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Sample records for bare bones pattern

  1. Bare Bones Pattern Formation: A Core Regulatory Network in Varying Geometries Reproduces Major Features of Vertebrate Limb Development and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yong-Tao; Alber, Mark S.; Newman, Stuart A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Major unresolved questions regarding vertebrate limb development concern how the numbers of skeletal elements along the proximodistal (P-D) and anteroposterior (A-P) axes are determined and how the shape of a growing limb affects skeletal element formation. There is currently no generally accepted model for these patterning processes, but recent work on cartilage development (chondrogenesis) indicates that precartilage tissue self-organizes into nodular patterns by cell-molecular circuitry with local auto-activating and lateral inhibitory (LALI) properties. This process is played out in the developing limb in the context of a gradient of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) emanating from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER). Results We have simulated the behavior of the core chondrogenic mechanism of the developing limb in the presence of an FGF gradient using a novel computational environment that permits simulation of LALI systems in domains of varying shape and size. The model predicts the normal proximodistal pattern of skeletogenesis as well as distal truncations resulting from AER removal. Modifications of the model's parameters corresponding to plausible effects of Hox proteins and formins, and of the reshaping of the model limb, bud yielded simulated phenotypes resembling mutational and experimental variants of the limb. Hypothetical developmental scenarios reproduce skeletal morphologies with features of fossil limbs. Conclusions The limb chondrogenic regulatory system operating in the presence of a gradient has an inherent, robust propensity to form limb-like skeletal structures. The bare bones framework can accommodate ancillary gene regulatory networks controlling limb bud shaping and establishment of Hox expression domains. This mechanism accounts for major features of the normal limb pattern and, under variant geometries and different parameter values, those of experimentally manipulated, genetically aberrant and evolutionary early forms, with no

  2. The bare bones of race.

    PubMed

    Fausto-Sterling, Anne

    2008-10-01

    In this paper I examine claims of racial difference in bone density and find that the use and definitions of race in medicine lack a theoretical foundation. My central argument is that the social produces the biological in a system of constant feedback between body and social experience. By providing a different angle of vision on claimed racial differences I hope to move the conversation away from an ultimately futile discussion of nature versus nurture, where time is held constant and place seen as irrelevant, and begin to build a new paradigm for examining the contributions of geographic ancestry, individual lifecycle experience, race, and gender to varied patterns of health and disease. PMID:19227817

  3. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

  4. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Even in normal gravity, bioactive glass particles enhance bone growth in laboratory tests with flat tissue cultures. Ducheyne and his team believe that using the bioactive microcarriers in a rotating bioreactor in microgravity will produce improved, three-dimensional tissue cultures. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering.

  5. Bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms. PMID:25013844

  6. Bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms.

  7. Bare-Bones Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms. PMID:25013844

  8. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  9. Evolutionary Patterns of Bone Histology and Bone Compactness in Xenarthran Mammal Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Straehl, Fiona R.; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Forasiepi, Analía M.; MacPhee, Ross D.; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  10. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    PubMed

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  11. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    PubMed

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness.

  12. Radionuclide bone scanning of osteosarcoma: falsely extended uptake patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, F.S.; Hudson, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    The pathologic specimens of 18 osteosarcomas of long bones were examined to correlate histologic abnormalities with abnormalities seen on preoperative /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate or methylene diphosphonate bone scans. Seven scans accurately represented the extent of the tumor. Eleven scans disclosed increased activity extending beyond the radiographic abnormalities. In eight of these, there was no occult tumor extension and in the other three, the scan activity did not accurately portray the skip metastases that were present. Therefore, these 11 scans demonstrated the falsely extended pattern of uptake beyond the true limits of the tumors. Pathologic slides were available for 10 of the 11 areas of bone that exhibited extended uptake. In two instances, there was no pathologic abnormality. In the other eight cases we found marrow hyperemia, medullary reactive bone, or periosteal new bone. This is the first description of these histologic abnormalities of medullary bone in areas of extended uptake on radionuclide bone scans.

  13. Bone Marrow Nails Created by Percutaneous Osteoplasty for Long Bone Fracture: Comparisons Among Acrylic Cement Alone, Acrylic-Cement-Filled Bare Metallic Stent, and Acrylic-Cement-Filled Covered Metallic Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Kouhei; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Cao, Guang; Sahara, Shinya; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the strength among bone marrow nails created to treat long bone fractures using interventional procedures. Methods: Twelve resected intact tibiae of healthy swine were used. A circumferential bone fracture was made in nine tibiae and restored with the following created bone marrow nails: acrylic cement alone (ACA) (n = 3), acrylic-cement-filled bare metallic stent (AC-FBMS) (n = 3), and acrylic-cement-filled covered metallic (AC-FCMS) stent (n = 3). The remaining intact tibiae (n = 3) were used as controls. Results: A bone marrow nail was successfully achieved within 30 min in all swine. The maximum injection volume of acrylic cement for creating ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS was 1.7 {+-} 0.3, 3.2 {+-} 0.4, and 2.9 {+-} 0.4 mL, respectively. The thickness of bone marrow nail created in the ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS groups was 3.6 {+-} 1.0, 10.3 {+-} 0.26, and 9.6 {+-} 0.32 mm, respectively (AC-FBMS group versus AC-FCMS group, p = 0.038), probably because of leakage of acrylic cement surrounding the interstices. The maximum bending power (kilonewton) and bending strength (newton/mm{sup 2}) in the normal long bone, ACA, AC-FBMS, and AC-FCMS groups were: 1.70 {+-} 0.25 and 79.2 {+-} 16.1; 0.21 {+-} 0.11 and 8.8 {+-} 2.8; 0.46 {+-} 0.06 and 18.2 {+-} 1.6; and 0.18 {+-} 0.04 and 7.8 {+-} 2.7, respectively. Conclusions: Although the maximum bending power and bending strength of AC-FBMS were not satisfactory, it was the most robust of the three marrow nails for restoring fractured long bone.

  14. The impact velocity and bone fracture pattern: Forensic perspective.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Haim; Kugel, Chen; May, Hila; Medlej, Bahaa; Stein, Dan; Slon, Viviane; Hershkovitz, Israel; Brosh, Tamar

    2016-09-01

    Studies on bone-energy interaction are meager and revealed only a general correlation between the fracture pattern and the mechanism of the insult. This study has two objectives, to establish a usable fracture analysis method and to reveal the association between the energy of the force and the fracture pattern. Dynatup Model POE 2000 (Instron Co.) low energy pendulum impact machine was utilized to apply impact loading on fresh pig femoral bones (n=30). The bone clamp shaft was adjusted to position the bone for three-point bending with additional bone compression. Three different velocities of the forced applied were carried out. On average, the number, length and the curviness of the fracture lines created under moderate and high-energy impact is significantly higher compared to a low-energy impact. Most fractures lines were located on the impacted aspect in bones subjected to moderate- and high-velocity impact. Four oblique-radial fracture lines running from the point of impact creating a double butterfly pattern were found in bones subjected to moderate and high-velocity impact. Only "false" wedge-shaped (butterfly) fragments were found in the current study. Our results suggest an association between fracture pattern and the velocity of the impact.

  15. Hypoxic adipocytes pattern early heterotopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth; Gannon, Francis H; Ozen, Mustafa; Ittmann, Michael M; Gugala, Zbigniew; Hipp, John A; Moran, Kevin M; Fouletier-Dilling, Christine M; Schumara-Martin, Shannon; Lindsey, Ronald W; Heggeness, Michael H; Brenner, Malcolm K; Davis, Alan R

    2007-02-01

    The factors contributing to heterotopic ossification, the formation of bone in abnormal soft-tissue locations, are beginning to emerge, but little is known about microenvironmental conditions promoting this often devastating disease. Using a murine model in which endochondral bone formation is triggered in muscle by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), we studied changes near the site of injection of BMP2-expressing cells. As early as 24 hours later, brown adipocytes began accumulating in the lesional area. These cells stained positively for pimonidazole and therefore generated hypoxic stress within the target tissue, a prerequisite for the differentiation of stem cells to chondrocytes and subsequent heterotopic bone formation. We propose that aberrant expression of BMPs in soft tissue stimulates production of brown adipocytes, which drive the early steps of heterotopic endochondral ossification by lowering oxygen tension in adjacent tissue, creating the correct environment for chondrogenesis. Results in misty gray lean mutant mice not producing brown fat suggest that white adipocytes convert into fat-oxidizing cells when brown adipocytes are unavailable, providing a compensatory mechanism for generation of a hypoxic microenvironment. Manipulation of the transcriptional control of adipocyte fate in local soft-tissue environments may offer a means to prevent or treat development of bone in extraskeletal sites. PMID:17255330

  16. Differential patterns of altered bone formation in different bone compartments in established osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, R J; Denton, J; Hoyland, J A; Freemont, A J

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the level of bone formation in the different bone compartments in cases of established osteoporosis, as previous work has concentrated on trabecular bone alone. METHODS: Bone formation rates were measured histomorphometrically, in the periosteal (P), cortical (C), subcortical (SC), and trabecular (T) compartments in iliac crest biopsies from 159 patients with established osteoporosis. The values were standardised using age and sex matched control data and patterns of differential change determined by analysis of parametric status (increased, normal, reduced). RESULTS: Mean bone formation was reduced in all four compartments. This was more marked (4.4/4.1 standard deviations below the mean in C/T, v 2.3/0.9 in P/SC) and more frequent (reduced in 81.5%/78.3% in T/C, v 43.3%/44% in P/SC) in the trabecular and cortical compartments than in the periosteal or subcortical bone. Parametric status was equal in trabecular and cortical bone in 85.4% of cases, and in periosteal and subcortical bone in 65.7%, but in all four compartments in only 35.1%, indicating differential alteration of bone formation in the two sets of compartments (T/C v P/SC). CONCLUSIONS: Altered trabecular bone formation is important in osteoporosis, but there are differential patterns of alteration in the other three compartments, emphasising the presence of different microenvironments in bone; thus the effect on the cortical compartment was similar to that on the trabecular, while the subcortical and periosteal compartments also showed linkage. The linkage between the two pairs was divergent, indicating different control of bone formation, with resultant different patterns of perturbation in osteoporosis. Images PMID:10343608

  17. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  18. Occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures in growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Mogha, I V; Aithal, H P; Kinjavdekar, P; Singh, G R; Pawde, A M; Kushwaha, R B

    2007-11-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to record the occurrence and pattern of long bone fractures, and the efficacy of Intramedullary (IM) Steinmann pin fixing in growing dogs. All the records of growing dogs during a 10-year-period were screened to record the cause of trauma, the age and sex of the animal, the bone involved, the type and location of the fracture, the status of fixation, alignment, maintenance of fixation and fracture healing. The results were analysed and comparisons were made between growing dogs with normal and osteopenic bones. Among the 310 cases of fractures recorded, the bones were osteopenic in 91 cases (29%). Minor trauma was the principal cause of fracture in dogs with osteopenia (25%), and indigenous breeds were most commonly affected (38%). Fractures in dogs with osteopenic bones were most commonly recorded in the age group of 2-4 months (53%), whereas fractures in normal dogs were almost equally distributed between 2 and 8 months of age. Male dogs were affected significantly more often in both groups. In osteopenic bones, most fractures were recorded in the femur (56%), and they were distributed equally along the length of the bone. Whereas in normal bones, fractures were almost equally distributed in radius/ulna, femur and tibia, and were more often recorded at the middle and distal third of long bones. Oblique fractures were most common in both groups; however, comminuted fractures were more frequent in normal bones, whereas incomplete fractures were more common in osteopenic bones. Ninety-nine fracture cases treated with IM pinning (66 normal, 33 osteopenic) were evaluated for the status of fracture reduction and healing. In a majority of the cases (61%) with osteopenic bones, the diameter of the pin was relatively smaller than the diameter of the medullary cavity (<70-75%), whereas in 68% of the cases in normal bones the pin diameter was optimum. The status of fracture fixing was satisfactory to good in significantly more

  19. Non-Linear Pattern Formation in Bone Growth and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here – chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) – which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of “group intelligence” exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called “particle swarm optimization” (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating “socially” in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or “feedback” between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the

  20. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  1. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  2. Maintaining distances with the engineer: patterns of coexistence in plant communities beyond the patch-bare dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Pescador, David S; Chacón-Labella, Julia; de la Cruz, Marcelino; Escudero, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    Two-phase plant communities with an engineer conforming conspicuous patches and affecting the performance and patterns of coexisting species are the norm under stressful conditions. To unveil the mechanisms governing coexistence in these communities at multiple spatial scales, we have developed a new point-raster approach of spatial pattern analysis, which was applied to a Mediterranean high mountain grassland to show how Festuca curvifolia patches affect the local distribution of coexisting species. We recorded 22 111 individuals of 17 plant perennial species. Most coexisting species were negatively associated with F. curvifolia clumps. Nevertheless, bivariate nearest-neighbor analyses revealed that the majority of coexisting species were confined at relatively short distances from F. curvifolia borders (between 0-2 cm and up to 8 cm in some cases). Our study suggests the existence of a fine-scale effect of F. curvifolia for most species promoting coexistence through a mechanism we call 'facilitation in the halo'. Most coexisting species are displaced to an interphase area between patches, where two opposite forces reach equilibrium: attenuated severe conditions by proximity to the F. curvifolia canopy (nutrient-rich islands) and competitive exclusion mitigated by avoiding direct contact with F. curvifolia. PMID:24954264

  3. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: typical patterns of bone involvement in whole-body bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Gunsel; Averill, Lauren W

    2014-08-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease of unknown etiology. It affects children and adolescents predominantly and occurs mostly in the female population. It is characterized by the insidious onset of pain and swelling, with a fluctuating clinical course of relapses and remissions. Typically, several bones are affected, either synchronously or metachronously, and bilateral involvement is common. CRMO most commonly affects the metaphysis of long bones, especially the tibia, femur, and clavicle. The spine, pelvis, ribs, sternum, and mandible may also be affected. Although lesions are mostly multiple, patients may present with a single symptomatic focus. Radiographic findings may be negative early in the course of the disease. Bone scintigraphy is useful in determining the presence of abnormality and the extent of disease. The imaging and clinical features of CRMO overlap with those of infectious osteomyelitis, bone malignancy, and inflammatory arthritis. Nonetheless, CRMO can be confidently diagnosed with the recognition of typical imaging patterns in the appropriate clinical setting. This article reviews imaging findings with special emphasis on bone scintigraphy and specific disease sites.

  4. Bare Code Reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Jean J.

    1980-05-01

    The Bare code system will be used, in every market and supermarket. The code, which is normalised in US and Europe (code EAN) gives informations on price, storage, nature and allows in real time the gestion of theshop.

  5. Changing bone patterns with progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-02-01

    It is commonly held that osteitis fibrosa and mixed uremic osteodystrophy are the predominant forms of renal osteodystrophy in patients with chronic kidney disease. Osteitis fibrosa is a high-turnover bone disease resulting mainly from secondary hyperparathyroidism, and mixed uremic osteodystrophy is in addition characterized by a mineralization defect most often attributed to vitamin D deficiency. However, there is ancient and more recent evidence that in early chronic kidney disease stages adynamic bone disease characterized by low bone turnover occurs first, at least in a significant proportion of patients. This could be due to the initial predominance of bone turnover-inhibitory conditions such as resistance to the action of parathyroid hormone (PTH), reduced calcitriol levels, sex hormone deficiency, diabetes, and, last but not least, uremic toxins leading to repression of osteocyte Wnt/β-catenin signaling and increased expression of Wnt antagonists such as sclerostin, Dickkopf-1, and sFRP4. The development of high-turnover bone disease would occur only later on, when serum PTH levels are able to overcome peripheral PTH resistance and the other inhibitory factors of bone formation. Whether FGF23 and Klotho play a direct role in the transition from low- to high-turnover bone disease or participate only indirectly via regulating PTH secretion remains to be seen. PMID:26806832

  6. Computational model-informed design and bioprinting of cell-patterned constructs for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Aurélie; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Hafezi, Forough; Ferraris, Eleonora; Patterson, Jennifer; Koç, Bahattin; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly advancing tissue engineering technology that holds great promise for the regeneration of several tissues, including bone. However, to generate a successful 3D bone tissue engineering construct, additional complexities should be taken into account such as nutrient and oxygen delivery, which is often insufficient after implantation in large bone defects. We propose that a well-designed tissue engineering construct, that is, an implant with a specific spatial pattern of cells in a matrix, will improve the healing outcome. By using a computational model of bone regeneration we show that particular cell patterns in tissue engineering constructs are able to enhance bone regeneration compared to uniform ones. We successfully bioprinted one of the most promising cell-gradient patterns by using cell-laden hydrogels with varying cell densities and observed a high cell viability for three days following the bioprinting process. In summary, we present a novel strategy for the biofabrication of bone tissue engineering constructs by designing cell-gradient patterns based on a computational model of bone regeneration, and successfully bioprinting the chosen design. This integrated approach may increase the success rate of implanted tissue engineering constructs for critical size bone defects and also can find a wider application in the biofabrication of other types of tissue engineering constructs. PMID:27187017

  7. Long Bone Histology and Growth Patterns in Ankylosaurs: Implications for Life History and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Martina; Hayashi, Shoji; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ankylosaurs are one of the major dinosaur groups and are characterized by unique body armor. Previous studies on other dinosaur taxa have revealed growth patterns, life history and evolutionary mechanisms based on their long bone histology. However, to date nothing is known about long bone histology in the Ankylosauria. This study is the first description of ankylosaurian long bone histology based on several limb elements, which were sampled from different individuals from the Ankylosauridae and Nodosauridae. The histology is compared to that of other dinosaur groups, including other Thyreophora and Sauropodomorpha. Ankylosaur long bone histology is characterized by a fibrolamellar bone architecture. The bone matrix type in ankylosaurs is closest to that of Stegosaurus. A distinctive mixture of woven and parallel-fibered bone together with overall poor vascularization indicates slow growth rates compared to other dinosaurian taxa. Another peculiar characteristic of ankylosaur bone histology is the extensive remodeling in derived North American taxa. In contrast to other taxa, ankylosaurs substitute large amounts of their primary tissue early in ontogeny. This anomaly may be linked to the late ossification of the ankylosaurian body armor. Metabolically driven remodeling processes must have liberated calcium to ossify the protective osteodermal structures in juveniles to subadult stages, which led to further remodeling due to increased mechanical loading. Abundant structural fibers observed in the primary bone and even in remodeled bone may have improved the mechanical properties of the Haversian bone. PMID:23894321

  8. Long bone histology and growth patterns in ankylosaurs: implications for life history and evolution.

    PubMed

    Stein, Martina; Hayashi, Shoji; Sander, P Martin

    2013-01-01

    The ankylosaurs are one of the major dinosaur groups and are characterized by unique body armor. Previous studies on other dinosaur taxa have revealed growth patterns, life history and evolutionary mechanisms based on their long bone histology. However, to date nothing is known about long bone histology in the Ankylosauria. This study is the first description of ankylosaurian long bone histology based on several limb elements, which were sampled from different individuals from the Ankylosauridae and Nodosauridae. The histology is compared to that of other dinosaur groups, including other Thyreophora and Sauropodomorpha. Ankylosaur long bone histology is characterized by a fibrolamellar bone architecture. The bone matrix type in ankylosaurs is closest to that of Stegosaurus. A distinctive mixture of woven and parallel-fibered bone together with overall poor vascularization indicates slow growth rates compared to other dinosaurian taxa. Another peculiar characteristic of ankylosaur bone histology is the extensive remodeling in derived North American taxa. In contrast to other taxa, ankylosaurs substitute large amounts of their primary tissue early in ontogeny. This anomaly may be linked to the late ossification of the ankylosaurian body armor. Metabolically driven remodeling processes must have liberated calcium to ossify the protective osteodermal structures in juveniles to subadult stages, which led to further remodeling due to increased mechanical loading. Abundant structural fibers observed in the primary bone and even in remodeled bone may have improved the mechanical properties of the Haversian bone. PMID:23894321

  9. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  10. Bone marrow edema pattern around the knee on magnetic resonance imaging excluding acute traumatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Lynne S; Suh, Kyung Jin

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very sensitive for the detection of marrow abnormalities. Bone marrow edema on MRI has been defined as an area of low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, associated with intermediate or high signal intensity findings on T2-weighted images. The bone marrow edema pattern is a nonspecific finding with multiple etiologies. The knee is a common place for bone marrow signal abnormalities to appear on MRI. Besides contusions and fractures from acute trauma, there are a variety of other causes of the bone marrow edema pattern. It is important for the interpreter of the study to be aware of the different etiologies responsible for producing these changes and to be able to narrow the differential diagnosis without mistaking such a pattern for acute trauma or infiltrative tumor. This article concentrates on those entities that produce a bone marrow edema pattern not related to acute trauma including red marrow proliferation, stress, osteochondral lesions, osteonecrosis, bone marrow edema syndrome, arthropathy, infection, Paget's disease, and marrow replacement disorders. PMID:21644195

  11. Tissue growth patterns in the carcasses of water buffalo and friesian crossbred cattle: Part 2-individual bones and anatomical bone groups.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, O Y

    1983-01-01

    Twelve Egyptian buffalo, nine ♂ Friesian × ♀ Egyptian native Baladi (half Friesian) and nine ♂ Friesian × ♀ half Friesian (three-quarter Friesian) bulls were serially slaughtered between 161 and 560 kg for buffaloes and between 176 and 448 kg for cattle. Anatomical dissection data from the left sides of the carcasses were used to examine the growth of individual bones and bone groups. No significant genetic differences with respect to the growth patterns of bones relative to total side bone were reported, indicating that bones followed similar patterns in buffaloes and cattle. Differential growth of bones occurred following an increase of impetus from cervical vertebrae to os sacrum and with growth coefficients for bones of the forelimb correspondingly higher than for the hindlimb and the entire axial and appendicular skeletons following, respectively, late- and early-maturing patterns. Some significant, though minor, differences between buffaloes and cattle were found when weights of individual bones were adjusted to constant side bone weight. As compared with Friesian crosses, buffaloes had more weight of the ribs and less weight of the vertebral column in the axial skeleton, and more weight of radius-and-ulna and less weight of scapula in the forelimb at equal total bone. There were no significant differences between buffaloes and Friesian crossbreds in the proportion of total bone occurring in the entire hindlimbs and forelimbs and in the distribution of total bone between axial and appendicular skeletons.

  12. Apparent density patterns in subchondral bone of the sloth and anteater forelimb.

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Carlson, Kristian J

    2008-10-23

    Vertebrate morphologists often are interested in inferring limb-loading patterns in animals characterized by different locomotor repertoires. Because bone apparent density (i.e. mass per unit volume of bone inclusive of porosities) is a determinant of compressive strength, and thus indicative of compressive loading, recent comparative studies in primates have proposed a structure-function relationship between apparent density of subchondral bone and locomotor behaviours that vary in compressive loading. If such patterns are found in other mammals, then these relationships would be strengthened further. Here, we examine the distal radius of suspensory sloths that generally load their forelimbs (FLs) in tension and of quadrupedal anteaters that generally load their FLs in compression. Computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry was used to visualize the patterns in subchondral apparent density. Suspensory sloths exhibit relatively smaller areas of high apparent density than quadrupedal anteaters. This locomotor-based pattern is analogous to the pattern observed in suspensory and quadrupedal primates. Similarity between xenarthran and primate trends suggests broad-scale applicability for analysing subchondral bone apparent density and supports the idea that bone functionally alters its material properties in response to locomotor behaviours.

  13. Apparent density patterns in subchondral bone of the sloth and anteater forelimb.

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Carlson, Kristian J

    2008-10-23

    Vertebrate morphologists often are interested in inferring limb-loading patterns in animals characterized by different locomotor repertoires. Because bone apparent density (i.e. mass per unit volume of bone inclusive of porosities) is a determinant of compressive strength, and thus indicative of compressive loading, recent comparative studies in primates have proposed a structure-function relationship between apparent density of subchondral bone and locomotor behaviours that vary in compressive loading. If such patterns are found in other mammals, then these relationships would be strengthened further. Here, we examine the distal radius of suspensory sloths that generally load their forelimbs (FLs) in tension and of quadrupedal anteaters that generally load their FLs in compression. Computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry was used to visualize the patterns in subchondral apparent density. Suspensory sloths exhibit relatively smaller areas of high apparent density than quadrupedal anteaters. This locomotor-based pattern is analogous to the pattern observed in suspensory and quadrupedal primates. Similarity between xenarthran and primate trends suggests broad-scale applicability for analysing subchondral bone apparent density and supports the idea that bone functionally alters its material properties in response to locomotor behaviours. PMID:18628113

  14. Audiologic Patterns of Otic Capsule Preserving Temporal Bone Fracture: Effects of the Affected Subsites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Yoon Joong; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Min-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study was aimed to assess the relationship between the type of temporal bone area involved and conductive hearing loss. Methods. We enrolled 97 patients who visited the otolaryngology clinics of Seoul National University Hospital or Boramae Medical Center, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University with temporal bone fracture between January 2004 and January 2014. Audiometric parameters, including initial and improved air-bone (AB) conduction gap values, were reviewed in accordance with the temporal bone computed tomography (external auditory canal [EAC], middle ear [ME], mastoid [M], and ossicle [O]). Results. Patients with ossicular chain involvement exhibited a larger AB gap compared to those with no ossicular chain involvement at 250, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz. Among the groups without ossicular chain involvement, the initial AB gap was largest in patients with EAC+ME+M involvement, followed by the ME+M and M-only involvement groups. The greatest improvement in the AB gap was observed in the EAC+ME+M group followed by the ME+M and M-only groups, irrespective of ossicular chain involvement. Improvements in AB gap values were smallest at 2,000 Hz. Conclusion. Conductive hearing loss pattern differed according to the temporal bone area involved. Therefore, areas such as the hematoma and hemotympanum, as well as the fracture line of the temporal bone area, must be evaluated to predict audiologic patterns with otic capsule preserving temporal bone fracture. PMID:27337953

  15. Mechanisms and Patterns of Intravascular Ultrasound In-Stent Restenosis Among Bare Metal Stents and First- and Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kosaku; Zhao, Zhijing; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Kirtane, Ajay J; Rabbani, LeRoy E; Collins, Michael B; Parikh, Manish A; Kodali, Susheel K; Leon, Martin B; Moses, Jeffrey W; Mintz, Gary S; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    The most common causes of in-stent restenosis (ISR) are intimal hyperplasia and stent under expansion. The purpose of this study was to use intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to compare the ISR mechanisms of bare metal stents (BMS), first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES), and second-generation DES. There were 298 ISR lesions including 52 BMS, 73 sirolimus-eluting stents, 52 paclitaxel-eluting stents, 16 zotarolimus-eluting stents, and 105 everolimus-eluting stent. Mean patient age was 66.6 ± 1.1 years, 74.2% were men, and 48.3% had diabetes mellitus. BMS restenosis presented later (70.0 ± 66.7 months) with more intimal hyperplasia compared with DES (BMS 58.6 ± 15.5%, first-generation DES 52.6 ± 20.9%, second-generation DES 48.2 ± 22.2%, p = 0.02). Although reference lumen areas were similar in BMS and first- and second-generation DES, restenotic DES were longer (BMS 21.8 ± 13.5 mm, first-generation DES 29.4 ± 16.1 mm, second-generation DES 32.1 ± 18.7 mm, p = 0.003), and stent areas were smaller (BMS 7.2 ± 2.4 mm(2), first-generation DES 6.1 ± 2.1 mm(2), second-generation DES 5.7 ± 2.0 mm(2), p <0.001). Stent fracture was seen only in DES (first-generation DES 7 [5.0%], second-generation DES 8 [7.4%], p = 0.13). In conclusion, restenotic first- and second-generation DES were characterized by less neointimal hyperplasia, smaller stent areas, longer stent lengths, and more stent fractures than restenotic BMS.

  16. Inter-dependent tissue growth and Turing patterning in a model for long bone development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Simon; Iber, Dagmar

    2013-10-01

    The development of long bones requires a sophisticated spatial organization of cellular signalling, proliferation, and differentiation programs. How such spatial organization emerges on the growing long bone domain is still unresolved. Based on the reported biochemical interactions we developed a regulatory model for the core signalling factors IHH, PTCH1, and PTHrP and included two cell types, proliferating/resting chondrocytes and (pre-)hypertrophic chondrocytes. We show that the reported IHH-PTCH1 interaction gives rise to a Schnakenberg-type Turing kinetics, and that inclusion of PTHrP is important to achieve robust patterning when coupling patterning and tissue dynamics. The model reproduces relevant spatiotemporal gene expression patterns, as well as a number of relevant mutant phenotypes. In summary, we propose that a ligand-receptor based Turing mechanism may control the emergence of patterns during long bone development, with PTHrP as an important mediator to confer patterning robustness when the sensitive Turing system is coupled to the dynamics of a growing and differentiating tissue. We have previously shown that ligand-receptor based Turing mechanisms can also result from BMP-receptor, SHH-receptor, and GDNF-receptor interactions, and that these reproduce the wildtype and mutant patterns during digit formation in limbs and branching morphogenesis in lung and kidneys. Receptor-ligand interactions may thus constitute a general mechanism to generate Turing patterns in nature.

  17. Dietary patterns in men and women are simultaneously determinants of altered glucose metabolism and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Barr, Susan I; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Berger, Claudie; Kovacs, Christopher S; Josse, Robert G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hanley, David A; Prior, Jerilynn C; Brown, Jacques P; Morin, Suzanne N; Davison, Kenneth S; Goltzman, David; Kreiger, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that diet would have direct effects on glucose metabolism with direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism in a cohort of Canadian adults. We assessed dietary patterns (Prudent [fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and legumes] and Western [soft drinks, potato chips, French fries, meats, and desserts]) from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used fasting blood samples to measure glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (a bone formation marker), and serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX; a bone resorption marker). We used multivariate regression models adjusted for confounders and including/excluding body mass index. In a secondary analysis, we examined relationships through structural equations models. The Prudent diet was associated with favorable effects on glucose metabolism (lower insulin and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (lower CTX in women; higher 25OHD and lower parathyroid hormone in men). The Western diet was associated with deleterious effects on glucose metabolism (higher glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (higher bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and lower 25OHD in women; higher CTX in men). Body mass index adjustment moved point estimates toward the null, indicating partial mediation. The structural equation model confirmed the hypothesized linkage with strong effects of Prudent and Western diet on metabolic risk, and both direct and indirect effects of a Prudent diet on bone turnover. In summary, a Prudent diet was associated with lower metabolic risk with both primary and mediated effects on bone turnover, suggesting that it is a potential target for reducing fracture risk. PMID:27001278

  18. Dietary patterns in men and women are simultaneously determinants of altered glucose metabolism and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Barr, Susan I; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Berger, Claudie; Kovacs, Christopher S; Josse, Robert G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hanley, David A; Prior, Jerilynn C; Brown, Jacques P; Morin, Suzanne N; Davison, Kenneth S; Goltzman, David; Kreiger, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that diet would have direct effects on glucose metabolism with direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism in a cohort of Canadian adults. We assessed dietary patterns (Prudent [fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and legumes] and Western [soft drinks, potato chips, French fries, meats, and desserts]) from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used fasting blood samples to measure glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (a bone formation marker), and serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX; a bone resorption marker). We used multivariate regression models adjusted for confounders and including/excluding body mass index. In a secondary analysis, we examined relationships through structural equations models. The Prudent diet was associated with favorable effects on glucose metabolism (lower insulin and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (lower CTX in women; higher 25OHD and lower parathyroid hormone in men). The Western diet was associated with deleterious effects on glucose metabolism (higher glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (higher bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and lower 25OHD in women; higher CTX in men). Body mass index adjustment moved point estimates toward the null, indicating partial mediation. The structural equation model confirmed the hypothesized linkage with strong effects of Prudent and Western diet on metabolic risk, and both direct and indirect effects of a Prudent diet on bone turnover. In summary, a Prudent diet was associated with lower metabolic risk with both primary and mediated effects on bone turnover, suggesting that it is a potential target for reducing fracture risk.

  19. Life Course Dietary Patterns and Bone Health in Later Life in a British Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Ann; Kuh, Diana L; Adams, Judith E; Ambrosini, Gina L

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Evidence for the contribution of individual foods and nutrients to bone health is weak. Few studies have considered hypothesis‐based dietary patterns and bone health. We investigated whether a protein‐calcium‐potassium–rich (PrCaK‐rich) dietary pattern over the adult life course, was positively associated with bone outcomes at 60 to 64 years of age. Diet diaries were collected at ages 36, 46, 53, and 60 to 64 years in 1263 participants (661 women) from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development. DXA and pQCT measurements were obtained at age 60 to 64 years, including size‐adjusted bone mineral content (SA‐BMC) and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD). A food‐based dietary pattern best explaining dietary calcium, potassium, and protein intakes (g/1000 kcal) was identified using reduced rank regression. Dietary pattern Z‐scores were calculated for each individual, at each time point. Individual trajectories in dietary pattern Z‐scores were modeled to summarize changes in Z‐scores over the study period. Regression models examined associations between these trajectories and bone outcomes at age 60 to 64 years, adjusting for baseline dietary pattern Z‐score and other confounders. A consistent PrCaK‐rich dietary pattern was identified within the population, over time. Mean ± SD dietary pattern Z‐scores at age 36 years and age 60 to 64 years were –0.32 ± 0.97 and 2.2 ± 1.5 (women) and –0.35 ± 0.98 and 1.7 ± 1.6 (men), respectively. Mean trajectory in dietary pattern Z‐scores ± SD was 0.07 ± 0.02 units/year. Among women, a 0.02‐SD unit/year higher trajectory in dietary pattern Z‐score over time was associated with higher SA‐BMC (spine 1.40% [95% CI, 0.30 to 2.51]; hip 1.35% [95% CI, 0.48 to 2.23]), and vBMD (radius 1.81% [95% CI, 0.13 to 3.50]) at age 60 to 64 years. No statistically significant associations were found in men. During adulthood, an increasing score for a dietary

  20. [Bone marrow biopsy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, chronic lymphoid leukemia and mycosis fungoides. 1. Incidence and infiltration patterns].

    PubMed

    Silva, M R; Mieza, M A; Saad, F A; Kerbauy, J; Burnier Júnior, M N

    1990-01-01

    Seventy bone marrow biopsies belonging to 53 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and micosis fungoides were studied. Bone marrow involvement was analyzed in correlation to staging before and after treatment. Bone marrow involvement was most frequently seen in CLL and IL followed by WDLL and PDLL/N and PDLL/D. Highest incidences after treatment were in CLL, WDLL, and PDLL/N and PDLL/D. With respect to staging, WDLL disseminated to bone marrow only in the late stages (III or IV), whereas the nodular and diffuse forms of PDLL presented similar infiltration in all stages. HLL and IL presented a slight trend to infiltrate only in the later stages. The pattern of bone marrow infiltration was also analyzed considering staging before and after treatment. No clear correlation was observed between staging and a specific pattern of bone marrow involvement in most cases, and disease evolution and treatment do not seem to change infiltration pattern.

  1. Maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy and childhood bone mass: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Cole, Zoe A; Gale, Catharine R; Javaid, M Kassim; Robinson, Sian M; Law, Catherine; Boucher, Barbara J; Crozier, Sarah R; Godfrey, Keith M; Dennison, Elaine M; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-04-01

    Maternal nutrition is a potentially important determinant of intrauterine skeletal development. Previous studies have examined the effects of individual nutrients, but the pattern of food consumption may be of greater relevance. We therefore examined the relationship between maternal dietary pattern during pregnancy and bone mass of the offspring at 9 yr of age. We studied 198 pregnant women 17-43 yr of age and their offspring at 9 yr of age. Dietary pattern was assessed using principal component analysis from a validated food frequency questionnaire. The offspring underwent measurements of bone mass using DXA at 9 yr of age. A high prudent diet score was characterized by elevated intakes of fruit, vegetables, and wholemeal bread, rice, and pasta and low intakes of processed foods. Higher prudent diet score in late pregnancy was associated with greater (p < 0.001) whole body and lumbar spine BMC and areal BMD in the offspring, after adjustment for sex, socioeconomic status, height, arm circumference, maternal smoking, and vitamin D status. Associations with prudent diet score in early pregnancy were weaker and nonsignificant. We conclude that dietary patterns consistent with current advice for healthy eating during pregnancy are associated with greater bone size and BMD in the offspring at 9 yr of age.

  2. Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Tian-Jiao; Bai, Ming-Jie

    2016-09-06

    China is an urban and rural social model country. In the past three decades, the developing speed of rural areas has been much slower than urban areas, which may lead to the differences in dietary patterns. This study aimed to investigate the disparities of dietary structures from urban and rural children, and to analyze the effects of different dietary patterns on their adverse outcome. Among 1590 students, aged 11 years to 17 years, from primary and middle schools, a cross-sectional study was conducted. There were three dietary patterns recognized: Westernization structure, meat diet structure, and Western and Chinese structure. Compared with rural students, more urban students were in the highest categories of the whole dietary patterns (p < 0.001). Overweight/obesity and central adiposity were more prevailing among urban students, while rural students had a more prevailing risk of bone fracture (p < 0.05). Through the adjustment for all confounding factors, the Westernization structure could increase the risk of overweight/obesity and central adiposity, the meat structure could increase the risk of elevated blood pressure/hypertension, while the risk of low bone mineral quality could be reduced by the Chinese and Western structure. In conclusion, a rural-urban disparity in dietary patterns was found in our study, and different dietary patterns were associated with the risk of some adverse outcomes. Therefore, there were different prevalences of the adverse outcomes between rural and urban students.

  3. Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Tian-Jiao; Bai, Ming-Jie

    2016-01-01

    China is an urban and rural social model country. In the past three decades, the developing speed of rural areas has been much slower than urban areas, which may lead to the differences in dietary patterns. This study aimed to investigate the disparities of dietary structures from urban and rural children, and to analyze the effects of different dietary patterns on their adverse outcome. Among 1590 students, aged 11 years to 17 years, from primary and middle schools, a cross-sectional study was conducted. There were three dietary patterns recognized: Westernization structure, meat diet structure, and Western and Chinese structure. Compared with rural students, more urban students were in the highest categories of the whole dietary patterns (p < 0.001). Overweight/obesity and central adiposity were more prevailing among urban students, while rural students had a more prevailing risk of bone fracture (p < 0.05). Through the adjustment for all confounding factors, the Westernization structure could increase the risk of overweight/obesity and central adiposity, the meat structure could increase the risk of elevated blood pressure/hypertension, while the risk of low bone mineral quality could be reduced by the Chinese and Western structure. In conclusion, a rural-urban disparity in dietary patterns was found in our study, and different dietary patterns were associated with the risk of some adverse outcomes. Therefore, there were different prevalences of the adverse outcomes between rural and urban students. PMID:27608038

  4. Hox11 genes are required for regional patterning and integration of muscle, tendon and bone.

    PubMed

    Swinehart, Ilea T; Schlientz, Aleesa J; Quintanilla, Christopher A; Mortlock, Douglas P; Wellik, Deneen M

    2013-11-01

    Development of the musculoskeletal system requires precise integration of muscles, tendons and bones. The molecular mechanisms involved in the differentiation of each of these tissues have been the focus of significant research; however, much less is known about how these tissues are integrated into a functional unit appropriate for each body position and role. Previous reports have demonstrated crucial roles for Hox genes in patterning the axial and limb skeleton. Loss of Hox11 paralogous gene function results in dramatic malformation of limb zeugopod skeletal elements, the radius/ulna and tibia/fibula, as well as transformation of the sacral region to a lumbar phenotype. Utilizing a Hoxa11eGFP knock-in allele, we show that Hox11 genes are expressed in the connective tissue fibroblasts of the outer perichondrium, tendons and muscle connective tissue of the zeugopod region throughout all stages of development. Hox11 genes are not expressed in differentiated cartilage or bone, or in vascular or muscle cells in these regions. Loss of Hox11 genes disrupts regional muscle and tendon patterning of the limb in addition to affecting skeletal patterning. The tendon and muscle defects in Hox11 mutants are independent of skeletal patterning events as disruption of tendon and muscle patterning is observed in Hox11 compound mutants that do not have a skeletal phenotype. Thus, Hox genes are not simply regulators of skeletal morphology as previously thought, but are key factors that regulate regional patterning and integration of the musculoskeletal system.

  5. Rural-Urban Differences of Dietary Patterns, Overweight, and Bone Mineral Status in Chinese Students

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Tian-Jiao; Bai, Ming-Jie

    2016-01-01

    China is an urban and rural social model country. In the past three decades, the developing speed of rural areas has been much slower than urban areas, which may lead to the differences in dietary patterns. This study aimed to investigate the disparities of dietary structures from urban and rural children, and to analyze the effects of different dietary patterns on their adverse outcome. Among 1590 students, aged 11 years to 17 years, from primary and middle schools, a cross-sectional study was conducted. There were three dietary patterns recognized: Westernization structure, meat diet structure, and Western and Chinese structure. Compared with rural students, more urban students were in the highest categories of the whole dietary patterns (p < 0.001). Overweight/obesity and central adiposity were more prevailing among urban students, while rural students had a more prevailing risk of bone fracture (p < 0.05). Through the adjustment for all confounding factors, the Westernization structure could increase the risk of overweight/obesity and central adiposity, the meat structure could increase the risk of elevated blood pressure/hypertension, while the risk of low bone mineral quality could be reduced by the Chinese and Western structure. In conclusion, a rural-urban disparity in dietary patterns was found in our study, and different dietary patterns were associated with the risk of some adverse outcomes. Therefore, there were different prevalences of the adverse outcomes between rural and urban students. PMID:27608038

  6. Imaging Patterns in MRI in Recent Bone Injuries Following Negative or Inconclusive Plain Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Sadineni, Raghu Teja; Bellapa, Narayan Chander; Velicheti, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Background Few bony injuries and most soft tissue injuries cannot be detected on plain radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect such occult bony injuries due to signal changes in bone marrow. In addition to excluding serious bony injuries, it can also identify tendon, ligament, cartilage and other soft tissue injuries and thus help in localizing the cause of morbidity. Aims and Objectives To determine the MRI imaging patterns in recent bone injuries (less than 4 weeks) following negative or inconclusive plain radiographs. To determine the role of MRI in recent fractures. Results Out of the 75 individuals with history of recent injury of less than 4 weeks duration, fracture line was demonstrated in 16 patients (21%) who had no obvious evidence of bone injury on plain radiographs. Bone contusion or bruising of the bone was demonstrated in 39 (52%) patients. This was the commonest abnormality detected in MRI. The remaining 20 patients did not show any obvious injury to the bone on MR imaging however, soft tissue injury could be demonstrated in 12 (16%) patients which show that the extent of soft tissue injury was relatively well demonstrated by MR imaging. The present study showed that occult injuries commonly occur at the Knee followed by Ankle, Wrist, Foot, Elbow, Leg, Hands, Hips & Spine. Conclusion The study showed that MR is efficient in the detection of occult bone injuries which are missed on radiography. Compared to radiographs, MRI clearly depicted the extent of injuries and associated soft tissue involvement. MRI demonstrates both acute and chronic injuries and also differentiates both, whereas radiography has poor sensitivity for acute injuries. Also, the soft tissue injuries like tendionous and ligamentous injuries cannot be identified on radiographs. PMID:26557590

  7. Meteorin-Like Shows Unique Expression Pattern in Bone and Its Overexpression Inhibits Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Weiyan; Liu, Yong; Wu, Zhihong; Wang, Shaohai; Qiu, Guixing; Lin, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to identify and characterize genes involved in osteoblasts function. Firstly, we constructed and sequenced a human osteoblast full-length cDNA library to screen for genes whose functions have not been reported and further identify these candidate genes through detecting the relationship with the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex using a dual luciferase reporter system. Only one gene, namely METRNL (Meteorin, glial cell differentiation regulator-like) has been screened out. We performed immunohistochemistry to analyze expression patterns in bone and established a stable transfection MG63 cell line of METRNL-EGFP fusion protein overexpression to analyze the function of METRNL in mineralized nodule formation. Immunohistochemistry showed METRNL expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts lining trabecular bone surfaces. Overexpression of METRNL inhibited mineralized nodule formation by the MG63 osteosarcoma cell line. Thus, the identified gene, METRNL, which is associated with AP-1 transcription factor complex activity, has a unique expression pattern in bone. In addition, the anomalous expression of METRNL may inhibit bone cell differentiation. PMID:27716826

  8. Postnatal changes in the growth dynamics of the human face revealed from bone modelling patterns

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Rosas, Antonio; Nieto-Díaz, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Human skull morphology results from complex processes that involve the coordinated growth and interaction of its skeletal components to keep a functional and structural balance. Previous histological works have studied the growth of different craniofacial regions and their relationship to functional spaces in humans up to 14 years old. Nevertheless, how the growth dynamics of the facial skeleton and the mandible are related and how this relationship changes through the late ontogeny remain poorly understood. To approach these two questions, we have compared the bone modelling activities of the craniofacial skeleton from a sample of subadult and adult humans. In this study, we have established for the first time the bone modelling pattern of the face and the mandible from adult humans. Our analyses reveal a patchy distribution of the bone modelling fields (overemphasized by the presence of surface islands with no histological information) reflecting the complex growth dynamics associated to the individual morphology. Subadult and adult specimens show important differences in the bone modelling patterns of the anterior region of the facial skeleton and the posterior region of the mandible. These differences indicate developmental changes in the growth directions of the whole craniofacial complex, from a predominantly downward growth in subadults that turns to a forward growth observed in the adult craniofacial skeleton. We hypothesize that these ontogenetic changes would respond to the physiological and physical requirements to enlarge the oral and nasal cavities once maturation of the brain and the closure of the cranial sutures have taken place during craniofacial development. PMID:23819603

  9. Acquisition of Structure and Interpretation: Cases from Mandarin Bare and Non-Bare Noun Phrases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Children's production of bare nominals is universal. When acquiring languages disallowing bare nominals, children will develop from the bare to the non-bare stage. However, Mandarin nominals may appear bare or non-bare in various positions with all kinds of interpretations. This dissertation conducts two acquisition studies to examine the…

  10. Frequency of Teriparatide Administration Affects the Histological Pattern of Bone Formation in Young Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tsuboi, Kanako; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Ota, Masahiro; Haraguchi, Mai; Takahata, Masahiko; Oda, Kimimitsu; Luiz de Freitas, Paulo Henrique; Takakura, Aya; Takao-Kawabata, Ryoko; Isogai, Yukihiro; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-07-01

    Evidence supports that daily and once-weekly administration of teriparatide, human (h)PTH(1-34), enhance bone mass in osteoporotic patients. However, it is uncertain whether different frequencies of hPTH(1-34) administration would induce bone formation similarly in terms of quantity and quality. To investigate that issue, mice were subjected to different frequencies of PTH administration, and their bones were histologically examined. Frequencies of administration were 1 time/2 days, 1 time a day, and 2 and 4 times a day. Mice were allocated to either to control or to 3 different dosing regimens: 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per injection (80 μg/kg per dose), 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (80 μg/kg · d), or 20 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (20 μg/kg · d). With the regimens of 80 μg/kg per dose and 80 μg/kg · d, high-frequency hPTH(1-34) administration increased metaphyseal trabecular number. However, 4 doses per day induced the formation of thin trabeculae, whereas the daily PTH regimen resulted in thicker trabeculae. A similar pattern was observed with the lower daily hPTH(1-34) dose (20 μg/kg · d): more frequent PTH administration led to the formation of thin trabeculae, showing a thick preosteoblastic cell layer, several osteoclasts, and scalloped cement lines that indicated accelerated bone remodeling. On the other hand, low-frequency PTH administration induced new bone with mature osteoblasts lying on mildly convex surfaces representative of arrest lines, which suggests minimodeling-based bone formation. Thus, high-frequency PTH administration seems to increase bone mass rapidly by forming thin trabeculae through accelerated bone remodeling. Alternatively, low-frequency PTH administration leads to the formation of thicker trabeculae through bone remodeling and minimodeling. PMID:27227535

  11. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  12. Patterns of Care Among Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases at a Large Academic Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Alcorn, Sara R.; Hales, Russell K.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates outcomes and patterns of care among patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases at a high-volume academic institution. Methods and Materials: Records of all patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases from April 2007 to July 2012 were identified from electronic medical records. Chart review yielded demographic and clinical data. Rates of complicated versus uncomplicated bone metastases were not analyzed. Results: We identified 339 patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases. Of these, 52.2% were male; median age was 65 years old. The most common primary was non-small-cell lung cancer (29%). Most patients (83%) were prescribed ≤10 fractions; 8% received single-fraction RT. Most patients (52%) had a documented goals of care (GOC) discussion with their radiation oncologist; hospice referral rates were higher when patients had such discussions (66% with vs 50% without GOC discussion, P=.004). Median life expectancy after RT was 96 days. Median survival after RT was shorter based on inpatient as opposed to outpatient status at the time of consultation (35 vs 136 days, respectively, P<.001). Hospice referrals occurred for 56% of patients, with a median interval between completion of RT and hospice referral of 29 days and a median hospice stay of 22 days. Conclusions: These data document excellent adherence to American Society for Radiation Oncolology Choosing Wisely recommendation to avoid routinely using >10 fractions of palliative RT for bone metastasis. Nonetheless, single-fraction RT remains relatively uncommon. Participating in GOC discussions with a radiation oncologist is associated with higher rates of hospice referral. Inpatient status at consultation is associated with short survival.

