. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; ...

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behaviormore » of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.« less

  7. Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumin, Md Abdul; Akhter, Kazi Farida; Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC).

  8. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center site was used for an experiment in which soil moisture remote sensing over bare, grass, and alfalfa fields was conducted over a three-month period using 0.6 GHz, 1.4 GHz, and 10.6 GHz Dicke-type microwave radiometers mounted on mobile towers. Ground truth soil moisture content and ambient air and sil temperatures were obtained concurrently with the radiometric measurements. Biomass of the vegetation cover was sampled about once a week. Soil density for each of the three fields was measured several times during the course of the experiment. Results of the radiometric masurements confirm the frequency dependence of moisture sensing sensitivity reduction reported earlier. Observations over the bare, wet field show that the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest of 0.6 GHz frequency, a result contrary to expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil water mixtures and current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  9. Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mumin, Md Abdul Akhter, Kazi Farida Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-03-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC)

  10. Optical properties of plasmon-resonant bare and silica-coated nanostars used for cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikova, Olga; Popov, Alexey; Bykov, Alexander; Prilepskii, Artur; Kinnunen, Matti; Kordas, Krisztian; Bogatyrev, Vladimir; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Vainio, Seppo; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-07-01

    We synthesized and characterized gold nanostars and their silica-coated derivatives with 7- to 50-nm shell thicknesses as contrast agents for optical imaging. The scattering and absorption coefficients of the nanoparticles (NPs) were estimated by means of collimated transmittance and diffuse reflectance/transmittance analyses. The contrasting properties of the nanostructures were studied in optical coherence tomography glass capillary imaging. The silica-coated nanostars with the thickest shell have higher scattering ability in comparison with bare nanostars. Viability assays confirmed weak in vitro toxicity of nanostructures at up to ˜200-μg/mL concentrations. We showed real-time visualization of nanostars in both agarose and cultured cells by analyzing the backscattering signal using a conventional laser confocal microscope. The signal intensity detected from the silica-coated NPs was almost 1.5 times higher in comparison with bare nanostars. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that conventional laser confocal microscopy was applied in combined scattering and transmitted light modes to detect the backscattered signal of gold nanostars, which is useful for direct monitoring of the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of NPs in living cells.

  11. Second stable regime of internal kink modes excited by barely passing energetic ions in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    He, H. D.; Zheng, G. Y.; Long, Y. X.; He, Z. X.; Jiang, H. B.; Shen, Y.; Wang, L. F.; Dong, J. Q.; Fu, G. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2010-08-15

    The internal kink (fishbone) modes, driven by barely passing energetic ions (EIs), are numerically studied with the spatial distribution of the EIs taking into account. It is found that the modes with frequencies comparable to the toroidal precession frequencies are excited by resonant interaction with the EIs. Positive and negative density gradient dominating cases, corresponding to off- and near-axis depositions of neutral beam injection (NBI), respectively, are analyzed in detail. The most interesting and important feature of the modes is that there exists a second stable regime in higher {beta}{sub h} (=pressure of EIs/toroidal magnetic pressure) range, and the modes may only be excited by the barely passing EIs in a region of {beta}{sub th1}<{beta}{sub h}<{beta}{sub th2} ({beta}{sub th} is threshold or critical beta of EIs). Besides, the unstable modes require minimum density gradients and minimum radial positions of NBI deposition. The physics mechanism for the existence of the second stable regime is discussed. The results may provide a means of reducing or even preventing the loss of NBI energetic ions and increasing the heating efficiency by adjusting the pitch angle and driving the system into the second stable regime fast enough.

  12. A Deep X-Ray View of the Bare AGN Ark 120. II. Evidence for Fe K Emission Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Lobban, A.; Matt, G.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the results from a large observational campaign on the bare Seyfert galaxy Ark 120, jointly carried out in 2014 with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and NuSTAR. The fortunate line of sight to this source, devoid of any significant absorbing material, provides an incomparably clean view to the nuclear regions of an active galaxy. Here we focus on the analysis of the iron fluorescence features, which form a composite emission pattern in the 6-7 keV band. The prominent Kα line from neutral iron at 6.4 keV is resolved in the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating spectrum to a full-width at half maximum of {4700}-1500+2700 km s-1, consistent with an origin from the optical broad-line region. Excess components are detected on both sides of the narrow Kα line: the red one (6.0-6.3 keV) clearly varies in strength in about one year, and hints at the presence of a broad, mildly asymmetric line from the accretion disk; the blue one (6.5-7.0 keV), instead, is likely a blend of different contributions, and appears to be constant when integrated over long enough exposures. However, the Fe K excess emission map computed over the 7.5 days of the XMM-Newton monitoring shows that both the red and blue features are actually highly variable on timescales of ˜10-15 hr, suggesting that they might arise from short-lived hotspots on the disk surface, located within a few tens of gravitational radii from the central supermassive black hole and possibly illuminated by magnetic reconnection events. Any alternative explanation would still require a highly dynamic, inhomogeneous disk/coronal system, involving clumpiness and/or instability.

  13. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  14. Bone scan alterations in aromatase inhibitor-treated patients.

    PubMed

    De Geeter, Frank; Van den Bruel, Annick; De Cuypere, Eveline; Langlois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We report bone scan changes in 3 patients receiving aromatase inhibitors as adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Compared with bone scans before treatment, repeated scans after at least 10 months of aromatase inhibitor treatment showed increased activity in the peripheral skeleton and the skull. In 2 patients, these alterations could be correlated with increased markers of bone turnover. They probably result from high bone turnover induced by estrogen depletion caused by aromatase inhibitors. This effect should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a bone scan pattern suggestive of hyperparathyroidism, which was ruled out.

  15. Relationships among maxillofacial morphologies, bone properties, and bone metabolic markers in patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Saito, D; Mikami, T; Oda, Y; Hasebe, D; Nishiyama, H; Saito, I; Kobayashi, T

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among bone properties, bone metabolic markers, and types of jaw deformity. The subjects were 55 female patients with jaw deformities. Skeletal morphology was examined using lateral cephalograms, and the patients were divided into three groups according to the type of anteroposterior skeletal pattern. Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, as well as deoxypyridinoline in urine, were measured as bone metabolic markers. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were used to assess bone properties at the calcaneal bone. The bone volume and bone density of the condylar process were measured in 43 patients by computed tomography. There were no significant differences in bone metabolic markers and QUS parameters between the groups, although bone formation and resorption markers tended to be higher in patients with a protrusive mandible. On the other hand, patients with mandibular retrusion had a higher tendency to have small and dense condylar processes. In conclusion, the results suggest that growth depression or a degenerative change in the mandibular condyle is involved in the pathogenesis of mandibular retrusion, although risk factors for progressive condylar resorption were not determined.

  16. Noncontact optical sensor for bone fracture diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Bishitz, Yael; Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Tenner, Felix; Schmidt, Michael; Mico, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    We present the first steps of a device suitable for detection of broken and cracked bones. The approach is based on temporal tracking of back reflected secondary speckle patterns generated when illuminating the limb with a laser and while applying periodic pressure stimulation via a loud speaker. Preliminary experiments are included showing the validity of the proposed device for detection of damaged bones. PMID:25798293

  17. Bone mineral measurement: Experiment M078

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C., Jr.; Rambaut, P. C.; Vogel, J. M.; Whittle, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray absorptiometric measurements on bone mineral content, in addition to calcium balance studies, were performed on male volunteers during bed rest periods of 24 to 36 weeks duration and compared to Skylab mission data. Results show that mineral losses occur from the bones of the lower extremities during missions of up to 84 days and that in general they follow the loss patterns of the bed rest situation. The level of loss observed in Spacelab crews are not of clinical concern.

  18. A morphometric analysis of vegetation patterns in dryland ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Stefan C.; Li, Mao; Mio, Washington; Punyasena, Surangi W.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity of regime shifts in dryland ecosystems. In this paper, we have developed quantitative methods to characterize the morphology of spatial patterns in dryland vegetation. Our approach is based on algorithmic techniques that have been used to classify pollen grains on the basis of textural patterning, and involves constructing feature vectors to quantify the shapes formed by vegetation patterns. We have analysed images of patterned vegetation produced by a computational model and a small set of satellite images from South Kordofan (South Sudan), which illustrates that our methods are applicable to both simulated and real-world data. Our approach provides a means of quantifying patterns that are frequently described using qualitative terminology, and could be used to classify vegetation patterns in large-scale satellite surveys of dryland ecosystems. PMID:28386414

  19. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  20. Soft Landing of Bare PtRu Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Moon, DaeWon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu alloy nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 x 104 ions µm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (STEM-HAADF) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu alloy nanoparticles are uniform in size and have a Ru core decorated with small regions of Pt on the surface. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in relative atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt4f and Ru3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 x 104 ions µm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the alloy nanoparticles supported on glassy

  1. Soft landing of bare PtRu nanoparticles for electrochemical reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Colby, Robert; Engelhard, Mark; Moon, Daewon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 × 10(4) ions μm(-2) and that their average height is centered at 4.5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (HAADF-STEM) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu nanoparticles are uniform in size. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in atomic concentrations of ∼9% and ∼33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt 4f and Ru 3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He(+) and O(+) ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 × 10(4) ions μm(-2) of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon. The reproducibility of the nanoparticle synthesis and deposition was

  2. Bone scan appearances following biopsy of bone and bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of sternal marrow aspiration, iliac crest marrow aspiration, and iliac crest bone biopsy on bone scan appearances was examined. Eighteen patients were scanned a mean of 9.9 days after sternal marrow aspiration with a Salah needle. Bone scans obtained in 9 patients a mean of 10 days aftr iliac crest trephine marrow biopsy with a Jamshidi needle showed no abnormality at the biopsy site. In 18 patients with metabolic bone disease who had undergone iliac crest bone biopsy with an 8 mm needle, a scan abnormality due to the biopsy was usually present when the interval between the biopsy and the scan was 5 days to 2 months. Patients who were scanned within 3 days of iliac crest bone biopsy or more than 2 months after biopsy had normal scan appearance at the biopsy site.

  3. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  4. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  5. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... secrete factors that interact with the naturally occurring cells in the bone and cause bone destruction, new bone formation, or both. Effects Because MBD weakens the affected bones, people with the disease are prone to fractures. Broken ...

  6. Bone microstructure and developmental plasticity in birds and other dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Starck, J Matthias; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2002-12-01

    Patterns of bone microstructure have frequently been used to deduce dynamics and processes of growth in extant and fossil tetrapods. Often, the various types of primary bone tissue have been associated with different bone deposition rates and more recently such deductions have extended to patterns observed in dinosaur bone microstructure. These previous studies are challenged by the findings of the current research, which integrates an experimental neontological approach and a paleontological comparison. We use tetracycline labeling and morphometry to study the variability of bone deposition rates in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) growing under different experimental conditions. We compare resulting patterns in bone microstructure with those found in fossil birds and other dinosaurs. We found that a single type of primary bone varies significantly in rates of growth in response to environmental conditions. Ranging between 10-50 microm per day, rates of growth overlap with the full range of bone deposition rates that were previously associated with different patterns of bone histology. Bone formation rate was significantly affected by environmental/experimental conditions, skeletal element, and age. In the quail, the experimental conditions did not result in formation of lines of arrested growth (LAGs). Because of the observed variation of bone deposition rates in response to variation in environmental conditions, we conclude that bone deposition rates measured in extant birds cannot simply be extrapolated to their fossil relatives. Additionally, we observe the variable incidence of LAGs and annuli among several dinosaur species, including fossil birds, extant sauropsids, as well as nonmammalian synapsids, and some extant mammals. This suggests that the ancestral condition of the response of bone to environmental conditions was variable. We propose that such developmental plasticity in modern birds may be reduced in association with the shortened developmental

  7. Bone Health and Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lupsa, Beatrice C; Insogna, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to decreased bone strength and an increased risk of low-energy fractures. Central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements are the gold standard for determining bone mineral density. Bone loss is an inevitable consequence of the decrease in estrogen levels during and following menopause, but additional risk factors for bone loss can also contribute to osteoporosis in older women. A well-balanced diet, exercise, and smoking cessation are key to maintaining bone health as women age. Pharmacologic agents should be recommended in patients at high risk for fracture.

  8. [Imaging of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Thariat, Juliette; Nouri, Yasir; Foti, Pauline; Hericord, Olivier; Stolear, Sandy; Coco, Lucia; Hauger, Olivier; Huwart, Laurent; Boileau, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Bone metastases are detected at initial diagnosis of cancer in 25% of cases and bone metastases are common in the course of a majority of cancer types. The spine and proximal long bones are the most affected sites. Knowledge of the basic radiological semiology is important to make the proper diagnosis of metastasis(s) bone(s), especially in situations in which the clinical context is not suggestive of metastases (such as cases where bone metastases are inaugural or cases of peripheral solitary metastasis). Tumor aggressiveness can be assessed at the level of the cortical bone and periosteum. Lodwick criteria are useful for the diagnosis of malignancy and tumor aggressiveness at initial diagnosis on plain radiographs, which are very important in the context of bone metastases. A CT scanner is required to confirm the malignancy of a bone lesion. MRI is complementary to the scanner including for the assessment of bone marrow involvement and tumor extensions.

  9. Radiative recombination of twisted electrons with bare nuclei: Going beyond the Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, V. A.; Serbo, V. G.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic investigation of the radiative recombination of a twisted electron with a bare heavy nucleus. The twisted electron is described by the wave function which accounts for the interaction with the nucleus in all orders in α Z . We use this wave function to derive the probability of the radiative recombination with a single ion being shifted from the twisted electron propagation direction. This probability is utilized for the consideration of a more realistic experimental scenario where the target is infinitely wide (macroscopic). The situation when the incident electron is a coherent superposition of two vortex states is considered as well. For the nonrelativistic case we present analytical expressions which support our numerical calculations. We study in details the influence of the electron twistedness on the polarization and angular distribution of the emitted photon.

