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Sample records for bariatric surgery presentation

  1. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis.

  2. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  3. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic surgery). The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric ...

  4. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... or bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  5. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their

  6. Psychopharmacology and Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Roerig, James L; Steffen, Kristine

    2015-11-01

    Currently, it has been demonstrated that psychotropic drugs, particularly antidepressants, are frequently prescribed for patients who seek bariatric surgery. Many bariatric surgery patients have a history of a mood disorder. Unlike medications for diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia, which are generally reduced and at times discontinued, postsurgery antidepressants use is only slightly reduced. The Roux-en-Y procedure is most frequently associated with alteration in drug exposure. Medication disintegration, dissolution, absorption, metabolism and excretion have been found to be altered in postbariatric patients, although data are sparse at this time. This paper will review the current evidence regarding the effect of bariatric surgery on drug treatment including mechanism of interference as well as the extent of changes identified to date. Data will be presented as controlled trials followed by case series and reports.

  7. Bariatric surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dumon, Kristoffel R; Murayama, Kenric M

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of death, and morbid obesity carries a significant risk of life-threatening complications such as heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Bariatric surgery is recognized as the only effective treatment of morbid obesity. The estimated number of bariatric operations performed in the United States in 2008 was more than 13 times the number performed in 1992. Despite this increase, only 1% of the eligible morbidly obese population are currently treated with bariatric surgery.

  8. Skin changes after bariatric surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Ana Paula Dornelles da Silva; Weber, Magda Blessmann

    2015-01-01

    Today, obesity is considered an epidemic all over the world and it is recognized as one of the major public health problems. Bariatric surgery is considered an appropriate therapeutic option for obesity with progressively increasing demands. The changes resulting from massive weight loss after bariatric surgery are related to numerous complications. This article will present the dermatological alterations that can be found after bariatric surgery. They will be subdivided into dermatoses that are secondary to metabolic and nutritional disorders, those derived from cutaneous structural modifications after major weight loss and the influence the latter may have in improving of certain dermatoses. PMID:25830984

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of atypical presentations of hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanagin, Brody A; Mitchell, Myrosia T; Thistlethwaite, William A; Alverdy, John C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery dramatically alters the normal stomach anatomy resulting in a significant incidence of hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although the majority of patients remain asymptomatic, many complain of severe heartburn refractory to medical management and additional highly atypical symptoms. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment regarding four cases of symptomatic hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery presenting with atypical symptoms in the University Hospital, USA. Four patients presented following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or duodenal switch/pancreaticobiliary bypass (DS) with disabling and intractable midepigastric abdominal pain characterized as severe and radiating to the jaw, left shoulder, and midscapular area. The pain in all cases was described as paroxysmal and not necessarily associated with eating. All four patients also experienced nausea, vomiting, and failure to thrive at various intervals following laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Routine workup failed to produce any clear mechanical cause of these symptoms. However, complimentary use of multidetector CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast studies eventually revealed the diagnosis of hiatal hernia. Exploration identified the presence of a type I hiatal hernia in all four patients, with the stomach staple lines densely adherent to the diaphragm and parietal peritoneum. Operative intervention led to immediate and complete resolution of symptoms. The presence of a hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery can present with highly atypical symptoms that do not resolve without operative intervention. Recognition of this problem should lead to the consideration of surgery in cases where patients are dependent on artificial nutritional support and whose symptoms are poorly controlled with medication alone.

  10. Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System Fact Sheet Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System February, 2012 Download PDFs ... John Morton, MD Marzieh Salehi, MD What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese ...

  11. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techniques have contributed to reduced operative time, length of stay, and complications. The development in bariatric surgery has been exceptional, resulting in a dramatic increase of the number of procedures performed world wide during the last decades. Although, a complex bariatric procedure can be performed with operative mortality no greater than cholecystectomy, specific procedure-related complications and other drawbacks must be taken into account. The evolution of laparoscopy will be the legacy of the 21st century and at present, day-care surgery and further reduction of the operative trauma is in focus. The impressive effects on comorbid conditions have prompted the adoption of minimal invasive bariatric procedures into the field of metabolic surgery. PMID:25386062

  12. Anaesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Roman

    2011-03-01

    Although many smaller studies have addressed anaesthetic care for bariatric surgical patients, comprehensive systematic literature reviews have yet to be compiled, and much evidence includes expert panel opinion. This review summarises study results in bariatric surgical patients regarding pre-anaesthesia evaluation, the perioperative impact of sleep-disordered breathing, airway management at anaesthetic induction and emergence, maintenance of anaesthesia, postoperative pain management, utility of clinical-care pathways and feasibility of outpatient bariatric surgery. The 'ramped' upper-body, reversed Trendelenburg position at anaesthetic induction and manual application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is recommended. Intra-operative hypoxaemia can be treated with the combination of PEEP and recruitment manoeuvres, and attention to airway management at emergence is critical. Local anaesthetic wound infiltration and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be part of multimodal opioid-sparing postoperative analgesia. Implementation of bariatric clinical-care pathways seems beneficial. Considering the prevalence of sleep apnoea in these patients, outpatient bariatric surgery remains controversial, but is probably safe for certain procedures, provided there is strict adherence to preoperative eligibility and home-care protocols.

  13. Bariatric and metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fried, M

    2013-09-01

    In the beginning of the 21st century obesity still represents health, social and economical threat for most of economically wealthy countries worldwide. Estimated direct costs for obesity and related comorbidities treatment exceed 5% of the total health care costs both in the US and in European Union. However, in addition there are obesity-related indirect costs linked to more frequent work sickness leave, higher unemployment rates and overall lower productivity of obese patients. Surgical treatment of obesity (bariatric surgery) is the most effective long-term treatment modality for those patients suffering from higher degrees of obesity. Bariatric surgery has not only positive effects on weight loss, but is also extremely effective in improving or resolving many of obesity-related comorbidities, which have evolved rapidly into the so-called metabolic surgery. T2DM may serve as excellent example of metabolic, obesity-related comorbidity which can be treated with bariatric-metabolic procedure even without direct relation to weight loss. In such cases bariatric surgery evolves into metabolic surgery. Thus metabolic operations (namely from the malabsorptive end) deeply influence hormonal secretion especially in the proximal part of small bowel, change parametres of entero-insular axis and have positive influence on insulin secretion, sensitivity and on the entire complex of glucose tolerance. Nowadays we can witness dramatic changes in perception of T2DM from bariatric surgeons, diabetologists, and many other medical specialists. T2DM has evolved from primarily medical disease into a condition where surgeons may play a more active role in the management of the diabetic patient. However, it has to be stressed that metabolic treatment of T2DM and other metabolic disorders need multidisciplinary approach and collaboration and that surgeon should play very important role as a multidisciplinary team member, however metabolic surgery should not yet be considered as stand

  14. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented. PMID:23676549

  15. Neurological complications of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Khan, Abid S.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Aldarmahi, Ahmed A.; Lodhi, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review and analyze the neurological complications from bariatric surgery in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2009 to December 2015. Important personal and clinical data were collected from the charts of the patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Data on follow up visit and remote complication if present, was also collected. All patients with neurological complications were reviewed in detail. The significant difference was calculated by using T-test and p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 451 patients underwent bariatric surgery, 15 cases had neurological complications (3%). Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of Wernicke syndrome, vitamin B12 deficiency, Guillain-Barre syndrome and copper deficiency were also identified. Fourteen patients (93.3%) had full recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms; one patient died. Conclusions: Bariatric surgery is not free of potential neurological complications. Complications may affect both central and peripheral nervous system and death is a possibility. Multidisciplinary care including consultation of different teams is highly recommended. PMID:27356656

  16. Adolescent bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Daniel S; Fallon, Sara C; Brandt, Mary L

    2012-08-01

    Pediatric obesity has increased from a relatively uncommon problem to one of the most important public health problems facing children today. Typical "adult" diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, have become increasingly prevalent in the pediatric population. The earlier presentation of these comorbidities will have a significant impact for the future because this population of children will require more medical resources at an earlier age and will have a significantly decreased life expectancy. The significant morbidity of obesity in the pediatric population has led to consideration of more aggressive treatment protocols for obesity in children, including the introduction of surgical management at an earlier age. Surgery for obesity in adolescents has particular risks and benefits that must be accounted for when considering this approach. The unique psychological and emotional needs of adolescent patients make the patient selection process and perioperative management substantially different from those of adult patients. Initial outcomes of bariatric surgery in adolescents are comparable to those seen in adults in the short term. However, the long-term effects of these procedures on the adolescent population are not known. This review discusses the epidemiology of pediatric obesity, the indications for operative therapy in adolescent patients, the common surgical procedures used for weight loss, the reported outcomes of these procedures, and the importance of multidisciplinary management for this unique patient population.

  17. [Bariatric surgery: an update].

    PubMed

    Moreno Esteban, B; Zugasti Murillo, A

    2004-01-01

    The indication of bariatric surgery as therapeutic procedure for morbid obese patients requires the application of selection criteria which deal with the degree of obesity, associated complications and previous failure of conventional therapy. Alcohol or drug addiction and concomitant serious disease are contraindications for bariatric surgery. Before operation, a full assessment is needed to identify possible eating behaviour disturbances and associated comorbidity such as cardiovascular disease, sleep apnoea, metabolic and psychiatric alterations which might induce intra and postoperative complications. Surgical techniques can be classified as restrictive, malabsortive and mixed procedures. Gastroplasty and adjustable gastric banding are restrictive techniques, which are indicated in obese patients with body mass index less than 45 kg/m2. Mixed techniques are the most used procedures. They include gastric by-pass which causes a reduction of 60-70% of weight excess, biliopancreatic diversion and duodenal switch which can eliminate a 75% of body weight excess. Following bariatric surgery a dramatic improvement in associated comorbidity can be demonstrated, specially in what refers to diabetes, hypertension, dislipidaemia and apnoea. Postoperative mortality is around 1-2%. Peritonitis and venous thromboembolism are the most serious complications. Postoperative follow-up should be lifelong and requires a progressive nutrition planning and vitamin supplementation.

  18. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  19. Bariatric Surgery: Risks and Rewards

    PubMed Central

    Pories, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Over 23 million Americans are afflicted with severe obesity, i.e. their body mass index (in kilograms per square meter) values exceed 35. Of even greater concern is the association of the adiposity with comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiopulmonary failure, asthma, pseudotumor cerebri, infertility, and crippling arthritis. Objective: Diets, exercise, behavioral modification, and drugs are not effective in these individuals. This article examines the effect of surgery on the control of the weight and the comorbidities, as well as the safety of these operations. Interventions: Although the article focuses on the outcomes of the three most commonly performed operations, i.e. adjustable gastric banding, the gastric bypass, and the biliopancreatic bypass with duodenal switch, it aims for perspective with the inclusion of abandoned and current investigational procedures, a review of the complications, and an emphasis on the appropriate selection of patients. Positions: Ample evidence, including controlled randomized studies, now document that bariatric surgery produces durable weight loss exceeding 100 lb (46 kg), full and long-term remission of type 2 diabetes in over 80% with salutary effects on the other comorbidities as well with significant reductions in all-cause mortality. Although the severely obese present with serious surgical risks, bariatric surgery is performed safely with a 0.35% 90-d mortality in Centers of Excellence throughout the United States—similar to the complication rates after cholecystectomy. Conclusions: Until better approaches become available, bariatric surgery is the therapy of choice for patients with severe obesity. PMID:18987275

  20. [Micronutrients in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Amaya García, M J; Vilchez López, F J; Campos Martín, C; Sánchez Vera, P; Pereira Cunill, J L

    2012-01-01

    The morbid obesity is a chronic disease with increasing prevalence and that associates an important morbility and mortality. The bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to secure a weight reduction maintained in the time and a diminution in the rates of complications associated to the obesity. The overweight and the obesity are risk factors for the deficit of several micronutrients like vitamins B1, B6, C, folic acid and D, minerals like the iron and trace elements like zinc, generally by dietetic deficit. In spite of it, at the moment a consensus don't exist about the monitoring of micronutrients in the preoperative one, although it seems reasonable in view of his considerable prevalence. The bariatric surgery can bring about deficit of micronutrients or to intensify previous deficiencies, as much by limitation of the ingestion like by the maldigestión and malabsorption in the malabsortives techniques, being the parallel risk to the ponderal loss. It is precise to monitor of by life the different micronutrients, mainly after the malabsortives surgical techniques. The use of a polivitamínic complex of systematic form is recommended and in the cases in which he is insufficient, it will be precise to use specific suplementación.

  1. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bariatric patients have serious health problems caused by vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Truth: Bariatric operations can lead to deficiencies in vitamins and minerals by reducing nutrient intake or by ...

  2. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  3. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... app, created for all professions caring for the bariatric surgery patient before, during, and after surgery. More Information ... Change You can help ASMBS bring coverage for bariatric surgery to all states in America through ObesityPAC Read ...

  4. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  5. New-Onset Mania Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Mukul; Agustin, Erie T.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a major public health problem over the past two decades. Non-surgical management of obesity does not often achieve its long term goals. Surgical treatment is roaring in popularity because of dramatic and durable results. However, outcomes from bariatric surgery have become a significant area of scrutiny because it is also associated with several medical and psychological complications. Out of those complications, there are descriptions of neuropsychiatric disorders and psycho-behavioral symptoms after surgery. Meanwhile, few reports of acute psychosis are described but to our knowledge, our case is the first case report of primary mania following bariatric surgery. We present an unusual and challenging case of primary mania in a 57 year old female who underwent bariatric surgery two months ago. Patient responded well initially to antipsychotic followed by mood stabilizer. PMID:25670960

  6. New-onset mania following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Hitekshya; Bhattarai, Mukul; Agustin, Erie T

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a major public health problem over the past two decades. Non-surgical management of obesity does not often achieve its long term goals. Surgical treatment is roaring in popularity because of dramatic and durable results. However, outcomes from bariatric surgery have become a significant area of scrutiny because it is also associated with several medical and psychological complications. Out of those complications, there are descriptions of neuropsychiatric disorders and psycho-behavioral symptoms after surgery. Meanwhile, few reports of acute psychosis are described but to our knowledge, our case is the first case report of primary mania following bariatric surgery. We present an unusual and challenging case of primary mania in a 57 year old female who underwent bariatric surgery two months ago. Patient responded well initially to antipsychotic followed by mood stabilizer.

  7. Bariatric surgery: assessing opportunities for value innovation.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, David P; Smith, Darlene B

    2005-03-01

    Obesity has been increasing over the past two decades, and the amount of medical and media attention given to bariatric surgery as a promising option for morbidly obese individuals is growing. The growth of bariatric surgery also has been attributed to improved surgical technique, the increase in surgeons trained in laparoscopic procedures, as well increased public awareness with celebrities having successfully undergone surgery. The number of surgeons and hospitals offering bariatric services is increasing. How then does a surgeon or a hospital develop a competitive strategy? The first step is to understand the health-care industry. The key forces are rivalry among present competitors, and the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers. While bariatric surgery currently is in a growth phase, time and competition will force practitioners to compete on the basis of price, unless they find true competitive advantage. Value innovation, is a means of creating new marketing space by looking across the conventionally defined boundaries of business--across substitute industries, across strategic groups, across buyer groups, across complementary product and service offerings, and across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry. One can compete by offering similar services focusing primarily on cost efficiencies as the key to profitability. Alternatively, one can break free from the pack by innovating and focusing on delivering superior value to the customer. As the market for bariatric surgery becomes increasingly overcrowded, profitable growth is not sustainable without developing a clear differential advantage in the market. Value innovation allows you to develop that advantage.

  8. Innovative solutions in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Tomasz; Kozakiewicz, Krzysztof; Dadan, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays all over the world the rising plague of obesity can be observed. The obesity was recognized as “an epidemic of XXI century” in 1997 by World Health Organization. The change of eating habits, active lifestyle or pharmacological curation are often insufficient to fight against obesity. Nowadays, there are not any guidelines about gold standard for curing obese patients is bariatric surgery. At the moment, two types of bariatric procedures: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, are most commonly used. There are also some other new approaches, which are still being investigated. The mechanism of losing weight in bariatric surgery is based on restriction, malabsorption and neurohormonal effect. Not only is the surgery technique very important to succeed, but also the postoperative care in the outpatient clinic. This article reviews the new possibilities in obesity treatment. PMID:27867868

  9. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  10. Future directions in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sean M; Pryor, Aurora D

    2011-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is a field in rapid evolution, and the speed of this evolution has been accelerating over the last several decades. A thorough understanding of past developments is crucial to anticipating the future intelligently. The trends that have driven evolution historically often persist, and continue to be influential in the future. With this in mind, this article briefly outlines the historical and current trends in bariatric surgery, and follows the trajectory of these trends into the future to anticipate the technologies and techniques that will be most important to the field in the coming years.

  11. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  12. Bariatric surgery to treat obesity.

    PubMed

    Kissler, Hermann J; Settmacher, Utz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has become a global health problem that contributes to numerous life-threatening and disabling diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. The long-term results of traditional weight loss therapies, including diet, exercise, and medications, are relatively poor. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment of morbidly obese patients to allow substantial, sustained weight loss and to improve or resolve obesity-associated comorbidities, thereby reducing mortality. According to US practice guidelines, patients qualify for bariatric surgery with a body mass index of 35 kg/m(2) and associated comorbidities, or a body mass index of 40 kg/m(2), after failure of conservative weight loss measures. Currently, the established procedures in the United States are the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. The surgeries vary substantially in their postoperative amount of weight loss, resolution of comorbidities, nutritional requirements, and nature and severity of complications. There is no perfect bariatric surgery, an informed risk and benefit assessment should be made by each patient. The procedures are safe, with a mortality rate of 0.3%. Sustained weight loss depends finally on patient re-education in terms of diet, need for regular exercise, and careful bariatric follow-up evaluation.

  13. Bariatric Surgery and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    Background As the prevalence of obesity increases, so are the prevalences of weight related diseases and the incidence of surgical procedures to promote weight loss. It is important for neuro-ophthalmologists to be familiar with these procedures and possible downstream effects on afferent and efferent visual function. Evidence acquisition Review of ophthalmology, neurology, general surgery, obesity, endocrinology, nutrition, psychiatry and neurosurgery literature. Results Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective treatment for weight loss in obese individuals. There is level IV evidence that it is associated with improvement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension(IIH). Laboratory nutrient deficiencies are common following some types of bariatric procedures. Symptomatic deficiencies are less common but can be devastating. Thiamine deficiency can cause nystagmus and other symptoms in weeks to months following surgery, B12 or copper deficiency can cause optic neuropathy in the years to decades following bariatric surgery. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be a treatment for IIH. Postoperative vitamin deficiencies may present with nystagmus, optic neuropathy, nyctalopia and/or ophthalmoparesis weeks to years after surgery. PMID:26764529

  14. Bariatric Surgery, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, James; Deguara, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the commonest cause of female infertility. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are key pathophysiological mechanisms behind PCOS. Women suffering from this syndrome and infertility often seek bariatric surgery hoping that they would be able to conceive postoperatively. Objective. At present, there is no consensus on the role of bariatric surgery in the management of PCOS-associated infertility within the medical community, making it difficult to give specific advice to these women, so a review of the literature was necessary. Results. A detailed review of the literature was performed. Only 6 manuscripts were relevant and contained quantitative data. They demonstrated that bariatric surgery results in postoperative conception rates varying from 33% to 100%. Surgery is also associated with amelioration of menstrual irregularities, hormonal abnormalities, and hirsutism that are associated with PCOS. These studies were retrospective and only had a small number of participants with infertility. Conclusions. Bariatric surgery has been shown to conclusively improve life expectancy, quality of life, and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. However, further research is required to identify whether weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in fertility of women with PCOS and to investigate which operation has the best results. PMID:27965894

  15. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery. PMID:27516900

  16. Severe vitamin A deficiency after malabsortive bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres García, Antonio J; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency may occur after malabsorptive bariatric surgery. However, it rarely entails important functionally limiting symptoms. We present the case of a woman who underwent bariatric surgery and developed ocular dryness, xeroderma and hearing loss due to severe vitamin A deficiency. We illustrate an outstanding and exceptional case of the consequences of an excessive and uncontrolled malabsorption.

  17. Optimizing perioperative care in bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Lemanu, Daniel P; Srinivasa, Sanket; Singh, Primal P; Johannsen, Sharon; MacCormick, Andrew D; Hill, Andrew G

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs have been shown to minimise morbidity in other types of surgery, but comparatively less data exist investigating ERAS in bariatric surgery. This article reviews the existing literature to identify interventions which may be included in an ERAS program for bariatric surgery. A narrative literature review was conducted. Search terms included 'bariatric surgery', 'weight loss surgery', 'gastric bypass', 'ERAS', 'enhanced recovery', 'enhanced recovery after surgery', 'fast-track surgery', 'perioperative care', 'postoperative care', 'intraoperative care' and 'preoperative care'. Interventions recovered by the database search, as well as interventions garnered from clinical experience in ERAS, were used as individual search terms. A large volume of evidence exists detailing the role of multiple interventions in perioperative care. However, efficacy and safety for a proportion of these interventions for ERAS in bariatric surgery remain unclear. This review concludes that there is potential to implement ERAS programs in bariatric surgery.

  18. Bariatric surgery waiting times in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Nicolas V.; Efthimiou, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    Background Severe obesity is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the world, including Canada. The only permanent treatment of severe or morbid obesity is bariatric surgery. Access to bariatric surgery is very limited in Canada. We sought to collect accurate data on waiting times for the procedure. Methods We carried out a survey of members of the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons and performed a more detailed analysis within Quebec and at one Canadian bariatric surgery centre where a prospectively collected bariatric surgery registry has been maintained since 1983. Results The survey response rate was 85%. All centres determined whether patients were eligible for bariatric surgery based on the National Institutes of Health criteria. Patients entered the queue as “office contacts” and moved through the queue, with the exit point being completion of the procedure. In 2007, a total of 6783 patients were waiting for bariatric surgery and 1313 procedures were performed in Canada. Assuming these trends are maintained, the calculated average waiting time for bariatric surgery in Canada is just over 5 years (6783/1313). The Fraser Institute and the Wait Times Alliance benchmarks for reasonable surgical waiting times vary from 8 weeks for cancer surgery to 18 months for cosmetic surgery. At one Canadian centre, 12 patients died while waiting for bariatric surgery. Conclusion The waiting times for bariatric surgery are the longest of any surgically treated condition. Given the significant reduction in the relative risk of death with bariatric surgery (40%–89% depending on the study), the current waiting times for the procedure in Canada are unacceptable. PMID:19503668

  19. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, D J; Baxter, J M; Baxter, J N

    2007-09-01

    A current review of nutritional complications following bariatric procedures is presented, focusing on the most common and clinically important deficiencies. A brief outline of nutritional supplementation protocol is presented, highlighting the need for a standardized, national or international set of guidelines for pre- and postoperative nutritional screening and appropriate supplementation.

  20. Nutritional and psychological considerations after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Song, Angela; Fernstrom, Madelyn H

    2008-01-01

    The anatomic and physiological changes resulting from bariatric surgery can affect both nutrition and psychological attitudes. Modifications of the gastrointestinal tract lead to a diminished ability to absorb nutrients, electrolytes, and bile salts, as well as deficiencies in iron, calcium, and other vitamins and minerals. Dehydration, lactose intolerance, and protein calorie malnutrition are other common sequelae. Alterations in bone metabolism increase long-term risk for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Noncompliance with postsurgical nutritional regimens has been estimated to occur in from one third to almost two thirds of cases and can exacerbate these complications. Psychological issues are often present in patients with morbid obesity and can affect surgical outcomes. These issues include mood and personality disorders, destructive eating behaviors, and poor body image. Nearly one third of patients undergoing bariatric surgery also have a history of substance abuse disorder. The literature suggests that although the mental health of patients improves as a result of bariatric surgery, the benefits may be transient, and problems such as negative personality profiles, detrimental eating patterns, and negative body image persist to some extent. Identification of presurgical psychiatric problems can help identify those patients more likely to achieve lasting weight loss when surgery is combined with long-term follow-up to minimize medical and psychological complications.

  1. Psychosocial Interventions Pre and Post Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2015-11-01

    Despite positive results overall, a substantial number of patients experience poor long-term outcomes following bariatric surgery. One reason for variability in weight loss may be difficulty in making and sustaining changes in dietary intake and physical activity; post-surgery binge eating has also been associated with poorer weight outcomes. In this paper, we review available evidence on adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Although the literature is limited, evidence suggests that bariatric surgery patients may benefit from a comprehensive approach targeting diet, activity and psychological factors. We think the optimal time to initiate adjunctive intervention is after surgery, but before significant weight regain has occurred. Adaptive interventions incorporating advances in technology may prove to be effective for promoting behavioural self-management and psychosocial adjustment following bariatric surgery. For some patients, pharmacotherapy and reoperation may also play a role in a personalized approach to post-surgery care.

  2. [Nursing care for bariatric surgery patients].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Chun; Chi, Shu-Ching; Pan, Kuei-Ching; Huang, Chin-Kun

    2010-10-01

    The sedentary lifestyle, common to most modern societies, has turned obesity into an increasingly prevalent and universal problem. Obesity correlates positively with many diseases and health risk factors. Medical therapies currently used to treat obesity are generally limited in terms of long-term effectiveness. Bariatric surgery has been demonstrated an effective treatment for morbid obesity. Special nursing care considerations for bariatric surgery include providing wider cuffs for blood pressure checks, preventing deep venous thrombosis and post operation dietary education in order to accommodate changes in the gastrointestinal system. The purposes of this article were to introduce obesity therapy trends as well as to share nursing care principles for those undergoing bariatric surgery.