  13. Racial Differences in Growth Patterns of Children Assessed on the Basis of Bone Age1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aifeng; Sayre, James W.; Vachon, Linda; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To collect up-to-date data in healthy children to create a digital hand atlas (DHA) that can be used to evaluate, on the basis of the Greulich and Pyle atlas method, racial differences in skeletal growth patterns of Asian, African American, white, and Hispanic children in the United States. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects or their guardians. From May 1997 to March 2008, a DHA containing 1390 hand and wrist radiographs obtained in male and female Asian, African American, white, and Hispanic children with normal skeletal development was developed. The age of subjects ranged from 1 day to 18 years. Each image was read by two pediatric radiologists working independently and without knowledge of the subject's chronologic age, and evaluation was based on their experience with the Greulich and Pyle atlas. Statistical analyses were performed with the paired-samples t test and analysis of variance to study racial differences in growth patterns. P ≤ .05 indicated a significant difference. Results: Bone age (P ≤ .05) was significantly overestimated in Asian and Hispanic children. These children appear to mature sooner than their African American and white peers. This was seen in both male and female subjects, especially in girls aged 10–13 years and boys aged 11–15 years. Conclusion: Ethnic and racial differences in growth patterns exist at certain ages; however, the Greulich and Pyle atlas does not recognize this fact. Assessment of bone age in children with use of the Greulich and Pyle atlas can be improved by considering the subject's ethnicity. © RSNA, 2008 PMID:18955510

  14. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma. PMID:26259072

  15. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma.

  16. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vinay Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med.; Wahab, Sherif Abdel; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Ngoma, Twalib; Vanderpuye, Verna; Sowunmi, Anthonia; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph; Jeremic, Branislav

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  17. Understanding Referral Patterns for Bone Mineral Density Testing among Family Physicians: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Munce, Sarah E P; Allin, Sonya; Carlin, Leslie; Sale, Joanna; Hawker, Gillian; Kim, Sandra; Butt, Debra A; Polidoulis, Irene; Tu, Karen; Jaglal, Susan B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Evidence of inappropriate bone mineral density (BMD) testing has been identified in terms of overtesting in low risk women and undertesting among patients at high risk. In light of these phenomena, the objective of this study was to understand the referral patterns for BMD testing among Ontario's family physicians (FPs). Methods. A qualitative descriptive approach was adopted. Twenty-two FPs took part in a semi-structured interview lasting approximately 30 minutes. An inductive thematic analysis was performed on the transcribed data in order to understand the referral patterns for BMD testing. Results. We identified a lack of clarity about screening for osteoporosis with a tendency for baseline BMD testing in healthy, postmenopausal women and a lack of clarity on the appropriate age for screening for men in particular. A lack of clarity on appropriate intervals for follow-up testing was also described. Conclusions. These findings lend support to what has been documented at the population level suggesting a tendency among FPs to refer menopausal women (at low risk). Emphasis on referral of high-risk groups as well as men and further clarification and education on the appropriate intervals for follow-up testing is warranted.

  18. 'Universal' microstructural patterns in cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular bone materials: micromechanics-based prediction of anisotropic elasticity.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian

    2007-02-21

    Bone materials are characterized by an astonishing variability and diversity. Still, because of 'architectural constraints' due to once chosen material constituents and their physical interaction, the fundamental hierarchical organization or basic building plans of bone materials remain largely unchanged during biological evolution. Such universal patterns of microstructural organization govern the mechanical interaction of the elementary components of bone (hydroxyapatite, collagen, water; with directly measurable tissue-independent elastic properties), which are here quantified through a multiscale homogenization scheme delivering effective elastic properties of bone materials: at a scale of 10nm, long cylindrical collagen molecules, attached to each other at their ends by approximately 1.5nm long crosslinks and hosting intermolecular water inbetween, form a contiguous matrix called wet collagen. At a scale of several hundred nanometers, wet collagen and mineral crystal agglomerations interpenetrate each other, forming the mineralized fibril. At a scale of 5-10microm, the extracellular solid bone matrix is represented as collagen fibril inclusions embedded in a foam of largely disordered (extrafibrillar) mineral crystals. At a scale above the ultrastructure, where lacunae are embedded in extracellular bone matrix, the extravascular bone material is observed. Model estimates predicted from tissue-specific composition data gained from a multitude of chemical and physical tests agree remarkably well with corresponding acoustic stiffness experiments across a variety of cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular materials. Besides from reconciling the well-documented, seemingly opposed concepts of 'mineral-reinforced collagen matrix' and 'collagen-reinforced mineral matrix' for bone ultrastructure, this approach opens new possibilities in the exploitation of computer tomographic data for nano-to-macro mechanics of bone organs.

  19. International Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Evidence-Based Practice?

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Alysa; Barnes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Sunita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William; Holt, Tanya; Wu, Jackson; Janjan, Nora; Chow, Edward

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. Methods and Materials: The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. Results: A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Conclusion: Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of

  20. Cortical and trabecular bone at the forearm show different adaptation patterns in response to tennis playing.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaële; Prouteau, Stéphanie; Courteix, Daniel; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Bone responds to impact-loading activity by increasing its size and/or density. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude and modality of the bone response between cortical and trabecular bone in the forearms of tennis players. Bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ulna and radius were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 57 players (24.5 +/- 5.7 yr old), at three sites: the ultradistal region (50% trabecular bone), the mid-distal regions, and third-distal (mainly cortical bone). At the ultradistal radius, the side-to-side difference in BMD was larger than in bone area (8.4 +/- 5.2% and 4.9 +/- 4.0%, respectively, p < 0.01). In the cortical sites, the asymmetry was lower (p < 0.01) in BMD than in bone area (mid-distal radius: 4.0 +/- 4.3% vs 11.7 +/- 6.8%; third-distal radius: 5.0 +/- 4.8% vs 8.4 +/- 6.2%). The asymmetry in bone area explained 33% of the variance of the asymmetry in BMC at the ultradistal radius, 66% at the mid-distal radius, and 53% at the third-distal radius. The ulna displayed similar results. Cortical and trabecular bone seem to respond differently to mechanical loading. The first one mainly increases its size, whereas the second one preferentially increases its density.

  1. Characterizing felid tooth marking and gross bone damage patterns using GIS image analysis: an experimental feeding study with large felids.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Jennifer A; Plummer, Thomas; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2015-03-01

    In recent years there has been much disagreement over the nature of carnivore involvement in Early Pleistocene zooarchaeological assemblages. This partially reflects the lack of reliable ways to identify the taphonomic signatures of different large carnivore taxa. It is often unclear which carnivore taxon or taxa may have played a role in forming or modifying faunal assemblages found associated with stone tools, and this lack of clarity impacts reconstructions of hominin behavior. The mode, frequency and nutritional yield of carcasses acquired by hominins, and the extent to which hominin foraging impinged on or was constrained by the guild of large predators are topics of great importance. This paper characterizes the taphonomic signature of large felids using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) image analysis method to study tooth marking and gross bone damage on neotaphonomic experiments carried out with tigers (Panthera tigris) and African lions (Panthera leo) at the Carolina Tiger Rescue (Pittsboro, North Carolina). This sample of over 400 bones significantly increases the size of current neotaphonomic samples modeling felid feeding traces, more than doubling the number of felid-modified specimens described in the literature. We identify a typical pattern of bone damage resulting from large felid carcass modification, which can be distinguished from bone damage patterns produced by hyaenids and canids. In summary, this pattern consists of tooth marking largely restricted to limb bone ends and minimal bone fragmentation. The frequency of tooth marking imparted by large felids in this study is lower than that produced by hyaenids, while canid tooth mark frequencies fall between the two. Investigation of the FLK Zinj assemblage from Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, has documented several specimens with surface damage similar to our neotaphonomic sample. This may signal early access to carcasses through 'power scavenging' by hominins. PMID:25467112

  2. Mineral density and penetration strength of the subchondral bone plate of the talar dome: high correlation and specific distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Leumann, André; Valderrabano, Victor; Hoechel, Sebastian; Göpfert, Beat; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The subchondral bone plate plays an important role in stabilizing the osteochondral joint unit and in the pathomechanism of osteochondral lesions and osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to measure the mineral density distribution and subchondral bone plate penetration strength of the talar dome joint facet to display and compare the specific distribution patterns. Ten cadaver specimens were used for computed tomography (CT) scans, from which densitograms were derived using CT-osteoabsorptiometry, and for mechanical indentation testing from which the penetration strength was obtained. Our results showed 2 different distribution patterns for mineral density and penetration strength. Of the 10 specimens, 6 (60%) showed bicentric maxima (anteromedially and anterolaterally), and 4 (40%) showed a monocentric maximum (either anteromedially or anterolaterally). A highly significant correlation (p < .0001) for both methods confirmed that the mineral density relied on local load characteristics. In conclusion, the biomechanical properties of the subchondral bone plate of the talar dome joint facet showed specific distribution patterns. CT-osteoabsorptiometry is a reliable method to display the mineral density distribution noninvasively. We recommend CT-osteoabsorptiometry for noninvasive analysis of the biomechanical properties of the subchondral bone plate in osteochondral joint reconstruction and the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis and osteochondral lesions.

  3. Early Bone Marrow Edema Pattern of the Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture : Can Be Predictor of Vertebral Deformity Types and Prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young; Kim, Sung Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an early bone marrow edema pattern predicts vertebral deformity types and prognosis in osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (OVCF). Methods This retrospective study enrolled 64 patients with 75 acute OVCFs who underwent early MRI and followed up MRI. On early MRI, the low SI pattern of OVCF on T1WI were assessed and classified into 3 types (diffuse, globular or patchy, band-like). On followed up MRI, the vertebral deformity types (anterior wedge, biconcave, crush), degree of vertebral body height loss, incidence of vertebral osteonecrosis and spinal stenosis were assessed for each vertebral fracture types. Results According to the early bone marrow edema pattern on T1WI, 26 vertebrae were type 1, 14 vertebrae were type 2 and 35 vertebrae were type 3. On followed up MRI, the crush-type vertebral deformity was most frequent among the type 1 OVCFs, the biconcave-type vertebral deformity was most frequent among the type 2 OVCFs and the anterior wedge-type vertebral deformity was most frequent among the type 3 OVCFs (p<0.001). In addition, type 1 early bone marrow edema pattern of OVCF on T1WI were associated with higher incidence of severe degree vertebral body height loss, vertebral osteonecrosis and spinal stenosis on the follow up MRI. Conclusion Early bone marrow edema pattern of OVCF on T1WI, significant correlated with vertebral deformity types on the follow up MRI. The severe degree of vertebral height loss, vertebral osteonecrosis, and spinal stenosis were more frequent in patients with diffuse low SI pattern. PMID:26962419

  4. Differential patterns of osteoblast dysfunction in trabecular bone in patients with established osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, R J; Denton, J; Hoyland, J A; Freemont, A J

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To analyse osteoblast function in 153 cases of established osteoporosis as previous work has indicated that osteoporosis is a heterogeneous condition characterised by different patterns of osteoclast and osteoblast dysfunction. METHODS: Histomorphometric data from 153 cases with established osteoporosis was used to analyse osteoblast function, using the following parameters: osteoblast number was assessed using the ratio of osteoblast surface to bone surface (ObS:BS); the percentage of active osteoblasts was assessed by using mineralising surface as a proportion of osteoid surface (sLS + dLS/OS); and the efficiency of active osteoblasts was assessed using the ratio of double to total labelled surface (dLS:tLS). The values of each parameter were standardised using age and sex matched control data and a three dimensional matrix was used to identify groups of patients with similar patterns of altered function. RESULTS: The largest group (60 cases) showed a reduction in all three parameters, while a small group (9 cases) had normal osteoblast function. However, one group showed reduction in osteoblast number only (23 cases), while another group showed a normal number of osteoblasts but both reduced percentage and efficiency of activity (14 cases). The results also suggest that efficiency of activity falls first and that this eventually leads to exit from the active pool. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the presence of heterogeneity of osteoblast dysfunction in osteoporosis, indicating that the disease is caused by interference at a variety of target sites along the pathway of osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and activation. Greater understanding of this pathway and of the variety of alterations in the pathway that can occur in osteoporosis may allow more focused therapy for different patient groups identified on the basis of histomorphometric analysis. Images PMID:9389977

  5. Different ossification patterns of intermuscular bones in fish with different swimming modes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjie; Lv, Yaoping; Gong, Xiaoling; Wu, Jiaming; Bao, Baolong

    2015-01-01

    Intermuscular bones are found in the myosepta in teleosts. However, there is very little information on the development and ossification of these intermuscular bones. In this study, we performed an in-depth investigation of the ossification process during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica). In Japanese eel, a typical anguilliform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the anterior to the posterior. By contrast, in the zebrafish, a sub-carangiform or carangiform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the posterior to the anterior regions of the fish. Furthermore, tail amputation affected the ossification of the intermuscular bones. The length of the intermuscular bones in the posterior area became significantly shorter in tail-amputated zebrafish and Japanese eels, and both had less active and lower swimming speeds; this indicates that swimming might induce the ossification of the intermuscular bones. Moreover, when a greater length of tail was amputated in the zebrafish, the intermuscular bones became even shorter. Tail amputation affected the length and ossification of intermuscular bones in the anterior part of the fish, close to the head, differently between the two fish: they became significantly shorter in the zebrafish, but did not in the Japanese eel. This might be because tail amputation did not significantly affect the undulations in the anterior of the Japanese eel, especially near the head. This study shows that the ossification of intermuscular bones might be induced through mechanical force loadings that are produced by swimming.

  6. Different ossification patterns of intermuscular bones in fish with different swimming modes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenjie; Lv, Yaoping; Gong, Xiaoling; Wu, Jiaming; Bao, Baolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intermuscular bones are found in the myosepta in teleosts. However, there is very little information on the development and ossification of these intermuscular bones. In this study, we performed an in-depth investigation of the ossification process during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica). In Japanese eel, a typical anguilliform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the anterior to the posterior. By contrast, in the zebrafish, a sub-carangiform or carangiform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the posterior to the anterior regions of the fish. Furthermore, tail amputation affected the ossification of the intermuscular bones. The length of the intermuscular bones in the posterior area became significantly shorter in tail-amputated zebrafish and Japanese eels, and both had less active and lower swimming speeds; this indicates that swimming might induce the ossification of the intermuscular bones. Moreover, when a greater length of tail was amputated in the zebrafish, the intermuscular bones became even shorter. Tail amputation affected the length and ossification of intermuscular bones in the anterior part of the fish, close to the head, differently between the two fish: they became significantly shorter in the zebrafish, but did not in the Japanese eel. This might be because tail amputation did not significantly affect the undulations in the anterior of the Japanese eel, especially near the head. This study shows that the ossification of intermuscular bones might be induced through mechanical force loadings that are produced by swimming. PMID:26603470

  7. Bone morphogenetic proteins, eye patterning, and retinocollicular map formation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Daniel T.; Dhande, Onkar; Lopez, Joshua E.; Murali, Deepa; Thaller, Christina; Henkemeyer, Mark; Furuta, Yasuhide; Overbeek, Paul; Crair, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Patterning events during early eye formation determine retinal cell fate and can dictate the behavior of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons as they navigate toward central brain targets. The temporally and spatially regulated expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their receptors in the retina are thought to play a key role in this process, initiating gene expression cascades that distinguish different regions of the retina, particularly along the dorsoventral axis. Here, we examine the role of BMP and a potential downstream effector, EphB, in retinotopic map formation in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC). RGC axon behaviors during retinotopic map formation in wild type mice are compared with those in several strains of mice with engineered defects of BMP and EphB signaling. Normal RGC axon sorting produces axon order in the optic tract that reflects the dorsoventral position of the parent RGCs in the eye. A dramatic consequence of disrupting BMP signaling is a missorting of RGC axons as they exit the optic chiasm. This sorting is not dependent on EphB. When BMP signaling in the developing eye is genetically modified, RGC order in the optic tract and targeting in the LGN and SC are correspondingly disrupted. These experiments show that BMP signaling regulates dorsoventral RGC cell fate, RGC axon behavior in the ascending optic tract and retinotopic map formation in the LGN and SC through mechanisms that are in part distinct from EphB signaling in the LGN and SC. PMID:18614674

  8. Matrix methods for bare resonator eigenvalue analysis.

    PubMed

    Latham, W P; Dente, G C

    1980-05-15

    Bare resonator eigenvalues have traditionally been calculated using Fox and Li iterative techniques or the Prony method presented by Siegman and Miller. A theoretical framework for bare resonator eigenvalue analysis is presented. Several new methods are given and compared with the Prony method.

  9. Tailored Surface Treatment of 3D Printed Porous Ti6Al4V by Microarc Oxidation for Enhanced Osseointegration via Optimized Bone In-Growth Patterns and Interlocked Bone/Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Jia, Zhaojun; Lv, Jia; Yin, Chuan; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Song, Chunli; Leng, Huijie; Zheng, Yufeng; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-07-20

    3D printed porous titanium (Ti) holds enormous potential for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Although the 3D printing technique has good control over the macro-sturctures of porous Ti, the surface properties that affect tissue response are beyond its control, adding the need for tailored surface treatment to improve its osseointegration capacity. Here, the one step microarc oxidation (MAO) process was applied to a 3D printed porous Ti6Al4V (Ti64) scaffold to endow the scaffold with a homogeneous layer of microporous TiO2 and significant amounts of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Following the treatment, the porous Ti64 scaffolds exhibited a drastically improved apatite forming ability, cyto-compatibility, and alkaline phosphatase activity. In vivo test in a rabbit model showed that the bone in-growth at the untreated scaffold was in a pattern of distance osteogenesis by which bone formed only at the periphery of the scaffold. In contrast, the bone in-growth at the MAO-treated scaffold exhibited a pattern of contact osteogenesis by which bone formed in situ on the entire surface of the scaffold. This pattern of bone in-growth significantly increased bone formation both in and around the scaffold possibly through enhancement of bone formation and disruption of bone remodeling. Moreover, the implant surface of the MAO-treated scaffold interlocked with the bone tissues through the fabricated microporous topographies to generate a stronger bone/implant interface. The increased osteoinetegration strength was further proven by a push out test. MAO exhibits a high efficiency in the enhancement of osteointegration of porous Ti64 via optimizing the patterns of bone in-growth and bone/implant interlocking. Therefore, post-treatment of 3D printed porous Ti64 with MAO technology might open up several possibilities for the development of bioactive customized implants in orthopedic applications. PMID:27341499

  10. Tailored Surface Treatment of 3D Printed Porous Ti6Al4V by Microarc Oxidation for Enhanced Osseointegration via Optimized Bone In-Growth Patterns and Interlocked Bone/Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Jia, Zhaojun; Lv, Jia; Yin, Chuan; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Song, Chunli; Leng, Huijie; Zheng, Yufeng; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-07-20

    3D printed porous titanium (Ti) holds enormous potential for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Although the 3D printing technique has good control over the macro-sturctures of porous Ti, the surface properties that affect tissue response are beyond its control, adding the need for tailored surface treatment to improve its osseointegration capacity. Here, the one step microarc oxidation (MAO) process was applied to a 3D printed porous Ti6Al4V (Ti64) scaffold to endow the scaffold with a homogeneous layer of microporous TiO2 and significant amounts of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Following the treatment, the porous Ti64 scaffolds exhibited a drastically improved apatite forming ability, cyto-compatibility, and alkaline phosphatase activity. In vivo test in a rabbit model showed that the bone in-growth at the untreated scaffold was in a pattern of distance osteogenesis by which bone formed only at the periphery of the scaffold. In contrast, the bone in-growth at the MAO-treated scaffold exhibited a pattern of contact osteogenesis by which bone formed in situ on the entire surface of the scaffold. This pattern of bone in-growth significantly increased bone formation both in and around the scaffold possibly through enhancement of bone formation and disruption of bone remodeling. Moreover, the implant surface of the MAO-treated scaffold interlocked with the bone tissues through the fabricated microporous topographies to generate a stronger bone/implant interface. The increased osteoinetegration strength was further proven by a push out test. MAO exhibits a high efficiency in the enhancement of osteointegration of porous Ti64 via optimizing the patterns of bone in-growth and bone/implant interlocking. Therefore, post-treatment of 3D printed porous Ti64 with MAO technology might open up several possibilities for the development of bioactive customized implants in orthopedic applications.

  11. Gene expression patterns related to osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Donatella; Ochoa, Gorka; Leonardi, Elisa; Devescovi, Valentina; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Osaba, Lourdes; Baldini, Nicola; Ciapetti, Gabriela

    2010-06-01

    Bone marrow is commonly used as a source of adult multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), defined for their ability to differentiate in vitro into multiple lineages. The ex vivo-expanded MSCs are currently being evaluated as a strategy for the restoration of function in damaged skeletal tissue, both in cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to define gene expression patterns underlying the differentiation of MSCs into mature osteoblasts during the expansion in vitro, and to explore a variety of cell functions that cannot be easily evaluated using morphological, cytochemical, and biochemical assays. Cell cultures were obtained from bone marrow samples of six individuals undergoing total hip replacement, and a large-scale transcriptome analysis, using Affymetrix HG-U133A Plus 2.0 array (Affymetrix((R)), Santa Clara, CA), was performed at the occurrence of specific events, including the appearance of MSC surface markers, formation of colonies, and deposition of mineral nodules. We focused our attention on 213 differentially upregulated genes, some belonging to well-known pathways and some having one or more Gene Ontology annotations related to bone cell biology, including angiogenesis, bone-related genes, cell communication, development and morphogenesis, transforming growth factor-beta signaling, and Wnt signaling. Twenty-nine genes, whose role in bone cell pathophysiology has not been described yet, were found. In conclusion, gene expression patterns that characterize the early, intermediate, and late phases of the osteogenic differentiation process of ex vivo-expanded MSCs were defined. These signatures represent a useful tool to monitor the osteogenic process, and to analyze a broad spectrum of functions of MSCs cultured on scaffolds, especially when the constructs are conceived for releasing growth factors or other signals to promote bone regeneration.

  12. Patterns of variation and covariation in the shapes of mandibular bones of juvenile salmonids in the genus Oncorhynchus

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sawyer; Couture, Ryan B.; McKibben, Natasha S.; Nichols, James T.; Richardson, Shannon E.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY What is the nature of evolutionary divergence of the jaw skeleton within the genus Oncorhynchus? How can two associated bones evolve new shapes and still maintain functional integration? Here, we introduce and test a ‘concordance’ hypothesis, in which an extraordinary matching of the evolutionary shape changes of the dentary and angular articular serves to preserve their fitting together. To test this hypothesis, we examined morphologies of the dentary and angular articular at parr (juvenile) stage, and at three levels of biological organization – between salmon and trout, between sister species within both salmon and trout, and among three types differing in life histories within one species, O. mykiss. The comparisons show bone shape divergences among the groups at each level; morphological divergence between salmon and trout is marked even at this relatively early life history stage. We observed substantial matching between the two mandibular bones in both pattern and amount of shape variation, and in shape covariation across species. These findings strongly support the concordance hypothesis, and reflect functional and/or developmental constraint on morphological evolution. We present evidence for developmental modularity within both bones. The locations of module boundaries were predicted from the patterns of evolutionary divergences, and for the dentary, at least, would appear to facilitate its functional association with the angular articular. The modularity results suggest that development has biased the course of evolution. PMID:26372063

  13. Patterns of variation and covariation in the shapes of mandibular bones of juvenile salmonids in the genus Oncorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Charles B; Watson, Sawyer; Couture, Ryan B; McKibben, Natasha S; Nichols, James T; Richardson, Shannon E; Noakes, David L G

    2015-01-01

    What is the nature of evolutionary divergence of the jaw skeleton within the genus Oncorhynchus? How can two associated bones evolve new shapes and still maintain functional integration? Here, we introduce and test a "concordance" hypothesis, in which an extraordinary matching of the evolutionary shape changes of the dentary and angular articular serves to preserve their fitting together. To test this hypothesis, we examined morphologies of the dentary and angular articular at parr (juvenile) stage, and at three levels of biological organization—between salmon and trout, between sister species within both salmon and trout, and among three types differing in life histories within one species, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The comparisons show bone shape divergences among the groups at each level; morphological divergence between salmon and trout is marked even at this relatively early life history stage. We observed substantial matching between the two mandibular bones in both pattern and amount of shape variation, and in shape covariation across species. These findings strongly support the concordance hypothesis, and reflect functional and/or developmental constraint on morphological evolution. We present evidence for developmental modularity within both bones. The locations of module boundaries were predicted from the patterns of evolutionary divergences, and for the dentary, at least, would appear to facilitate its functional association with the angular articular. The modularity results suggest that development has biased the course of evolution.

  14. Age-related differences in the bone mineralization pattern of rats following exercise

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Hegenauer, J.; Saltman, P.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of 12 weeks of treadmill exercise on the mineralization of trabecular and cortical bone was studied in rats 7, 14, and 19 months of age. Bone mineralization was evaluated by measuring concentrations of Ca, Mg, and hydroxyproline as well as uptake of 45Ca concentration in the femur, humerus, rib and calvaria. The 7- and 14-month-old rats increased mineralization in those cortical bones directly involved in exercise. The 19-month animal responded to exercise by increasing mineralization in all bones examined, including the nonweight bearing trabecular calvaria and cortical rib. From these data, it is apparent that the older animals undergo a total skeletal mineralization in response to exercise compared with local adaptation in the younger animal. Further, we provide evidence to support the use of the rat as a model in which to study mammalian bone physiology during the aging process.

  15. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Shikama, Naoto; Wada, Hitoshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Nozaki, Miwako; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tago, Masao; Oguchi, Masahiko; Uchida, Nobue

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  16. Unique micro- and nano-scale mineralization pattern of human osteogenesis imperfecta type VI bone.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Schmidt, Ingo; Roschger, Paul; Roschger, Andreas; Glorieux, Francis H; Klaushofer, Klaus; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Rauch, Frank; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of inheritable connective tissue disorders characterized by mutation in genes involved in collagen synthesis and leading to increased bone fragility, low bone mass, impaired bone material properties and abnormally high bone matrix mineralization. Recessive OI type VI is caused by mutation in SERPINF1 leading to a loss-of-function of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) a collagen-binding protein with potent antiangiogenic activity. Affected patients develop a severe OI phenotype with a striking histological characteristic, rare in other OI types, of an excess of osteoid tissue and prolonged mineralization lag time. To get insights into matrix mineralization, we evaluated biopsies from 9 affected children by quantitative and by high-resolution backscattered electron imaging and assessed bone mineralization density distribution. Thickness, shape and arrangement of mineral particles were measured in a subset of 4 patients by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering. Typical calcium content in the bone matrix was found to be increased compared to controls, even exceeding values found previously in OI patients with collagen-gene mutations. A main characteristic however, is the coexistence of this highly mineralized bone matrix with seams showing abnormally low mineral content. Atypical collagen fibril organization was found in the perilacunar region of young osteocytes, suggesting a disturbance in the early steps of mineralization. These observations are consistent with the presence of a heterogeneous population of mineral particles with unusual size, shape and arrangement, especially in the region with lower mineral content. The majority of the particles in the highly mineralized bone areas were less disorganized, but smaller and more densely packed than in controls and in previously measured OI patients. These data suggest that the lack of PEDF impairs a proper osteoblast-osteocyte transition and consequently

  17. Axial loading verification method for small bones using carrier fringes in speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila, A.; Márquez, S.; Landgrave, E.; Vázquez, Z.; Vera, K.; Caudillo, C.

    2015-06-01

    A computerized system for real-time displacement visualization using carrier fringes in an electronic speckle in-plane sensitive interferometer allows force calibration for micro-displacement analysis of rat bones and verification of axial loading conditions. Once the force has been calibrated and the load is applied along the bone axis, the difference-of-phase method is used to obtain the phase map, which after phase unwrapping, allows the evaluation of the displacements produced by the bone deformation. The proposed method avoids common loading mistakes using first carrier fringes to assure that the loads are within the measuring capabilities of the in-plane interferometer and the Carré phase-stepping method to compensate for linear phase step miscalibration. The experimental results obtained with the calibration of loading forces and axial loading verification show the advantages of the system proposed here over a system which uses a cantilever configuration to make a similar bone deformation analysis.

  18. Patterns of ossification in the manus of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena): hyperphalangy and delta-shaped bones.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Susan D

    2003-11-01

    With the transition from terrestrial to aquatic habitats, cetacean forelimbs have undergone significant modifications in bone morphology and soft tissue distribution. Some, but not all, of these modifications are also demonstrated in other lineages of extant and extinct secondarily aquatic tetrapods. This study examines the ontogenetic pattern of ossification of the manus of the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), using plain film radiography. Two modifications examined are hyperphalangy (number of phalanges per digit increased beyond the typical mammalian number) and the morphology of delta-shaped bones. Hyperphalangy in Phocoena phocoena is apparent in digits 2 and 3. Phalangeal counts in all digits are variable (sometimes between the right and left flippers of the same individual) and are not necessarily correlated with age. Phalangeal ossification and epiphyseal fusion proceeds along the proximo-distal axis within each digit. In addition, digits 2 and 3 are at a more advanced stage of ossification than more abaxial digits. Delta-shaped bones appear to be a normal stage in the ossification of phalanges in all digits except the third, and may persist in the adult in certain digits. In humans, this morphology is a developmental anomaly usually associated with other malformations, such as polydactyly or syndactyly. Delta-shaped bones in the cetacean manus display a consistent orientation and the process by which they are formed may be similar to that in extinct marine reptiles. PMID:14518013

  19. Heterogeneous rare earth element (REE) patterns and concentrations in a fossil bone: Implications for the use of REE in vertebrate taphonomy and fossilization history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Celina A.; Macpherson, G. L.; González, Luis A.; Grandstaff, David E.

    2010-05-01

    A bone fragment (CGDQ-3) of Falcariusutahensis, a therizinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, contained within a carbonate nodule, was analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) in order to investigate REE variability within a thin-walled phalanx. Previous studies have found depth-related REE pattern variations; however, in CGDQ-3 variation occurs along the circumference of the bone. NASC-normalized REE patterns and concentrations vary between two apparent end members. A light-REE enriched (LREE) pattern, similar to solution ICP-MS analysis of this bone, characterizes approximately two-thirds of the bone fragment. Total REE concentrations are high and do not vary significantly from the periosteal surface to the medullar surface. Conversely, the remaining one-third of the bone has REE patterns that are MREE-depleted and low in total REE concentrations. REE concentrations in this part of the bone do not vary significantly from the periosteal to the medullar surface. A positive Ce anomaly is found throughout the entire bone, and is greatest within the LREE-enriched portion of the bone. This, in combination with the LREE-enrichment, suggests that the bone fossilized under reducing conditions. The distance between the LREE-enriched and MREE-depleted regions is less than 1 mm. Isotopic and petrographic analyses of the bone and surrounding carbonate matrix suggest the REE patterns in the bone were the result of partial fossilization/incomplete filling of micro-pore spaces around bone crystallites in an environment with changing redox conditions. The lower, MREE-depleted part of the bone fossilized contemporaneously with a pendant cement that formed on the underside of the bone in the vadose zone. Formation of the pendant cement restricted water flow through the bone, isolating the lower portion, which incorporated a MREE-depleted pattern. The upper part of the bone (LREE-enriched side) fossilized under

  20. Study of Imaging Pattern in Bone Marrow Oedema in MRI in Recent Knee Injuries and its Correlation with Type of Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Kulamani; Saha, Pramod; Dodia, Jainesh Valjibhai; Raj, Vinay Rajappa; Bhairagond, Shweta Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The knee is a major weight bearing joint that provides mobility and stability during physical activity as well as balance while standing. If the knee is exposed to forces beyond its physiologic range, risk of injury to bone or soft tissue structures increases. A thorough understanding of knee injury patterns and their mechanisms may help in achieving more accurate assessment of injuries. Aim To identify imaging pattern in bone marrow oedema and to correlate the pattern of bone marrow oedema retrospectively with type of knee injury from clinical history. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was done on all patients referred to Krishna Hospital, Karad for MRI knee with history of recent (< 6 weeks) knee injury. Study was conducted between May 2014 to September 2015 with a sample size of 200 patients. Plain radiograph of knee was done in all patients and they were scanned using 1.5 Tesla Seimens Avanto (Tim + Dot) with Tx/Rx 15 channel knee coil # Tim. Results Among the 200 cases, bone marrow contusion was noted in 138 cases (69%) and absent contusion in 62 cases (31%). Bone marrow contusion showed five patterns (according to Sanders classification) i.e., Clip injury in 39 cases (28.3%), Pivot shift injury in 78 cases (56.5%), Dashboard injury in eight cases (5.8%), Hyperextension injury in four cases (2.9%), Lateral patellar dislocation in three cases (2.2%). In six cases (4.3%) no pattern of bone marrow contusion could be explained and was categorized as unclassified pattern. Conclusion Pivot shift pattern is most common contusion pattern and the most common type/mode of sports related injury. By analysing bone marrow contusion pattern, type/mode can be determined in most of the cases. By applying a biomechanical approach in MR interpretation, it is possible to detect lesions like ligament rupture and osseous contusion, to predict subtle but it might overlook important abnormalities. PMID:27190914

  1. Clinton delivers bare bones plan for 1997 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    1996-02-01

    Congress and the White House have yet to finish negotiating and haggling over the U.S. federal budget for 1996, but the calendar and the law say that they ought to start thinking about 1997. On February 5, President Bill Clinton issued a preliminary budget plan for 1997 that reflected his fiscal priorities as they were last stated in January, before budget talks with congressional Republicans broke down. Required by law to propose a spending plan by the first Monday in February, Clinton delivered to Congress what he termed a "thematic document," one that gives a minimally detailed outline of how the federal government should spend the taxpayers' money in 1997.

  2. Fishbone Diagrams: Organize Reading Content with a "Bare Bones" Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    Fishbone diagrams, also known as Ishikawa diagrams or cause-and-effect diagrams, are one of the many problem-solving tools created by Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa, a University of Tokyo professor. Part of the brilliance of Ishikawa's idea resides in the simplicity and practicality of the diagram's basic model--a fish's skeleton. This article describes how…

  3. Associations of breast-feeding patterns and introduction of solid foods with childhood bone mass: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    van den Hooven, Edith H; Gharsalli, Mounira; Heppe, Denise H M; Raat, Hein; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-03-28

    Breast-feeding has been associated with later bone health, but results from previous studies are inconsistent. We examined the associations of breast-feeding patterns and timing of introduction of solids with bone mass at the age of 6 years in a prospective cohort study among 4919 children. We collected information about duration and exclusiveness of breast-feeding and timing of introduction of any solids with postnatal questionnaires. A total body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan was performed at 6 years of age, and bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), area-adjusted BMC (aBMC) and bone area (BA) were analysed. Compared with children who were ever breast-fed, those never breast-fed had lower BMD (-4·62 mg/cm2; 95 % CI -8·28, -0·97), BMC (-8·08 g; 95 % CI -12·45, -3·71) and BA (-7·03 cm2; 95 % CI -12·55, -1·52) at 6 years of age. Among all breast-fed children, those who were breast-fed non-exclusively in the first 4 months had higher BMD (2·91 mg/cm2; 95 % CI 0·41, 5·41) and aBMC (3·97 g; 95 % CI 1·30, 6·64) and lower BA (-4·45 cm2; 95 % CI -8·28, -0·61) compared with children breast-fed exclusively for at least 4 months. Compared with introduction of solids between 4 and 5 months, introduction <4 months was associated with higher BMD and aBMC, whereas introduction between 5 and 6 months was associated with lower aBMC and higher BA. Additional adjustment for infant vitamin D supplementation did not change the results. In conclusion, results from the present study suggest that ever breast-feeding compared with never breast-feeding is associated with higher bone mass in 6-year-old children, but exclusive breast-feeding for 4 months or longer was not positively associated with bone outcomes.

  4. Evaluation of opening pattern and bone neoformation at median palatal suture area in patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SALGUEIRO, Daniel Gomes; RODRIGUES, Vitor Hugo Leite de Oliveira; TIEGHI, Victor; de MENEZES, Carolina Carmo; GONÇALES, Eduardo Sanches; FERREIRA, Osny

    2015-01-01

    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) is the treatment of choice to adult patients even with severe transversal maxillary discrepancies. However, the adequate retention period to achieve the bone remodeling, thus assuring treatment stability, is controversial. Objective To evaluate the opening pattern and bone neoformation process at the midpalatal suture in patients submitted to surgically assisted (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods Fourteen patients were submitted to SARME through subtotal Le Fort I osteotomy. Both the opening pattern and the mean bone density at midpalatal suture area to evaluate bone formation were assessed pre- and post-operatively (15, 60 and 180 days) through CBCT. Results Type I opening pattern (from anterior to posterior nasal spine) occurred in 12 subjects while type II opening pattern (from anterior nasal spine to transverse palatine suture) occurred in 2 individuals. The 180-day postoperative mean (PO 180) of bone density value was 49.9% of the preoperative mean (Pre) value. Conclusions The opening pattern of midpalatal suture is more related to patients’ age (23.9 years in type I and 33.5 years in type II) and surgical technique. It was not possible to observe complete bone formation at midpalatal suture area at the ending of the retention period studied (180 days). PMID:26398512

  5. Evaluation of opening pattern and bone neoformation at median palatal suture area in patients submitted to surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Daniel Gomes; Rodrigues, Vitor Hugo Leite de Oliveira; Tieghi Neto, Victor; Menezes, Carolina Carmo de; Gonçales, Eduardo Sanches; Ferreira Júnior, Osny

    2015-01-01

    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) is the treatment of choice to adult patients even with severe transversal maxillary discrepancies. However, the adequate retention period to achieve the bone remodeling, thus assuring treatment stability, is controversial.Objective To evaluate the opening pattern and bone neoformation process at the midpalatal suture in patients submitted to surgically assisted (SARME) through cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).Material and Methods Fourteen patients were submitted to SARME through subtotal Le Fort I osteotomy. Both the opening pattern and the mean bone density at midpalatal suture area to evaluate bone formation were assessed pre- and post-operatively (15, 60 and 180 days) through CBCT.Results Type I opening pattern (from anterior to posterior nasal spine) occurred in 12 subjects while type II opening pattern (from anterior nasal spine to transverse palatine suture) occurred in 2 individuals. The 180-day postoperative mean (PO 180) of bone density value was 49.9% of the preoperative mean (Pre) value.Conclusions The opening pattern of midpalatal suture is more related to patients' age (23.9 years in type I and 33.5 years in type II) and surgical technique. It was not possible to observe complete bone formation at midpalatal suture area at the ending of the retention period studied (180 days).

  6. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  7. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  8. Molecular analysis of the bare lymphocyte syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K E; Stobo, J D; Peterlin, B M

    1985-07-01

    The bare lymphocyte syndrome is a disorder in which class I histocompatibility antigens fail to be expressed normally on the surface of lymphocytes. Utilizing complementary DNA probes for both beta 2-microglobulin and class I genes, the molecular basis for this syndrome was investigated in a family with two siblings exhibiting the bare lymphocyte syndrome. Southern blot analysis demonstrated no gross internal defect in either class I or beta 2-microglobulin genes. Northern blot analysis of class I and beta 2-microglobulin messenger RNAs also revealed no qualitative difference between affected and unaffected family members. In contrast, quantitation of both class I and beta 2-microglobulin transcripts demonstrated each to be decreased in patients when compared to controls. Moreover, the decrease in both transcripts was coordinate. These results suggest that the bare lymphocyte syndrome may represent a pretranslational regulatory defect of both class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression.

  9. Relationship between tissue stress during gait in healthy volunteers and patterns of urate deposition and bone erosion in gout: a biomechanical computational modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Deacon, Michelle; Gamble, Gregory D; Mithraratne, Kumar; Fernandez, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether patterns of high internal tissue stress during gait are associated with patterns of monosodium urate crystal deposition and bone erosion in gout. Methods We compared patterns of foot von Mises stress predicted computationally during gait in volunteers of normal and high body mass index (BMI) with patterns of urate deposition in gout and asymptomatic hyperuricaemia, and bone erosion in gout using dual-energy and conventional CT data. Results The highest average and peak von Mises stress during gait was observed at the third metatarsal (MT) head. Similar stress patterns were observed for high and low BMI groups. In contrast, for both urate deposition and bone erosion, the first MT head was most frequently affected, with very infrequent involvement of the third MT head. There was no clear relationship between average or peak von Mises stress patterns with patterns of urate deposition or bone erosion (−0.29>r<0.16). Addition of BMI into linear regression models did not alter the findings. Conclusions These data do not support the concept that elevated internal tissue stress during biomechanical loading plays an important role in patterns of monosodium urate crystal deposition or structural damage in gout. PMID:26535140

  10. Bone microstructure and the evolution of growth patterns in Permo-Triassic therocephalians (Amniota, Therapsida) of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Botha-Brink, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Therocephalians were a speciose clade of nonmammalian therapsids whose ecological diversity and survivorship of the end-Permian mass extinction offer the potential to investigate the evolution of growth patterns across the clade and their underlying influences on post-extinction body size reductions, or ‘Lilliput effects’. We present a phylogenetic survey of limb bone histology and growth patterns in therocephalians from the Middle Permian through Middle Triassic of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Histologic sections were prepared from 80 limb bones representing 11 genera of therocephalians. Histologic indicators of skeletal growth, including cortical vascularity (%CV) and mean primary osteon diameters (POD), were evaluated in a phylogenetic framework and assessed for correlations with other biologically significant variables (e.g., size and robusticity). Changes in %CV and POD correlated strongly with evolutionary changes in body size (i.e., smaller-bodied descendants tended to have lower %CV than their larger-bodied ancestors across the tree). Bone wall thickness tended to be high in early therocephalians and lower in the gracile-limbed baurioids, but showed no general correlation with cross-sectional area or degree of vascularity (and, thus, growth). Clade-level patterns, however, deviated from previously studied within-lineage patterns. For example, Moschorhinus, one of few therapsid genera to have survived the extinction boundary, demonstrated higher %CV in the Triassic than in the Permian despite its smaller size in the extinction aftermath. Results support a synergistic model of size reductions for Triassic therocephalians, influenced both by within-lineage heterochronic shifts in survivor taxa (as reported in Moschorhinus and the dicynodont Lystrosaurus) and phylogenetically inferred survival of small-bodied taxa that had evolved short growth durations (e.g., baurioids). These findings mirror the multi-causal Lilliput patterns described in marine faunas

  11. Bone microstructure and the evolution of growth patterns in Permo-Triassic therocephalians (Amniota, Therapsida) of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Huttenlocker, Adam K; Botha-Brink, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Therocephalians were a speciose clade of nonmammalian therapsids whose ecological diversity and survivorship of the end-Permian mass extinction offer the potential to investigate the evolution of growth patterns across the clade and their underlying influences on post-extinction body size reductions, or 'Lilliput effects'. We present a phylogenetic survey of limb bone histology and growth patterns in therocephalians from the Middle Permian through Middle Triassic of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Histologic sections were prepared from 80 limb bones representing 11 genera of therocephalians. Histologic indicators of skeletal growth, including cortical vascularity (%CV) and mean primary osteon diameters (POD), were evaluated in a phylogenetic framework and assessed for correlations with other biologically significant variables (e.g., size and robusticity). Changes in %CV and POD correlated strongly with evolutionary changes in body size (i.e., smaller-bodied descendants tended to have lower %CV than their larger-bodied ancestors across the tree). Bone wall thickness tended to be high in early therocephalians and lower in the gracile-limbed baurioids, but showed no general correlation with cross-sectional area or degree of vascularity (and, thus, growth). Clade-level patterns, however, deviated from previously studied within-lineage patterns. For example, Moschorhinus, one of few therapsid genera to have survived the extinction boundary, demonstrated higher %CV in the Triassic than in the Permian despite its smaller size in the extinction aftermath. Results support a synergistic model of size reductions for Triassic therocephalians, influenced both by within-lineage heterochronic shifts in survivor taxa (as reported in Moschorhinus and the dicynodont Lystrosaurus) and phylogenetically inferred survival of small-bodied taxa that had evolved short growth durations (e.g., baurioids). These findings mirror the multi-causal Lilliput patterns described in marine faunas, but

  12. Linear and geometric morphometric analysis of long bone scaling patterns in Jurassic neosauropod dinosaurs: their functional and paleobiological implications.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F

    2007-09-01

    Neosauropod dinosaurs were gigantic, herbivorous dinosaurs. Given that the limb skeleton is essentially a plastic, mobile framework that supports and moves the body, analysis of long bone scaling can reveal limb adaptations that supported neosauropod gigantism. Previously, analyses of linear dimensions have revealed a relatively isometric scaling pattern for the humerus and femur of neosauropods. Here, a combined scaling analysis of humerus and femur linear dimensions, cortical area, and shape across six neosauropod taxa is used to test the hypothesis that neosauropod long bones scaled isometrically and to investigate the paleobiological implications of these trends. A combination of linear regression and geometric morphometrics analyses of neosauropod humeri and femora were performed using traditional and thin-plate splines approaches. The neosauropod sample was very homogeneous, and linear analyses revealed that nearly all humerus and femur dimensions, including cortical area, scale with isometry against maximum length. Thin-plate splines analyses showed that little to no significant shape change occurs with increasing length or cortical area for the humerus or femur. Even with the exclusion of the long-limbed Brachiosaurus, the overall trends were consistently isometric. These results suggest that the mechanical advantage of limb-moving muscles and the relative range of limb movement decreased with increasing size. The isometric signal for neosauropod long bone dimensions and shape suggests these dinosaurs may have reached the upper limit of vertebrate long bone mechanics. Perhaps, like stilt-walkers, the absolutely long limbs of the largest neosauropods allowed for efficient locomotion at gigantic size with few ontogenetic changes.