  10. Oxidation and hot corrosion of coated and bare oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy MA-755E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Santoro, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic hot corrosion and oxidation of an experimental oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy MA-755E were conducted in a hot gas stream at Mach 0.3. The response of the ODS alloy, bare or with protective coatings, was similar to that of a conventional cast alloy, IN-792, in hot corrosion at 900 C. However, during oxidation at 1100 and 1150 C the ODS alloy differed from the cast alloy by developing a greater amount of subsurface porosity. Compared with a diffused aluminide coating, an electron beam vapor deposited NiCrAlY coating offered superior oxidation protection and decreased porosity formation. In additional testing, the tendency to form porosity was associated with the large grains of recrystallized powder metallurgy alloys but was independent of the presence of an oxide dispersion.

  11. CONSERVB: A numerical method to compute soil water content and temperature profiles under a bare surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbavel, C. H. M.; Lascano, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, yet fairly simple model of water disposition in a bare soil profile under the sequential impact of rain storms and other atmospheric influences, as they occur from hour to hour is presented. This model is intended mostly to support field studies of soil moisture dynamics by our current team, to serve as a background for the microwave measurements, and, eventually, to serve as a point of departure for soil moisture predictions for estimates based in part upon airborne measurements. The main distinction of the current model is that it accounts not only for the moisture flow in the soil-atmosphere system, but also for the energy flow and, hence, calculates system temperatures. Also, the model is of a dynamic nature, capable of supporting any required degree of resolution in time and space. Much critical testing of the sample is needed before the complexities of the hydrology of a vegetated surface can be related meaningfully to microwave observations.

  12. Experimental comparison of filter algorithms for bare-Earth extraction from airborne laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithole, George; Vosselman, George

    Over the past years, several filters have been developed to extract bare-Earth points from point clouds. ISPRS Working Group III/3 conducted a test to determine the performance of these filters and the influence of point density thereon, and to identify directions for future research. Twelve selected datasets have been processed by eight participants. In this paper, the test results are presented. The paper describes the characteristics of the provided datasets and the used filter approaches. The filter performance is analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. All filters perform well in smooth rural landscapes, but all produce errors in complex urban areas and rough terrain with vegetation. In general, filters that estimate local surfaces are found to perform best. The influence of point density could not well be determined in this experiment. Future research should be directed towards the usage of additional data sources, segment-based classification, and self-diagnosis of filter algorithms.

  13. Preliminary Results of Estimating Soil Moisture Over Bare Soil Using Full-Polarimetric ALOS-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekertekin, A.; Marangoz, A. M.; Abdikan, S.; Esetlili, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging system is one of the most effective way for Earth observation. The aim of this study is to present the preliminary results about estimating soil moisture using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Full-polarimetric (HH, HV, VV, VH) ALOS-2 data, acquired on 22.04.2016 with the incidence angle of 30.4o, were used in the study. Simultaneously with the SAR acquisition, in-situ soil moisture samples over bare agricultural lands were collected and evaluated using gravimetric method. Backscattering coefficients for all polarizations were obtained and linear regression analysis was carried out with in situ moisture measurements. The best correlation coefficient was observed with VV polarization. Cross-polarized backscattering coefficients were not so sensitive to soil moisture content. In the study, it was observed that soil moisture maps can be retrieved with the accuracy about 14% (RMSE).

  14. [Molecular basis of HLA class-I deficiency and bare lymphocyte syndrome (BLS)].

    PubMed

    Dzik, Michał; Majdan, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Molecules of human leukocyte HLA class I antigens play a crucial role in the presentation of endogenic peptides, allowing effector cells of the immune system to control the immune homeostasis of the host. There are rare immunodeficiencies which result in impaired HLA antigen expression on cell membranes and which are called bare lymphocyte syndrome (BLS). These diseases allow us to gain insight into the roles of antigen-processing pathways in HLA class I expression and into the genetic disorders of transcription factors crucial to the expression of HLA class II molecules. Moreover, the clinical pictures of BLS patients provide us with a rare opportunity to study the host's immune responses when one of the most important immune mechanisms is impaired. In this study we present disorders of endogenic antigen-presentation pathways and point out pathways which, at least in part, allow the host to overcome these defects. We also present hypotheses that may explain the clinical findings in BLS patients.

  15. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  16. Infrared temperature measurements over bare soil and vegetation - A HAPEX perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Toby N.; Perry, Eileen M.; Taconet, Odile

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of aircraft and ground measurements made in France during the HAPEX experiment show that horizontal radiometric surface temperature variations, as viewed by aircraft, can reflect the vertical profile of soil moisture (soil versus root zone) because of horizontal variations in vegetation density. Analyses based on one day's data show that, although horizontal variations in soil moisture were small, the vertical differences between a dry surface and a wet root zone were large. Horizontal temperature differences between bare soil, corn and oats reflect differences in the fractional vegetation cover, as seen by the radiometer. On the other hand, these horizontal variations in radiometric surface temperature seem to reflect real horizontal variations in surface turbulent energy fluxes.

  17. Nanosecond electrical explosion of bare and dielectric coated tungsten wire in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun

    2017-02-01

    Experiments of the electrical explosion of tungsten wire with and without insulating coatings demonstrate that the insulating coatings exert a significant influence on the exploding characteristics. The shadowgraphy and interferometry diagnostics are applied to present the morphology of the exploding products. In the experiments, energy of ˜3.2 eV/atom is deposited into the bare tungsten wire at the instant of voltage breakdown, giving a velocity of 0.38 km/s for the high density core. The value and structure of the energy deposition for the tungsten wire explosions are substantially improved by employing the thin dielectric coatings. Energy of ˜15.2 eV/atom is deposited into the coated tungsten wire transforming the wire into gaseous state and the expanding velocity of the high density core is 5.64 km/s. The interference phase shift and atomic density are reconstructed from the interferogram for the exploding coated tungsten wire.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of bare Ge-Sb-Se chalcogenide glass fiber taper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Baohua; Wang, Yingying; Sun, Ya'nan; Dai, Shixun; Yang, Peilong; Zhang, Peiqing; Wang, Xunsi; Chen, Feifei; Wang, Rongping

    2017-01-01

    In this work, Ge15Sb20Se65 bare glass fiber with a diameter of 500 μm was fabricated, and then tapered with different tapering parameters. The analysis of Raman and energy dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) indicated that, a slight change in the chemical composition of the glass, fiber and tapering fiber has negligible effect on the glass structure. It was found that, the waist diameter decreases exponentially with increasing tapering length and speed, and high quality taper fiber with the cone diameter of 2.65 μm can be achieved under the optimal tapering conditions. Finally, the simulated and experimental results of the output transmission under different waist length and taper ratio show that the transmission decreases with increasing waist length and taper ratio.

  19. Low cost, bare plate solar air collector. Semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A low cost, bare plate solar collector that is specifically designed to preheat ambient air with solar energy is discussed. Two prototype solar collector test systems have been designed, fabricated and assembled. Each system has been instrumented to provide instantaneous and average thermal performance data by means of a computerized data logger system. This data logger system is currently being made operational. Data collection is scheduled to begin March 1, 1980 and continue until the project completion date of June 17, 1980. Some preliminary test data have been obtained for both prototype systems. The results showed that ambient air was preheated between 5/sup 0/F and 10/sup 0/F with the systems achieving a thermal performance of between 15% and 30% efficiency.

  20. Electronic and magnetic properties of bare armchair BC2N nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Xiao, Xiang; Tie, Jun; Lu, Jing

    2017-03-01

    We present the electronic and magnetic properties of bare armchair BC2N nanoribbons (ABC2NNRs) in the view of density functional calculations. We consider three types of edge terminations with a width of 0.75 2.10 nm. All the investigated ribbons exhibit magnetic ground states with the magnetic moments mainly located on the edge C atoms. Room temperature accessible magnetic stabilities are obtained for ABC2NNRs with NC-NC and NC-BC edge alignments. We find the ABC2NNRs have various electronic structures, where half-metal, metal, and semiconductor are all acquired depend on the edge alignment and magnetic coupling state. The results show the ABC2NNRs can be a promising candidate material in nanoelectronics and nanospintronics.

  1. Postnatal temporal bone ontogeny in Pan, Gorilla, and Homo, and the implications for temporal bone ontogeny in Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E; Kimbel, William H; Lockwood, Charles A

    2013-08-01

    Assessments of temporal bone morphology have played an important role in taxonomic and phylogenetic evaluations of fossil taxa, and recent three-dimensional analyses of this region have supported the utility of the temporal bone for testing taxonomic and phylogenetic hypotheses. But while clinical analyses have examined aspects of temporal bone ontogeny in humans, the ontogeny of the temporal bone in non-human taxa is less well documented. This study examines ontogenetic allometry of the temporal bone in order to address several research questions related to the pattern and trajectory of temporal bone shape change during ontogeny in the African apes and humans. We further apply these data to a preliminary analysis of temporal bone ontogeny in Australopithecus afarensis. Three-dimensional landmarks were digitized on an ontogenetic series of specimens of Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, and Gorilla gorilla. Data were analyzed using geometric morphometric methods, and shape changes throughout ontogeny in relation to size were compared. Results of these analyses indicate that, despite broadly similar patterns, African apes and humans show marked differences in development of the mandibular fossa and tympanic portions of the temporal bone. These findings indicate divergent, rather than parallel, postnatal ontogenetic allometric trajectories for temporal bone shape in these taxa. The pattern of temporal bone shape change with size exhibited by A. afarensis showed some affinities to that of humans, but was most similar to extant African apes, particularly Gorilla.

  2. Topography of acoustical properties of long bones: from biomechanical studies to bone health assessment.

    PubMed

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a retrospective view on the assessment of long bones condition using topographical patterns of the acoustic properties. The application of ultrasonic point-contact transducers with exponential waveguides on a short acoustic base for detailed measurements in human long bones by the surface transmission was initiated during the 1980s in Latvia. The guided wave velocity was mapped on the surface of the long bones and the topographical patterns reflected the biomechanical peculiarities. Axial velocity profiles obtained in vivo by measurements along the medial surface of tibia varied due to aging, hypokinesia, and physical training. The method has been advanced at Artann Laboratories (West Trenton, NJ) by the introduction of multifrequency data acquisition and axial scanning. The model studies carried out on synthetic phantoms and in bone specimens confirmed the potential to evaluate separately changes of the bone material properties and of the cortical thickness by multifrequency acoustic measurements at the 0.1 to 1 MHz band. The bone ultrasonic scanner (BUSS) is an axial mode ultrasonometer developed to depict the acoustic profile of bone that will detect the onset of bone atrophy as a spatial process. Clinical trials demonstrated a high sensitivity of BUSS to osteoporosis and the capability to assess early stage of osteopenia.

  3. Topography of Acoustical Properties of Long Bones: From Biomechanical Studies to Bone Health Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a retrospective view on the assessment of long bones condition using topographical patterns of the acoustic properties. The application of ultrasonic point-contact transducers with exponential waveguides on a short acoustic base for detailed measurements in human long bones by the surface transmission was initiated during the 1980s in Latvia. The guided wave velocity was mapped on the surface of the long bones and the topographical patterns reflected the biomechanical peculiarities. Axial velocity profiles obtained in vivo by measurements along the medial surface of tibia varied due to aging, hypokinesia, and physical training. The method has been advanced at Artann Laboratories (West Trenton, NJ) by the introduction of multifrequency data acquisition and axial scanning. The model studies carried out on synthetic phantoms and in bone specimens confirmed the potential to evaluate separately changes of the bone material properties and of the cortical thickness by multifrequency acoustic measurements at the 0.1 to 1 MHz band. The bone ultrasonic scanner (BUSS) is an axial mode ultrasonometer developed to depict the acoustic profile of bone that will detect the onset of bone atrophy as a spatial process. Clinical trials demonstrated a high sensitivity of BUSS to osteoporosis and the capability to assess early stage of osteopenia. PMID:18599416

  4. [Bone involvement in endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Ribot, C; Trémollières, F; Pouillès, J M

    1994-06-04

    Progress in bone densitometry, particularly biphotonic absoptiometry, has made it possible to better identify the effects of endocrinopathies on bone. Both cortical and trabecular bone structures can be evaluated quantitatively and topographically revealing important information on the pathophysiology of bone loss. Sex hormones play a major role in the regulation of bone mineralization and hypogonadism, whatever the origin, can lead to deleterious effects. Bone loss is known to be significative in high performance female athletes with amenorrhoea; long-term consequences are not yet determined, but stress fractures have been reported in up to 50%. Other hypogonadisms leading to bone demineralization include anorexia nervosa, chronic intake of gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues and anti-oestrogens, and hyperprolactinism. Hyperthyroidism leads to a negative calcium balance and demineralization with remodelling, predominantly in cortical bone. In hypothyroid states a 10% bone loss is observed in vertebrae. In both cases, bone densitometry should be performed in order to evaluate the effect of treatment. The deleterious effect of spontaneous or iatrogenic hypercortisism is well known, leading to spontaneous wedge fractures of the vertebrae due to predominating trabecular bone loss. The mechanism of action of corticosteroids on bone metabolism is complex, but the major effect is an inhibition of osteoblast maturation. Recovery may be possible, but no large long-term series have yet been reported. Hyperparathyroidism and acromegaly also affect bone mineralization. The information provided by bone densitometry is essential to properly manage patients with endocrinopathies affecting bone mineralization.

  5. Structural evolution, tunable electronic and magnetic properties of bare and semi-hydrogenated two-dimensional cubic boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Li, Hongdong; Yin, Hong

    2014-08-01

    By first-principles calculations, we study the layer number (n) dependent structural evolution, electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional bare and semi-hydrogenated (1 1 1)-oriented cubic boron nitride (c-BN) nanosheets. After energy optimization, there is a threshold of n = 7 for maintaining the cubic phase of the bare BN nanosheets. The hydrogenation on either B-end or N-end surface sites would be helpful for stabilizing the c-BN nanosheets with small n, and the structural relaxations on both two outermost surface sides are asymmetric due to different electronegativity between B and N atoms. The bare nanosheets are ferrimagnetic metallic and further turn into ferrimagnetic semiconductor after semi-hydrogenation.