  3. Bariatric surgery, a risk factor for rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    García-García, M L; Campillo-Soto, A; Martín-Lorenzo, J G; Torralba-Martínez, J A; Lirón-Ruiz, R; Aguayo-Albasini, J L

    2013-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of bariatric surgery. We report a case of this complication and its consequences, in a patient who had undergone bariatric surgery, with a very high creatine kinase (CK) concentration, and whose renal function failed. Obesity causes a range of effects on all major organ systems. Knowledge of these effects and issues specific to the intensive care unit care of bariatric patients can help to predict and manage this underestimated complication in this population in which early diagnosis can alter the outcome.

  4. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented.

  5. Kidney Stone Risk Following Modern Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers. PMID:24658828

  6. Bariatric surgery, bone loss, obesity and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, M M; Sainsbury, A; Eisman, J A; Baldock, P A; Center, J R

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for severely obese patients. However, the potential long-term effects of bariatric surgical procedures on health, including bone health, are only partially understood. The goal of this review was to present data on the impact of bariatric surgery on bone metabolism and to analyse possible reasons for the loss of bone mass that frequently occurs after bariatric surgery. Such factors include nutritional deficiencies, rapid weight loss per se, effects of fat-derived adipokines and gut-derived appetite-regulatory hormones. However, the relative roles of these factors in skeletal regulation and the mechanisms by which they work are not yet fully defined. Our review was focussed on the complex relationship between body weight, fat mass and bone mass, as well as peripheral and central mediators potentially involved in the dual regulation of both energy and bone homeostasis. We also review the data on the inverse relationship between central obesity, bone marrow fat and osteoporosis. As the number of bariatric operations increases, it is imperative to recognize mechanisms responsible for bariatric surgery-induced bone loss, with careful monitoring of bone health including long-term fracture incidence in patients undergoing these procedures.

  7. Criteria for selection of patients for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cowan, G S; Hiler, M L; Buffington, C

    1999-02-01

    International criteria for bariatric surgery and bariatric surgeons have been well-defined in terms of the current state of the art and are presented together with weight tables and a list of co-morbidities of morbid obesity. The bariatric surgeon should make the primary judgement concerning bariatric surgery using these criteria as guidelines only, not strict rules; others who use these criteria should govern themselves in a like, fair-minded, fashion. Medical insurers' and their agents' criteria, if excessively restrictive relative to the guidelines, may reflect an ingrained prejudice against the morbidly obese, manifesting itself in an unfair, unethical and immoral bias. It is the essence of humane and equitable behaviour on the part of all concerned that the morbidly obese receive non-discriminatory, appropriate treatment, care and medical insurer coverage for their disease and its comorbidities.

  8. Emotional and Affective Temperaments in Smoking Candidates for Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mombach, Karin Daniele; de Souza Brito, Cesar Luis; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel; Casagrande, Daniela Schaan; Mottin, Claudio Cora

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of smoking habits in severe obesity is higher than in the general population. There is some evidence that smokers have different temperaments compared to non-smokers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the associations between smoking status (smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers) and temperament characteristics in bariatric surgery candidates. Methods We analyzed data on temperament of 420 bariatric surgery candidates, as assessed by the AFECTS scale, in an exploratory cross-sectional survey of bariatric surgery candidates who have been grouped into smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers. Results We detected significant statistical differences in temperament related to the smoking status in this population after controlling the current use of psychiatric medication. Smokers had higher anxiety and lower control than non-smokers. Ex-smokers with BMI >50 kg/m2 presented higher coping and control characteristics than smokers. Conclusions Smoking in bariatric surgery candidates was associated with lower control and higher anxious temperament, when controlled by current use of psychiatric medication. Smokers with BMI >50 kg/m2 presented lower coping and control than ex-smokers. Assessment of temperament in bariatric surgery candidates may help in decisions about smoking cessation treatment and prevention of smoking relapse after surgery. PMID:26987115

  9. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  10. Nutritional and metabolic complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Scott S

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for patients with clinically severe obesity. In addition to significant weight loss, it is also associated with improvements in comorbidities. Unfortunately, bariatric surgery also has the potential to cause a variety of nutritional and metabolic complications. These complications are mostly due to the extensive surgically induced anatomical changes incurred by the patient's gastrointestinal tract, particularly with roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. Complications associated with vertical banded gastroplasty are mostly due to decreased intake amounts of specific nutrients. Macronutrient deficiencies can include severe protein-calorie malnutrition and fat malabsorption. The most common micronutrient deficiencies are of vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and vitamin D. Other micronutrient deficiencies that can lead to serious complications include thiamine, folate, and the fat-soluble vitamins. Counseling, monitoring, and nutrient and mineral supplementation are essential for the treatment and prevention of nutritional and metabolic complications after bariatric surgery.

  11. Nutritional optic neuropathy following bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka-Pierko, Anna; Hady, Razak Hady; Mariak, Zofia; Dadan, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric procedures, associated with gastrointestinal malabsorption of vitamins and microelements, may constitute a risk factor for nutritional optic neuropathy (NON). We present a case of a 34-year-old female patient who developed bilateral NON after sleeve gastrectomy. Despite postoperative ophthalmological supervision, 10 months after the procedure the woman presented with a bilateral decrease in visual acuity down to 0.8, bilateral visual field loss and abnormal visual evoked potential recordings. Laboratory abnormalities included decreased serum concentration of vitamin B12 (161 pg/ml). Treatment was based on intramuscular injections of vitamin B12 (1000 units per day). After 1 week of the treatment, we observed more than a three-fold increase in the serum concentration of vitamin B12 and resolution of the bilateral symptoms of NON. The incidence of NON is likely to increase due to the growing number of these bariatric procedures performed worldwide. Therefore, all persons subjected to such surgery should receive long-term ophthalmological follow-up and supplementation with vitamins and microelements. PMID:25562012

  12. Routine Liver Biopsy During Bariatric Surgery: an Analysis of Evidence Base.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Parmar, Chetan; Graham, Yitka; Abouleid, Ayman; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Small, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis are common in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis can progress to cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-invasive methods of diagnosing non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis are not as accurate as liver biopsy, and bariatric surgery presents a unique opportunity to carry out a simultaneous liver biopsy. Routine liver biopsy can help early and accurate diagnosis of obesity-associated liver conditions. This has led some surgeons to argue for routine liver biopsy at the time of bariatric surgery. However, most bariatric surgeons remain unconvinced and liver biopsy is currently not routine practice with bariatric surgery. This review examines published scientific literature to ascertain the usefulness of routine liver biopsy at the time of bariatric surgery.

  13. Benign, Premalignant, and Malignant Lesions Encountered in Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kini

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with several comorbidities like diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea. It is also well established that obese patients have an increased risk of several types of cancer like kidney, pancreas, endometrial, breast, and others. The bariatric surgeon needs to be aware of the problem of benign tumors and cancer in obese patients as well as the optimal management of these conditions that may be present at the time of evaluation for bariatric surgery, during the surgical procedure, and in the postoperative period. Database: A PubMed search for the words “cancer” and “bariatric surgery” and subsequent review of the abstracts identified 40 articles concerning cancerous, benign, and premalignant conditions in bariatric surgery patients. Data were then extracted from full-text articles. Conclusion: Bariatric surgery decreases cancer risk especially in women. RYGB can be an effective treatment for Barrett's esophagus. Patients having esophageal cancer should not undergo bariatric surgery, while those who develop the same postoperatively are usually managed by a combined abdominal and thoracic approach (Ivor Lewis technique). Gastric cancer of the remnant stomach is usually managed by a remnant gastrectomy. A remnant gastrectomy during RYGB would be necessary in conditions that require endoscopic surveillance of the stomach like gastric polyps, intestinal metaplasia, and carcinoid tumors. Sleeve gastrectomy is an excellent option in a patient with GIST or a carcinoid who needs a bariatric operation. Preoperative endoscopy usually does not detect malignant conditions. Postoperative evaluation of the bypassed stomach is possible using various percutaneous and novel endoscopic techniques. PMID:23318060

  14. Metabolic/bariatric surgery Worldwide 2008.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Henry; Oien, Danette M

    2009-12-01

    Periodically, the state of bariatric surgery worldwide should be assessed; the most recent prior evaluation was in 2003. An email survey was sent to the leadership of the 36 International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders nations or national groupings, as well as Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. Responses were tabulated; calculation of relative prevalence of specific procedures was done by weighted averages. Out of a potential 39, 36 nations or national groupings responded. In 2008, 344,221 bariatric surgery operations were performed by 4,680 bariatric surgeons; 220,000 of these operations were performed in USA/Canada by 1,625 surgeons. The most commonly performed procedures were laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (AGB; 42.3%), laparoscopic standard Roux-Y gastric bypass (RYGB; 39.7%), and total sleeve gastrectomies 4.5%. Over 90% of procedures were performed laparoscopically. Comparing the 5-year trend from 2003 to 2008, all categories of procedures, with the exception of biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch, increased in absolute numbers performed. However, the relative percent of all RYGBs decreased from 65.1% to 49.0%; whereas, AGB increased from 24.4% to 42.3%. Markedly, different trends were found for Europe and USA/Canada: in Europe, AGB decreased from 63.7% to 43.2% and RYGB increased from 11.1% to 39.0%; whereas, in USA/Canada, AGB increased from 9.0% to 44.0% and RYGB decreased from 85.0% to 51.0%. The absolute growth rate of bariatric surgery decreased over the past 5 years (135% increase), in comparison to the preceding 5 years (266% increase). Bariatric surgery continues to grow worldwide, but less so than in the past. The types of procedures are in flux; trends in Europe vs USA/Canada are diametrically opposed.

  15. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY: CURRENT PRACTICES

    PubMed Central

    FLORES, Carolina Aita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of obesity on a global scale has alarmed health institutions, the general population and professionals involved in its treatment. Bariatric surgery has emerged as an effective and lasting alternative for weight reduction and improved general health. In this context and as part of a multidisciplinary team, psychologists are responsible for the preoperative psychological assessment of bariatric candidates. Aim To investigate how psychological assessments are occurring, including the identification of utilized resources; factors that are addressed; the duration of the process; existing protocols; and to evaluate the importance of this practice. Method A systematic review of national and international literature, through PubMed and Scielo's databases, using "psychological assessment", "obesity" and "surgery", as keywords. Conclusion There is an agreement about the main factors that should be investigated during the preoperative assessment, as well as the main contraindications for the surgical procedure. The importance of the psychological assessment is well established in the field of bariatric surgery. However, this area needs a standard protocol to guide the mental health professionals that deal with bariatric patients. PMID:25409969

  16. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    PubMed Central

    Frikke-Schmidt, H.; O’Rourke, R. W.; Lumeng, C. N.; Sandoval, D. A.; Seeley, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. PMID:27272117

  17. Bariatric surgery and vitamin D: key messages for surgeons and clinicians before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Leigh A

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional problem globally. Bariatric surgery is the preeminent long-term obesity treatment. Bariatric procedures manipulate the intestines to produces malabsorption and/or restrict the size of the stomach. The most enduring bariatric procedure is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, which utilizes both restriction (small stomach pouch) and malabsorption (duodenum bypass). The in-vogue procedure is the vertical sleeve gastrectomy - resection of the greater curvature of the stomach (predominantly restrictive). Malabsorptive procedures function by decreasing nutrient absorption, primarily fat and fat-soluble nutrients (vitamins A, D, E, and K). Most studies of vitamin D status in bariatric surgery candidates reported a prevalence of over 50% vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/L), enduring post-operatively with one study reporting 65% deficient at 10 years post-bariatric surgery. Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation, which may contribute to adverse surgical outcomes, e.g. poor healing and infection. Since vitamin D deficiency is also associated with chronic inflammation, obese individuals with vitamin D deficiency have extraordinary risk of adverse surgical outcomes, particularly delayed wound healing and infection due to the role of vitamin D in re-epithelialization and innate immunity. When the risk of adverse surgical outcomes in obesity is combined with that of vitamin D deficiency, there is likely an additive or potentially a synergistic effect. Furthermore, deficiency in fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin D, is considered a metabolic complication of bariatric surgery. Thus, determining the vitamin D status of bariatric surgery candidates and amending it preoperatively may prove greatly beneficial acutely and lifelong.

  18. What are the indications for bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Pentin, Pamela L; Nashelsky, Joan

    2005-07-01

    No studies evaluate the commonly used indications for bariatric surgery. Consensus guidelines suggest that the surgical treatment of obesity should be reserved for patients with a body-mass index (BMI) >40 kg/m(2) or with BMI >35 kg/m(2) and 1 or more significant comorbid conditions, when less invasive methods of weight loss have failed and the patient is at high risk for obesity-associated morbidity and mortality (strength of recommendation: C, based on consensus guidelines).

  19. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications. PMID:27668069

  20. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  1. Bariatric psychology, psychological aspects of weight loss surgery.

    PubMed

    van Hout, Gerbrand; van Heck, Guus

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is the 'disease of the 21st century' and results in physical and psychosocial co-morbidities as well as poor quality of life (QoL). In contrast to the nonsurgical treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery is treatment of choice for morbid obesity. Since improved QoL and enhanced psychosocial functioning are important goals of bariatric surgery, success following bariatric surgery should not only include weight loss and improvement or cure of co-morbid conditions, but also improvements in eating behavior, psychosocial variables, and QoL. Unfortunately, bariatric surgery does not lead to identical results in every patient. Patients who fail to adjust their eating behavior and lifestyle after bariatric surgery may experience adverse reactions. Compliance and adjustment may be attributed largely to psychological factors, implying that the operation on its own represents only one element in bariatric surgery. Considering the role of psychosocial factors in the outcomes of bariatric surgery and the impact of the operation on the psychological and social situation, mental health professionals should be a part of the process of evaluation and treatment of bariatric surgery patients. In the Netherlands, between 2000 and 2005, bariatric surgery has increased tremendously, and most Dutch hospitals have a multidisciplinary selection process.

  2. Recent advances in metabolic and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Flynn, C. Robb; Tamboli, Robyn A.; Abumrad, Naji N.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its associated medical conditions continue to increase and add significant burden to patients, as well as health-care systems, worldwide. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and its comorbidities, and resolution of diabetes is weight loss-independent in the case of some operations. Although these weight-independent effects are frequently described clinically, the mechanisms behind them are not well understood and remain an intense area of focus in the growing field of metabolic and bariatric surgery. Perceptions of the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial metabolic effects of metabolic/bariatric operations have shifted from being mostly restrictive and malabsorption over the last 10 to 15 years to being more neuro-hormonal in origin. In this review, we describe recent basic and clinical findings of the major clinical procedures (adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion) as well as other experimental procedures (ileal interposition and bile diversion) that recapitulate many of the metabolic effects of these complex operations in a simpler fashion. As the role of bile acids and the gut microbiome on metabolism is becoming increasingly well described, their potential roles in these improvements following metabolic surgery are becoming better appreciated. Bile acid and gut microbiome changes, in light of recent developments, are discussed in the context of these surgical procedures, as well as their implications for future study. PMID:27239296

  3. Bariatric surgery: the challenges with candidate selection, individualizing treatment and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a global health crisis. Bariatric surgery offers a treatment that can reduce weight, induce remission of obesity-related diseases, and improve the quality of life. In this article, we outline the different options in bariatric surgery and summarize the recommendations for selecting and assessing potential candidates before proceeding to surgery. We present current data on post-surgical outcomes and evaluate the psychosocial and economic effects of bariatric surgery. Finally, we evaluate the complication rates and present recommendations for post-operative care. PMID:23302153

  4. NUTRITIONAL REPERCUSSIONS IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    SILVEIRA-JÚNIOR, Sérgio; de ALBUQUERQUE, Maurício Mendes; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis; da ROSA, Luisa Salvagni; HYGIDIO, Daniel de Andrade; ZAPELINI, Raphaela Mazon

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies evaluated the association between nutritional disorders, quality of life and weight loss in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Aim To identify nutritional changes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and correlate them with weight loss, control of comorbidities and quality of life. Method A prospective cohort, analytical and descriptive study involving 59 patients undergoing bariatric surgery was done. Data were collected preoperatively at three and six months postoperatively, evaluating nutritional aspects and outcomes using BAROS questionnaire. The data had a confidence interval of 95%. Results The majority of patients was composed of women, 47 (79.7%), with 55.9% of the series with BMI between 40 to 49.9 kg/m². In the sixth month after surgery scores of quality of life were significantly higher than preoperatively (p<0.05) and 27 (67.5 %) patients had comorbidities resolved, 48 (81.3 %) presented BAROS scores of very good or excellent. After three and six months of surgery 16 and 23 presented some nutritional disorder, respectively. There was no relationship between the loss of excess weight and quality of life among patients with or without nutritional disorders. Conclusions Nutritional disorders are uncommon in the early postoperative period and, when present, have little or no influence on quality of life and loss of excess weight. PMID:25861070

  5. Twelve key nutritional issues in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Huber, Olivier; Azagury, Dan E; Pichard, Claude

    2016-02-01

    In morbidly obese patients, i.e. body mass index ≥35, bariatric surgery is considered the only effective durable weight-loss therapy. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) are associated with risks of nutritional deficiencies and malnutrition. Therefore, preoperative nutritional assessment and correction of vitamin and micronutrient deficiencies, as well as long-term postoperative nutritional follow-up, are advised. Dietetic counseling is mandatory during the first year, optional later. Planned and structured physical exercise should be systematically promoted to maintain muscle mass and bone health. In this review, twelve key perioperative nutritional issues are raised with focus on LRYGBP and LSG procedures, the most common current bariatric procedures.

  6. Metformin after bariatric surgery--an acid problem.

    PubMed

    Aberle, J; Reining, F; Dannheim, V; Flitsch, J; Klinge, A; Mann, O

    2012-03-01

    Metformin is the oral drug of first choice in type 2 diabetes. Therefore a large number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery will be on Metformin treatment. However, use of Metformin has been associated with lactate acidosis. Weight loss following bariatric surgery is most pronounced during the first weeks after the operation and this creates a phase of negative energy balance with ketone body formation. To shed more light on this situation we measured ketone bodies in 90 patients 5 days-18 months after bariatric surgery. Ketone bodies were markedly elevated during the first 3-4 months. Metformin use should therefore be critically reconsidered after bariatric operations.

  7. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  8. Development of a Pilot Telehealth Bariatric Surgery Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Carin K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to grow. Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and accepted in the treatment of obesity. Clinical candidates for bariatric surgery should have a BMI > 40 kg/m[superscript 2] alone, or a BMI > 35 kg/m[superscript 2] plus one comorbidity. A trend is emerging in the literature showing…

  9. Panniculectomy Combined with Bariatric Surgery by Laparotomy: An Analysis of 325 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Colabianchi, Vincenzo; de Bernardinis, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Matteo; Langella, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of obese patients is much debated in the literature because of the significant intraoperative risks related to comorbidities presented by this type of patients. Recent literature suggests that panniculectomy should follow bariatric surgery after the patient's weight loss has been stabilized. However, when performed by laparotomy, bariatric surgery can be combined with panniculectomy. This paper presents the analysis of 325 cases of patients undergoing abdominal panniculectomy combined with bariatric surgery. The study highlights the risks, complications, and benefits of the combined procedure and describes a standardized technique for excision of a large abdominal panniculus in a short operating time. PMID:26682282

  10. Peroneal palsy after bariatric surgery; is nerve decompresion always necessary?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero, Antonio; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    We present two patients who underwent successful bariatric surgery and developed peroneal nerve palsy six months after the procedure. This is an unusual complication which determines a significant functional limitation, mainly because of foot drop, and its presence may be a hallmark of excessive and rapid weight loss. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic options, and we emphasize the important role of an adequate nutritional management, in order to avoid the need for a surgical nerve decompression.

  11. PRE- AND POSTOPERATIVE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: SOME BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES

    PubMed Central

    TEDESCO, Amanda Kaseker; BIAZOTTO, Rafaela; GEBARA, Telma Souza e Silva; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The bariatric surgery may cause some nutritional deficiencies. Aim: To compare the serum levels of biochemical markers, in iimmediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods: Non-concurrent prospective cross-sectional study. The analysis investigated data in medical charts of pre-surgical and immediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery, focusing total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein, vitamin B12 levels, folic acid, homocysteine values, iron and serum calcium at the referred period. Results: Twenty-nine patients of both genders were evaluated. It was observed weight loss from 108.53 kg to 78.69 kg after the procedure. The variable LDL-c had a significant difference, decreasing approximately 30.3 mg/dl after the surgery. The vitamin B12 serum average levels went from 341.9 pg/ml to 667.2 pg/ml. The triglycerides values were in a range of 129.6 mg/dl-173.3 mg/dl, and 81.9 mg/dl-105.3 mg/dl at the pre- and postoperative respectively. CRP levels fall demonstrated reduction of inflammatory activity. The variable homocysteine was tested in a paired manner and it did not show a significant changing before or after, although it showed a strong correlation with LDL cholesterol. Conclusion: Eligible patients to bariatric surgery frequently present pre-nutritional deficiencies, having increased post-surgical risks when they don´t follow an appropriate nutritional follow-up. PMID:27683780

  12. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VIDAL, Eduardo Arevalo; RENDON, Francisco Abarca; ZAMBRANO, Trino Andrade; GARCÍA, Yudoco Andrade; VITERI, Mario Ferrin; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins; RAMOS, Manoela Galvão; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. Aim: To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Methods: Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Results: Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Conclusion: Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. PMID:27683770

  13. [Management of complications in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Weiner, R A; Stroh, C; El-Sayes, I; Frenken, M; Theodoridou, S; Scheffel, O; Weiner, S

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is known to be the most effective and long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity and associated comorbidities. These comorbidities together with cardiopulmonary decompensation make morbidly obese patients a high risk group for operative interventions. Early detection of postoperative complications is a challenging task in these patients and requires accurate and timely interpretation of any alarm signals. Symptoms, such as tachycardia and abdominal pain are highly suspicious. The same applies to elevated inflammatory parameters and fever. Early diagnostic laparoscopy is mandatory once cardiopulmonary complications have been excluded. Moreover, it has a higher sensitivity and specificity than other radiological modalities and is a minimally invasive procedure with a highly satisfactory outcome.

  14. Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Josep; Corcelles, Ricard; Jiménez, Amanda; Flores, Lílliam; Lacy, Antonio M

    2017-02-10

    Metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) leads to weight loss in obese individuals and reduces comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. MBS is superior to medical therapy in reducing hyperglycemia in persons with type 2 diabetes, and has been associated with reduced mortality and incidences of cardiovascular events and cancer in obese individuals. New guidelines have been proposed for the use of MBS in persons with type 2 diabetes. We review the use of MBS as a treatment for obesity and obesity-related conditions and, based on recent evidence, propose health care systems make the appropriate changes to increase accessibility for eligible patients.

  15. [Bariatric surgery and pregnancy: literature review].

    PubMed

    Ferrand Miranda, Pedro; Contreras Rivas, Tomas; Leigh Pacciarini, Stephanie

    2014-02-14

    Obesity has currently reached epidemic proportions, both in Chile and in the world. This condition is associated to a variety of maternal complications in all stages of the vital cycle and during pregnancy. Medical treatment has not proved successful thus resulting in an increase in bariatric surgery in recent years, even when it is not first line treatment. This literature review aims to report updated results of surgical treatment for obesity before and during pregnancy with respect to fertility, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. It also looks into the possible effects of surgery on fetal development, and its relation to premature delivery, fetal macrosomy, low birth weight and neural tube defects, as well as effects on maternal and fetal outcomes, mainly in nutrition. Lastly, we suggest some recommendations that arise from this review on the role of contraception, nutrition and time between surgery and pregnancy.

  16. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... Surgery Types of Surgery Gastric Bypass ... or intestines removed due to ulcers or cancer tended to lose a lot of weight after ...

  17. Biochemical consequences of bariatric surgery for extreme clinical obesity.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Anita; Meek, Claire L; Park, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index over 30 kg/m(2) for adults, poses a major healthcare challenge with important economic, personal and social consequences. Although public health measures, lifestyle change and pharmacological therapies have an important role in the management of obesity, patients with established morbid obesity (body mass index over 40 kg/m(2)) may also require bariatric surgery. Bariatric or metabolic surgery is associated with effective and enduring weight loss but is also known to improve glucose homeostasis, blood pressure and dyslipidaemia. Patients who have bariatric surgery need lifelong clinical follow-up to identify and prevent nutritional deficiencies and other complications. Clinical biochemistry laboratories have an important role in the nutritional assessment of obese patients and in the identification of complications following bariatric surgery. The aim of this article is to review the different bariatric procedures available and to summarize their complications, especially nutrient deficiencies and those of particular relevance to clinical biochemistry laboratories.

  18. [Bariatric surgery for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Benaiges Boix, David; Goday Arno, Albert; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2012-04-14

    Weight loss can improve metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus but the results of conventional therapy in this respect have been discouraging. Besides achieving significant and sustained weight loss, bariatric surgery can improve or resolve type 2 diabetes mellitus in the majority of patients. Anatomical modifications and changes in the secretion of intestinal hormones can explain the superiority of malabsorptive techniques. Currently, bariatric surgery offers a therapeutic alternative for type 2 diabetes patients with severe obesity and poor metabolic control under conventional therapy. Ongoing research will provide insights regarding the effect of intestinal hormones, new surgery techniques and the possible benefits of bariatric surgery in non-obese patients.