  13. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of bone morphogenetic protein 3 in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ito-Amano, Midori; Nakamura, Yukio; Morisaki, Mika; He, Xinjun; Hayashi, Masanori; Watanapokasin, Ramida; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are important elements in bone biology. We herein report the expression profiles of zebrafish bmp3 (zbmp3) as demonstrated by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. The expression of zbmp3 was highly detectable by real-time PCR from 1 day post-fertilization (1 dpf) to 2 weeks post-fertilization (2 wpf) and peaked at 1 wpf. For in situ hybridization experiments, zbmp3 was expressed in the otic vesicle at 1 dpf, 2 dpf, 3 dpf, and 5 dpf. It was also expressed in the pharyngeal arches, including the opercle, branchiostegal ray, and pectoral fins, at 2 dpf. Our results suggest that zbmp3 may play an important role in the skeletal biology of developing zebrafish.

  14. Computed tomography of temporal bone pneumatization. 1. Normal pattern and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Virapongse, C.; Sarwar, M.; Bhimani, S.; Sasaki, C.; Shapiro, R.

    1985-09-01

    The pneumatization of 141 normal temporal bones on computed tomography (CT) was evaluated in 100 patients. Because of the controversy surrounding the sclerotic squamomastoid (mastoid), temporal bones with this finding were discarded. A CT index of pneumatization was based on the pneumatized area and the number of cells seen within a representative scanning section. Results suggest that squamomastoid pneumatization follows the classic normal distribution and does not correlate with age, gender, or laterality. A high degree of symmetry was found in 41 patients who had both ears examined. Air-cell configuration was variable. Air-cell size tended to increase progressively from the mastoid antrum. The scutum pseudotumor appearance caused by incomplete pneumatization was seen frequently, and should not be mistaken for mastoiditis or an osteoma. Thick sections producing partial-volume effect may also produce this spurious finding. Therefore, when searching for mucosal thickening due to mastoiditis, large air cells should preferably be analyzed.

  15. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  16. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  19. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  20. Effects of sublethal irradiation on patterns of engraftment after murine bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jacob; Ge, Shundi; Symbatyan, Goar; Rosol, Michael S; Olch, Arthur J; Crooks, Gay M

    2011-05-01

    Attempts to reduce the toxicity of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have led to the use of various immunosuppressive, yet nonmyeloablative preparative regimens that often include low-dose irradiation. To determine the effects of low-dose irradiation on the dynamics of donor cell engraftment after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we coupled standard endpoint flow cytometric analysis with in vivo longitudinal bioluminescence imaging performed throughout the early (<10 days) and late (days 10-90) post-BMT periods. To exclude the contribution of irradiation on reducing immunologic rejection, severely immune-deficient mice were chosen as recipients of allogeneic bone marrow. Flow cytometric analysis showed that sublethal doses of total body irradiation (TBI) significantly increased long-term (14 weeks) donor chimerism in the bone marrow compared with nonirradiated recipients (P < .05). Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated that the effect of TBI (P < .001) on chimerism occurred only after the first 7 days post-BMT. Flow cytometric analysis on day 3 showed no increase in the number of donor cells in irradiated bone marrow, confirming that sublethal irradiation does not enhance marrow chimerism early after transplantation. Local irradiation also significantly increased late (but not early) donor chimerism in the irradiated limb. Intrafemoral injection of donor cells provided efficient early chimerism in the injected limb, but long-term systemic donor chimerism was highest with i.v. administration (P < .05). Overall, the combination of TBI and i.v. administration of donor cells provided the highest levels of long-term donor chimerism in the marrow space. These findings suggest that the major effect of sublethal irradiation is to enhance long-term donor chimerism by inducing proliferative signals after the initial phase of homing.

  1. Rietveld refinement on x-ray diffraction patterns of bioapatite in human fetal bones.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Carlo; Dalconi, Maria Chiara; Nuzzo, Stefania; Mobilio, Settimio; Wenk, Rudy H

    2003-03-01

    Bioapatite, the main constituent of mineralized tissue in mammalian bones, is a calcium-phosphate-based mineral that is similar in structure and composition to hydroxyapatite. In this work, the crystallographic structure of bioapatite in human fetuses was investigated by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (XRD) and microdiffraction ( micro -XRD) techniques. Rietveld refinement analyses of XRD and micro -XRD data allow for quantitative probing of the structural modifications of bioapatite as functions of the mineralization process and gestational age.

  2. An Evaluation of Upper and Lower Pharyngeal Airway Width, Tongue Posture and Hyoid Bone Position in Subjects with Different Growth Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tarkar, Jaipal Singh; Parashar, Sandeep; Gupta, Garima; Bhardwaj, Preeti; Singh, Atul; Singh, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is important to evaluate the position of the hyoid bone in relation to the tongue at the beginning of orthodontic treatment so that during the treatment, its position may be directed hence overall impact on airway could be assessed. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the upper and lower pharyngeal airway dimensions, posture of tongue and hyoid bone position in young adults with different growth patterns. Materials and Methods Sample size of the study included 90 post-adolescent subjects, within the age range of 18-32 years. Based on the different growth pattern of the face, subjects were divided into Group I (n=30; average growth pattern), Group II (n=30; horizontal growth pattern) and Group III (n=30; vertical growth pattern). Lateral cephalogram were traced and analysed manually by the same investigator for evaluation of upper and lower pharyngeal airway, tongue posture and hyoid bone position. The intergroup comparison of upper and lower pharyngeal airway dimensions, posture of tongue and hyoid bone was performed with one-way ANOVA test. Results The results showed that upper oropharyngeal widths were significantly different in different facial skeletal patterns (p=0.00). Subjects with vertical skeletal pattern have significantly narrower upper airways than those with horizontal skeletal pattern (p= 0.025). There was significantly higher difference in position of dorsum of the tongue in vertical growth pattern group (p=0.00). The hyoid bone was positioned farther from the mandibular symphysis in brachyfacial subjects, reflected by the larger H-RGN (Hyoid- retrognathion) values compared with the dolichofacial and normal subjects (p=0.044). Conclusion The upper oropharyngeal width was found to be narrower in subjects with vertical growth pattern. The dorsum of the tongue is seen to be placed higher in subjects with vertical growth pattern. The hyoid bone was more inferiorly and posteriorly positioned in subjects with horizontal growth pattern

  3. Grazing intensity and spatial heterogeneity in bare soil in a grazing-resistant grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial patterns in rangeland vegetation serve as indicators of rangeland condition and are an important component of wildlife habitat. We illustrate the use of very-large-scale aerial photography (VLSA) to quantify spatial patterns in bare soil of the northeastern Colorado shortgrass steppe. Using ...

  4. Parathyroid hormone secretory pattern, circulating activity, and effect on bone turnover in adult growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A M; Hopkins, M T; Fraser, W D; Ooi, C G; Durham, B H; Vora, J P

    2003-02-01

    Adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) is associated with osteoporosis. Reports have associated parathyroid hormone (PTH) circadian rhythm abnormalities with osteoporosis. Furthermore, there is evidence of relative PTH insensitivity in AGHD patients. Factors regulating PTH circadian rhythm are not fully understood. There is evidence that serum phosphate is a likely determinant of PTH rhythm. The aim of this study was to investigate PTH circadian rhythm and its circulating activity and association with bone turnover in untreated AGHD patients compared to healthy individuals. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 30-min and urine at 3-h intervals during the day over a 24-h period from 1400 h in 14 untreated AGHD patients (7 M, 7 W; mean age, 49.5 +/- 10.7 years) and 14 age (48.6 +/- 11.4 years; P = NS) and gender-matched controls. Cosinor analysis was performed to analyze rhythm parameters. Cross-correlational analysis was used to determine the relationship between variables. Serum PTH (1-84), phosphate, total calcium, urea, creatinine, albumin, type I collagen C-telopeptides (CT(x)), a bone resorption marker, and procollagen type I amino-terminal propeptide (PINP), a bone formation marker, were measured on all samples. Nephrogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate (NcAMP), which reflects the renal activity of PTH, was calculated from plasma and urinary cAMP. Urinary calcium and phosphate were measured on all urine samples. Significant circadian rhythms were observed for serum PTH, phosphate, CT(x), and PINP in AGHD and healthy subjects (P < 0.001). No significant rhythm was observed for serum-adjusted calcium. PTH MESOR (rhythm-adjusted mean) was significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas the MESOR values for phosphate, CT(x) (P < 0.05), and PINP (P < 0.001) were lower in AGHD patients than in controls. AGHD patients had significantly lower 24-h NcAMP (P < 0.001) and higher urinary calcium excretion (P < 0.05). Maximum cross-correlation between PTH and phosphate (r = 0

  5. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates Amifostine induced preservation of bone mineralization patterns in the irradiated murine mandible

    PubMed Central

    Poushanchi, Behdod; Donneys, Alexis; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Gallagher, K. Kelly; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of head and neck cancer remains severely debilitating. Fortunately, newly developed agents aimed at decreasing radiation-induced damage have shown great promise. Amifostine (AMF) is a compound, which confers radio-protection to the exposed normal tissues, such as bone. Our intent is to utilize Raman spectroscopy to demonstrate how AMF preserves the mineral composition of the murine mandible following human equivalent radiation. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into 3 experimental groups: control (n=5), XRT (n=5), and AMF–XRT (n=5). Both XRT and AMF groups underwent bioequivalent radiation of 70 Gy in 5 fractions to the left hemimandible. AMF–XRT received Amifostine prior to radiation. Fifty-six days post-radiation, the hemimandibles were harvested, and Raman spectra were taken in the region of interest spanning 2 mm behind the last molar. Bone mineral and matrix-specific Raman bands were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, with statistical significance at p<0.05. Results The full-width at half-maximum of the primary phosphate band (FWHM) and the ratio of carbonate/phosphate intensities demonstrated significant differences between AMF–XRT versus XRT (p<0.01) and XRT versus control (p<0.01). There was no difference between AMF–XRT and control (p>0.05) in both Raman metrics. Computer-aided spectral subtraction further confirmed these results where AMF–XRT was spectrally similar to the control. Interestingly, the collagen cross-link ratio did not differ between XRT and AMF–XRT (p<0.01) but was significantly different from the control (p<0.01). Conclusion Our novel findings demonstrate that AMF prophylaxis maintains and protects bone mineral quality in the setting of radiation. Raman spectroscopy is an emerging and exceptionally attractive clinical translational technology to investigate and monitor both the destructive effects of radiation and the therapeutic remediation of AMF on the structural, physical

  6. Comparison of craniofacial morphology, head posture and hyoid bone position with different breathing patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Ekizer, Abdullah; Uysal, Tancan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in craniofacial morphology, head posture and hyoid bone position between mouth breathing (MB) and nasal breathing (NB) patients. Methods Mouth breathing patients comprised 34 skeletal Class I subjects with a mean age of 12.8 ± 1.5 years (range: 12.0–15.2 years). Thirty-two subjects with skeletal Class I relationship were included in the NB group (mean 13.5 ± 1.3 years; range: 12.2–14.8 years). Twenty-seven measurements (15 angular and 12 linear) were used for the craniofacial analysis. Additionally, 12 measurements were evaluated for head posture (eight measurements) and hyoid bone position (four measurements). Student’s t-test was used for the statistical analysis. Probability values <0.05 were accepted as significant. Results Statistical comparisons showed that sagittal measurements including SNA (p < 0.01), ANB (p < 0.01), A to N perp (p < 0.05), convexity (p < 0.05), IMPA (p < 0.05) and overbite (p < 0.05) measurements were found to be lower in MB patients compared to NB. Vertical measurements including SN-MP (p < 0.01) and PP-GoGn (p < 0.01), S-N (p <0.05) and anterior facial height (p < 0.05) were significantly higher in MB patients, while the odontoid proses and palatal plane angle (OPT-PP) was greater and true vertical line and palatal plane angle (Vert-PP) was smaller in MB patients compared to NB group (p < 0.05 for both). No statistically significant differences were found regarding the hyoid bone position between both groups. Conclusions The maxilla was more retrognathic in MB patients. Additionally, the palatal plane had a posterior rotation in MB patients. However, no significant differences were found in the hyoid bone position between MB and NB patients. PMID:23960542

  7. RGD-Binding Integrins in Prostate Cancer: Expression Patterns and Therapeutic Prospects against Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Mark; Gordon, Andrew; Shnyder, Steven D.; Patterson, Laurence H.; Sheldrake, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of male cancer deaths in the developed world. The current lack of highly specific detection methods and efficient therapeutic agents for advanced disease have been identified as problems requiring further research. The integrins play a vital role in the cross-talk between the cell and extracellular matrix, enhancing the growth, migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Progression and metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma is strongly associated with changes in integrin expression, notably abnormal expression and activation of the β3 integrins in tumour cells, which promotes haematogenous spread and tumour growth in bone. As such, influencing integrin cell expression and function using targeted therapeutics represents a potential treatment for bone metastasis, the most common and debilitating complication of advanced prostate cancer. In this review, we highlight the multiple ways in which RGD-binding integrins contribute to prostate cancer progression and metastasis, and identify the rationale for development of multi-integrin antagonists targeting the RGD-binding subfamily as molecularly targeted agents for its treatment. PMID:24213501

  8. Frequency and patterning of bone trauma in the late medieval population (13th-16th century) from Dugopolje, southern Croatia.

    PubMed

    Novak, Mario; Slaus, Mario

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the hypothesis of an increased level of interpersonal violence in Dugopolje during the late medieval period as testified by written sources. In order to accomplish this, an analysis and comparison of frequencies and patterning of long bone and craniofacial fractures between sex and age categories in the Dugopolje skeletal sample was performed. In total 209 excellently preserved adult skeletons were analysed: 111 males and 98 females. The total long bone fracture frequency is 1.5% (29/1910) with a significantly higher frequency in males compared to females. Most of the long bone injuries occurred as a result of accidents, probably due to rugged mountainous terrain, while a certain portion of trauma resulted from deliberate violence. Significantly higher fracture frequencies in males could be a result of a strict sexual division of labour where males performed more physically demanding and risky tasks, as witnessed by historical sources. 26 out of 119 complete adult crania (21.8%) exhibit skeletal trauma with significantly higher frequencies in males. Perimortem trauma was observed in one individual while antemortem healed sharp force lesions were registered in five individuals (all males). The predominance of frontal craniofacial injuries, as well as the presence ofperimortem trauma and sharp force lesions, suggests the presence of deliberate violence in this community. Although the indicators of deliberate violence were recorded predominantly in males, suggesting that intentional violence in Dugopolje was exclusively males' prerogative, the presence of nasal fracture in a female skeleton might point to a male towards female violence. Presented bioarchaeological data are in accordance with the written documents thus corroborating the claims of an increased level of deliberate interpersonal violence in the late medieval population from Dugopolje.

  9. Vibration measurement of the tympanic membrane of guinea pig temporal bones using time-averaged speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hiroshi; Ando, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Sugawara, Hironori; Koike, Takuji; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Hozawa, Koji; Gemma, Takashi; Nara, Makoto

    2002-05-01

    ``Time-averaged holography'' and ``holographic interferometry'' enable recording of the complete vibration pattern of a surface within several seconds. The results appear in the form of fringes. Vibration amplitudes smaller than 100 nm are not readily measurable by these techniques, because such small amplitudes produce variations in gray level, but not fringes. In practice, to obtain clear fringes in these measurements, stimulus sound pressures higher than 100 dB SPL must be used. The phase of motion is also not obtainable from such fringe techniques. In this study, a sinusoidal phase modulation technique is described, which allows detection of both small amplitudes of motion and their phase from time-averaged speckle pattern interferometry. In this technique, the laser injection current is modulated and digital image processing is used to analyze the measured patterns. When the sound-pressure level of stimuli is between 70 and 85 dB SPL, this system is applied to measure the vibratory response of the tympanic membrane (TM) of guinea pig temporal bones at frequencies up to 4 kHz where complicated vibration modes are observed. The effect of the bulla on TM displacements is also quantified. Results indicate that this system is capable of measuring the nanometer displacements of the TM, produced by stimuli of 70 dB SPL.

  10. Water Accommodation on Bare and Coated Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui

    2015-04-01

    A good understanding of water accommodation on ice surfaces is essential for quantitatively predicting the evolution of clouds, and therefore influences the effectiveness of climate models. However, the accommodation coefficient is poorly constrained within the literature where reported values vary by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, the complexity of the chemical composition of the atmosphere plays an important role in ice phase behavior and dynamics. We employ an environmental molecular beam (EMB) technique to investigate molecular water interactions with bare and impurity coated ice at temperatures from 170 K to 200 K. In this work, we summarize results of water accommodation experiments on bare ice (Kong et al., 2014) and on ice coated by methanol (Thomson et al., 2013), butanol (Thomson et al., 2013) and acetic acid (Papagiannakopoulos et al., 2014), and compare those results with analogous experiments using hexanol and nitric acid coatings. Hexanol is chosen as a complementary chain alcohol to methanol and butanol, while nitric acid is a common inorganic compound in the atmosphere. The results show a strong negative temperature dependence of water accommodation on bare ice, which can be quantitatively described by a precursor model. Acidic adlayers tend to enhance water uptake indicating that the system kinetics are thoroughly changed compared to bare ice. Adsorbed alcohols influence the temperature dependence of the accommodation coefficient and water molecules generally spend less time on the surfaces before desorbing, although the measured accommodation coefficients remain high and comparable to bare ice for the investigated systems. We conclude that impurities can either enhance or restrict water uptake in ways that are influenced by several factors including temperature and type of adsorbant, with potential implications for the description of ice particle growth in the atmosphere. This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council and

  11. Cell Fusion Reprogramming Leads to a Specific Hepatic Expression Pattern during Mouse Bone Marrow Derived Hepatocyte Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arza, Elvira; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fabregat, Isabel; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Meza, Nestor W.; Segovia, Jose C.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells with hepatocytes to generate BM derived hepatocytes (BMDH) is a natural process, which is enhanced in damaged tissues. However, the reprogramming needed to generate BMDH and the identity of the resultant cells is essentially unknown. In a mouse model of chronic liver damage, here we identify a modification in the chromatin structure of the hematopoietic nucleus during BMDH formation, accompanied by the loss of the key hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1/Sfpi1 (SFFV proviral integration 1) and gain of the key hepatic transcriptional regulator HNF-1A homeobox A (HNF-1A/Hnf1a). Through genome-wide expression analysis of laser captured BMDH, a differential gene expression pattern was detected and the chromatin changes observed were confirmed at the level of chromatin regulator genes. Similarly, Tranforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and neurotransmitter (e.g. Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 [Ptger4]) pathway genes were over-expressed. In summary, in vivo BMDH generation is a process in which the hematopoietic cell nucleus changes its identity and acquires hepatic features. These BMDHs have their own cell identity characterized by an expression pattern different from hematopoietic cells or hepatocytes. The role of these BMDHs in the liver requires further investigation. PMID:22457803

  12. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  14. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  15. Loading patterns and jaw movements during mastication in Macaca fascicularis: a bone-strain, electromyographic, and cineradiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hylander, W L; Johnson, K R; Crompton, A W

    1987-03-01

    Rosette strain gage, electromyography (EMG), and cineradiographic techniques were used to analyze loading patterns and jaw movements during mastication in Macaca fascicularis. The cineradiographic data indicate that macaques generally swallow frequently throughout a chewing sequence, and these swallows are intercalated into a chewing cycle towards the end of a power stroke. The bone strain and jaw movement data indicate that during vigorous mastication the transition between fast close and the power stroke is correlated with a sharp increase in masticatory force, and they also show that in most instances the jaws of macaques are maximally loaded prior to maximum intercuspation, i.e. during phase I (buccal phase) occlusal movements. Moreover, these data indicate that loads during phase II (lingual phase) occlusal movements are ordinarily relatively small. The bone strain data also suggest that the duration of unloading of the jaw during the power stroke of mastication is largely a function of the relaxation time of the jaw adductors. This interpretation is based on the finding that the duration from 100% peak strain to 50% peak strain during unloading closely approximates the half-relaxation time of whole adductor jaw muscles of macaques. The EMG data of the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles have important implications for understanding both the biomechanics of the power stroke and the external forces responsible for the "wishboning" effect that takes place along the mandibular symphysis and corpus during the power stroke of mastication. Although both medial pterygoid muscles reach maximum EMG activity during the power stroke, the activity of the working-side medial pterygoid peaks after the balancing-side medial pterygoid. Associated with the simultaneous increase of force of the working-side medial pterygoid and the decrease of force of the balancing-side medial pterygoid is the persistently high level of EMG activity of the balancing-side deep masseter

  16. Comparison of interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Khumsarn, Nattida; Patanaporn, Virush; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated and compared interradicular distances and cortical bone thickness in Thai patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Pretreatment CBCT images of 24 Thai orthodontic patients with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns were included in the study. Three measurements were chosen for investigation: the mesiodistal distance between the roots, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness. All distances were recorded at five different levels from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Descriptive statistical analysis and t-tests were performed, with the significance level for all tests set at p<0.05. Results Patients with a Class II skeletal pattern showed significantly greater maxillary mesiodistal distances (between the first and second premolars) and widths of the buccolingual alveolar process (between the first and second molars) than Class I skeletal pattern patients at 10 mm above the CEJ. The maxillary buccal cortical bone thicknesses between the second premolar and first molar at 8 mm above the CEJ in Class II patients were likewise significantly greater than in Class I patients. Patients with a Class I skeletal pattern showed significantly wider mandibular buccolingual alveolar processes than did Class II patients (between the first and second molars) at 4, 6, and 8 mm below the CEJ. Conclusion In both the maxilla and mandible, the mesiodistal distances, the width of the buccolingual alveolar process, and buccal cortical bone thickness tended to increase from the CEJ to the apex in both Class I and Class II skeletal patterns. PMID:27358819

  17. Splitting placodes: effects of bone morphogenetic protein and Activin on the patterning and identity of mouse incisors.

    PubMed

    Munne, Pauliina M; Felszeghy, Szabolcs; Jussila, Maria; Suomalainen, Marika; Thesleff, Irma; Jernvall, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    The single large rodent incisor in each jaw quadrant is evolutionarily derived from a mammalian ancestor with many small incisors. The embryonic placode giving rise to the mouse incisor is considerably larger than the molar placode, and the question remains whether this large incisor placode is a developmental requisite to make a thick incisor. Here we used in vitro culture system to experiment with the molecular mechanism regulating tooth placode development and how mice have thick incisors. We found that large placodes are prone to disintegration and formation of two to three small incisor placodes. The balance between one large or multiple small placodes was altered through the regulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Activin signaling. Exogenous Noggin, which inhibits BMP signaling, or exogenous Activin cause the development of two to three incisors. These incisors were more slender than normal incisors. Additionally, two inhibitor molecules, Sostdc1 and Follistatin, which regulate the effects of BMPs and Activin and have opposite expression patterns, are likely to be involved in the incisor placode regulation in vivo. Furthermore, inhibition of BMPs by recombinant Noggin has been previously suggested to cause a change in the tooth identity from the incisor to the molar. This evidence has been used to support a homeobox code in determining tooth identity. Our work provides an alternative interpretation, where the inhibition of BMP signaling can lead to splitting of the large incisor placode and the formation of partly separate incisors, thereby acquiring molar-like morphology without a change in tooth identity.

  18. Hydrolysis and Sulfation Pattern Effects on Release of Bioactive Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 from Heparin-Based Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Liane E.; Miller, Tobias; McDevitt, Todd C.; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as heparin are promising materials for growth factor delivery due to their ability to efficiently bind positively charged growth factors including bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) through their negatively charged sulfate groups. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine BMP-2 release from heparin-based microparticles (MPs) after first, incorporating a hydrolytically degradable crosslinker and varying heparin content within MPs to alter MP degradation and second, altering the sulfation pattern of heparin within MPs to vary BMP-2 binding and release. Using varied MP formulations, it was found that the time course of MP degradation for 1 wt% heparin MPs was ~4 days slower than 10 wt% heparin MPs, indicating that MP degradation was dependent on heparin content. After incubating 100 ng BMP-2 with 0.1 mg MPs, most MP formulations loaded BMP-2 with ~50% efficiency and significantly more BMP-2 release (60% of loaded BMP-2) was observed from more sulfated heparin MPs (MPs with ~100% and 80% of native sulfation). Similarly, BMP-2 bioactivity in more sulfated heparin MP groups was at least four-fold higher than soluble BMP-2 and less sulfated heparin MP groups, as determined by an established C2C12 cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay. Ultimately, the two most sulfated 10 wt% heparin MP formulations were able to efficiently load and release BMP-2 while enhancing BMP-2 bioactivity, making them promising candidates for future growth factor delivery applications.

  19. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  20. Pattern of primary tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone in children: retrospective survey of biopsy results

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Göret, Ceren Canbey; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuğba; Yanık, Serdar; Doğan, Meryem; Gönültaş, Aylin; Akkoca, Ayşe Neslin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although primary bone tumors are relatively uncommon, they constitute the most important tumors in patients less than 20 years. We aimed to determine the frequencies of primary bone tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone and the anatomical sites of their occurrence. Methods: A retrospective review of histopathology reports of all bone specimens received in a private pathology laboratory in Istanbul between 2009 and 2015. Results: A total of 57 patients (aged 5 to 18 years) with a mean of 13.12 years were studied. Thirty five patients (61.4%) were males and 22 (38.6%) were females. Fifty five (94.4%) of the tumors were benign. Osteochondroma was the commonest tumor accounting for 31 cases (54.3%) followed by osteoid osteoma, 9 cases (15.7%). Chondrosarcoma observed in two patients and Ewing sarcoma in one patient as malignant tumors. Of the 57 bone tumors 13 (22.8%) occurred in the upper extremities, while 44 (77.2%) were in the lower extremities. Proximal humerus was the most commonly involved site in upper extremity tumors, with osteochondromas representing the most frequent type of tumor (4 patients; 7%). In the lower extremities again osteochondromas were the most common type of tumor (8 cases, 14%), with the femur being the most common site of involvement (18 patients, 31.5%). Of the patients with tumor-like lesions; four patients had fibrous dysplasia, 4 patients had non-ossified fibromas, 4 patients had simple bone cysts and 3 had aneurismal bone cyst. Conclusion: This study showed that primary bone tumors were mainly benign, settled predominantly in the lower extremities mostly in the femur with a male preponderance. Osteochondroma was the most common benign bone tumor. We didn’t observed osteosarcoma, which is the most frequent malignant bone tumor. PMID:26617888

  1. Determinants of bone mass in Chinese women aged 21-40 years. II. Pattern of dietary calcium intake and association with bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Ho, S C; Leung, P C; Swaminathan, R; Chan, C; Chan, S S; Fan, Y K; Lindsay, R

    1994-05-01

    A study on the determinants of bone mass in young women is being carried out among 287 young Chinese women aged 21-40 years. The baseline cross-sectional data show that the mean dietary calcium intake, estimated from the quantitative food frequency method, was 448 mg/day (standard deviation = 219). About 50% of the calcium source was from vegetables and 22% from dairy products. Among women aged 21-30 years, those with a dietary calcium intake of at least 600 mg/day had a 4%-7% higher mean bone mineral density at the spine and femur when compared with those with a mean intake below 300 mg/day. In women aged 31-40 years, subjects belonging to the highest quartile of calcium density (> or = 35 mg/420 kJ) had a 3%-8% higher mean bone mineral density at the spine and femur when compared with those in the lowest quartile (< 20.8 mg/420 kJ). Favorable calcium intake is beneficial in this population of young women with habitual low dietary calcium intake.

  2. Chloride–hydrogen antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5 drive osteoblast mineralization and regulate fine-structure bone patterning in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Larrouture, Quitterie C; Nelson, Deborah J; Robinson, Lisa J; Liu, Li; Tourkova, Irina; Schlesinger, Paul H; Blair, Harry C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoblasts form an epithelium-like layer with tight junctions separating bone matrix from extracellular fluid. During mineral deposition, calcium and phosphate precipitation in hydroxyapatite liberates 0.8 mole of H+ per mole Ca+2. Thus, acid export is needed for mineral formation. We examined ion transport supporting osteoblast vectorial mineral deposition. Previously we established that Na/H exchangers 1 and 6 are highly expressed at secretory osteoblast basolateral surfaces and neutralize massive acid loads. The Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1), a pdz-organizing protein, occurs at mineralizing osteoblast basolateral surfaces. We hypothesized that high-capacity proton transport from matrix into osteoblast cytosol must exist to support acid transcytosis for mineral deposition. Gene screening in mineralizing osteoblasts showed dramatic expression of chloride–proton antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5. Antibody localization showed that ClC-3 and ClC-5 occur at the apical secretory surface facing the bone matrix and in membranes of buried osteocytes. Surprisingly, the Clcn3−/− mouse has only mildly disordered mineralization. However, Clcn3−/− osteoblasts have large compensatory increases in ClC-5 expression. Clcn3−/− osteoblasts mineralize in vitro in a striking and novel trabecular pattern; wild-type osteoblasts form bone nodules. In mesenchymal stem cells from Clcn3−/− mice, lentiviral ClC-5 shRNA created Clcn3−/−, ClC-5 knockdown cells, validated by western blot and PCR. Osteoblasts from these cells produced no mineral under conditions where wild-type or Clcn3−/− cells mineralize well. We conclude that regulated acid export, mediated by chloride–proton exchange, is essential to drive normal bone mineralization, and that CLC transporters also regulate fine patterning of bone. PMID:26603451

  3. Chloride-hydrogen antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5 drive osteoblast mineralization and regulate fine-structure bone patterning in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larrouture, Quitterie C; Nelson, Deborah J; Robinson, Lisa J; Liu, Li; Tourkova, Irina; Schlesinger, Paul H; Blair, Harry C

    2015-11-01

    Osteoblasts form an epithelium-like layer with tight junctions separating bone matrix from extracellular fluid. During mineral deposition, calcium and phosphate precipitation in hydroxyapatite liberates 0.8 mole of H(+) per mole Ca(+2). Thus, acid export is needed for mineral formation. We examined ion transport supporting osteoblast vectorial mineral deposition. Previously we established that Na/H exchangers 1 and 6 are highly expressed at secretory osteoblast basolateral surfaces and neutralize massive acid loads. The Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1), a pdz-organizing protein, occurs at mineralizing osteoblast basolateral surfaces. We hypothesized that high-capacity proton transport from matrix into osteoblast cytosol must exist to support acid transcytosis for mineral deposition. Gene screening in mineralizing osteoblasts showed dramatic expression of chloride-proton antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5. Antibody localization showed that ClC-3 and ClC-5 occur at the apical secretory surface facing the bone matrix and in membranes of buried osteocytes. Surprisingly, the Clcn3(-/-) mouse has only mildly disordered mineralization. However, Clcn3(-/-) osteoblasts have large compensatory increases in ClC-5 expression. Clcn3(-/-) osteoblasts mineralize in vitro in a striking and novel trabecular pattern; wild-type osteoblasts form bone nodules. In mesenchymal stem cells from Clcn3(-/-) mice, lentiviral ClC-5 shRNA created Clcn3(-/-), ClC-5 knockdown cells, validated by western blot and PCR. Osteoblasts from these cells produced no mineral under conditions where wild-type or Clcn3(-/-) cells mineralize well. We conclude that regulated acid export, mediated by chloride-proton exchange, is essential to drive normal bone mineralization, and that CLC transporters also regulate fine patterning of bone.

  4. Chloride-hydrogen antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5 drive osteoblast mineralization and regulate fine-structure bone patterning in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larrouture, Quitterie C; Nelson, Deborah J; Robinson, Lisa J; Liu, Li; Tourkova, Irina; Schlesinger, Paul H; Blair, Harry C

    2015-11-01

    Osteoblasts form an epithelium-like layer with tight junctions separating bone matrix from extracellular fluid. During mineral deposition, calcium and phosphate precipitation in hydroxyapatite liberates 0.8 mole of H(+) per mole Ca(+2). Thus, acid export is needed for mineral formation. We examined ion transport supporting osteoblast vectorial mineral deposition. Previously we established that Na/H exchangers 1 and 6 are highly expressed at secretory osteoblast basolateral surfaces and neutralize massive acid loads. The Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1), a pdz-organizing protein, occurs at mineralizing osteoblast basolateral surfaces. We hypothesized that high-capacity proton transport from matrix into osteoblast cytosol must exist to support acid transcytosis for mineral deposition. Gene screening in mineralizing osteoblasts showed dramatic expression of chloride-proton antiporters ClC-3 and ClC-5. Antibody localization showed that ClC-3 and ClC-5 occur at the apical secretory surface facing the bone matrix and in membranes of buried osteocytes. Surprisingly, the Clcn3(-/-) mouse has only mildly disordered mineralization. However, Clcn3(-/-) osteoblasts have large compensatory increases in ClC-5 expression. Clcn3(-/-) osteoblasts mineralize in vitro in a striking and novel trabecular pattern; wild-type osteoblasts form bone nodules. In mesenchymal stem cells from Clcn3(-/-) mice, lentiviral ClC-5 shRNA created Clcn3(-/-), ClC-5 knockdown cells, validated by western blot and PCR. Osteoblasts from these cells produced no mineral under conditions where wild-type or Clcn3(-/-) cells mineralize well. We conclude that regulated acid export, mediated by chloride-proton exchange, is essential to drive normal bone mineralization, and that CLC transporters also regulate fine patterning of bone. PMID:26603451

  5. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  6. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  7. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D; Dharmshaktu, P; Aggarwal, A; Gaurav, K; Bansal, R; Devru, N; Garga, UC; Kulshreshtha, B

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) loss in endocrinopathies [Graves’ disease (GD), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH), hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH), hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT)] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO), andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126) were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (79.59%) compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001). The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%), HyperH (85%), and HypoH (59.26%) compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT) was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67%) and HypoH (54.55%) compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001). Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting. PMID:27241810

  8. Markers of bone resorption and calcium metabolism are related to dietary intake patterns in male and female bed rest subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. r.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary potassium and protein intakes predict net endogenous acid production in humans. Intracellular buffers, including exchangeable bone mineral, play a crucial role in balancing chronic acid-base perturbations in the body; subsequently, chronic acid loads can potentially contribute to bone loss. Bone is lost during space flight, and a dietary countermeasure would be desirable for many reasons. We studied the ability of diet protein and potassium to predict levels of bone resorption markers in males and females. Identical twin pairs (8 M, 7 F) were assigned to 2 groups: bed rest (sedentary, SED) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (EX). Diet was controlled for 3 d before and 30 d of bed rest (BR). Urinary Ca, N-telopeptide (NTX), and pyridinium crosslinks (PYD) were measured before and on days 5, 12, 19, and 26 of BR. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation (P<0.05). The ratio of dietary animal protein/potassium intake was not correlated with NTX before BR for males or females, but they were positively correlated in both groups of males during bed rest. Dietary animal protein/potassium and urine Ca were correlated before and during bed rest for the males, and only during bed rest for the females. Conversely, the ratio of dietary vegetable protein/potassium intake was negatively correlated with urinary calcium during bed rest for the females, but there was no relationship between vegetable protein/potassium intake and bone markers for the males. These data suggest that the ratio of animal protein/potassium intake may affect bone, particularly in bed rest subjects. These data show that the type of protein and gender may be additional factors that modulate the effect of diet on bone metabolism during bed rest. Altering this ratio may help prevent bone loss on Earth and during space flight.

  9. The Semantics of Proper Names and Other Bare Nominals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izumi, Yu

    2012-01-01

    This research proposes a unified approach to the semantics of the so-called bare nominals, which include proper names (e.g., "Mary"), mass and plural terms (e.g., "water," "cats"), and articleless noun phrases in Japanese. I argue that bare nominals themselves are monadic predicates applicable to more than one…

  10. Energy Availability and Dietary Patterns of Adult Male and Female Competitive Cyclists With Lower Than Expected Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Viner, Rebecca T; Harris, Margaret; Berning, Jackie R; Meyer, Nanna L

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess energy availability (EA) and dietary patterns of 10 adult (29-49 years) male (n = 6) and female (n = 4) competitive (USA Cycling Category: Pro, n = 2; 1-4, n = 8) endurance cyclists (5 road, 5 off-road), with lower than expected bone mineral density (BMD; Z score < 0) across a season. Energy intake (EI) and exercise energy expenditure during preseason (PS), competition (C), and off-season (OS) were estimated from 3-day dietary records, completed once per month, across a cycling season. BMD was measured by DXA at 0 months/5 months/10 months. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) was used to assess cognitive dietary restraint. Seventy percent of participants had low EA [(LEA); < 30 kcal · kg fat-free mass (FFM) (-1) · day(-1)] during PS, 90% during C, and 80% during OS (range: 3-37 kcal · kg FFM(-1) · day(-1)). Ninety percent of cyclists had LEA during ≥ 1 training period, and 70% had LEA across the season. Seventy percent of cyclists were identified as restrained eaters who consciously restrict EI as a means of weight control. Mean daily carbohydrate intake was below sport nutrition recommendations during each training period (PS: 3.9 ± 1.1 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p < .001; C: 4.3 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .005; OS: 3.7 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .01). There were no differences in EA and EI · kg(-1) between male and female cyclists and road and off-road cyclists. Low EI, and specifically low carbohydrate intake, appears to be the main contributor to chronic LEA in these cyclists. Adult male and female competitive road and off-road cyclists in the United States may be at risk for long-term LEA. Further studies are needed to explore strategies to prevent and monitor long-term LEA in these athletes.

  11. Energy Availability and Dietary Patterns of Adult Male and Female Competitive Cyclists With Lower Than Expected Bone Mineral Density.

    PubMed

    Viner, Rebecca T; Harris, Margaret; Berning, Jackie R; Meyer, Nanna L

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess energy availability (EA) and dietary patterns of 10 adult (29-49 years) male (n = 6) and female (n = 4) competitive (USA Cycling Category: Pro, n = 2; 1-4, n = 8) endurance cyclists (5 road, 5 off-road), with lower than expected bone mineral density (BMD; Z score < 0) across a season. Energy intake (EI) and exercise energy expenditure during preseason (PS), competition (C), and off-season (OS) were estimated from 3-day dietary records, completed once per month, across a cycling season. BMD was measured by DXA at 0 months/5 months/10 months. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) was used to assess cognitive dietary restraint. Seventy percent of participants had low EA [(LEA); < 30 kcal · kg fat-free mass (FFM) (-1) · day(-1)] during PS, 90% during C, and 80% during OS (range: 3-37 kcal · kg FFM(-1) · day(-1)). Ninety percent of cyclists had LEA during ≥ 1 training period, and 70% had LEA across the season. Seventy percent of cyclists were identified as restrained eaters who consciously restrict EI as a means of weight control. Mean daily carbohydrate intake was below sport nutrition recommendations during each training period (PS: 3.9 ± 1.1 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p < .001; C: 4.3 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .005; OS: 3.7 ± 1.4 g · kg(-1) · day(-1), p = .01). There were no differences in EA and EI · kg(-1) between male and female cyclists and road and off-road cyclists. Low EI, and specifically low carbohydrate intake, appears to be the main contributor to chronic LEA in these cyclists. Adult male and female competitive road and off-road cyclists in the United States may be at risk for long-term LEA. Further studies are needed to explore strategies to prevent and monitor long-term LEA in these athletes. PMID:26131616

  12. Changes of the mineralization pattern in the subchondral bone plate of the glenoid cavity in the shoulder joints of the throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Natsu, Koji; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of mineralization in the subchondral bone plate (DMSB) is used as a parameter for individual stress distribution of shoulder joints. We have analyzed 28 shoulder joints of throwing athletes by DMSB of the glenoid with computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry and described their mineralization patterns. The throwing motion imposes a heavy rotational load on the shoulder joint, and this, in turn, may lead to excessive translation of the humeral head on the glenoid. This could explain why the two most frequent density maxima were localized to the anterior and posterior portions of the glenoid. Our finding of a frequent bicentric density distribution of the shoulder joints of throwing athletes should be useful in any future analysis of the relationship between the DMSB and the bone morphology of the glenoid.

  13. Antlers on the Arctic Refuge: capturing multi-generational patterns of calving ground use from bones on the landscape.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua H; Druckenmiller, Patrick; Bahn, Volker

    2013-05-22

    Bone accumulations faithfully record historical ecological data on animal communities, and owing to millennial-scale bone survival on high-latitude landscapes, have exceptional potential for extending records on arctic ecosystems. For the Porcupine Caribou Herd, maintaining access to calving grounds on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR, Alaska) is a central management concern. However, variability in calving ground geography over the 30+ years of monitoring suggests establishing the impacts of climate change and potential petroleum development on future calving success could benefit from extended temporal perspectives. Using accumulations of female antlers (shed within days of calving) and neonatal skeletons, we test if caribou calving grounds develop measureable and characteristic bone accumulations and if skeletal data may be helpful in establishing a fuller, historically integrated understanding of landscape and habitat needs. Bone surveys of an important ANWR calving area reveal abundant shed antlers (reaching 10(3) km(-2)) and high proportional abundance of newborn skeletal individuals (up to 60% neonate). Openly vegetated riparian terraces, which compose less than 10 per cent of ANWR calving grounds, yield significantly higher antler concentrations than more abundant habitats traditionally viewed as primary calving terrain. Differences between habitats appear robust to potential differences in bone visibility. The distribution of antler weathering stages mirrors known multi-decadal calving histories and highlights portions of the antler accumulation that probably significantly extends records of calving activity. Death assemblages offer historically integrated ecological data valuable for the management and conservation of faunas across polar latitudes. PMID:23536601

  14. In vivo bone strain patterns in the zygomatic arch of macaques and the significance of these patterns for functional interpretations of craniofacial form.

    PubMed

    Hylander, W L; Johnson, K R

    1997-02-01

    It has been proposed that the mammalian facial skeleton is optimized for countering or dissipating masticatory stress. As optimized load-bearing structures by definition exhibit maximum strength with a minimum amount of material, this hypothesis predicts that during chewing and biting there should be relatively high and near uniform amounts of strain throughout the facial skeleton. If levels of strain in certain areas of the facial skeleton are relatively low during these behaviors, this indicates that the amount of bone mass in these areas could be significantly reduced without resulting in the danger of structural failure due to repeated masticatory loads. Furthermore, and by definition, this indicates that these areas are not optimized for countering masticatory stress, and instead their overall morphology and concentration of bone mass has most likely been selected or influenced mainly by factors unrelated to the dissipation or countering of chewing and biting forces. An analysis of in vivo bone strain along the lateral aspect of the zygomatic arch of macaques indicates the clear absence of a high and near uniform strain environment throughout its extent. Instead, there is a steep strain gradient along the zygomatic arch, with the highest strains along its anterior portion, intermediate strains along its middle portion, and the lowest strains along its posterior portion. These data, in combination with earlier published data (Hylander et al., 1991), indicate that levels of functional strains during chewing and biting are highly variable from one region of the face to the next, and therefore it is unlikely that all facial bones are especially designed so as to minimize bone tissue and maximize strength for countering masticatory loads. Thus, the functional significance of the morphology of certain facial bones need not necessarily bear any important or special relationship to routine and habitual cyclical mechanical loads associated with chewing or biting

  15. Resolving the anomaly of bare habitable ground in Daisyworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Robin K. S.; Mitchell, Neil

    2011-02-01

    The parable of Daisyworld places biological homeostasis on a non-teleological basis. However, one feature of Daisyworld is that, at equilibrium, the system appears to require habitable but bare ground. The presence of bare ground is an unavoidable consequence of the death rate parameter γ. Here, we simplify Watson and Lovelock's original formulation by removing γ and allowing instead the black and white daisies to infiltrate each others' territory. This device furnishes a model in which the area of bare ground asymptotically approaches zero. The infiltration process is modelled in terms of a parameter that is ecologically interpretable as a quantification of the incumbent advantage enjoyed by the dominant species.

  16. 38. BARED MASONRY WALL USED TO FASTEN CLAPBOARDS. THE WOODEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. BARED MASONRY WALL USED TO FASTEN CLAPBOARDS. THE WOODEN VERTICAL MEMBER IS A STUD. THE WOODEN BLOCK IS A MORTISE-AND-TENON JOINT. - Andalusia, State Road vicinity (Bensalem Township), Andalusia, Bucks County, PA

  17. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF MEMORIAL CEMETERY SHOWING HOSPITAL COMPLEX BARELY VISIBLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST OF MEMORIAL CEMETERY SHOWING HOSPITAL COMPLEX BARELY VISIBLE THROUGH THE DISTANT TREES - Bath National Cemetery, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Juan Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  18. Novel 3D scaffold with enhanced physical and cell response properties for bone tissue regeneration, fabricated by patterned electrospinning/electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Fatemeh; Mirzadeh, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Developing three dimensional scaffolds mimicking the nanoscale structure of native extracellular matrix is a key parameter in tissue regeneration. In this study, we aimed to introduce a novel 3D structures composed of nanofibers (NF) and micro particles (MP) and compare their efficiency with 2D nanofibrous scaffold. The conventional nanofibrous PCL scaffolds are 2D mats fabricated by the electrospinning technique, whereas the NF/MP and patterned NF/MP PCL scaffolds are three dimensional structures fabricated by a modified electrospinning/electrospraying technique. The mentioned method was carried out by varying the electrospinning solution parameters and use of a metal mesh as the collector. Detailed fabrication process and morphological properties of the fabricated structures is discussed and porosity, pore size and PBS solution absorption value of the prepared structures are reported. Compared with the 2D structure, 3D scaffolds possessed enhanced porosity and pore size which led to the significant increase in their water uptake capacity. In vitro cell experiments were carried out on the prepared structures by the use of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line. The fabricated 3D structures offered significantly increased cell attachment, spread and diffusion which were confirmed by SEM analysis. In vitro cytocompatibility assessed by MTT colorimetric assay indicated a continuous cell proliferation over 21 days on the innovative 3D structure, while on 2D mat cell proliferation stopped at early time points. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of the seeded MG-63 cells on 3D scaffold was confirmed by the remarkable ALP activity together with increased and accelerated calcium deposition on this structure compared to 2D mat. Massive and well distributed bone minerals formed on patterned 3D structure were shown by EDX analysis. In comparison between NF/MP quasi-3D and Patterned NF/MP 3D scaffolds, patterned structures proceeded in all of the above properties. As such, the

  19. Novel 3D scaffold with enhanced physical and cell response properties for bone tissue regeneration, fabricated by patterned electrospinning/electrospraying.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Fatemeh; Mirzadeh, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Developing three dimensional scaffolds mimicking the nanoscale structure of native extracellular matrix is a key parameter in tissue regeneration. In this study, we aimed to introduce a novel 3D structures composed of nanofibers (NF) and micro particles (MP) and compare their efficiency with 2D nanofibrous scaffold. The conventional nanofibrous PCL scaffolds are 2D mats fabricated by the electrospinning technique, whereas the NF/MP and patterned NF/MP PCL scaffolds are three dimensional structures fabricated by a modified electrospinning/electrospraying technique. The mentioned method was carried out by varying the electrospinning solution parameters and use of a metal mesh as the collector. Detailed fabrication process and morphological properties of the fabricated structures is discussed and porosity, pore size and PBS solution absorption value of the prepared structures are reported. Compared with the 2D structure, 3D scaffolds possessed enhanced porosity and pore size which led to the significant increase in their water uptake capacity. In vitro cell experiments were carried out on the prepared structures by the use of MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line. The fabricated 3D structures offered significantly increased cell attachment, spread and diffusion which were confirmed by SEM analysis. In vitro cytocompatibility assessed by MTT colorimetric assay indicated a continuous cell proliferation over 21 days on the innovative 3D structure, while on 2D mat cell proliferation stopped at early time points. Enhanced osteogenic differentiation of the seeded MG-63 cells on 3D scaffold was confirmed by the remarkable ALP activity together with increased and accelerated calcium deposition on this structure compared to 2D mat. Massive and well distributed bone minerals formed on patterned 3D structure were shown by EDX analysis. In comparison between NF/MP quasi-3D and Patterned NF/MP 3D scaffolds, patterned structures proceeded in all of the above properties. As such, the

  20. Killing, letting die and the bare difference argument.

    PubMed

    Perrett, Roy W

    1996-04-01

    I believe that there is no intrinsic moral difference between killing and letting die. That is, there is no difference that depends solely on the distinction between an act and an omission. I also believe that we can reasonably establish this thesis by appeal to the Bare Difference Argument. The form of this argument involves considering two imaginary cases in which there are no morally relevant differences present, save the bare difference that one is a case of killing and one a case of letting die. But in the pair of cases under consideration this bare difference makes no moral difference. Hence it cannot be that the bare difference between killing and letting die is in itself a morally important difference. Winston Nesbitt has recently argued that the Bare Difference Argument fails because "the examples produced typically possess a feature which makes their use in this context illegitimate, and that when modified to remove this feature, they provide support for the view which they were designed to undermine". I argue that Nesbitt misunderstands the logic of the Bare Difference Argument and that accordingly his objections are mistaken.