  6. Bone-composition imaging using coherent-scatter computed tomography: Assessing bone health beyond bone mineral density

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelar, Deidre L.; Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Dabrowski, Waldemar; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2006-04-15

    Quantitative analysis of bone composition is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic bone diseases. Accurate assessment of the bone mineralization state is the first requirement for a comprehensive analysis. In diagnostic imaging, x-ray coherent scatter depends upon the molecular structure of tissues. Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) exploits this feature to identify tissue types in composite biological specimens. We have used CSCT to map the distributions of tissues relevant to bone disease (fat, soft tissue, collagen, and mineral) within bone-tissue phantoms and an excised cadaveric bone sample. Using a purpose-built scanner, we have measured hydroxyapatite (bone mineral) concentrations based on coherent-scatter patterns from a series of samples with varying hydroxyapatite content. The measured scatter intensity is proportional to mineral density in true g/cm{sup 3}. Repeated measurements of the hydroxyapatite concentration in each sample were within, at most, 2% of each other, revealing an excellent precision in determining hydroxyapatite concentration. All measurements were also found to be accurate to within 3% of the known values. Phantoms simulating normal, over-, and under-mineralized bone were created by mixing known masses of pure collagen and hydroxyapatite. An analysis of the composite scatter patterns gave the density of each material. For each composite, the densities were within 2% of the known values. Collagen and hydroxyapatite concentrations were also examined in a bone-mimicking phantom, incorporating other bone constituents (fat, soft tissue). Tomographic maps of the coherent-scatter properties of each specimen were reconstructed, from which material-specific images were generated. Each tissue was clearly distinguished and the collagen-mineral ratio determined from this phantom was also within 2% of the known value. Existing bone analysis techniques cannot determine the collagen-mineral ratio in intact

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates bone repair by promoting angiogenesis and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Street, John; Bao, Min; deGuzman, Leo; Bunting, Stuart; Peale, Franklin V; Ferrara, Napoleone; Steinmetz, Hope; Hoeffel, John; Cleland, Jeffrey L; Daugherty, Ann; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Redmond, H Paul; Carano, Richard A D; Filvaroff, Ellen H

    2002-07-23

    Several growth factors are expressed in distinct temporal and spatial patterns during fracture repair. Of these, vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, is of particular interest because of its ability to induce neovascularization (angiogenesis). To determine whether VEGF is required for bone repair, we inhibited VEGF activity during secondary bone healing via a cartilage intermediate (endochondral ossification) and during direct bone repair (intramembranous ossification) in a novel mouse model. Treatment of mice with a soluble, neutralizing VEGF receptor decreased angiogenesis, bone formation, and callus mineralization in femoral fractures. Inhibition of VEGF also dramatically inhibited healing of a tibial cortical bone defect, consistent with our discovery of a direct autocrine role for VEGF in osteoblast differentiation. In separate experiments, exogenous VEGF enhanced blood vessel formation, ossification, and new bone (callus) maturation in mouse femur fractures, and promoted bony bridging of a rabbit radius segmental gap defect. Our results at specific time points during the course of healing underscore the role of VEGF in endochondral vs. intramembranous ossification, as well as skeletal development vs. bone repair. The responses to exogenous VEGF observed in two distinct model systems and species indicate that a slow-release formulation of VEGF, applied locally at the site of bone damage, may prove to be an effective therapy to promote human bone repair.

  8. Factors stimulating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Lind, M; Bünger, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this review is to describe major approaches for stimulating bone healing and to review other factors affecting bone healing. Spinal bone fusion after surgery is a demanding process requiring optimal conditions for clinical success. Bone formation and healing can be enhanced through various methods. Experimental studies have revealed an array of stimulative measures. These include biochemical stimulation by use of hormones and growth factors, physical stimulation through mechanical and electromagnetic measures, and bone grafting by use of bone tissue or bone substitutes. Newer biological techniques such as stem cell transplantation and gene therapy can also be used to stimulate bone healing. Apart from bone transplantation, clinical experience with the many stimulation modalities is limited. Possible areas for clinical use of these novel methods are discussed.

  9. Regulation of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Maryam; Peymani, Amir; Sahmani, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells.In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), wingless-type (Wnt) genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX). PMID:28367467

  10. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  11. [Microdestruction of the bone].

    PubMed

    Iankovskiĭ, V É

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the detection of microcracks in the compact bone tissue surrounding the fracture and in deformed bone undergoing subcritical loading. The portions of deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones were obtained in the form of blocks longitudinally sawcut from the regions of primary and secondary bone rupture. A total of 300 such blocks were available for the examination. All portions of the deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones showed up microcracks commensurate with the bone structures. They were actually hardened traces of deformation that preceded the fracture and reflected the volume of the destroyed bone tissue; moreover, in certain cases they allowed to identify the kind of the object that exerted the external action (either a blow or slow bending).

  12. Regulation of Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Maryam; Peymani, Amir; Sahmani, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells.In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), wingless-type (Wnt) genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX).

  13. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss following unilateral temporal bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Hunchaisri, Niran

    2009-06-01

    Temporal bone fractures usually cause unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) by fracture that violated otic capsule of that side. Bilateral SNHL from unilateral temporal bone fracture were rarely seen. Labyrinthine concussion was considered to be the pathogenesis in these cases. This article reports an additional case of bilateral SNHL from unilateral temporal bone fracture but in a different pattern of SNHL which may result from an occlusion of the internal auditory artery.

  14. Imaging of the Wormian bones using microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kozerska, Magdalena; Skrzat, Janusz; Walocha, Jerzy; Wrobel, Andrzej; Leszczynski, Bartosz

    2013-01-01

    Wormian bones are irregular ossicles of small size and reveal fractal pattern of their edges. Their anatomy was visualized in volumetric reconstructions obtained from a series of micro-CT scans. In visual evaluation Wormian bones showed typical anatomy for the calvarial bones. They revealed three-layer composition: the outer and the inner table of the compact bone intervening with the table of the spongy bone. Microcomputed tomography captured all details of the interdigitation of the edge being incorporated into the lambdoid suture and interlocked between opposing edges of the occipital and parietal bones. This modality provided accurate images which allowed delineating morphological differences between the compact bone and the diploe, including vascular channels.

  15. Mammalian cortical bone in tension is non-Haversian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    Cortical bone, found in the central part of long bones like femur, is known to adapt to local mechanical stresses. This adaptation has been linked exclusively with Haversian remodelling involving bone resorption and formation of secondary osteons. Compared to primary/plexiform bone, the Haversian bone has lower stiffness, fatigue strength and fracture toughness, raising the question why nature prefers an adaptation that is detrimental to bone's primary function of bearing mechanical stresses. Here, we show that in the goat femur, Haversian remodelling occurs only at locations of high compressive stresses. At locations corresponding to high tensile stresses, we observe a microstructure that is non-Haversian. Compared with primary/plexiform bone, this microstructure's mineralisation is significantly higher with a distinctly different spatial pattern. Thus, the Haversian structure is an adaptation only to high compressive stresses rendering its inferior tensile properties irrelevant as the regions with high tensile stresses have a non-Haversian, apparently primary microstructure.

  16. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  17. Subchondral bone histology and grading in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aho, Olli-Matti; Finnilä, Mikko; Thevenot, Jerome; Saarakkala, Simo; Lehenkari, Petri

    2017-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) has often regarded as a disease of articular cartilage only. New evidence has shifted the paradigm towards a system biology approach, where also the surrounding tissue, especially bone is studied more vigorously. However, the histological features of subchondral bone are only poorly characterized in current histological grading scales of OA. The aim of this study is to specifically characterize histological changes occurring in subchondral bone at different stages of OA and propose a simple grading system for them. Design 20 patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery were randomly selected for the study and series of osteochondral samples were harvested from the tibial plateaus for histological analysis. Cartilage degeneration was assessed using the standardized OARSI grading system, while a novel four-stage grading system was developed to illustrate the changes in subchondral bone. Subchondral bone histology was further quantitatively analyzed by measuring the thickness of uncalcified and calcified cartilage as well as subchondral bone plate. Furthermore, internal structure of calcified cartilage-bone interface was characterized utilizing local binary patterns (LBP) based method. Results The histological appearance of subchondral bone changed drastically in correlation with the OARSI grading of cartilage degeneration. As the cartilage layer thickness decreases the subchondral plate thickness and disorientation, as measured with LBP, increases. Calcified cartilage thickness was highest in samples with moderate OA. Conclusion The proposed grading system for subchondral bone has significant relationship with the corresponding OARSI grading for cartilage. Our results suggest that subchondral bone remodeling is a fundamental factor already in early stages of cartilage degeneration. PMID:28319157

  18. Elastic Properties of Chimpanzee Craniofacial Cortical Bone.

    PubMed

    Gharpure, Poorva; Kontogiorgos, Elias D; Opperman, Lynne A; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Smith, Amanda; Pryor, Leslie C; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Relatively few assessments of cranial biomechanics formally take into account variation in the material properties of cranial cortical bone. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of chimpanzee craniofacial cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties of dentate human craniofacial cortical bone. From seven cranial regions, 27 cylindrical samples were harvested from each of five chimpanzee crania. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived using modified equations of Hooke's law in a Mathcad program. Consistent orientations among individuals were observed in the zygomatic arch and alveolus. The density of cortical bone showed significant regional variation (P < 0.001). The elastic moduli demonstrated significant differences between sites, and a distinct pattern where E3  > E2  > E1 . Shear moduli were significantly different among regions (P < 0.001). The pattern by which chimpanzee cranial cortical bone varies in elastic properties resembled that seen in humans, perhaps suggesting that the elastic properties of craniofacial bone in fossil hominins can be estimated with at least some degree of confidence. Anat Rec, 299:1718-1733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  20. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  1. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  2. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires §...

  3. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires §...

  5. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires §...

  7. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  8. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhigang; Wang, Xinming

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China. Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS. The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively). Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils. Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime. COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29 degrees C. While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature. COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios, and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  9. The role of bacterial communities in the natural suppression of Rhizoctonia bare patch of wheat Triticum aestivum L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia bare patch and root rot of wheat, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, develops as distinct patches of stunted plants, and limits the yield of direct-seeded wheat in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States. At a long-term wheat cropping systems study site near Ritzville, WA, conve...

  10. Cross-satellite comparison of operational land surface temperature products derived from MODIS and ASTER data over bare soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Si-Bo; Li, Zhao-Liang; Cheng, Jie; Leng, Pei

    2017-04-01

    The collection 6 (C6) MODIS land surface temperature (LST) product is publicly available for the user community. Compared to the collection 5 (C5) MODIS LST product, the C6 MODIS LST product has been refined over bare soil pixels. Assessing the accuracy of the C6 MODIS LST product will help to facilitate the use of the LST product in various applications. In this study, we present a cross-satellite comparison to evaluate the accuracy of the C6 MODIS LST product (MOD11_L2) over bare soil surfaces under various atmospheric and surface conditions using the ASTER LST product as a reference. For comparison, the C5 MODIS LST product was also used in the analysis. The absolute biases (0.2-1.5 K) of the differences between the C6 MODIS LST and ASTER LST over bare soil surfaces are approximately two times less than those (0.6-3.8 K) of the differences between the C5 MODIS LST and ASTER LST. Furthermore, the RMSEs (0.7-2.3 K) over bare soil surfaces for the C6 MODIS LST are significantly smaller than those (0.9-4.2 K) for the C5 MODIS LST. These results indicate that the accuracy of the C6 MODIS LST product is much better than that of the C5 MODIS LST product. We recommend that the user community employs the C6 MODIS LST product in their applications.

  11. Future human bone research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A.; Shackelford, L.; Schneider, V.

    1998-01-01

    Skylab crewmembers demonstrated negative calcium (Ca) balance reaching about -300 mg/day by flight day 84. Limited bone density (BMD) measurements documented that bone was not lost equally from all parts of the skeleton. Subsequent BMD studies during long duration Russian flights documented the regional extent of bone loss. These studies demonstrated mean losses in the spine, femur neck, trochanter, and pelvis of about 1%-1.6% with large differences between individuals as well as between bone sites in a given individual. Limited available data indicate postflight bone recovery occurred in some individuals, but may require several years for complete restoration. Long duration bedrest studies showed a similar pattern of bone loss and calcium balance (-180 mg/day) as spaceflight. During long duration bedrest, resorption markers were elevated, formation markers were unchanged, 1,25 vitamin D (VitD) and calcium absorption were decreased, and serum ionized Ca was increased. Although this information is a good beginning, additional spaceflight research is needed to assess architectural and subregional bone changes, elucidate mechanisms, and develop efficient as well as effective countermeasures. Space research poses a number of unique problems not encountered in ground-based laboratory research. Therefore, researchers contemplating human spaceflight research need to consider a number of unique problems related to spaceflight in their experimental design.

  12. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  13. Crosslink in bone collagen in Paget's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, D P

    1975-01-01

    The crosslink in bone collagen was analysed in specimens of bone obtained at necropsy from cases of Paget's disease and compared with normal bone collagen of the same age. The specimens were stored at -20 degrees C before analysis. The predominant crosslink in a normal bone collagen was hydroxylysinohydroxynorleucine (di OH-LNL) (F1), which was designated syndesine in the past; another fraction, hydroxylysinorleucine (HLNL) (F2), musch less prominent than di OH-LNL, was also noted in a normal bone collagen. Both fractions were reduced in bone tissue of advancing age. The peak corresponding to HLNL was considerably increased in Paget's disease. This abnormality was constantly seen in specimens of bone from cases of Paget's disease, but the significance of the finging could not be assessed from the present investigation. Calcitonin has been shown to produce complete remission in Paget's disease and the crosslink pattern was found to be normal in specimens examined froma calcitonin-treated patient. This shows that calcitonin has some effect on the metabolism of collagen and a normal crosslink in such a situation lends support to this idea. PMID:1127123

  14. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts.