  19. Current Status of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered to be the most effective treatment modality in maintaining long-term weight reduction and improving obesity-related conditions in morbidly obese patients. In Korea, surgery for morbid obesity was laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy first performed in 2003. Since 2003, the annual number of bariatric surgeries has markedly increased, including adjustable gastric banding (AGB), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, mini-gastric bypass, and others. In Korea, AGB is much more common than in others countries. A large proportion of doctors, the public, and government misunderstand the necessity and effectiveness of bariatric surgery, believing that bariatric surgery has an unacceptably high morbidity, and that it is not superior to non-surgical treatments to improve obesity and obesity-related diseases. The effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery have been well demonstrated. The Korean Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery recommend bariatric surgery confining to morbidly obese patients (body mass index ≥40 or >35 in the presence of significant comorbidities). PMID:27834081

  20. Nutritional management of patients after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Emmy

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method of sustainable weight loss among morbidly obese patients. The types of bariatric surgeries can be divided into three categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and combination (restrictive and malabsorption) procedures. In general, patients undergoing restrictive procedures have the least risk for long-term diet-related complications, whereas patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures have the highest risk. For many patients, the benefits of weight loss, such as decreased blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure and increased mobility, will outweigh the risks of surgical complications. Most diet-related surgical complications can be prevented by adhering to strict eating behavior guidelines and supplement prescriptions. Eating behavior guidelines include restricting portion sizes, chewing foods slowly and completely, eating and drinking separately, and avoiding foods that are poorly tolerated. Supplement prescriptions vary among practitioners and usually involve at least a multivitamin with minerals. Some practitioners may add other supplements only as needed for diagnosed deficiencies; others may prescribe additional prophylactic supplements. The most common nutrient deficiencies are of iron, folate, and vitamin B12. However, deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins have been reported in patients with malabsorption procedures, and thiamin deficiency has been reported among patients with very poor intake and/or nausea and vomiting. Frequent monitoring of nutrition status for all patients can aid in preventing severe clinical deficiencies.

  1. Nephrolithiasis after bariatric surgery for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv; Collazo-Clavell, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical intervention has become an accepted therapeutic alternative for the patient with medically complicated obesity. Multiple investigators have reported significant and sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery that is associated with improvement of many weight related medical co-morbidities, and statistically-significant decreased overall mortality for surgically-treated as compared to medically-treated subjects. Although the Roux-en-Y Gastric bypass (RYGB) is considered an acceptably safe treatment, an increasing number of patients are being recognized with nephrolithiasis after this, the most common bariatric surgery currently performed. The main risk factor appears to be hyperoxaluria, although low urine volume and citrate concentrations may contribute. The incidence of these urinary risk factors amongst the total post-RYGB population is unknown, but may be more than previously suspected based upon small pilot studies. The etiology of the hyperoxaluria is unknown, but may be related to subtle and seemingly sub clinical fat malabsorption. Clearly, further study is needed, especially to define better treatment options than the standard advice for a low fat, low oxalate diet, and use of calcium as an oxalate binder. PMID:18359397

  2. Bariatric Surgery: Bad to the Bone, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2016-01-01

    As discussed in Part 1, obesity is now a global epidemic affecting a significant and rapidly increasing number of adults, adolescents, and children. As the incidence of obesity has increased, so has the use of bariatric surgery to treat it. A growing number of recently published studies have reported that, despite calcium and vitamin D supplementation, the most frequently performed types of bariatric surgery, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and the sleeve gastrectomy (SG), cause significant, ongoing bone loss. Recent studies investigating nutrient malabsorption and changes in a wide range of hormones that are induced by bariatric surgery have indicated that calcium malabsorption is just the tip of a formidable iceberg. Part 1 reviewed the latest research findings confirming that the prevalence of obesity is, in fact, skyrocketing and that bariatric surgery causes ongoing accelerated bone loss. Part 1 also discussed the mechanisms through which the malabsorption of key nutrients induced by bariatric surgery adversely affects bone. The current article, Part 2, reviews the specific changes seen in bone metabolism after bariatric surgery and the current data on the underlying mechanisms, in addition to nutrient malabsorption, that may contribute to bariatric surgery-induced bone loss. These mechanisms include mechanical unloading, calcium malabsorption despite maintenance of vitamin D levels of ≥30 ng/mL, and changes in a number of hormones, including leptin, adiponectin, testosterone, estradiol, serotonin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP). Research discussing the use of nutritional supplements to help ameliorate bariatric surgery-induced bone loss is summarized. The adverse effects of bariatric surgery on bone must be widely recognized, and protocols must be developed to prevent early onset osteoporosis in recipients of this increasingly utilized and otherwise potentially life-saving surgery. PMID:27330488

  3. Quality criteria in bariatric surgery: Consensus review and recommendations of the Spanish Association of Surgeons and the Spanish Society of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Domínguez-Adame Lanuza, Eduardo; Ibarzabal, Ainitze; Socas Macias, María; Valentí Azcárate, Víctor; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; García-Moreno Nisa, Francisca; González Fernández, Jesús; Vilallonga Puy, Ramón; Vilarrasa García, Nuria; Sánchez Santos, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven to be highly effective in controlling obesity and metabolic syndrome; the results of this surgery are not only expressed in terms of weight loss, but also in terms of resolution of comorbidities, improved quality of life and complications. The different parameters used to measure these outcomes require uniformity and reference patterns. Therefore, it is essential to identify those indicators and quality criteria that are helpful in defining the «best practice» principles in bariatric surgery. In this regard, the Section of Obesity of the Spanish Association of Surgeons, in collaboration with the Spanish Society for Bariatric Surgery (SECO), present as an objective to identify the key points that define «quality» in this type of surgery. We describe the main indicators based on the published literature as well as the criteria for referral of the main comorbidities according to the evidence found and grades of recommendation.

  4. Bariatric Surgery: Bad to the Bone, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is now a global epidemic affecting a significant and rapidly increasing number of adults, adolescents, and children. As the incidence of obesity has increased, so has the use of bariatric surgery as a medical solution. A growing number of studies now report that, despite calcium and vitamin D supplementation, the most frequently performed types of bariatric surgery, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the sleeve gastrectomy, cause significant ongoing bone loss. In resources available to the general public and to physicians, this adverse outcome is rarely mentioned or is attributed solely to reduced calcium absorption. Recent studies investigating micronutrient malabsorption and changes in a wide range of hormones induced by bariatric surgery now indicate that calcium malabsorption is the tip of a formidable iceberg. The current article, part 1 of a 2-part series, reviews the latest research findings confirming that obesity prevalence is skyrocketing and that bariatric surgery causes ongoing, accelerated bone loss. Part 1 also discusses the mechanisms through which the bariatric surgery-induced malabsorption of key nutrients adversely affects bone homeostasis. Part 2 discusses the specific changes seen in bone metabolism after bariatric surgery and reviews current data on the underlying mechanisms, in addition to nutrient malabsorption, which are thought to contribute to bariatric surgery-induced ongoing accelerated bone loss. These processes include mechanical unloading and changes in a wide variety of hormones (eg, leptin, adiponectin, testosterone, estradiol, serotonin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and gastric inhibitory peptide). Also, part 2 covers interventions that may help lessen bariatric surgery-induced bone loss, which are now beginning to appear in the medical literature. Bariatric surgery’s adverse effects on bone must be widely recognized and protocols developed to prevent early onset osteoporosis in the recipients of an increasingly

  5. Response to Dietary Oxalate after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Froeder, Leila; Arasaki, Carlos Haruo; Malheiros, Carlos Alberto; Baxmann, Alessandra Calábria

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Bariatric surgery (BS) may be associated with increased oxalate excretion and a higher risk of nephrolithiasis. This study aimed to investigate urinary abnormalities and responses to an acute oxalate load as an indirect assessment of the intestinal absorption of oxalate in this population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Twenty-four–hour urine specimens were collected from 61 patients a median of 48 months after BS (post-BS) as well as from 30 morbidly obese (MO) participants; dietary information was obtained through 24-hour food recalls. An oral oxalate load test (OLT), consisting of 2-hour urine samples after overnight fasting and 2, 4, and 6 hours after consuming 375 mg of oxalate (spinach juice), was performed on 21 MO and 22 post-BS patients 12 months after BS. Ten post-BS patients also underwent OLT before surgery (pre-BS). Results There was a higher percentage of low urinary volume (<1.5 L/d) in post-BS versus MO (P<0.001). Hypocitraturia and hyperoxaluria (P=0.13 and P=0.36, respectively) were more frequent in BS versus MO patients. The OLT showed intragroup (P<0.001 for all periods versus baseline) and intergroup differences (P<0.001 for post-BS versus MO; P=0.03for post-BS versus pre-BS). The total mean increment in oxaluria after 6 hours of load, expressed as area under the curve, was higher in both post-BS versus MO and in post-BS versus pre-BS participants (P<0.001 for both). Conclusions The mean oxaluric response to an oxalate load is markedly elevated in post-bariatric surgery patients, suggesting that increased intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate is a predisposing mechanism for enteric hyperoxaluria. PMID:23024163

  6. [Beginnings of bariatric and metabolic surgery in Spain].

    PubMed

    Baltasar, Aniceto; Domínguez-Adame, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When bariatric and metabolic surgery initially began in Spain, it was a subject of debate, due to not knowing exactly who were the first surgeons to perform it. A study has revealed the authors of the first interventions.

  7. Bariatric Surgery in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; De Alwis, Nimantha; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Small, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recognised as an effective treatment strategy for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An increasing number of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus also suffer with obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities but the role of bariatric and metabolic surgery in this group of patients is unclear. This systematic review investigates published English language scientific literature to understand the results of bariatric surgery in obese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We found that these patients can experience significant weight loss and comorbidity resolution with bariatric surgery. Though most patients also see a decline in total insulin requirement, glycaemic control remains difficult. Most of the patients reported in literature have undergone gastric bypass but data is insufficient to recommend any particular procedure.

  8. Re-operations after Secondary Bariatric Surgery: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Alexandr; Palmer, Andrew J; Wilkinson, Stephen; Khatsiev, Bekkhan; Venn, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    This paper reviews reoperations rates for short- and long-term complications following secondary bariatric procedures and need for further bariatric surgery. The search revealed 28 papers (1317 secondary cases) following at least 75 % of patients for 12 months or more. For adjustable gastric banding (AGB), rebanding had higher re-revisional rates than conversions into other procedures. Conversion of AGB to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass had the highest number of short- (10.7 %) and long-term (22.0 %) complications. We estimated 194 additional reoperations per 1000 patients having a secondary procedure, 8.8 % needing tertiary surgery. Despite being poorly reported, risks of reoperations for long-term complications and tertiary bariatric surgery are higher than usually reported risks of short-term complications and should be taken into account when choosing a secondary bariatric procedure and for economic evaluations.

  9. Asymptomatic sinus bradycardia following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Malik, Manish G; Franklin, Sona M; Whigham, Latrisha A; Castellanos, Andres; Fontaine, John M

    2014-03-15

    Approximately 121,000 bariatric surgical procedures are performed annually, and salutary effects include a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, risk factor modification, and improvement in sympathovagal tone. There are anecdotal accounts of unexplained sinus bradycardia (SB) after significant weight loss but no systematic studies have been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of incident SB, its timing, and association with weight loss, clinical characteristics, and predictors. We evaluated various clinical characteristics including resting heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), heart rate reserve (HRR), basal metabolic rate, and exercise regimen in 151 consecutive patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of SB. Twenty-five of 137 patients (18%) experienced postoperative SB. Patients with SB had significantly greater reduction in BMI than those without bradycardia (35 ± 9.6% and 25.7 ± 13%, respectively, p = 0.002). HRR was significantly greater in patients with SB (116 ± 14 beats/min) compared with those without bradycardia (105 ± 14 beats/min, p = 0.007). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of developing SB were 1.96 and 1.91 and associated with the percent decrease in BMI (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 3.0, p = 0.002) or increase in HRR (95% confidence interval 1.28 to 2.85, p = 0.002), respectively. In conclusion, SB occurred 14 ± 11 months postoperatively and its predictors were the percent reduction in BMI or increase in HRR.

  10. Guillain-Barré syndrome (demyelinating) six weeks after bariatric surgery: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ishaque, Noman; Khealani, Bhojo A; Shariff, Amir H; Wasay, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been increasingly used to manage obesity. Many acute as well as chronic neurological complications have been reported after bariatric surgery including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). An autoimmune process has been postulated as the underlying pathophysiology. Most of the reported cases of GBS after bariatric surgery are of the axonal variety. Here, we report a case of a demyelinating variety of GBS in a young woman who presented with acute onset of progressive weakness and paresthesia of all limbs within six weeks after bariatric surgery. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rehabilitation. She had complete recovery on follow-up. We believe that onset of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is demyelinating variety of GBS, is associated with changes in immune system after bariatric surgery.

  11. [Metabolic surgery: an evolution (or revolution) of bariatric surgery?].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; De Flines, J; Rorive, M; De Roover, A; Paquot, N

    2011-04-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven its efficacy to obtain a marked and sustained weight loss and dramatically improves metabolic control in obese patients. The frequently observed remission of type 2 diabetes occurs very early, before any marked weight reduction. Increasing evidence suggests that this favourable effect results from profound changes in gut hormones involved in the regulation of energy intake behaviour and glucose homeostasis rather than simply from mechanical food restriction or malabsorption imposed by the surgical procedure. The better knowledge of these pathophysiological mechanisms, especially well studied with Roux-en Y gastric bypass, resulted in recent innovation in the technical procedures leading to a shift from bariatric surgery to metabolic surgery. Such type of surgery is currently evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes, but with only a moderate obesity (BMI < 35 kg/m2), or even without obesity (BMI < 30 kg/m2). The Belgian Metabolic Intervention (BMI) Study Group would like to contribute very soon to this evaluation in a multidisciplinary approach.

  12. Recommendations for bariatric surgery in adolescents in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Baur, Louise A; Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of severe obesity and associated co-morbidities is increasing in adolescence. Although support for long-term whole-of-family lifestyle change is the mainstay of paediatric obesity treatment, there is increasing recognition of the place of other therapies,including bariatric surgery, in the management of severely obese adolescents. While there are rising numbers of reports of bariatric surgery in adolescents, there are as yet no Australian or New Zealand recommendations available to guide decisions as to which adolescents should receive such surgery and how they should best be managed. This paper presents a summary of the recommendations that are contained within the full position paper developed on behalf of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Paediatric Policy and Advocacy Committee Working Party on Bariatric Surgery for Adolescents, working in conjunction with the Australia and New Zealand Association of Paediatric Surgeons and the Obesity Surgery Society of Australia and New Zealand.

  13. Effects of bariatric surgery on urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bulbuller, Nurullah; Habibi, Mani; Yuksel, Mustafa; Ozener, Onur; Oruc, Mehmet Tahir; Oner, Osman Zekai; Kazak, Mehmet Altug

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is an important modifiable etiological factor associated with several diseases. There is strong evidence that urinary incontinence (UI) is positively correlated with body mass index (BMI). Aim One of the many benefits experienced by obese patients after bariatric surgery is decrease in UI. To investigate this correlation, we aimed to examine the effects of weight loss on UI in female patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Materials and methods Obese female patients (n=120), ≥18 years of age, and planning to undergo LSG were included in this prospective study. We administered the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) to the patients prior to surgery and 6 months after the surgery. Using the collected data, we determined the incidence of UI and examined the relationship between the preoperative and postoperative BMI and UI values. Results The mean age of the patients was 39.19 (standard deviation [SD] =9.94) years and the mean preoperative BMI was 46.17 (SD =5.35). Of the 120 patients, 72 (60%) complained of UI preoperatively. Among these 72 patients, 23 (31.95%) described urge incontinence, 18 (25%) stress incontinence, and 31 (43.05%) mixed-type incontinence. At 6 months postoperatively, the percentage of excess weight loss was 70.33% (SD =14.84%). For all three UI subtypes, the 6-month postoperative ICIQ-UI-SF and IIQ-7 scores decreased significantly compared to the preoperative scores (P<0.05). Conclusion LSG results in a clinically significant improvement in most common types of UI, regardless of patient reproductive history, existence of comorbid conditions, and smoking status. PMID:28176911

  14. Country of origin and bariatric surgery in Sweden during 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Memarian, Ensieh; Sundquist, Kristina; Calling, Susanna; Sundquist, Jan; Li, Xinjun

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity, as well as use of bariatric surgery, has increased worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential differences in the use of bariatric surgery among Swedes and immigrants in Sweden and whether the hypothesized differences remain after adjustment for socioeconomic factors. Methods A closed cohort of all individuals aged 20–64 years was followed during 2001–2010. Further analyses were performed in 2 periods separately (2001–2005 and 2006–2010). Age-standardized cumulative incidence rates (CR) of bariatric surgery were compared between Swedes and immigrants considering individual variables. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate models for males and females. Results A total of 12,791 Swedes and 2060 immigrants underwent bariatric surgery. The lowest rates of bariatric surgery were found in immigrant men. The largest difference in CR between Swedes and immigrants was observed among low-income individuals (3.4 and 2.3 per 1000 individuals, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were lower for all immigrants compared with Swedes in the second period. The highest HRs were observed among immigrants from Chile and Lebanon and the lowest among immigrants from Bosnia. Except for Nordic countries, immigrants from all other European countries had a lower HR compared with Swedes. Conclusions Men in general and some immigrant groups had a lower HR of bariatric surgery. Moreover, the difference between Swedes and immigrants was more pronounced in individuals with low socioeconomic status (income). It is unclear if underlying barriers to receive bariatric surgery are due to patients’ preferences/lack of knowledge or healthcare structures. Future studies are needed to examine potential causes behind these differences. PMID:25979207

  15. Review of contemporary role of robotics in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Bindal, Vivek; Bhatia, Parveen; Dudeja, Usha; Kalhan, Sudhir; Khetan, Mukund; John, Suviraj; Wadhera, Sushant

    2015-01-01

    With the rise in a number of bariatric procedures, surgeons are facing more complex and technically demanding surgical situations. Robotic digital platforms potentially provide a solution to better address these challenges. This review examines the published literature on the outcomes and complications of bariatric surgery using a robotic platform. Use of robotics to perform adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB), biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch and revisional bariatric procedures (RBP) is assessed. A search on PubMed was performed for the most relevant articles in robotic bariatric surgery. A total of 23 articles was selected and reviewed in this article. The review showed that the use of robotics led to similar or lower complication rate in bariatric surgery when compared with laparoscopy. Two studies found a significantly lower leak rate for robotic gastric bypass when compared to laparoscopic method. The learning curve for RYGB seems to be shorter for robotic technique. Three studies revealed a significantly shorter operative time, while four studies found a longer operative time for robotic technique of gastric bypass. As for the outcomes of RBP, one study found a lower complication rate in robotic arm versus laparoscopic and open arms. Most authors stated that the use of robotics provides superior visualisation, more degrees of freedom and better ergonomics. The application of robotics in bariatric surgery seems to be a safe and feasible option. Use of robotics may provide specific advantages in some situations, and overcome limitations of laparoscopic surgery. Large and well-designed randomised clinical trials with long follow-up are needed to further define the role of digital platforms in bariatric surgery.

  16. Predictors of Bariatric Surgery among an Interested Population

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Daniel P.; Arterburn, David E.; Wise, Ruth; Boone, William; Fischer, David; Eckman, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Severely obese patients considering bariatric surgery face a difficult decision given the tradeoff between the benefits and risks of surgery. Objectives To study the forces driving this decision and improve our understanding of the decision making process. Setting University Hospital Methods A 64-item survey was developed to assess factors in the decision making process for bariatric surgery. The survey included the decisional conflict scale, decision self-efficacy scale, EuroQol 5D, and the standard gamble. Subjects were recruited from a regularly scheduled bariatric surgery 'interest group meeting' associated with a large, university-based bariatric practice and administered a survey at the conclusion of the interest group. Logistic regression models were used to predict who pursued or still planned to pursue surgery at 12 months. Results 200 subjects were recruited over an 8-month period. Mean age was 45 years; mean BMI was 48 kg/m2, and 77% were female. The 12-month follow-up rate was 95%. At 12 months, 33 subjects (17.6%) had surgery and 30 (16.0%) still planned to have surgery. There was no association between age, gender, or obesity-associated conditions and surgery or plan to have surgery. Subjects having surgery or still planning to have surgery had significantly worse scores for quality of life, and better scores for decisional conflict (indicating readiness to make a decision). Conclusions The decision to have bariatric surgery is strongly associated with patients' perceptions of their current quality of life. In addition, lower decisional conflict and higher self-efficacy are predictive of surgery. Interestingly, factors clinicians might consider important, such as gender, age, and the presence of obesity-associated co-morbidities did not influence patients' decisions. PMID:24355320

  17. The effect of the Ontario Bariatric Network on health services utilization after bariatric surgery: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Elnahas, Ahmad; Jackson, Timothy D.; Okrainec, Allan; Austin, Peter C.; Bell, Chaim M.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2009, the Ontario Bariatric Network was established to address the exploding demand by Ontario residents for bariatric surgery services outside Canada. We compared the use of postoperative hospital services between out-of-country surgery recipients and patients within the Ontario Bariatric Network. Methods: We conducted a population-based, comparative study using administrative data held at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We included Ontario residents who underwent bariatric surgery between 2007 and 2012 either outside the country or at one of the Ontario Bariatric Network's designated centres of excellence. The primary outcome was use of hospital services in Ontario within 1 year after surgery. Results: A total of 4852 patients received bariatric surgery out of country, and 5179 patients underwent surgery through the Ontario Bariatric Network. After adjustment, surgery at a network centre was associated with a significantly lower utilization rate of postoperative hospital services than surgery out of country (rate ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 to 0.97). No statistically significant differences were found with respect to time in critical care or mortality. However, the physician assessment and reoperation rates were significantly higher among patients who received surgery at a network centre than among those who had bariatric surgery out of country (rate ratio 4.10, 95% CI 3.69 to 4.56, and rate ratio 1.84, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.53, respectively). Interpretation: The implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary provincial program to replace outsourcing of bariatric surgical services was associated with less use of postoperative hospital services by Ontario residents undergoing bariatric surgery. Future research should include an economic evaluation to determine the costs and benefits of the Ontario Bariatric Network. PMID:27730113

  18. [Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency, with or without anemia, before and after bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Jericó, Carlos; Bretón, Irene; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; de Oliveira, Ana Carla; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Tinahones, Francisco J; Vidal, Josep; Vilarrasa, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) is an increasingly used therapeutic option for severe obesity which allows patients to achieve sustained weight loss over time and resolution or improvement in most associated pathological conditions. Major mid- and long-term complications of BS include iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia, which may occur in up to 50% of cases and significantly impair patient quality of life. These changes may be present before surgery. The aim of this review was to prepare schemes for diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia before and after bariatric surgery.

  19. Glucose Regulation and Cognitive Function after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Galioto, Rachel; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is associated with cognitive impairment and bariatric surgery has been shown to improve cognitive functioning. Rapid improvements in glycemic control are common after bariatric surgery and likely contribute to these cognitive gains. We examined whether improvements in glucose regulation are associated with better cognitive function following bariatric surgery. Method A total of 85 adult bariatric surgery patients underwent computerized cognitive testing and fasting blood draw for glucose, insulin, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at baseline and 12 month post-operatively. Results Significant improvements in both cognitive function and glycemic control were observed among patients. After controlling for and baseline factors, 12-month homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance HOMA-IR predicted 12-month digits backward (β = −.253, p < .05), switching of attention- A (β = .156, p < .05), and switching of attention-B (β = −.181, p < .05). Specifically, as HOMA-IR decreased over time, working memory, psychomotor speed, and cognitive flexibility improved. Decreases in HbA1c were not associated with post-operative cognitive improvements. After controlling for baseline cognitive test performance, changes in BMI were also not associated with 12-month cognitive function. Conclusions Small effects of improved glycemic control on improved aspects of attention and executive function were observed following bariatric surgery among severely obese individuals. Future research is needed to identify the underlying mechanisms for the neurocognitive benefits of these procedures. PMID:25875124

  20. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Salvatore; Victorzon, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (%) with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I (2) test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone.

  1. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  2. The knowledge of Polish primary care physicians about bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stefura, Tomasz; Jezierska-Kazberuk, Monika; Wysocki, Michał; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Małczak, Piotr; Kacprzyk, Artur; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The general practitioner (GP) can play a key role in this multi-disciplinary team, coordinating care provided by dietitians and surgeons, maximizing the potential benefits of surgery. Therefore, it seems important to verify changes in GPs’ knowledge about surgical treatment of obesity. Aim To reassess knowledge of obesity surgical treatment among Polish primary care physicians and their willingness to improve it in the future. Material and methods To assess the knowledge of Polish primary care physicians about surgical treatment of obesity, a prospective study, which included an anonymous online questionnaire, was conducted in the years 2015–2016. Results Two hundred and six physicians answered the invitation. One hundred and sixty-six (81.8%) respondents were familiar with the indications for bariatric operation. The great majority of respondents, 198 (96.6%), were aware that bariatric surgery is efficient in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome. The study revealed a disproportion between the number of patients who would be potential candidates for bariatric treatment, who are currently under care of participating physicians, and the number of patients who are referred to a bariatric surgeon. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that nowadays bariatric surgery is a recognized method of treatment, but physicians remain reluctant to refer their patients for surgical treatment of obesity. It was found that there is a large disproportion between the number of patients who are referred to a bariatric surgeon and the number of patients who require this treatment. It may be a result of lack of knowledge in the field of bariatric surgery. PMID:27829939

  3. Acute Wernicke encephalopathy and sensorineural hearing loss complicating bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Jethava, Ashif; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2012-01-01

    Health-care professionals must be aware of the mandatory vitamin supplementation in patients status post bariatric surgery. A recent increase in the number of gastric bypass surgeries in US has been associated with a proportional increase in Wernicke encephalopathy reports. Subtle or atypical neurologic features are not uncommon. Our report is of a female patient with acute Wernicke encephalopathy accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss six weeks after bariatric surgery. The patient had only a partial recovery of her neurologic symptoms eightweeks after vigorous therapy for this condition. Symptomatic thiamine (vitamin B1) and vitamin B12 deficiencies are particularly concerning effects of bariatric procedures, as neurologic and cognitive deficits may be long lasting or even permanent despite aggressive replacement therapy.