  1. Differential effects of grammatical gender and gender inflection in bare noun production.

    PubMed

    Paolieri, Daniela; Lotto, Lorella; Leoncini, Debora; Cubelli, Roberto; Job, Remo

    2011-02-01

    In a new series of experiments with the picture-word interference paradigm, we replicated the grammatical gender interference effect in bare noun production in Italian: naming times are slower to picture-word noun pairs sharing the same gender. This effect is independent from the morphological transparency for gender, but responses are significantly slower when the distracters are transparent for gender. Overall, the pattern of results supports the assumption that in bare noun production grammatical gender is always selected, at least in languages like Italian. We assume that the differential effects of the nominal endings are due to the mechanisms involved in the recognition of grammatical gender of the distracter nouns which are sensitive to the morphological transparency for gender: lexical representation of transparent written words leads to a higher level of activation, thus resulting in stronger gender interference. PMID:21241283

  2. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Contact Pattern between the Cortical Bone and Femoral Prosthesis after Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hajime; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The cementless stem Excia (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) implant has a rectangular cross-sectional shape with back-and-forth flanges and a plasma-sprayed, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating from the middle to proximal portion to increase initial fixation and early bone formation. Here, the conformity of the Excia stem to the femoral canal morphology was three-dimensionally assessed using computed tomography. Forty-three patients (45 hips) were examined after primary total hip arthroplasty with a mean follow-up of 27 ± 3 months (range: 24–36 months). Spot welds occurred at zone 2 in 16 hips and at zone 6 in 24 hips, with 83% (20/24 hips) of those occurring within 3 months after surgery. First- (n = 12 hips), second- (n = 32), and third- (n = 1) degree stress shielding were observed. The stem was typically in contact with the cortical bone in the anterolateral mid-portion (100%) and posteromedial distal portions (85%). Stress shielding did not progress, even in cases where the stems were in contact with the distal portions. The anterior flange was in contact with the bone in all cases. The stability of the mid-lateral portion with the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating and the anterior flange may have inhibited the progression of stress shielding beyond the second degree. PMID:26881087

  3. Mouse NK cell–mediated rejection of bone marrow allografts exhibits patterns consistent with Ly49 subset licensing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Alvarez, Maite; Ames, Erik; Barao, Isabel; Chen, Mingyi; Longo, Dan L.; Redelman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can mediate the rejection of bone marrow allografts and exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory/activating receptors that can bind MHC. In vitro data have shown that NK subsets bearing Ly49 receptors for self-MHC class I have intrinsically higher effector function, supporting the hypothesis that NK cells undergo a host MHC-dependent functional education. These subsets also play a role in bone marrow cell (BMC) allograft rejection. Thus far, little in vivo evidence for this preferential licensing across mouse strains with different MHC haplotypes has been shown. We assessed the intrinsic response potential of the different Ly49+ subsets in BMC rejection by using β2-microglobulin deficient (β2m−/−) mice as donors. Using congenic and allogeneic mice as recipients and depleting the different Ly49 subsets, we found that NK subsets bearing Ly49s, which bind “self-MHC” were found to be the dominant subset responsible for β2m−/− BMC rejection. This provides in vivo evidence for host MHC class I–dependent functional education. Interestingly, all H2d strain mice regardless of background were able to resist significantly greater amounts of β2m−/−, but not wild-type BMC than H2b mice, providing evidence that the rheostat hypothesis regarding Ly49 affinities for MHC and NK-cell function impacts BMC rejection capability. PMID:22184406

  4. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  5. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  6. Development of a 'bare-earth' SRTM DEM product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Paiva, Rodrigo; Durand, Michael; Alsdorf, Douglas; Bates, Paul

    2015-04-01

    We present the methodology and results from the development of a near-global 'bare-earth' Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. Digital Elevation Models are the most important input for hydraulic modelling, as the DEM quality governs the accuracy of the model outputs. While SRTM is currently the best near-globally [60N to 60S] available DEM, it requires adjustments to reduce the vegetation contamination and make it useful for hydrodynamic modelling over heavily vegetated areas (e.g. tropical wetlands). Unlike previous methods of accounting for vegetation contamination, which concentrated on correcting relatively small areas and usually applied a static adjustment, we account for vegetation contamination globally and apply a spatial varying correction, based on information about canopy height and density. In creating the final 'bare-earth' SRTM DEM dataset, we produced three different 'bare-earth' SRTM products. The first applies global parameters, while the second and third products apply parameters that are regionalised based on either climatic zones or vegetation types, respectively. We also tested two different canopy density proxies of different spatial resolution. Using ground elevations obtained from the ICESat GLA14 satellite altimeter, we calculate the residual errors for the raw SRTM and the three 'bare-earth' SRTM products and compare performances. The three 'bare-earth' products all show large improvements over the raw SRTM in vegetated areas with the overall mean bias reduced by between 75 and 92% from 4.94 m to 0.40 m. The overall standard deviation is reduced by between 29 and 33 % from 7.12 m to 4.80 m. As expected, improvements are higher in areas with denser vegetation. The final 'bare-earth' SRTM dataset is available at 3 arc-second with lower vertical height errors and less noise than the original SRTM product.

  7. Patterns of hematopoietic chimerism following bone marrow transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia from volunteer unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Molloy, K; Goulden, N; Lawler, M; Cornish, J; Oakhill, A; Pamphilon, D; Potter, M; Steward, C; Langlands, K; Humphries, P; McCann, S R

    1996-04-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism was analyzed in serial bone marrow samples taken from 28 children following T-cell depleted unrelated donor bone marrow transplants (UD BMT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Chimeric status was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of simple tandem repeat (STR) sequences (maximal sensitivity, 0.1%). At least two serial samples were examined in 23 patients. Of these, two had evidence of complete donor engraftment at all times and eight showed stable low level mixed chimerism (MC) (<1% recipient hematopoiesis). All 10 of these patients remain in remission with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. By contrast, 13 patients demonstrated a progressive return of recipient hematopoiesis. Five of these relapsed (4 to 9 months post BMT), one died of cytomegalovirus pneumonitis and seven remain in remission with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Five children were excluded from serial analysis as two serial samples were not collected before either relapse (3) or graft rejection (2). We conclude that as with sibling transplants, ex vivo T depleted UD BMT in children with ALL is associated with a high incidence of MC. Stable donor engraftment and low level MC always correlated with continued remission. However, detection of a progressive return of recipient cells did not universally correlate with relapse, but highlighted those patients at greatest risk. Serial chimerism analysis by PCR of STRs provides a rapid and simple screening technique for the detection of relapse and the identification of patients with progressive MC who might benefit from detailed molecular analysis for minimal residual disease following matched volunteer UD BMT for childhood ALL.

  8. Comparison of expression patterns of fibroblast growth factor 8, bone morphogenetic protein 4 and sonic hedgehog in jaw development of the house shrew, Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Hidenao; Tabata, Makoto J; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Yasui, Kinya; Uemura, Masanori

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying jaw development in mammals, we used a new laboratory animal, Suncus murinus (house shrew, an insectivore) as the subject for the investigation, because Suncus has all types of teeth (incisor, canine, premolar and molar) in its upper and lower jaws and is thought to be a good model animal having a general mammalian tooth pattern. At the start, by use of degenerate primers we cloned Suncus homologues of fibroblast growth factor 8 (sFgf8), bone morphogenetic protein 4 (sBmp4) and sonic hedgehog (sShh) genes from cDNA library derived from whole Suncus embryos at day 12 (E12). Thereafter, we examined the expression patterns of these genes in the jaw development of Suncus E11-16 embryos (for mouse E9.5-12 embryos). sFgf8 and sBmp4 were expressed in E11 but not in E15 and onward during orofacial development. sShh was expressed from E11 onward, and its expression was increased in the orofacial area. The expression pattern of sFgf8 in the maxillary and mandibular arches of E14 coincided with the area of the presumptive tooth arch. However, sShh and sBmp4 were expressed only in the outer area (= buccal/labial side) of presumptive tooth arch. Thus, these 3 genes showed specific expression pattern in jaw development of Suncus, and their distributions did not overlap each other except in a few regions. These findings suggest that sFgf8, sBmp4 and sShh have a specific function respectively during jaw development in Suncus murinus.

  9. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity...

  10. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  11. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  12. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity...

  14. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  15. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  16. Different temporal patterns in the expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins and noggin during astroglial scar formation after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin A; Kang, Jihee Lee; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Eun-Mi

    2012-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their antagonists have roles in scar formation and regeneration after central nervous system injuries. However, temporal changes in their expression during astroglial scar formation in the ischemic brain are unknown. Here, we examined protein levels of BMP2, BMP7, and their antagonist noggin in the ischemic brain up to 4 weeks after experimental stroke in mice. BMP2 and BMP7 levels were increased from 1 to 4 weeks in the ischemic brain, and their expression was associated with astrogliosis. BMP7 expression was more intense and co-localized in reactive astrocytes in the ischemic subcortex at 1 week. Noggin expression began to increase after 2 weeks and was further increased at 4 weeks only in the ischemic subcortex, but the intensity was weak compared to the intensity of BMPs. Noggin was co-localized mainly in activated microglia. These findings show that expression of BMPs and noggin differed over time, in intensity and in types of cell, and suggest that BMPs and noggin have different roles in the processes of glial scar formation and neurorestoration in the ischemic brain.

  17. Evaluation of Bare Ground on Rangelands using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins

    2011-01-01

    Attention is currently being given to methods that assess the ecological condition of rangelands throughout the United States. There are a number of different indicators that assess ecological condition of rangelands. Bare Ground is being considered by a number of agencies and resource specialists as a lead indicator that can be evaluated over a broad area. Traditional methods of measuring bare ground rely on field technicians collecting data along a line transect or from a plot. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an alternative to collecting field data, can monitor a large area in a relative short period of time, and in many cases can enhance safety and time required to collect data. In this study, both fixed wing and helicopter UAVs were used to measure bare ground in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. The data were collected with digital imagery and read using the image analysis software SamplePoint. The approach was tested over seven different plots and compared against traditional field methods to evaluate accuracy for assessing bare ground. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho in locations where there is very little disturbance by humans and the area is grazed only by wildlife. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  18. Increase of T and B cells and altered BACH2 expression patterns in bone marrow trephines of imatinib-treated patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Von Laffert, Maximilian; Hänel, Mathias; Dietel, Manfred; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of imatinib on T and B cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is not well understood. An upregulation of the transcription factor Broad-complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-Brac and Cap‘n’collar 1 bZip transcription factor 2 (BACH2), which is involved in the development and differentiation of B cells, was demonstrated in a CML cell line treated with imatinib. The present study retrospectively analysed the expression and distribution of cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD20 and BACH2 (per 1,000 cells), as well as the co-expression of CD20 and BACH2, using immunohistochemistry in serial bone marrow trephines obtained from 14 CML patients treated with imatinib in comparison to 17 patients with newly diagnosed CML and 6 control trephines. Bone marrow trephines of CML patients in remission under imatinib therapy exhibited significantly higher numbers of CD3 and CD20 infiltrates (partly ordered in aggregates) compared with patients with newly diagnosed CML and control individuals. Similarly, nuclear expression of BACH2 in granulopoietic cells was increased in CML patients treated with imatinib, which may represent the histological correlate of the positive treatment effect. Furthermore, since BACH2 is involved in B cell development, its altered expression patterns by imatinib may be one explanation for high B cell numbers, as revealed by CD20/BACH2 (nuclear)-positive cells. As the present data are preliminary, future prospective studies are required to assess the prognostic and predictive role of BACH2 in patients with CML under targeted therapy. PMID:27698808

  19. Increase of T and B cells and altered BACH2 expression patterns in bone marrow trephines of imatinib-treated patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Von Laffert, Maximilian; Hänel, Mathias; Dietel, Manfred; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The effect of imatinib on T and B cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is not well understood. An upregulation of the transcription factor Broad-complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-Brac and Cap‘n’collar 1 bZip transcription factor 2 (BACH2), which is involved in the development and differentiation of B cells, was demonstrated in a CML cell line treated with imatinib. The present study retrospectively analysed the expression and distribution of cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD20 and BACH2 (per 1,000 cells), as well as the co-expression of CD20 and BACH2, using immunohistochemistry in serial bone marrow trephines obtained from 14 CML patients treated with imatinib in comparison to 17 patients with newly diagnosed CML and 6 control trephines. Bone marrow trephines of CML patients in remission under imatinib therapy exhibited significantly higher numbers of CD3 and CD20 infiltrates (partly ordered in aggregates) compared with patients with newly diagnosed CML and control individuals. Similarly, nuclear expression of BACH2 in granulopoietic cells was increased in CML patients treated with imatinib, which may represent the histological correlate of the positive treatment effect. Furthermore, since BACH2 is involved in B cell development, its altered expression patterns by imatinib may be one explanation for high B cell numbers, as revealed by CD20/BACH2 (nuclear)-positive cells. As the present data are preliminary, future prospective studies are required to assess the prognostic and predictive role of BACH2 in patients with CML under targeted therapy.

  20. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-01-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

  1. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  2. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-26

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), displaymore » less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.« less

  3. Radar reflectivity of bare and vegetation-covered soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Bradley, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Radar sensitivity to soil moisture content has been investigated experimentally for bare and vegetation-covered soil using detailed spectral measurements obtained by a truck-mounted radar spectrometer in the 1-8 GHz band and by airborne scatterometer observations at 1.6, 4.75, and 13.3 GHz. It is shown that radar can provide quantitative information on the soil moisture content of both bare and vegetation-covered soil. The observed soil moisture is in the form of the soil matric potential or a related quantity such as the percent of field capacity. The depth of the monitored layer varies from 1 cm for very wet soil to about 15 cm for very dry soil.

  4. Geological map of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Monsen, S.A.; Carr, M.D.; Reheis, M.C.; Orkild, P.P.

    1992-12-31

    Bare Mountain comprises the isolated complex of mountain peaks southeast of the town of Beatty in southern Nye County, Nevada. This small mountain range lies between the alluvial basins of Crater Flat to the east and the northern Amargosa Desert to the southwest. The northern boundary of the range is less well defined, but for this report, the terrane of faulted Miocene volcanic rocks underlying Beatty Mountain and the unnamed hills to the east are considered to be the northernmost part of Bare Mountain. The southern tip of the mountain range is at Black Marble, the isolated hill at the southeast corner of the map. The main body of the range, between Fluorspar Canyon and Black Marble, is a folded and complexly faulted, but generally northward-dipping (or southward-dipping and northward-overturned), sequence of weakly to moderately metamorphosed upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic marine strata, mostly miogeoclinal (continental shelf) rocks. The geology of Bare Mountain is mapped at a scale of 1:24,000.

  5. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  6. The Facial Growth Pattern and the Amount of Palatal Bone Deficiency Relative to Cleft Size Should Be Considered in Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to determine the best surgical/orthodontic treatment plan for the complete bilateral and unilateral cleft lip and palate patient to achieve all treatment goals of facial aesthetics, speech, dental function, and psychosocial development. Methods: Review of 40 years of serial complete bilateral cleft lip and palate and complete unilateral cleft lip and palate dental casts and photographs from birth to adolescence, with serial cephs starting at 4 years. This was part of a multicenter international 3-dimensional palatal growth study of serial dental casts of patients who developed good speech, occlusion, and facial growth. Results: Nasoalveolar molding and gingivoperiosteoplasty were introduced without proven longitudinal benefits. The procedure bodily retruded the premaxilla, which “telescoped” backward causing synostosis at the premaxillary vomerine suture. The resulting midfacial recessiveness with an anterior dental crossbite can only be corrected by midfacial protraction or a Le Fort I surgery. Conclusions: Staged orthodontic/surgical treatment limiting premaxillary retraction forces to lip adhesion or forces that cause only premaxillary ventroflexion produce the best results. The palatal cleft should be closed between 18 and 24 months when the ratio of the cleft to the palatal size medial to the alveolar ridge is at least 10%. The protruding premaxilla should only be ventroflexed but never bodily retruded. The facial growth pattern and degree of palatal bone deficiency are the main items to be considered in treatment planning. PMID:27579230

  7. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  8. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  9. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  10. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  11. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  12. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  13. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  14. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  15. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  16. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  18. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  19. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  20. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  1. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  2. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for... reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps; and (2) For each basic model of bare or covered...

  3. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for... reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps; and (2) For each basic model of bare or covered...

  4. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact....35 Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for... reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps; and (2) For each basic model of bare or covered...

  5. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  6. Thermomechanical and isothermal fatigue behavior of bare and coated superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Y.; Sehitoglu, H.

    1996-01-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) and isothermal fatigue (IF) experiments were performed on bare Mar-M246 as well as bare and coated Mar-M247 nickel based superalloys at strain ranges from 0.335 to 1 percent. The experiments were conducted in air, through a temperature range of 500 to 1,038 C at a constant strain rate of 5.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} s{sup {minus}1}. Due to the coarse-grained structure of Mar-M246, TMF lives scattered considerably under low strain range conditions. Electron microscopy studies show that significant surface oxidation and gamma prime, {gamma}{prime}, depleted zones occur for Mar-M246 under these conditions. In the surface grain, where the change in {gamma}{prime} morphology is most pronounced, {gamma}{prime} rafted along axes {approx}{+-}45 deg from the loading axis. The influence of a protective coating on the IF and TMF lives of Mar-M247 was also examined. Results indicate that the coating does not significantly affect the fatigue lives of Mar-M247. The oxidation behavior of bare and coating Mar-M247 was investigated via X-ray microprobe and Auger Spectroscopy. Through these analyses, it is evident that the coating was completely degraded when exposed to the test environment for a long time. In both Mar-M246 and Mar-M247, in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF IP) loading resulted in intergranular cracking. TMF IP loading promoted multiple cracks at the coating/substrate interface of coating Mar-M247. Finally, Eshelby techniques were used to calculate stress distributions in the vicinity of a surface oxide and second-phase particle at the coating/substrate interface.

  7. Bare skin, blood and the evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Changizi, Mark A; Zhang, Qiong; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2006-06-22

    We investigate the hypothesis that colour vision in primates was selected for discriminating the spectral modulations on the skin of conspecifics, presumably for the purpose of discriminating emotional states, socio-sexual signals and threat displays. Here we show that, consistent with this hypothesis, there are two dimensions of skin spectral modulations, and trichromats but not dichromats are sensitive to each. Furthermore, the M and L cone maximum sensitivities for routine trichromats are optimized for discriminating variations in blood oxygen saturation, one of the two blood-related dimensions determining skin reflectance. We also show that, consistent with the hypothesis, trichromat primates tend to be bare faced.

  8. Evaporation Dynamics of Moss and Bare Soil in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, S.; Young, J. M.; Barron, C. G.; Bolton, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation dynamics of mosses is a critical process in boreal and arctic systems and represents a key uncertainty in hydrology and climate models. At this point, moss evaporation is not well quantified at the plot or landscape scale. Relative to bare soil or litter evaporation, moss evaporation can be challenging to predict because the water flux is not isolated to the moss surface. Evaporation can originate from nearly 10 cm below the surface. Some mosses can wick moisture from even deeper than 10 cm, which subsequently evaporates. The goal of this study was to use field measurements to quantify the moss evaporation dynamics in a coniferous forest relative to bare ground or litter evaporation dynamics in a deciduous forest in Interior Alaska. Measurements were made in two ecosystem types within the boreal forest of Interior Alaska: a deciduous forest devoid of moss and a coniferous forest with a thick moss layer. A small clear chamber was attached to a LiCor 840 infrared gas analyzer in a closed loop system with a low flow rate. Water fluxes were measured for ~ 90 seconds on each plot in dry and wet soil and moss conditions. Additional measurements included: soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, barometric pressure, dew point, relative humidity, and wind speed. Thermal infrared images were also captured in congruence with water flux measurements to determine skin temperature. We found that the moss evaporation rate was over 100% greater than the soil evaporation rate (0.057 g/min vs. 0.024 g/min), and evaporation rates in both systems were most strongly driven by relative humidity and surface temperature. Surface temperature was lower at the birch site than the black spruce site because trees shade the surface beneath the birch. High fluxes associated with high water content were sustained for a longer period of time over the mosses compared to the bare soil. The thermal IR data showed that skin temperature lagged the evaporation flux, such that the

  9. These Small Schools Pooled Resources to Beef Up Bare-Bones Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditzler, Lolita

    1984-01-01

    In the Midwest, three types of cooperation among rural school districts have supplemented rural schools' limited curricula and facilities: (1) shared classes, with cooperative transportation between schools; (2) shared classes via cable television; and (3) shared extracurricular activities. (JW)

  10. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  11. Bone Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types of primary bone cancer are: • Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common primary bone cancer. It ... Any bone can be affected by this cancer. Multiple myeloma affects approximately six people per 100,000 each ...

  12. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  13. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq(-1) and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm(-2) reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters. PMID:27678197

  14. Laser impingement on bare and encased high explosives: safety limits

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1999-03-15

    During the course of experiments involving high explosives, (HE), alignment lasers are often employed where the laser beam impinges upon a metal encased HE sample or on the bare HE itself during manned operations. While most alignment lasers are of low enough power so as not to be of concern, safety questions arise when considering the maximum credible power output of the laser in a failure mode, or when multiple laser spots are focused onto the experiment simultaneously. Safety questions also arise when the focused laser spot size becomes very small, on the order of 100 {micro}m or less. This paper addresses these concerns by describing a methodology for determining safety margins for laser impingement on metal encased HE as well as one for bare HE. A variety of explosives encased in Al, Cu, Ta and stainless steel were tested using the first of these techniques. Additional experiments were performed using the second method where the laser beam was focused directly on eight different samples of pressed-powder HE.

  15. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq(-1) and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm(-2) reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  16. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  17. High-performance, bare silver nanowire network transparent heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Orcun; Coskun, Sahin; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Emrah Unalan, Husnu

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanowire (Ag NW) networks are one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films in many different applications. Recently, Ag-NW-based transparent heaters (THs) showed excellent heating performance. In order to overcome the instability issues of Ag NW networks, researchers have offered different hybrid structures. However, these approaches not only require extra processing, but also decrease the optical performance of Ag NW networks. So, it is important to investigate and determine the thermal performance limits of bare-Ag-NW-network-based THs. Herein, we report on the effect of NW density, contact geometry, applied bias, flexing and incremental bias application on the TH performance of Ag NW networks. Ag-NW-network-based THs with a sheet resistance and percentage transmittance of 4.3 Ω sq‑1 and 83.3%, respectively, and a NW density of 1.6 NW μm‑2 reached a maximum temperature of 275 °C under incremental bias application (5 V maximum). With this performance, our results provide a different perspective on bare-Ag-NW-network-based transparent heaters.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Water Flow and Salt Transport in Bare Saline Soil Subjected to Transient Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Boufadel, M.; Saleh, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    It has been found that evaporation over bare soil plays an important role in subsurface solute transport processes. A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to transient evaporation. The bulk aerodynamic formulation was adopted to simulate transient evaporation rate at ground surface. Subsurface flow pattern, moisture distribution, and salt migration were quantified. Key factors likely affecting this process, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, air humidity, and surrounding water supply, were examined. The results showed that evaporation induced an upward flow pattern, which led to a high saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. In absence of surrounding water supply, as the humidity between the ground surface and air tended to equilibrium, evaporation-induced density gradient generated pore water circulations around the plume edge and caused the salt to migrate downwards with "finger" shapes. It was found that capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. Larger capillary fringe and/or lower air humidity would allow evaporation to extract more water from the ground. It would induce a larger and denser saline plume formed beneath the evaporation zone. The results also suggested that the presence of the surrounding water supply (represented as a constant water table herein) could provide a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface; meanwhile, in response to the evaporation, a hydraulic gradient was formed from the water supply boundary, which induced an inclined upper saline plume with greater density far from the supply boundary.

  19. Effect of serum from postmenopausal women with osteoporosis exhibiting the Kidney-Yang deficiency pattern on bone formation in an hFOB 1.19 human osteoblastic cell line

    PubMed Central

    LI, YACHAN; LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; YIN, LIANHUA; SHEN, JIANYING; KANG, JIE; DING, SHANSHAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanism of the Kidney-Yang deficiency (KYD) pattern of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women of a certain age range by comparing the effect of serum from postmenopausal women with osteoporosis exhibiting the KYD pattern with that of serum from postmenopausal women without osteoporosis on bone formation in an hFOB 1.19 human osteoblastic cell line. A random selection of 30 female, postmenopausal volunteers aged 60–70 years, including 15 cases without osteoporosis and 15 cases with the KYD pattern of osteoporosis, were enrolled at the Physical Examination Center of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Venous blood was extracted and the serum was separated. The hFOB 1.19 cells were treated with 10% KYD pattern-serum or control serum from postmenopausal women of the same age range without osteoporosis. It was found that the KYD pattern-serum significantly decreased the cell viability, activity of alkaline phosphatase and number of calcified nodules, as well as downregulated the expression of osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and upregulated that of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in the hFOB 1.19 cells. In addition, the present results showed that the concentrations of estradiol (E2), OPG and insulin-like factor-1 (IGF-1) in the KYD pattern-serum were lower than those in the control serum. In combination, these findings suggest that the downregulation of E2, OPG and IGF-1 in the KYD pattern-serum inhibits the OPG/RANKL system, leading to a decrease in bone formation in the hFOB 1.19 cells. This indicates that the alterations in E2, OPG and IGF-1 may account for the susceptibility of certain postmenopausal women to the KYD pattern of osteoporosis. PMID:26622445

  20. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  1. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of a passive and friction fit implant abutment interface and the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress distribution pattern on the implant and surrounding bone

    PubMed Central

    Sarfaraz, Hasan; Paulose, Anoopa; Shenoy, K. Kamalakanth; Hussain, Akhter

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the stress distribution pattern in the implant and the surrounding bone for a passive and a friction fit implant abutment interface and to analyze the influence of occlusal table dimension on the stress generated. Materials and Methods: CAD models of two different types of implant abutment connections, the passive fit or the slip-fit represented by the Nobel Replace Tri-lobe connection and the friction fit or active fit represented by the Nobel active conical connection were made. The stress distribution pattern was studied at different occlusal dimension. Six models were constructed in PRO-ENGINEER 05 of the two implant abutment connection for three different occlusal dimensions each. The implant and abutment complex was placed in cortical and cancellous bone modeled using a computed tomography scan. This complex was subjected to a force of 100 N in the axial and oblique direction. The amount of stress and the pattern of stress generated were recorded on a color scale using ANSYS 13 software. Results: The results showed that overall maximum Von Misses stress on the bone is significantly less for friction fit than the passive fit in any loading conditions stresses on the implant were significantly higher for the friction fit than the passive fit. The narrow occlusal table models generated the least amount of stress on the implant abutment interface. Conclusion: It can thus be concluded that the conical connection distributes more stress to the implant body and dissipates less stress to the surrounding bone. A narrow occlusal table considerably reduces the occlusal overload. PMID:26929518

  2. A Healthier Lifestyle Pattern for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Is Associated With Better Bone Mass in Southern Chinese Elderly Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-min; Wong, Carmen Ka Man; Wong, Samuel Yeung-shan; Leung, Jason; Tse, Lap Ah; Chan, Ruth; Woo, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lifestyle factors have been linked to bone health, however little is known about their combined impact on bone. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share some common pathophysiology. We aimed to assess whether higher adherence to American Heart Association diet and lifestyle recommendations (AHA-DLR) was associated with better bone health in Chinese elderly. This was a cross-sectional study using data from the largest population-based study on osteoporosis in Asia (Mr and Ms Os, Hong Kong). The study recruited 4000 independent walking Chinese men and women aged ≥65 year. Information on demographic, health, and lifestyle factors was obtained by standardized questionnaires. An overall lifestyle score was estimated based on a modified adherence index of AHA-DLR. Bone mineral measurements of the whole body, total hip, lumbar spine, and femoral neck were made by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Most lifestyle factors alone were not significantly associated bone mass. Overall lifestyle score in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile had significantly better bone mass at all sites in a dose–response manner. Every 10-unit of lifestyle score increase was associated with 0.005, 0.004, and 0.007 g/cm2 increases of bone mineral density (BMD) at whole body, femur neck, and total hip, respectively (all P < 0.05), and 13.2% (odds ratio 0.868; 95% CI 0.784, 0.961) decreased risk of osteoporosis at total hip after adjustment for potential covariates. Our study suggested that greater adherence to an overall healthy lifestyle for CVD risk reduction was associated with better bone mass among Chinese elderly. PMID:26252299

  3. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Bare Peat Surfaces on Permafrost Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repo, M. E.; Pitkämäki, A.; Biasi, C.; Seppälä, M.; Martikainen, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Pronounced warming predicted for the arctic areas may enhance the release of soil carbon and nitrogen as greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. While carbon dioxide and methane fluxes in high-latitude ecosystems have been widely investigated, fewer studies have been published on nitrous oxide (N2O) dynamics in the North. Although most pristine ecosystems in the Arctic do not emit N2O due to strict nitrogen limitation, recent findings show that there are specific surfaces capable of high N2O production and release (Repo et al., 2009). In this study we used a static chamber technique to study N2O emissions from bare peat surfaces on two subarctic permafrost peatland types, peat plateau and palsa mire. The peat plateau site is located in the discontinuous permafrost zone in Komi Republic, Russia (67°03' N, 62°57' E). Field data from this Russian site from snow-free season 2007 showed high emissions from peat circles (bare peat surfaces affected by cryoturbation; 1.9 to 31 mg N2O m-2 d-1) and negligible N2O release from all the vegetated surfaces (Repo et al. 2009). Peat circles were emitting N2O at rates comparable to those measured typically from agricultural and tropical soils. These observations were confirmed by field campaign in 2008. Partly vegetated palsas on the top of the peat plateau, included in the study in 2008, showed also significant N2O emissions, intermediate to those from peat circles and fully vegetated sites. No particularly high peak emissions were observed during cold season from either of the studied surfaces, in contrast to what has been reported from many boreal soils. To get evidence on the spatial coverage of high N2O emissions from subarctic peatlands, N2O emissions were measured from three palsa mires in Finnish Lapland (69°34'-69°50' N, 26°10'-27°10' E) during a short campaign in peak season 2009. The region has less permafrost extent and milder climatic conditions than the Russian site. Bare peat surfaces on palsas, created by wind

  4. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Casstevens, J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 {angstrom}, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29-100 mm{sup -1}. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufactureability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible for its unusual stability and polishability.

  5. Turbulence-induced thermal signatures over evaporating bare soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-07-01

    Soil wetness and airflow turbulence are key factors affecting surface energy balance components thereby influencing surface skin temperature. Turbulent eddies interacting with evaporating surfaces often induce localized and intermittent evaporative and sensible heat fluxes that leave distinct thermal signatures. These surface thermal fluctuations observable by infrared thermography (IRT) offer a means for characterization of overlaying turbulent airflows and remote quantification of surface wetness. We developed a theoretical and experimental methodology for using rapid IR surface temperature measurements to deduce surface wetness and evaporative fluxes from smooth bare soils. The mechanistic model provides theoretical links between surface thermal fluctuations, soil, and aerodynamic properties enabling thermal inferences of soil wetness with explicit consideration of soil thermal capacity and airflow turbulence effects. The method potentially improves accuracy of soil wetness assessment by IRT-based techniques whose performance is strongly influenced by surface-turbulence interactions and offers new ways for quantifying fluxes directly at their origin.

  6. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  7. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  8. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales. PMID:25437760

  9. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  10. Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Sanders, Cassandra; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dust minerals coated with soluble materials are not yet well understood. We determined ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw; 75 to 110%) for five different mineral dust types: (1) Arizona test dust, (2) illite, (3) montmorillonite, (4) K-feldspar, and (5) quartz. The particles were dry dispersed and size selected at 200 nm, and we determined the fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw. Under water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability. Under water-supersaturated conditions, however, we did not observe a significant coating effect (i.e., the bare and coated dust particles had nearly similar nucleating properties). X-ray diffraction patterns of the coated particles indicated that acid treatment altered the crystalline nature of the surface and caused structural disorder; thus, we concluded that the lack of such structured order reduced the ice nucleation efficiency of the coated particles in deposition ice nucleation mode. In addition, our single column model results show that coated particles significantly modify cloud properties such as ice crystal number concentration and ice water content compared to bare particles in water-subsaturated conditions. However, in water-supersaturated conditions, cloud properties differ only at warmer temperatures. These modeling results imply that future aged dust particle simulations should implement coating parameterizations to accurately predict cloud properties.

  11. Nitrogen controls spatial and temporal variability of substrate-induced respiration within seven years of bare fallow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Bornemann, Ludger; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2015-04-01

    Bare fallow management goes along with lacking supply of new C sources; yet, little is known on the spatio-temporal controls of microbial adaptation processes. Here we hypothesized that microbial activity parameters decline upon bare fallow but that their spatial patterns are increasingly controlled by nutrient status as fallow management proceeds. To test these hypotheses, we investigated spatial and temporal patterns of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration curves in an arable field after 1, 3, and 7 years of bare fallow but with large within-field heterogeneity of physicochemical soil parameters. The analyses comprised the contents of SOC, mineral nitrogen (Nmin), particulate organic matter (POM), texture of the fine earth, and the proportion of rock fragments as well as basal respiration and several SIR fitting parameters (microbial biomass, microbial growth rates, peak respiration rates, cumulative CO2 release) each with and without additions of mineral N and P. We also repeated substrate (i.e. glucose) additions following the first SIR measurement. The results revealed that most respiration parameters like basal respiration, microbial biomass, and growth rates showed no or inconsistent responses to spatial and temporal patterns of basic soil properties like SOC, Nmin or texture. However, bare fallow changed the shape of the SIR curves; it developed two distinct microbial growth peaks at advanced stages of fallow, i.e. a delayed CO2 release. Likewise, the maximum respiration rate during the first growth phase declined during 7 years of fallow by 47% but its spatial distribution was always correlated with Nmin contents (r = 0.43 - 0.79). The nutrient additions suggested that these changes in SIR curves were caused by N deficiency; the first peak increased after N additions while the second growth phase diminished. Intriguingly, a repeated glucose addition had a similar effect on the SIR curves as the glucose+N addition. Thus, N deficiency

  12. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography-Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nagle, David B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and submerged topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, acquired March 3, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  14. EAARL Topography - Vicksburg National Military Park 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi, acquired on March 6, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed

  15. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of select barrier islands and peninsular regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, acquired on June 27-30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using

  16. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey, acquired April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  17. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the

  18. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  19. Electron capture by bare ions on water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivarola, Roberto; Montenegro, Pablo; Monti, Juan; Fojón, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Single electron capture from water molecules by impact of bare ions is theoretically investigated at intermediate and high collision energies. This reaction is of fundamental importance to determine the deposition of energy in biological matter irradiated with ion beams (hadrontherapy), dominating other ionizing processes of the target at low-intermediate impact velocities and giving principal contributions to the energetic region where electronic stopping power maximizes. The dynamics of the interaction between the aggregates is described within the one active-electron continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. The orbitals of the target in the ground state are represented using the approximate self-consistent complete neglect of differential orbitals (SC-CNDO) model. The contribution of different molecular orbitals on the partial cross sections to selected n-principal quantum number projectile states is discriminated as well as the collaboration of these n-states on total cross sections. The latter ones are dominated by capture to n=1 states at high enough energies decreasing their contribution as n increases.

  20. Effect of soil property on evaporation from bare soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the actual evaporation rate from bare soils remains a challenging task as it not only associates with the atmospheric demand and liquid water saturation on the soil surface, but also the properties of the soils (e.g., porosity, pore size distribution). A physically based analytical model was developed to describe the surface resistance varying with the liquid water saturation near the soil surface. This model considers the soil pore size distribution, hydraulic connection between the main water cluster and capillary water in the soil surface when the soil surface is wet and the thickness of the dry soil layer when the soil surface is dry. The surface resistance model was then integrated to a numerical model based on water balance, heat balance and surface energy balance equations. The integrated model was validated by simulating water and heat transport processes during six soil column drying experiments. The analysis indicates that the when soil surface is wet, the consideration of pore size distribution in the surface resistance model offers better estimation of transient evaporation among different soil types than the estimations given by empirically based surface resistance models. Under fixed atmospheric boundary condition and liquid water saturation, fine sand has greater evaporation rate than coarse sand as stronger capillary force devlivers more water from the main water cluster. When the soil surface becomes dry, the impact of soil property to evaporation becomes trivial as the thickness of the dry soil layer turns to be the key factor to determine the evaporation rate.

  1. Delaminations of barely visible impact damage in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Rai, Badri

    CFRP laminates were impacted by projectiles of low masses, accelerated in an air gun, to have barely visible impact damage (BVID) to simulate damage to aircraft by runway debris. The delamination damage on individual interfaces was revealed by the destructive method of thin strips. In sub-BVID and BVID specimens, the damage was confined mostly to the front 30 percent of the laminate thickness. Delamination areas in the BVID specimens were found to be considerable - the largest dimension exceeding 12 mm on several interfaces. Nucleation of delamination damage was observed in interfaces adjacent to the mid plane in BVID specimens. At higher impact energies, about 110 to 150 percent more, the delamination damage was observed on almost all the interfaces with no sign of spalling at the rear surfaces. In comparison with a lightweight projectile of aluminum (4.4 g), a higher density steel projectile ( 11.8 g) caused more delamination damage for the same impact energy and an identical geometry of projectiles.

  2. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  3. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  4. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... may also be ordered to monitor the disease: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  5. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  6. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  7. Alcohol and bone.

    PubMed

    Mikosch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed across the world in different cultural and social settings. Types of alcohol consumption differ between (a) light, only occasional consumption, (b) heavy chronic alcohol consumption, and (c) binge drinking as seen as a new pattern of alcohol consumption among teenagers and young adults. Heavy alcohol consumption is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Osteoporosis is regularly mentioned as a secondary consequence of alcoholism, and chronic alcohol abuse is established as an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. The review will present the different mechanisms and effects of alcohol intake on bone mass, bone metabolism, and bone strength, including alcoholism-related "life-style factors" such as malnutrition, lack of exercise, and hormonal changes as additional causative factors, which also contribute to the development of osteoporosis due to alcohol abuse. PMID:24477631

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging pattern of bone marrow involvement as a new predictive parameter of disease progression in newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Song, Moo-Kon; Chung, Joo-Seop; Lee, Je-Jung; Min, Chang-Ki; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Lee, Sang-Min; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Bae, Sung-Hwa; Hong, Junshik; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lee, In-Sook; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the prognostic value of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of bone marrow involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). 126 patients with untreated MM indicated for ASCT underwent spine MRI and cytogenetic analysis at diagnosis. All patients received ASCT after induction therapy of VAD (vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone; n = 55) or a thalidomide-based regimen (TCD; n = 71). Thalidomide maintenance therapy was performed in 68 patients. The MRI pattern was normal in 27, focal in 47, and diffuse/variegated in 52 patients. Patients with the diffuse/variegated pattern showed significantly higher stage (P = 0·038), higher β-2 microglobulin level (P = 0·001) and severe anaemia (P = 0·015). However, the cytogenetics were not different among the MRI patterns (P = 0·890). Progression-free survival (PFS) was lower in the diffuse/variegated pattern (P = 0·002) than other patterns, but not overall survival (OS) (P = 0·058). Thalidomide maintenance therapy was correlated only with PFS (P = 0·001). High-risk cytogenetics were associated with both poorer PFS (P < 0·001) and OS (P = 0·003). In a multivariate analysis, the diffuse/variegated MRI pattern was an independent predictor of disease progression (Hazard Ratio, 1·922; 95% confidence interval, 1·185-3·118; P = 0·008). The diffuse/variegated MRI pattern is a novel prognostic factor for disease progression in MM patients eligible for ASCT.

  9. Multipotent human stromal cells isolated from cord blood, term placenta and adult bone marrow show distinct differences in gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Matigian, Nicholas; Brooke, Gary; Zaibak, Faten; Rossetti, Tony; Kollar, Katarina; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Heazlewood, Celena; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A; Atkinson, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human placenta (pMSCs), and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from cord blood share many properties with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs) and are currently in clinical trials for a wide range of clinical settings. Here we present gene expression profiles of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs), human placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs), and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs), all derived from four different donors. The microarray data are available on the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-TABM-880. Additionally, the data has been integrated into a public portal, www.stemformatics.org. Our data provide a resource for understanding the differences in MSCs derived from different tissues. PMID:26484151

  10. Multipotent human stromal cells isolated from cord blood, term placenta and adult bone marrow show distinct differences in gene expression pattern

    PubMed Central

    Matigian, Nicholas; Brooke, Gary; Zaibak, Faten; Rossetti, Tony; Kollar, Katarina; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Heazlewood, Celena; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A.; Atkinson, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human placenta (pMSCs), and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from cord blood share many properties with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs) and are currently in clinical trials for a wide range of clinical settings. Here we present gene expression profiles of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs), human placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs), and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs), all derived from four different donors. The microarray data are available on the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-TABM-880. Additionally, the data has been integrated into a public portal, www.stemformatics.org. Our data provide a resource for understanding the differences in MSCs derived from different tissues. PMID:26484151

  11. Field Investigations of Evaporation from a Bare Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evett, Steven Roy

    Selected components of the water and energy balances at the surface of a bare clay loam were measured at 57 locations in a 1 ha field. Spatial and temporal variability of these components were also studied. Components included evaporation, irrigation, moisture storage, sensible heat flux and long wave radiation. Sub-studies were conducted on irrigation uniformity under low pressure sprinklers; and, on steel versus plastic microlysimeters (ML) of various lengths. An energy balance model of evaporation, requiring minimal inputs, was developed and validated giving an r ^2 value of 0.78. Model improvements included an easy method of accurately estimating soil surface temperature at many points in a field, and an empirically fitted transfer coefficient function for the sensible heat flux from the reference dry soil. The omission of soil heat flux and reflected shortwave radiation terms was shown to reduce model accuracy. Steel ML underestimated cumulative evaporation compared to plastic ML at 20 and 30 cm lengths. Cumulative evaporation increased with ML length. The 10 and 20 cm ML were too short for use over multiple days but 30 cm ML may not be long enough for extended periods. Daily net soil heat flux for steel ML averaged 44% higher than that for both plastic ML and undisturbed field soil. Christiansen's uniformity coefficient (UCC) was close to 0.83 for each of 3 irrigations when measured by both catch cans and by profile water contents. But UCC for the change in storage due to irrigation averaged only 0.43 indicating than the high uniformity of profile water contents was more due to surface and subsurface redistribution than to the uniformity of application. Profile water contents and catch can depths were time invariant across at least 3 irrigations. Midday soil surface temperatures and daily evaporation were somewhat less time invariant. Variogram plots for evaporation and surface temperature showed mostly random behavior. Relative variograms represented well

  12. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  13. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A; Harris, William A

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  14. [Bare Soil Moisture Inversion Model Based on Visible-Shortwave Infrared Reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-po; Sun, Yue-jun; Qin, Qi-ming; Ren, Hua-zhong; Gao, Zhong-ling; Wu, Ling; Meng, Qing-ye; Wang, Jin-liang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Soil is the loose solum of land surface that can support plants. It consists of minerals, organics, atmosphere, moisture, microbes, et al. Among its complex compositions, soil moisture varies greatly. Therefore, the fast and accurate inversion of soil moisture by using remote sensing is very crucial. In order to reduce the influence of soil type on the retrieval of soil moisture, this paper proposed a normalized spectral slope and absorption index named NSSAI to estimate soil moisture. The modeling of the new index contains several key steps: Firstly, soil samples with different moisture level were artificially prepared, and soil reflectance spectra was consequently measured using spectroradiometer produced by ASD Company. Secondly, the moisture absorption spectral feature located at shortwave wavelengths and the spectral slope of visible wavelengths were calculated after analyzing the regular spectral feature change patterns of different soil at different moisture conditions. Then advantages of the two features at reducing soil types' effects was synthesized to build the NSSAI. Thirdly, a linear relationship between NSSAI and soil moisture was established. The result showed that NSSAI worked better (correlation coefficient is 0.93) than most of other traditional methods in soil moisture extraction. It can weaken the influences caused by soil types at different moisture levels and improve the bare soil moisture inversion accuracy. PMID:26672277

  15. [Bare Soil Moisture Inversion Model Based on Visible-Shortwave Infrared Reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-po; Sun, Yue-jun; Qin, Qi-ming; Ren, Hua-zhong; Gao, Zhong-ling; Wu, Ling; Meng, Qing-ye; Wang, Jin-liang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Soil is the loose solum of land surface that can support plants. It consists of minerals, organics, atmosphere, moisture, microbes, et al. Among its complex compositions, soil moisture varies greatly. Therefore, the fast and accurate inversion of soil moisture by using remote sensing is very crucial. In order to reduce the influence of soil type on the retrieval of soil moisture, this paper proposed a normalized spectral slope and absorption index named NSSAI to estimate soil moisture. The modeling of the new index contains several key steps: Firstly, soil samples with different moisture level were artificially prepared, and soil reflectance spectra was consequently measured using spectroradiometer produced by ASD Company. Secondly, the moisture absorption spectral feature located at shortwave wavelengths and the spectral slope of visible wavelengths were calculated after analyzing the regular spectral feature change patterns of different soil at different moisture conditions. Then advantages of the two features at reducing soil types' effects was synthesized to build the NSSAI. Thirdly, a linear relationship between NSSAI and soil moisture was established. The result showed that NSSAI worked better (correlation coefficient is 0.93) than most of other traditional methods in soil moisture extraction. It can weaken the influences caused by soil types at different moisture levels and improve the bare soil moisture inversion accuracy.