  15. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... There may be some bleeding at the puncture site. More serious risks, such as serious bleeding or infection, are very rare. Alternative Names Culture - bone marrow Images Bone marrow aspiration References ...

  16. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  17. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information Facts About Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones weaken ... adopt new habits for healthy bones. Smoking and Osteoporosis Cigarette smoking was first identified as a risk ...

  18. Bare serratus anterior free flap in the reconstruction of the partial pharyngoesophageal defect.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, Kemal; Karsidag, Tamer; Akcal, Arzu; Karsidag, Semra; Yazar, Memet; Seven, Hüseyin

    2011-05-01

    Reconstruction of defects of the cervical esophagus is a challenge in head and neck surgery. Several methods have been used: flaps with local tissues, pharyngogastric anastomosis, deltopectoral skin flaps, skin muscle transplant from the pectoralis major, and microvascularized free skin fascial and small intestine flaps. A 81-year-old patient who has a partial pharyngoesophageal defect after resection of laryngeal carcinoma underwent reconstruction with bare serratus anterior fascial free flap. The subscapular artery and vein were anastomosed to the superior thyroid artery and vein. The patient's postoperative recovery went uneventfully. In the endoscopic examination, the defect was completely covered with native mucosa 8 weeks after surgery, and also, there were no stricture and fistula tract in the reconstructed area.Serratus fascial flap is a thin and pliable flap with good and reliable vascularity; it can be used in the reconstruction of partial cervical esophageal defect with its long pedicle. Serratus fascial flap can provide significant epithelialization that cannot be differentiated from native esophagus. We propose that serratus fascial free flap is an important alternative in esophageal reconstructions because it creates minimal donor-site morbidity and it can easily adapt to the defect.

  19. Single-cycle surface plasmon polaritons on a bare metal wire excited by relativistic electrons

    PubMed Central

    op ‘t Root, W.P.E.M.; Brussaard, G.J.H.; Smorenburg, P.W.; Luiten, O.J.

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) pulses are applied in areas as diverse as materials science, communication and biosensing. Techniques for subwavelength concentration of THz pulses give access to a rapidly growing range of spatial scales and field intensities. Here we experimentally demonstrate a method to generate intense THz pulses on a metal wire, thereby introducing the possibility of wave-guiding and focussing of the full THz pulse energy to subwavelength spotsizes. This enables endoscopic sensing, single-shot subwavelength THz imaging and study of strongly nonlinear THz phenomena. We generate THz surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by launching electron bunches onto the tip of a bare metal wire. Bunches with 160 pC charge and ≈6 ps duration yield SPPs with 6–10 ps duration and 0.4±0.1 MV m−1 electric field strength on a 1.5 mm diameter aluminium wire. These are the most intense SPPs reported on a wire. The SPPs are shown to propagate around a 90° bend. PMID:28008908

  20. MCP detector read out with a bare quad Timepix at kilohertz frame rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, J.; Raffanti, R.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Siegmund, O.

    2011-01-01

    The existing Berkeley neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix hybrid detector has been very successful at demonstrating energy resolved spatial imaging with a single Timepix ASIC read out at a ~ 30 Hz frame rate where each neutron's position and time (energy) is determined (X,Y,E). By increasing the detector format using a quad arrangement of Timepix readouts and increasing the frame rate to 1 kHz, we can increase our total event throughput by a factor of 120, thereby taking full advantage of the high fluxes of modern pulsed neutron sources (106 n cm-2 s-1). The key to this conversion is a new design for the ASIC readout, called the Berkeley Quad Timepix detector, consisting of 3 major subsystems. The first is a quad (2 × 2) bare Timepix ASIC board mounted directly behind the neutron sensitive MCPs in a hermetic vacuum enclosure with a sapphire window. The data from the Timepix ASICs flow to the second subsystem called the Interface board whose field programmable gate array (FPGA) rearranges and converts the digital bit stream to LVDS logic levels before sending downstream to the third subsystem, the Roach board. The Roach board is also FPGA based, and takes the data from all the ASICs and analyses the frames to extract information on the input events to pass on to the host PC. This paper describes in detail the hardware and firmware designs to accomplish this task.

  1. Long-Term Clinical Outcomes Following Drug-eluting and Bare Metal Stenting in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Laura; Silbaugh, Treacy S; Wolf, Robert E; Zelevinsky, Katya; Lovett, Ann; Zhou, Zheng; Resnic, Frederic S; Normand, Sharon-Lise T

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-eluting stents (DES) reduce the need for repeat revascularization, but their long term safety relative to bare metal stents (BMS) in general use remains uncertain. We sought to compare the clinical outcome of patients treated with DES vs. BMS. Methods and Results All adults undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting between April 1, 2003 and September 30, 2004 at non-US governmental hospitals in Massachusetts were identified from a mandatory state database. Patients were classified according to stent types used from the index admission. Clinical and procedural risk factors were collected prospectively. Risk-adjusted mortality, myocardial infarction, and revascularization rate differences (DES-BMS) were estimated through propensity score matching without replacement. 11556 patients were treated with DES and 6237 treated with BMS with unadjusted 2 year mortality of 7.0% and 12.6% respectively (p<0.0001). In 5549 DES patients matched to 5549 BMS patients, 2 year risk-adjusted mortality rates were 9.8% and 12.0% (p=0.0002), myocardial infarction, 8.3% vs. 10.3% (p=0.0005), and target vessel revascularization, 11.0% vs. 16.8% (p<0.0001). Conclusions DES treatment was associated with lower mortality, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization compared with BMS treatment in similar patients in a matched population based study. Comprehensive follow-up in this inclusive population is warranted to identify if similar safety and efficacy remain beyond 2 years. PMID:18852368

  2. A comparison of simulation models for predicting soil water dynamics in bare and vegetated lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Kickert, R.N.; Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes the results of simulation models used to predict soil water storage dynamics at the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) weighing lysimeters. The objectives of this research is to develop the capability to predict soil water storage dynamics with plants in support of water infiltration control studies for the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program. It is important to gain confidence in one`s ability to simulate soil water dynamics over long time periods to assess the barrier`s ability to prevent drainage. Two models were compared for their ability to simulate soil water storage dynamics with and without plants in weighing lysimeters, the soil water infiltration and movement (SWIM) and the simulation of production and utilization of rangelands (SPUR-91) models. These models adequately simulated soil water storage dynamics for the weighing lysimeters. The range of root mean square error values for the two models was 7.0 to 19.8. This compares well with the range reported by Fayer et al. (1992) for the bare soil data sets of 8.1 to 22.1. Future research will test the predictive capability of these models for longer term lysimeter data sets and for historical data sets collected in various plant community types.

  3. Energy and angular distributions of electron emission from diatomic molecules by bare ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, A.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2015-06-01

    The three-Coulomb wave model has been used extensively to study the energy and angular distributions of double-differential cross sections (DDCS) of electron emissions from hydrogen and nitrogen molecules by bare ion impact at intermediate and high energies. In the present model, we have expressed the molecular triple differential cross section in terms of the corresponding atomic triple differential cross section multiplied by the occupation number and the average Rayleigh interference factor, which accounts for the two-center interference effect. Here we have used an active electron approximation of the molecule as a whole in the initial channel. To account for the effect of passive electrons, we have constructed a model potential that satisfies the initial conditions and the corresponding wavefunction has been calculated from the model Hamiltonian of the active electron in the target. In the final channel, we have used a hydrogenic model with an effective nuclear charge that is calculated from its binding energy. In this model, the correlated motion of the particles in the exit channel of the reaction is considered by an adequate product of three-Coulomb functions. The emitted electron, the incident projectile ion and the residual ion are considered to be in same plane. The obtained results are compared with other recent theoretical and experimental findings. There is an overall agreement of the calculations with the experimental data for electron emission cross sections.

  4. Single-cycle surface plasmon polaritons on a bare metal wire excited by relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Op `T Root, W. P. E. M.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Smorenburg, P. W.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-12-01

    Terahertz (THz) pulses are applied in areas as diverse as materials science, communication and biosensing. Techniques for subwavelength concentration of THz pulses give access to a rapidly growing range of spatial scales and field intensities. Here we experimentally demonstrate a method to generate intense THz pulses on a metal wire, thereby introducing the possibility of wave-guiding and focussing of the full THz pulse energy to subwavelength spotsizes. This enables endoscopic sensing, single-shot subwavelength THz imaging and study of strongly nonlinear THz phenomena. We generate THz surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by launching electron bunches onto the tip of a bare metal wire. Bunches with 160 pC charge and ~6 ps duration yield SPPs with 6-10 ps duration and 0.4+/-0.1 MV m-1 electric field strength on a 1.5 mm diameter aluminium wire. These are the most intense SPPs reported on a wire. The SPPs are shown to propagate around a 90° bend.

  5. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1< Z < 11. Numerical simulation is used here to study ion confinement in a compact, Penning-style ion trap consisting of electrodes integrated with rare-earth permanent magnets, and to model the capture of charge-state-selected ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). An experimental apparatus adapted to the NIST EBIT will also be discussed. Reference: [1] U.D. Jentschura, P.J. Mohr, J.N. Tan, and B.J. Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  6. Automated bare earth extraction technique for complex topography in light detection and ranging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Bradford, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital surface models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. Few existing algorithms can handle substantial terrain diversity without significant editing or user interaction. This effort presents a newly developed methodology that provides a flexible, adaptable tool capable of integrating multiple LiDAR data attributes for an accurate terrain assessment. The terrain extraction and segmentation (TEXAS) approach uses a third-order spatial derivative for each point in the digital surface model to determine the curvature of the terrain rather than rely solely on the slope. The utilization of the curvature has shown to successfully preserve ground points in areas of steep terrain as they typically exhibit low curvature. Within the framework of TEXAS, the contiguous sets of points with low curvatures are grouped into regions using an edge-based segmentation method. The process does not require any user inputs and is completely data driven. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LiDAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity.

  7. A LADAR bare earth extraction technique for diverse topography and complex scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.

    2012-06-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to LADAR data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. A successful approach provides a flexible methodology (adaptable for topography and/or environment) that is capable of integrating multiple ladar point cloud data attributes. A newly developed approach (TE-SiP) uses a 2nd and 3rd order spatial derivative for each point in the DEM to determine sets of contiguous regions of similar elevation. Specifically, the derivative of the central point represents the curvature of the terrain at that position. Contiguous sets of high (positive or negative) values define sharp edges such as building edges or cliffs. This method is independent of the slope, such that very steep, but continuous topography still have relatively low curvature values and are preserved in the terrain classification. Next, a recursive segmentation method identifies unique features of homogeneity on the surface separated by areas of high curvature. An iterative selection process is used to eliminate regions containing buildings or vegetation from the terrain surface. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LADAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity. The results shown here include developed and forested regions in the Dominican Republic.

  8. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-02-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements.

  9. Moss cushions facilitate water and nutrient supply for plant species on bare limestone pavements.

    PubMed

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Hammer, Kathrine Jul

    2012-10-01

    Dense moss cushions of different size are distributed across the bare limestone pavements on Øland, SE Sweden. Increasing cushion size is predicted to physically protect and improve performance and colonization by vascular plants. Therefore, we tested water balance, phosphorus supply, and species richness, and evaluated duration of plant activity during desiccation as a function of ground area, for a large collection of moss cushions. We found that lower evaporation and higher water storage contributed equally to extending the desiccation period with increasing cushion size. Evaporation rates declined by the -0.36 power of cushion diameter, and were not significantly different from -0.50 for the square root function previously predicted for the increasing thickness of the boundary layer, with greater linear dimensions for smooth flat objects at low wind velocities. Size dependence vanished under stagnant conditions. One moss species was added to the species pool for every nine-fold increase in cushion area. Vascular plants were absent from the smallest cushions, whereas one or two species, on average, appeared in 375- and 8,500-cm(2) cushions with water available for 6 and 10 days during desiccation. Phosphorus concentrations increased stepwise and four-fold from detritus to surface mosses and to vascular plants, and all three pools increased with cushion size. We conclude that cushion mosses and cushion size play a critical role in this resource-limited limestone environment by offering an oasis of improved water and nutrient supply to colonization and growth of plants.

  10. Bare Below the Elbows: A comparative study of a tertiary and district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Connaughton, J; Ridgway, P F

    2013-10-01

    A 'Bare Below the Elbows' (BBTE) dress code policy has been introduced by the majority of NHS trusts in the UK. The aim of this Irish study was to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on perception of medical attire. The study was carried out in two centres: a tertiary referral centre (Beaumont Hospital) and a district hospital (MRH, Portlaoise). Two questionnaires, incorporating photographic evaluation of appropriate attire for consultants and junior doctors, were completed pre and post BBTE education. One hundred and five patients participated. Analysis pre BBTE education indicated patients considered formal attire and white coats most appropriate for consultants and junior doctors respectively. Post-intervention analysis revealed a significant reduction in the popularity of both (p <0.001), with scrubs and smart casual attire gaining significant support in both cohorts (p <0.001). Our findings demonstrated that patient opinion on medical attire is malleable. The support of such a policy may be achieved if patients are informed that the aim is to reduce the spread of healthcare-associated infections.

  11. Docosanol: new drug. Herpes labialis: barely more effective than an excipient.

    PubMed

    2009-06-01

    (1) Herpes is a contagious, recurrent viral infection of the skin and mucous membranes. In immunocompetent patients the recurrences can be troublesome but they heal spontaneously. Management is mainly based on lifestyle measures. Local application of an antiviral drug such as aciclovir has modest effects. It reduces healing time by about 2 days provided treatment is started as soon as the first symptoms appear; (2) Docosanol, a fatty alcohol, was recently authorized in France for treatment of episodes of herpes labialis; (3) A trial in 474 patients showed no tangible difference between docosanol and 5% aciclovir in reducing healing time; (4) Clinical evaluation also includes two trials versus an excipient (polyethylene glycol) including 370 and 373 patients. The median healing time was reduced by less than a day; (5) In these trials, the adverse effects of docosanol were similar to those of the excipients. In particular, docosanol cream contains excipients that can provoke allergic reactions; (6) In practice, docosanol cream is barely or no more effective than an excipient in treating acute episodes of herpes labialis. Lifestyle measures are still the cornerstone of herpes management.