  4. Urolithiasis in inflammatory bowel disease and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gkentzis, Agapios; Kimuli, Michael; Cartledge, Jon; Traxer, Olivier; Biyani, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse current literature focusing on pathogenesis and therapeutic aspects of urolithiasis with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and following bariatric surgery. METHODS A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, supplemented with additional references. Studies assessing the association of IBD or bariatric surgery with renal stones in both paediatric and adulthood were included. RESULTS Certain types of stones are seen more frequently with IBD. Hyperoxaluria and hypocitraturia are the main metabolic changes responsible for urolithiasis. The incidence of renal stones in malabsorptive types of bariatric surgery such as gastric bypass is high; this is not as common in modern restrictive surgical methods. Preventative methods and urine alkalinisation have been shown to be beneficial. CONCLUSION Both conditions are associated with renal stones. Patients’ counselling and prevention strategies are the mainstay of urolithiasis management in these patients. PMID:27872836

  5. IMPACT OF DEFICIENT NUTRITION IN BONE MASS AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Tatiana Munhoz da Rocha Lemos; PAGANOTO, Mariana; RADOMINSKI, Rosana Bento; BORBA, Victoria Zeghbi Cochenski

    2016-01-01

    Background: Essential nutrients are considered for the prevention of the bone loss that occurs after bariatric surgery. Aim: Evaluate nutrients involved in bone metabolism, and relate to serum concentrations of calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone, and the use of supplements and sun exposure on the bone mass of patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery. Methods: An observational study, with patients who had undergone the surgery 12 or more months previously, operated group (OG), compared to a control group (CG). Results: Were included 56 in OG and 27 in the CG. The mean age was 36.4±8.5 years. The individuals in the OG, compared to CG, consumed inadequate amounts of protein and daily calcium. The OG had a higher prevalence of low sun exposure, lower levels of 25OH Vitamin D (21.3±10.9 vs. 32.1±11.8 ng/dl), and increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone (68.1±32.9 vs. 39.9±11.9 pg/ml, p<0.001). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was present only in the OG (41.7%). The mean lumbar spine bone mineral density was lower in the OG. Four individuals from the OG had low bone mineral density for chronological age, and no one from the CG. Conclusion: The dietary components that affect bone mass in patients undergoing bariatric surgery were inadequate. The supplementation was insufficient and the sun exposure was low. These changes were accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism and a high prevalence of low bone mass in lumbar spine in these subjects. PMID:27120738

  6. Can Bariatric Surgery Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Stanek, Kelly; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that obesity is independently associated with poor neurocognitive outcomes, including cognitive impairment, increased risk for dementia, and regional alterations in brain structure. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity and initial findings suggest that it may result in cognitive improvements. The current paper reviews and integrates recent research in this area, with a focus on potential mediators and moderators of neuropsychological outcome in bariatric surgery patients, including anesthetic and nutritional complications and proposes novel avenues for continued study in this area. PMID:22771689

  7. Bariatric surgery in type 1 diabetes mellitus; long-term experience in two cases.

    PubMed

    Fuertes-Zamorano, Nuria; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres García, Antonio J; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    In patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, recommendations for bariatric surgery are well established. However, no consensus exists regarding its role for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes and morbid obesity. We present the long-term follow-up of two women with type 1 diabetes, morbid obesity and associated comorbidities, who underwent malabsorptive bariatric surgery. More than four years after the procedure, both have a body mass index (BMI) within the normal range and HbA1c levels below 7%. Also, they have been able to reduce their insulin requirements in more than 50%, their associated comorbidities have disappeared, and their overall quality of life has significantly improved. We compare our results with other recently published ones, emphasizing potential indications of bariatric surgery for patients with type 1 diabetes.

  8. The effects of bariatric surgery on bone and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Sakhaee, Khashayar; Poindexter, John; Aguirre, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular and diabetic complications associated with an improvement in survival has overshadowed the adverse skeletal health and development of kidney stone disease in this population. All longitudinal based studies in the literature reporting the incidence of bone fractures or kidney stones following bariatric surgery were reviewed. Moreover, all publications over the past decade which assessed changes in bone mineral density and bone quality, or explored underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of bone and kidney stone disease were carefully reviewed. This review provides sufficient data to support that osteoporotic fractures and kidney stone disease are associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. However, due to the limited data available to date, no definitive conclusion could yet be drawn whether sleeve gastrectomy or adjustable gastric banding is associated with bone fractures and kidney stones. Bariatric surgery has emerged as the most effective and sustained treatment for weight reduction. This treatment modality has been recognized to diminish the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and ameliorate diabetes mellitus complications. The derangement in mineral metabolism has emerged as a major complication following bariatric surgery.

  9. The impact of bariatric surgery on obesity-related infertility and in vitro fertilization outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Orkun; Carr, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    Obesity-related infertility is one of the most common problems of reproductive-age obese women who desire childbearing. The various types of bariatric surgeries have proved effective in controlling excessive weight gain, improving fertility, and preventing certain maternal and fetal complications in these women. This article summarizes the current evidence regarding the impact of bariatric surgery on obesity-related infertility and in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. We have also attempted to draw conclusions about maternal and fetal risks and the benefits of bariatric surgery. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y procedures are the two most commonly performed bariatric surgeries. Bariatric surgery was believed to improve menstrual irregularity and increase ovulation rate in anovulatory obese women, which lead to increased pregnancy rates. Although there are data in the literature suggesting the improvement of both the ovulatory function and the spontaneous pregnancy rates in obese women who lost weight after bariatric surgery, most of these are case-control studies with a small number of patients. The data are insufficient to determine an ideal time interval for pregnancy after bariatric surgery; however, the general consensus is that pregnancy should be delayed 12 to 18 months after bariatric surgery to avoid nutritional deficiencies. Few data exist regarding IVF success rates in women who have undergone bariatric surgery. One pairwise study discussed five patients who underwent bariatric surgery followed by IVF that resulted in three term pregnancies in three patients after the first IVF cycle. Many studies reported reductions in obesity-related pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders after bariatric surgery. Although data are inconsistent, some studies reported increased rate of preterm delivery and small for gestational age infants after bariatric surgery. Pregnancies after bariatric surgery may be

  10. PROFILE OF PATIENTS WHO SEEK THE BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Paola Turchiello; PATIAS, Luciana Dapieve; ALVAREZ, Glauco da Costa; KIRSTEN, Vanessa Ramos; COLPO, Elisângela; de MORAES, Cristina Machado Bragança

    2015-01-01

    Background : Nowadays obesity is a chronic disease considered one of the greatest problems in public healthy. Showing to be effective in a short and long term, the bariatric surgery has emerged as an optional treatment for morbid obesity. Aim: Identify the profile of patients seeking bariatric surgery. Methods: Were interviewed 100 patients in preoperative nutritional monitoring of bariatric surgery. The study was conducted by applying a questionnaire prepared according to the research objectives. Results: From the individuals that were seeking bariatric surgery, 78% were female, 62% were married and 69% reported physical activity. The average age of those surveyed was 37±10.83 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 43.51± 6.25 kg/m². The comorbidity more prevalent in this group was high blood pressure (51%). In previous treatments for weight reduction, 92% have already done hypocaloric diet followed by anorectic drug (83%). The success of these treatments was reported by 92% of patients; however, the weight lost was recovered in less than one year of 75%. Patients with diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia had higher BMI values. The patients with comorbidities showed lower levels of BMI. Conclusion: The profile of patients who sought surgical treatment for their obesity were predominantly women with a family background of obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, especially hypertension and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26734799

  11. Gastrointestinal Hormones and Bariatric Surgery-induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ionut, Viorica; Burch, Miguel; Youdim, Adrienne; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide. While recent statistics have demonstrated that obesity rates have begun to plateau, more severe classes of obesity are accelerating at a faster pace with important implications in regards to treatment. Bariatric surgery has a profound and durable effect on weight loss, being to date one of the most successful interventions for obesity. Objective To provide updates to the possible role of gut hormones in post bariatric surgery weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Design and Methods The current review examines the changes in gastro-intestinal hormones with bariatric surgery and the potential mechanisms by which these changes could result in decreased weight and adiposity. Results The mechanism by which bariatric surgery results in body weight changes is incompletely elucidated, but it clearly goes beyond caloric restriction and malabsorption. Conclusion Changes in gastro-intestinal hormones, including increases in GLP-1, PYY, and oxyntomodulin, decreases in GIP and ghrelin, or the combined action of all these hormones might play a role in induction and long-term maintenance of weight loss. PMID:23512841

  12. Interdisciplinary European Guidelines on metabolic and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Fried, Martin; Yumuk, Volkan; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Scopinaro, Nicola; Torres, Antonio J; Weiner, Rudolf; Yashkov, Yuri; Frühbeck, Gema

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, an outstanding expert panel derived from IFSO-EC (International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity-European Chapter) and EASO (European Association for the Study of Obesity), composed by key representatives of both Societies including past and present presidents together with EASO's OMTF (Obesity Management Task Force) chair, agreed to devote the joint Medico-Surgical Workshop of both institutions to the topic of metabolic surgery as a pre-satellite of the 2013 European Congress on Obesity (ECO) to be held in Liverpool given the extraordinarily advancement made specifically in this field during the past years. It was further agreed to revise and update the 2008 Interdisciplinary European Guidelines on Surgery of Severe Obesity produced in cooperation of both Societies by focusing in particular on the evidence gathered in relation to the effects on diabetes during this lustrum and the subsequent changes that have taken place in patient eligibility criteria. The expert panel composition allowed the coverage of key disciplines in the comprehensive management of obesity and obesity-associated diseases, aimed specifically at updating the clinical guidelines to reflect current knowledge, expertise and evidence-based data on metabolic and bariatric surgery.

  13. Patients’ perceptions of waiting for bariatric surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada waiting lists for bariatric surgery are common, with wait times on average > 5 years. The meaning of waiting for bariatric surgery from the patients’ perspective must be understood if health care providers are to act as facilitators in promoting satisfaction with care and quality care outcomes. The aims of this study were to explore patients’ perceptions of waiting for bariatric surgery, the meaning and experience of waiting, the psychosocial and behavioral impact of waiting for treatment and identify health care provider and health system supportive measures that could potentially improve the waiting experience. Methods Twenty-one women and six men engaged in in-depth interviews that were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis between June 2011 and April 2012. The data were subjected to re-analysis to identify perceived health care provider and health system barriers to accessing bariatric surgery. Results Thematic analysis identified inequity as a barrier to accessing bariatric surgery. Three areas of perceived inequity were identified from participants’ accounts: socioeconomic inequity, regional inequity, and inequity related to waitlist prioritization. Although excited about their acceptance as candidates for surgery, the waiting period was described as stressful, anxiety provoking, and frustrating. Anger was expressed towards the health care system for the long waiting times. Participants identified the importance of health care provider and health system supports during the waiting period. Recommendations on how to improve the waiting experience included periodic updates from the surgeon’s office about their position on the wait list; a counselor who specializes in helping people going through this surgery, dietitian support and further information on what to expect after surgery, among others. Conclusion Patients’ perceptions of accessing and

  14. Robotics in advanced gastrointestinal surgery: the bariatric experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keith; Hagen, Monika E; Buffington, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery for laparoscopic procedures such as advanced gastrointestinal surgery and abdominal malignancies is currently on the rise. The first robotic systems have been used since the 1990s with increasing number of clinical cases and broader clinical applications each year. Although high-evidence-level data are scarce, studies suggest that the technical advantages of robotic surgery result in a clinical value for procedures of advanced complexity such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and revisional bariatric surgery. Ultimately, the digital interface of the robotic system with the option to integrate augmented reality and real-time imaging will allow advanced applications particularly in the field of gastrointestinal surgery for malignancies.

  15. Endoscopic management of bariatric surgery complications: what the gastroenterologist should know.

    PubMed

    Miranda da Rocha, L C; Ayub Pérez, O A; Arantes, V

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a serious disorder in almost the entire world. It is an important risk factor for a series of conditions that affect and threaten health. Currently, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity, and in addition to the resulting weight loss, it reduces morbidity in this population. There has been a significant increase in the number of obese patients operated on. Despite the success of bariatric surgery, an important group of patients still present with major postoperative complications. In order for endoscopy to effectively contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of complications deriving from obesity surgery, the gastroenterologist must be aware of the particularities involved in bariatric surgery. The present article is a review of the resulting anatomic aspects of the main surgical techniques employed, the most common postoperative symptoms, the potential complications, and the possibilities that endoscopic diagnosis and treatment offer. Endoscopy is a growing and continuously evolving method in the treatment of bariatric surgery complications. The aim of this review is to contribute to the preparation of gastroenterologists so they can offer adequate endoscopic diagnosis and treatment to this high-risk population.

  16. [Bariatric surgery in inflammatory bowel disease; case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Tenorio Jiménez, Carmen; Manzano García, Gregorio; Prior Sánchez, Inmaculada; Corpas Jiménez, María Sierra; Molina Puerta, María José; Benito López, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rarely associated with obesity, as malabsorption is a common feature of these diseases (1). However, some patients may experience morbid obesity and associated complications refractory to dietary treatment and benefit from bariatric surgery. It has even been postulated that surgery may result in improvement of IBD by reducing inflammatory markers (2). However, patients may experience a higher incidence of complications following surgery in the context of immunosuppressive therapy and prior malabsorption. Therefore, if surgery is performed, careful patient selection and individualization of technique are essential. We present a patient diagnosed with ulcerative colitis who presented severe protein malnutrition after bariatric surgery type bilio-pancreatic diversion and review the available literature.

  17. Dermatitis and optic neuropathy due to zinc deficiency after malabsortive bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    We present a patient who underwent successful classic duodenal switch and developed a marked dermatitis with a significant functional limitation. This is an unusual complication, despite the relatively moderate prevalence of nutrient deficiency after this type of bariatric surgery. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and emphasize the importance of an appropriate nutritional management.

  18. Complications of bariatric surgery--What the general surgeon needs to know.

    PubMed

    Healy, Paul; Clarke, Christopher; Reynolds, Ian; Arumugasamy, Mayilone; McNamara, Deborah

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important cause of physical and psychosocial morbidity and it places a significant burden on health system costs and resources. Worldwide an estimated 200 million people over 20 years are obese and in the U.K. the Department of Health report that 61.3% of people in the U.K. are either overweight or obese. Surgery for obesity (bariatric surgery) is being performed with increasing frequency in specialist centres both in the U.K. and Ireland and abroad due to the phenomenon of health tourism. Its role and success in treating medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension in obese patients will likely lead to an even greater number of bariatric surgery procedures being performed. Patients with early postoperative complications may be managed in specialist centres but patients with later complications, occurring months or years after surgery, may present to local surgical units for assessment and management. This review will highlight the late complications of the 3 most commonly performed bariatric surgery procedures that the emergency general surgeon may encounter. It will also highlight the complications that require urgent intervention by the emergency general surgeon and those that can be safely referred to a bariatric surgeon for further management after initial assessment and investigations.

  19. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-11-27

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and those with BMI > 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  20. [Bariatrica paraplegia patient and morbid obesity. New challenge in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Gros Herguido, Noelia; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Barranco Moreno, Antonio; Socas Macias, Maria; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Garcia-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2014-06-01

    The loss of mobility due to spinal cord injury is a risk factor for weight gain. Despite the well-documented outcomes of bariatric surgery in outpatients, little information is available about the surgery in paraplegic patients. We present two cases of patients with morbid obesity and spinal cord injury. After several attempts to lose weight conservatively, were assessed by the multidisciplinary team of our hospital and finally intervened by laparoscopic gastric bypass. After surgery have been no post-surgical complications. The patient in case 1, after two years of follow-up, a weight of 84 kg (BMI 25.08 kg/m2). Case 2, after a month of surgery has reduced weight and stopped taking antihypertensive therapy. It 's available to bariatric surgery as an important option to consider if all non-surgical interventions fail is highlighted.

  1. Resolution of Comorbidities and Impact on Longevity Following Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouse, Tammy; Brethauer, Stacy

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable treatment of severe obesity. In addition to weight loss, these operations result in significant improvement or resolution of many obesity-related comorbid diseases. There are now numerous studies demonstrating that bariatric surgery decreases all-cause mortality long-term compared with cohorts of patients who did not undergo surgery. Decreases in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular-related mortality are major contributors to this overall effect on life expectancy after bariatric surgery.

  2. Complications of pre-operative anorexia nervosa in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Shear, Matthew; DeFilippis, Ersilia M

    2015-01-01

    It is important to recognise that patients who seek weight loss surgery may have a history of restrictive eating or anorexia nervosa. The following case report describes a woman with a history of anorexia nervosa who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Her eating disorder symptoms subsequently reappeared and were largely resistant to treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a bariatric surgery patient with a prior history of anorexia nervosa. Further research is required to determine how best to select patients for weight loss surgery.

  3. FROM COMPLEX EVOLVING TO SIMPLE: CURRENT REVISIONAL AND ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES FOLLOWING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    ZORRON, Ricardo; GALVÃO-NETO, Manoel Passos; CAMPOS, Josemberg; BRANCO, Alcides José; SAMPAIO, José; JUNGHANS, Tido; BOTHE, Claudia; BENZING, Christian; KRENZIEN, Felix

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a standard therapy in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding, although with good results in the literature, are showing higher rates of treatment failure to reduce obesity-associated morbidity and body weight. Other problems after bariatric may occur, as band erosion, gastroesophageal reflux disease and might be refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to a RYGB can be an effective alternative, as long as specific indications for revision are fulfilled. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse own and literature data on revisional bariatric procedures to evaluate best alternatives to current practice. Methods: Institutional experience and systematic review from the literature on revisional bariatric surgery. Results: Endoscopic procedures are recently applied to ameliorate failure and complications of bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20%. Transoral outlet reduction is currently an alternative method to reduce the gastrojejunal anastomosis. The diameter and volume of sleeve gastrectomy can enlarge as well, which can be reduced by endoscopic full-thickness sutures longitudinally. Dumping syndrome and severe hypoglycemic episodes (neuroglycopenia) can be present in patients following RYGB. The hypoglycemic episodes have to be evaluated and usually can be treated conventionally. To avoid partial pancreatectomy or conversion to normal anatomy, a new laparoscopic approach with remnant gastric resection and jejunal interposition can be applied in non-responders alternatively. Hypoglycemic episodes are ameliorated while weight loss is sustained. Conclusion: Revisional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery in patients with collateral symptomatic or treatment failure can be applied. Conventional non-surgical approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional surgery will be indicated. Former complex

  4. [Treatment of anemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency in patients with morbid obesity can occur before bariatric surgery due to its inflammatory component and after surgery as the result of implementing the malabsorptive techniques. For patients with morbid obesity, micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron and folate, should be suspected. Iron deficiency and other hematinics should be corrected, even when anemia has not been established. Normal ferritin levels do not allow us to rule out a possible iron deficiency, given that ferritin can increase due to the chronic inflammatory condition of obesity. After bariatric surgery, patients should take iron supplements; however, these supplements are frequently poorly tolerated. Rapid and effective correction of hemoglobin levels might require the intravenous administration of iron preparations.

  5. Possible Risk Factors for Increased Suicide Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; Crosby, Ross; de Zwaan, Martina; Engel, Scott; Roerig, James; Steffen, Kristine; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Karr, Trisha; Lavender, Jason; Wonderlich, Steve

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing research literature suggesting that there may be elevated risk of suicide following bariatric surgery. Most of the data reported thus far has been cross-sectional and observational, and very little is known about the possible specific causal variables involved. The purpose of this report is to review this literature and to review possible risk factors for increased suicidal risk following bariatric surgery, in order to delineate future research directions. First a variety of medical, biological, and genetic factors, including the persistence of recurrence of medical comorbidities after bariatric surgery, the disinhibition and impulsivity secondary to changes in the absorption of alcohol, hypoglycemia, as well as pharmacokinetic changes that may affect the absorption of various medications including antidepressant medications are reviewed. Also reviewed are possible mediating factors involving changes in various peptidergic systems such as GLP-1 and Ghrelin. A number of psychosocial issues that might be involved are discussed, including lack of improvement in quality of life after surgery, continued or recurrent physical mobility restrictions, persistence or recurrence of sexual dysfunction and relationship problems, low self-esteem, and a history of child maltreatment. Inadequate weight loss or weight regain are also discussed. Possible theoretical models involved and directions for research are suggested. PMID:23404774

  6. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Hadi, Mustafa; Birch, Daniel W.; Gill, Richdeep S.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic that is known to play a role in the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Studies have shown that increasing body mass index plays a role in the incompetence of the gastroesophageal junction and that weight loss and lifestyle modifications reduce the symptoms of GERD. As a method of producing effective and sustainable weight loss, bariatric surgery plays a major role in the treatment of obesity. We reviewed the literature on the effects of different types of bariatric surgery on the symptomatic relief of GERD and its complications. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was considered an effective method to alleviate symptoms of GERD, whereas laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appeared to increase the incidence of the disease. Adjustable gastric banding was seen to initially improve the symptoms of GERD; however, a subset of patients experienced a new onset of GERD symptoms during long-term follow-up. The literature suggests that different surgeries have different impacts on the symptomatology of GERD and that careful assessment may be needed before performing bariatric surgery in patients with GERD. PMID:24666452

  7. NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LIFE QUALITY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Paulo Roberto Bezerra; de SOUZA, Marcela Ramos; da SILVA, Evane Moises; da SILVA, Silvia Alves

    2014-01-01

    Background The obesity has achieved an alarming increase in recent years, which led this disease to global epidemic condition. Aim To evaluate the nutritional status as well as the quality of life of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods A transversal study was conducted with obese adults of both genders who underwent bariatric surgery by Fobi-Capella technique for at least 30 days. It was evaluated: age, gender, marital status, occupation, weight before surgery, current weight, height, preoperative and current BMI, weight loss and loss of excess weight percentages, presence of clinical manifestations and food intolerances. Results The sample consisted of 70 patients, being 81.4% female, 37.1% aged 30 to 39 years, 58.6% were married, 41.4% have undergone the bariatric surgery in the last 12 months. It was observed a reduction in BMI from 37.2 kg/m2 (one to three months) to 28.9 kg/m2 (>12 months) and consequent increase in weight loss and loss of excess weight percentages. The most frequent clinical manifestation was alopecia (62.9%). The most reported food intolerance was on the red meat (24%). According to the Baros questionnaire, 50% of patients were classified as having good quality of life. Conclusion The operation of Fobi-Capella proved to be effective in promoting gradual and lasting weight loss. Quality of life was considered good in most patients, indicating that the operation had a positive impact on their lives. PMID:25409963

  8. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    El-Hadi, Mustafa; Birch, Daniel W; Gill, Richdeep S; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is an epidemic that is known to play a role in the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Studies have shown that increasing body mass index plays a role in the incompetence of the gastroesophageal junction and that weight loss and lifestyle modifications reduce the symptoms of GERD. As a method of producing effective and sustainable weight loss, bariatric surgery plays a major role in the treatment of obesity. We reviewed the literature on the effects of different types of bariatric surgery on the symptomatic relief of GERD and its complications. Roux-en- Y gastric bypass was considered an effective method to alleviate symptoms of GERD, whereas laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appeared to increase the incidence of the disease. Adjustable gastric banding was seen to initially improve the symptoms of GERD; however, a subset of patients experienced a new onset of GERD symptoms during long-term follow-up. The literature suggests that different surgeries have different impacts on the symptomatology of GERD and that careful assessment may be needed before performing bariatric surgery in patients with GERD.

  9. Bariatric surgery in monogenic and syndromic forms of obesity.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Aayed R; Elahmedi, Mohamed; Alqahtani, Yara A

    2014-02-01

    Currently, no topic is more controversial in bariatric surgery than performing these procedures on children with monogenic and syndromic forms of obesity. The medical community and the caregivers of those patients are struggling to find a solution that can alleviate their suffering and save their life. In all forms of obesity, dieting and physical activity do not result in significant weight loss and is associated with a high rate of weight regain. Additionally, effective medical therapy is not available yet. While there is significant debate about the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the adolescent population, there is an increasing number of studies that demonstrate the success of this option for the appropriate patients. Similarly, our experience demonstrated the same success not only in normal children and adolescents but also in those with monogenic and syndromic form of obesity.

  10. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: More than a restrictive bariatric surgery procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Benaiges, David; Más-Lorenzo, Antonio; Goday, Albert; Ramon, José M; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Roux, Juana A Flores-Le

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a restrictive bariatric surgery technique that was first used as part of restrictive horizontal gastrectomy in the original Scopinaro type biliopancreatic diversion. Its good results as a single technique have led to a rise in its use, and it is currently the second most performed technique worldwide. SG achieves clearly better results than other restrictive techniques and is comparable in some aspects to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current gold standard in bariatric surgery. These benefits have been associated with different pathophysiologic mechanisms unrelated to weight loss such as increased gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and activation of hormonal mechanisms such as increased GLP-1 hormone and decreased ghrelin. The aim of this review was to highlight the salient aspects of SG regarding its historical evolution, pathophysiologic mechanisms, main results, clinical applications and perioperative complications. PMID:26557004

  11. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years. PMID:21935309

  12. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  13. Visual deterioration caused by vitamin A deficiency in patients after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Fok, J S; Li, J Y Z; Yong, T Y

    2012-06-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) after bariatric surgery is recognised as a significant post-operative complication that can lead to visual impairment. We report two cases of night blindness and visual impairment caused by VAD after malabsorptive bariatric surgery. Both patients were treated with intramuscular vitamin A replacement and made near complete recovery in their vision. Ocular complications due to VAD should be diagnosed and treated promptly in patients after bariatric surgery because these complications are reversible.