  16. Signaling context modulates social function of silent bared-teeth displays in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Beisner, Brianne A; McCowan, Brenda

    2014-02-01

    The signaling context has been found to change the meaning of the silent bared-teeth display (SBT) in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina) such that the SBT in apparently peaceful contexts communicates subordination, a long-term pattern of behavior, whereas in conflict contexts it communicates immediate submission (PNAS, 104: 1581-1586). However, the context dependent nature of the SBT has not yet been explored in other species. We investigated SBT usage with respect to grooming, severe aggression, and signaler-receiver sex, rank difference, and body size in seven captive groups of rhesus macaques. Peaceful SBTs were given most often to male receivers by male and female signalers whereas conflict SBTs were given to both male and female receivers primarily by female signalers. Male signalers rarely gave SBTs (peaceful or conflict) to female receivers. Unlike pigtail macaques, peaceful SBTs in rhesus were often accompanied by withdrawal behavior (referred to as peaceful SBT-leave), which influenced grooming, but not aggression, at the dyadic level. Severe aggression was less frequent among dyads using peaceful SBTs (regardless of withdrawal behavior) than those using conflict SBTs. In contrast, grooming was more frequent among dyads using peaceful SBT-stay signals than those using peaceful SBT-leave signals or conflict SBTs. In total, our results indicate that peaceful SBTs are a functionally different signal from conflict SBTs in rhesus macaques.

  17. Updates in biological therapies for knee injuries: bone.

    PubMed

    Kfuri, Mauricio; de Freitas, Rafael Lara; Batista, Bruno Bellaguarda; Salim, Rodrigo; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; Tavares, Ricardo Antonio; Araújo, Paulo Henrique

    2014-09-01

    Bone is a unique tissue because of its mechanical properties, ability for self-repair, and enrollment in different metabolic processes such as calcium homeostasis and hematopoietic cell production. Bone barely tolerates deformation and tends to fail when overloaded. Fracture healing is a complex process that in particular cases is impaired. Osteoprogenitor cells proliferation, growth factors, and a sound tridimensional scaffold at fracture site are key elements for new bone formation and deposition. Mechanical stability and ample vascularity are also of great importance on providing a proper environment for bone healing. From mesenchymal stem cells delivery to custom-made synthetic scaffolds, many are the biological attempts to enhance bone healing. Impaired fracture healing represents a real burden to contemporary society. Sound basic science knowledge has contributed to newer approaches aimed to accelerate and improve the quality of bone healing. PMID:25030275

  18. Updates in biological therapies for knee injuries: bone.

    PubMed

    Kfuri, Mauricio; de Freitas, Rafael Lara; Batista, Bruno Bellaguarda; Salim, Rodrigo; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira; Tavares, Ricardo Antonio; Araújo, Paulo Henrique

    2014-09-01

    Bone is a unique tissue because of its mechanical properties, ability for self-repair, and enrollment in different metabolic processes such as calcium homeostasis and hematopoietic cell production. Bone barely tolerates deformation and tends to fail when overloaded. Fracture healing is a complex process that in particular cases is impaired. Osteoprogenitor cells proliferation, growth factors, and a sound tridimensional scaffold at fracture site are key elements for new bone formation and deposition. Mechanical stability and ample vascularity are also of great importance on providing a proper environment for bone healing. From mesenchymal stem cells delivery to custom-made synthetic scaffolds, many are the biological attempts to enhance bone healing. Impaired fracture healing represents a real burden to contemporary society. Sound basic science knowledge has contributed to newer approaches aimed to accelerate and improve the quality of bone healing.

  19. Molecular markers based on LTR retrotransposons BARE-1 and Jeli uncover different strata of evolutionary relationships in diploid wheats.

    PubMed

    Konovalov, Fedor A; Goncharov, Nikolay P; Goryunova, Svetlana; Shaturova, Aleksandra; Proshlyakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    Molecular markers based on retrotransposon insertions are widely used for various applications including phylogenetic analysis. Multiple cases were described where retrotransposon-based markers, namely sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP), were superior to other marker types in resolving the phylogenetic relationships due to their higher variability and informativeness. However, the patterns of evolutionary relationships revealed by SSAP may be dependent on the underlying retrotransposon activity in different periods of time. Hence, the proper choice of retrotransposon family is essential for obtaining significant results. We compared the phylogenetic trees for a diverse set of diploid A-genome wheat species (Triticum boeoticum, T. urartu and T. monococcum) based on two unrelated retrotransposon families, BARE-1 and Jeli. BARE-1 belongs to Copia class and has a uniform distribution between common wheat (T. aestivum) genomes of different origin (A, B and D), indicating similar activity in the respective diploid genome donors. Gypsy-class family Jeli was found by us to be an A-genome retrotransposon with >70% copies residing in A genome of hexaploid common wheat, suggesting a burst of transposition in the history of A-genome progenitors. The results indicate that a higher Jeli transpositional activity was associated with T. urartu versus T. boeoticum speciation, while BARE-1 produced more polymorphic insertions during subsequent intraspecific diversification; as an outcome, each retrotransposon provides more informative markers at the corresponding level of phylogenetic relationships. We conclude that multiple retroelement families should be analyzed for an image of evolutionary relationships to be solid and comprehensive. PMID:20407790

  20. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  1. Mercury flux from naturally enriched bare soils during simulated cold weather cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Nicholas E.; Glassford, Shannon M.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

    2016-03-01

    Elemental mercury flux released from terrestrial surfaces is a critical area of research due to mercury's potent toxicity and persistency on a global scale. However, there is significant uncertainty surrounding mercury flux in colder environments. The objective of this research was to investigate and identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the release of elemental mercury flux from bare soils in cold weather temperature cycling under simulated laboratory conditions. Seasonal cycling scenarios, including freeze-thaw and sub-zero, were utilized to simulate Fall, Winter, and Spring. The results for both freeze-thaw and sub-zero cycles indicated that there are separate and distinct mechanisms present that promote elemental mercury flux at temperatures below 0°C. During the freeze-thaw cycles, the amount of flux released was linked to the amount of energy leaving and entering the system, respectively. During the sub-zero cycles, flux spikes were produced by the thin surface layer of soil and corresponded to air temperature minimums rather than soil temperature minimums. This rapid drop in temperature was speculated to force mercury from the ice structure, due to further freezing of the liquid water content, increasing the mercury concentration within the remaining water and creating a pathway that encourages volatilization to the atmosphere. This was not observed in the thin layer clean soil trials. Additionally, as the soil water content approached a field capacity of approximately 20%, the flux pattern was suppressed during freeze-thaw cycles, as the number of available interstitial pore spaces decreased. However, this pattern was not observed during sub-zero cycling, as the largest response was triggered with the highest water content.

  2. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  3. Exploiting Defect Clustering to Screen Bare Die for Infant Mortality Failure: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, David R., II; Singh, Adit D.

    1999-01-01

    We present the first experimental results to establish that a binning strategy based on defect clustering can be used to screen bare die for early life failures. The data for this study comes from the SEMATECH test methods experiment.

  4. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite (“gouge”) at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed. Key Points Gouge friction approaches that of bare surfaces at high normal stress Dehydration reactions and bulk melting in serpentinite in < 1 m of slip Flash heating causes dynamic frictional weakening in gouge and bare surfaces PMID:26167425

  5. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klein-Nulend, J; Bacabac, R G; Veldhuijzen, J P; Van Loon, J J W A

    2003-01-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGE2 production. Therefore it is possible that the

  6. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGEZ production. Therefore it is possible that the

  7. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  8. Low-fat, increased fruit, vegetable, and grain dietary pattern, fractures, and bone mineral density: the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial123

    PubMed Central

    Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wu, LieLing; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Watts, Nelson B; Tylavsky, Frances; Freeman, Ruth; Hendrix, Susan; Jackson, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Background: The effects of dietary changes on osteoporosis, low bone density, and frequent falls are unestablished. Objective: We assessed the effect of the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification low-fat and increased fruit, vegetable, and grain intervention on incident hip, total, and site-specific fractures and self-reported falls, and, in a subset, on bone mineral density (BMD). Design: Postmenopausal women (n = 48,835) aged 50–79 y (18.6% of minority race-ethnicity) were randomly assigned to receive the Dietary Modification intervention (40%, n = 19,541) (daily goal: ≤20% of energy as fat, ≥5 servings of vegetables and fruit, and ≥6 servings of grains) or to a comparison group that received no dietary changes (60%; n = 29,294). Results: After a mean 8.1 y of follow-up, 215 women in the intervention group and 285 women in the comparison group (annualized rate: 0.14% and 0.12%, respectively) experienced a hip fracture (hazard ratio: 1.12; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.34; P = 0.21). The intervention group (n = 5423; annualized rate: 3.44%) had a lower rate of reporting ≥2 falls than did the comparison group (n = 8695; annualized rate: 3.67%) (HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.96; P < 0.01). There was a significant interaction according to hormone therapy use; those in the comparison group receiving hormone therapy had the lowest incidence of hip fracture. In a subset of 3951 women, hip BMD at years 3, 6, and 9 was 0.4–0.5% lower in the intervention group than in the comparison group (P = 0.003). Conclusions: A low-fat and increased fruit, vegetable, and grain diet intervention modestly reduced the risk of multiple falls and slightly lowered hip BMD but did not change the risk of osteoporotic fractures. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611. PMID:19403636

  9. Phytonutrients for bone health during ageing.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Sandra Maria; Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle; Offord, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by a decrease in bone mass and bone quality that predispose an individual to an increased risk of fragility fractures. Evidence demonstrating a positive link between certain dietary patterns (e.g. Mediterranean diet or high consumption of fruits and vegetables) and bone health highlights an opportunity to investigate their potential to protect against the deterioration of bone tissue during ageing. While the list of these phytonutrients is extensive, this review summarizes evidence on some which are commonly consumed and have gained increasing attention over recent years, including lycopene and various polyphenols (e.g. polyphenols from tea, grape seed, citrus fruit, olive and dried plum). Evidence to define a clear link between these phytonutrients and bone health is currently insufficient to generate precise dietary recommendations, owing to mixed findings or a scarcity in clinical data. Moreover, their consumption typically occurs within the context of a diet consisting of a mix of phytonutrients and other nutrients rather than in isolation. Future clinical trials that can apply a robust set of outcome measurements, including the determinants of bone strength, such as bone quantity (i.e. bone mineral density) and bone quality (i.e. bone turnover and bone microarchitecture), will help to provide a more comprehensive outlook on how bone responds to these various phytonutrients. Moreover, future trials that combine these phytonutrients with established bone nutrients (i.e. calcium and vitamin D) are needed to determine whether combined strategies can produce more robust effects on skeletal health.

  10. Phytonutrients for bone health during ageing.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Sandra Maria; Horcajada, Marie-Noëlle; Offord, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by a decrease in bone mass and bone quality that predispose an individual to an increased risk of fragility fractures. Evidence demonstrating a positive link between certain dietary patterns (e.g. Mediterranean diet or high consumption of fruits and vegetables) and bone health highlights an opportunity to investigate their potential to protect against the deterioration of bone tissue during ageing. While the list of these phytonutrients is extensive, this review summarizes evidence on some which are commonly consumed and have gained increasing attention over recent years, including lycopene and various polyphenols (e.g. polyphenols from tea, grape seed, citrus fruit, olive and dried plum). Evidence to define a clear link between these phytonutrients and bone health is currently insufficient to generate precise dietary recommendations, owing to mixed findings or a scarcity in clinical data. Moreover, their consumption typically occurs within the context of a diet consisting of a mix of phytonutrients and other nutrients rather than in isolation. Future clinical trials that can apply a robust set of outcome measurements, including the determinants of bone strength, such as bone quantity (i.e. bone mineral density) and bone quality (i.e. bone turnover and bone microarchitecture), will help to provide a more comprehensive outlook on how bone responds to these various phytonutrients. Moreover, future trials that combine these phytonutrients with established bone nutrients (i.e. calcium and vitamin D) are needed to determine whether combined strategies can produce more robust effects on skeletal health. PMID:23384080

  11. Phytonutrients for bone health during ageing

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Sandra Maria; Horcajada, Marie‐Noëlle; Offord, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by a decrease in bone mass and bone quality that predispose an individual to an increased risk of fragility fractures. Evidence demonstrating a positive link between certain dietary patterns (e.g. Mediterranean diet or high consumption of fruits and vegetables) and bone health highlights an opportunity to investigate their potential to protect against the deterioration of bone tissue during ageing. While the list of these phytonutrients is extensive, this review summarizes evidence on some which are commonly consumed and have gained increasing attention over recent years, including lycopene and various polyphenols (e.g. polyphenols from tea, grape seed, citrus fruit, olive and dried plum). Evidence to define a clear link between these phytonutrients and bone health is currently insufficient to generate precise dietary recommendations, owing to mixed findings or a scarcity in clinical data. Moreover, their consumption typically occurs within the context of a diet consisting of a mix of phytonutrients and other nutrients rather than in isolation. Future clinical trials that can apply a robust set of outcome measurements, including the determinants of bone strength, such as bone quantity (i.e. bone mineral density) and bone quality (i.e. bone turnover and bone microarchitecture), will help to provide a more comprehensive outlook on how bone responds to these various phytonutrients. Moreover, future trials that combine these phytonutrients with established bone nutrients (i.e. calcium and vitamin D) are needed to determine whether combined strategies can produce more robust effects on skeletal health. PMID:23384080

  12. Microgravity and Bone Cell Mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R.; Veldhuijzen, J.; van Loon, J.

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone.The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction.Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, has catabolic effects on the skeleton of astronauts, and on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGE2 production. Therefore it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions

  13. The Life Cycle of Bare Branch Families in China---A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, Quanbao; GUO, Zhen; LI, Shuzhuo; FELDMAN, Marcus W.

    2013-01-01

    China is and will be characterized by a large number of men who are unable to marry: these men are often referred to as “bare branches.” In this paper we define the bare branch family and divide its life cycle into three stages: the unmarried co-resident with both parents, co-resident with a surviving parent, and living alone. Using life tables and probability methods, we find that up to age 60, the bare branch male faces cumulative probabilities of 0.8 and 0.6, for his father's and mother's death, respectively. The definition of the age at which bare branch status is initialized influences the length of these stages. As the childbearing age of parents increases, the age of a bare branch at the death of his parents decreases, and the duration of his living alone lengthens. An increase in the mother's childbearing age, holding that of the father constant, shortens the stage of co-residence with both parents, and lengthens the stage of living alone. PMID:24174704

  14. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  15. Using Micro-CT Derived Bone Microarchitecture to Analyze Bone Stiffness - A Case Study on Osteoporosis Rat Bone.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuchin; Adeeb, Samer; Doschak, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) images can be used to quantitatively represent bone geometry through a range of computed attenuation-based parameters. Nonetheless, those parameters remain indirect indices of bone microarchitectural strength and require further computational tools to interpret bone structural stiffness and potential for mechanical failure. Finite element analysis (FEA) can be applied to measure trabecular bone stiffness and potentially predict the location of structural failure in preclinical animal models of osteoporosis, although that procedure from image segmentation of Micro-CT derived bone geometry to FEA is often challenging and computationally expensive, resulting in failure of the model to build. Notably, the selection of resolution and threshold for bone segmentation are key steps that greatly affect computational complexity and validity. In the following study, we evaluated an approach whereby Micro-CT derived grayscale attenuation and segmentation data guided the selection of trabecular bone for analysis by FEA. We further correlated those FEA results to both two- and three-dimensional bone microarchitecture from sham and ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n = 10/group). A virtual cylinder of vertebral trabecular bone 40% in length from the caudal side was selected for FEA, because Micro-CT based image analysis indicated the largest differences in microarchitecture between the two groups resided there. Bone stiffness was calculated using FEA and statistically correlated with the three-dimensional values of bone volume/tissue volume, bone mineral density, fractal dimension, trabecular separation, and trabecular bone pattern factor. Our method simplified the process for the assessment of trabecular bone stiffness by FEA from Micro-CT images and highlighted the importance of bone microarchitecture in conferring significantly increased bone quality capable of resisting failure due to increased mechanical loading. PMID:26042089

  16. Oblique shock wave calculations for detonation waves in brass confined and bare PBXN-111 cylindrical charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemar, E. R.; Forbes, J. W.; Cowperthwaite, M.

    1998-07-01

    Shock polar theory is used to calculate the angles detonation fronts make with the cylinder wall for brass cased and bare PBXN-111 cylinders. Two extrapolated unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniot curves are used to calculate these angles. Measured and calculated angles for bare PBXN-111 cylinders are in good agreement for one of the unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniots. Except for the 100 mm diameter charge, the differences between calculated and measured angles for brass cased charges are beyond experimental error. Limited data suggests that the wave front curvature exhibits a large change right at the brass wall and the resolution in the experiments may not be fine enough to show it clearly.

  17. Characteristics of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with air using bare metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huabo; Sun Wenting; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Zhang Xiaozhang

    2006-10-16

    In this letter, an induced gas discharge approach is proposed and described in detail for obtaining a uniform atmospheric-pressure glow discharge with air in a {gamma} mode using water-cooled, bare metal electrodes driven by radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power supply. A preliminary study on the discharge characteristics of the air glow discharge is also presented in this study. With this induced gas discharge approach, radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges using bare metal electrodes with other gases which cannot be ignited directly as the plasma working gas, such as nitrogen, oxygen, etc., can also be obtained.

  18. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex Plant - part I: Bare pits

    SciTech Connect

    Knief, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    This paper briefly describes criticality investigations for weapon assembly and dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. Results are summarized for calculations performed for safety analyses, radiological hazards assessments, and a study to justify the criticality alarm exemption. Pits and pits in containers were modeled in their most reactive configuration. Criticality calculations were performed with the KENO and MCNP code packages. Configurations involving bare pits were subcritical by a substantial amount even with very conservative model assumptions. Thus, it is concluded that a critical configuration involving the bare pits is not credible.

  19. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands.

  20. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands. PMID:16998521

  1. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  2. Genetics of Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... study linked 32 novel genetic regions to bone mineral density. The findings may help researchers understand why ... or treating osteoporosis. Bones are made of a mineral and protein scaffold filled with bone cells. Bone ...

  3. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  4. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burger, E H; Klein-Nulend, J

    1998-05-01

    Bone cells, in particular osteocytes, are extremely sensitive to mechanical stress, a quality that is probably linked to the process of mechanical adaptation (Wolff's law). The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely a flow of an interstitial fluid along the surface of the osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin synthesis and expression of inducible prostaglandin G/H synthase (PGHS-2 or inducible cyclooxygenase, COX-2), an enzyme that mediates the induction of bone formation by mechanical loading in vivo. Disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity has catabolic effects on the skeleton of astronauts, as well as on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained simply as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under weightlessness conditions. However, under microgravity conditions, the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered, as gravity has been shown to determine the pattern of microtubular orientation assembled in vitro. Therefore, it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under microgravity conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to the disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts. In vitro experiments on the International Space Station should test this hypothesis experimentally.

  5. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  6. Fibrillin microfibrils in bone physiology.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The severe skeletal abnormalities associated with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) underscore the notion that fibrillin assemblies (microfibrils and elastic fibers) play a critical role in bone formation and function in spite of representing a low abundance component of skeletal matrices. Studies of MFS and CCA mice have correlated the skeletal phenotypes of these mutant animals with distinct pathophysiological mechanisms that reflect the contextual contribution of fibrillin-1 and -2 scaffolds to TGFβ and BMP signaling during bone patterning, growth and metabolism. Illustrative examples include the unique role of fibrillin-2 in regulating BMP-dependent limb patterning and the distinct impact of the two fibrillin proteins on the commitment and differentiation of marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Collectively, these findings have important implication for our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that drive age- and injury-related processes of bone degeneration.

  7. Employing UAVs to Acquire Detailed Vegetation and Bare Ground Data for Assessing Rangeland Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.; Laliberte, A.; Herrick, J. E.; Winters, C.

    2007-12-01

    Because of its value as a historical record (extending back to the mid 1930s), aerial photography is an important tool used in many rangeland studies. However, these historical photos are not very useful for detailed analysis of rangeland health because of inadequate spatial resolution and scheduling limitations. These issues are now being resolved by using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over rangeland study areas. Spatial resolution improvements have been rapid in the last 10 years from the QuickBird satellite through improved aerial photography to the new UAV coverage and have utilized improved sensors and the more simplistic approach of low altitude flights. Our rangeland health experiments have shown that the low altitude UAV digital photography is preferred by rangeland scientists because it allows, for the first time, their identification of vegetation and land surface patterns and patches, gap sizes, bare soil percentages, and vegetation type. This hyperspatial imagery (imagery with a resolution finer than the object of interest) is obtained at about 5cm resolution by flying at an altitude of 150m above the surface of the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico. Additionally, the UAV provides improved temporal flexibility, such as flights immediately following fires, floods, and other catastrophic disturbances, because the flight capability is located near the study area and the vehicles are under the direct control of the users, eliminating the additional steps associated with budgets and contracts. There are significant challenges to improve the data to make them useful for operational agencies, namely, image distortion with inexpensive, consumer grade digital cameras, difficulty in detecting sufficient ground control points in small scenes (152m by 114m), accuracy of exterior UAV information on X,Y, Z, roll, pitch, and heading, the sheer number of images collected, and developing reliable relationships with ground-based data across a broad

  8. BONE BANKS

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Vieira, Inácio Facó Ventura

    2015-01-01

    Bone banks are necessary for providing biological material for a series of orthopedic procedures. The growing need for musculoskeletal tissues for transplantation has been due to the development of new surgical techniques, and this has led to a situation in which a variety of hospital services have been willing to have their own source of tissue for transplantation. To increase the safety of transplanted tissues, standards for bone bank operation have been imposed by the government, which has limited the number of authorized institutions. The good performance in a bone bank depends on strict control over all stages, including: formation of well-trained harvesting teams; donor selection; conducting various tests on the tissues obtained; and strict control over the processing techniques used. Combination of these factors enables greater scope of use and numbers of recipient patients, while the incidence of tissue contamination becomes statistically insignificant, and there is traceability between donors and recipients. This paper describes technical considerations relating to how a bone bank functions, the use of grafts and orthopedic applications, the ethical issues and the main obstacles encountered. PMID:27026958

  9. The Bare Facts about the Listener's Responsibility in Understanding Semantic Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlken, Bob

    The bare fact is that the speaker's words are nothing until the listener gives them meaning. The denotation of a word is developed through association with other words. The connotation is the more difficult concept to establish for the critical/comprehensive listener studying word meaning. The common explanation is that "connotation refers to the…

  10. Utilization of active microwave roughness measurements to improve passive microwave soil moisture estimates over bare soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Blanchard, B. J.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Multisensor aircraft data were used to establish the potential of the active microwave sensor response to be used to compensate for roughness in the passive microwave sensor's response to soil moisture. Only bare fields were used. It is found that the L-band radiometer's capability to estimate soil moisture significantly improves when surface roughness is accounted for with the scatterometers.

  11. Utilization of active microwave roughness measurements to improve passive microwave soil moisture estimates over bare soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Blanchard, A. J.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Multisensor aircraft data were used to establish the potential of the active microwave sensor response to be used to compensate for roughness in the passive microwave sensor's response to soil moisture. Only bare fields were used. It is found that the L-band radiometer's capability to estimate soil moisture significantly improves when surface roughness is accounted for with the scatterometers.

  12. Analyses of protein corona on bare and silica-coated gold nanorods against four mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Minakshi; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxic effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs). Here, a comprehensive study was performed by examining the effects of bare (uncoated) AuNRs and AuNRs functionalized with silica (SiO2-AuNRs) against various mammalian cell lines, including cervical cancer cells, fibroblast cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and neuroblastoma cells. The interactions between AuNRs and mammalian cells were investigated with cell viability and mortality assays. Dihydrorhodamine-123 assay was carried out for evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, along with mass spectroscopy analysis for determining the composition of the protein corona. Our results suggest that even the lowest concentrations of AuNRs (0.7 μg/mL) induced ROS production leading to cell mortality. On the other hand, cellular viability and ROS production were maintained even at a higher concentration of SiO2-coated AuNRs (12 μg/mL). The increased production of ROS by AuNRs seemed to cause the toxicity observed in all four mammalian cell types. The protein corona on the bare AuNRs did not appear to reduce ROS generation; however, different compositions of the protein corona on bare and SiO2-coated AuNRs may affect cellular behavior differently. Therefore, it was determined that SiO2-coated AuNRs would be more advantageous than bare AuNRs for cellular applications.

  13. 3D laser measurements of bare and shod feet during walking.

    PubMed

    Novak, Boštjan; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new system for 3D foot-shape measurements during walking. It is based on the laser-triangulation, multiple-line-illumination and color-modulation techniques. It consists of a walking stage and four measuring modules that simultaneously acquire the foot shape from the top, bottom and side views. The measuring speed is 30 fps. Custom-developed software makes it possible to analyze the foot's dimensions at an arbitrary cross-section by means of the width, height, girth and section orientation. Six subjects were measured during bare and shod walking, and the bare foot and the outside dimensions of the footwear during the entire stance phase are presented. The relative measurement repeatability of a single subject is 0.5% for bare foot and 1% for shod foot. This means that it is possible to study the differences between various influences on the foot-shape dynamics, such as a bare/shod foot, different loading conditions and the shoe's stiffness condition.

  14. Estimation of the bed shear stress in vegetated and bare channels with smooth beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judy Q.; Kerger, Francois; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2015-05-01

    The shear stress at the bed of a channel influences important benthic processes such as sediment transport. Several methods exist to estimate the bed shear stress in bare channels without vegetation, but most of these are not appropriate for vegetated channels due to the impact of vegetation on the velocity profile and turbulence production. This study proposes a new model to estimate the bed shear stress in both vegetated and bare channels with smooth beds. The model, which is supported by measurements, indicates that for both bare and vegetated channels with smooth beds, within a viscous sublayer at the bed, the viscous stress decreases linearly with increasing distance from the bed, resulting in a parabolic velocity profile at the bed. For bare channels, the model describes the velocity profile in the overlap region of the Law of the Wall. For emergent canopies of sufficient density (frontal area per unit canopy volume a≥4.3 m-1), the thickness of the linear-stress layer is set by the stem diameter, leading to a simple estimate for bed shear stress.

  15. Introducing the Notion of Bare and Effective Mass via Newton's Second Law of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here I discuss how these concepts may be introduced together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion. The…

  16. Detection of soil properties with airborne hyperspectral measurements of bare fields.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airborne remote sensing data, using a hyperspectral (HSI) camera, were collected for a flight over two fields with a total of 128 ha. of recently seeded and nearly bare soil. The within-field spatial distribution of several soil properties was found by using multiple linear regression to select the ...

  17. Statistical characteristics of simulated radar imagery from bare soil surfaces: Effects of surface roughness and soil moisture variability

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, R.M.; Rundquist, D.C. ); Pardipuram, R. )

    1994-01-01

    The potential of high-resolution radar imagery to estimate various hydrological parameters, such as soil moisture, has long been recognized. Image simulation is one approach to study the interrelationships between the radar response and the underlying ground parameters. In order to perform realistic simulations, the authors incorporated the effects of naturally occurring spatial variability and spatial correlations of those ground parameters that affect the radar response, primarily surface roughness and soil moisture. Surface roughness and soil moisture images were generated for a hypothetical 100 x 100 m bare soil surface area at 1 m resolution using valid probability distribution and correlation lengths, These values were then used to obtain copolarized radar scattering coefficients at 2 GHz (L band) and 10 GHz (X band) frequencies using appropriate backscatter models, which were then converted to a digital number within 0--255 gray scale in order to generate radar images. The effect of surface roughness variability causes variability in the radar image, which is more apparent under smooth soil conditions. On the other hand, the inherent spatial pattern in soil moisture tends to cause similar patterns in the radar image under rougher soil conditions. The maximum difference between contrast-enhanced mean values of the radar image digital number due to moisture variations occurs at surface roughness values in the 1.5--2.0 cm range.

  18. The contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance in an arid ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, C. M.; Smith, A.; Campanella, A.; Rango, A.

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneity of vegetation and soils in arid and semi-arid environments complicates the analysis of medium spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery. A single pixel may contain several different types of vegetation, as well as a sizeable proportion of bare soil. We have used linear mixture modeling to explore the contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance. In October, 2006, aerial imagery (0.25 m spatial resolution) was acquired for our study sites in the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. Imagery was also acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for June and November, 2006. These data corresponded with pre- and post monsoon conditions. Object-based feature extraction was used to classify the aerial imagery to shrub, grass and bare ground cover classes. Percent cover was then calculated for each cover class. Visible-near-infrared and shortwave infrared ASTER reflectance data from both dates were combined into a single 18-band dataset (30 m spatial resolution). A vector overlay from the classification results of the aerial imagery was used to define pure endmember pixels in the ASTER imagery. Estimates of the proportions of shrub, grass and bare ground cover from the linear mixture modeling approach were compared with cover calculated using feature extraction from the aerial imagery. The results indicate that reflectance in ASTER pixels is likely to be a linear combination of the cover proportions of the three main cover types (shrubs, grass, bare ground). However, noticeable outliers in the relationship between cover calculated from each method, indicate there may be other variables that affect the accuracy with which we can estimate cover using linear mixture modeling.

  19. Modelling emergent patterns of dynamic desert ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many desert ecosystems vegetation is both patchy and dynamic: vegetated areas are interspersed with patches of bare ground, and both the positioning and the species composition of the vegetated areas exhibit change through time. These characteristics lead to the emergence of multi-scale patterns ...

  20. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  1. Bone Vascularization in Normal and Disease Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Bone vasculature is essential for many processes, such as skeletal development and growth, bone modeling and remodeling, and healing processes. Endothelium is an integral part of bone tissue, expressing a physiological paracrine function via growth factors and chemokines release, and interacting with several cellular lines. Alterations of the complex biochemical interactions between vasculature and bone cells may lead to various clinical manifestations. Two different types of pathologies result: a defect or an excess of bone vasculature or endothelium metabolism. Starting from the molecular basis of the interactions between endothelial and bone cells, the Authors present an overview of the recent acquisitions in the physiopathology of the most important clinical patterns, and the modern therapeutic strategies for their treatments. PMID:23986744

  2. Soy foods: are they useful for optimal bone health?

    PubMed

    Lanou, Amy J

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between soy foods, soy protein, or isoflavone extracts and markers of bone health and osteoporosis prevention, and have come to conflicting conclusions. Research on dietary patterns, rather than on specific food ingredients or individual foods, may offer an opportunity for better understanding the role of soy foods in bone health. Evidence is reviewed regarding the question of whether soy foods contribute to a dietary pattern in humans that supports and promotes bone health. Soy foods are associated with improved markers of bone health and improved outcomes, especially among Asian women. Although the optimal amounts and types of soy foods needed to support bone health are not yet clear, dietary pattern evidence suggests that regular consumption of soy foods is likely to be useful for optimal bone health as an integral part of a dietary pattern that is built largely from whole plant foods.

  3. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  8. Runoff and Sediment Delivery from Bare and Graveled Forest Road Approaches to Stream Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. R.; McGuire, K. J.; Aust, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    Forested watersheds are typically associated with high quality water yield, yet forest roads and trails can adversely impact water quality draining forested watersheds. Increased stream sedimentation from forest road stream crossings often represents the most significant water quality threat associated with forestry operations. Quantification of sediment delivery rates is essential for the prescription of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that adequately address forest road stormwater runoff. Two different field experiments were implemented in the Virginia Piedmont to achieve the objectives of quantifying sediment delivery from forest roads where the road meets the stream (the road approach) and evaluating the sediment reduction efficacy of partially graveling road approaches. A forest operational experiment that included sediment traps and differential leveling was used to measure sediment delivery from five bare and four fully graveled road approaches for one year (August 2011 through July 2012). Rainfall simulation experiments were performed on six additional approaches to measure stormwater runoff volume, infiltration, and sediment delivery for 10 to 50-minute rain events with rainfall recurrence intervals of < 1 to 5-year return periods. Rainfall simulations were performed on newly-reopened bare approaches, with subsequent simulations on partially graveled approaches. The sediment trap study provides annual sediment delivery rates for bare and fully graveled road approaches. The rainfall simulation experiments characterize sediment delivery during storm events and provide an evaluation of different levels of Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation (i.e. ¼ to full gravel coverage) to minimize sediment inputs from road approaches. Sediment delivery from both experiments was related to rainfall amount, timing, and intensity, as well as road approach characteristics such as length, slope, and percentage of bare soil through stepwise multiple regression

  9. Implications of climate change for evaporation from bare soils in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet; Yano, Tomohisa; Evrendilek, Fatih; Uygur, Veli

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict quantitative changes in evaporation from bare soils in the Mediterranean climate region of Turkey in response to the projections of a regional climate model developed in Japan (hereafter RCM). Daily RCM data for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ETr) and soil evaporation were obtained for the periods of 1994--2003 and 2070--2079. Potential evaporation (Ep) from bare soils was calculated using the Penman-Monteith equation with a surface resistance of zero. Simulation of actual soil evaporation (Ea) was carried out using Aydin model (Aydin et al., Ecological Modelling 182:91-105, 2005) combined with Aydin and Uygur (2006, A model for estimating soil water potential of bare fields. In Proceedings of the 18th International Soil Meeting (ISM) on Soils Sustaining Life on Earth, Managing Soil and Technology, Sanliurfa, 477-480pp.) model of predicting soil water potential at the top surface layer of a bare soil, after performances of Aydin model (R2 = 94.0%) and Aydin and Uygur model (R2 = 97.6) were tested. The latter model is based on the relations among potential soil evaporation, hydraulic diffusivity, and soil wetness, with some simplified assumptions. Input parameters of the model are simple and easily obtainable such as climatic parameters used to compute the potential soil evaporation, average diffusivity for the drying soil, and volumetric water content at field capacity. The combination of Aydin and Aydin and Uygur models appeared to be useful in estimating water potential of soils and Ea from bare soils, with only a few parameters. Unlike ETr and Ep projected to increase by 92 and 69 mm (equivalent to 8.0 and 7.3% increases) due to the elevated evaporative demand of the atmosphere, respectively, Ea from bare soils is projected to reduce by 50 mm (equivalent to a 16.5% decrease) in response to a decrease in rainfall by 46% in the Mediterranean region of Turkey by the 2070s predicted by RCM, and consequently

  10. Implications of climate change for evaporation from bare soils in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet; Yano, Tomohisa; Evrendilek, Fatih; Uygur, Veli

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict quantitative changes in evaporation from bare soils in the Mediterranean climate region of Turkey in response to the projections of a regional climate model developed in Japan (hereafter RCM). Daily RCM data for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ETr) and soil evaporation were obtained for the periods of 1994--2003 and 2070--2079. Potential evaporation (Ep) from bare soils was calculated using the Penman-Monteith equation with a surface resistance of zero. Simulation of actual soil evaporation (Ea) was carried out using Aydin model (Aydin et al., Ecological Modelling 182:91-105, 2005) combined with Aydin and Uygur (2006, A model for estimating soil water potential of bare fields. In Proceedings of the 18th International Soil Meeting (ISM) on Soils Sustaining Life on Earth, Managing Soil and Technology, Sanliurfa, 477-480pp.) model of predicting soil water potential at the top surface layer of a bare soil, after performances of Aydin model (R2 = 94.0%) and Aydin and Uygur model (R2 = 97.6) were tested. The latter model is based on the relations among potential soil evaporation, hydraulic diffusivity, and soil wetness, with some simplified assumptions. Input parameters of the model are simple and easily obtainable such as climatic parameters used to compute the potential soil evaporation, average diffusivity for the drying soil, and volumetric water content at field capacity. The combination of Aydin and Aydin and Uygur models appeared to be useful in estimating water potential of soils and Ea from bare soils, with only a few parameters. Unlike ETr and Ep projected to increase by 92 and 69 mm (equivalent to 8.0 and 7.3% increases) due to the elevated evaporative demand of the atmosphere, respectively, Ea from bare soils is projected to reduce by 50 mm (equivalent to a 16.5% decrease) in response to a decrease in rainfall by 46% in the Mediterranean region of Turkey by the 2070s predicted by RCM, and consequently

  11. Connecting mechanics and bone cell activities in the bone remodeling process: an integrated finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.'s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  12. Differential expression of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein in bone metastasis of breast and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlinfante, Gabriele; Vassiliou, Daphne; Svensson, Olle; Wendel, Mikael; Heinegård, Dick; Andersson, Göran

    2003-01-01

    Breast and prostate cancer often metastasise to the skeleton. Interestingly, the histopathological characteristics of the bone lesions that arise from these two cancer types differ. Breast tumours give rise to metastases in the skeleton with a mixed lytic/sclerotic pattern, whereas a predominantly sclerotic pattern is seen in metastases from prostate tumours. Osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) are bone matrix proteins that have been implicated in the selective affinity of cancer cells for bone. In the present study, 21 patient cases with skeletal metastasis and their respective primary tumours (12 with breast cancer, 9 with prostate cancer) were investigated by immunohistochemistry in order to assess the level of OPN and BSP. Moderate to strong OPN expression was found in 42% of all breast tumours and in 56% of all prostate tumours. Significantly more breast cancer bone metastases exhibited high OPN expression, 83%, as compared with prostate tumour bone metastases, 11% (P = 0.0019). In contrast, moderate to strong BSP expression was found in 33% of breast tumours and in 89% of prostate tumours. In the bone lesions, only 33% of breast tumour metastases showed moderate/strong BSP expression compared to 100% of prostate tumour metastases (P = 0.0046). This divergent pattern of OPN/BSP expression could be an important determinant for the different characteristics of these two types of bone metastasis, i.e., lytic vs. sclerotic, consistent with the proposed role of OPN in differentiation and activation of osteoclasts and of BSP as a stimulator of bone mineralisation.

  13. Molecular characterisation of growth differentiation factor 9 (gdf9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (bmp15) and their patterns of gene expression during the ovarian reproductive cycle in the European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Halm, S; Ibañez, A J; Tyler, C R; Prat, F

    2008-09-10

    Members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15), have crucial roles in primary follicle growth in mammals. To initiate investigations into their significance in teleost oogenesis, we set out to clone and characterise the cDNAs of gdf9 and bmp15 and analysed their patterns of gene expression during the ovarian reproductive cycle in the European sea bass (Dicentrachus labrax). Sea bass gdf9 and bmp15 cDNAs were 2200 and 2049 bp long, coding for 438 and 459 amino acids (aas), respectively, and were most similar to zebrafish gdf9 and bmp15 (64.4 and 56.1%, respectively). By Northern analysis, sea bass gdf9 and bmp15 mRNA transcripts were detected in the ovary only of the tissues analysed and their sizes were 2.2 and 2.1 kb, respectively. Dot-blot analysis revealed high levels of gdf9 and bmp15 expression in the ovary during primary oocyte growth and previtellogenesis (July to October), with a significant decline at the onset of vitellogenesis (November) and remaining low until the beginning of new oocyte growth (April/May). There was a highly significant positive correlation (r=0.939) between gdf9 and bmp15 gene expression in individual samples. The high levels of gdf9 and bmp15 mRNA transcripts in the ovary, especially during the previtellogenic growth period suggest an important role for these factors in early primary oocyte growth in the European sea bass.

  14. Oblique shock wave calculations for detonation waves in brass confined and bare PBXN-111 cylindrical charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lemar, E.R.; Forbes, J.W.; Cowperthwaite, M.

    1998-07-01

    Shock polar theory is used to calculate the angles detonation fronts make with the cylinder wall for brass cased and bare PBXN-111 cylinders. Two extrapolated unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniot curves are used to calculate these angles. Measured and calculated angles for bare PBXN-111 cylinders are in good agreement for one of the unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniots. Except for the 100 mm diameter charge, the differences between calculated and measured angles for brass cased charges are beyond experimental error. Limited data suggests that the wave front curvature exhibits a large change right at the brass wall and the resolution in the experiments may not be fine enough to show it clearly. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Development of Ferromagnetic Superspins in Bare Cu Nanoparticles by Electronic Charge Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Batsaikhan, Erdembayalag; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Lee, Chi-Hung; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Li, Wen-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    We report on the results of investigating the ferromagnetic properties of bare Cu nanoparticles. Three sets of bare Cu nanoparticle assemblies with mean particle diameters of 6.6, 8.1, and 11.1 nm were fabricated, employing the gas condensation method. Curie-Weiss paramagnetic responses to a weak driving magnetic field were detected, showing the appearance of particle superspins that overcomes the diamagnetic responses from the inner core. The isothermal magnetization displays a Langevin field profile together with magnetic hysteresis appearing even at 300 K, demonstrating the existence of ferromagnetic superspins in the Cu nanoparticles. Shifting of a noticeable amount of electronic charge from being distributed near the lattice sites in bulk form toward their neighboring ions in nanoparticles was found. The extended 3d and 4s band mixture are the main sources for the development of localized 3d holes for the development of ferromagnetic particle superspins in Cu nanoparticles. PMID:26404237

  16. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  17. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Controlled ground-based passive microwave radiometric measurements on soil moisture were conducted to determine the effects of terrain surface roughness and vegetation on microwave emission. Theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and with some recent airborne radiometric measurements. The relationship of soil moisture to the permittivity for the soil was obtained in the laboratory. A dual frequency radiometer, 1.41356 GHz and 10.69 GHz, took measurements at angles between 0 and 50 degrees from an altitude of about fifty feet. Distinct surface roughnesses were studied. With the roughness undisturbed, oats were later planted and vegetated and bare field measurements were compared. The 1.4 GHz radiometer was less affected than the 10.6 GHz radiometer, which under vegetated conditions was incapable of detecting soil moisture. The bare surface theoretical model was inadequate, although the vegetation model appeared to be valid. Moisture parameters to correlate apparent temperature with soil moisture were compared.

  18. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on soil moisture remote sensing was conducted during July to September 1981 on bare, grass, and alfalfa fields at frequencies of 0.6, 1.4, 5.0, and 10.6 GHz with radiometers mounted on mobile towers. The results confirm the frequency dependence of sensitivity reduction due to the presence of vegetation cover. For the type of vegetated fields reported here, the vegetation effect is appreciable even at 0.6 GHz. Measurements over bare soil show that when the soil is wet, the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest at 0.6 GHz, a result contrary to the expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil-water mixtures and the current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  19. Optimization of the bare platinum electrode as an oxygen measurement system in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Meunier, P C; Popovic, R

    1988-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the definition of the standard conditions required for optimum operation of the bare platinum electrode with photosynthetic samples. Experimental evidence shows the following: 1) Polarization circuits should have zero resistance; 2) The electrolyte layer between the electrodes should have a conductance higher than 54×10(-6) Ω(-1) per mm(2) of platinum electrode area; 3) The electrodes should be polarized just before taking the measurements. All these facts can be interpreted in terms of phenomena occurring on the electrode: The adsorption of hydrogen on the electrode imposes the need for low resistances in the system, and oxygen consumption by the electrode is minimized by polarizing the electrodes as late as possible. This investigation increases the reliability of the bare platinum electrode and gives a basis for a comparison of the results from different experiments. Demonstrations of the pertinence of these conditions are made in our lab with the algae Dunaliella Tertiolecta.

  20. Unusual delayed hydrocephalus after bare platinum coil embolization of an unruptured aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Mohri, Masanao; Hirota, Yuichi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman developed hydrocephalus after the embolization of an incidentally detected unruptured large internal carotid artery aneurysm with bare platinum coils. Endovascular embolization resulted in near-total aneurysm occlusion. She complained of mild headache 18 hours after the procedure and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed on the 6(th) post-treatment day revealed wall enhancement and perianeurysmal brain edema. Follow-up MR imaging showed recanalization of the aneurysm and gradual ventricular enlargement. She presented with typical symptoms of hydrocephalus including disorientation, gait disturbance, and urine incontinence at 7 months post-embolization. We removed 30 ml of cerebrospinal fluid by lumbar tap, which improved her condition without symptom recurrence for 2 months. She did not require shunt placement. Post-interventional hydrocephalus is known in patients with unruptured aneurysms embolized with bioactive second-generation coils. This case shows that hydrocephalus can occur after aneurysm embolization with bare platinum coils without intracranial hemorrhage.

  1. R-mode Instability of Low-mass Bare Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-mei, Pi; Shu-hua, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The r-mode instability window of low-mass strange stars is studied using the modified bag model of strange quark matter and reasonable sets of parameters. The results show that the ultimate spin frequency of strange stars increases with the decreasing stellar mass, and the highest spin frequency (716 Hz) of pulsars observed sofar can be explained by the bare strange stars with a mass lower than about 0.1∼0.2 M⊙, depending on the selected parameters.

  2. Analyses of protein corona on bare and silica-coated gold nanorods against four mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Minakshi; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxic effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs). Here, a comprehensive study was performed by examining the effects of bare (uncoated) AuNRs and AuNRs functionalized with silica (SiO2-AuNRs) against various mammalian cell lines, including cervical cancer cells, fibroblast cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and neuroblastoma cells. The interactions between AuNRs and mammalian cells were investigated with cell viability and mortality assays. Dihydrorhodamine-123 assay was carried out for evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, along with mass spectroscopy analysis for determining the composition of the protein corona. Our results suggest that even the lowest concentrations of AuNRs (0.7 μg/mL) induced ROS production leading to cell mortality. On the other hand, cellular viability and ROS production were maintained even at a higher concentration of SiO2-coated AuNRs (12 μg/mL). The increased production of ROS by AuNRs seemed to cause the toxicity observed in all four mammalian cell types. The protein corona on the bare AuNRs did not appear to reduce ROS generation; however, different compositions of the protein corona on bare and SiO2-coated AuNRs may affect cellular behavior differently. Therefore, it was determined that SiO2-coated AuNRs would be more advantageous than bare AuNRs for cellular applications. PMID:25759578

  3. Analysis of ProSEDS Test of Bare-Tether Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanmartin, J. R.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Estes, R. D.; Charro, M.; Cosmo, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's tether experiment ProSEDS will be placed in orbit on board a Delta-II rocket to test bare-tether electron collection, deorbiting of the rocket second stage, and the system dynamic stability. ProSEDS performance will vary because ambient conditions change along the orbit and tether-circuit bulk elements at the cathodic end follow the step-by-step sequence for the current cycles of operating modes (open-circuit, shunt and resistor modes for primary cycles; shunt and battery modes for secondary cycles). In this work we discuss expected ProSEDS values of the ratio L,/L*, which jointly with cathodic bulk elements determines bias and current tether profiles; L, is tether length, and L* (changing with tether temperature and ionospheric plasma density and magnetic field) is a characteristic length gauging ohmic versus baretether collection impedances. We discuss how to test bare-tether electron collection during primary cycles, using probe measurements of plasma density, measurements of cathodic current in resistor and shunt modes, and an estimate of tether temperature based on ProSEDS orbital position at the particular cycle concerned. We discuss how a temperature misestimate might occasionally affect the test of bare-tether collection, and how introducing the battery mode in some primary cycles, for an additional current measurement, could obviate the need of a temperature estimate. We also show how to test bare-tether collection by estimating orbit-decay rate from measurements of cathodic current for the shunt and battery modes of secondary cycles.