  12. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector

  13. Toxicity of bare and surfaced functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles towards microalgae.

    PubMed

    Toh, Pey Yi; Tai, Wan Yii; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, Jit Kang; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the toxicity of bare iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and surface functionalization iron oxide nanoparticles (SF-IONPs) to the growth of freshwater microalgae Chlorella sp. This study is important due to the increased interest on the application of the magnetic responsive IONPs in various fields, such as biomedical, wastewater treatment, and microalgae harvesting. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of IONPs was mainly contributed by the indirect light shading effect from the suspending nanoparticles which is nanoparticles concentration-dependent, direct light shading effect caused by the attachment of IONPs on cell and the cell aggregation, and the oxidative stress from the internalization of IONPs into the cells. The results showed that the layer of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) tended to mask the IONPs and hence eliminated oxidative stress toward the protein yield but it in turn tended to enhance the toxicity of IONPs by enabling the IONPs to attach on cell surfaces and cause cell aggregation. Therefore, the choice of the polymer that used for surface functionalize the IONPs is the key factor to determine the toxicity of the IONPs.

  14. An electrochemical study of hydrogen uptake and elimination by bare and gold-plated waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.; Lowery, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Two electrochemical methods for the determination of hydrogen concentrations in metals are discussed and evaluated. The take-up of hydrogen at a pressure of 5000 psi by Waspaloy metal was determined experimentally at 24 C. It was found that the metal becomes saturated with hydrogen after an exposure time of about 1 hr. For samples charged with hydrogen at high pressure, most of the hydrogen is contained in the interstitial solid solution of the metal. For electrolytically charged samples, most of the hydrogen is contained as surface and subsurface hydrides. Hydrogen elimination rates were determined for these two cases, with the rate for electrolytically charged samples being greater by over a factor of two. Theoretical effects of high temperature and pressure on hydrogen take-up and elimination by bare and gold plated Waspaloy metal was considered. The breakthrough point for hydrogen at 5000 psi, determined experimentally, lies between a gold thickness of 0.0127 mm (0.0005 in.) and 0.0254 mm (0.001 in.) at 24 C. Electropolishing was found to greatly reduce the uptake of hydrogen at high pressure by Waspaloy metal at 24 C. Possible implications of the results obtained, as they apply to the turbine disk of the space shuttle main engine, are discussed.

  15. Is HE 0436-4717 Anemic? A deep look at a bare Seyfert 1 galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonson, K.; Gallo, L. C.; Vasudevan, R.

    2015-06-01

    A multi-epoch, multi-instrument analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy HE 0436-4717 is conducted using optical to X-ray data from XMM-Newton and Swift (including the Burst Alert Telescope). Fitting of the UV-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution shows little evidence of extinction and the X-ray spectral analysis does not confirm previous reports of deep absorption edges from O VIII. HE 0436-4717 is a `bare' Seyfert with negligible line-of-sight absorption making it ideal to study the central X-ray emitting region. Three scenarios were considered to describe the X-ray data: partial covering absorption, blurred reflection, and soft Comptonization. All three interpretations describe the 0.5-10.0 keV spectra well. Extrapolating the models to 100 keV results in poorer fits for the partial covering model. When also considering the rapid variability during one of the XMM-Newton observations, the blurred reflection model appears to describe all the observations in the most self-consistent manner. If adopted, the blurred reflection model requires a very low iron abundance in HE 0436-4717. We consider the possibilities that this is an artefact of the fitting process, but it appears possible that it is intrinsic to the object.

  16. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the solid-liquid interface of fused-silica nanofabricated channels with and without a hydrophilic 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (cyanosilane) coating. We develop a model that relaxes the assumption that the surface parameters C(1), C(2), and pK(+) are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy-Chapman-Stern triple-layer model of the electrochemical double layer coupling these two equilibrium models. To validate our model, we used both pH-sensitive dye-based capillary filling experiments as well as electro-osmotic current-monitoring measurements. Using our model we predict the dependence of ζ potential, surface charge density, and capillary filling length ratio on ionic strength for different surface compositions, which can be difficult to achieve otherwise.

  17. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-01-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements. PMID:26883289

  18. Bare fiber Bragg grating immunosensor for real-time detection of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Rajesh; Umesh, Sharath; Murali, Swetha; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Siva Gorthi, Sai

    2017-02-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria have been identified to be the cause of variety of health outbreaks resulting from contamination of food and water. Timely and rapid detection of the bacteria is thus crucial to maintain desired quality of food products and water resources. A novel methodology proposed in this paper demonstrates for the first time, the feasibility of employing a bare fiber Bragg grating (bFBG) sensor for detection of E. coli bacteria. The sensor was fabricated in a photo-sensitive optical fiber (4.2 µm/80 µm). Anti-E. coli antibody was immobilized on the sensor surface to enable the capture of target cells/bacteria present in the sample solution. Strain induced on the sensor surface as a result of antibody immobilization and subsequent binding of E. coli bacteria resulted in unique wavelength shifts in the respective recording of the reflected Bragg wavelength, which can be exploited for the application of biosensing. Functionalization and antibody binding on to the fiber surface was cross validated by the color development resulting from the reaction of an appropriate substrate solution with the enzyme label conjugated to the anti-E. coli antibody. Scanning electron microscope image of the fiber, further verified the E. coli cells bound to the antibody immobilized sensor surface.

  19. Empirical formulas for direct double ionization by bare ions: Z = - 1 to 92

    DOE PAGES

    DuBois, R. D.; Santos, A. C. F.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-25

    Experimental cross sections and cross-section ratios reported in the literature for direct double ionization of the outer shells of helium, neon, and argon atoms resulting from bare ions ranging from protons to uranium and for antiprotons are analyzed in terms of a first- and second-order interference model originally proposed by McGuire [J. H. McGuire, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1153 (1982)]. Empirical formulas for the various contributions to double ionization plus information about the phase difference between the first- and second-order mechanisms are extracted from the data. Projectile and target scalings are also extracted. Total cross sections and their ratios determinedmore » using these formulas and scalings are shown to be in very good agreement with experimental data for lower-Z projectiles and impact velocities larger than 1 a.u. For very-high-Z projectiles, the amount of double ionization is overestimated, probably due to saturation of probabilities that is not accounted for in scaling formulas.« less

  20. Electronic structure transformation in small bare Au clusters as seen by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, T.; Zhang, C.; Björneholm, O.; Mikkelä, M.-H.; Jänkälä, K.; Anin, D.; Urpelainen, S.; Huttula, M.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2017-01-01

    Free bare gold clusters in the size range from few tens to few hundred atoms (≤1 nm dimensions) have been produced in a beam, and the size-dependent development of their full valence band including the 5d and 6s parts has been mapped ‘on the fly’ by synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy. The Au 4f core level has been also probed, and the cluster-specific Au 4f ionization energies have been used to estimate the cluster size. The recorded in the present work valence spectra of the small clusters are compared with the spectra of the large clusters ( N ∼ 103) created by us using a magnetron-based gas aggregation source. The comparison shows a substantially narrower 5d valence band and the decrease in its splitting for gold clusters in the size range of few hundred atoms and below. Our DFT calculations involving the pseudopotential method show that the 5d band width of the ground state increases with the cluster size and by the size N = 20 becomes comparable with the experimental width of the valence photoelectron spectrum. Similar to the earlier observations on supported clusters we interpret our experimental and theoretical results as due to the undercoordination of a large fraction of atoms in the clusters with N ∼ 102 and below. The consequences of such electronic structure of small gold clusters are discussed in connection with their specific physical and chemical properties related to nanoplasmonics and nanocatalysis.

  1. Nanoscopic and redox characterization of engineered horse cytochrome C chemisorbed on a bare gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Laura; Caroppi, Paola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Piro, Maria Cristina; Sinibaldi, Federica; Ferri, Tommaso; Polticelli, Fabio; Cannistraro, Salvatore; Santucci, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we exploit the potential offered by site-directed mutagenesis to achieve direct adsorption of horse cyt c on a bare gold electrode surface. To this issue, the side chain T102 has been replaced by a cysteine. T102 is close to the surface exposed C-terminal residue (E104), therefore the T102C mutation is expected to generate an exposed cysteine side chain able to facilitate protein binding to the electrode via the sulphur atom (analogously to what observed for yeast iso-1-cyt c). Scanning Tunnelling and Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy measurements show that the T102C mutant stably adsorbs on an Au(111) surface and retains the morphological characteristics of the native form. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that the adsorbed variant is electroactive; however, the heterogeneous electron transfer with the electrode surface is slower than that observed for yeast iso-1-cyt c. We ascribe it to differences in the tertiary architecture of the two proteins, characterized by different flexibility and stability. In particular, the region where the N- and C-terminal helices get in contact (and where the mutation occurs) is analyzed in detail, since the interactions between these two helices are considered crucial for the stability of the overall protein fold.

  2. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  3. [Sacral metastasis simulating aneurysmal bone cyst].

    PubMed

    Sanromán-Álvarez, Pablo; Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Miranda-Lloret, Pablo; Pérez-Borredá, Pedro; Botella-Asunción, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Cystic spinal lesions with characteristic patterns, such as the presence of haematic fluid-fluid levels (H-FFL), have been associated with many tumoral lineages, more frequently with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) and exceptionally with metastasis. We present the case of a 60-year-old man with the finding of a sacral cystic bone lesion with H-FFL, with initial suspicion of ABC and confirmed diagnosis of metastasis. The case presented is, to our knowledge, the second case published of spinal cystic bone metastasis with H-FFL pattern with unknown primary tumour at the time of diagnosis and the only one that received resective surgical treatment, achieving pulmonary and metastatic disease control with good quality of life after 1 year of follow up.

  4. Medicines and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies also show that drinking a lot of alcohol might weaken bones. Questions to ask your doctor • Do any of my medicines cause bone loss? • Are there different medicines I can take? • Do I need a bone density test? • What should I do to protect my ...

  5. Temporal bone meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Hooper, R; Siu, K; Cousins, V

    1990-10-01

    Meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of space-occupying lesions of the temporal bone. Five cases of meningiomas of the temporal bone are described and the literature reviewed. These tumours may stimulate Schwannomas and glomus tumours in their presentation and radiological findings. The tumours were managed by combining standard neurosurgical approaches with temporal bone and skull base techniques.

  6. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-09-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-microm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on

  7. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-01-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-µm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on the

  8. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, Judith R.; Anderson, Gerhard D.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  9. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications.

  10. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications. PMID:27279797

  11. EAARL coastal topography-western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: seamless (bare earth and submerged.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, John C.; Yates, Xan

    2010-01-01

    Project Description These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the western Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Charley on August 17 and 18, 2004. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  12. Measurements, interpretation and climate change effects evaluation for pyroclastic bare soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, G.; Pagano, L.; Mercogliano, P.; Montesarchio, M.

    2012-12-01

    A physical model has been designed to achieve the following goals: to mark out the main features of the soil-atmosphere interaction; to quantify the water and energy fluxes through the soil surface during several years; to monitor the trends of the main variables regulating the hydraulic and thermal conditions. It is constituted by a soil volume (about 1mc) exposed to weather forcing; it is instrumented at four depths by sensors for measuring suction, water content and temperature. Therefore, a station allows knowing the meteo variables (rainfall, wind velocity and direction, air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity) and the two directly measurable components of the energy balance at the soil surface (net radiation and soil heat flux). Under the soil specimen, three shear beam load cells measure the soil weight and, hence, because the soil particles weight can be assumed as constant, the sample water storage. As first attempt, the soil surface is kept bare to avoid the complications led by overlapping processes induced by vegetation (interception, transpiration). Since May 2010, the soil involved in testing is pyroclastic material (silty sand) representative of air fall deposits covering a large part of Campania (South Italy) and erupted in the last 10,000 years by different volcanic centres (Phlegrean fields, Vesuvius). Because of their genesis, these soils show peculiar features: high porosity, low weight of soil unit volume, high water retention capacity; they cause an unusual hydraulic behaviour, halfway between coarse and fine soils in terms of saturated hydraulic permeability and mean slope of soil-water characteristic curve. In turn, these elements induce, among other things, that the currently adopted predictive approaches to estimate, for example, infiltration and evaporation processes are not directly suitable for these soils as the available parameters, even for grain sizes comparable to those of pyroclastic soils, fail to reproduce the

  13. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  14. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  15. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  16. Calcium and bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Sun, Li; Friedman, Peter A.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Zaidi, Mone

    2013-01-01

    Calcium transport and calcium signaling are of basic importance in bone cells. Bone is the major store of calcium and a key regulatory organ for calcium homeostasis. Bone, in major part, responds to calcium-dependent signals from the parathyroids and via vitamin D metabolites, although bone retains direct response to extracellular calcium if parathyroid regulation is lost. Improved understanding of calcium transporters and calcium-regulated cellular processes has resulted from analysis of genetic defects, including several defects with low or high bone mass. Osteoblasts deposit calcium by mechanisms including phosphate and calcium transport with alkalinization to absorb acid created by mineral deposition; cartilage calcium mineralization occurs by passive diffusion and phosphate production. Calcium mobilization by osteoclasts is mediated by acid secretion. Both bone forming and bone resorbing cells use calcium signals as regulators of differentiation and activity. This has been studied in more detail in osteoclasts, where both osteoclast differentiation and motility are regulated by calcium. PMID:21674636

  17. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  18. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  19. Optimum sizing of bare-tape tethers for de-orbiting satellites at end of mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Sánchez-Torres, A.; Khan, S. B.; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Charro, M.