  14. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a review of the moral challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery for children and adolescents is becoming widespread. However, the evidence is still scarce and of poor quality, and many of the patients are too young to consent. This poses a series of moral challenges, which have to be addressed both when considering bariatric surgery introduced as a health care service and when deciding for treatment for young individuals. A question based (Socratic) approach is applied to reveal underlying moral issues that can be relevant to an open and transparent decision making process. Discussion A wide range of moral issues with bariatric surgery for children and adolescents is identified in the literature. There is a moral imperative to help obese minors avoiding serious health problems, but there is little high quality evidence on safety, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness for bariatric surgery in this group. Lack of maturity and family relations poses a series of challenges with autonomy, informed consent, assent, and assessing the best interest of children and adolescents. Social aspects of obesity, such as medicalization, prejudice, and discrimination, raise problems with justice and trust in health professionals. Conceptual issues, such as definition of obesity and treatment end-points, present moral problems. Hidden interests of patients, parents, professionals, industry, and society need to be revealed. Summary Performing bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents in order to discipline their behavior warrants reflection and caution. More evidence on outcomes is needed to be able to balance benefits and risks, to provide information for a valid consent or assent, and to advise minors and parents. PMID:23631445

  15. STAMPEDE: Bariatric surgery gains more evidence based support

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recent large-scale trials of intensive medical management for obesity and diabetes have been disappointing. Observational studies and small-scale trials of bariatric surgery on DM patients have shown promising results. The effects of sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass in a larger cohort of patients with DM and obesity was tested in the STAMPEDE trial over a 3-year follow-up. PMID:25054119

  16. Current challenges in providing bariatric surgery in France

    PubMed Central

    Czernichow, Sébastien; Paita, Michel; Nocca, David; Msika, Simon; Basdevant, Arnaud; Millat, Bertrand; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery is a well-accepted procedure for severe and massive obesity management. We aimed to determine trends, geographical variations, and factors influencing bariatric surgery and the choice of procedure in France in a large observational study. The Health Insurance Fund for Salaried Workers (Caisse National Assurance Maladie Travailleurs Salariés) covers about 86% of the French population. The Système National d’Information Inter-régimes de l’Assurance Maladie database contains individualized and anonymized patient data on all reimbursements for healthcare expenditure. All types of primary bariatric procedures (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or omega loop, adjustable gastric banding [AGB], or longitudinal sleeve gastrectomy [LSG]) performed during 2011 to 2013 were systematically recorded. Surgical techniques performed by region of residence and age-range relative risks with 95% confidence intervals of undergoing LSG or RYGB versus AGB were computed. In 2013, LSG was performed more frequently than RYGB and AGB (57% vs 31% and 13%, respectively). A total of 41,648 patients underwent a bariatric procedure; they were predominantly female (82%) with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 40 (±12) years and a body mass index ≥40 kg/m2 for 68% of them. A total of 114 procedures were performed in patients younger than 18 years and 2381 procedures were performed in patients aged 60 years and older. Beneficiaries of the French universal health insurance coverage for low-income patients were more likely to undergo surgery than the general population. Large nationwide variations were observed in the type choice of bariatric surgical procedures. Significant positive predictors for undergoing RYGB compared to those for undergoing AGB were as follows: referral to a center performing a large number of surgeries or to a public hospital, older age, female gender, body mass index ≥50 kg/m2, and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

  17. Patient race and the likelihood of undergoing bariatric surgery among patients seeking surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Jones, Daniel B.; Schneider, Benjamin E.; Blackburn, George L.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Hess, Donald T.; Chiodi, Sarah; Robert, Shirley; Bourland, Ashley C.; Wee, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethnic minority adults have disproportionately higher rates of obesity than Caucasians but are less likely to undergo bariatric surgery. Recent data suggest that minorities might be less likely to seek surgery. Whether minorities who seek surgery are also less likely to proceed with surgery is unclear. Methods We interviewed 651 patients who sought bariatric surgery at two academic medical centers to examine whether ethnic minorities are less likely to proceed with surgery than Caucasians and whether minorities who do proceed with surgery have higher illness burden than their counterparts. We collected patient demographics and abstracted clinical data from the medical records. We then conducted multivariable analyses to examine the association between race and the likelihood of proceeding with bariatric surgery within 1 year of initial interview and to compare the illness burden by race and ethnicity among those who underwent surgery. Results Of our study sample, 66 % were Caucasian, 18 % were African-American, and 12 % were Hispanics. After adjustment for socioeconomic factors, there were no racial differences in who proceeded with bariatric surgery. Among those who proceeded with surgery, illness burden was comparable between minorities and Caucasian patients with the exception that African-Americans were underrepresented among those with reflux disease (0.4, 95 % CI 0.2–0.7) and depression (0.4, 0.2–0.7), and overrepresented among those with anemia (4.8, 2.4–9.6) than Caucasian patients. Conclusions Race and ethnicity were not independently associated with likelihood of proceeding with bariatric surgery. Minorities who proceeded with surgery did not clearly have higher illness burden than Caucasian patients. PMID:25492453

  18. Nutritional Recommendations for Adult Bariatric Surgery Patients: Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sherf Dagan, Shiri; Goldenshluger, Ariela; Globus, Inbal; Schweiger, Chaya; Kessler, Yafit; Kowen Sandbank, Galit; Ben-Porat, Tair; Sinai, Tali

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its associated metabolic complications. To ensure long-term postoperative success, patients must be prepared to adopt comprehensive lifestyle changes. This review summarizes the current evidence and expert opinions with regard to nutritional care in the perioperative and long-term postoperative periods. A literature search was performed with the use of different lines of searches for narrative reviews. Nutritional recommendations are divided into 3 main sections: 1) presurgery nutritional evaluation and presurgery diet and supplementation; 2) postsurgery diet progression, eating-related behaviors, and nutritional therapy for common gastrointestinal symptoms; and 3) recommendations for lifelong supplementation and advice for nutritional follow-up. We recognize the need for uniform, evidence-based nutritional guidelines for bariatric patients and summarize recommendations with the aim of optimizing long-term success and preventing complications.

  19. Patient Expectations of Bariatric and Body Contouring Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Anne; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Pusic, Andrea; Roessler, Kirsten K.; Rose, Michael; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient expectations are important in bariatric and body contouring surgery because the goals include improvements in health-related quality of life, appearance, and body image. The aim of this study was to identify patient expectations along the weight loss journey and/or body contouring surgery. Methods: This qualitative study took an interpretive description approach. Between September 2009 and February 2012, 49 patients were interviewed postbody contouring surgery. Data were analyzed using a line-by-line approach whereby expectations were identified and labeled as expected, unexpected, or neutral. Constant comparison was used to ensure coding was done consistently. Interviews continued until no new themes emerged. Results: Participants described expectations according to appearance, health-related quality of life, and patient experience of care. Two areas stood out in terms of unmet expectations and included appearance and physical health, ie, recovery from body contouring surgery. Most participants, who underwent bariatric surgery, expected neither the extent of excess skin after weight loss nor how the excess skin would make them look and feel. For recovery, participants did not expect that it would be as long or as hard as it was in reality. Conclusions: A full understanding of outcomes and expectations for this patient population is needed to enhance patient education and improve shared medical decision making. Education materials should be informed by the collection of evidence-based patient-reported outcome information using measures such as the BODY-Q. A patient-reported outcome scale measuring patient expectations is needed for obese and bariatric patients. PMID:27200256

  20. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  1. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In June 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding strategies for successful management and treatment of diabetes. This project came about when the Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the Ministry’s newly released Diabetes Strategy. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified five key areas in which evidence was needed. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five areas: insulin pumps, behavioural interventions, bariatric surgery, home telemonitoring, and community based care. For each area, an economic analysis was completed where appropriate and is described in a separate report. To review these titles within the Diabetes Strategy Evidence series, please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/masabout.html, Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetics: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity: An Evidence-Based Summary Community-Based Care for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telemonitoring for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Application of the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model (ODEM) to Determine the Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Selected Type 2 Diabetes Interventions in Ontario Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery for the management of diabetes in morbidly obese people. This report summarized evidence specific

  2. [Wernicke´s encephalopathy and polyneuropathy associated with vitamin B complex deficiency after a bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Tomas; Franco, Diana L; Martínez, Adriana; Peña, Iván M

    2012-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a treatment that guarantees a substantial and lasting weight loss in addition to the tangible benefits relating to obesity-associated medical conditions. The increasing number of bariatric surgeries has revealed an increasing number of complications related to this procedure, including Wernicke´s encephalopathy and vitamin B deficiency polyneuropathies. Herein, a 7-week post-surgery case of Wernicke´s encephalopathy is presented that emphasizes the importance of an early recognition of these symptoms so as to initiate intervention during the reversible phase of these potentially lethal pathologies.

  3. Eating Disorders and Problematic Eating Behaviours Before and After Bariatric Surgery: Characterization, Assessment and Association with Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Utzinger, Linsey M.; Pisetsky, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Accumulating evidence suggests that bariatric surgery candidates are likely to present with eating disorders (EDs) and/or problematic eating behaviours (EBs), and research suggests that these problems may persist or develop after bariatric surgery. While there is growing evidence indicating that EDs and EBs may impact bariatric surgery outcomes, the definitions and assessment methods used lack consensus, and findings have been mixed. The aims of this paper were (1) to summarize the existing literature on pre‐operative and post‐operative EDs and problematic EBs; (2) to discuss the terms, definitions and assessment measures used across studies; and (3) to consider the extent to which the presence of these problems impact surgery outcomes. We highlight the importance of investigators utilizing consistent definitions and assessment methodologies across studies. © 2015 The Authors. European Eating Disorders Review published by Eating Disorders Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26315343

  4. Differential Effects of Bariatric Surgery Versus Exercise on Excessive Visceral Fat Deposits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Zong; Huang, Yi-Luan; Wu, Carol C; Wang, Yen-Chi; Pan, Hsiang-Ju; Huang, Chin-Kun; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare differential impacts of bariatric surgery and exercise-induced weight loss on excessive abdominal and cardiac fat deposition.Excessive fat accumulation around the heart may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Recent evidences have suggested that bariatric surgery results in relatively less decrease in epicardial fat compared with abdominal visceral fat and paracardial fat.Sixty-four consecutive overweight or obese subjects were enrolled in the study. Clinical characteristics and metabolic profiles were recorded. The volumes of abdominal visceral adipose tissue (AVAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT), epicardial (EAT), and paracardial adipose tissue (PAT) were measured by computed tomography in the bariatric surgery group (N = 25) and the exercise group (N = 39) at baseline and 3 months after intervention. Subjects in both the surgery and exercise groups showed significant reduction in body mass index (15.97%, 7.47%), AVAT (40.52%, 15.24%), ASAT (31.40, 17.34%), PAT (34.40%, 12.05%), and PAT + EAT (22.31%, 17.72%) (all P < 0.001) after intervention compared with baseline. In both the groups, the decrease in EAT was small compared with the other compartments (P < 0.01 in both groups). Compared with the exercise group, the surgery group had greater loss in abdominal and cardiac visceral adipose tissue (AVAT, ASAT, PAT, EAT+PAT) (P < 0.001), but lesser loss in EAT (P = 0.037).Compared with the exercise group, bariatric surgery results in significantly greater percentage loss of excessive fat deposits except for EAT. EAT, but not PAT, was relatively preserved despite weight reduction in both the groups. The physiological impact of persistent EAT deserves further investigation.

  5. Food quality in the late postoperative period of bariatric surgery: an evaluation using the bariatric food pyramid.

    PubMed

    Soares, Fernando Lucas; Bissoni de Sousa, Larissa; Corradi-Perini, Carla; Ramos da Cruz, Magda Rosa; Nunes, Mario Gilberto Jesus; Branco-Filho, Alcides José

    2014-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the treatment of obesity, but lifestyle and diet should be monitored after this procedure to ensure success. The Bariatric Food Pyramid was created basing on long-term nutritional care that proposes a standard of healthy living and eating habits considering gastric capacity and specific nutritional needs. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the life habits and diet quality of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have been recovering for at least 6 months) based on the specific food pyramid. Retrospective data analysis was performed using medical records of patients who had been followed for at least 6 months after bariatric surgery. The following data were collected from patient records: age, gender, education level (years), BMI (preoperative and postoperative), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) relative to the time of surgery, frequency of physical activity, use of nutritional supplements, usual dietary intake history, and fluid intake. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 172 patient records. In this study, there was a low prevalence of physical activity, use of vitamin-mineral supplements, and water intake. There also was low consumption of protein, fruit, vegetables, and vegetable oils. In addition, intake of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats were higher than the recommendations established by the pyramid. The results indicate that patients who have undergone bariatric surgery have an inadequate diet according to food evaluation with the specific pyramid. In the long term, this may lead to weight gain and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

  6. Baropodometric analyses of patients before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Ivan Leo; Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical component of the ground reaction force, plantar pressure, contact area of the feet and double-support time using static and dynamic (gait) baropodometry before and after bariatric surgery. METHODS: Sixteen individuals with a body mass index of between 35 and 55 were evaluated before and after bariatric surgery. Thirteen patients (81.3%) were female and three (18.8%) male and their average age was 46±10 (21-60) years. An FSCAN system (version 3848) was used for baropodometric analyses (1 km/h and 3 km/h). The peak plantar pressure and ground reaction force were measured for the rear foot and forefoot. The double-support time and foot contact area were measured during gait. RESULTS: There were reductions in the ground reaction force in the forefoot and rear foot and in the foot contact area in all evaluations and of the double-support time at 3 km/h, as well as a significant reduction in the body mass index at six months post-surgery. The peak pressure did not vary at 1 km/h and at 3 km/h, reductions in peak pressure were observed in the left and right rear feet and left forefoot. CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss after bariatric surgery resulted in decreases in the ground reaction force and contact area of the foot. Plantar pressure was decreased at 3 km/h, especially in the forefoot. There was an increase in rhythm because of a reduction in the double-support time at 3 km/h. PMID:26602521

  7. Psychological assessment of the patient undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Allison G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the critical domains assessed during the psychological evaluation of candidates for bariatric surgery. Although no formal standard exists in the literature, there is growing recognition of the important elements to be addressed and the appropriate means for collecting the necessary data to determine psychological readiness for these procedures. Information regarding the components of the clinical interview and the specific measures used for psychological testing are discussed. Given the limited data on predicting success after surgery, determining psychological contraindications for surgery is addressed. Additionally, the multiple functions served by the psychologist during this assessment procedure are highlighted along with the value of this procedure in the patients' preparation for surgery.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  9. Endoscopic Approach for Major Complications of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Moon Kyung

    2017-01-01

    As lifestyle and diet patterns have become westernized in East Asia, the prevalence of obesity has rapidly increased. Bariatric surgeries, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), are considered the first-line treatment option in patients with severe obesity. However, postoperative complications have increased and the proper management of these complications, including the use of endoscopic procedures, has become important. The most serious complications, such as leaks and fistulas, can be treated with endoscopic stent placement and injection of fibrin glue, and a novel full-thickness closure over-the-scope clip (OTSC) has been used for treatment of postoperative leaks. Stricture at the gastrojejunal (GJ) anastomosis site after RYGB or incisura angularis in SG can be managed using stents or endoscopic balloon dilation. Dilation of the GJ anastomosis or gastric pouch may lead to failure of weight loss, and the use of endoscopic sclerotherapy, novel endoscopic suturing devices, and OTSCs have been attempted. Intragastric migration of the gastric band can be successfully treated using various endoscopic tools. Endoscopy plays a pivotal role in the management of post-bariatric complications, and close cooperation between endoscopists and bariatric surgeons may further increase the success rate of endoscopic procedures. PMID:28008162

  10. BARIATRIC SURGERY REVERSES METABOLIC RISK IN PATIENTS TREATED IN OUTPATIENT LEVEL

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA-NETO, Epifânio Feitosa; VÁZQUEZ, Cecília Mª Passos; SOARES, Fabiana Melo; da SILVA, Danielle Góes; de SOUZA, Márcia Ferreira Cândido; BARBOSA, Kiriaque Barra Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Background The conventional treatment of obesity presents unsatisfactory results on weight loss and its long-term sustainability, therefore bariatric surgery has been suggested as an effective therapy, determining sustainable long-term weight loss, reversal of components of cardiometabolic risk and improved quality and life expectancy. Aim To investigate the clinical component of the cardiometabolic risk in patients undergoing bariatric surgery assisted on outpatient basis. Methods The sample consisted of 47 patients with ages between 18 and 60 years, 72% females. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were prospectively evaluated by using the Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities scale. Results Occurred improvement in these co-morbidities within 12 months after surgery. Co-morbidities resolved were greater than those improved. Conclusion The study revealed that the Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities is a system that can be effectively used to quantify the degree of reduction of the severity of the cardiometabolic risk in response to bariatric surgery. PMID:24676297

  11. EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    ASSEF, Maurício Saab; MELO, Tiago Torres; ARAKI, Osvaldo; MARIONI, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become epidemic, and is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. Treatment is multidisciplinary. Surgical treatment is a consistent resource in severe obesity. The indication of preoperative upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in asymptomatic patients is controversial; however, most studies recommend its implementation in all patients. Aim: To analyze endoscopic performance in patients who were in preoperative for bariatric surgery and compare them with control group. Method: A series of 35 obese patients in preoperative period for bariatric surgery compared with a control group of 30 patients submitted to upper endoscopy. There were analyzed clinical and endoscopic data. Results: The mean age of the group of patients was 43.54 years. Most individuals in the group of patients were female with median BMI of 47.26kg/m2and in control group 24.21 kg/m2. The majority of patients were asymptomatic. Upper endoscopy was altered in 81.25% of asymptomatic patients. Endoscopic findings in the patient group were 57.1% resulting from peptic ulcer disease and 34.3% associated with GERD. The analysis of endoscopic findings in patients showed no significant difference in relation of the control group. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 60% in patients. Conclusion: It is recommended that the upper endoscopy should be made in all patients in the preoperative bariatric surgery period, although the degree of obesity is not related to a greater number of endoscopic findings. Obese patients do not have more endoscopic findings that non-obese individuals. PMID:26537272

  12. Nursing care of the person having bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Grindel, Mary E; Grindel, Cecelia Gatson

    2006-06-01

    The increasing incidence of morbid obesity suggests that the quantity of bariatric surgical procedures will continue to multiply each year. Bariatric surgery has become an accepted approach to weight management with the additional benefit of resolution of several co-morbidities. However, quality nursing care and effective patient teaching are essential to achieve positive patient outcomes. Nursing care along the continuum of the bariatric surgical experience is key to positive outcomes for these patients. Throughout the process from selection for surgery to follow-up visits in the physician's office, the nurse can have a significant impact on the response of the patient and family to the surgical procedure. During the selection process, the nurse can explain the required diagnostic tests and their rationale and conduct a thorough medical history, informing the physician of pertinent information that might affect the patient's outcomes. Patient and family teaching begins at this stage with information about the peri-operative experience. Bariatric surgery results in a major lifestyle change for the patient. This change will evolve over time as weight is lost, and the patient adjusts to changes in eating patterns, body image, and the perceptions of others. The nurse should see that the patient has appropriate referral information for support services and should follow up to see that the patient and family availed themselves of these services. The patient's stay in acute care is usually very short. Clearly the patient and family need to go home with specific information about drinking/eating, caring for drainage tubes, skin and wound care, ambulation, self-care, and signs and symptoms that require medical attention. Nursing care should include written information and demonstrations of such activities as care of the wounds and drains. The nurse should assure that the patient leaves the hospital with a call number if questions arise at home. Ideally the nurse, patient

  13. PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS ELIGIBLE FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Graziela Aparecida Nogueira de Almeida; GIAMPIETRO, Helenice Brizolla; BELARMINO, Lídia Barbieri; SALGADO-JÚNIOR, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The psychologist who works in bariatric surgery has a role to receive, evaluate, prepare and educate the patient who will undergo the surgical procedure. Psychological evaluation becomes important in so far as allows us to obtain data on personal and familiar history and allow tracing of possible psychopathology. Aim: To collect data on psychological evaluations of patients in a bariatric surgery service of a public hospital in order to describe the psychological profile of patients in this service. Method: Data were collected from 827 patients between 2001 and 2015, using data from an interview, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Binge Eating Scale (BES). Results: The mean age of patients before surgery was 39 years+/- 10, the mean BMI was 51 kg/m²+7, and most patients (81%) were female. The average score on the BDI was 14.8+8 and women had significantly higher scores than men. On the BAI the average score was 11+8 and on the ECAP was 14+8, both with no difference between groups. Conclusions: Psychosocial characteristics of the patients points to the significant presence of indicators of depression, with low levels of anxiety and binge eating. PMID:27683771

  14. Significant Resolution of Female Sexual Dysfunction after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Wing, Rena R.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Sax, Harry C.; Roye, G. Dean; Ryder, Beth A.; Pohl, Dieter; Giovanni, Jeannine

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the majority of women seeking bariatric surgery had female sexual dysfunction (FSD) as defined by the validated Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Objective The current study examined whether FSD resolves after bariatric surgery. Setting The Miriam Hospital, Providence RI, USA. Methods Fifty-four reportedly sexually active women (43.3±9.5 years) completed the FSFI pre- and 6-months post-operatively after a mean excess weight loss (%EWL) of 42.3% [Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) n=38; %EWL=34.6±15.7; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) n=16; %EWL=60.0±21.2). The FSFI assesses sexual function across six domains with higher scores indicating better sexual function. Summing of these scores yields a FSFI-total score (range=2–36 with ≤26.55=FSD). Results Before surgery, 34 women (63%) had scores indicative of FSD. By 6-months after surgery, FSD had resolved in 23 of these 34 (68%) women, and only 1 woman developed FSD. In the entire sample, there were significant (p<0.05) improvements from pre- to post-surgery on all FSFI domains. FSFI-total scores improved after LAGB (24.2±5.9 to 29.1±4.1, p<0.001) and RYGB (23.7±7.7 to 30.0±4.7, p<0.001). In regression analyses, being married, younger age, and worse preoperative sexual function were related to greater sexual function improvements. Postoperatively, participants’ FSFI-total scores were indistinguishable from published normative controls (29.4±4.3 vs. 30.5±5.3, p=0.18). Conclusion FSD resolved in a large percentage of women. Sexual functioning in the entire sample improved to levels consistent with normative controls. This improvement in sexual function did not depend on surgery type or weight loss amount, and appears to be an additional benefit for women undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:20678969

  15. The impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindekilde, N; Gladstone, B P; Lübeck, M; Nielsen, J; Clausen, L; Vach, W; Jones, A

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to review the obesity literature in order to assess the impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life and the between-study variation by examining the standardized mean magnitude of effect in change in the levels of quality of life. The following databases EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies examining change in quality of life in adults receiving bariatric surgery for obesity. Seventy-two studies were included with a total of 9,433 participants treated for obesity with bariatric surgery. The average impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life corresponded to an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80-0.96), indicating that bariatric surgery has a significant positive influence on quality of life in general. The impact varied considerably across studies with bariatric surgery showing a significantly greater positive influence on physical quality of life compared to mental quality of life. Bariatric surgery is effective in improving quality of life, especially when looking at physical well-being. Greater focus on the psychological well-being of the person undergoing surgery for obesity may lead to a better post-surgery prognosis for more people.

  16. ANALYSIS OF FOOD TOLERANCE IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY USING THE QUESTIONNAIRE QUALITY OF ALIMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    STUMPF, Matheo Augusto Morandi; RODRIGUES, Marcos Ricardo da Silva; KLUTHCOVSKY, Ana Claudia Garabeli Cavalli; TRAVALINI, Fabiana; MILLÉO, Fábio Quirillo

    2015-01-01

    Background : Due to the increased prevalence of obesity in many countries, the number of bariatric surgeries is increasing. They are considered the most effective treatment for obesity. In the postoperative there may be difficulties with the quality of alimentation, tolerance to various types of food, as well as vomiting and regurgitation. Few surveys are available to assess these difficulties in the postoperative. Aim : To perform a systematic literature review about food tolerance in patients undergoing bariatric surgery using the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation", and compare the results between different techniques. Method : A descriptive-exploratory study where the portals Medline and Scielo were used. The following headings were used in english, spanish and portuguese: quality of alimentation, bariatric surgery and food tolerance. A total of 88 references were found, 14 used the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation" and were selected. Results : In total, 2745 patients were interviewed of which 371 underwent to gastric banding, 1006 to sleeve gastrectomy, 1113 to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 14 to biliopancreatic diversion associated with duodenal switch, 83 were non-operated obese, and 158 non-obese patients. The questionnaire showed good acceptability. The biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared to other techniques, but it was evaluated in a single article with a small sample. The longer the time after the operation, the better is the food tolerance. Comparing the sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there are still controversial results in the literature. The gastric banding had the worst score of food tolerance among all the techniques evaluated. Conclusion: The questionnaire is easy and fast to assess the food tolerance in patients after bariatric surgery. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared

  17. The effects of bariatric surgeries on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Aldoheyan, Tamadar; Hassanain, Mazen; Al-Mulhim, Amnah; Al-Sabhan, Atheer; Al-Amro, Shaden; Bamehriz, Fahad; Al-Khalidi, Hisham

    2017-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease and is associated with obesity. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective method for weight reduction. However, no conclusive data exists on the effects of weight reduction surgery on NAFLD. This study aimed to characterize liver histology, metabolic status, and liver function changes in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, before and after the weight-reduction procedure. This is a phase 1 report of a prospective cohort study of patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Biopsies were obtained at baseline (intraoperatively) and 3 months postoperatively. Clinical characteristics, biochemical profile, and histopathological data [steatosis, NAFLD activity score (NAS), hepatocyte ballooning, lobular inflammation, and degree of fibrosis] were obtained at each time point. Twenty-seven patients were included (9 men and 18 women), and the median age was 35 ± 8 years old. At baseline, 3 patients had dyslipidemia, 4 had diabetes, and 5 patients had hypertension, which did not change at follow-up. The average body mass index decreased from 44.6 ± 7.8 to 34.2 ± 6.3 kg/m(2) at follow-up (P < 0.001). On histopathology, 12 of the 18 patients with preoperative steatosis (median score 2) had reduced steatosis scores postoperatively (P = 0.025); fibrosis (median score 1) was also reduced in 17 patients (P = 0.012), and NAS was decreased from 4 (3-5) to 2 (1-3) (P = 0.004). The changes in lobular inflammation and hepatocyte ballooning were not statistically significant on follow-up. The phase 1 results of this study described the histopathological changes following weight reduction surgery and suggested that hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and NAFLD activity score were reduced 3 months after surgery. This clinical trial is financially supported by the National Plan for Science, Technology and Innovation Program grant number (11-MED1910-02).