  4. Soft Landing of Bare Nanoparticles with Controlled Size, Composition, and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    A kinetically-limited physical synthesis method based on magnetron sputtering and gas aggregation has been coupled with size-selection and ion soft landing to prepare bare metal nanoparticles on surfaces with controlled coverage, size, composition, and morphology. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it is demonstrated that the size and coverage of bare nanoparticles soft landed onto flat glassy carbon and silicon as well as stepped graphite surfaces may be controlled through size-selection with a quadrupole mass filter and the length of deposition, respectively. The bare nanoparticles are observed with AFM to bind randomly to the flat glassy carbon surface when soft landed at relatively low coverage (1012 ions). In contrast, on stepped graphite surfaces at intermediate coverage (1013 ions) the soft landed nanoparticles are shown to bind preferentially along step edges forming extended linear chains of particles. At the highest coverage (5 x 1013 ions) examined in this study the nanoparticles are demonstrated with both AFM and SEM to form a continuous film on flat glassy carbon and silicon surfaces. On a graphite surface with defects, however, it is shown with SEM that the presence of localized surface imperfections results in agglomeration of nanoparticles onto these features and the formation of neighboring depletion zones that are devoid of particles. Employing high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in the high angular annular dark field imaging mode (STEM-HAADF) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) it is demonstrated that the magnetron sputtering/gas aggregation synthesis technique produces single metal particles with controlled morphology as well as bimetallic alloy nanoparticles with clearly defined core-shell structure. Therefore, this kinetically-limited physical synthesis technique, when combined with ion soft landing, is a versatile complementary method for preparing a wide range of

  5. Optical coupling of bare optoelectronic components and flexographically printed polymer waveguides in planar optronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yixiao; Wolfer, Tim; Lange, Alex; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-05-01

    Large scale, planar optronic systems allowing spatially distributed functionalities can be well used in diverse sensor networks, such as for monitoring the environment by measuring various physical quantities in medicine or aeronautics. In these systems, mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric foils, e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), are employed as carrier materials. A benefit of using these materials is their low cost. The optical interconnections from light sources to light transmission structures in planar optronic systems occupy a pivotal position for the sensing functions. As light sources, we employ the optoelectronic components, such as edgeemitting laser diodes, in form of bare chips, since their extremely small structures facilitate a high integration compactness and ensure sufficient system flexibility. Flexographically printed polymer optical waveguides are deployed as light guiding structures for short-distance communication in planar optronic systems. Printing processes are utilized for this generation of waveguides to achieve a cost-efficient large scale and high-throughput production. In order to attain a high-functional optronic system for sensing applications, one of the most essential prerequisites is the high coupling efficiency between the light sources and the waveguides. Therefore, in this work, we focus on the multimode polymer waveguide with a parabolic cross-section and investigate its optical coupling with the bare laser diode. We establish the geometrical model of the alignment based on the previous works on the optodic bonding of bare laser diodes and the fabrication process of polymer waveguides with consideration of various parameters, such as the beam profile of the laser diode, the employed polymer properties of the waveguides as well as the carrier substrates etc. Accordingly, the optical coupling of the bare laser diodes and the polymer waveguides was simulated

  6. Bare Shear Viscosity and Anomalous Fall Rate of Oil Droplets in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, Rodney

    2011-11-01

    Experimental evidence of Kim and Fedele (1982) indicates a breakdown of the Millikan Law for the fall rate of oil droplets in Nitrogen gas over a pressure range of 1-15 atm. The discrepancy is most pronounced for smallest, 0.1 micron radius droplets for which the fall rate increases with pressure. The opposite behavior was observed by Millikan with larger drops in air of pressure at most one atm. We explain these results by arguing that the particle's motion, in particular Stokes' drag formula, is determined by the so-called bare shear viscosity which applies to micro fluid flows. This is in contrast with the usual theory which uses a renormalized shear viscosity and which is well approximated by the Enskog value. A mode coupling formula for the bare shear viscosity is discussed and a graphical comparison is made with the experimental results. Basically an increase in gas pressure produces a decrease in the bare shear viscosity and thus the fall rate increases. The idea that the shear viscosity is smaller for micro flows is consistent with the intuitive belief that on small enough spatial and time scales, fluid flows are conservative without dissipation.

  7. Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, Matthew V.; Hagen, Scott C.

    2013-02-01

    This study is focused on the integration of bare earth lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data into unstructured (triangular) finite element meshes and the implications on simulating storm surge inundation using a shallow water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th percentile of vertical elevation errors using four different interpolation methods (linear, inverse distance weighted, natural neighbor, and cell averaging) to resample bare earth lidar and lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) onto unstructured meshes at different resolutions. The results are consolidated into a table of optimal interpolation methods that minimize the vertical elevation error of an unstructured mesh for a given mesh node density. The cell area averaging method performed most accurate when DEM grid cells within 0.25 times the ratio of local element size and DEM cell size were averaged. The methodology is applied to simulate inundation extent and maximum water levels in southern Mississippi due to Hurricane Katrina, which illustrates that local changes in topography such as adjusting element size and interpolation method drastically alter simulated storm surge locally and non-locally. The methods and results presented have utility and implications to any modeling application that uses bare earth lidar.

  8. An evaluation of the simulated bare soil evaporation of an atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Jan-Peter; Vogel, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Land surface processes have a significant impact on near-surface atmospheric phenomena. They determine, among others, near-surface sensible and latent heat fluxes and the radiation budget, and thus influence atmosphere and land characteristics, such as temperature and humidity, the structure of the planetary boundary layer, and even cloud formation processes. It is therefore important to simulate the land surface processes in atmospheric models as realistically as possible. Verifications have shown that the bare soil evaporation computed by the land surface scheme TERRA of the COSMO atmospheric model is systematically overestimated. Since this flux is part of the surface water and energy balance it affects, for instance, the other components of the turbulent heat fluxes as well as the soil water content and the surface temperature. Data from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Meteorological Service were used to analyse this model behaviour. In the standard model configuration of TERRA, the formulation of bare soil evaporation is based on the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), following the work by R. E. Dickinson. In order to reduce the excessive evaporation simulated by BATS, other formulations for the bare soil evaporation were tested in TERRA. In turned out that a scheme based on a resistance formulation efficiently reduces the simulated vapour flux, leading to a better agreement with the measurements.

  9. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  10. Study of THz surface waves (TSW) on bare and coated metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Mufei

    Scope and Method of Study. The focus of the research was to investigate the propagation characteristics (such as field distribution, attenuation and group velocity) of terahertz surface waves on bare and dielectric coated metal surface. The experiment was carried out on a modified standard terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system. Surface waves were coupled into the metal surface using the parallel plate waveguide coupling mechanism. The picosecond terahertz pulses were generated and detected using the Grischkowsky photo-conductive transmitter and antenna driven by a femtosecond laser. Findings and Conclusions. Surface waves at microwave and terahertz frequencies are weakly guided on bare metal surface due to the high metal conductivity. Detailed wave coupling analysis and experiment has shown that on a bare metal surface, the majority of energy remains to be uncoupled freely propagating waves. The spatial extent of the terahertz surface wave collapses two orders of magnitude upon the addition of the sub-wavelength dielectric layer on the metal surface. Simple theory in terahertz range gives an accurate explanation to this effect. Direct experimental measurements of the terahertz surface wave on an aluminum surface covered with a 12.5 mum thick dielectric layer have completely characterized the wave. The measurements of the frequency-dependent exponential fall-off of the evanescent wave from the surface agree well with theory.

  11. Bare, Bio-Active and Hydrogel-Coated Coils for Endovascular Treatment of Experimentally Induced Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Reinges, M.H.T.; Krings, T.; Drexler, A.Y.; Ludolph, A.; Sellhaus, B.; Bovi, M.; Geibprasert, S.; Agid, R.; Scherer, K.; Hans, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms with bare platinum coils have a higher rate of recurrence compared to surgical clipping. This may be related to failed vessel wall reconstruction since histological and scanning electron microscopy results following embolization failed to demonstrate neoendothelialization over the aneurysm neck. The present study tried to elucidate whether the use of modified coils resulted in a better rate of reconstructing the vessel wall over the aneurysm neck in experimental aneurysms. Aneurysms were created in 20 rabbits by intraluminal elastase incubation of the common carotid artery. Five animals each were assigned to the following groups: untreated, bare platinum coils, bioactive coils with polyglycolic/polylactic acid coating, and hydrogel-coated platinum coils. After 12 months, angiography, histology and scanning electron microscopy was performed. No neoendothelial layer was visualized in the bioactive and bare coil groups with a tendency to an increased layering of fibroblasts along the bioactive coils at the aneurysm fundus. However, at the aneurysm neck perfused clefts were present and although a thin fibrinous layer was present over some coils, no bridging neointimal or neoendothial layer was noted over different coils. Following loose Hydrogel coiling, a complete obliteration of the aneurysm was present with neoendothelialization present over different coil loops. The study demonstrates that with surface coil modifications complete and stable aneurysm obliteration may become possible. A smooth and dense surface over the aneurysm neck may be necessary for endothelial cells to bridge the aneurysm neck and to lead to vessel wall reconstruction. PMID:20642888

  12. Percutaneous Creation of Bare Intervascular Tunnels for Salvage of Thrombosed Hemodialysis Fistulas Without Recanalizable Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Wang, Yen-Chi; Weng, Mei-Jui

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThis study aimed to retrospectively assess the efficacy of a bare intervascular tunnel for salvage of a thrombosed hemodialysis fistula. We examined the clinical outcomes and provided follow-up images of the bare intervascular tunnel.Materials and MethodsEight thrombosed fistulas lacked available recanalizable outflow veins were included in this study. These fistulas were salvaged by re-directing access site flow to a new outflow vein through a percutaneously created intervascular tunnel without stent graft placement. The post-intervention primary and secondary access patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method.ResultsThe procedural and clinical success rates were 100 %. Post-intervention primary and secondary access patency at 300 days were 18.7 ± 15.8 and 87.5 ± 11.7 %, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 218.7 days (range 10–368 days). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction 10 days after the procedure. No other major complications were observed. Minor complications, such as swelling, ecchymosis, and pain around the tunnel, occurred in all of the patients.ConclusionsPercutaneous creation of a bare intervascular tunnel is a treatment option for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas without recanalizable outflow in selected patients.

  13. Relating variation of dust on snow to bare soil dynamics in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2013-12-01

    The deposition of desert dust to mountain snow directly impacts the hydrologic cycle and water resource management through the depression of snow albedo and acceleration of snowmelt. However, the key processes that control the variation of dust deposition to snow are poorly understood. Here we relate the bare soil exposure from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data for the period of 2002-2011, with dust loading in snow at downwind mountain sites in southern Colorado, the United States. We found that, for many pixels, remotely sensed fraction of bare soil in the dust-emitting area is significantly correlated with end-of-season dust concentrations in snow, and that the highest number of significantly correlated pixels in the dust-source area corresponds well with the period of peak dust deposition in the mountain snow (April-May). This analysis indicates that surface conditions in the dust-source area may provide first-order controls on emission of dust and deposition of that dust to the mountain snowcover. A preliminary analysis of precipitation records indicates that bare ground cover is strongly affected by prior rainfall in the months preceding the dust-emission season.

  14. Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of coated and bare nickel-based superalloy single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chataigner, E.; Remy, L.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of chromium-aluminum coated [001] single crystals of AM1, a nickel-base superalloy for turbine blades, is studied using a diamond shape cycle from 600 to 1,100 C. Comparison with bare specimens does not show any significant difference in thermal-mechanical fatigue nor in isothermal low cycle fatigue at high temperature. Metallographic observations on fracture surfaces and longitudinal sections of specimens tested to fatigue life or to a definite fraction of expected life have shown that the major crack tends to initiate from casting micropores in the sub-surface area very early in bare and coated specimens, under low cycle fatigue or thermal-mechanical fatigue. But the interaction between oxidation and fatigue cracking seems to play a major role. A simple model proposed by Reuchet and Remy has been identified for this single crystal superalloy. Its application to the life prediction under low cycle fatigue and thermal-mechanical fatigue for bare and coated single crystals with different orientations is shown.

  15. Bone strain magnitude is correlated with bone strain rate in tetrapods: implications for models of mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, B. R.; Iriarte-Diaz, J.; Blob, R. W.; Butcher, M. T.; Carrano, M. T.; Espinoza, N. R.; Main, R. P.; Ross, C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypotheses suggest that structural integrity of vertebrate bones is maintained by controlling bone strain magnitude via adaptive modelling in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased tissue-level strain magnitude and rate have both been identified as potent stimuli leading to increased bone formation. Mechanotransduction models hypothesize that osteocytes sense bone deformation by detecting fluid flow-induced drag in the bone's lacunar–canalicular porosity. This model suggests that the osteocyte's intracellular response depends on fluid-flow rate, a product of bone strain rate and gradient, but does not provide a mechanism for detection of strain magnitude. Such a mechanism is necessary for bone modelling to adapt to loads, because strain magnitude is an important determinant of skeletal fracture. Using strain gauge data from the limb bones of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, we identified strong correlations between strain rate and magnitude across clades employing diverse locomotor styles and degrees of rhythmicity. The breadth of our sample suggests that this pattern is likely to be a common feature of tetrapod bone loading. Moreover, finding that bone strain magnitude is encoded in strain rate at the tissue level is consistent with the hypothesis that it might be encoded in fluid-flow rate at the cellular level, facilitating bone adaptation via mechanotransduction. PMID:26063842

  16. Drug-Eluting or Bare-Metal Stents for Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Bønaa, Kaare H; Mannsverk, Jan; Wiseth, Rune; Aaberge, Lars; Myreng, Yngvar; Nygård, Ottar; Nilsen, Dennis W; Kløw, Nils-Einar; Uchto, Michael; Trovik, Thor; Bendz, Bjørn; Stavnes, Sindre; Bjørnerheim, Reidar; Larsen, Alf-Inge; Slette, Morten; Steigen, Terje; Jakobsen, Ole J; Bleie, Øyvind; Fossum, Eigil; Hanssen, Tove A; Dahl-Eriksen, Øystein; Njølstad, Inger; Rasmussen, Knut; Wilsgaard, Tom; Nordrehaug, Jan E

    2016-09-29

    Background Limited data are available on the long-term effects of contemporary drug-eluting stents versus contemporary bare-metal stents on rates of death, myocardial infarction, repeat revascularization, and stent thrombosis and on quality of life. Methods We randomly assigned 9013 patients who had stable or unstable coronary artery disease to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with the implantation of either contemporary drug-eluting stents or bare-metal stents. In the group receiving drug-eluting stents, 96% of the patients received either everolimus- or zotarolimus-eluting stents. The primary outcome was a composite of death from any cause and nonfatal spontaneous myocardial infarction after a median of 5 years of follow-up. Secondary outcomes included repeat revascularization, stent thrombosis, and quality of life. Results At 6 years, the rates of the primary outcome were 16.6% in the group receiving drug-eluting stents and 17.1% in the group receiving bare-metal stents (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88 to 1.09; P=0.66). There were no significant between-group differences in the components of the primary outcome. The 6-year rates of any repeat revascularization were 16.5% in the group receiving drug-eluting stents and 19.8% in the group receiving bare-metal stents (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.85; P<0.001); the rates of definite stent thrombosis were 0.8% and 1.2%, respectively (P=0.0498). Quality-of-life measures did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions In patients undergoing PCI, there were no significant differences between those receiving drug-eluting stents and those receiving bare-metal stents in the composite outcome of death from any cause and nonfatal spontaneous myocardial infarction. Rates of repeat revascularization were lower in the group receiving drug-eluting stents. (Funded by the Norwegian Research Council and others; NORSTENT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00811772 .).

  17. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Benign (noncancerous) bone tumors include: Bone cyst Fibroma Osteoblastoma Osteoid osteoma Cancerous tumors include: Ewing sarcoma Multiple myeloma Osteosarcoma Other types of cancer that may have spread to the bone Abnormal ...

  18. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... direct relationship between tobacco use and decreased bone density. Analyzing the impact of cigarette smoking on bone ... hard to determine whether a decrease in bone density is due to smoking itself or to other ...

  19. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  20. Facts about Broken Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... las fracturas de huesos Your bones are tough stuff — but even tough stuff can break. Like a wooden pencil, bones will ... that? Get a lot of physical activity, especially stuff like jumping and running. Feed your bones the ...

  1. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  2. Measurement of microstructural strain in cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    NICOLELLA, DANIEL P.; BONEWALD, LYNDA F.; MORAVITS, DONALD E.; LANKFORD, JAMES

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that mechanical factors affect bone remodeling such that increased mechanical demand results in net bone formation, whereas decreased demand results in net bone resorption. Current theories suggest that bone modeling and remodeling is controlled at the cellular level through signals mediated by osteocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate how macroscopically applied bone strains similar in magnitude to those that occur in vivo are manifest at the microscopic level in the bone matrix. Using a digital image correlation strain measurement technique, experimentally determined bone matrix strains around osteocyte lacuna resulting from macroscopic strains of approximately 2,000 microstrain (0.2%) reach levels of over 30,000 microstrain (3%) over fifteen times greater than the applied macroscopic strain. Strain patterns were highly heterogeneous and in some locations similar to observed microdamage around osteocyte lacuna indicating the resulting strains may represent the precursors to microdamage. This information may lead to a better understanding of how bone cells are affected by whole bone functional loading. PMID:16123021

  3. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  4. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruoxun; Gong, He; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  5. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruoxun; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  6. Early bone apposition in vivo on plasma-sprayed and electrochemically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Eliaz, Noam; Xiang, Zhou; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron; Hobbs, Linn W

    2006-08-01

    Three different implants, bare Ti-6Al-4V alloy, Ti-6Al-4V alloy coated with plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA), and Ti-6Al-4V alloy coated with electrochemically deposited hydroxyapatite (EDHA), were implanted into canine trabecular bone for 6 h, 7, and 14 days, respectively. Environmental scanning electron microscopy study showed that PSHA coatings had higher bone apposition ratios than those exhibited by bare Ti-6Al-4V and EDHA coatings after 7 days; however, at 14 days after implantation, EDHA and PSHA coatings exhibited similar bone apposition ratios, much higher than that for bare Ti-6Al-4V. The ultrastructure of the bone/implant interface observed by transmission electron microscope showed that the earliest mineralization (6 h-7 days) was in the form of nano-ribbon cluster mineral deposits with a Ca/P atomic ratio lower than that of hydroxyapatite. Later-stage mineralization (7-14 days) resulted in bone-like tissue with the characteristic templating of self-assembled collagen fibrils by HA platelets. Though adhesion of EDHA coatings to Ti-6Al-4V substrate proved problematical and clearly needs to be addressed through appropriate manipulation of electrodepositon parameters, the finely textured microstructure of EDHA coatings appears to provide significant advantage for the integration of mineralized bone tissue into the coatings. PMID:16618502

  7. Bone and bone marrow involvement in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Yachoui, Ralph; Parker, Brian J; Nguyen, Thanhcuong T

    2015-11-01

    Bone and bone marrow involvement in sarcoidosis have been infrequently reported. We aimed to describe the clinical features, radiological descriptions, pathological examinations, and outcomes of three patients with osseous sarcoidosis and one patient with bone marrow sarcoidosis seen at our institution. Our case series included fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography descriptions in assessing the whole-body extent of sarcoidosis. In the era of advanced imaging, large bone and axial skeleton sarcoidosis lesions are more common than previously reported.

  8. Relationships among maxillofacial morphologies, bone properties, and bone metabolic markers in patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Saito, D; Mikami, T; Oda, Y; Hasebe, D; Nishiyama, H; Saito, I; Kobayashi, T

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among bone properties, bone metabolic markers, and types of jaw deformity. The subjects were 55 female patients with jaw deformities. Skeletal morphology was examined using lateral cephalograms, and the patients were divided into three groups according to the type of anteroposterior skeletal pattern. Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, as well as deoxypyridinoline in urine, were measured as bone metabolic markers. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were used to assess bone properties at the calcaneal bone. The bone volume and bone density of the condylar process were measured in 43 patients by computed tomography. There were no significant differences in bone metabolic markers and QUS parameters between the groups, although bone formation and resorption markers tended to be higher in patients with a protrusive mandible. On the other hand, patients with mandibular retrusion had a higher tendency to have small and dense condylar processes. In conclusion, the results suggest that growth depression or a degenerative change in the mandibular condyle is involved in the pathogenesis of mandibular retrusion, although risk factors for progressive condylar resorption were not determined. PMID:26972158

  9. Survival of Ancylostoma caninum on bare ground, pea gravel, and concrete.

    PubMed

    Mark, D L

    1975-12-01

    Studies were done to determine the survival of infective Ancylostoma caninum 3rd-stage larvae on 3 ground covers commonly used in dog run construction: bare ground, pea gravel, and concrete. Changes in numbers of recovered larvae were compared to meterologic data and the most significant weather variables were determined. Larvae were recovered 1 to 7 days on bare ground. Larvae survived longer in the fecal mass (mean of 3 days) than on the bare ground (mean of 2 days). Rain was the most significant variable, in that it was positive in its effects (higher larval count) early in the experiment (causing fecal mass breakdown and release of larvae) and negative (lower larval count) later in the experiment (spreading larvae away from test site). Larvae were also recovered 1 to 7 days on pea gravel. They were recovered for a mean 2.6 days from the fecal sample, a mean of 1.5 days from the rocks directly below the fecal mass, and a mean of 1.3 days from the remaining rocks. Here also, rain was the most significant weather factor. It was negatively significant (lower larval count) for the fecal mass (spreading of the larvae) and positive for those in the pebbles (increasing the moisture in the pebbles). Survival time of larvae on concrete was shorter than that on the other 2 substrates: from 0 to 2 days. Larvae were recovered a mean of 1.3 days from the fecal mass and a mean of 0., days from the surrounding concrete. Rain was positively significant early in the experiments in that it released trapped larvae from the fecal mass. Sunlight consistently was negatively significant (lower larval count) due to its lethality to the unprotected larvae.

  10. Occupation of bare habitats, an evolutionary precursor to soil specialization in plants

    PubMed Central

    Cacho, N. Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y.

    2014-01-01

    Plant soil specialists contribute greatly to global diversity; however, the ecoevolutionary forces responsible for generating this diversity are poorly understood. We integrate molecular phylogenies with descriptive and experimental ecological data, creating a powerful framework with which to elucidate forces driving soil specialization. Hypotheses explaining edaphic specialization have historically focused on costs of adaptation to elements (e.g., nickel, calcium/magnesium) and accompanying tradeoffs in competitive ability in benign soils. We combine in situ microhabitat data for 37 streptanthoid species (Brassicaceae), soil analyses, and competition experiments with their phylogeny to reconstruct selective forces generating serpentine soil endemism, which has four to five independent origins in this group. Coupling ancestral state reconstruction with phylogenetic independent contrasts, we examine the magnitude and timing of changes in soil and habitat attributes relative to inferred shifts to serpentine. We find large changes in soil chemistry at nodes associated with soil shifts, suggesting that elemental changes occurred concomitantly with soil transitions. In contrast, the amount of bare ground surrounding plants in the field (“bareness”), which is greater in serpentine environments, is conserved across soil-type shifts. Thus, occupation of bare environments preceded shifts to serpentine, and may serve as an evolutionary precursor to harsh elemental soils and environments. In greenhouse experiments, taxa from barer environments are poorer competitors, a tradeoff that may contribute to soil endemism. The hypothesis of occupation of bare habitats as a precursor of soil specialization can be tested in other systems with a similar integrative ecophylogenetic approach, thereby providing deeper insights into this rich source of biodiversity. PMID:25267640

  11. Seawater recharge into oceanic crust: IODP Exp 327 Site U1363 Grizzly Bare outcrop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Hulme, Samuel M.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Orcutt, Beth N.; Becker, Keir

    2013-06-01

    Systematic differences in sediment thermal and pore water chemical profiles from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1363 document mixing and reaction within the basaltic crust adjacent to Grizzly Bare outcrop, a site of hydrothermal recharge into 3.6 My-old basaltic crust. A transect of seven holes was drilled ~50 m to ~750 m away from the base of the outcrop. Temperatures at the sediment-basement interface increase from ~6°C to >30°C with increasing distance from the outcrop, and heat flow is suppressed within several hundred meters from the outcrop. Calculated fluid compositions at the sediment-basement interface are generally explained by mixing between bottom seawater and altered crustal basement fluids, with a composition similar but not identical to fluids from seeps at Baby Bare outcrop, located ~45 km to the northeast. Reactions within upper basement and overlying sediment affect a variety of ions (Mn, Fe, Mo, Si, PO43-, V, and U) and δ13DIC, indicating a diagenetic influence and diffusive exchange with overlying sediment pore waters. The apparent 14C age of basal pore fluids is much older than bottom seawater. Collectively, these results are consistent with seawater recharge at Grizzly Bare outcrop; however, there are strong gradients in fluid composition within 50 m of the outcrop, providing evidence for complex flow paths and vigorous mixing of young, recently recharged seawater with much older, more reacted basement fluid. The proximity of these altered fluids to the edge of the outcrop raises the possibility for fluid seepage from the outcrop in addition to seawater recharge.

  12. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Charles Y. Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  13. Inner-Shell Electron Capture by a Swift Bare Ion: Second Born Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeshaft, Robin

    1980-02-01

    The second Born cross section for electron capture from a hydrogenlike atom of atomic number ZT by a bare ion of atomic number ZP and speed v is evaluated for (ZPe2ℏv<<1 and ZT arbitrary. The ratio of the second to first Born cross sections increases rapidly as ZT increases; for (ZTe2ℏv)>~1 this ratio is very large. These results indicate that second- and higher-order Born terms must be considered in calculating the cross section for inner-shell electron capture (or the time-reversed process).

  14. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  15. Photoinduced phase transition and relaxation in bare SrTiO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K. X.; Luo, B. C.; Li, Y. F.; Chen, C. L.; Wu, T.

    2013-07-01

    The photoinduced insulator-metal phase transition and relaxation characteristics have been investigated in bare SrTiO3 single crystals. The photoinduced relaxation time constant after the irradiation shows an increase with increasing temperatures. The SrTiO3 single crystal has a cutoff wavelength and an absorption edge of spectrum at about 385 nm, which agrees well with the band gap. The photocurrent responsivity is 1.36 × 10-5 A/W at 300 nm wavelength. The relative change in resistance is more than above six orders at room temperature, possessing potential applications in ultraviolet sensitive and detecting devices.

  16. Data documentation for the bare soil experiment at the University of Arkansas, June - August 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the relationships between soil moisture and reflectivity of a bare soil, using microwave techniques. A drainage experiment was conducted on a Captina silt loam in cooperation with personnel in the Electrical Engineering Department. Measurements included soil moisture pressures at various depths, neutron probe measurements, gravimetric moisture samples, and reflectivity of the soil surface at selected frequencies including 1.5 and 6.0 GHz and at the incident angle of 45 deg. All measurements were made in conjuction with that of reflectivity data.

  17. Low-frequency noise in bare SOI wafers: Experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-11-01

    Low-frequency noise (LFN) measurements are largely used for interface quality characterization in MOSFETs. In this work, a detailed investigation of LFN technique applied to pseudo-MOSFETs in bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates is provided. A physical model capable to describe the experimental results is proposed and validated using different die areas and inter-probe distances. The effective silicon area contributing to the noise signal, the impact of defects induced by probes and the possibility to extract interface trap density are addressed.

  18. [The pisiform bone: sesamoid or carpal bone?].

    PubMed

    May, O

    1996-01-01

    In man, the pisiform bone occupies an unusual place among the carpal bones. It is situated in an anterior plane to the other bones, sheathed within the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris, and ossifying almost four years the last of the carpal bones. Many theories have tried to explain the presence of this "exceptional" bone: the first theory, proposed by Flower and Mivart, suggested the possibility that this bone could be a sesamoid. The second theory supposes a polydactyl hand, assuming that polydactyly preceded pentadactyly; the pisiform would then be a post-minimus vestigial bone according to Bardeleben. Finally, Gegenbauer and Gillies, proposed a primary pentadactyl hand in which the carpus would be composed of three proximal elements, generally two central, and five distal. The pisiform would either be a derivative of the central series, or a distinct element in the carpus. This last theory appears to be the most likely. The primary carpus would therefore have consisted of 12 bones arranged in 3 distinct rows, a proximal row of 3 bones, a central row of 4 bones, and a distal row of 5 bones. According to this theory, the most ulnar of the central would have been displaced to the medial limit of the carpus, to become the pisiform. PMID:9026058

  19. Therapy Effect: Impact on Bone Marrow Morphology.

    PubMed

    Li, K David; Salama, Mohamed E

    2016-03-01

    This article highlights the most common morphologic features identified in the bone marrow after chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies, growth-stimulating agents, and specific targeted therapies. The key is to be aware of these changes while reviewing post-therapeutic bone marrow biopsies and to not mistake reactive patterns for neoplastic processes. In addition, given the development and prevalent use of targeted therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immune modulators, knowledge of drug-specific morphologic changes is required for proper bone marrow interpretation and diagnosis.

  20. Bone grafts in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna; Vinitha, Belliappa; Fathima, Ghousia

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation. PMID:23946565

  1. Bone Health and Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lupsa, Beatrice C; Insogna, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to decreased bone strength and an increased risk of low-energy fractures. Central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements are the gold standard for determining bone mineral density. Bone loss is an inevitable consequence of the decrease in estrogen levels during and following menopause, but additional risk factors for bone loss can also contribute to osteoporosis in older women. A well-balanced diet, exercise, and smoking cessation are key to maintaining bone health as women age. Pharmacologic agents should be recommended in patients at high risk for fracture.

  2. Bone Adaptation and Regeneration - New Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bacabac, Rommel Gaud

    osteocytes sensing different canalicular flow patterns around cutting cone and reversal zone during loading, thus determining the bone's structure. Disturbances in architecture and permeability of the 3D porous network will affect transduction of mechanical loads to the mechanosensors. Uncovering the cellular and mechanical basis of the osteocyte's response to loading represents a significant challenge to our understanding of cellular mechanotransduction and bone remodeling. In view of the importance of mechanical stress for maintaining bone strength, mechanical stimuli have great potential for providing a therapeutic approach for bone (re)generation.

  3. BMP-2 encapsulated polysaccharide nanoparticle modified biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenming; Wang, Kefeng; Lu, Xiong; Li, Minqi; Liu, Hongrui; Xie, Chaoming; Meng, Fanzhi; Jiang, Ou; Li, Chen; Zhi, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Bone morphology protein-2 (BMP-2) encapsulated chitosan/chondrotin sulfate nanoparticles (CHI/CS NPs) are developed to enhance ectopic bone formation on biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) scaffolds. BMP-2 contained CHI/CS NPs were prepared by a simple and mild polyelectrolyte complexation process. It does not involve harsh organic solvents and high temperature, and therefore retain growth factors activity. These NPs were immobilized on BCP scaffolds, and realize the sustained release of growth factors from the scaffolds. The bare BCP scaffolds, NP loaded scaffolds (BCP-NP), and NP loaded and polydopamine coated scaffolds (BCP-Dop-NP) were seeded with bone marrow stroma cells (BMSC) to evaluate the osteoinductivity of the scaffolds. BMSC culture results indicate that all scaffolds favor cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation. Afterwards, the bare BCP, BCP-NP, and BCP-Dop-NP scaffolds were implanted into rabbits intramuscularly to evaluate the ectopic bone formation of scaffolds. In vivo results indicate that the BCP-NP and BCP-Dop-NP scaffolds enhance more ectopic bone formation than the bare BCP scaffolds. Both the in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that BMP-2 encapsulated polysaccharide NPs are effective to improve the osteoinductivity of the scaffolds. In addition, BCP-NP scaffolds induce more bone formation than BCP-Dop-NP scaffolds. This is because BCP-NP scaffolds harness the intrinsic osteoinductivity BCP and BMP-2, whereas BCP-Dop-NP scaffolds have polydopamine coatings that inhibit the surfaces biological features of BCP scaffolds, and therefore weaken the bone formation ability of scaffolds. PMID:25100662

  4. Biochemical markers of bone turnover in osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients with osteoporosis and advanced cancer involving the bone.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Serge; Farooki, Azeez

    2011-02-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) has been hypothesized to result in part from a relative "oversuppression" of normal physiologic bone remodeling at the jaw brought about by bisphosphonate therapy. Biochemical markers of bone turnover give readily measurable information on integrated systemic bone remodeling activity, as measured by blood and urine assays. The intra- and interassay variability of most currently available assays is less than 10%, although many biological factors can influence levels of bone turnover markers. Bone turnover markers may show a dynamic response to changes in clinical status for a given disease state. Elevated bone turnover on and off treatment appears to predict adverse clinical consequences in both osteoporosis and cancer. Bisphosphonates effectively decrease the level of the bone turnover markers with a pattern depending on the marker, the bisphosphonate, the dose regimen, and the disease. However, long-term (10-year) treatment with bisphosphonates for osteoporosis does not appear to result in a progressive decline in bone turnover, as measured by markers and bone histology. The effects of long-term (greater than 2 years) treatment with monthly intravenous bisphosphonates on bone turnover markers in cancer are unknown. Discontinuation of bisphosphonate therapy appears to allow a recovery of bone turnover, which is related to the bisphosphonate, the duration of therapy, and the disease being treated. At this time, data are limited with regard to the utility of bone turnover markers in assessing risk for ONJ and whether bone marker-directed bisphosphonate holidays would be useful in prevention or treatment of ONJ.

  5. Does running strengthen bone?

    PubMed

    Boudenot, Arnaud; Achiou, Zahra; Portier, Hugues

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a living tissue needing mechanical stress to maintain strength. Traditional endurance exercises offer only modest effects on bone. Walking and running produce low impact but lead to bone fatigue. This article is specifically addressed to therapists and explains the mechanisms involved for the effects of exercise on bone. Intermittent exercise limits bone fatigue, and downhill exercises increase ground impact forces and involve eccentric muscle contractions, which are particularly osteogenic. PMID:26562001

  6. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  7. The Hedgehog signalling pathway in bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Andre, Philipp; Ye, Ling; Yang, Ying-Zi

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway plays many important roles in development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The critical function of Hh signalling in bone formation has been identified in the past two decades. Here, we review the evolutionarily conserved Hh signalling mechanisms with an emphasis on the functions of the Hh signalling pathway in bone development, homeostasis and diseases. In the early stages of embryonic limb development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) acts as a major morphogen in patterning the limb buds. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has an essential function in endochondral ossification and induces osteoblast differentiation in the perichondrium. Hh signalling is also involved intramembrane ossification. Interactions between Hh and Wnt signalling regulate cartilage development, endochondral bone formation and synovial joint formation. Hh also plays an important role in bone homeostasis, and reducing Hh signalling protects against age-related bone loss. Disruption of Hh signalling regulation leads to multiple bone diseases, such as progressive osseous heteroplasia. Therefore, understanding the signalling mechanisms and functions of Hh signalling in bone development, homeostasis and diseases will provide important insights into bone disease prevention, diagnoses and therapeutics. PMID:26023726

  8. SERS detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a bare gold nanoparticles coupled film system.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hai-Xin; Hu, Kai; Li, Da-Wei; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-07-21

    A facile approach based on a bare gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coupled film system as the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was developed for the effective detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A smooth gold film (Au film) was self-assembled with a hydrophobic layer of an alkyl chain in order to capture the PAHs molecules from bulk solution to its surface. Next, the bare gold nanoparticles, about 60 nm in diameter without functional modification, were paved onto the PAHs-molecule-coated Au film. This was aimed at generating a plasmon coupling effect to illuminate a stronger electromagnetic field within the gaps between particles and film, exactly where the absorbed molecules were located. The effects of the Au film, alkyl chain, and Au NPs on the SERS response to PAHs were respectively investigated. Through utilizing this simple system, a reproducible and interference-free SERS detection was demonstrated. Furthermore, the excellent detection ability to sense a series of PAHs was achieved with low concentrations of 1.2 × 10(-8) M, 2.0 × 10(-8) M, 5.5 × 10(-8) M, and 6.3 × 10(-8) M for benzo[b]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, and pyrene, respectively. This method, capable of sample preparation and SERS measurement on a portable carrier, would be an ideal candidate for practical applications under field conditions.

  9. Oralloy (93.2 235U) Bare Metal Annuli And Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, Andrew John

    2015-09-01

    A multitude of critical experiments with highly enriched uranium metal were conducted in the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments served to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant while also providing data for verification of different calculation methods and associated cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included both solid cylinders and annuli of various diameters, interacting cylinders of various diameters, parallelepipeds, and reflected cylinders and annuli. The experiments described here involve a series of delayed critical stacks of bare oralloy HEU annuli and disks. Three of these experiments consist of stacking bare HEU annuli of varying diameters to obtain critical configurations. These annuli have nominal inner and outer diameters (ID/OD) including: 7 inches (") ID – 9" OD, 9" ID – 11" OD, 11" ID – 13" OD, and 13? ID – 15" OD. The nominal heights range from 0.125" to 1.5". The three experiments themselves range from 7" – 13", 7" – 15", and 9" – 15" in diameter, respectively. The fourth experiment ranges from 7" – 11", and along with different annuli, it also includes an 11" disk and several 7" diameter disks. All four delayed critical experiments were configured and evaluated by J. T. Mihalczo, J. J. Lynn, and D. E. McCarty from December of 1962 to February 1963 with additional information in their corresponding logbook.

  10. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J. C.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1980-01-01

    Remote measurements of soil moisture contents over bare fields and fields covered with orchard grass, corn, and soybean were made during October 1979 with 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz microwave radiometers mounted on a truck. Ground truth of soil moisture content, ambient air, and soil temperatures was acquired concurrently with the radiometric measurements. The biomass of the vegetation was sampled about once a week. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields were compared with those of radiative transfer model calculations using as inputs the acquired soil moisture and temperature data with appropriate values of dielectric constants for soil-water mixtures. Good agreement was found between the calculated and the measured results over 10-70 deg incident angles. The presence of vegetation was found to reduce the sensitivity of soil moisture sensing. At 1.4 GHz the sensitivity reduction ranged from approximately 20% for 10-cm tall grassland to over 60% for the dense soybean field. At 5 GHz the corresponding reduction in sensitivity ranged from approximately 70 to approximately 90%.

  11. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Claudia; Dubois, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. PMID:26345228

  12. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J. C.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground truth of soil moisture content, and ambient air and soil temperatures were acquired concurrently with measurements of soil moisture in bare fields and fields covered with grass, corn, and soybeans obtained with 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz radiometers mounted on a truck. The biomass of the vegetation was sampled about once a week. The measured brightness temperatures over the bare fields were compared with those of radiative transfer model calculations using as inputs the acquired soil moisture and temperatures data with appropriate values of dielectric constants for soil-water mixtures. A good agreement was found between the calculated and measured results over 10 deg to 70 deg incident angles. The presence of vegetation reduced the sensitivity of soil moisture sensing. At 1.4 GHz the sensitivity reduction ranged from about 20% for 10 cm tall grassland cover to over 50 to 60% for the dense soybean field. At 5 GHz corresponding reduction in sensitivity ranged from approximately 70% to approximately 90%.

  13. Reforesting "bare hills" in Vietnam: social and environmental consequences of the 5 million hectare reforestation program.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Pamela

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, forestry has been strongly promoted by the government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam through large-scale projects to rehabilitate and reforest millions of hectares of land. One project to reforest 5 million hectares has received hundreds of millions of US dollars for implementation. Yet based on a case study in one area of northern Vietnam, this project appears to have had a number of unforeseen consequences. Large areas of land classified as "bare hills" have been targeted for reforestation, despite the fact that these lands already harbor a number of species that were used by local communities. The bare hills were especially economically important to poor households and to women who collected a variety of nontimber forest products there. Because the reforestation project focused most efforts on establishing new plantations rather than supporting natural regeneration, diverse sources of non-timber forest products were being replaced with monocrop exotic tree plantations. A strong inequity in the allocation of private lands for reforestation has characterized the regreening projects to date, and this may have continuing unwelcome social, environmental, and economic impacts into the future, particularly for the poor. PMID:19860156

  14. Trajectories of water table recovery following the re-vegetation of bare peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim; Maskill, Rachael; Pilkington, Michael; Walker, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological status of blanket peat influences a wide range of peatland functions, such as runoff generation, water quality, vegetation distribution, and rates of carbon sequestration. The UK supports 15% of the world's blanket peat cover, but much of this vital resource is significantly degraded, impacted by industrial pollution, overgrazing, wildfire, and climatic shifts. These pressures have produced a unique landscape characterised by severe gully erosion and extensive areas of bare peat. This in turn has led water tables to become substantially drawn down, impacting peatland function and limiting the resilience of these landscapes to future changes in climate. The restoration of eroding UK peatlands is a major conservation concern, and landscape-scale interventions through the re-vegetation of bare peat is becoming increasingly extensive in areas of upland Britain. Water table is the primary physical parameter considered in the monitoring of many peatland restoration projects, and there is a wealth of data on individual monitoring programmes which indicates that re-vegetation significantly raises water tables. This paper draws on data from multiple restoration projects carried out by the Moors for the Future Partnership in the Southern Pennines, UK, covering a range of stages in the erosion-restoration continuum, to assess the trajectories of water table recovery following re-vegetation. This will allow us to generate projections of future water table recovery, which will be of benefit to land managers and conservation organisations to inform future restoration initiatives.

  15. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  16. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behaviormore » of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.« less

  17. Preliminary study of quaternary faulting on the east side of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Reheis, M.C.

    1986-12-31

    Active faults bound the east side of Bare Mountain. Geomorphic features, stratigraphy, and soil development indicate that two 3-km-long segments of the range-front fault probably last moved in Holocene or late Pleistocene time. Other segments of the fault have been quiescent since the late Pleistocene. Both late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits bury many faults east of the northern end of Bare Mountain. Two prospect pits on the range-front fault reveal evidence of recurrent late Quaternary movements. Both older and younger deposits in one pit are faulted, but fractures in the older unit do not extend up into the younger unit. Based on soil development, the older and younger fault episodes respectively are probably late Pleistocene and Holocene in age. Another pit shows carbonate-cemented fractures with slickensides in a late Pleistocene deposit, suggesting at least two late Pleistocene or Holocene fault movements. Middle to early Pleistocene and Tertiary deposits show evidence of recurrent faulting in many locations. Faults in these deposits are pervaded by secondary CaCO{sub 3} and silica that commonly exhibit slickensides.

  18. Chernozem aggregate waterstability loss investigation in a long-term bare fallow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, N. A.; Milanovskiy, E. Y.

    2009-04-01

    The research is focused on mechanisms of aggregate waterstability controlled by soil organic matter (SOM). The objects of the research are two contrast variants of typical chernozem - under native grassland and under a 60-year bare fallow experimental plot (100 m2) on the territory of Central Chernozem Biosphere Reserve, Russia. Seasonal plowing and deficiency of fresh plant residues (due to weeding out) resulted in a rapid mineralization of SOM. The Corg content in the 0-20 cm topsoil under native grassland is 6-4.5 %. For the last two decades Corg content under bare fallow has stabilized on the 2.6% level and is therefore assumed to represent stable SOM pool. However excellent aggregate waterstability of chernozem is completely lost under bare fallow. Therefore the aim of our study is to reveal the role of different SOM pools spatial and functional organization in aggregate waterstability formation. Bulk soil samples were collected from 2 m grassland profile and 1.5 m bare fallow profile with 10 cm interval and simultaneous measurements of soil field density and moisture. Following samples were analysed: bulk samples, dry and wet-sieving aggregates, undisturbed and pulverized aggregates, granule-densimetric fractions obtained by sedimentation of bulk samples (clay 5 mkm) with following densimetric fractionation in bromoform (light ? 2.4 g/cm3), and above mentioned samples after removal of SOM by hydrogen peroxide. Isolation of aggregates and granule-densimetric fractionation were carried out for bulk soils at 0-20, 40-50 and 80-90 cm depth. We use elemental analysis (C, H, N), size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction chromatography of humic substances (HS), laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area (SSA) measurements by nitrogen adsorption and micromorphological examination of thin sections. Detailed characteristics obtained for aggregates and granule-densimetric fractions from a typical chernozem soil under native grassland and under 60

  19. Matching the BtA line to the bare-AGS (Part 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Glenn, J. W.; Huan, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Raparia, D.; Zeno, K.

    2008-11-01

    The Booster to AGS (BtA) transfer line [Ref for BtA line] transports the beam bunches from the AGS-Booster to the AGS synchrotron, and also matches the beam parameters ({beta}{sub x,y}, {alpha}{sub x,y}) and dispersion functions ({eta}{sub x,y}, {eta}{prime}{sub x,y}) of the transported beam to the corresponding quantities of the circulating beam in AGS, at the AGS injection point. In this technical note we describe in details, the calculations of the matching procedure of the BtA line to the bare-AGS, and provide magnet settings for the MAD-model of the BtA transfer line which is 'matched' to the bare-AGS. In a separate but more concise technical note (Part II) we will present results on the beam optics of the BtA beam line which is 'matched' to the AGS with two helical snakes.

  20. Reforesting "bare hills" in Vietnam: social and environmental consequences of the 5 million hectare reforestation program.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Pamela

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, forestry has been strongly promoted by the government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam through large-scale projects to rehabilitate and reforest millions of hectares of land. One project to reforest 5 million hectares has received hundreds of millions of US dollars for implementation. Yet based on a case study in one area of northern Vietnam, this project appears to have had a number of unforeseen consequences. Large areas of land classified as "bare hills" have been targeted for reforestation, despite the fact that these lands already harbor a number of species that were used by local communities. The bare hills were especially economically important to poor households and to women who collected a variety of nontimber forest products there. Because the reforestation project focused most efforts on establishing new plantations rather than supporting natural regeneration, diverse sources of non-timber forest products were being replaced with monocrop exotic tree plantations. A strong inequity in the allocation of private lands for reforestation has characterized the regreening projects to date, and this may have continuing unwelcome social, environmental, and economic impacts into the future, particularly for the poor.

  1. Similar Success Rates with Bivalirudin and Unfractionated Heparin in Bare-Metal Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hallak, Omar; Shams, S. Ali; Broce, Mike; Lavigne, P. Scott; Lucas, B. Daniel; Elhabyan, Abdul-Karim; Reyes, Bernardo J.