    2015-10-01

    De-orbiting satellites at end of mission would prevent generation of new space debris. A proposed de-orbit technology involves a bare conductive tape-tether, which uses neither propellant nor power supply while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. The present work shows how to select tape dimensions for a generic mission so as to satisfy requirements of very small tether-to-satellite mass ratio mt/MS and probability Nf of tether cut by small debris, while keeping de-orbit time tf short and product tf × tether length low to reduce maneuvers in avoiding collisions with large debris. Design is here discussed for particular missions (initial orbit of 720 km altitude and 63° and 92° inclinations, and 3 disparate MS values, 37.5, 375, and 3750 kg), proving it scalable. At mid-inclination and a mass-ratio of a few percent, de-orbit time takes about 2 weeks and Nf is a small fraction of 1%, with tape dimensions ranging from 1 to 6 cm, 10 to 54 μ m, and 2.8 to 8.6 km. Performance drop from middle to high inclination proved moderate: if allowing for twice as large mt/MS, increases are reduced to a factor of 4 in tf and a slight one in Nf, except for multi-ton satellites, somewhat more requiring because efficient orbital-motion-limited electron collection restricts tape-width values, resulting in tape length (slightly) increasing too.

  20. In vivo enhancement of anticancer therapy using bare or chemotherapeutic drug-bearing nanodiamond particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingqi; Tong, Yaoli; Cao, Ruixia; Tian, Zhimei; Yang, Binsheng; Yang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the use of nanodiamond particles (NDs) as a promising material for drug delivery in vivo and in vitro. Methods HepG2 cells (a human hepatic carcinoma cell line) were used to determine the characteristics of a nanodiamond-doxorubicin complex (ND-DOX) when taken up by cells in vitro using laser scanning confocal microscopy and dialysis experiments. We also compared the survival rate and histopathology of tumor-bearing mice after treatment with NDs or ND-DOX in vivo. Results In vitro investigation showed that ND-DOX has slow and sustained drug release characteristics compared with free doxorubicin. In vivo, the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice treated with ND-DOX was four times greater than that of mice treated with free doxorubicin. Interestingly, the survival rate in mice treated with NDs alone was close to that of mice treated with free doxorubicin. This indicates that treatment with ND-DOX can prolong the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice significantly compared with conventional doxorubicin and that NDs can have this effect as well. Histopathological analysis showed that neither the NDs nor ND-DOX were toxic to the kidney, liver, or spleen in contrast with the well-known toxic effects of free doxorubicin on the kidney and liver. Further, both the bare NDs and ND-DOX could suppress tumor growth effectively. Conclusion NDs can potentially prolong survival, and ND-DOX may act as a nanodrug with promising chemotherapeutic efficacy and safety. PMID:24591828

  1. Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Ahrens, L.; Gleen, J.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-09-01

    This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section

  2. Remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare fields at 1.4 GHz frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple method of estimating moisture content (W) of a bare soil from the observed brightness temperature (T sub B) at 1.4 GHz is discussed. The method is based on a radiative transfer model calculation, which has been successfully used in the past to account for many observational results, with some modifications to take into account the effect of surface roughness. Besides the measured T sub B's, the three additional inputs required by the method are the effective soil thermodynamic temperature, the precise relation between W and the smooth field brightness temperature T sub B and a parameter specifying the surface roughness characteristics. The soil effective temperature can be readily measured and the procedures of estimating surface roughness parameter and obtaining the relation between W and smooth field brightness temperature are discussed in detail. Dual polarized radiometric measurements at an off-nadir incident angle are sufficient to estimate both surface roughness parameter and W, provided that the relation between W and smooth field brightness temperature at the same angle is known. The method of W estimate is demonstrated with two sets of experimental data, one from a controlled field experiment by a mobile tower and the other, from aircraft overflight. The results from both data sets are encouraging when the estimated W's are compared with the acquired ground truth of W's in the top 2 cm layer. An offset between the estimated and the measured W's exists in the results of the analyses, but that can be accounted for by the presently poor knowledge of the relationship between W and smooth field brightness temperature for various types of soils. An approach to quantify this relationship for different soils and thus improve the method of W estimate is suggested.

  3. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  4. Hemocompatibility Improvement of Chromium-Bearing Bare-Metal Stent Platform After Magnetoelectropolishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokicki, Ryszard; Haider, Waseem; Maffi, Shivani Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Research was undertaken to determine the influence of the increased content of chromium in the outermost passive layer of magneto-electrochemically refined Co-Cr alloy L-605 surface on its hemocompatibility. The chemistry, roughness, surface energy, and wettability of conventionally electropolished (EP) and magnetoelectropolished (MEP) samples were studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), open circuit potential, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle meter. In vitro hemocompatibility of tested material surfaces was assessed using two important indicators of vascular responses to biomaterial, namely endothelialization and platelets adhesion. The endothelialization was assessed by seeding and incubating samples with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) for 3 days before counting and observing them under a fluorescent microscope. The platelet (rich plasma blood) adhesion and activation test on EP and MEP L-605 alloy surfaces was assessed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The XPS analysis of MEP samples showed significant enrichment of the passive layer with Cr and O when compared with the EP one. The amount of other elements in the passive layer did not show a significant difference between EP and MEP treatments. The adhesion of HUVEC cells shows remarkable affinity to surfaces enriched in Cr (MEP) with almost 100% confluency. In addition, the number of platelets that adhered to standard EP surfaces was higher compared to the MEP surface. The present study shows that the chromium-enriched surface of cobalt-chromium alloy L-605 by the magnetoelectropolishing process tremendously improves surface hemocompatibility with regard to stent functionality by enhanced endothelialization and lower platelet adhesion and should be taken under consideration as an alternative surface of biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents, polymer-free drug-eluting stents as well as bare-metal stents.

  5. A hydrometeorological approach for probabilistic simulation of monthly soil moisture under bare and crop land conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sarit Kumar; Maity, Rajib

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the probabilistic estimation of monthly soil moisture variation by considering (a) the influence of hydrometeorological forcing to model the temporal variation and (b) the information of Hydrological Soil Groups (HSGs) and Agro-Climatic Zones (ACZs) to capture the spatial variation. The innovative contributions of this study are: (i) development of a Combined Hydro-Meteorological (CHM) index to extract the information of different influencing hydrometeorological variables, (ii) consideration of soil-hydrologic characteristics (through HSGs) and climate regime-based zoning for agriculture (through ACZs), and (iii) quantification of uncertainty range of the estimated soil moisture. Usage of Supervised Principal Component Analysis (SPCA) in the development of the CHM index helps to eliminate the "curse of dimensionality," typically arises in the multivariate analysis. The usage of SPCA also ensures the maximum possible association between the developed CHM index and soil moisture variation. The association between these variables is modeled through their joint distribution which is obtained by using the theory of copula. The proposed approach is also spatially transferable, since the information on HSGs and ACZs is considered. The "leave-one-out" cross-validation (LOO-CV) approach is adopted for stations belong to a particular HSG to examine the spatial transferability. The simulated soil moisture values are also compared with a few existing soil moisture data sets, derived from different Land Surface Models (LSMs) or retrieved from different satellite-based missions. The potential of the proposed approach is found to be promising and even applicable to crop land also, though with a lesser degree of efficiency as compared to bare land conditions.

  6. Bare and Polymer-Coated Indium Tin Oxide as Working Electrodes for Manganese Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Cory A; Bange, Adam; Warren, Mercedes; Kang, Wenjing; Nahan, Keaton; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2016-04-19

    Though an essential metal in the body, manganese (Mn) has a number of health implications when found in excess that are magnified by chronic exposure. These health complications include neurotoxicity, memory loss, infertility in males, and development of a neurologic psychiatric disorder, manganism. Thus, trace detection in environmental samples is increasingly important. Few electrode materials are able to reach the negative reductive potential of Mn required for anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), so cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) has been shown to be a viable alternative. We demonstrate Mn CSV using an indium tin oxide (ITO) working electrode both bare and coated with a sulfonated charge selective polymer film, polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene-sulfonate (SSEBS). ITO itself proved to be an excellent electrode material for Mn CSV, achieving a calculated detection limit of 5 nM (0.3 ppb) with a deposition time of 3 min. Coating the ITO with the SSEBS polymer was found to increase the sensitivity and lower the detection limit to 1 nM (0.06 ppb). This polymer modified electrode offers excellent selectivity for Mn as no interferences were observed from other metal ions tested (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), In(3+), Sb(3+), Al(3+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(3+), Bi(3+), and Sn(2+)) except Fe(2+), which was found to interfere with the analytical signal for Mn(2+) at a ratio 20:1 (Fe(2+)/Mn(2+)). The applicability of this procedure to the analysis of tap, river, and pond water samples was demonstrated. This simple, sensitive analytical method using ITO and SSEBS-ITO could be applied to a number of electroactive transition metals detectable by CSV.

  7. Results from NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Series 2 bare fuel dissolution tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-09-01

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Two bare spent fuel specimens plus the empty cladding hulls were tested in NNWSI J-13 well water in unsealed fused silica vessels under ambient hot cell air conditions (25{degree}C) in the currently reported tests. One of the specimens was prepared from a rod irradiated in the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 reactor and the other from a rod irradiated in the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor. Results indicate that most radionuclides of interest fall into three groups for release modeling. The first group principally includes the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm), all of which reached solubility-limited concentrations that were orders of magnitude below those necessary to meet the NRC 10 CFR 60.113 release limits for any realistic water flux predicted for the Yucca Mountain repository site. The second group is nuclides of soluble elements such as Cs, Tc, and I, for which release rates do not appear to be solubility-limited and may depend on the dissolution rate of fuel. In later test cycles, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 129}I were continuously released at rates between about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} of inventory per year. The third group is radionuclides that may be transported in the vapor phase, of which {sup 14}C is of primary concern. Detailed test results are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. Pericytes in sarcomas of bone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Nguyen, Vi; Nguyen, Alan; Scott, Michelle A; James, Aaron W

    2015-07-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells that closely enwrap small blood vessels, lying in intimate association with the endothelium. Pericytes have recently gained attention as an important mediator of vascular biology and angiogenesis in cancer. Although better studied in carcinoma, pericytes have known interaction with sarcomas of bone, including Ewing's sarcoma, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Best studied is Ewing's sarcoma (ES), which displays a prominent perivascular growth pattern. Signaling pathways of known importance in intratumoral pericytes in ES include Notch, PDGF/PDGFR-β, and VEGF signaling. In summary, pericytes serve important functions in the tumor microenvironment. Improved understanding of pericyte biology may hold significant implications for the development of new therapies in sarcoma.

  9. Epidemiology and pathology of Paget's disease of bone - a review.

    PubMed

    Nebot Valenzuela, Elena; Pietschmann, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a noninflammatory, metabolic, skeletal disorder characterized by localized excessive osteoclastic bone resorption that is followed by compensatory increased osteoblastic activity leading to unstructured, fibroblastic, and biomechanically unstable bone. As a result, there is deformity and enlargement of the bone with a defective and disorganized pattern. Here, we review the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, macrostructure, histology, and quantitative histomorphometry findings of PDB. Hyperosteoclastosis and poor definition of the boundary between cortical and medullary bone are the main histological findings in PDB. Additionally, Pagetic bone is also characterized by hypertrophy and alteration of trabecular parameters.

  10. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  11. Biological Regulation of Bone Quality

    PubMed Central

    Alliston, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The ability of bone to resist fracture is determined by the combination of bone mass and bone quality. Like bone mass, bone quality is carefully regulated. Of the many aspects of bone quality, this review focuses on biological mechanisms that control the material quality of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Bone ECM quality depends upon ECM composition and organization. Proteins and signaling pathways that affect the mineral or organic constituents of bone ECM impact bone ECM material properties, such as elastic modulus and hardness. These properties are also sensitive to pathways that regulate bone remodeling by osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes. Several extracellular proteins, signaling pathways, intracellular effectors, and transcription regulatory networks have been implicated in the control of bone ECM quality. A molecular understanding of these mechanisms will elucidate the biological control of bone quality and suggest new targets for the development of therapies to prevent bone fragility. PMID:24894149

  12. Bioreactor cultivation of anatomically shaped human bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Temple, Joshua P; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Grayson, Warren L

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a method for engineering bone grafts in vitro with the specific geometry of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. The anatomical geometry of the bone grafts was segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans, converted to G-code, and used to machine decellularized trabecular bone scaffolds into the identical shape of the condyle. These scaffolds were seeded with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using spinner flasks and cultivated for up to 5 weeks in vitro using a custom-designed perfusion bioreactor system. The flow patterns through the complex geometry were modeled using the FloWorks module of SolidWorks to optimize bioreactor design. The perfused scaffolds exhibited significantly higher cellular content, better matrix production, and increased bone mineral deposition relative to non-perfused (static) controls after 5 weeks of in vitro cultivation. This technology is broadly applicable for creating patient-specific bone grafts of varying shapes and sizes.

  13. Endochondral bone formation in embryonic mouse pre-metatarsals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Long term exposure to a reduced gravitational environment has a deleterious effect on bone. The developmental events which occur prior to initial bone deposition will provide insight into the regulation of mature bone physiology. We have characterized a system in which the events preceding bone formation take place in an isolated in vitro organ culture environment. We show that cultured pre-metatarsal tissue parallels development of pre-metatarsal tissue in the embryo. Both undergo mesenchyme differentiation and morphogenesis to form a cartilage rod, which resembles the future bone, followed by terminal chondrocyte differentiation in a definite morphogenetic pattern. These sequential steps occur prior to osteoblast maturation and bone matrix deposition in the developing organism. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity is a distinctive enzymatic marker for mineralizing tissues. We have measured this activity throughout pre-metatarsal development and show (a) where in the tissue it is predominantly found, and (b) that this is indeed the mineralizing isoform of the enzyme.