  18. A Health Services Research Agenda for Bariatric Surgery Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Funk, L M; Gunnar, W; Dominitz, J A; Eisenberg, D; Frayne, S; Maggard-Gibbons, M; Kalarchian, M A; Livingston, E; Sanchez, V; Smith, B R; Weidenbacher, H; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    In 2016, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) held a Weight Management State of the Art conference to identify evidence gaps and develop a research agenda for population-based weight management for veterans. Included were behavioral, pharmacologic, and bariatric surgery workgroups. This article summarizes the bariatric surgery workgroup (BSWG) findings and recommendations for future research. The BSWG agreed that there is evidence from randomized trials and large observational studies suggesting that bariatric surgery is superior to medical therapy for short- and intermediate-term remission of type 2 diabetes, long-term weight loss, and long-term survival. Priority evidence gaps include long-term comorbidity remission, mental health, substance abuse, and health care costs. Evidence of the role of endoscopic weight loss options is also lacking. The BSWG also noted the limited evidence regarding optimal timing for bariatric surgery referral, barriers to bariatric surgery itself, and management of high-risk bariatric surgery patients. Clinical trials of pre- and post-surgery interventions may help to optimize patient outcomes. A registry of overweight and obese veterans and a workforce assessment to determine the VHA's capacity to increase bariatric surgery access were recommended. These will help inform policy modifications and focus the research agenda to improve the ability of the VHA to deliver population-based weight management.

  19. Hospital Charge and Health-Care Quality in Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Telem, Dana A; Yang, Jie; Altieri, Maria; Talamini, Mark; Zhang, Qiao; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-02-01

    To determine if hospital charges correlate with patient outcomes after bariatric surgery. A retrospective review of 46,180 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2004-2010 was performed. Patients were identified using the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. Hospitals were categorized on estimates from a multiple linear regression model for charge: low (<$25,027.00), medium ($25,027.00-$35,449.00), and high (≥$35,449.01). Patient outcomes were compared among the charge classification. Of the 46,180 patients, 24 per cent underwent operations in low-, 26 per cent in medium-, and 23,082 (50%) in high-charge hospitals. Controlling for patient demographics, comorbidity, insurance, and operative procedure, multivariable logistic regression demonstrated no significant difference in major complication or mortality among charges. Hospital charge does not correlate with improved outcomes. This is significant given the adverse association between price inflation and rising insurance premiums. Inflated hospital charges may also discriminate against certain patient populations including the uninsured and those with high-deductible insurance plans.

  20. A numerical scale to assess the outcomes of metabolic/bariatric surgery (NOMS)

    PubMed Central

    Michalik, Maciej; Buchwald, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absent today is a simple numerical system of outcomes assessment that recognizes that bariatric surgery is metabolic surgery and incorporates weight loss, hypertension control, and type 2 diabetes control. Aim To introduce a simple, new Numerical Scale to Assess the Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery (NOMS). Material and methods For the stratification of weight outcomes, we used the percentage excess weight loss (%EWL); for hypertension, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) combined with medication usage; and for type 2 diabetes, the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) value combined with medication usage. Results Utilizing the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, the Working Group of the European Society of Hypertension, the European Society of Cardiology, and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, we propose for %EWL: W1 ≥ 50, W2 > 25 and < 50, and W3 ≤ 25; for hypertension H1 SBP/DPB < 140/90 mm Hg on no medication, H2 SBP/DBP ≥ 140/90 mm Hg with improvement of SBP or possible reduction of antihypertensive medication, and H3 no change or SBP higher than before surgery; for diabetes mellitus D1 HbA1c ≤ 7% and no medication, D2 HbA1c > 7% with a decrease of the HbA1c level or possible reduction of medication, D3 no change in HbA1c or HbA1c higher than before surgery. Designations of H0 and D0 are given if hypertension or diabetes was not present before surgery. Patient examples for numerical scores are provided. Conclusions The introduction of our numerical scale (NOMS) can be of benefit in metabolic/bariatric outcomes assessment; communications among metabolic/bariatric surgery centers, physicians, and patients; and for more precise reporting in the evidence-based literature. PMID:26649080

  1. [Quality indicators in bariatric surgery: weight loss valoration].

    PubMed

    Menéndez, P; Gambi, D; Villarejo, P; Cubo, T; Padilla, D; Menéndez, J M; Martín, J

    2009-01-01

    The medical management of MO may be effective in the short and intermediate terms, although it usually fails then leading to surgical management. Our goal is to assess Capella's surgical technique by means of quality indicators including weight loss. The present work has been performed with surgical MO patients at the 12 de Octubre University Hospital during 2000-2001, and registering the follow-up checkups for the period 2000-2001/2003-2004. We reviewed the clinical charts of 23 patients. The average Body Mass Index (BMI) was 52.24 +/- 10.07 kg/m(2), (range, 41-74.41). When compiling the statistical results, we observed statistically significant post-surgical decreases with no differences whether the PEIMCP outcome was excellent (>or= 65%), fair (= 50-65%) or failure (bariatric surgery, we may state that Capella's gastric by-pass is efficient in obese patients with BMI or= 60 kg/m(2).

  2. [Sleeve gastrectomy: a new approach to bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Mognol, P; Marmuse, J P

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, obesity surgery has developed tremendously. The two most frequently practiced procedures are the adjustable gastric ring and gastric by-pass. A new intervention has recently appeared: the sleeve gastrectomy, an essentially restrictive intervention consisting of a vertical gastrectomy including the entire greater curvature of the stomach while leaving in place an approximately 100-ml gastric tube along the lesser curvature. This intervention was initially proposed as the first part of a duodenal switch in patients whose body mass index was greater than 60 kg/m2. Since then, these indications have developed and this intervention now enjoys a certain fervor on the part of bariatric surgery teams. The objective of this mini-review is to detail the technical aspects of this procedure, its morbidity and mortality, and the long-term results, although there are currently few teams with more than 3 years of experience.

  3. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Renal Function in Obese Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhibin; Di, Jianzhong; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Weijie; Ren, Qinggui; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is an independent risk factor of development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on the benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with impaired kidney function have been conflicting. Objective To explore whether there is improvement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proteinuria or albuminuria after bariatric surgery. Methods We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, Embase, web of science and Cochrane for randomized, controlled trials and observational studies that examined bariatric surgery in obese subjects with impaired kidney function. Outcomes included the pre- and post-bariatric surgery GFR, proteinuria and albuminuria. In obese patients with hyperfiltration, we draw conclusions from studies using measured GFR (inulin or iothalamate clearance) unadjusted for BSA only. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results 32 observational studies met our inclusion criteria, and 30 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No matter in dichotomous data or in dichotomous data, there were statistically significant reduction in hyperfiltration, albuminuria and proteinuria after bariatric surgery. Limitations The main limitation of this meta-analysis is the lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Another limitation is the lack of long-term follow-up. Conclusions Bariatric surgery could prevent further decline in renal function by reducing proteinuria, albuminuria and improving glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients with impaired renal function. However, whether bariatric surgery reverses CKD or delays ESRD progression is still in question, large, randomized prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed. PMID:27701452

  4. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1.

  5. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1.

  6. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Diabetic Retinopathy: Good, Bad, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Dora M.; le Roux, Carel W.

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, initially intended as a weight-loss procedure, is superior to standard lifestyle intervention and pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Intensive medical management of hyperglycemia is associated with improved microvascular outcomes. Whether or not the reduction in hyperglycemia observed after bariatric surgery translates to improved microvascular outcomes is yet to be determined. There is substantial heterogeneity in the data relating to the impact of bariatric surgery on diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes. This review aims to collate the recent data on retinal outcomes after bariatric surgery. This comprehensive evaluation revealed that the majority of DR cases remain stable after surgery. However, risk of progression of pre-existing DR and the development of new DR is not eliminated by surgery. Instances of regression of DR are also noted. Potential risk factors for deterioration include severity of DR at the time of surgery and the magnitude of glycated hemoglobin reduction. Concerns also exist over the detrimental effects of postprandial hypoglycemia after surgery. In vivo studies evaluating the chronology of DR development and the impact of bariatric surgery could provide clarity on the situation. For now, however, the effect of bariatric surgery on DR remains inconclusive. PMID:27766242

  7. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Outcomes for Type 1 Diabetes after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Alexandra; Switzer, Noah J.; Dang, Jerry; Shi, Xinzhe; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel W.; Gill, Richdeep S.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-01-01

    Background. The utility of bariatric surgery in type 1 diabetes remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate glycemic control outcomes in obese patients with type 1 diabetes after bariatric surgery. Methods. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was completed. Inclusion criteria included human adult subjects with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 and a confirmed diagnosis of type 1 diabetes who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure. Results. Thirteen primary studies (86 patients) were included. Subjects had a mean age of 41.16 ± 6.76 years with a mean BMI of 42.50 ± 2.65 kg/m2. There was a marked reduction in BMI postoperatively at 12 months and at study endpoint to 29.55 ± 1.76 kg/m2 (P < 0.00001) and 30.63 ± 2.09 kg/m2 (P < 0.00001), respectively. Preoperative weighted mean total daily insulin requirement was 98 ± 26 IU/d, which decreased significantly to 36 ± 15 IU/d (P < 0.00001) and 42 ± 11 IU/d (P < 0.00001) at 12 months and at study endpoint, respectively. An improvement in HbA1c was also seen from 8.46 ± 0.78% preoperatively to 7.95 ± 0.55% (P = 0.01) and 8.13 ± 0.86% (P = 0.03) at 12 months and at study endpoint, respectively. Conclusion. Bariatric surgery in patients with type 1 diabetes leads to significant reductions in BMI and improvements in glycemic control. PMID:27375900

  8. The Use of Rat and Mouse Models in Bariatric Surgery Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Thomas A.; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been proven to be a crucial tool for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying bariatric surgery in general and individual techniques in particular. By using a translational approach, most of these studies have been performed in rodents and have helped to understand how bariatric surgery may or may not work. However, data from studies using animal models should always be critically evaluated for their transferability to the human physiology. It is, therefore, the aim of this review to summarize both advantages and limitations of data generated by animal based experiments designed to investigate and understand the physiological mechanisms at the root of bariatric surgery. PMID:27547753

  9. The Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and the Management of Hypoglycemic Events

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Mahmoud Attia Mohamed; Durda, Michael Andrew; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Cavus, Omer; Sahin, Levent; Rogers, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies discussed the benefit of bariatric surgery on obese patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several factors play an essential role in predicting the impact of bariatric surgery on T2DM, such as ABCD score (age, BMI, C-peptide, and duration of the disease), HbA1c, and fasting blood glucose, incretins [glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP)]. DiaRem score known to include factors such as age, HbA1c, medication, and insulin usage used to predict the remission of T2DM, but it has some limitations. An extensive literature search was conducted on PubMed and Google Scholar using keywords such as gastric bypass, T2DM, bariatric surgery, GLP-1, GIP, and post bariatric hypoglycemia. Restrictive-malabsorptive procedures are most effective in treating T2DM patients based on changes induced in appetite through regulation of gastrointestinal hormones, with decreased hunger and increased satiation. We provide a review of bariatric surgery influence on T2DM and management of post-intervention hypoglycemic events. Post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia is a serious complication especially when patients develop life-threatening neuroglycopenia with loss of consciousness and seizure. The avoidance of this adverse event may be achieved by strict dietary modification including a restriction on carbohydrates as well as foods with high glycemic index. Further research will provide more information on post-bariatric surgery hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia pathophysiology and management. PMID:28298900

  10. Bariatric surgery in the Caribbean: is it safe in a low-volume, third world setting?

    PubMed

    Dan, Dilip; Singh, Yardesh; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Maharaj, Ravi; Teelucksingh, Surujpal

    2012-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a well-recognized modality of management of obesity. In addition to obesity, it effectively controls diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. It has been recommended that bariatric surgery should be done in "designated centers" of excellence where there is a high volume of case turnover. Caribbean nations are not spared from the global spread of the obesity epidemic; however, not many patients get the benefits of bariatric surgery. This study aimed to establish that bariatric surgery could be safely and efficiently undertaken in a low-volume center outside the "designated centers" with comparable patient outcomes even in a third world setting. Though "patient numbers" generally imply better outcome, in an environment where these numbers cannot be achieved, patients should not be denied the access to surgery once good outcomes are achieved.

  11. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: improving outcomes for mother and child

    PubMed Central

    González, Irene; Lecube, Albert; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; García-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increase in the number of obese women who become pregnant. In this setting, in recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of bariatric procedures, with approximately half of them performed in women of childbearing age, and a remarkable surge in the number of women who become pregnant after having undergone bariatric surgery (BS). These procedures entail the risk of nutritional deficiencies, and nutrition is a crucial aspect during pregnancy. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of the consequences of these techniques on maternal and fetal outcomes is essential. Current evidence suggests a better overall obstetric outcome after BS, in comparison to morbid obese women managed conservatively, with a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, macrosomia, and congenital defects. However, the risk of potential maternal nutritional deficiencies and newborns small for gestational age cannot be overlooked. Results concerning the incidence of preterm delivery and the number of C-sections are less consistent. In this paper, we review the updated evidence regarding the impact of BS on pregnancy. PMID:28008286

  12. Binge Eating Disorder and Medical Comorbidities in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Pories, Walter; Wolfe, Bruce; Flum, David R.; Spaniolas, Konstatinos; Bessler, Mark; Devlin, Michael; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Engel, Scott; Khandelwal, Saurobh; Yanovski, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether binge eating disorder (BED) status is associated with medical comorbidities in obese adults scheduled for bariatric surgery. Method The study utilized Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 data obtained from 6 clinical centers around the United States. This is a well-phenotyped cohort of individuals who were evaluated within 30 days prior to their scheduled surgery using standardized protocols. In the cohort, 350 participants were classified as having BED and 1875 as not having BED (non-BED). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether BED status was independently related to medical comorbidities. As an exploratory analysis, significance was based on nominal P-values (p<.05). Holm-adjusted P-values were also reported. Results After adjusting for age, sex, education and body mass index, BED status was independently associated with 4 of 15 comorbidities (i.e., impaired glucose levels (odds ratio [OR]=1.45 (95%CI: 1.12–1.87), high triglycerides (OR=1.28 (95%CI: 1.002–1.63) and urinary incontinence (OR=1.30 (95%CI: 1.02,1.66) all being more common among the BED sample, and severe walking limitations being less common in the BED sample (OR=0.53 (95%CI: 0.29–0.96)). With further adjustment for psychiatric/emotional health indicators, BED status was independently associated with 3 comorbidities (impaired glucose levels (OR=1.36 (95%CI: 1.04–1.79), cardiovascular disease (OR=0.50 (95%CI: 0.30–0.86) and severe walking limitations (OR=0.38 (95%CI: 0.19–0.77)). However, Holm’s adjusted P-values for all variables were greater than .05. Discussion The results suggest the possibility of a contribution of BED to risk of specific medical comorbidities in severely obese adults. PMID:25778499

  13. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel; de FREITAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira; de ALMEIDA, Andréa Adriana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. Aim: To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. Method: A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were divided into two groups: intervention-group, who performed out-patient physiotherapy twice a week, from thirty to sixty days after surgery; and the control-group, who only followed home instructions. Both groups were evaluated before surgery and sixty days after surgery through manovacuometry, six-minute walk test and the Borg Scale of perceived exertion. Results: Twenty participants were included the intervention-group and twenty-three in the control-group. Both groups had significant and similar weight loss after surgery. The manovacuometry presented no differences comparing pre- and post-surgery and in the comparison between the groups. The result of the six-minute walk test for the intervention-group increased by 10.1% in the post-operative period in relation to pre-. The Borg scale of perceived exertion in the intervention-group in pre-surgery decreased by 13.5% in the post-surgery compared to pre-surgery. In the control-group there was no difference comparing pre- and post-operative values, as in the comparison with the intervention-group. Conclusion: The low-intensity exercise program, carried out between the 30th and the 60th day after bariatric surgery provided better functional capacity; did not change respiratory muscle strength; and improved the perceived exertion rate. PMID:27683775

  14. Presence of Serum Ferritin before and after Bariatric Surgery: Analysis in Dentate and Edentulous Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mosquim, Victor; Sales Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Chaim, Elinton Adami

    2016-01-01

    Society has changed its own lifestyle, specially its eating habits and physical activities, leading to excessive weight and a sedentary behavior, which has contributed to obesity increase. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to obesity, allowing weight loss and its maintenance. However, it has been related high levels of iron deficiency after surgery. A person’s nutritional status might be affected by total or partial tooth loss. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study was to evaluate the levels of serum ferritin before and after bariatric surgery and to identify if there is a relation with tooth loss. The sample was composed of 50 patients selected and assisted at Amaral Carvalho Hospital, located in Jaú city, Brazil. The use and necessity of prosthesis, dental absence or presence, and serum ferritin dosage were evaluated. Student’s t test, Univariate analysis, Chi-square and Odds Ratio were adopted (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding the serum ferritin levels between dentate and edentulous patients prior to surgery (p = 0.436). After surgery, the serum ferritin levels were higher in edentulous patients (prosthesis users) when compared to the pre-surgical levels, and the post-surgical levels presented significant difference regarding the dentate patients (p = 0.024). It can be concluded that rehabilitated patients in postoperative period showed better levels of serum ferritin after surgical intervention. PMID:27695053

  15. Other aspects of bariatric surgery: liver steatosis, ferritin and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, A E; Benetti, A; Folini, L; Merlotti, C; Frigè, F

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery developed in the late 1970 to treat severe hyperlipidemias in overweight individuals, not necessarily obese. Several techniques have been developed, and the concept has come first of a surgery for morbid obesity, then of a cure for diabetes in morbid obesity. There are other aspects of bariatric surgery that deserve attention, beyond BMI and diabetes, such as hypertension, poor life expectancy, increased prevalence of cancer, congestive heart failure, social inadequacy. The aim of this presentation is to review some recent development in clinical research, in the fields of liver steatosis, ferritin metabolism, and cholesterol metabolism. Liver steatosis, also called fatty liver encompasses a graduation of diseases with different clinical relevance and prognosis. NAFLD correlates with atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. There is now evidence that weight loss, obtained through diet or restrictive surgery, reduces the prevalence (and the severity) of NAFLD. An other issue is represented by serum ferritin concentrations, that are strongly associated with fibrosis, portal and lobular inflammation in NAFLD patients, especially in the presence of obesity. Body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non iron overload concentrations. Moreover, serum ferritin is an important and independent predictor of the development of diabetes. Weight loss is accompanied by reduction of ferritin, more after restrictive than malabsorptive surgery. Metabolic changes are greater after malabsorptive or mixed surgery than after purely restrictive surgery, and this has been ascribed to a greater weight loss. Studies comparing the two kinds of surgery indicate that, for the same amount of weight loss, decrease of cholesterol is greater with the former than with the latter techniques, and this difference is mainly due to a greater reduction of intestinal absorption of cholesterol. In the choice of surgery for the single patient, among

  16. Appetite and body weight regulation after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Münzberg, H; Laque, A; Yu, S; Rezai-Zadeh, K; Berthoud, H-R

    2015-02-01

    Bariatric surgery continues to be remarkably efficient in treating obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus and a debate has started whether it should remain the last resort only or also be used for the prevention of metabolic diseases. Intense research efforts in humans and rodent models are underway to identify the critical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects with a view towards non-surgical treatment options. This non-systematic review summarizes and interprets some of this literature, with an emphasis on changes in the controls of appetite. Contrary to earlier views, surgery-induced reduction of energy intake and subsequent weight loss appear to be the main drivers for rapid improvements of glycaemic control. The mechanisms responsible for suppression of appetite, particularly in the face of the large weight loss, are not well understood. Although a number of changes in food choice, taste functions, hedonic evaluation, motivation and self-control have been documented in both humans and rodents after surgery, their importance and relative contribution to diminished appetite has not yet been demonstrated. Furthermore, none of the major candidate mechanisms postulated in mediating surgery-induced changes from the gut and other organs to the brain, such as gut hormones and sensory neuronal pathways, have been confirmed yet. Future research efforts should focus on interventional rather than descriptive approaches in both humans and rodent models.

  17. Energetic Adaptations Persist after Bariatric Surgery in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Nancy F.; Brandt, Mary L.; Wong, William W.; Liu, Yan; Mehta, Nitesh R.; Wilson, Theresa A.; Adolph, Anne L.; Puyau, Maurice R.; Vohra, Firoz A.; Shypailo, Roman J.; Zakeri, Issa F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods post-surgery. Energetic, metabolic and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. Design and Methods At baseline and at 1.5, 6 and 12 months post-baseline, 24-h room calorimetry, body composition and fasting blood biochemistries were measured in eleven obese adolescents relative to five matched controls. Results In RYGB group, mean weight loss was 44±19 kg at 12 months. Total energy expenditure (TEE), activity EE, basal metabolic rate (BMR), sleep EE and walking EE significantly declined by 1.5 months (p=0.001) and remained suppressed at 6 and 12 months. Adjusted for age, sex, FFM and FM, EE was still lower than baseline (p=0.001). Decreases in serum insulin, leptin, and T3, gut hormones, and urinary norepinephrine (NE) paralleled the decline in EE. Adjusted changes in TEE, BMR and/or sleep EE were associated with decreases in insulin, HOMA, leptin, TSH, total T3, PYY3–36, GLP2 and urinary NE and epinephrine (p=0.001–0.05). Conclusions Energetic adaptations in response to RYGB-induced weight loss are associated with changes in insulin, adipokines, thyroid hormones, gut hormones and sympathetic nervous system activity, and persist 12 months post-surgery. PMID:25707380

  18. Appetite and body weight regulation after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Heike; Laque, Amanda; Yu, Sangho; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery continues to be remarkably efficient in treating obesity and T2DM and a debate has started whether it should remain the last resort only or also be used for the prevention of metabolic diseases. Intense research efforts in humans and rodent models are underway to identify the critical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects with a view towards non-surgical treatment options. This non-systematic review summarizes and interprets some of this literature, with an emphasis on changes in the controls of appetite. Contrary to earlier views, surgery-induced reduction of energy intake and subsequent weight loss appear to be the main drivers for rapid improvements of glycemic control. The mechanisms responsible for suppression of appetite, particularly in the face of the large weight loss, are not well understood. Although a number of changes in food choice, taste functions, hedonic evaluation, motivation, and self-control have been documented in both humans and rodents after surgery, their importance and relative contribution to diminished appetite has not yet been demonstrated. Furthermore, none of the major candidate mechanisms postulated in mediating surgery induced changes from the gut and other organs to the brain, such as gut hormones and sensory neuronal pathways, have been confirmed yet. Future research efforts should focus on interventional rather than descriptive approaches in both humans and rodent models. PMID:25614206

  19. Totally changed, yet still the same: patients' lived experiences 5 years beyond bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Råheim, Målfrid

    2013-09-01

    Bariatric surgery provides sustainable weight loss and increased quality of life for most, but not all patients. To increase the knowledge of this complex patient group and their needs during follow-up, we aimed to describe the essential meaning of bariatric surgery patients' long-term experiences by using a phenomenological lifeworld approach. Eight patients were interviewed between 5 and 7 years after bariatric surgery. Life after bariatric surgery was described as living with tension, ambivalence, and reinforced attention toward one's own body. The tension was related to embodied change and altered relations to the social world. The patients express an ongoing demand for control of health-related habits and practices, and to not lose control over the body again. Surgical weight loss and improved physical function do not necessarily mean changed health-related habits and practices in the long term. Experiencing weight regain is connected with emotional stress, shame, and self-contempt.

  20. Operative Treatments for Reflux After Bariatric Surgery: Current and Emerging Management Options.

    PubMed

    Treitl, Daniela; Nieber, Derek; Ben-David, Kfir

    2017-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that has a well-established connection with obesity. To ameliorate the morbidity associated with obesity, bariatric procedures have become an established pathway to accomplish sustained weight loss. In some procedures, such as with the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, weight loss is also accompanied by the resolution of GERD symptoms. However, other popular bariatric surgeries, such as the sleeve gastrectomy, have a controversial impact on their effect on reflux. Consequently, increased attention has been given to the development of strategies for the management of de novo or recurrent reflux after bariatric surgery. This article aims to discuss medical and surgical strategies for reflux after bariatric surgery, and their outcomes.