    2007-09-15

    Background. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the traditional agent utilized during percutaneous peripheral interventions (PPIs) despite its well-known limitations. Bivalirudin, a thrombin-specific anticoagulant, overcomes many of the limitations of UFH and has consistently demonstrated comparable efficacy with significantly fewer bleeding complications. The purpose of this study was to compare procedural success in patients undergoing bare-metal stent implantation for atherosclerotic blockage of the renal, iliac, and femoral arteries and receiving either bivalirudin (0.75 mg/kg bolus/1.75 mg/kg/hr infusion) or UFH (50-70 U/kg/hr bolus) as the primary anticoagulant. Methods. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized retrospective registry with the primary endpoint of procedural success. Secondary endpoints included incidence of: death, myocardial infarction (MI), urgent revascularization, amputation, and major and minor bleeding. Results. One hundred and five consecutive patients were enrolled (bivalirudin = 53; heparin = 52). Baseline demographics were comparable between groups. Patients were pretreated with clopidogrel (approx. 71%) and aspirin (approx. 79%). Procedural success was achieved in 97% and 96% of patients in the bivalirudin- and heparin-treated groups, respectively. Event rates were low and similar between groups. Conclusion. Bivalirudin maintained an equal rate of procedural success in this cohort without sacrificing patient safety. Results of this study add to the growing body of evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of bivalirudin as a possible substitute for UFH in anticoagulation during peripheral vascular bare-metal stent implantation.

  2. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center site was used for an experiment in which soil moisture remote sensing over bare, grass, and alfalfa fields was conducted over a three-month period using 0.6 GHz, 1.4 GHz, and 10.6 GHz Dicke-type microwave radiometers mounted on mobile towers. Ground truth soil moisture content and ambient air and sil temperatures were obtained concurrently with the radiometric measurements. Biomass of the vegetation cover was sampled about once a week. Soil density for each of the three fields was measured several times during the course of the experiment. Results of the radiometric masurements confirm the frequency dependence of moisture sensing sensitivity reduction reported earlier. Observations over the bare, wet field show that the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest of 0.6 GHz frequency, a result contrary to expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil water mixtures and current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  3. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Claudia; Dubois, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. PMID:26345228

  4. Bonding of IC bare chips for microsystems using Ar atom bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Akiomi; Sasaki, Yasuhiko; Udo, Ryujirou; Harada, Takeshi; Usami, Mitsuo

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes integrated circuit (IC) bare chip bonding to micromechanical devices and discusses factors affecting bond and IC qualities. Test element group (TEG) with protective diode and TEG with transistors, small-scale circuits and junctions were used here as the IC chips. Some of the TEG dies were thinned into films. In the bonding process, an Ar atom beam is used to sputter clean the surface to be bonded. After contaminants on the surfaces to be bonded are removed by the Ar atomic beam irradiation, the IC chip, a die or a film is bonded to a silicon substrate. The IC dies and the films can be bonded at low temperature and under low pressure. The strengths of the joints are good enough for use in microsystems. There is no difference in current-voltage properties of the IC films before and after the irradiation. The shapes of the ring osillator waves of the bonded IC films are not distorted by the thermal tests. This suggests that the thermal tests do not cause electrical damage to the IC chips. Although the joints of IC film/Si substrate have a few fine voids at the interface, the thermal conductivities of the joints are compared to those of IC films before bonding. The results given show the feasibility of mounting bare IC chips onto substrates of microsystems.

  5. The influence of soil hydraulic properties on bare soil evaporation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durner, Wolfgang; Iden, Sascha C.; Diamantopoulos, Efstathios

    2015-04-01

    Evaporation from bare soil is an important component of the global water cycle and the energy balance of the earth's surface. Forecasting bare soil evaporation requires knowledge of physical soil properties like thermal and hydraulic conductivity, heat and water capacity, and the water-content dependency of the albedo. The focus of this contribution is to analyze the sensitivity of soil evaporation dynamics with respect to physical soil properties. A coupled numerical model of water, vapor, and heat flow in soil considering the surface energy balance and temperature effects on the transport coefficients is used for the analysis. Particular attention is devoted to the influence of soil hydraulic properties on the duration of stage-one evaporation and evaporation rates during stage-two. We illustrate the importance of an adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties which should account for water sorption in dry soil, water flow in completely and incompletely-filled pores, and vapor diffusion. A comparison with data from evaporation experiments in the laboratory under different atmospheric forcings provides the link between models and reality. This confrontation unveils that the use of classic parametrizations of soil hydraulic properties leads to a bias in the description of experimental data and model predictions.

  6. Second stable regime of internal kink modes excited by barely passing energetic ions in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H. D.; Dong, J. Q.; Fu, G. Y.; Zheng, G. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Long, Y. X.; He, Z. X.; Jiang, H. B.; Shen, Y.; Wang, L. F.

    2010-08-01

    The internal kink (fishbone) modes, driven by barely passing energetic ions (EIs), are numerically studied with the spatial distribution of the EIs taking into account. It is found that the modes with frequencies comparable to the toroidal precession frequencies are excited by resonant interaction with the EIs. Positive and negative density gradient dominating cases, corresponding to off- and near-axis depositions of neutral beam injection (NBI), respectively, are analyzed in detail. The most interesting and important feature of the modes is that there exists a second stable regime in higher βh (=pressure of EIs/toroidal magnetic pressure) range, and the modes may only be excited by the barely passing EIs in a region of βth1<βh<βth2 (βth is threshold or critical beta of EIs). Besides, the unstable modes require minimum density gradients and minimum radial positions of NBI deposition. The physics mechanism for the existence of the second stable regime is discussed. The results may provide a means of reducing or even preventing the loss of NBI energetic ions and increasing the heating efficiency by adjusting the pitch angle and driving the system into the second stable regime fast enough.

  7. Gas phase interactions with bare and gold nanoparticle decorated gallium nitride nanowires by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, Ishwar; Kengne, Blaise-Alexis; McIlroy, David

    2012-02-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) has been used to characterize the interaction of CO and H2O with the surface of bare and gold nanoparticle (Au NP) decorated gallium nitride nanowires at 298 K, 77 K and 20 K. The average diameter of the Au NPs is 4.5 ± 0.5 nm and the average nanowire diameter is 105 ± 75 nm. CO and H2O do not bond to the surface of the bare GaN nanowires at 298K, 77K, or 20K. Temperature dependent UPS analysis reveals that CO and H2O weakly physisorbed to the Au NP decorated GaN nanowires with heats of adsorption of 4.37 ± 0.03 meV and 1.25 ± 0.04 meV , respectively. The adsorption at 298K of 50 Langmuir of CO followed by 50 Langmuir of H2O showed that CO adsorption promotes H2O adsorption, while 50 Langmuir of H2O followed by 50 Langmuir of CO showed that H2O inhibits CO adsorption. The findings of this study that the adsorption of H2O inhibits CO adsorption onto the Au NP-GaN nanowires explains previous studies of the gas sensing properties of mats of Au NP- GaN nanowires.

  8. Laser damage of HR, AR-coatings, monolayers and bare surfaces at 1064 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnov, S. V.; Klimentov, S. M.; Said, A. A.; Soileau, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced damage thresholds and morphologies were investigated in a variety of uncoated and coated surfaces, including monolayers and multi-layers of different chemical compositions. Both antireflective (AR) and highly reflective (HR) were tested. Testing was done at 1064 nm with 25 picosecond and 8 nanosecond YAG/Nd laser single pulses. Spot diameter in the experiments varied from 0.09 to 0.22 mm. The laser damage measurement procedure consisted of 1-on-1 (single laser pulse in the selected site) and N-on-1 experiments including repeated irradiation by pulses of the same fluence and subsequently raised from pulse to pulse fluence until damage occurred. The highest picosecond damage thresholds of commercially available coatings averaged 12 - 14 J/sq cm, 50 percent less than thresholds obtained in bare fused silica. Some coatings and bare surfaces revealed a palpable preconditioning effect (an increase in threshold of 1.2 to 1.8 times). Picosecond and nanosecond data were compared to draw conclusions about pulse width dependence. An attempt was made to classify damage morphologies according to the type of coating, class of irradiating, and damage level.

  9. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J. C.; McMurtrey, J. E., III

    1980-10-01

    Remote measurements of soil moisture contents over bare fields and fields covered with orchard grass, corn, and soybean were made during October 1979 with 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz microwave radiometers mounted on a truck. Ground truth of soil moisture content, ambient air and soil temperatures was acquired concurrently with the radiometric measurements. The biomass of the vegetation was sampled about once a week. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields were compared with those of radiative transfer model calculations using as inputs the acquired soil moisture and temperature data with appropriate values of dielectric constants for soil-water mixtures. Good agreement was found between the calculated and the measured results over 10°-70° incident angles. The presence of vegetation was found to reduce the sensitivity of soil moisture sensing. At 1.4 GHz the sensitivity reduction ranged from ˜20% for 10-cm tall grassland to over 60% for the dense soybean field. At 5 GHz the corresponding reduction in sensitivity ranged from ˜70% to ˜90%.

  10. Exciton Emission from Bare and Alq3/Gold Coated GaN Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Fatemesadat; Kuhnert, Gerd; Hommel, Detlef; Schmitzer, Heidrun; Wagner, Hans-Peter

    We study the excitonic and impurity related emission in bare and aluminum quinoline (Alq3)/gold coated wurtzite GaN nanorods by temperature-dependent time-integrated (TI) and time-resolved (TR) photoluminescence (PL). The GaN nanorods were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Alq3 as well as Alq3/gold covered nanorods were synthesized by organic molecular beam deposition. In the near-band edge region a donor-bound-exciton (D0X) emission is observed at 3.473 eV. Another emission band at 3.275 eV reveals LO-phonon replica and is attributed to a donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) luminescence. TR PL traces at 20 K show a nearly biexponential decay for the D0X with lifetimes of approximately 180 and 800 ps for both bare and Alq3 coated nanorods. In GaN nanorods which were coated with an Alq3 film and subsequently with a 10 nm thick gold layer we observe a PL quenching of D0X and DAP band and the lifetimes of the D0X transition shorten. The quenching behaviour is partially attributed to the energy-transfer from free excitons and donor-bound-excitons to plasmon oscillations in the gold layer.

  11. Diurnal fluctuations of water and heat flows in a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelde, K.; Thomsen, A.; Heidmann, T.; SchjøNning, P.; Jansson, P.-E.

    1998-11-01

    The complexity of coupled transport of heat and moisture at the soil surface necessitates a combination of field and numerical experiments to evaluate the interactions between liquid and vapor phase flow. The near-surface moisture and temperature conditions of a bare soil were investigated experimentally and by using the SOIL model to assess the importance of water vapor flow. During a 1-month period in early fall, intensive measurements of water content, water tension, and temperature were made in a bare soil plot. Soil thermal conductivity, measured on soil cores extracted for laboratory analysis, was found to agree with estimates based on the Kersten equation. Simulated water content and soil temperature agreed well with observations. Modeled soil vapor flow was significant compared to liquid flow only during the initial dry days when the inclusion of vapor flow improved the predicted diurnal variation in water tension. Model predictions were sensitive to an accurate representation of the soil surface energy balance, including the consideration of steep gradients in tension near the soil surface, and to the enhancement of vapor flow.

  12. Inkjet-Based Biopatterning of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 to Spatially Control Calvarial Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric D.; DeCesare, Gary E.; Usas, Arvydas; Lensie, Emily L.; Bykowski, Michael R.; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Lee E.; Losee, Joseph E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate spatial control of osteoblast differentiation in vitro and bone formation in vivo using inkjet bioprinting technology and to create three-dimensional persistent bio-ink patterns of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and its modifiers immobilized within microporous scaffolds. Semicircular patterns of BMP-2 were printed within circular DermaMatrix™ human allograft scaffold constructs. The contralateral halves of the constructs were unprinted or printed with BMP-2 modifiers, including the BMP-2 inhibitor, noggin. Printed bio-ink pattern retention was validated using fluorescent or 125I-labeled bio-inks. Mouse C2C12 progenitor cells cultured on patterned constructs differentiated in a dose-dependent fashion toward an osteoblastic fate in register to BMP-2 patterns. The fidelity of spatial restriction of osteoblastic differentiation at the boundary between neighboring BMP-2 and noggin patterns improved in comparison with patterns without noggin. Acellular DermaMatrix constructs similarly patterned with BMP-2 and noggin were then implanted into a mouse calvarial defect model. Patterns of bone formation in vivo were comparable with patterned responses of osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. These results demonstrate that three-dimensional biopatterning of a growth factor and growth factor modifier within a construct can direct cell differentiation in vitro and tissue formation in vivo in register to printed patterns. PMID:20028232

  13. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy.

  14. Carpal bone analysis in bone age assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Kurkowska-Pospiech, Sylwia; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2006-03-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed in our Laboratory based on features extracted from regions of interest (ROI) in phalanges in a digital hand atlas. Due to various factors, including, the diversity of size, shape and orientation of carpal bones, non-uniformity of soft tissue, low contrast between the bony structure and soft tissue, the automatic identification and segmentation of bone boundaries is an extremely challenging task. Past research work on carpal bone segmentation has been done utilizing dynamic thresholding. However, due to the discrepancy of carpal bones developments and the limitations of segmentation algorithms, carpal bone ROI has not been taken into consideration in the bone age assessment procedure. In this paper, we present a method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and feature analysis in hand X-ray radiograph. The purpose of this paper is to automatically segment the carpal bones by anisotropic diffusion and Canny edge detection techniques. By adding their respective features extracted from carpal bones ROI to the phalangeal ROI feature space, the accuracy of bone age assessment can be improved especially when the image processing in the phalangeal ROI fails in younger children.

  15. Bone-composition imaging using coherent-scatter computed tomography: Assessing bone health beyond bone mineral density

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelar, Deidre L.; Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Dabrowski, Waldemar; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2006-04-15

    Quantitative analysis of bone composition is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic bone diseases. Accurate assessment of the bone mineralization state is the first requirement for a comprehensive analysis. In diagnostic imaging, x-ray coherent scatter depends upon the molecular structure of tissues. Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) exploits this feature to identify tissue types in composite biological specimens. We have used CSCT to map the distributions of tissues relevant to bone disease (fat, soft tissue, collagen, and mineral) within bone-tissue phantoms and an excised cadaveric bone sample. Using a purpose-built scanner, we have measured hydroxyapatite (bone mineral) concentrations based on coherent-scatter patterns from a series of samples with varying hydroxyapatite content. The measured scatter intensity is proportional to mineral density in true g/cm{sup 3}. Repeated measurements of the hydroxyapatite concentration in each sample were within, at most, 2% of each other, revealing an excellent precision in determining hydroxyapatite concentration. All measurements were also found to be accurate to within 3% of the known values. Phantoms simulating normal, over-, and under-mineralized bone were created by mixing known masses of pure collagen and hydroxyapatite. An analysis of the composite scatter patterns gave the density of each material. For each composite, the densities were within 2% of the known values. Collagen and hydroxyapatite concentrations were also examined in a bone-mimicking phantom, incorporating other bone constituents (fat, soft tissue). Tomographic maps of the coherent-scatter properties of each specimen were reconstructed, from which material-specific images were generated. Each tissue was clearly distinguished and the collagen-mineral ratio determined from this phantom was also within 2% of the known value. Existing bone analysis techniques cannot determine the collagen-mineral ratio in intact

  16. Bone disease in hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bart L

    2014-07-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder that may be acquired or inherited. Postsurgical hypoparathyroidism is responsible for the majority of acquired hypoparathyroidism. Bone disease occurs in hypoparathyroidism due to markedly reduced bone remodeling due to the absence or low levels of parathyroid hormone. Chronically reduced bone turnover in patients with hypoparathyroidism typically leads to higher bone mass than in age- and sex-matched controls. Whether this increased bone density reduces fracture risk is less certain, because while increased bone mineralization may be associated with increased brittleness of bone, this does not appear to be the case in hypoparathyroidism. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism with recombinant parathyroid hormone may reduce bone mineral density but simultaneously strengthen the mechanical properties of bone.

  17. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  18. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  19. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma. PMID:26000310

  20. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  1. Soft Landing of Bare PtRu Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Moon, DaeWon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu alloy nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 x 104 ions µm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (STEM-HAADF) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu alloy nanoparticles are uniform in size and have a Ru core decorated with small regions of Pt on the surface. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in relative atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt4f and Ru3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 x 104 ions µm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the alloy nanoparticles supported on glassy

  2. Soft landing of bare PtRu nanoparticles for electrochemical reduction of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert; Engelhard, Mark; Moon, Daewon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 × 104 ions μm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4.5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (HAADF-STEM) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu nanoparticles are uniform in size. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt 4f and Ru 3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 × 104 ions μm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon. The reproducibility of the nanoparticle synthesis and deposition was evaluated by

  3. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  4. Gas-Phase Reactions of Bare and Ligated Uranium Ions with Sulfer Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Glen P.; Gibson, John K; Duckworth, Douglas {Doug} C

    2004-01-01

    Reactions of bare and ligated uranium ions with sulfur hexafluoride were studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Bare U{sup +} was found to react rather efficiently with SF{sub 6} (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.4) to produce both UF{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) and SF{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1, 2, 3). Whereas the UF{sup +}/SF{sub 6} reaction rate was essentially the same as that for U{sup +}/SF{sub 6}, both UF{sub 2}{sup +} and UF{sub 3}{sup +} were inert; this is attributed to a repulsive interaction between UF{sub n}{sup +} and SF{sub 6} when n exceeds 1. Reactions of UF{sup +} (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.2) and UF{sub 2}{sup +} (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.05) with H{sub 2}O resulted in both F {yields} OH exchange and oxidation. In contrast, UF{sub 3}{sup +} reacted very efficiently with H{sub 2}O (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 1), exhibiting only F {yields} OH exchange. The primary ion products of the UO{sup +}/SF{sub 6} reaction (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.2) were SF{sub 3}{sup +} and UOF{sub 2}{sup +}; those of the UOH{sup +}/SF{sub 6} reaction (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.3) were SF{sub 3}{sup +} and UOF{sup +}. The reaction results are discussed in the context of a previously proposed reaction model, the distinctive chemistry of uranium, and thermodynamic considerations. The results illuminate the nature of uranium as well as general aspects of the interaction of bare and ligated transition-metal ions with SF{sub 6}. Results for collision-induced dissociation (CID) of selected uranium molecular ions support the concept of CID being a quasithermal process under these experimental conditions, with rearrangements prior to fragmentation possible for certain ions.

  5. Co-polarization channel imbalance determination by the use of bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Pingxiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a novel technique which determines the co-polarization channel imbalance by the use of natural bare soil, instead of a trihedral corner reflector (CR). In polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) remote sensing, the polarimetric calibration (PolCAL) is the key technique in quantitative earth parameter measurement. In general, the current PolCAL process can be separated into two parts. The first part tries to estimate the crosstalk and the cross-polarization (x-pol) channel imbalance components by the reflection symmetry and the reciprocity properties, without a CR. Then, at least one trihedral CR is required to determine the co-polarization (co-pol) channel imbalance; however, it is not always possible to deploy a CR in difficult terrain such as desert. In this paper, we utilize bare soil as a stable reference target, and four common natural constraints of bare soil are evaluated to determine the co-pol channel imbalance, without the use of a CR. It should be mentioned that we do not propose to replace the CR by a natural target, but we utilize the natural target to enhance the PolCAL accuracy when a CR is missing. The four constraints are: (1) the consistency of the polarimetric orientation angle (CPOA) between the PolSAR POA and the digital elevation model (DEM) derived POA; (2) the unitary zero POA (UZPOA) of a flat ground surface; (3) the zero helix (ZHEX) component of the ground surface; and (4) the unitary version of the previous zero helix (UZHEX). In the theoretical part of this paper, we demonstrate that the forth constraint is the most suitable in different scenes. We then propose a multi-scale algorithm to further improve the robustness of the co-pol channel imbalance determination. In the experimental part, we apply our new methods to simulated airborne SAR (AIRSAR) and real uninhabited aerial vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data. Without the use of any CR, the recovered results show that the estimated amplitude and phase error of the co

  6. Mammalian cortical bone in tension is non-Haversian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    Cortical bone, found in the central part of long bones like femur, is known to adapt to local mechanical stresses. This adaptation has been linked exclusively with Haversian remodelling involving bone resorption and formation of secondary osteons. Compared to primary/plexiform bone, the Haversian bone has lower stiffness, fatigue strength and fracture toughness, raising the question why nature prefers an adaptation that is detrimental to bone's primary function of bearing mechanical stresses. Here, we show that in the goat femur, Haversian remodelling occurs only at locations of high compressive stresses. At locations corresponding to high tensile stresses, we observe a microstructure that is non-Haversian. Compared with primary/plexiform bone, this microstructure's mineralisation is significantly higher with a distinctly different spatial pattern. Thus, the Haversian structure is an adaptation only to high compressive stresses rendering its inferior tensile properties irrelevant as the regions with high tensile stresses have a non-Haversian, apparently primary microstructure.

  7. Mathematical model for bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Svetlana V.; Safranek, Lee; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Ou, Miao-jung Yvonne; McKee, Marc D.; Murshed, Monzur; Rauch, Frank; Zuhr, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Defective bone mineralization has serious clinical manifestations, including deformities and fractures, but the regulation of this extracellular process is not fully understood. We have developed a mathematical model consisting of ordinary differential equations that describe collagen maturation, production and degradation of inhibitors, and mineral nucleation and growth. We examined the roles of individual processes in generating normal and abnormal mineralization patterns characterized using two outcome measures: mineralization lag time and degree of mineralization. Model parameters describing the formation of hydroxyapatite mineral on the nucleating centers most potently affected the degree of mineralization, while the parameters describing inhibitor homeostasis most effectively changed the mineralization lag time. Of interest, a parameter describing the rate of matrix maturation emerged as being capable of counter-intuitively increasing both the mineralization lag time and the degree of mineralization. We validated the accuracy of model predictions using known diseases of bone mineralization such as osteogenesis imperfecta and X-linked hypophosphatemia. The model successfully describes the highly nonlinear mineralization dynamics, which includes an initial lag phase when osteoid is present but no mineralization is evident, then fast primary mineralization, followed by secondary mineralization characterized by a continuous slow increase in bone mineral content. The developed model can potentially predict the function for a mutated protein based on the histology of pathologic bone samples from mineralization disorders of unknown etiology. PMID:26347868

  8. Rethinking the nature of fibrolamellar bone: an integrative biological revision of sauropod plexiform bone formation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Koen; Prondvai, Edina

    2014-02-01

    We present novel findings on sauropod bone histology that cast doubt on general palaeohistological concepts concerning the true nature of woven bone in primary cortical bone and its role in the rapid growth and giant body sizes of sauropod dinosaurs. By preparing and investigating longitudinal thin sections of sauropod long bones, of which transverse thin sections were published previously, we found that the amount of woven bone in the primary complex has been largely overestimated. Using comparative cellular and light-extinction characteristics in the two section planes, we revealed that the majority of the bony lamina consists of longitudinally organized primary bone, whereas woven bone is usually represented only by a layer a few cells thin in the laminae. Previous arguments on sauropod biology, which have been based on the overestimated amount, misinterpreted formation process and misjudged role of woven bone in the plexiform bone formation of sauropod dinosaurs, are thereby rejected. To explain the observed pattern in fossil bones, we review the most recent advances in bone biology concerning bone formation processes at the cellular and tissue levels. Differentiation between static and dynamic osteogenesis (SO and DO) and the revealed characteristics of SO- versus DO-derived bone tissues shed light on several questions raised by our palaeohistological results and permit identification of these bone tissues in fossils with high confidence. By presenting the methods generally used for investigating fossil bones, we show that the major cause of overestimation of the amount of woven bone in previous palaeohistological studies is the almost exclusive usage of transverse sections. In these sections, cells and crystallites of the longitudinally organized primary bone are cut transversely, thus cells appear rounded and crystallites remain dark under crossed plane polarizers, thereby giving the false impression of woven bone. In order to avoid further confusion in

  9. Infrared temperature measurements over bare soil and vegetation - A HAPEX perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Toby N.; Perry, Eileen M.; Taconet, Odile

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of aircraft and ground measurements made in France during the HAPEX experiment show that horizontal radiometric surface temperature variations, as viewed by aircraft, can reflect the vertical profile of soil moisture (soil versus root zone) because of horizontal variations in vegetation density. Analyses based on one day's data show that, although horizontal variations in soil moisture were small, the vertical differences between a dry surface and a wet root zone were large. Horizontal temperature differences between bare soil, corn and oats reflect differences in the fractional vegetation cover, as seen by the radiometer. On the other hand, these horizontal variations in radiometric surface temperature seem to reflect real horizontal variations in surface turbulent energy fluxes.

  10. Estimating steady-state evaporation rates from bare soils under conditions of high water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; Rubin, J.; Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure that combines meteorological and soil equations of water transfer makes it possible to estimate approximately the steady-state evaporation from bare soils under conditions of high water table. Field data required include soil-water retention curves, water table depth and a record of air temperature, air humidity and wind velocity at one elevation. The procedure takes into account the relevant atmospheric factors and the soil's capability to conduct 'water in liquid and vapor forms. It neglects the effects of thermal transfer (except in the vapor case) and of salt accumulation. Homogeneous as well as layered soils can be treated. Results obtained with the method demonstrate how the soil evaporation rates·depend on potential evaporation, water table depth, vapor transfer and certain soil parameters.

  11. Simple equation to approximate the bidirectional reflectance from vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, C. L.; Norman, J. M.; Blad, B. L.; Welles, J. M.; Campbell, G.

    1985-01-01

    A simple equation has been developed for describing the bidirectional reflectance of some vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces. The equation describes directional reflectance as a function of zenith and azimuth view angles and solar azimuth angle. The equation works for simulated and field measured red and IR reflectance under clear sky conditions. Hemispherical reflectance can be calculated as a function of the simple equation coefficients by integrating the equation over the hemisphere of view angles. A single equation for estimating soil bidirectional reflectance was obtained using the relationships between solar zenith angles and the simple equation coefficients for medium and rough soil distributions. The equation has many useful applications such as providing a lower level boundary condition in complex plant canopy models and providing an additional tool for studying bidirectional effects on pointable sensors.

  12. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications. PMID:26555179

  13. Paradoxical switching to a barely-mastered second language by an aphasic patient.

    PubMed

    Leemann, B; Laganaro, M; Schwitter, V; Schnider, A

    2007-06-01

    Polyglot speakers who become aphasics are not necessarily affected to the same extent in each language. In some cases there is a mixing of the different languages or a switching between languages and in very rare cases the switch is to the language seldom if ever used in everyday live. We report a French-speaking aphasic, who switched paradoxically from his mother tongue (French) to a second language (German) which he had learned at school but barely mastered and hardly ever spoke, and kept using German most of the time. We tried to understand the mechanism responsible for that phenomenon by reviewing the actual hypothesis of multi-language organization. We concluded, in line with previous reports, that our case used his metalinguistic knowledge to compensate for his inability to access his linguistic skills. PMID:17786781

  14. Morphology and Optical Properties of Bare and Silica Coated Hybrid Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sushant; Lebek, Werner; Godehardt, Reinhold; Lee, Wan In; Adhikari, Rameshwar

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their wide applications in the field of optoelectronics, photonics, catalysis, and medicine; plasmonic metal nanoparticles are attaining considerable interest nowadays. The optical properties of these metal nanoparticles depend upon their size, shape, and surrounding medium. The present work studies the morphology and optical properties of bare silver nanoparticles and silica coated hybrid silver nanoparticles. Aqueous phase mediated synthesis and water-in-oil microemulsion mediated synthesis are two different wet chemical routes employed for nanosynthesis. Direct coating of silica is performed in water-in-oil microemulsion on pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles using tetraethyl orthosilicate as silica precursor. This study shows that using different wet chemical routes the size of the synthesized nanoparticles could be tuned. In addition, using reverse micelles as nanoreactors, the thickness of the silica shell around the core silver nanoparticles could be significantly controlled. Further, the optical properties of silver nanoparticles could be adjusted through the size and the surface coating. PMID:27483900

  15. Effects of roughness on the radar response to soil moisture of bare ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batlivala, P. P.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar response to soil moisture content was experimentally determined for three different bare fields with considerably different surface roughnesses at eight frequencies in the 2 to 8 GHz band and for Horizontal transmit-Horizontal receive (HH) and Vertical transmit-Vertical receive (VV) polarizations. Analysis of the data indicated that the effect of roughness on the radar backscattering coefficient can be minimized by proper choice of the radar parameters. If, in addition, sensitivity to soil moisture variations and system design constraints are considered, the following radar parameters for an operational soil moisture mapper are recommended: frequency= 4 GHz, angle of incidence range= 7 deg to 15 deg and either HH or VV polarization. The corresponding sensitivity is about 0.25 db/ 0.01 gram/cubic cm.

  16. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-11-10

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications.

  17. CONSERVB: A numerical method to compute soil water content and temperature profiles under a bare surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbavel, C. H. M.; Lascano, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, yet fairly simple model of water disposition in a bare soil profile under the sequential impact of rain storms and other atmospheric influences, as they occur from hour to hour is presented. This model is intended mostly to support field studies of soil moisture dynamics by our current team, to serve as a background for the microwave measurements, and, eventually, to serve as a point of departure for soil moisture predictions for estimates based in part upon airborne measurements. The main distinction of the current model is that it accounts not only for the moisture flow in the soil-atmosphere system, but also for the energy flow and, hence, calculates system temperatures. Also, the model is of a dynamic nature, capable of supporting any required degree of resolution in time and space. Much critical testing of the sample is needed before the complexities of the hydrology of a vegetated surface can be related meaningfully to microwave observations.

  18. Size-controllable synthesis of bare gold nanoparticles by femtosecond laser fragmentation in water.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Ksenia; Aristov, Andrei; Sentis, Marc; Kabashin, Andrei V

    2015-02-13

    We report a size-controllable synthesis of stable aqueous solutions of ultrapure low-size-dispersed Au nanoparticles by methods of femtosecond laser fragmentation from preliminary formed colloids. Such approach makes possible the tuning of mean nanoparticle size between a few nm and several tens of nm under the size dispersion lower than 70% by varying the fluence of pumping radiation during the fragmentation procedure. The efficient size control is explained by 3D geometry of laser fragmentation by femtosecond laser-induced white light super-continuum and plasma-related phenomena. Despite the absence of any protective ligands, the nanoparticle solutions demonstrate exceptional stability due to electric repulsion effect associated with strong negative charging of formed nanoparticles. Stable aqueous solutions of bare gold nanoparticles present a unique object with a variety of potential applications in catalysis, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photovoltaics, biosensing and biomedicine.

  19. Bremsstrahlung from relativistic bare heavy ions: Nuclear and electronic contributions in amorphous and crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Tue V.; Sørensen, Allan H.

    2013-02-01

    A charged particle emits bremsstrahlung while traversing matter. We calculate the radiation cross section for bare heavy ions penetrating amorphous materials and single crystals at highly relativistic energies. The main component originates in scattering of the virtual photons of screened target nuclei on the projectile. It appears at, approximately, 2γ times the energy of the giant dipole resonance of the projectile, approximately 25γ MeV for a lead nucleus (γ≡E/Mc2, where E and M denote the projectile energy and mass). The emission pertains to relatively close impacts, with impact parameters ranging to, at maximum, the screening radius of the target atoms. As a result, the main bremsstrahlung component shows channeling dips, that is, dips in yield upon variation of the incidence angle to major crystallographic directions of a single crystal. The minimum yield increases with γ but saturates at a very low value. Incoherent interaction with single target electrons gives rise to two additional bremsstrahlung components, a modest component due to scattering of virtual photons of the electrons on the projectile and a strong low-energy component due to scattering of the virtual photons of the projectile on the electrons. The difference in radiation levels can be traced to the mass of the scatterer. Since target electrons are more widely distributed than nuclei in a crystal channel the variation of the electron component of the bremsstrahlung with incidence angle to a major crystallographic direction is less abrupt than the variation of the nuclear component. In consequence, the shape of the total bremsstrahlung spectrum changes when the crystal is tilted and the individual components may be singled out. Pair creation is also sensitive to the orientation of a crystalline material, resulting in a pronounced directional dependence of the energy loss of bare heavy ions at extreme relativistic energies.

  20. Bone resorption, metastasis, and diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiotherapy of Bone Lesions; Methodological Problems; Treatment of Bone Metastasis with Antiresorptive Drugs; Control of Bone Cancer Pain; and Chemotherapy of Bone Metastases.

  1. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic How is bone cancer staged? How is bone cancer diagnosed? A patient’s symptoms, physical exam, and results ... and other imaging tests. Imaging tests to detect bone cancer X-rays Most bone cancers show up on ...

  2. Future human bone research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A.; Shackelford, L.; Schneider, V.

    1998-01-01

    Skylab crewmembers demonstrated negative calcium (Ca) balance reaching about -300 mg/day by flight day 84. Limited bone density (BMD) measurements documented that bone was not lost equally from all parts of the skeleton. Subsequent BMD studies during long duration Russian flights documented the regional extent of bone loss. These studies demonstrated mean losses in the spine, femur neck, trochanter, and pelvis of about 1%-1.6% with large differences between individuals as well as between bone sites in a given individual. Limited available data indicate postflight bone recovery occurred in some individuals, but may require several years for complete restoration. Long duration bedrest studies showed a similar pattern of bone loss and calcium balance (-180 mg/day) as spaceflight. During long duration bedrest, resorption markers were elevated, formation markers were unchanged, 1,25 vitamin D (VitD) and calcium absorption were decreased, and serum ionized Ca was increased. Although this information is a good beginning, additional spaceflight research is needed to assess architectural and subregional bone changes, elucidate mechanisms, and develop efficient as well as effective countermeasures. Space research poses a number of unique problems not encountered in ground-based laboratory research. Therefore, researchers contemplating human spaceflight research need to consider a number of unique problems related to spaceflight in their experimental design.

  3. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  4. Bone Loss in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  5. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  6. What Is Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a soft framework, and calcium phosphate is a mineral that adds strength and hardens the framework. This ... bone formation continues at a faster pace than removal until bone mass peaks during the third decade ...

  7. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts. PMID:26917429

  8. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts.

  9. Copper phthalocyanine on hydrogenated and bare diamond (001)-2 x 1: influence of interfacial interactions on molecular orientations.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dongchen; Sun, Jiatao; Gao, Xingyu; Wang, Li; Chen, Shi; Loh, Kian Ping; Wee, Andrew T S

    2010-01-01

    The molecular orientations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) organic semiconductor molecules on hydrogenated and bare diamond (001)-2 x 1 surfaces are studied using synchrotron-based photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Angular-dependent NEXAFS reveals that the CuPc molecular assemblies are orientationally ordered and lying down on hydrogenated diamond, whereas they undergo a molecular reorientation on bare diamond from lying down at submonolayer coverage to standing up in multilayers. The molecular film on bare diamond also exhibits an order-disorder-order transition in the molecular orientations. The distinct molecular orientation within the CuPc films on both diamond (001) surfaces is explained in terms of the interplay between intermolecular interactions and molecule-substrate interactions.

  10. Radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Webber, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging of the skeleton, now well established as the most important diagnostic procedure in detecting bone metastases, is also a reliable method for the evaluation of the progression or regression of metastatic bone disease. The article concentrates on the technetium-99m agents and the value of these agents in the widespread application of low-dose radioisotope scanning in such bone diseases as metastasis, osteomyelitis, trauma, osteonecrosis, and other abnormal skeletal conditions.

  11. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  12. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  13. [Benign bone forming tumors].

    PubMed

    Caufourier, C; Leprovost, N; Guillou-Jamard, M-R; Compère, J-F; Bénateau, H

    2009-09-01

    Benign bone forming tumors typically produce dense bone (osteoma, enostosis) or osteoid tissue (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma). Even though these four lesions have distinct characteristics, it is sometimes difficult to tell them apart and to rule out malignant bone forming lesions such as osteosarcoma. The first line treatment is surgical exeresis.

  14. Radionuclide bone scanning in giant cell tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, D.; Madewell, J.E.; McNiesh, L.M.; Kyle, R.W.; Sweet, D.

    1986-03-01

    Radionuclide bone scan findings are described and correlated with pathology in 23 patients with giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone. The degree of radionuclide activity was markedly increased in 20 (87%), minimally increased in three (13%), and decreased in none of the patients. Of the 23 patients with increased radioactivity, the pattern was diffuse in 11 (48%) and doughnut in 12 (52%). Extended patterns of radioactivity were present in 19 of 22 patients; however, none were associated with true tumor extension. Bone scanning did not aid in the detection of GCT, was nonspecific, and did not differentiate benign from malignant GCT. Although radioactivity extended beyond the radiographic abnormality in the majority of patients, this was most likely secondary to other bony abnormalities or local and/or regional hyperemia, and caution should be taken in ascribing this extension to either tumor or metastasis.

  15. [Sacral metastasis simulating aneurysmal bone cyst].

    PubMed

    Sanromán-Álvarez, Pablo; Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Miranda-Lloret, Pablo; Pérez-Borredá, Pedro; Botella-Asunción, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Cystic spinal lesions with characteristic patterns, such as the presence of haematic fluid-fluid levels (H-FFL), have been associated with many tumoral lineages, more frequently with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) and exceptionally with metastasis. We present the case of a 60-year-old man with the finding of a sacral cystic bone lesion with H-FFL, with initial suspicion of ABC and confirmed diagnosis of metastasis. The case presented is, to our knowledge, the second case published of spinal cystic bone metastasis with H-FFL pattern with unknown primary tumour at the time of diagnosis and the only one that received resective surgical treatment, achieving pulmonary and metastatic disease control with good quality of life after 1 year of follow up.

  16. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-09-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-microm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on

  17. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage.

  18. Oxytocin and bone

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone; Zallone, Alberta

    2014-01-01

    One of the most meaningful results recently achieved in bone research has been to reveal that the pituitary hormones have profound effect on bone, so that the pituitary-bone axis has become one of the major topics in skeletal physiology. Here, we discuss the relevant evidence about the posterior pituitary hormone oxytocin (OT), previously thought to exclusively regulate parturition and breastfeeding, which has recently been established to directly regulate bone mass. Both osteoblasts and osteoclasts express OT receptors (OTR), whose stimulation enhances bone mass. Consistent with this, mice deficient in OT or OTR display profoundly impaired bone formation. In contrast, bone resorption remains unaffected in OT deficiency because, even while OT stimulates the genesis of osteoclasts, it inhibits their resorptive function. Furthermore, in addition to its origin from the pituitary, OT is also produced by bone marrow osteoblasts acting as paracrine-autocrine regulator of bone formation modulated by estrogens. In turn, the power of estrogen to increase bone mass is OTR-dependent. Therefore, OTR−/− mice injected with 17β-estradiol do not show any effects on bone formation parameters, while the same treatment increases bone mass in wild-type mice. These findings together provide evidence for an anabolic action of OT in regulating bone mass and suggest that bone marrow OT may enhance the bone-forming action of estrogen through an autocrine circuit. This established new physiological role for OT in the maintenance of skeletal integrity further suggests the potential use of this hormone for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25209411

  19. [Prefabrication of bone transplants].

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Kokemüller, H; Jehn, P; Vogt, P; Gellrich, N-C; Krettek, C

    2015-03-01

    Prefabrication of bone transplants is a promising option for large defects of the long bones, especially if there is compromised vascularization of the defect. This is especially true for postinfection bone defects and other types of atrophic nonunion. The generation of a foreign body membrane (Masquelet's technique) has been investigated in order to ameliorate the response of the host tissue surrounding the defect. In an experimental animal study, a blood vessel within a bone construct could be used to generate customized, vascularized osteogenic constructs that can be used to treat large bone defects in the future.

  20. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, Judith R.; Anderson, Gerhard D.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  1. Pituitary diseases and bone.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Chiavistelli, Silvia; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary hormones have direct and indirect effects on bone remodeling, and skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of pituitary diseases. Fragility fractures may occur in many patients with prolactinomas, acromegaly, Cushing disease, and hypopituitarism. As in other forms of secondary osteoporosis, pituitary diseases generally affect bone quality more than bone quantity, and fractures may occur even in the presence of normal or low-normal bone mineral density, making difficult the prediction of fractures in these settings. Treatment of excess and defective pituitary hormone generally improves skeletal health, although some patients remain at high risk for fractures, necessitating treatment with bone-active drugs.

  2. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications. PMID:27279797

  3. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications. PMID:27279797

  4. Quantification of the partition between bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration using stable water isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braud, I.; Bariac, T.; Rothfuss, Y.; Rothfuss, Y.; Biron, Ph.

    2009-04-01

    Evapotranspiration from continental surfaces is one of the most important components of the global water cycle, but it is certainly the less known. The lack of knowledge is even larger when referring to the partition of evapotranspiration between its components: bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration. Isotopic biogeochemistry can provide useful information to progress in a better quantification of this partition. Assuming specific hypotheses of stationarity, it is possible to identify and quantify the different sources of the atmospheric water vapour (local and regional, vegetation and soil) Analysis of the heavy stable isotopic ratios of water in both the liquid and vapour phases : 18O and 2H can allow to determine the « history » of the water in the soil since the last rainfall event (infiltration, re-evaporation) or the root extraction depths. . The presentation will provide a synthesis of the theoretical basis for the interpretation of the isotopic composition of the various reservoir water (soil, plant, atmosphere) and an illustration of recent advances obtained within the framework of the PIETE (Isotopic partition of evapotranspiration between evaporation and transpiration) project. The project combines laboratory and field experiments with a modelling work in order to progress in the understanding of the coupled water, heat and isotopic transfer within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum. Four types of experiments were conducted : (i) Laboratory Characterization of the water vapour released during plants transpiration, focusing on transient regimes and especially water stress; (ii) laboratory characterization of the isotopic signature of the water vapour released by soil evaporation; (iii) determination of the partition between evaporation and transpiration under controlled conditions using a soil monolith which was sawn with grass.; (iv) determination of the partition of evapotranspiration under field conditions, with an experiment conducted

  5. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  6. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  7. Bone kidney interactions.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Jamal, Sophie A

    2015-06-01

    The fact that bone disease and kidney disease co-exist is well known. Formally, this inter-relationship is called chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder or CKD-MBD. Traditionally, it was thought that bone played a passive role in CKD-MBD - specifically that kidney disease caused disordered mineral metabolism which resulted in bone disease and ultimately fractures. More recently however our understanding of bone function in general and the role that bone plays in CKD-MBD in particular, has changed. This chapter will briefly review epidemiology of fractures in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the roles that imaging and measuring markers of mineral metabolism can play in assessing fracture risk. We will then review more recent data consistent with the concept MBD occurs early in the course of CKD and, via the secretion of novel molecules and/or signalling pathways, the bone can influence other organ systems. PMID:26156535

  8. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  9. [Bone and Nutrition. Bone and phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidekazu; Sakuma, Masae

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus is necessary for bone mineralization. Although adequate phosphorus intake is essential for skeletal mineralization, it is reported that excessive phosphorus intake can induce deleterious effect on bone. Recently, since the Japanese diet has been westernized, phosphorus intake by the meat and dairy products has increased. Furthermore, along with the development of processed foods, excessive intake of inorganic phosphorus from food additives has become a problem. An adverse effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion from high phosphorus intake was seen only when calcium intake was inadequate. Dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio can be considered as one of the indicators that can predict the health of the bone.

  10. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  11. [Bone and Nutrition. Bone and phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidekazu; Sakuma, Masae

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus is necessary for bone mineralization. Although adequate phosphorus intake is essential for skeletal mineralization, it is reported that excessive phosphorus intake can induce deleterious effect on bone. Recently, since the Japanese diet has been westernized, phosphorus intake by the meat and dairy products has increased. Furthermore, along with the development of processed foods, excessive intake of inorganic phosphorus from food additives has become a problem. An adverse effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion from high phosphorus intake was seen only when calcium intake was inadequate. Dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio can be considered as one of the indicators that can predict the health of the bone. PMID:26119308

  12. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  14. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  15. Factors influencing bone mass accrual: focus on nutritional aspects.

    PubMed

    Viljakainen, H T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, much of the research exploring the role of nutrition on bone mass accrual has focused on single nutrients. Although randomised controlled trials have provided key information about the effects of calcium and vitamin D on bone, they also have limitations, e.g. generalisation, implementation of the results and long-term consequences. Human subjects do not eat single nutrients, but foods, and describing healthy food patterns for optimising bone mineral accrual is warranted. Recent advances in research suggest that the effects of whole diet are larger than those of single nutrients on bone health. Research should focus on younger age groups to identify the life-course determinants of osteoporosis during prenatal, infancy, childhood and adolescence that would help to maximise peak bone mass. Food patterns that describe the variability, quality and choices of individuals give broader insight and may provide new strategies for preventing osteoporosis. PMID:27169333

  16. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  17. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  19. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  20. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  1. Use of the bare chip Cernox(TM) thermometer for the detection of second sound in superfluid helium [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, S.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2004-03-01

    Bare chip Cernox™ thermometers model CX-1030 from LakeShore Cryotronics Inc. have been used to detect second sound in superfluid helium. This paper presents some examples of second sound measurements and comments on the electrical and thermal time constants of these thermometers.

  2. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  3. Bone grafting: history, rationale, and selection of materials and techniques.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Robert A; Leventis, Minas D; Rohrer, Michael D; Prasad, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    In the 100-year history of bone replacement in the human body for different purposes, a wide variety of surgical approaches and materials have been used. The techniques and materials selected significantly affect the outcome of bone replacement procedures in terms of bone formation volume and the quality and amount of vital bone. The choices facing the dental surgeon at the time of extraction, ridge augmentation, or sinus graft are wide-ranging. When choosing a bone graft material the surgeon should consider its ultimate effect on healing patterns in and around the alveolar bone at the endpoint of the procedure. As this article concludes, a better understanding of the materials and the results that can be predictably achieved with them can be valuable to the appropriately trained surgeon when preparing for these procedures. PMID:25455148

  4. Endochondral bone formation in embryonic mouse pre-metatarsals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Long term exposure to a reduced gravitational environment has a deleterious effect on bone. The developmental events which occur prior to initial bone deposition will provide insight into the regulation of mature bone physiology. We have characterized a system in which the events preceding bone formation take place in an isolated in vitro organ culture environment. We show that cultured pre-metatarsal tissue parallels development of pre-metatarsal tissue in the embryo. Both undergo mesenchyme differentiation and morphogenesis to form a cartilage rod, which resembles the future bone, followed by terminal chondrocyte differentiation in a definite morphogenetic pattern. These sequential steps occur prior to osteoblast maturation and bone matrix deposition in the developing organism. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity is a distinctive enzymatic marker for mineralizing tissues. We have measured this activity throughout pre-metatarsal development and show (a) where in the tissue it is predominantly found, and (b) that this is indeed the mineralizing isoform of the enzyme.

  5. Bioreactor cultivation of anatomically shaped human bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Temple, Joshua P; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Grayson, Warren L

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a method for engineering bone grafts in vitro with the specific geometry of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. The anatomical geometry of the bone grafts was segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans, converted to G-code, and used to machine decellularized trabecular bone scaffolds into the identical shape of the condyle. These scaffolds were seeded with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using spinner flasks and cultivated for up to 5 weeks in vitro using a custom-designed perfusion bioreactor system. The flow patterns through the complex geometry were modeled using the FloWorks module of SolidWorks to optimize bioreactor design. The perfused scaffolds exhibited significantly higher cellular content, better matrix production, and increased bone mineral deposition relative to non-perfused (static) controls after 5 weeks of in vitro cultivation. This technology is broadly applicable for creating patient-specific bone grafts of varying shapes and sizes.