  14. [Bone and Nutrition. Sclerostin and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Sawako; Nagamoto, Kenta; Ogata, Mao; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-07-01

    Osteocytes orchestrate bone resorption and bone formation by controlling osteoclast and osteoblast activity. On the other hand, osteocytes secret FGF23 (fibroblast growth factor 23), FGF23 acts on the kidney to control phosphate homeostasis. Sclerostin is also released from osteocytes and it regulated osteoblast activity through Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Therefore, an antibody that targets sclerostin is currently in phase- III clinical trials for the treatment of osteoporosis and it is expected as new therapeutics.

  15. [Fibrous dysplasia of bone].

    PubMed

    Orcel, Philippe; Chapurlat, Roland

    2007-10-31

    Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a congenital non hereditary benign bone disease, where normal bone is replaced by a fibrous-like tissue with immature osteogenesis. Prevalence is difficult to estimate, due to frequent asymptomatic lesions. Bone lesions are mono- or polyostotic and may be associated with bone pain and fragility, leading to fractures. In some patients or bone sites, they are hypertrophic, responsible for neurological complications. Imaging and, when necessary, histology are the cornerstones of the diagnosis. A common molecular defect, i.e. activating mutations of the GNAS gene, encoding the a subunit of the Gs protein in target cells, is responsible for bone cell alterations as well as for the involvement of other cells/tissues bearing the same molecular defect (melanocytes, endocrine cells). These mutations affect only somatic cells and are therefore not hereditary: antenatal diagnosis is not appropriate for this disease and genetic counselling is not very useful, except for reassuring the patients. The conventional therapeutic approach is essentially symptomatic (pain killers) and orthopaedic (prevention and treatment of bone complications). Recent publications have focused attention on pamidronate, which rapidly relieves bone pain in most patients, and progressively increases bone mineralization in osteolytic areas in about half of the patients. Tubular phosphate wasting is common and should be treated with phosphate supplement and calcitriol. The prognosis should improve with therapeutic advances, but this remains to be properly evaluated.

  16. Initial colloid deposition on bare and zeolite-coated stainless steel and aluminum: influence of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gexin; Bedi, Rajwant S; Yan, Yushan S; Walker, Sharon L

    2010-08-03

    The impact of surface roughness of bare and zeolite ZSM-5 coated stainless steel and aluminum alloy on colloid deposition has been investigated using a parallel plate flow chamber system in an aqueous environment. The metals were systematically polished to alter the surface roughness from nanoscale to microscale, with the subsequent surface roughness of both the bare and coated surfaces varying from 11.2 to 706 nm. The stainless steel and aluminum alloy surfaces are extensively characterized, both as bare and as coated surfaces. Experimental results suggest that ZSM-5 coating and surface roughness have a pronounced impact on the kinetics of the colloid deposition. The ZSM-5 coating reduced colloid adhesion compared to the corresponding bare metal surface. In general, the greater surface roughness of like samples resulted in higher colloid deposition. Primarily, this is due to greater surface roughness inducing less reduction in the attractive interactions occurring between colloids and collector surfaces. This effect was sensitive to ionic strength and was found to be more pronounced at lower ionic strength conditions. For the most electrostatically unfavorable scenario (ZSM-5 coatings in 1 mM KNO(3)), the enhanced deposition may also be attributed to inherent surface charge heterogeneity of ZSM-5 coatings due to aluminum in the crystalline structure. The two exceptions are ZSM-5 coated mirror-polished stainless steel and the unpolished aluminum surfaces, which are rougher than the other two samples of the same metal type but result in the least deposition. The reasons for these observations are discussed, as well as the effect of surface charge and hydrophobicity on the adhesion. The relative importance of surface roughness versus contributions of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobicity to the colloid deposition is also discussed.

  17. Bare ground as a crucial habitat feature for a rare terrestrially foraging farmland bird of Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Schaub, Michael; Reichlin, Thomas S.; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-02-01

    Most farmland birds have declined significantly throughout the world due to agricultural intensification. Agri-environmental policies could not halt the decline of ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds in Europe, indicating a gap in knowledge of species' ecological requirements. This represents a major impediment to the development of efficient, evidence-based agri-environmental measures. Using radio-tracking we studied habitat selection by farmland Hoopoes, a rare terrestrially foraging bird in Central Europe, and assessed habitat preferences of their main prey (Molecrickets), with the aim to identify optimal foraging habitat profiles in order to guide farmland management. Hierarchical logistic regression modelling of habitat descriptors at actual foraging locations vs. random locations within the home ranges of 13 males showed that the availability of bare ground was the principal determinant of foraging activity, with an optimum of 60-70% bare ground at patch scale. This ideal habitat configuration, which facilitates birds' terrestrial hunting, was found primarily in intensively farmed fruit tree plantations which dominated the landscape matrix: this habitat offers extensive strips of bare ground due to systematic removal of ground vegetation along tree rows. In contrast, dense grassland and cropland were avoided. Another important habitat feature was the availability of nongravelly soil, which enabled Hoopoes to probe the earth with their long, curved bill in search of underground invertebrates. The role of Molecrickets, however, appeared secondary to foraging patch selection, suggesting that prey accessibility was per se more important than prey abundance. Creating patches of bare ground within modern farmland where sufficient supplies of suitable invertebrate prey exist will support Hoopoe populations.

  18. Covered versus bare stents for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingshun; Tian, Yulong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zhiping; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a standard treatment option for the management of portal hypertension in liver cirrhosis. Since the introduction of covered stents, shunt patency has been greatly improved. However, it remains uncertain about whether covered stents could improve survival. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials has been performed to compare the outcomes of covered versus bare stents for TIPS. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify the relevant randomized controlled trials. Overall survival, shunt patency, and hepatic encephalopathy were the major endpoints. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Heterogeneity was calculated. Cochrane risk of bias tool was employed. Results: Overall, 119 papers were identified. Among them, four randomized controlled trials were eligible. Viatorr covered stents alone, Fluency covered stents alone, and Viatorr plus Fluency covered stents were employed in one, two, and one randomized controlled trials, respectively. Risk of bias was relatively low. Meta-analyses demonstrated that the covered-stents group had significantly higher probabilities of overall survival (HR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.50–0.90, p = 0.008) and shunt patency (HR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.29–0.62, p < 0.0001) than the bare-stents group. Additionally, the covered-stents group might have a lower risk of hepatic encephalopathy than the bare-stents group (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.49–1.00, p = 0.05). The heterogeneity among studies was not statistically significant in the meta-analyses. Conclusions: Compared with bare stents, covered stents for TIPS may improve the overall survival. In the era of covered stents, the indications for TIPS may be further expanded. PMID:28286557

  19. Drug eluting and bare metal stents in people with and without diabetes: collaborative network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stettler, Christoph; Allemann, Sabin; Wandel, Simon; Kastrati, Adnan; Morice, Marie Claude; Schömig, Albert; Pfisterer, Matthias E; Stone, Gregg W; Leon, Martin B; de Lezo, José Suárez; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Park, Seung-Jung; Sabaté, Manel; Suttorp, Maarten J; Kelbaek, Henning; Spaulding, Christian; Menichelli, Maurizio; Vermeersch, Paul; Dirksen, Maurits T; Cervinka, Pavel; Carlo, Marco De; Erglis, Andrejs; Chechi, Tania; Ortolani, Paolo; Schalij, Martin J; Diem, Peter; Meier, Bernhard; Windecker, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety of three types of stents (sirolimus eluting, paclitaxel eluting, and bare metal) in people with and without diabetes mellitus. Design Collaborative network meta-analysis. Data sources Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), relevant websites, reference lists, conference abstracts, reviews, book chapters, and proceedings of advisory panels for the US Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers and trialists provided additional data. Review methods Network meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison method to combine direct within trial comparisons between stents with indirect evidence from other trials while maintaining randomisation. Overall mortality was the primary safety end point, target lesion revascularisation the effectiveness end point. Results 35 trials in 3852 people with diabetes and 10 947 people without diabetes contributed to the analyses. Inconsistency of the network was substantial for overall mortality in people with diabetes and seemed to be related to the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (P value for interaction 0.02). Restricting the analysis to trials with a duration of dual antiplatelet therapy of six months or more, inconsistency was reduced considerably and hazard ratios for overall mortality were near one for all comparisons in people with diabetes: sirolimus eluting stents compared with bare metal stents 0.88 (95% credibility interval 0.55 to 1.30), paclitaxel eluting stents compared with bare metal stents 0.91 (0.60 to 1.38), and sirolimus eluting stents compared with paclitaxel eluting stents 0.95 (0.63 to 1.43). In people without diabetes, hazard ratios were unaffected by the restriction. Both drug eluting stents were associated with a decrease in revascularisation rates compared with bare metal stents in people both with and without diabetes. Conclusion In trials that specified a duration of dual antiplatelet therapy of six

  20. Bone marrow lesions and subchondral bone pathology of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kon, Elizaveta; Ronga, Mario; Filardo, Giuseppe; Farr, Jack; Madry, Henning; Milano, Giuseppe; Andriolo, Luca; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) around the knee are a common magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding. However, despite the growing interest on BMLs in multiple pathological conditions, they remain controversial not only for the still unknown role in the etiopathological processes, but also in terms of clinical impact and treatment. The differential diagnosis includes a wide range of conditions: traumatic contusion and fractures, cyst formation and erosions, hematopoietic and infiltrated marrow, developmental chondroses, disuse and overuse, transient bone marrow oedema syndrome and, lastly, subchondral insufficiency fractures and true osteonecrosis. Regardless the heterogeneous spectrum of these pathologies, a key factor for patient management is the distinction between reversible and irreversible conditions. To this regard, MRI plays a major role, leading to the correct diagnosis based on recognizable typical patterns that have to be considered together with coexistent abnormalities, age, and clinical history. Several treatment options have been proposed, from conservative to surgical approaches. In this manuscript the main lesion patterns and their management have been analysed to provide the most updated evidence for the differential diagnosis and the most effective treatment.

  1. Assessment of Long Bone Flexural Properties from Bone Densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Cleek, Tammy; Katz, BethAnn

    1994-01-01

    While bone densitometry is the accepted non-invasive method of quantifying bone mineral content in bones, its assessment of bone structural properties is less well understood. The objective of our current work is to compare cross-section shape or areal properties of long bones computed from densitometry data with cross-section flexural properties obtained from surface strain measurements.

  2. Genetic regulation of bone mass: from bone density to bone strength.

    PubMed

    Langman, Craig B

    2005-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized in adults by diminished bone density. Bone is an organ that evolves and grows throughout life, and establishing optimal bone density in childhood and adolescence serves to buffer bone loss later in life. Bone density, a measurable entity, is the clinical substitute for bone strength, or the ability to defend against fracture. Chronic diseases may adversely affect optimal peak bone density. Bone density is under genetic control, as revealed by three lines of investigations. These include (1) the finding of quantitative trait loci for bone density, (2) the finding that specific mutations in genes that are important in the development of osteoblast or osteoclast lineages alter bone density, and (3) the linkeage of known polymorphisms for genes involved in mineral homeostasis to bone density and/or fracture. Future therapeutics for improving peak bone density or delaying bone loss later in life may take advantage of the genetic nature of bone density development.

  3. Deciphering skeletal patterning: clues from the limb.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Francesca V; Martin, Gail R

    2003-05-15

    Even young children can distinguish a Tyrannosaurus rex from a Brontosaurus by observing differences in bone size, shape, number and arrangement, that is, skeletal pattern. But despite our extensive knowledge about cartilage and bone formation per se, it is still largely a mystery how skeletal pattern is established. Much of what we do know has been learned from studying limb development in chicken and mouse embryos. Based on the data from such studies, models for how limb skeletal pattern is established have been proposed and continue to be hotly debated.

  4. The impact of the use of different types of gloves and bare hands for preparation of clean surgical instruments 1

    PubMed Central

    Bruna, Camila Quartim de Moraes; de Souza, Rafael Queiroz; Massaia, Irineu Francisco Silva; Cruz, Áurea Silveira; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to determine if there are differences on the safety of the preparation of clean surgical instruments using different types of gloves and bare hands and evaluate the microbiological load of these preparations without gloves. Method: laboratory procedure with a pragmatic approach, in which the samples were handled with different types of gloves and bare hands. In addition, cytotoxicity assays were carried out by means of the agar diffusion method. Further samples were subjected to microbiological analysis after being handled without gloves. Results: none of the samples showed cytotoxic effect. All microbiological cultures showed growth of microorganisms, but no microorganism has been recovered after autoclaving. Conclusion: there were no differences in the cytotoxic responses regarding the use of different types of gloves and bare hands in the handling of clean surgical instruments, which could entail iatrogenic risk. It is noteworthy that the use of gloves involves increase in the costs of process and waste generation, and the potential allergenic risk to latex. PMID:27737375

  5. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  6. Radar backscattering measurement of bare soil and vegetation covered soil using X-band and full polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, B.; Kalita, M.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study is to measure backscattered power of bare soil and vegetation covered soil using X-band scatterometer system with full polarization and various angles during monsoon season and relate backscattered power to the density of vegetation over soil. The measurement was conducted at an experimental field located in the campus of Assam Engineering College, Guwahati, India. The soil sample consists of Silt and Clay in higher proportions as compared to Sand. The scatterometer system consists of dual-polarimetric square horn antennas, Power meter, Klystron, coaxial cables, isolator and waveguide detector. The polarization of the horn antennas as well as the look angle can be changed in the set-up. The backscattering coefficients were calculated by applying a radar equation for the measured values at incident angles between 30° and 60° for full polarization (HH, VV, HV, VH), respectively, and compared with vegetation cover over soil for each scatterometer measurement simultaneously. The VH polarization and 60° look angle are found to be the most suitable combination of configuration of an X-band scatterometer for distinguishing the land cover targets such as bare soil and vegetation covered soil. From the analysis of the results, polarimetric scatterometer data appear to be promising to distinguish the land cover types such as bare soil and soil completely covered by vegetation. The results of this study will help the scientists working in the field of active microwave remote sensing.