  1. The prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Khanbhai, M; Dubb, S; Patel, K; Ahmed, A; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    As bariatric surgery rates continue to climb, anaemia will become an increasing concern. We assessed the prevalence of anaemia and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Prospective data (anaemia [haemoglobin <12 g/dL], haematinics and length of hospital stay) was analysed on 400 hundred patients undergoing elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Results from a prospective database of 1530 patients undergoing elective general surgery were used as a baseline. Fifty-seven patients (14%) were anaemic pre-operatively, of which 98% were females. Median MCV (fL) and overall median ferritin (μg/L) was lower in anaemic patients (83 vs. 86, p=0.001) and (28 vs. 61, p<0.0001) respectively. In the elective general surgery patients, prevalence of anaemia was similar (14% vs. 16%) but absolute iron deficiency was more common in those undergoing bariatric surgery; microcytosis p<0.0001, ferritin <30 p<0.0001. Mean length of stay (days) was increased in the anaemic compared to in the non-anaemic group (2.7 vs. 1.9) and patients who were anaemic immediately post-operatively, also had an increased length of stay (2.7 vs. 1.9), p<0.05. Absolute iron deficiency was more common in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. In bariatric patients with anaemia there was an overall increased length of hospital stay.

  2. Visual Loss, Retinal Hemorrhages, and Optic Disc Edema Resulting From Thiamine Deficiency Following Bariatric Surgery Complicated by Prolonged Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Andrew W.; Frisard, Nicholas E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vision loss resulting from thiamine deficiency is a recognized complication of bariatric surgery. Most patients with such vision loss have Wernicke encephalopathy with characteristic changes seen on neuroimaging. Other patients may have retinal hemorrhages, optic disc edema, and peripheral neuropathy without Wernicke encephalopathy. The risk for thiamine deficiency is potentiated by the presence of prolonged vomiting. Case Report: A 37-year-old female presented with abrupt onset of vision loss and peripheral neuropathy following bariatric surgery. She had a history of prolonged vomiting postoperatively. Examination of the posterior segment of the eye revealed optic disc edema and large retinal hemorrhages bilaterally. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. She responded quickly to parenteral thiamine therapy with recovery of normal vision and resolution of ophthalmologic findings. Conclusion: Patients who undergo bariatric surgery and have a thiamine deficiency can present with visual symptoms and ophthalmologic findings only visible by fundoscopy prior to developing more severe and potentially irreversible complications from the vitamin deficiency. Early detection of intraocular changes resulting from thiamine deficiency and initiation of therapy could prevent more devastating neurologic manifestations. Our case supports the consideration of a prospective study aimed at determining the true incidence of ocular and visual changes such as retinal hemorrhage, optic disc edema, and peripapillary telangiectasia in patients following bariatric surgery. PMID:28331457

  3. Oral liquid L-thyroxine (L-t4) may be better absorbed compared to L-T4 tablets following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Pirola, Ilenia; Formenti, Anna M; Gandossi, Elena; Mittempergher, Francesco; Casella, Claudio; Agosti, Barbara; Cappelli, Carlo

    2013-09-01

    Drug malabsorption is a potential concern after bariatric surgery. We present four case reports of hypothyroid patients who were well replaced with thyroxine tablets to euthyroid thyrotropin (TSH) levels prior to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. These patients developed elevated TSH levels after the surgery, the TSH responded reversibly to switching from treatment with oral tablets to a liquid formulation.

  4. Metabolic bariatric surgery and type 2 diabetes mellitus: an endocrinologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Sonali; Tan, Hong Chang; Lee, Phong Ching; Tham, Kwang Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traditional treatment of T2DM consisting of modification of diet, an exercise regimen, and pharmacotherapy has problems of poor lifestyle modifications and fail tend of treatment over time, now bariatric surgery is recommended for treatment of obese patients with T2DM because its great improvements on weight loss and metabolic. In this article, effects of bariatric surgery on diabetes and diabetes-related complications are reviewed. PMID:25859264

  5. The effect of bariatric surgery on gut hormones that alter appetite.

    PubMed

    Pournaras, D-J; Le Roux, C-W

    2009-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity in the long term. Gut hormones are key players in the metabolic mechanisms causing obesity. Furthermore gut hormones are involved in the signalling process of hunger and satiety which leads to the control of nutrient intake. In this review, the role of these hormones as facilitators of appetite control after bariatric and metabolic surgery will be explored.

  6. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  7. Experiences of obesity among Saudi Arabian women contemplating bariatric surgery: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Alqout, Ohud; Reynolds, Frances

    2014-05-01

    This study explored experiences of obesity, its perceived causes and motives for surgery, as described by seven Saudi women contemplating bariatric surgery. The women experienced cultural restrictions on their physical and social activities. Obesity embodied these restrictions, attracting stigma and moral failure. Traditional clothing, foods, hospitality norms and limited outdoor female activities were regarded as barriers to weight loss. Bariatric surgery was chosen to protect health and to access normative female roles. Some were encouraged by relatives who had undergone surgery. Opting for surgery reflected both participants' sense of powerlessness to self-manage weight and the social acceptability, within their family context, of this biomedical approach.

  8. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Meek, Claire L; Lewis, Hannah B; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Park, Adrian J

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric surgery for obesity has proved to be an extremely effective method of promoting long-term weight reduction with additional beneficial metabolic effects, such as improved glucose tolerance and remission of type 2 diabetes. A range of bariatric procedures are in common use, including gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Although the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of bariatric surgery are unclear, gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides are thought to play an important role. The aim of this review is to summarise the effects of different bariatric surgery procedures upon gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides, including ghrelin, gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucose-dependent insulinotropic hormone (GIP), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, insulin, glucagon and somatostatin.

  9. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes before and after bariatric surgery: evolution and microvascular complications.

    PubMed

    Chuah, L L; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly seen as a treatment option for patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe complex obesity (SCO). There is however no consensus on how to manage this cohort preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients with T2DM having cardiac surgery benefit from glycaemic optimisation prior to surgery. National Health Service Diabetes in the United Kingdom recommends that glucose is optimised prior to all elective surgery. However, bariatric surgery such as gastric bypass (RYGB) is distinct from general surgery. Glycaemic control improves immediately after RYGB and thus all T2DM patients need a review of their glucose lowering medications postoperatively. Preoperatively most bariatric centres use a low calorie diet (LCD) which improved glycaemic control and may predisposed patients using insulin or sulphonylureas to risks of hypoglycaemia. There are no protocols and consensus among bariatric centres on how best to manage patients with T2DM preoperatively and postoperatively. Moreover patients with difficult to control T2DM are at risk of microvascular complications of diabetes. So far, there is little evidence on the impact of bariatric surgery on diabetes nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy. In conclusion, bariatric surgery improves glycaemic control; however, there are limited studies, and no guidelines on how to manage patients with T2DM pre and postoperatively. Given the increasing proportion of T2DM patients referred for bariatric surgery, there is a need to review current practice on how to manage these patients in the short term and long term with a specific focus on improving end organ damage such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy.

  10. Kidney outcomes three years after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nehus, Edward J; Khoury, Jane C; Inge, Thomas H; Xiao, Nianzhou; Jenkins, Todd M; Moxey-Mims, Marva M; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2017-02-01

    A significant number of severely obese adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery have evidence of early kidney damage. To determine if kidney injury is reversible following bariatric surgery, we investigated renal outcomes in the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery cohort, a prospective multicenter study of 242 severely obese adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery. Primary outcomes of urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were evaluated preoperatively and up to 3 years following bariatric surgery. At surgery, mean age of participants was 17 years and median body mass index (BMI) was 51 kg/m(2). In those with decreased kidney function at baseline (eGFR under 90 mL/min/1.73m(2)), mean eGFR significantly improved from 76 to 102 mL/min/1.73m(2) at three-year follow-up. Similarly, participants with albuminuria (albumin-to-creatinine ratio of 30 mg/g and more) at baseline demonstrated significant improvement following surgery: geometric mean of ACR was 74 mg/g at baseline and decreased to 17 mg/g at three years. Those with normal renal function and no albuminuria at baseline remained stable throughout the study period. Among individuals with a BMI of 40 kg/m(2) and more at follow-up, increased BMI was associated with significantly lower eGFR, while no association was observed in those with a BMI under 40 kg/m(2). In adjusted analysis, eGFR increased by 3.9 mL/min/1.73m(2) for each 10-unit loss of BMI. Early kidney abnormalities improved following bariatric surgery in adolescents with evidence of preoperative kidney disease. Thus, kidney disease should be considered as a selection criteria for bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents who fail conventional weight management.

  11. Bariatric Surgery to Correct Morbid Obesity Also Ameliorates Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Cuihua

    2009-01-01

    Morbid obesity, a physiological dysfunction in humans associated with environmental, genetic and endocrinological origins, has significantly increased in the past few decades in the USA. Many methods have emerged for treating morbid obesity, such as diets, exercise, behavior modification, liposuction, drugs, and surgery; among these, bariatric surgery reduces weight and appears to have other curative effects. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the principal form of bariatric surgery, followed by laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, gastric sleeve operation, duodenojejunal bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. This weight-loss surgery may also affect comorbidities of morbid obesity, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), atherosclerosis, hypertension and steatohepatitis. Weight-loss surgery, for example, is associated with a more than 80% diabetes (data indicates > 80%) remission rate in severely obese persons. Empirical evidence also suggests that the use of bariatric surgery reduces atherosclerosis, and may ameliorate other comorbities. This warrants closer examination. PMID:19915685

  12. Wernicke Encephalopathy in Adolescents After Bariatric Surgery: Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Armstrong-Javors, Amy; Pratt, Janey; Kharasch, Sigmund

    2016-12-01

    Roughly 1% of all weight loss surgery is performed in adolescents. There is strong evidence demonstrating significant postsurgical weight loss, improvement in quality of life, and reduction in comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes. Reports of postoperative complications in adolescents are few because of the small sample size in most series. Despite vitamin supplementation, nutritional deficiencies requiring hospitalization occur occasionally after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Wernicke encephalopathy, a triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and altered mental status, is a serious consequence of thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Few cases of Wernicke encephalopathy after weight loss surgery have been reported in the literature and even fewer in the pediatric population. Here we describe a teenage girl who develops vomiting after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and presented with nystagmus, irritability, and ataxia. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in adolescents after bariatric surgery are discussed.

  13. The impact of bariatric surgery on nutritional status of patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Currently, surgical treatment is considered to be the most efficient method of dealing with morbid obesity. Aim To evaluate changes in nutritional status after surgical treatment of obesity in the early postoperative period. Material and methods The study included 50 patients (30 women and 20 men) treated surgically due to morbid obesity. During the preliminary visit and during control visits measurements of body mass, height, and waist and hip circumference were conducted. Also, analysis of body content was performed and blood was taken for biochemical analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted using the program Statistica 10. Results Six months after the surgery, in the group of women, significant reduction of average body mass, average waist circumference, average hip circumference and average body mass index (BMI) was observed. Also, significant reduction of the percentage of body fat and an increase in the percentage of fat-free body mass were observed. A significant decrease in muscle mass was also noted. Both in women and in men, 6 months after the surgery, a significant decrease in fasting glucose concentration, fasting insulin and triglycerides in blood serum was observed. Conclusions Bariatric procedures lead to significant body mass, BMI, waist and hip circumference reduction. Loss of body mass is caused mainly by the reduction of fat tissue. Application of surgical procedures in morbid obesity treatment also allowed us to achieve improvement in insulin, glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:25960802

  14. MASTICATORY FUNCTION OF OBESE CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY FROM DISTINCT SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES

    PubMed Central

    PASSERI, Celso Roberto; ANDRADE, Jacira Alves Caracik de Camargo; TOMAL, Karla Thaíza; PRACUCHO, Eduardo Marcucci; de CAMPOS, Livia Paschoalino; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity and metabolic syndrome can be labeled as worldwide outbreak; thus, both have led to serious public health problem. Oral health can be worsened by both, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Tooth loss harms masticatory function, essential status to whom will be submitted to bariatric surgery. Aim: Assess masticatory function of obese candidates to bariatric surgery, who belong to distinct socioeconomic class range, in order to recognize hazard factors and the bias of socioeconomic factor in this context. Methods: Observational cross-section study, with samples comprised by two groups of patients, with distinct socioeconomic class range, one of them belonging to public health system (SUSG) and the other to private clinic (CPG), candidates to bariatric surgery. Were assessed anthropometric data, comorbidities and medicines usage, blood tests, habits and the number of dental functional units. Results: The groups SUSG and CPG were homogeneous taking into account gender (p=0,890) and age range (p=0,170). The number of dental functional units was higher in the private group (p<0.001). The impaired masticatory function was rather present among public group (p<0.001) and female gender (p<0,001). Regarded as blood tests, fasting glucose was higher in female in SUSG (p<0,001). The following hazard factors have corroborated to have patients rated as impaired masticatory function: belong to public service (OR: 8.420, p=0.003), higher age (OR: 1.186, p<0.001), female gender (OR: 0.153, p=0.029), diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.545, p=0.045) and smokers (OR: 2.951, p=0.043). Conclusion: The general health and masticatory function of female SUSG were worse, highlighting the socioeconomic condition as hazard factor. PMID:27683777

  15. News media reports of patient deaths following 'medical tourism' for cosmetic surgery and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article identifies and describes twenty-six reported cases of deaths of individuals who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Over half of the reported deaths occurred in two countries. Analysis of these news reports cannot be used to make causal claims about why the patients died. In addition, cases identified in news media accounts do not provide a basis for establishing the relative risk of traveling abroad for care instead of seeking elective cosmetic surgery at domestic health care facilities. Acknowledging these limitations, the case reports suggest the possibility that contemporary peer-reviewed scholarship is underreporting patient mortality in medical travel. The paper makes a strong case for promoting normative analyses and empirical studies of medical travel. In particular, the paper argues that empirically informed ethical analysis of 'medical tourism' will benefit from rigorous studies tracking global flows of medical travelers and the clinical outcomes they experience. The paper contains practical recommendations intended to promote debate concerning how to promote patient safety and quality of care in medical travel.

  16. A History of Bariatric Surgery: The Maturation of a Medical Discipline.

    PubMed

    Celio, Adam C; Pories, Walter J

    2016-08-01

    This article examines the progression of bariatric surgery since its creation more than 60 years ago with a focus on the effect of surgery on weight loss, comorbidity reduction, and safety. The success has been remarkable. It is possible to cure severe obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia in addition to the many other manifestations of the metabolic syndrome with remarkable safety. Equally important are the opportunities for research afforded by the surgery and its outcomes. Until better treatments become available, bariatric surgery is the therapy of choice for patients with morbid obesity for weight control and comorbidity improvement.

  17. History and current status of bariatric and metabolic surgeries in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Akira; Lee, Wei-Jei; Sasaki, Akira; Wakabayashi, Go

    2015-08-01

    Morbid obesity and obesity-related comorbidities are major public health problems around the world, including in East Asia. Although Asian populations have been shown to have an elevated risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia at a relatively lower BMI than Western populations, the Asian perspective on bariatric and metabolic surgeries has not been actively discussed until recently. Bariatric surgery in East Asia has undergone a paradigm shift since the first laparoscopic vertical bariatric surgery was performed in Taiwan in 1998, which was subsequently followed by the introduction of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and mini-gastric bypass. Since 2006, use of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has remarkably increased because of its ease, speed, and safety. With regard to metabolic surgery, a randomized controlled trial in Taiwan demonstrated that laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is more effective than laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for surgical treatment of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. In this article, we describe the history of bariatric procedures, revision surgeries, weight-loss effect, and metabolic surgeries in Asian populations, and we also discuss minimally invasive bariatric surgery with some important citations.

  18. Objective Quantification of Physical Activity in Bariatric Surgery Candidates and Normal-Weight Controls

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Jakicic, John M.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Leahey, Tricia M.; Sax, Harry C.; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G.D.; Ryder, Beth A.; Wing, Rena R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is an important component of weight loss programs and may be encouraged for severely obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. However, few studies have determined the amount and intensity of activities undertaken preoperatively by bariatric surgery patients using objective measures. Methods Using RT3 tri-axial accelerometers, this study compared 38 bariatric surgery candidates and 20 normal-weight controls on: 1) activity counts/hour; 2) minutes/day spent in moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and vigorous intensity PA (VPA); and 3) level of compliance with national recommendations to accumulate 150 minutes/week of MVPA in bouts ≥ 10 minutes. Results Surgery candidates, compared to controls, recorded significantly (Ps < 0.01) fewer activity counts/hour (13799 ± 3758 vs 19462 ± 4259) and spent fewer minutes/day engaged in MVPA (26.4 ± 23.0 vs 52.4 ± 24.7) and VPA (1.2 ± 3.4 vs 11.8 ± 9.0). More than two-thirds (68%) of surgery candidates versus 13% of NW did not accumulate any MVPA in bouts ≥ 10 minutes and only 4.5% of Ob met the weekly MVPA recommendation compared to 40% of NW. Conclusion Bariatric surgery candidates have low PA levels and rarely engage in PA bouts of sufficient duration and intensity to maintain and improve health. Additional research is needed to determine how best to increase PA in bariatric surgery candidates. PMID:19837009

  19. Translating weight loss into agency: Men's experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2015-01-01

    Fewer men than women with severe obesity undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss, and knowledge about men's situation after surgery, beyond medical status, is lacking. Our aim was to explore men's experiences with life after bariatric surgery from a long-term perspective. We conducted in-depth interviews with 13 men, aged 28–60 years, between 5 and 7 years after surgery. The analysis was inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological method. We found that agency was pivotal for how the men understood themselves and their lives after surgery. Weight loss meant regaining opportunities for living and acting in unrestricted and independent daily lives, yet surgery remained a radical treatment with complex consequences. Turning to surgery had involved conceptualizing their own body size as illness, which the men had resisted doing for years. After surgery, the rapid and major weight loss and the feelings of being exhausted, weak, and helpless were intertwined. The profound intensity of the weight loss process took the men by surprise. Embodying weight loss and change involved an inevitable renegotiating of experiences connected to the large body. Having bariatric surgery was a long-term process that seemed unfinished 5 years after surgery. Restrictions and insecurity connected to health and illness persist, despite successful weight loss and embodied change. Bariatric surgery initiated a complex and long-lasting life-changing process, involving both increased capacity for agency and illness-like experiences. PMID:26066518

  20. Re-embodying eating: patients' experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2014-12-01

    Health experts advise and expect patients to eat healthily after bariatric surgery. For patients, difficulties with eating might have been a long-standing, problematic part of life-a part that is not necessarily healed by surgery. Empirical research on patients' experiences of eating practices after bariatric surgery is lacking. Aiming to contribute to the development of clinical practice, we explored meanings attached to eating in the long term and sought descriptions of change and bodily sensations. We interviewed 14 patients at least 5 years after bariatric surgery. The surgical restriction forced changes in the way patients sensed their own body in eating, but the uncertainty related to maintaining weight loss in the long term remained. Meanings attached to eating transcended food as choices situated in a nourishment and health perspective, and were not necessarily changed. Eating was an existential and embodied practice, which remained an ambiguous and sensitive matter after surgery.

  1. Place of upper endoscopy before and after bariatric surgery: A multicenter experience with 3219 patients

    PubMed Central

    Abd Ellatif, Mohamed E; Alfalah, Haitham; Asker, Walid A; El Nakeeb, Ayman E; Magdy, Alaa; Thabet, Waleed; Ghaith, Mohamed A; Abdallah, Emad; Shahin, Rania; Shoma, Asharf; Dawoud, Ibraheim E; Abbas, Ashraf; Salama, Asaad F; Ali Gamal, Maged

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the preoperative and postoperative role of upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in morbidly obese patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter retrospective study by reviewing the database of patients who underwent bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass, or laparoscopic minigastric bypass) in the period between 2001 June and 2015 August (Jahra Hospital-Kuwait, Hafr Elbatin Hospital and King Saud Medical City-KSA, and Mansoura University Hospital - Egypt). Patients with age 18-65 years, body mass index (BMI) > 40, or > 35 with comorbidities after failure of many dietetic regimen and acceptable levels of surgical risk were included in the study after having an informed signed consent. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of all morbidly obese patients. The patients’ preoperative data included clinical history including upper digestive symptoms and preoperative full workup including EGD. Only patients whose charts revealed weather they were symptomatic or not were studied. We categorized patients accordingly into two groups; with (group A) or without (group B) upper digestive symptoms. The endoscopic findings were categorized into 4 groups based on predetermined criteria. The medical record of patients who developed stricture, leak or bleeding after bariatric surgery was reviewed. Logestic regression analysis was used to identify preoperative predictors that might be associated with abnormal endoscopic findings. RESULTS: Three thousand, two hundred and nineteen patients in the study period underwent bariatric surgery (75% LSG, 10% LRYDB, and 15% MGB). Mean BMI was 43 ± 13, mean age 37 ± 9 years, 79% were female. Twenty eight percent had presented with upper digestive symptoms (group A). EGD was considered normal in 2414 (75%) patients (9% group A vs 66% group B, P = 0.001). The abnormal endoscopic findings were found high in those patients with upper digestive symptoms. Abnormal findings (one

  2. Bariatric surgery. Surgery for weight control in patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, B M; Murr, M M; Poggio, J L; Sarr, M G

    2000-03-01

    Morbid obesity has become a health crisis in the United States. Medical programs developed at nonoperative attempts to lose (and maintain) an adequate weight loss are largely unsuccessful. Bariatric surgery has been proven to be effective at inducing and maintaining a satisfactory weight loss to decrease weight-related comorbidity. Bariatric operations include procedures that decrease mechanically the volume capacitance of the proximal stomach (vertical banded gastroplasty, laparoscopic gastric banding) or decrease the proximal gastric capacitance and establish a partial selective malabsorption (gastric bypass and its modifications, partial biliopancreatic bypass, and duodenal switch with partial biliopancreatic bypass). These operations should induce a loss of at least 50% (or more) of excess body weight. Not all patients are candidates for these procedures, and the best results are obtained by a multidisciplinary team (including nutritionist, physician, dietitian, psychologist or psychiatrist interested in eating disorders, and surgeon).

  3. Adolescent bariatric surgery program characteristics: the Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) study experience.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Teich, Steven; Eneli, Ihuoma; Miller, Rosemary; Brandt, Mary L; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M; Zeller, Meg H; Jenkins, Todd M; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph C

    2014-02-01

    The number of adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) has increased in response to the increasing prevalence of severe childhood obesity. Adolescents undergoing WLS require unique support, which may differ from adult programs. The aim of this study was to describe institutional and programmatic characteristics of centers participating in Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS), a prospective study investigating safety and efficacy of adolescent WLS. Data were obtained from the Teen-LABS database, and site survey completed by Teen-LABS investigators. The survey queried (1) institutional characteristics, (2) multidisciplinary team composition, (3) clinical program characteristics, and (4) clinical research infrastructure. All centers had extensive multidisciplinary involvement in the assessment, pre-operative education, and post-operative management of adolescents undergoing WLS. Eligibility criteria and pre-operative clinical and diagnostic evaluations were similar between programs. All programs have well-developed clinical research infrastructure, use adolescent-specific educational resources, and maintain specialty equipment, including high weight capacity diagnostic imaging equipment. The composition of clinical team and institutional resources is consistent with current clinical practice guidelines. These characteristics, coupled with dedicated research staff, have facilitated enrollment of 242 participants into Teen-LABS.