  6. Bioreactor Cultivation of Anatomically Shaped Human Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Joshua P.; Yeager, Keith; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Grayson, Warren L.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a method for engineering bone grafts in vitro with the specific geometry of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. The anatomical geometry of the bone grafts was segmented from computed tomography (CT) scans, converted to G-code, and used to machine decellularized trabecular bone scaffolds into the identical shape of the condyle. These scaffolds were seeded with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using spinner flasks and cultivated for up to 5 weeks in vitro using a custom-designed perfusion bioreactor system. The flow patterns through the complex geometry were modeled using the FloWorks module of SolidWorks to optimize bioreactor design. The perfused scaffolds exhibited significantly higher cellular content, better matrix production, and increased bone mineral deposition relative to non-perfused (static) controls after 5 weeks of in vitro cultivation. This technology is broadly applicable for creating patient-specific bone grafts of varying shapes and sizes. PMID:24014312

  7. MCP detector read out with a bare quad Timepix at kilohertz frame rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, J.; Raffanti, R.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Siegmund, O.

    2011-01-01

    The existing Berkeley neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix hybrid detector has been very successful at demonstrating energy resolved spatial imaging with a single Timepix ASIC read out at a ~ 30 Hz frame rate where each neutron's position and time (energy) is determined (X,Y,E). By increasing the detector format using a quad arrangement of Timepix readouts and increasing the frame rate to 1 kHz, we can increase our total event throughput by a factor of 120, thereby taking full advantage of the high fluxes of modern pulsed neutron sources (106 n cm-2 s-1). The key to this conversion is a new design for the ASIC readout, called the Berkeley Quad Timepix detector, consisting of 3 major subsystems. The first is a quad (2 × 2) bare Timepix ASIC board mounted directly behind the neutron sensitive MCPs in a hermetic vacuum enclosure with a sapphire window. The data from the Timepix ASICs flow to the second subsystem called the Interface board whose field programmable gate array (FPGA) rearranges and converts the digital bit stream to LVDS logic levels before sending downstream to the third subsystem, the Roach board. The Roach board is also FPGA based, and takes the data from all the ASICs and analyses the frames to extract information on the input events to pass on to the host PC. This paper describes in detail the hardware and firmware designs to accomplish this task.

  8. Nonlinear thermosonics and laser vibrometry for barely visible impact damage of a composite stiffener panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfense Fierro, Gian Piero; Ginzburg, Dmitri; Ciampa, Francesco; Meo, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Two methods have been evaluated in order to locate barely visible impact damage (BVID) in a composite stiffener panel. A nonlinear thermosonics technique and a nonlinear laser vibrometer technique were evaluated. Damaged regions were excited using a piezo shaker in both methods. Evaluation of the damaged regions was done by first determining the second and third order nonlinear harmonic response of the damaged regions. This was then used to determine the excitation frequency. By evaluating the presence of nonlinear responses in the output signal it is possible to excite the damaged structure at frequencies that give high heat generation and high displacements at the damaged regions. The results showed that both methods can be used to locate damaged regions, although it was shown that the stiffener impedes the propagation of the exciting wave and that these tests should be carried out in-between stiffeners in order to maximise the excitation and heating of damaged regions. Furthermore, both methods allowed for excitation of damaged regions over a large area.

  9. Degradation of bare and silanized silicon wafer surfaces by constituents of biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Dekeyser, C M; Buron, C C; Derclaye, S R; Jonas, A M; Marchand-Brynaert, J; Rouxhet, P G

    2012-07-15

    The 24 h stability of bare silicon wafers as such or silanized with CH(3)O-(CH(2)-CH(2)-O)(n)-C(3)H(6)-trichlorosilane (n=6-9) was investigated in water, NaCl, phosphate and carbonate solutions, and in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C (close to biological conditions regarding temperature, high ionic strength, and pH). The resulting surfaces were analyzed using ellipsometry, X-ray Reflectometry (XRR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Incubation of the silanized wafers in phosphate solution and PBS provokes a detachment of the silane layer. This is due to a hydrolysis of Si-O bonds which is favored by the action of phosphate, also responsible for a corrosion of non-silanized wafers. The surface alteration (detachment of silane layer and corrosion of the non-silanized wafer) is also important with carbonate solution, due to a higher pH (8.3). The protection of the silicon oxide layer brought by silane against the action of the salts is noticeable for phosphate but not for carbonate.

  10. Effect of sheet and rill erosion on overland flow connectivity in bare agricultural plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penuela Fernandez, Andres; Rocio Rodriguez Pleguezuelo, Carmen; Javaux, Mathieu; Bielders, Charles L.

    2014-05-01

    Rill erosion processes generate preferential flow paths that may increase the degree of connectivity of the soil surface and hence strongly modify its hydrological response. However, few studies have tried to quantify the effect of rill development on overland flow connectivity. For this purpose, changes in surface microtopography were monitored on three bare agricultural plots (3 m wide x 10 m long and 11% of slope) in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) under natural rainfall conditions. Digital elevation models of these plots were obtained on a monthly basis over a 1-year period by photogrammetry using the Micmac software. Runoff was collected at the plot outlets. To characterize the hydrological connectivity, a functional connectivity indicator was used, called the relative surface connection function (RSCf). This indicator, which relates the area connected to the outflow boundary to the degree of filling of maximum depression storage (MDS), is fast to compute and was previously shown to be able to capture runoff-relevant connectivity properties. The RSC function was calculated for each DEM and the evolution of overland flow connectivity was quantified and compared to the measured runoff. The results of this study showed that the changes in microtopography resulting from sheet and rill erosion have a strong impact on the hydrological connectivity as reflected in the RSCf. A higher volume of runoff was generated as a consequence of surface sealing and the decrease of the MDS. More rapid runoff initiation was observed as the RSCf evolved from a concave to a convex shape.

  11. Transport of bare and capped zinc oxide nanoparticles is dependent on porous medium composition.

    PubMed

    Kurlanda-Witek, H; Ngwenya, B T; Butler, I B

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are one of the most frequently used nanoparticles in industry and hence are likely to be introduced to the groundwater environment. The mobility of these nanoparticles in different aquifer materials has not been assessed. While some studies have been published on the transport of ZnO nanoparticles in individual porous media, these studies do not generally account for varying porous medium composition both within and between aquifers. As a first step towards understanding the impact of this variability, this paper compares the transport of bare ZnO nanoparticles (bZnO-NPs) and capped ZnO nanoparticles, coated with tri-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (cZnO-NPs), in saturated columns packed with glass beads, fine grained sand and fine grained calcite, at near-neutral pH and groundwater salinity levels. With the exception of cZnO-NPs in sand columns, ZnO nanoparticles are highly immobile in all three types of studied porous media, with most retention taking place near the column inlet. Results are in general agreement with DLVO theory, and the deviation in experiments with cZnO-NPs flowing through columns packed with sand is linked to variability in zeta potential of the capped nanoparticles and sand grains. Therefore, differences in surface charge of nanoparticles and porous media are demonstrated to be key drivers in nanoparticle transport.

  12. Transport of bare and capped zinc oxide nanoparticles is dependent on porous medium composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlanda-Witek, H.; Ngwenya, B. T.; Butler, I. B.

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are one of the most frequently used nanoparticles in industry and hence are likely to be introduced to the groundwater environment. The mobility of these nanoparticles in different aquifer materials has not been assessed. While some studies have been published on the transport of ZnO nanoparticles in individual porous media, these studies do not generally account for varying porous medium composition both within and between aquifers. As a first step towards understanding the impact of this variability, this paper compares the transport of bare ZnO nanoparticles (bZnO-NPs) and capped ZnO nanoparticles, coated with tri-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (cZnO-NPs), in saturated columns packed with glass beads, fine grained sand and fine grained calcite, at near-neutral pH and groundwater salinity levels. With the exception of cZnO-NPs in sand columns, ZnO nanoparticles are highly immobile in all three types of studied porous media, with most retention taking place near the column inlet. Results are in general agreement with DLVO theory, and the deviation in experiments with cZnO-NPs flowing through columns packed with sand is linked to variability in zeta potential of the capped nanoparticles and sand grains. Therefore, differences in surface charge of nanoparticles and porous media are demonstrated to be key drivers in nanoparticle transport.

  13. Is HE 0436-4717 Anemic? A deep look at a bare Seyfert 1 galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonson, K.; Gallo, L. C.; Vasudevan, R.

    2015-06-01

    A multi-epoch, multi-instrument analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy HE 0436-4717 is conducted using optical to X-ray data from XMM-Newton and Swift (including the Burst Alert Telescope). Fitting of the UV-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution shows little evidence of extinction and the X-ray spectral analysis does not confirm previous reports of deep absorption edges from O VIII. HE 0436-4717 is a `bare' Seyfert with negligible line-of-sight absorption making it ideal to study the central X-ray emitting region. Three scenarios were considered to describe the X-ray data: partial covering absorption, blurred reflection, and soft Comptonization. All three interpretations describe the 0.5-10.0 keV spectra well. Extrapolating the models to 100 keV results in poorer fits for the partial covering model. When also considering the rapid variability during one of the XMM-Newton observations, the blurred reflection model appears to describe all the observations in the most self-consistent manner. If adopted, the blurred reflection model requires a very low iron abundance in HE 0436-4717. We consider the possibilities that this is an artefact of the fitting process, but it appears possible that it is intrinsic to the object.

  14. Directly Grafting Alkanethiol on Bare Si (111) by UV-assisted Photochemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lo-Yueh; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Chia-Hao

    2014-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are organic molecules that self-assembled and closely packed on substrate surface. The surface physic and chemical properties are dependent on the controllable tail of SAMs. Therefore, SAMs is attracting a lot of attention in bio-sensing, nano-manipulating, and microfluidic field. The alkanethiol on noble metal surface, such as gold and silver, is a well-known SAM system to understand the fundamental properties. However, alkanethiols grown on semiconductor surfaces was less systematically studied, especially on bare silicon surface, despite their prospective applications. To have in-depth understanding of such system, we tried to grow alkanethiol SAMs on hydrogen-terminated Si surface by UV-assisted photochemical reaction. The resulting monolayer was studied by means of water contact angle measurement, synchrotron radiation based X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and polarization dependent near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure. The combined characterization probes revealed a hydrophobic ambient surface, and the n-alkanethiols were directly attached on Si through Si-S bond that formed a highly order monolayer to prevent the air oxidation and contamination.

  15. Microwave emission from smooth bare fields and soil moisture sampling depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper studies the depth to which soil moisture can be directly estimated with microwave measurements over smooth bare fields. The analyses are based on both theoretical and experimental considerations at the frequencies of 1.4, 5.0, and 10.7 GHz. Radiative transfer calculations of microwave emissivities at these frequencies are performed with a number of moisture profiles measured for two soils. The calculated emissivities are compared with those derived from the Fresnel equation to deduce the microwave sampling depth in soils. The data acquired from the ground-level radiometric measurements during the summers of 1979-1981 are examined and compared with the theoretical analysis. Both theoretical and experimental analyses lead to the conclusion that the microwave samplinhg depth in soils is about one tenth of the wavelength of observation. It is shown that the moisture content at any depth near the surface of a smooth soil can be estimated, in principle, by a combination of a radiometric measurement and a curve generated by the Fresnel equation at an appropriate frequency, provided that the texture of the soil is known.

  16. Moss cushions facilitate water and nutrient supply for plant species on bare limestone pavements.

    PubMed

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Hammer, Kathrine Jul

    2012-10-01

    Dense moss cushions of different size are distributed across the bare limestone pavements on Øland, SE Sweden. Increasing cushion size is predicted to physically protect and improve performance and colonization by vascular plants. Therefore, we tested water balance, phosphorus supply, and species richness, and evaluated duration of plant activity during desiccation as a function of ground area, for a large collection of moss cushions. We found that lower evaporation and higher water storage contributed equally to extending the desiccation period with increasing cushion size. Evaporation rates declined by the -0.36 power of cushion diameter, and were not significantly different from -0.50 for the square root function previously predicted for the increasing thickness of the boundary layer, with greater linear dimensions for smooth flat objects at low wind velocities. Size dependence vanished under stagnant conditions. One moss species was added to the species pool for every nine-fold increase in cushion area. Vascular plants were absent from the smallest cushions, whereas one or two species, on average, appeared in 375- and 8,500-cm(2) cushions with water available for 6 and 10 days during desiccation. Phosphorus concentrations increased stepwise and four-fold from detritus to surface mosses and to vascular plants, and all three pools increased with cushion size. We conclude that cushion mosses and cushion size play a critical role in this resource-limited limestone environment by offering an oasis of improved water and nutrient supply to colonization and growth of plants.

  17. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-02-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements.

  18. The Hydrodynamic Effect of Bare Platinum Coils versus Hydrogel-Coated Platinum Coils

    PubMed Central

    Sorteberg, A.; Bakke, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary HydroCoils (HES) were designed to obtain a better initial aneurysm occlusion and increased durability of endovascular treatment. We compared the immediate hydrodynamic effects of HES versus bare platinum coils (Guglielmi detachable coils, GDC). Intra-aneurysmal pressure and flow were measured with a 0.014 inch guide-wire mounted transducer in silicone aneurysms mounted onto a pulsatile flow phantom before and after consecutively coiling with GDC and HES. We evaluated flow using the thermodilution technique along with changes in steady pressure and sudden increases in pressure. We also considered the effect of the coils on the transmission of pressure from the parent artery to the dome of the aneurysm. Intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchan-ged after maximal packing with either GDC or HES. Sudden increases in pressure were less attenuated within the aneurysm after coiling with HES. In spite of HES obtaining a much higher percentage filling volume in the aneurysms, GDC equivalently virtually abolished intra-ane-urysmal flow apart from in one instance where there was significant persistent flow after coiling with GDC. The effects of HES in terms of pressure and flow attenuation within the aneur-ysm could hence not be proven superior to GDC. PMID:20557740

  19. Numerical modeling of water flow and salt transport in bare saline soil subjected to evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2015-05-01

    A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model MARUN, was conducted to investigate subsurface flow and salt transport in bare saline aquifers subjected to evaporation, which was simulated using the bulk aerodynamic formulation. As evaporation was assumed to depend on the pore moisture, the evaporation flux evolved gradually causing a gradual increase in the pore salinity. This is in contrast to prior studies where the high salinity was imposed instantaneously on the ground surface. Key factors likely affecting subsurface hydrodynamics were investigated, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, capillary drive, relative humidity in the air, and surrounding groundwater replenishment. The simulations showed two temporal regimes where the first consists of rapid evaporation for a duration of hours followed by slow evaporation, until evaporation ceases. In the absence of surrounding groundwater replenishment, evaporation-induced density gradient generated an upward water flow initially, and then the flow decreased at which time a high density salt "finger" formed and propagated downwards. Capillary properties and atmospheric condition had significant impacts on subsurface moisture distribution and salt migration in response to the evaporation. The results also suggested that the presence of subsurface water replenishment to the evaporation zone tended to produce a steady evaporation rate at the ground surface.

  20. Moss cushions facilitate water and nutrient supply for plant species on bare limestone pavements.

    PubMed

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Hammer, Kathrine Jul

    2012-10-01

    Dense moss cushions of different size are distributed across the bare limestone pavements on Øland, SE Sweden. Increasing cushion size is predicted to physically protect and improve performance and colonization by vascular plants. Therefore, we tested water balance, phosphorus supply, and species richness, and evaluated duration of plant activity during desiccation as a function of ground area, for a large collection of moss cushions. We found that lower evaporation and higher water storage contributed equally to extending the desiccation period with increasing cushion size. Evaporation rates declined by the -0.36 power of cushion diameter, and were not significantly different from -0.50 for the square root function previously predicted for the increasing thickness of the boundary layer, with greater linear dimensions for smooth flat objects at low wind velocities. Size dependence vanished under stagnant conditions. One moss species was added to the species pool for every nine-fold increase in cushion area. Vascular plants were absent from the smallest cushions, whereas one or two species, on average, appeared in 375- and 8,500-cm(2) cushions with water available for 6 and 10 days during desiccation. Phosphorus concentrations increased stepwise and four-fold from detritus to surface mosses and to vascular plants, and all three pools increased with cushion size. We conclude that cushion mosses and cushion size play a critical role in this resource-limited limestone environment by offering an oasis of improved water and nutrient supply to colonization and growth of plants. PMID:22481304

  1. Bare-tether cathodic contact through thermionic emission by low-work-function materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xin; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2012-07-15

    A new material, C12A7:e{sup -} electride, which might present a work function as low as 0.6 eV and moderately high temperature stability, was recently proposed as coating for floating bare tethers. Arising from heating under space operation, current is emitted by thermionic emission along a thus coated cathodic segment. A preliminary study on the space-charge-limited (SCL) double layer in front of the cathodic segment is presented using Langmuir's SCL electron current between cylindrical electrodes and orbital-motion-limited ion-collection sheath. A detailed calculation of current and bias profiles along the entire tether length is carried out with ohmic effects and the transition from SCL to full Richardson-Dushman emission included. Analysis shows that in the simplest drag mode, under typical orbital and tether conditions, thermionic emission leads to a short cathodic section and may eliminate the need for an active cathodic device and its corresponding gas feed requirements and power subsystem, which results in a truly 'propellant-less' tether system for such basic applications as de-orbiting low earth orbit satellites.

  2. Comparison between dressed-atom and bare-atom pictures in laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, P. R.; Salomaa, Rainer

    1982-05-01

    The theory of the interaction between radiation fields and atoms as applied to laser spectroscopy can be approached using either a bare-atom picture (BAP) or dressed-atom picture (DAP). In the BAP, the basis states are those of the free atoms and free field while, in the DAP, the basis states encompass some part of the atom-field interaction. The theory of saturation spectroscopy in three-level systems is discussed using both approaches. Whereas calculations are usually more easily done using the BAP, one can gain useful insight into the underlying physical processes from the DAP. Moreover, when the radiation field strengths (in frequency units) are larger than the relaxation rates in the problem, the DAP equations simplify considerably and lead to line-shape expressions which may be given a simple interpretation. The DAP is used to obtain resonance conditions for traveling-wave fields interacting with three- and four-level atoms and for a standing-wave saturator and traveling-wave probe interacting with a three-level atom. In addition, the DAP is applied to several problems involving optical coherent transients. A comparison is made between the various advantages of the BAP and DAP and an interesting duality between the two approaches is noted.

  3. The detection of Pb2+ in solution using bare magnetoelastic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Shengbo; Gao, Shuang; Guo, Xing; Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a simple and low cost method for determination of Pb2+ in solution, using bare Metglas alloy 2826MB as the resonator, is reported. Based on the replacement reaction mechanism of the Pb2+ in the solution with Fe and Ni in the Metglas 2826MB ribbon surface, the Pb replaced on the resonator can increase the mass load of the resonator and decrease the resonant frequency of the resonator. Hence, the Pb2+ concentration in solution can be determined by the resonant frequency shift of the ME resonator. The Energy Dispersive Spectrometer results of Pb, Fe, and Ni contents on the resonator's surface prove the reliability of this method. Furthermore, the experimental results show that the resonant frequency shift rate of the resonator decreases when the Pb2+ concentration declines. The sensitivity of the resonator for Pb2+ detection is greatly related to its dimension. The resonator with smaller size has a better sensitivity. The resonant frequency shift of the resonator with dimension of 3 mm × 6 mm × 30 μm is linearly proportional to the Pb2+ concentration. The sensitivity of the resonator for Pb(NO3)2 detection is about 24 Hz/mg ml-1 , and the resonator has a better stability and reproducibility for Pb2+ detection with low concentration.

  4. Easy and safe coated optical fiber direct connection without handling bare optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kotaro; Kihara, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Tomoya; Kurashima, Toshio

    2015-06-01

    We propose a novel field installable splicing technique for the direct connection of 250 μm diameter coated optical fiber that does not require bare optical fiber to be handled. Our proposed technique can realize a low insertion loss over a wide field installation temperature range of -10-40 °C. The keys to coated optical fiber direct connection are a cleaving technique and a technique for removing coated optical fiber. As the cleaving technique, we employed a method where the fiber is stretched and then a blade is pushed perpendicularly against the stretched fiber. As a result we confirmed that fiber endfaces cleaved at -10-40 °C were all mirror endfaces. With the removal technique, the coating is removed inside the connecting component by incorporating a circular cone shaped coating removal part. A mechanical splice based on these techniques successfully achieved a low insertion loss of less than 0.11 dB and a return loss of more than 50 dB at -10, 20, and 40 °C. In addition, the temperature cycle characteristics were stable over a wide temperature range of -40-75 °C.

  5. A physically based surface resistance model for evaporation from bare soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2015-02-01

    The resistance to vapor transfer across the soil-air interface, termed surface resistance, plays an important role in determining the evaporation rate from unsaturated bare soils. A physically based analytical model is developed to describe the surface resistance under varying liquid water saturation. When the vaporization plane remains in the topmost soil layer (TSL), the model considers the vapor transport through the external diffusive layer (EDL), and the hydraulic connection between the capillary water in the TSL and underneath water source for evaporation. When the vaporization plane develops below the TSL, the model predicts the surface resistance by taking into account the development of the dry soil layer, the major barrier for vapor transport at the soil-drying stage. With the consideration of the soil pore size distribution, the model is applicable to different soil types. The model was validated against six sets of laboratory experiments on the drying process of initially water-saturated soil columns under nonisothermal conditions. These experiments were conducted using different soil types and/or heat intensities above the soil surface. The model was found to perform well over intermediate and low liquid water saturation ranges while underestimating the surface resistance for the high liquid water saturation range. The results suggest that the model overall represents reasonably well the processes underlying the vapor transfer across the soil-air interface. Future model improvement may be gained by considering the hydraulic connection between the capillary water and film water in the TSL.

  6. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  7. An electrochemical study of hydrogen uptake and elimination by bare and gold-plated waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.; Lowery, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Two electrochemical methods for the determination of hydrogen concentrations in metals are discussed and evaluated. The take-up of hydrogen at a pressure of 5000 psi by Waspaloy metal was determined experimentally at 24 C. It was found that the metal becomes saturated with hydrogen after an exposure time of about 1 hr. For samples charged with hydrogen at high pressure, most of the hydrogen is contained in the interstitial solid solution of the metal. For electrolytically charged samples, most of the hydrogen is contained as surface and subsurface hydrides. Hydrogen elimination rates were determined for these two cases, with the rate for electrolytically charged samples being greater by over a factor of two. Theoretical effects of high temperature and pressure on hydrogen take-up and elimination by bare and gold plated Waspaloy metal was considered. The breakthrough point for hydrogen at 5000 psi, determined experimentally, lies between a gold thickness of 0.0127 mm (0.0005 in.) and 0.0254 mm (0.001 in.) at 24 C. Electropolishing was found to greatly reduce the uptake of hydrogen at high pressure by Waspaloy metal at 24 C. Possible implications of the results obtained, as they apply to the turbine disk of the space shuttle main engine, are discussed.

  8. Visual detection of melamine based on the peroxidase-like activity enhancement of bare gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ni, Pengjuan; Dai, Haichao; Wang, Yilin; Sun, Yujing; Shi, Yan; Hu, Jingting; Li, Zhuang

    2014-10-15

    In this study, a facile method to sensitively detect melamine and highly improve the peroxidase-like activity of bare gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) at the same time is proposed for the first time. It is interesting to find that the addition of melamine could improve the peroxidase-like activity of Au NPs. By coupling with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethlybenzidine (TMB)-H2O2 chormogenic reaction, a novel method for colorimetic detection of melamine is developed. The detection limit of this method is as low as 0.2 nM with the help of UV-vis spectroscopy and 0.5 µM by naked-eye observation, both which are far below the US food and Drug Administration estimated melamine safety limit of 20 µM. In addition, the present method is successfully applied for the detection of melamine in raw milk and milk powder. More importantly, the proposed method could also improve the peroxidase-like activity of Au NPs, which may not only provide a new approach to develop effective nanomaterials-based mimetic enzyme, but also irradiative to develop new applications for Au NPs in varieties of cost-effective and simple sensors in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  9. Comparison of different methods for estimating soil surface evaporation in a bare field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haofang; Zhang, Chuan; Oue, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Hideki

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, three methods for estimating soil evaporation in a bare field were evaluated: evaporation ratio method ( k ratio), complementary relationship and bulk equation. Micro-lysimeters were used to measure the actual evaporation for validation of the three methods. For the k ratio method, pan evaporation was used as the reference evaporation instead of the value obtained from the Penman-Monteith equation. This result is important for areas where meteorological data are unavailable. The results showed that, for daytime evaporation, the k ratio and bulk equation produced a good fit with the observation data, while the complementary relationship generated a larger deviation from the measured data. We recommend that the k ratio method and bulk equation could be used to calculate daytime soil evaporation with high accuracy when soil water content and pan evaporation data or meteorological data are available, while the complementary relationship could be used for a rough estimation when pan evaporation is available. All the methods could be applied to calculate cumulative evaporation.

  10. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the solid-liquid interface of fused-silica nanofabricated channels with and without a hydrophilic 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (cyanosilane) coating. We develop a model that relaxes the assumption that the surface parameters C(1), C(2), and pK(+) are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy-Chapman-Stern triple-layer model of the electrochemical double layer coupling these two equilibrium models. To validate our model, we used both pH-sensitive dye-based capillary filling experiments as well as electro-osmotic current-monitoring measurements. Using our model we predict the dependence of ζ potential, surface charge density, and capillary filling length ratio on ionic strength for different surface compositions, which can be difficult to achieve otherwise.

  11. A LADAR bare earth extraction technique for diverse topography and complex scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.

    2012-06-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to LADAR data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. A successful approach provides a flexible methodology (adaptable for topography and/or environment) that is capable of integrating multiple ladar point cloud data attributes. A newly developed approach (TE-SiP) uses a 2nd and 3rd order spatial derivative for each point in the DEM to determine sets of contiguous regions of similar elevation. Specifically, the derivative of the central point represents the curvature of the terrain at that position. Contiguous sets of high (positive or negative) values define sharp edges such as building edges or cliffs. This method is independent of the slope, such that very steep, but continuous topography still have relatively low curvature values and are preserved in the terrain classification. Next, a recursive segmentation method identifies unique features of homogeneity on the surface separated by areas of high curvature. An iterative selection process is used to eliminate regions containing buildings or vegetation from the terrain surface. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LADAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity. The results shown here include developed and forested regions in the Dominican Republic.

  12. Empirical formulas for direct double ionization by bare ions: Z = - 1 to 92

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DuBois, R. D.; Santos, A. C. F.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-25

    Experimental cross sections and cross-section ratios reported in the literature for direct double ionization of the outer shells of helium, neon, and argon atoms resulting from bare ions ranging from protons to uranium and for antiprotons are analyzed in terms of a first- and second-order interference model originally proposed by McGuire [J. H. McGuire, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1153 (1982)]. Empirical formulas for the various contributions to double ionization plus information about the phase difference between the first- and second-order mechanisms are extracted from the data. Projectile and target scalings are also extracted. Total cross sections and their ratios determinedmore » using these formulas and scalings are shown to be in very good agreement with experimental data for lower-Z projectiles and impact velocities larger than 1 a.u. For very-high-Z projectiles, the amount of double ionization is overestimated, probably due to saturation of probabilities that is not accounted for in scaling formulas.« less

  13. The contributions to drift of positive and negative thermoelements in type K bare-wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scervini, M.; Rae, C.

    2013-09-01

    A study on drift of type K bare-wire thermocouples in the temperature range 600-1200°C has been undertaken both in air and inert atmosphere: the investigation focused on type K thermocouples of Rescal composition. The approach of this study is based on separating the contributions of each thermoelement to drift and, to a deeper level of understanding, the contributions of different metallurgical modifications for each thermoelement. The drift contributions for each thermoelement have been related to the metallurgical modifications occurring during exposure: the investigated temperature range has been divided into a low temperature range (600-1000°C), characterised by short range order transformations and a high temperature range (1000-1200°C), where oxidation is more pronounced. The contribution of the positive KP thermoelement is the most important for the total type K drift in both the low and high temperature ranges. The negative KN thermoelement has a reduced drift compared to conventional KN compositions.

  14. A comparison of simulation models for predicting soil water dynamics in bare and vegetated lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Kickert, R.N.; Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes the results of simulation models used to predict soil water storage dynamics at the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) weighing lysimeters. The objectives of this research is to develop the capability to predict soil water storage dynamics with plants in support of water infiltration control studies for the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program. It is important to gain confidence in one`s ability to simulate soil water dynamics over long time periods to assess the barrier`s ability to prevent drainage. Two models were compared for their ability to simulate soil water storage dynamics with and without plants in weighing lysimeters, the soil water infiltration and movement (SWIM) and the simulation of production and utilization of rangelands (SPUR-91) models. These models adequately simulated soil water storage dynamics for the weighing lysimeters. The range of root mean square error values for the two models was 7.0 to 19.8. This compares well with the range reported by Fayer et al. (1992) for the bare soil data sets of 8.1 to 22.1. Future research will test the predictive capability of these models for longer term lysimeter data sets and for historical data sets collected in various plant community types.

  15. Compact bone fatigue damage: a microscopic examination.

    PubMed

    Carter, D R; Hayes, W C

    1977-01-01

    Flexural fatigue tests of bovine bone specimens produced fracture surfaces that were transverse on the tension side and oblique on the compression side. Similar fracture patterns were produced by bending tests with a single applied loading. Microscopic examination of flexural fatigue specimens prior to complete established that fatigue fracture is caused by the progressive accumulation of diffuse structural damage. The microdamage observed on the tension side consisted primarily of separation (or debonding) at cement lines and interlamellar cement bands. Tensile cracks in interstitial bone were also observed. The major damage modes on the compression side were oblique cracking and longitudinal splitting. The fatigue fracture patterns observed for the bone specimens correspond to the types of fatigue fractures observed clinically. Compact bone fatigue fractures in areas of longitudinal tensile stresses are generally seen as transverse lesions, whereas fatigue fractures in areas of longitudinal compressive stresses are normally oblique fractures. The diffuse nature of the observed fatigue damage is consistent with the hypothesis that microdamage caused by mechanical loading may serve as a stimulus for in vivo bone remodeling.

  16. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  17. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  18. The behaviour of microcracks in compact bone.

    PubMed

    O'brien, Fergal J; Hardiman, David A; Hazenberg, Jan G; Mercy, Matthew V; Mohsin, Sahar; Taylor, David; Lee, T Clive

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarises four separate studies carried out by our group over the past number of years in the area of bone microdamage. The first study investigated the manner by which microcracks accumulate and interact with bone microstructure during fatigue testing of compact bone specimens. In a series of fatigue tests carried out at four different stress ranges between 50 and 80 MPA, crack density increased with loading cycles at a rate determined by the applied stress. Variations in the patterns of microdamage accumulation suggest that that at low stress levels, larger amounts of damage can build up without failure occurring. In a second study using a series of four-pont bending tests carried out on ovine bone samples, it was shown that bone microstructure influenced the ability of microcracks to propagate, with secondary osteons acting as barriers to crack growth. In a third study, the manner by which crack growth disrupts the canalicular processes connecting osteocytes was investigated. Analysis of individual cracks showed that disruption of the canalicular processes connecting osteocytes occurred due to shear displacement at the face of propagating microcracks, suggesting that this may play some role in the mechanism that signals bone remodelling. In a fourth in vivo study, it was shown that altering the mechanical load applied to the long bones of growing rats causes microcrack formation. In vivo microdamage was present in rats subjected to hindlimb suspension with a higher microcrack density found in the humeri than the femora. Microdamage was also found in control animals. This is the first study to demonstrate in vivo microcracks in normally loaded bones in a rat model.

  19. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  20. Measurements, interpretation and climate change effects evaluation for pyroclastic bare soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, G.; Pagano, L.; Mercogliano, P.; Montesarchio, M.

    2012-12-01

    A physical model has been designed to achieve the following goals: to mark out the main features of the soil-atmosphere interaction; to quantify the water and energy fluxes through the soil surface during several years; to monitor the trends of the main variables regulating the hydraulic and thermal conditions. It is constituted by a soil volume (about 1mc) exposed to weather forcing; it is instrumented at four depths by sensors for measuring suction, water content and temperature. Therefore, a station allows knowing the meteo variables (rainfall, wind velocity and direction, air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity) and the two directly measurable components of the energy balance at the soil surface (net radiation and soil heat flux). Under the soil specimen, three shear beam load cells measure the soil weight and, hence, because the soil particles weight can be assumed as constant, the sample water storage. As first attempt, the soil surface is kept bare to avoid the complications led by overlapping processes induced by vegetation (interception, transpiration). Since May 2010, the soil involved in testing is pyroclastic material (silty sand) representative of air fall deposits covering a large part of Campania (South Italy) and erupted in the last 10,000 years by different volcanic centres (Phlegrean fields, Vesuvius). Because of their genesis, these soils show peculiar features: high porosity, low weight of soil unit volume, high water retention capacity; they cause an unusual hydraulic behaviour, halfway between coarse and fine soils in terms of saturated hydraulic permeability and mean slope of soil-water characteristic curve. In turn, these elements induce, among other things, that the currently adopted predictive approaches to estimate, for example, infiltration and evaporation processes are not directly suitable for these soils as the available parameters, even for grain sizes comparable to those of pyroclastic soils, fail to reproduce the

  1. EAARL coastal topography-western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: seamless (bare earth and submerged.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, John C.; Yates, Xan

    2010-01-01

    Project Description These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the western Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Charley on August 17 and 18, 2004. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  2. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  3. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, J.R.; Anderson, G.D.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1996-03-12

    The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  4. Genetics of aging bone.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas J; Rowe, David W; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L

    2016-08-01

    With aging, the skeleton experiences a number of changes, which include reductions in mass and changes in matrix composition, leading to fragility and ultimately an increase of fracture risk. A number of aspects of bone physiology are controlled by genetic factors, including peak bone mass, bone shape, and composition; however, forward genetic studies in humans have largely concentrated on clinically available measures such as bone mineral density (BMD). Forward genetic studies in rodents have also heavily focused on BMD; however, investigations of direct measures of bone strength, size, and shape have also been conducted. Overwhelmingly, these studies of the genetics of bone strength have identified loci that modulate strength via influencing bone size, and may not impact the matrix material properties of bone. Many of the rodent forward genetic studies lacked sufficient mapping resolution for candidate gene identification; however, newer studies using genetic mapping populations such as Advanced Intercrosses and the Collaborative Cross appear to have overcome this issue and show promise for future studies. The majority of the genetic mapping studies conducted to date have focused on younger animals and thus an understanding of the genetic control of age-related bone loss represents a key gap in knowledge.

  5. Autoinflammatory bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Stern, Sara M; Ferguson, Polly J

    2013-11-01

    Autoinflammatory bone disease is a new branch of autoinflammatory diseases caused by seemingly unprovoked activation of the innate immune system leading to an osseous inflammatory process. The inflammatory bone lesions in these disorders are characterized by chronic inflammation that is typically culture negative with no demonstrable organism on histopathology. The most common autoinflammatory bone diseases in childhood include chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO), synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis syndrome, Majeed syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and cherubism. In this article, the authors focus on CNO and summarize the distinct genetic autoinflammatory bone syndromes.

  6. Optimum sizing of bare-tape tethers for de-orbiting satellites at end of mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Sánchez-Torres, A.; Khan, S. B.; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Charro, M.

    2015-10-01

    De-orbiting satellites at end of mission would prevent generation of new space debris. A proposed de-orbit technology involves a bare conductive tape-tether, which uses neither propellant nor power supply while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. The present work shows how to select tape dimensions for a generic mission so as to satisfy requirements of very small tether-to-satellite mass ratio mt/MS and probability Nf of tether cut by small debris, while keeping de-orbit time tf short and product tf × tether length low to reduce maneuvers in avoiding collisions with large debris. Design is here discussed for particular missions (initial orbit of 720 km altitude and 63° and 92° inclinations, and 3 disparate MS values, 37.5, 375, and 3750 kg), proving it scalable. At mid-inclination and a mass-ratio of a few percent, de-orbit time takes about 2 weeks and Nf is a small fraction of 1%, with tape dimensions ranging from 1 to 6 cm, 10 to 54 μ m, and 2.8 to 8.6 km. Performance drop from middle to high inclination proved moderate: if allowing for twice as large mt/MS, increases are reduced to a factor of 4 in tf and a slight one in Nf, except for multi-ton satellites, somewhat more requiring because efficient orbital-motion-limited electron collection restricts tape-width values, resulting in tape length (slightly) increasing too.

  7. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girolamo, D.; Girolamo, L.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  8. Coupling of heat, water vapor, and liquid water fluxes to compute evaporation in bare soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittelli, Marco; Ventura, Francesca; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Snyder, Richard L.; Gallegati, Fabia; Pisa, Paola Rossi

    2008-12-01

    SummaryThe quantification of soil evaporation and of soil water content dynamics near the soil surface are critical in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales, in particular in relation to mass and energy fluxes between the ground and the atmosphere. Although it is widely recognized that both liquid and gaseous water movement are fundamental factors in the quantification of soil heat flux and surface evaporation, their computation is still rarely considered in most models or practical applications. Moreover, questions remain about the correct computation of key factors such as the soil surface resistance or the soil surface temperature. This study was conducted to: (a) implement a fully coupled numerical model to solve the governing equations for liquid water, water vapor, and heat transport in bare soils, (b) test the numerical model with detailed measurements of soil temperature, heat flux, water content, and evaporation from the surface, and (c) test different formulations for the soil surface resistance parameter and test their effect on soil evaporation. The code implements a non-isothermal solution of the vapor flux equation that accounts for the thermally driven water vapor transport and phase changes. Simulated soil temperature, heat flux, and water content were in good agreement with measured values. The model showed that vapor transport plays a key role in soil mass and energy transfer and that vapor flow may induce sinusoidal variations in soil water content near the surface. Different results were obtained for evaporation calculations, depending on the choice of the soil surface resistance equation, which was shown to be a fundamental term in the soil-atmosphere interactions. The results also demonstrated that soil water dynamics are strongly linked to temperature variations and that it is important to consider coupled transport of heat, vapor and liquid water when assessing energy dynamics in soils.

  9. Results from NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Series 2 bare fuel dissolution tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-09-01

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Two bare spent fuel specimens plus the empty cladding hulls were tested in NNWSI J-13 well water in unsealed fused silica vessels under ambient hot cell air conditions (25{degree}C) in the currently reported tests. One of the specimens was prepared from a rod irradiated in the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 reactor and the other from a rod irradiated in the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor. Results indicate that most radionuclides of interest fall into three groups for release modeling. The first group principally includes the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm), all of which reached solubility-limited concentrations that were orders of magnitude below those necessary to meet the NRC 10 CFR 60.113 release limits for any realistic water flux predicted for the Yucca Mountain repository site. The second group is nuclides of soluble elements such as Cs, Tc, and I, for which release rates do not appear to be solubility-limited and may depend on the dissolution rate of fuel. In later test cycles, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 129}I were continuously released at rates between about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} of inventory per year. The third group is radionuclides that may be transported in the vapor phase, of which {sup 14}C is of primary concern. Detailed test results are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs.

  10. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  11. Remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare fields at 1.4 GHz frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple method of estimating moisture content (W) of a bare soil from the observed brightness temperature (T sub B) at 1.4 GHz is discussed. The method is based on a radiative transfer model calculation, which has been successfully used in the past to account for many observational results, with some modifications to take into account the effect of surface roughness. Besides the measured T sub B's, the three additional inputs required by the method are the effective soil thermodynamic temperature, the precise relation between W and the smooth field brightness temperature T sub B and a parameter specifying the surface roughness characteristics. The soil effective temperature can be readily measured and the procedures of estimating surface roughness parameter and obtaining the relation between W and smooth field brightness temperature are discussed in detail. Dual polarized radiometric measurements at an off-nadir incident angle are sufficient to estimate both surface roughness parameter and W, provided that the relation between W and smooth field brightness temperature at the same angle is known. The method of W estimate is demonstrated with two sets of experimental data, one from a controlled field experiment by a mobile tower and the other, from aircraft overflight. The results from both data sets are encouraging when the estimated W's are compared with the acquired ground truth of W's in the top 2 cm layer. An offset between the estimated and the measured W's exists in the results of the analyses, but that can be accounted for by the presently poor knowledge of the relationship between W and smooth field brightness temperature for various types of soils. An approach to quantify this relationship for different soils and thus improve the method of W estimate is suggested.

  12. Stent selection in patients with myocardial infarction: drug eluting, biodegradable polymers or bare metal stents?

    PubMed

    Mieres, Juan; Rodríguez, Alfredo E

    2012-08-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been increasingly used in the last years during interventional procedures in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) including ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). In patients with either STEMI, NSTEMI, high risk ACS with EKG changes or cardiac enzymes rises; PCI with bare metal stent (BMS) implantation has been associated with a significant improvement in clinical outcome. Therefore, BMS implantation during primary PCI in STEMI has become a standard of practice. With the introduction of drug eluting stents (DESs) in this decade, the use of these new devices instead of BMSs in patients with STEMI has emerged as a rational PCI alternative in this particular subgroup of patients. In spite of the unquestionable benefits of DESs in terms of reduction of restenosis and TVR, specific concerns have arisen with regard to their long-term safety. High incidence of very late stent thrombosis has been described with these devices, and special attention should be paid in patients with unstable coronary lesions, in which plaque composition and remodeling may play a main role in their safety and long-term outcome. Intraluminal thrombus caused by plaque rupture is the most frequent mechanism of STEMI, in which the necrotic core and thin fibrous cap play a major role. In this context, the use of first DESs designs may be futile or even unsafe because delayed healing may further contribute to plaque instability. Adjunctive invasive imaging tools can improve stent deployment and safety outcome in these lesions with intravascular findings of plaque instability. Recently, other players such as new dedicated antithrombotic BMS designs, including selfexpanding stents or drug-eluting coated balloons, are exploring their potential indications in patients with ACS and myocardial infarction. This paper reports and discusses new stent devices and adjunctive pharmacologic agents. It

  13. Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Ahrens, L.; Gleen, J.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-09-01

    This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section

  14. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  15. Hemocompatibility Improvement of Chromium-Bearing Bare-Metal Stent Platform After Magnetoelectropolishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokicki, Ryszard; Haider, Waseem; Maffi, Shivani Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Research was undertaken to determine the influence of the increased content of chromium in the outermost passive layer of magneto-electrochemically refined Co-Cr alloy L-605 surface on its hemocompatibility. The chemistry, roughness, surface energy, and wettability of conventionally electropolished (EP) and magnetoelectropolished (MEP) samples were studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), open circuit potential, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle meter. In vitro hemocompatibility of tested material surfaces was assessed using two important indicators of vascular responses to biomaterial, namely endothelialization and platelets adhesion. The endothelialization was assessed by seeding and incubating samples with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) for 3 days before counting and observing them under a fluorescent microscope. The platelet (rich plasma blood) adhesion and activation test on EP and MEP L-605 alloy surfaces was assessed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The XPS analysis of MEP samples showed significant enrichment of the passive layer with Cr and O when compared with the EP one. The amount of other elements in the passive layer did not show a significant difference between EP and MEP treatments. The adhesion of HUVEC cells shows remarkable affinity to surfaces enriched in Cr (MEP) with almost 100% confluency. In addition, the number of platelets that adhered to standard EP surfaces was higher compared to the MEP surface. The present study shows that the chromium-enriched surface of cobalt-chromium alloy L-605 by the magnetoelectropolishing process tremendously improves surface hemocompatibility with regard to stent functionality by enhanced endothelialization and lower platelet adhesion and should be taken under consideration as an alternative surface of biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents, polymer-free drug-eluting stents as well as bare-metal stents.

  16. In vivo penetration of bare and lipid-coated silica nanoparticles across the human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Iannuccelli, Valentina; Bertelli, Davide; Romagnoli, Marcello; Scalia, Santo; Maretti, Eleonora; Sacchetti, Francesca; Leo, Eliana

    2014-10-01

    Skin penetration of silica nanoparticles (NP) currently used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products is a topic of interest not only to evaluate their possible toxicity, but also to understand their behaviour upon contact with the skin and to exploit their potential positive effects in drug or cosmetic delivery field. Therefore, the present work aimed to elucidate the in vivo mechanism by which amorphous hydrophilic silica NP enter human stratum corneum (SC) through the evaluation of the role played by the nanoparticle surface polarity and the human hair follicle density. Two silica samples, bare hydrophilic silica (B-silica, 162±51nm in size) and hydrophobic lipid-coated silica (LC-silica, 363±74nm in size) were applied on both the volar and dorsal side of volunteer forearms. Twelve repetitive stripped tapes were removed from the human skin and evaluated for elemental composition by Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and for silicon content by Inductively Coupled Plasma quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). All the stripped tapes revealed nanosized structures generally located in the broad spaces between corneocytes and characterized by the same elemental composition (relative weight percentage of silicon and silicon to oxygen weight ratio) than that of the applied samples. However, only about 10% B-silica permeated until the deepest SC layers considered in the study indicating a silica retention in the upper layers of SC, regardless of the hair follicle density. Otherwise, the exposure to LC-silica led to a greater silica skin penetration extent into the deeper SC layers (about 42% and 18% silica following volar and dorsal forearm application, respectively) indicating that the NP surface polarity played a predominant role on that of their size in determining the route and the extent of penetration.

  17. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: Global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, C.G.; Mottl, M.J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The authors have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO{sub 2}, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58 C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes form seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. The authors use the Baby Bare spring water to estimate upper limits on the global fluxes of 14 elements at warm ridge-flank sites such as Baby Bare. Maximum calculated fluxes of Mg, Ca, sulfate, B, and K may equal or exceed 25% of the riverine flux, and such sites may represent the missing, high K/Rb sink required for the K budget.

  18. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Mottl, Michael J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures (63°C in uppermost basement at this site) remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO 2, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. These data confirm the earlier inference that sediment pore waters from areas of upwelling can be used to estimate the composition of altered seawater in the underlying basement, even for those elements that are reactive in the sediment column or are affected by sampling artifacts. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58°C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes from seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in basement at the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. This conclusion is supported

  19. Deciphering skeletal patterning: clues from the limb.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Francesca V; Martin, Gail R

    2003-05-15

    Even young children can distinguish a Tyrannosaurus rex from a Brontosaurus by observing differences in bone size, shape, number and arrangement, that is, skeletal pattern. But despite our extensive knowledge about cartilage and bone formation per se, it is still largely a mystery how skeletal pattern is established. Much of what we do know has been learned from studying limb development in chicken and mouse embryos. Based on the data from such studies, models for how limb skeletal pattern is established have been proposed and continue to be hotly debated.

  20. Aneurysmal bone cyst involving the metacarpal bone in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor; Sohn, Eun Seok

    2015-03-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts associated with tubular bones of the hand occur rarely and require particular diagnostic and therapeutic management techniques. While optimal treatment has not been established, accepted treatments range from aggressive radical treatment, including en bloc resection and excision diaphysectomy with strut bone grafting, to relatively simple techniques, such as thorough curettage followed by bone graft. Aggressive treatment approaches may be optimal for the cases with articular surface involvement, full-bone invasion of the phalanx or metacarpal, or more than 1 recurrence. We report a monocentric case of aneurysmal bone cysts involving metacarpal bone in a child who achieved favorable outcome with curettage and morselized cancellous bone grafts. PMID:25750953