  7. Linear and nonlinear optical studies of bare and copper doped TiO2 nanoparticles via sol gel technique.

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, B; Mugundan, S; Viruthagiri, G; Praveen, P; Shanmugam, N

    2014-01-24

    In general, the nanoparticles of TiO2 may exist in the phases of anatase, rutile and brookite. In the present work, we used titanium terta iso propoxide and 2-propanol as a common starting material to prepare the precursors of bare and copper doped nanosized TiO2. Then the synthesized products were calcinated at 500°C and after calcination the pure TiO2 nanoparticles in anatase phase were harvested. The crystallite sizes of bare and copper doped TiO2 nanoparticles were calculated from X-ray diffraction analysis. The existence of functional groups of the samples was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The optical properties of bare and doped samples were carried out using UV-DRS and photoluminescence measurements. The surface morphology and the element constitution of the copper doped TiO2 nanoparticles were studied by scanning electron microscope fitted with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer arrangement. The nonlinear optical properties of the products were confirmed by Kurtz second harmonic generation (SHG) test and the output power generated by the nanoparticle was compared with that of potassium di hydrogen phosphate (KDP).

  8. Evaluation of barely visible indentation damage (BVID) in CF/EP sandwich composites using guided wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Samir; Ye, Lin; Dong, Xingjian; Alamdari, Mehrisadat Makki

    2016-08-01

    Barely visible indentation damage after quasi-static indentation in sandwich CF/EP composites was assessed using ultrasonic guided wave signals. Finite element analyses were conducted to investigate the interaction between guided waves and damage, further to assist in the selection process of the Lamb wave sensitive modes for debonding identification. Composite sandwich beams and panels structures were investigated. Using the beam structure, a damage index was defined based on the change in the peak magnitude of the captured wave signals before and after the indentation, and the damage index was correlated with the residual deformation (defined as the depth of the dent), that was further correlated with the amount of crushing within the core. Both A0 and S0 Lamb wave modes showed high sensitivity to the presence of barely visible indentation damage with residual deformation of 0.2 mm. Furthermore, barely visible indentation damage was assessed in composite sandwich panels after indenting to 3 and 5 mm, and the damage index was defined, based on (a) the peak magnitude of the wave signals before and after indentation or (b) the mismatch between the original and reconstructed wave signals based on a time-reversal algorithm, and was subsequently applied to locate the position of indentation.

  9. A study on zinc distribution in calcareous soils for cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L.) and barely ( Hordeum Vulgare L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroomand, Naser; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2010-05-01

    Compared to other cereals, such as wheat and barley cultivars which have low sensitivity to Zn deficiency, cowpea is sensitive to zinc (Zn) deficiency, however it extensively grows even in soils with deficient in Zn. A 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the response of cowpea and barely to Zn in calcareous soils with different DTPA- Zn. The soil samples were taken from soil surface up to 0.3 m in which their DTPA- Zn ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 mg kg-1. Shoot dry matter, concentration and uptake of Zn were found to be significantly correlated with soil DTPA- Zn in cowpea and barely. Critical deficiency level of Zn in cowpea was 1.3 mg kg-1 in soil and 28.5 mg kg-1 in shoot dry matter, however, to barely symptoms of Zn deficiency was not observed and concentration of Zn was higher than the critical level reported in literatures. Organic carbon (OC), calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE), pH and field capacity soil moisture content(FC) were significantly correlated with plant responses to Zn which were the most influenced characteristics to Zn uptake by plants.

  10. Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide fluxes from a bare soil using a micrometeorological approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner-Riddle, C.; Thurtell, G.W.; King, K.M.; Kidd, G.E.; Beauchamp, E.G.

    1996-07-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) levels have prompted research on management of the soil C and N pools. The impact of C and N fertilizer addition on N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} field emissions in not clear. We determined N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} fluxes from a 1-ha bare soil plot using micrometeorological methods with the objective of evaluating the effect of management practices (cultivation, irrigation, fertilizer, and sucrose applications) on the relative importance of both trace gases. Research was conducted at the Elora Research Station (Typic Hapludalf) in Ontario, Canada, over 7 mo. The N{sub 2}O concentration gradients were measured using a Tunable Diode Laser Trace Gas Analyzer and the CO{sub 2} gradients using an Infra-Red Gas Analyzer. The transport coefficients were calculated using a Bowen Ratio Energy Balance and two wind profile approaches. These three approaches resulted in similar hourly fluxes. Peak emissions of 250 ng N{sub 2}O m{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} were measured after wetting of dry soil (WFP < 0.4) through irrigation in 1991, and rain in 1992. Application of ammonium sulfate (100 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}) and irrigation increased N{sub 2}O emissions to 75 ng m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, with a smaller effect caused by two subsequent irrigations on wet soil (WFP >0.6). Carbon dioxide fluxes varied between 0.01 and 0.5 mg m{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} being the predominant gas contributing to an equivalent CO{sub 2} global-warming potential, but addition of sucrose increased the contribution of N{sub 2} O to twice the contribution of CO{sub 2}. The combined effect of C and N additions (e.g. manure and legume) on the N{sub 2}O emissions in irrigated or high rainfall areas should be considered in the efforts of atmospheric C sequestering. 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon.

    PubMed

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-07

    The paper presents calculated cross sections for bare and dressed carbon projectiles of charge states q (0 to 6) with energies 1-10(4) keV u(-1) impacting on molecular water and atomic neon targets. The cross sections of water are of interest for radiobiological studies, but there are very few experimental data for water in any phase, while those for liquid water are non-existent. The more extensive experimental database for the neon target made it possible to test the reliability of the model calculations for the many-electron collision system. The current calculations cover major single and double electronic interactions of low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The three-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method was used for the calculation of one-electron transition probabilities for target ionization, electron capture and projectile electron loss. The many-electron problem was taken into account using statistical methods: a modified independent event model was used for pure (direct) and simultaneous target and projectile ionizations, and the independent particle model for pure electron capture and electron capture accompanied by target ionization. Results are presented for double differential cross sections (DDCS) for total electron emission by carbon projectile impact on neon. For the water target, we present the following: single differential cross sections (SDCS) and DDCS for single target ionization; total cross sections (TCS) for electron emission; TCS for the pure single electronic interactions; equilibrium charge state fractions; and stopping cross sections. The results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data in many cases, including DDCS and SDCS for the single target ionization, TCS for the total electron emission and TCS for the pure single electron capture. The stopping cross sections of this work are consistent with the other model calculations for projectile energies ≥800 keV u(-1), but smaller

  12. Evolution of soil organic matter composition during long-term bare fallow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Barre, P.; Cecillon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Much of our understanding of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics stems from results of isotopic (stable and radiocarbon) analyses and decomposition studies. The large majority of decomposition studies involve laboratory incubation experiments, which have several limitations that provide an incomplete picture of SOM dynamics due to their short duration compared to the mean turnover times estimated from isotopic analyses, and due to the constant and optimal conditions typically used. Long-term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments (in which C inputs have been stopped for several decades) provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of SOM during extended periods of decomposition without fresh organic inputs from growing plants. These experiments are essentially decades-long incubation experiments conducted under field conditions. The objective of the current study was to examine the evolution of SOM composition under LTBF conditions in order to better understand SOM stabilization mechanisms and to better predict the vulnerability of SOM to disturbance and climate change. The evolution of energetic and chemical characteristics of bulk SOM was studied in five LTBF experiments across Europe: Askov (DK), Grignon (FR), Rothamsted (UK), Ultuna (SW) and Versailles (FR), using simultaneous thermal analysis (i.e., thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved CO2 gas analysis (CO2-EGA)) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT-MIRS). Our results showed that in spite of the heterogeneity of the soils at the LTBF sites, generalized energetic and chemical pathways exist for SOM decomposition and stabilization. The DRIFT-MIRS indices demonstrated that long-term SOM decomposition is accompanied by a consistent evolution of its bulk chemical composition across most sites. The increased burning temperature and lower energy density of stable SOM suggest that SOM stability may be a function of high activation energy cost

  13. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  14. Bone Surface Mapping Method

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Zhang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bone shape is an important factor to determine the bone's structural function. For the asymmetrically shaped and anisotropically distributed bone in vivo, a surface mapping method is proposed on the bases of its geometric transformation invariance and its uniqueness of the principal axes of inertia. Using spiral CT scanning, we can make precise measurements to bone in vivo. The coordinate transformations lead to the principal axes of inertia, with which the prime meridian and the contour can be set. Methods such as tomographic reconstruction and boundary development are employed so that the surface of bone in vivo can be mapped. Experimental results show that the surface mapping method can reflect the shape features and help study the surface changes of bone in vivo. This method can be applied to research into the surface characteristics and changes of organ, tissue or cell whenever its digitalized surface is obtained. PMID:22412952

  15. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  16. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Sikavitsas, V I; Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2001-10-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  17. Modulation of gene expression in bone cells during strain-adapted bone remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Vatsa, A.; Tan, S. D.; Smit, Th. H.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2005-08-01

    Bone tissue can adapt to changing mechanical demands. The osteocytes are believed to play a role as the "professional" mechanosensory cells of bone, and the lacuno-canalicular network as the structure that mediates mechanosensing. Loading on bone produces flow of interstitial fluid in the lacunar-canalicular network along the surface of osteocytes, which is likely the physiological signal for bone cell adaptive responses in vivo. The alignment of secondary osteons along the dominant loading direction suggests that bone remodeling is guided by mechanical strain. We propose that alignment during remodeling occurs as a result of different canalicular flow patterns around cutting cone and reversal zone during loading.The response of osteocytes to fluid flow includes prostaglandin synthesis and expression of inducible cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme that mediates mechanical loading-induced bone formation in vivo. The response of osteocytes to fluid flow also includes nitric oxide production, and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide has been shown to mediate the mechanical effects in bone, leading to enhanced prostaglandin E2 release. These studies have increased our understanding of the cell biology underlying Wolff's Law. This may lead to new strategies for combating disuse-related osteoporosis, such as occurs during long- mission spaceflights.

  18. Optical evaluation of digital micromirror devices (DMDs) with UV-grade fused silica, sapphire, and magnesium fluoride windows and long-term reflectance of bare devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are commercial micro-electromechanical systems, consisting of millions of mirrors which can be individually addressed and tilted into one of two states (+/-12°). These devices were developed to create binary patterns in video projectors, in the visible range. Commercially available DMDs are hermetically sealed and extremely reliable. Recently, DMDs have been identified as an alternative to microshutter arrays for space-based multi-object spectrometers (MOS). Specifically, the MOS at the heart of the proposed Galactic Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) uses the DMD as a reprogrammable slit mask. Unfortunately, the protective borosilicate windows limit the use of DMDs in the UV and IR regimes, where the glass has insufficient throughput. In this work, we present our efforts to replace standard DMD windows with custom windows made from UV-grade fused silica, low-absorption optical sapphire (LAOS) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). We present transmission measurements of the antireflection coated windows and the reflectance of bare (window removed) DMDs. Furthermore, we investigated the long-term stability of the DMD reflectance and experiments for coating DMD active area with a layer of pure aluminum (Al) to boost reflectance performance in the UV spectral range (200-400 nm).

  19. Optical Evaluation of Digital Micromirror Devices (DMDs) with UV-Grade Fused Silica, Sapphire, and Magnesium Fluoride Windows and Longterm Reflectance of Bare Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are commercial micro-electromechanical systems, consisting of millions of mirrors which can be individually addressed and tilted into one of two states (+/-12deg). These devices were developed to create binary patterns in video projectors, in the visible range. Commercially available DMDs are hermetically sealed and extremely reliable. Recently, DMDs have been identified as an alternative to microshutter arrays for space-based multi-object spectrometers (MOS). Specifically, the MOS at the heart of the proposed Galactic Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) uses the DMD as a reprogrammable slit mask. Unfortunately, the protective borosilicate windows limit the use of DMDs in the UV and IR regimes, where the glass has insufficient throughput. In this work, we present our efforts to replace standard DMD windows with custom windows made from UV-grade fused silica, low-absorption optical sapphire (LAOS) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). We present transmission measurements of the antireflection coated windows and the reflectance of bare (window removed) DMDs. Furthermore, we investigated the long-term stability of the DMD reflectance and experiments for coating DMD active area with a layer of pure aluminum (Al) to boost reflectance performance in the UV spectral range (200-400 nm).

  20. Strontium-containing hydroxyapatite bioactive bone cement in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ni, G X; Chiu, K Y; Lu, W W; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y G; Hao, L B; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Lu, S B; Luk, K D K

    2006-08-01

    Clinical outcome of cemented implants to revision total hip replacement (THR) is not as satisfactory as primary THR, due to the loss of bone stock and normal trabecular pattern. This study evaluated a bioactive bone cement, strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bone cement, in a goat revision hip hemi-arthroplasty model, and compared outcomes with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. Nine months after operation, significantly higher bonding strength was found in the Sr-HA group (3.36+/-1.84 MPa) than in the PMMA bone cement group (1.23+/-0.73 MPa). After detached from the femoral component, the surface of PMMA bone cement mantle was shown relatively smooth, whereas the surface of the Sr-HA bioactive bone cement mantle was uneven, by SEM observation. EDX analysis detected little calcium and no phosphorus on the surface of PMMA bone cement mantle, while high content of calcium (14.03%) and phosphorus (10.37%) was found on the surface of the Sr-HA bone cement mantle. Even higher content of calcium (17.37%) and phosphorus (10.84%) were detected in the concave area. Intimate contact between Sr-HA bioactive bone cement and bone was demonstrated by histological and SEM observation. New bone bonded to the surface of Sr-HA cement and grew along its surface. However, fibrous tissue was observed between PMMA bone cement and bone. The results showed good bioactivity of Sr-HA bioactive bone cement in this revision hip replacement model using goats. This in vivo study also suggested that Sr-HA bioactive bone cement was superior to PMMA bone cement in terms of bone-bonding strength. Use of bioactive bone cement may be a possible solution overcoming problems associated with the use of PMMA bone cement in revision hip replacement.