  4. Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jammoul, Adham; Aminian, Ali; Shimizu, Hideharu; Fisher, Carolyn J.; Schauer, Philip R.; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Brethauer, Stacy A.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in this population remain unclear. A database of 2,918 was retrospectively reviewed, yielding 22 (0.75%) severely obese patients with MS who underwent bariatric surgery. Sixteen surgical patients with complete follow-up data were matched to a nonsurgical control group of MS patients, based on age, BMI, MS subtype, and length of follow-up. MS relapse rates and trends in the timed twenty-five foot walk test (T25FW) were compared. In the surgical group (gastric bypass n = 19, sleeve gastrectomy n = 3), preoperative BMI was 46.5 ± 7.2 Kg/m2 and average excess weight was 60.4 kg. Follow-up data was collected at 59.0 ± 29.8 months. There were two major and four minor complications. Five patients required readmission and there were no mortalities. Percent excess weight loss was 75.5 ± 27.0%. In the 16 patients with follow-up data, patients who underwent bariatric surgery were significantly faster on the T25FW compared to the nonsurgical population. In conclusion, bariatric surgery is relatively safe and effective in achieving weight loss in patients with MS. In addition, surgery may help patients maintain ambulation. Findings support the need for further studies on bariatric surgery and disease-specific outcomes in this population. PMID:28299203

  5. Ménage-à-trois of bariatric surgery, bile acids and the gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Raghow, Rajendra

    2015-04-15

    Bariatric surgeries have emerged as highly effective treatments for obesity associated type-2 diabetes mellitus. Evidently, the desired therapeutic endpoints such as rates of weight loss, lower levels of glycated hemoglobin and remission of diabetes are achieved more rapidly and last longer following bariatric surgery, as opposed to drug therapies alone. In light of these findings, it has been suspected that in addition to causing weight loss dependent glucose intolerance, bariatric surgery induces other physiological changes that contribute to the alleviation of diabetes. However, the putative post-surgical neuro-hormonal pathways that underpin the therapeutic benefits of bariatric surgery remain undefined. In a recent report, Ryan and colleagues shed new light on the potential mechanisms that determine the salutary effects of bariatric surgery in mice. The authors demonstrated that the improved glucose tolerance and weight loss in mice after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) surgery were likely to be caused by post-surgical changes in circulating bile acids and farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) signaling, both of which were also mechanistically linked to changes in the microbial ecology of the gut. The authors arrived at this conclusion from a comparison of genome-wide, metabolic consequences of VSG surgery in obese wild type (WT) and FXR knockout mice. Gene expression in the distal small intestines of WT and FXR knockout mice revealed that the pathways regulating bile acid composition, nutrient metabolism and anti-oxidant defense were differentially altered by VSG surgery in WT and FXR(-/-) mice. Based on these data Ryan et al, hypothesized that bile acid homeostasis and FXR signaling were mechanistically linked to the gut microbiota that played a role in modulating post-surgical changes in total body mass and glucose tolerance. The authors' data provide a plausible explanation for putative weight loss-independent benefits of bariatric surgery and its relationship with

  6. Genetic modifiers of obesity and bariatric surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Samantha; Hubal, Monica J

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is a highly heritable trait. While acute and chronic changes in body weight or obesity-related comorbidities are heavily influenced by environmental factors, there are still strong genomic modifiers that help account for inter-subject variability in baseline traits and in response to interventions. This review is intended to provide an up-to-date overview of our current understanding of genetic influences on obesity, with emphasis on genetic modifiers of baseline traits and responses to intervention. We begin by reviewing how genetic variants can influence obesity. We then examine genetic modifiers of weight loss via different intervention strategies, focusing on known and potential modifiers of surgical weight loss outcomes. We will pay particular attention to the effects of patient age on outcomes, addressing the risks and benefits of adopting early intervention strategies. Finally, we will discuss how the field of bariatric surgery can leverage knowledge of genetic modifiers to adopt a personalized medicine approach for optimal outcomes across this widespread and diverse patient population.

  7. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Hiatal Hernia Repair Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Victoria; Kuwada, Timothy; Gersin, Keith; Simms, Connie; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    Large hiatal hernias are notorious for their high recurrence rates after conventional repair. Recurrence rates have been described to be higher in obese patients due to increased intra-abdominal pressure. We hypothesized that patients who undergo hiatal hernia repair (HHR) with bariatric surgery (BAR) will have a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with fundoplication (FP) due to the decrease in intra-abdominal pressure observed with weight loss. This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review. The outcomes of patients who underwent HHR+BAR as well as patients who had HHR+FP only from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients who had small hiatal hernias (<2 cm), underwent an anterior repair, or had gastropexy only were excluded. The primary outcome was hernia recurrence and reflux resolution. The outcomes of 58 patients who had HHR+BAR were compared with 30 patients with HHR+FP. Hernia recurrence rate for HHR+BAR was 12 per cent, whereas hernia recurrence rate for HHR+FP was 38 per cent (P < 0.01). Reflux resolution for HHR+FP was 78 per cent, whereas reflux improvement rate for HHR+BAR was 84 per cent (P = n.s.). Combining HHR with BAR leads to a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with FP.

  8. Animal models of bariatric/metabolic surgery shed light on the mechanisms of weight control and glucose homeostasis: view from the chair.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, K A

    2011-09-01

    Bariatric/metabolic surgeries are remarkably effective in reducing weight over a sustained period of time, and they also have significant beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Interestingly, the metabolic benefits of these surgeries frequently occur before significant weight loss. Given these findings, it is perhaps not surprising that obesity researchers are asking, how does bariatric/metabolic surgery work? Establishing these mechanisms can offer new insights into the physiology of energy balance and the control of metabolism. In the second half of the 13(th) International Symposium of the Merck Frosst/CIHR Research Chair in Obesity, four papers that address the mechanisms of bariatric/metabolic surgery were presented. The papers that follow this viewpoint all make use of animal models to reveal the neurohumoral mechanisms underlying weight loss and improved glucose homeostasis after experimental bariatric surgery. The rodent models of the commonly used clinical procedures have shown that energy intake is increased, food reward is altered and that the proximal gut is important in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Taken together, these models shed light on the mechanisms of bariatric/metabolic surgery and offer new insights that, in the future, may lead to less invasive therapies.

  9. [Changes in the pattern of substance use after bariatric surgery: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Yamil; Kirsten, Kurt; Ponce de León, Consuelo; Fernández, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Even though the benefits of bariatric surgery are supported by scientific evidence, its indications and contraindications must be revised to avoid its indiscriminate use. Substance use is more common in patients subjected to bariatric surgery than in the general population. After surgery, an increase in alcohol abuse has been reported. We report a 41 years old male, with morbid obesity, alcohol and cocaine use. After bariatric surgery, his alcohol tolerance significantly decreased, increasing the doses of cocaine and starting to consume it without alcohol. His high anxiety level and paranoid delusions, motivated him to seek help in a rehabilitation center where a Substance Dependence Disorder was diagnosed and received initial treatment. The cause of this adverse effect needs further research. Functional and anatomic changes in the digestive tract lead to a greater alcohol absorption and reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Also neurochemical alterations may produce a displacement from compulsive use of food to compulsive use of addictive substances.

  10. Micronutrient Levels and Supplement Intake in Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Devlieger, Roland; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Jans, Goele; Voets, Willy; Vanholsbeke, Caroline; Vansant, Greet

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies report frequent micronutrient deficiencies after bariatric surgery, but less is known about micronutrient levels of pregnant women after bariatric surgery. Objective To prospectively evaluate micronutrient levels and supplement intake in pregnancy following bariatric surgery. Design A multicenter prospective cohort study including women with restrictive or malabsorptive types of bariatric surgery. Nutritional deficiencies, together with supplement intake, were screened during pregnancy. Results The total population included 18 women in the restrictive and 31 in the malabsorptive group. Most micronutrients were depleted and declined significantly during pregnancy. The proportion of women with low vitamin A and B-1 levels increased to respectively 58 and 17% at delivery (P = 0.005 and 0.002). The proportion of women with vitamin D deficiency decreased from 14% at trimester 1 to 6% at delivery (P = 0.030). Mild anemia was found in respectively 22 and 40% of the women at trimester 1 and delivery. In the first trimester, most women took a multivitamin (57.1%). In the second and third trimester, the majority took additional supplements (69.4 and 73.5%). No associations were found between supplement intake and micronutrient deficiencies. Conclusion Pregnant women with bariatric surgery show frequent low micronutrient levels. Supplementation partially normalizes low levels of micronutrients. PMID:25470614

  11. Moxifloxacin dosing in post-bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Pieter; Eleveld, Douglas J; Struys, Michel M R F; T'Jollyn, Huybrecht; Bortel, Luc M Van; Ruige, Johannes; De Waele, Jan; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Boussery, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Given the ever increasing number of obese patients and obesity related bypass surgery, dosing recommendations in the post-bypass population are needed. Using a population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis and PK–pharmacodynamic (PD) simulations, we investigated whether adequate moxifloxacin concentrations are achieved in this population. Methods In this modelling and simulation study we used data from a trial on moxifloxacin PK. In this trial, volunteers who had previously undergone bariatric surgery (at least 6 months prior to inclusion), received two doses (intravenous and oral) of 400 mg moxifloxacin administered on two occasions. Results In contrast to other papers, we found that moxifloxacin PK were best described by a three compartmental model using lean body mass (LBM) as a predictor for moxifloxacin clearance. Furthermore, we showed that the probability of target attainment for bacterial eradication against a hypothetical Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is compromised in patients with higher LBM, especially when targeting microorganisms with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.5 mg l−1 or higher (probability of target attainment (PTA) approaching zero). When considering the targets for suppression of bacterial resistance formation, even at MIC values as low as 0.25 mg l−1, standard moxifloxacin dosing does not attain adequate levels in this population. Furthermore, for patients with a LBM of 78 kg or higher, the probability of hitting this target approaches zero. Conclusions Throughout our PK–PD simulation study, it became apparent that, whenever optimal bacterial resistance suppression is deemed necessary, the standard moxifloxacin dosing will not be sufficient. Furthermore, our study emphasizes the need for a LBM based individualized dosing of moxifloxacin in this patient population. PMID:24313873

  12. Impact of bariatric surgery on life expectancy in severely obese patients with diabetes: A Decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Daniel P.; Arterburn, David E.; Livingston, Edward H.; Coleman, Karen J.; Sidney, Steve; Fisher, David; O'Connor, Patrick; Fischer, David; Eckman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create a decision analytic model to estimate the balance between treatment risks and benefits for severely obese patients with diabetes. Summary Background Data Bariatric surgery leads to many desirable metabolic changes, but long-term impact of bariatric surgery on life expectancy in patients with diabetes has not yet been quantified. Methods We developed a Markov state transition model with multiple Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression models as inputs to compare bariatric surgery versus no surgical treatment for severely obese diabetic patients. The model is informed by data from three large cohorts: 1) 159,000 severely obese diabetic patients (4,185 had bariatric surgery) from 3 HMO Research Network sites, 2) 23,000 subjects from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), and 3) 18,000 subjects from the National Health Interview Survey linked to the National Death Index. Results In our main analyses, we found that a 45 year-old female with diabetes and a BMI of 45 kg/m2 gained an additional 6.7 years of life expectancy with bariatric surgery (38.4 years with surgery vs. 31.7 without). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the gain in life expectancy decreased with increasing BMI, until a BMI of 62 kg/m2 is reached, at which point nonsurgical treatment was associated with greater life expectancy. Similar results were seen for both men and women in all age groups. Conclusions For most severely obese patients with diabetes, bariatric surgery appears to improve life expectancy; however, surgery may reduce life expectancy for the super obese with BMIs over 62 kg/m2. PMID:25844968

  13. Improved Quality of Life after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients. Interdisciplinary group of bariatric surgery of Verona (G.I.C.O.V.)

    PubMed Central

    NADALINI, L.; ZENTI, M.G.; MASOTTO, L.; INDELICATO, L.; FAINELLI, G.; BONORA, F.; BATTISTONI, M.; ROMANI, B.; GENNA, M.; ZOPPINI, G.; BONORA, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Our aim was to evaluate the changes of health-related Quality of Life (HR-QoL) after bariatric surgery. Patients and methods 110 patients, who underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgery (N=34 gastric banding; N= 69 Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, N=7 sleeve gastrectomy), were evaluated before surgery and after an average of 36±13 months with SF-36 Health Survey. Results Mean preoperative age and body mass index (BMI) were 43±12 years and 45±7 kg/m2 respectively. At follow-up, mean BMI was 33±6 kg/m2. A significant improvement was observed for all dimensions of SF-36, except for General and Mental Health dimension. Satisfaction was greater in patients with the higher reduction in weight. Only the PF (Physical Functioning) domain (F=6,349, p=0.01) resulted a significant predictor of the weight lost after surgery independently of age, sex and type of surgery. Conclusions We confirm a beneficial effect of bariatric surgery on HR-QoL. Moreover, we found that PF domain of SF-36 is a significant predictor of weight loss. PMID:25174289

  14. [A cooperation protocol for the follow-up of patients after bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Barbelanne, Alexia; Wolf, Sylvie; Foiry, Anne-Françoise; Guillot, Caroline; Aron Wisnewsky, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Professional cooperation protocols have recently been developed by the French national health authority and regional health agencies. They enable paramedical staff to perform procedures usually carried out by doctors. In the framework of bariatric surgery, the follow-up of patients after surgery is thereby assured by specialist nurses. They can make a diagnosis and prescribe vitamins, minerals and tests.

  15. Psychological and Personality Predictors of Weight Loss and Comorbid Metabolic Changes After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Agüera, Zaida; García-Ruiz-de-Gordejuela, Amador; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Sanchez, Isabel; Baño, Marta; Camacho, Lucía; Granero, Roser; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Virgili, Nuria; Lopez-Urdiales, Rafael; de Bernabe, Mónica Montserrat-Gil; Garrido, Pilar; Monasterio, Carmen; Steward, Trevor; Pujol-Gebelli, Jordi; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Menchón, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) has proven to be the most effective treatment for weight loss and for improving comorbidities in severe obesity. A comprehensive psychological assessment prior to surgery is proposed to prepare patients for a successful post-surgical outcome. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to assess psychological and personality predictors of BS outcome. The sample comprised 139 severely obese patients who underwent BS. Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, the Symptom Checklist-Revised and the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised. Our results show that favourable BS outcome, after 2 years follow up, was associated with younger age, less depression, moderate anxiety symptoms and high cooperativeness levels. Likewise, metabolic improvements were found to be linked to younger age and certain psychopathological factors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that age, baseline body mass index, psychopathological indexes and personality traits predict successful BS outcome.

  16. Is social support associated with greater weight loss after bariatric surgery?: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Livhits, M; Mercado, C; Yermilov, I; Parikh, J A; Dutson, E; Mehran, A; Ko, C Y; Shekelle, P G; Gibbons, M M

    2011-02-01

    Social support may be associated with increased weight loss after bariatric surgery. The objective of this article is to determine impact of post-operative support groups and other forms of social support on weight loss after bariatric surgery. MEDLINE search (1988-2009) was completed using MeSH terms including bariatric procedures and a spectrum of patient factors with potential relationship to weight loss outcomes. Of the 934 screened studies, 10 reported on social support and weight loss outcomes. Five studies reported on support groups and five studies reported on other forms of social support (such as perceived family support or number of confidants) and degree of post-operative weight loss (total n = 735 patients). All studies found a positive association between post-operative support groups and weight loss. One study found a positive association between marital status (being single) and weight loss, while three studies found a non-significant positive trend and one study was inconclusive. Support group attendance after bariatric surgery is associated with greater post-operative weight loss. Further research is necessary to determine the impact of other forms of social support. These factors should be addressed in prospective studies of weight loss following bariatric surgery, as they may represent ways to improve post-operative outcomes.

  17. Behavioral characteristics of severely obese patients seeking bariatric surgery: cross-sectional study with alimentary interview.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Andrea; Marinari, Giuseppe M; Sukkar, Samir G; Scopinaro, Nicola; Adami, Gian Franco

    2008-01-01

    The authors' aim in this study was to gain insight on the eating behaviors of severely obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. The authors compared anthropometric and alimentary interview data on 50 patients applying for biliopancreatic diversion with data obtained from 50 severely obese individuals enrolling in a behavior modification weight-loss program. The severely obese patients seeking bariatric surgery were metabolically more compromised than were their counterparts enrolled in the conservative treatment group, whereas the latter more often reported compromised eating behaviors. These unexpected results could reflect changes in the widespread attitudes toward bariatric surgery-that unlike in the past, it is now considered a safe and effective method to treat a serious disease.

  18. Mechanisms underlying weight loss and metabolic improvements in rodent models of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing health risk with few successful treatment options and fewer still that target both obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities. Despite ongoing scientific efforts, the most effective treatment option to date was not developed from basic research but by surgeons observing outcomes in the clinic. Bariatric surgery is the most successful treatment for significant weight loss, resolution of type 2 diabetes and the prevention of future weight gain. Recent work with animal models has shed considerable light on the molecular underpinnings of the potent effects of these ‘metabolic’ surgical procedures. Here we review data from animal models and how these studies have evolved our understanding of the critical signalling systems that mediate the effects of bariatric surgery. These insights could lead to alternative therapies able to accomplish effects similar to bariatric surgery in a less invasive manner. PMID:25374275

  19. Mechanisms underlying weight loss and metabolic improvements in rodent models of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna M; Sandoval, Darleen A; Seeley, Randy J

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a growing health risk with few successful treatment options and fewer still that target both obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities. Despite ongoing scientific efforts, the most effective treatment option to date was not developed from basic research but by surgeons observing outcomes in the clinic. Bariatric surgery is the most successful treatment for significant weight loss, resolution of type 2 diabetes and the prevention of future weight gain. Recent work with animal models has shed considerable light on the molecular underpinnings of the potent effects of these 'metabolic' surgical procedures. Here we review data from animal models and how these studies have evolved our understanding of the critical signalling systems that mediate the effects of bariatric surgery. These insights could lead to alternative therapies able to accomplish effects similar to bariatric surgery in a less invasive manner.

  20. Obesity: Lifestyle management, bariatric surgery, drugs, and the therapeutic exploitation of gut hormones.

    PubMed

    Behary, Preeshila; Cegla, Jaimini; Tan, Tricia M; Bloom, Stephen R

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is on the rise and the pursuit of efficient and safe treatment is ongoing. Available anti-obesity medical therapies have so far proved to be disappointing, whereas bariatric surgery is leading the way and offers long-term health benefits. Part of the success of bariatric surgery is thought to be mediated by gut hormones. A better understanding of the role of gut hormones within the gut-brain signaling pathway in the control of hunger, satiety, and energy homeostasis, has led to their therapeutic exploitation as possible anti-obesity drugs. In this review, we provide a summary of currently available treatment options for obesity from simple lifestyle modifications and bariatric surgery to traditional and novel medical therapies.

  1. Analyses of balance and flexibility of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Bacha, Ivan Leo; Junior, Arthur Belarmino Garrido; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the postural control and flexibility of obese subjects before and both six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. To verify whether postural control is related to flexibility following weight reductions resulting from bariatric surgery. METHODS: The sample consisted of 16 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery. All assessments were performed before and six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Postural balance was assessed using an Accusuway® portable force platform, and flexibility was assessed using a standard chair sit and reach test (Wells' chair). RESULTS: With the force platform, no differences were observed in the displacement area or velocity from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. The displacement speed from the center of pressure was decreased at the six month after the surgery; however, unchanged from baseline at 12 months post-surgery. Flexibility increased over time according to the three measurements tested. CONCLUSIONS: Static postural balance did not change. The velocity of postural adjustment responses were increased at six months after surgery. Therefore, weight loss promotes increased flexibility. Yet, improvements in flexibility are not related to improvements in balance. PMID:26934236

  2. Interest, views and perceived barriers to bariatric surgery in patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Wharton, S; Serodio, K J; Kuk, J L; Sivapalan, N; Craik, A; Aarts, M-A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the interest, views and patient-perceived barriers to bariatric surgery among surgery-eligible patients. Surveys were completed at a weight management clinic and local hospital in Ontario, Canada. Patients were ≥18 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg m(-2) or BMI > 35 kg m(-2) with ≥1 comorbidity. The sample included 105 participants, 73.3% female, with a mean BMI of 46.6 ± 7.1 kg m(-2) . Only 33.3% of participants were interested in surgery; 50.5% of participants were not interested and 16.2% had mixed feelings. Participants identified risks (69.5%) and side effects (57.1%) as significant surgical barriers. Interested participants were more likely to perceive themselves as obese, were unhappy with their current weight loss method and were less likely to fear surgery (P < 0.05). The prevalence of comorbidities was not different by surgical interest (P = 0.17). Despite the effectiveness of bariatric surgery, the majority of qualified patients are not interested in surgery mainly due to the perceived risk of surgery in general and satisfaction with current non-surgical weight loss efforts. The self-perception of obesity, as opposed to medical comorbidities, may be a stronger driver of the decision to have bariatric surgery. It is unclear if patients are aware of the effectiveness of bariatric surgery to help improve comorbidities or if bariatric surgery is perceived as being more cosmetic in nature.

  3. Willingness to pay as patient preference to bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khawali, Cristina; Ferraz, Marcos B.; Zanella, Maria T.; Ferreira, Sandra R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background  An obesity epidemic is spreading worldwide. In addition to comorbidities, social and emotional problems contribute to reduce the quality of life (QoL) of obese people. Considering the heterogeneity of outcomes from clinical and surgical approaches, it is recommended that severely obese patients participate in their treatment decisions. This study evaluated preferences of severely obese patients for obesity surgical treatment using the willingness to pay (WTP) and to assess the impact of the presence of some clinical disorders, socioeconomic conditions and QoL on their decisions. Methods  The selected patients were invited to answer the WTP questionnaire using two formats of contingent valuation questions: dichotomous choice (yes/no) and a bidding game. The answers were correlated with clinical features, QoL assessed by the SF‐36 and the Moorehead‐Ardelt Quality of Life Questionnaire II, Brazilian socioeconomic classification, and family and personal incomes. Results  The group of patients who accepted the first bid was older and had higher frequency of sleep apnoea when compared to those who rejected the offer. A significant correlation between the bidding game value and family income was found (r = 0.28; P < 0.02). In the logistic regression model, socioeconomic classification and sleep apnoea were shown to be independently associated with acceptance the bid. Conclusions  Sleep apnoea was the comorbidity that most influenced the acceptance in dichotomous choice for bariatric surgery, probably due to the deleterious effects on daily activities induced by sleep disturbances. Our findings also suggest that the frequency of surgical procedures is below the preference of the obese population in Brazil. PMID:22070389

  4. Physical activity and cognitive function in bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Galioto, Rachel; King, Wendy C; Bond, Dale S; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Gunstad, John

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in severe obesity. Lack of physical activity is a likely contributor to impairment in this population, as many obese persons are inactive and physical activity has been positively and independently associated with cognitive function in healthy and medically-ill samples. This study investigated whether physical activity, measured by self-report of aerobic physical activity in 85 bariatric surgery candidates, was associated with cognitive function. A subset of 31 participants also completed objective activity monitoring. Steps/d and high-cadence min/week, representative of ambulatory moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), were calculated. Approximately one quarter of participants self-reported at least 30 min/d of aerobic MVPA, at least 5 d/week. Median steps/d was 7949 (IQR = 4572) and median MVPA min/week was 105 (IQR = 123). Cognitive deficits were found in 32% of participants (29% memory, 10% executive function, 13% language, 10% attention). Controlling for demographic and medical factors, self-reported aerobic physical activity was weakly correlated with lower attention (r = -0.21, p = 0.04) and executive function (r = -0.27, p < 0.01) and both self-reported aerobic physical activity and objectively-determined MVPA min/week were negatively correlated with memory (r = -0.20, p = 0.04; r = -0.46; p = 0.02, respectively). No other correlations between physical activity measures and cognitive function were significant. Contrary to expectations, greater levels of physical activity were not associated with better cognitive functioning. Such findings encourage future studies to clarify the association among cognitive function and physical activity in obese persons.

  5. Personal Descriptions of Life Before and After Bariatric Surgery From Overweight or Obese Men.

    PubMed

    Edward, Karen-Leigh; Hii, Michael W; Giandinoto, Jo-Ann; Hennessy, Julie; Thompson, Lisa

    2016-02-04

    Bariatric surgery is now a common weight loss solution for morbidly obese men where meaningful weight reduction and improvements in quality of life have been identified postsurgery. As the majority of surgical candidates are female, there exists a paucity of literature relating to the experience of males undergoing bariatric surgery. In this study, a qualitative descriptive-exploratory design was used to explore body image descriptions, adaptation of a new lifestyle, new boundaries postsurgery, and any barriers seeking consultation for surgery. Six males who had undergone bariatric surgery were recruited in Australia. Data were collected and analyzed using NVivo between May and October 2014. The themes emerging from the data included living in an obese body, life before surgery, decision making for surgery, and life after surgery. The participants collectively reported that life before surgery was challenging. They described the changes the surgery had made in their lives including positive changes to their health, body image, social lives, and self-esteem. Some participants preferred not to tell others their intentions for surgery due to perceived stigma. The men in this study also described a lack of information available to them depicting male perspectives, a possible barrier for men seeking weight loss surgery options. Implications for practice highlighted in these results relate to a greater need for accessible information specific to men based on real-life experiences.

  6. A Core Outcome Set for the Benefits and Adverse Events of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery: The BARIACT Project

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, James; Brookes, Sara T.; Main, Barry; Owen-Smith, Amanda; Andrews, Robert C.; Byrne, James; Mazza, Graziella; Welbourn, Richard; Wordsworth, Sarah; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bariatric and metabolic surgery is used as a treatment for patients with severe and complex obesity. However, there is a need to improve outcome selection and reporting in bariatric surgery trials. A Core Outcome Set (COS), an agreed minimum set of outcomes reported in all studies of a specific condition, may achieve this. Here, we present the development of a COS for BARIAtric and metabolic surgery Clinical Trials—the BARIACT Study. Methods and Findings Outcomes identified from systematic reviews and patient interviews informed a questionnaire survey. Patients and health professionals were surveyed three times and asked to rate the importance of each item on a 1–9 scale. Delphi methods provided anonymised feedback to participants. Items not meeting predefined criteria were discarded between rounds. Remaining items were discussed at consensus meetings, held separately with patients and professionals, where the COS was agreed. Data sources identified 2,990 outcomes, which were used to develop a 130-item questionnaire. Round 1 response rates were moderate but subsequently improved to above 75% for other rounds. After rounds 2 and 3, 81 and 14 items were discarded, respectively, leaving 35 items for discussion at consensus meetings. The final COS included nine items: “weight,” “diabetes status,” “cardiovascular risk,” “overall quality of life (QOL),” “mortality,” “technical complications of the specific operation,” “any re-operation/re-intervention,” “dysphagia/regurgitation,” and “micronutrient status.” The main limitation of this study was that it was based in the United Kingdom only. Conclusions The COS is recommended to be used as a minimum in all trials of bariatric and metabolic surgery. Adoption of the COS will improve data synthesis and the value of research data. Future work will establish methods for the measurement of the outcomes in the COS. PMID:27898680

  7. Conserved Metabolic Changes in Nondiabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Bariatric Surgery Patients: Global Metabolomic Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Pappan, Kirk L.; Gandhi, Ankit V.; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y.; McMahon, Heather; Chipitsyna, Galina I.; Tichansky, David S.; Arafat, Hwyda A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide insight into the mechanism by which bariatric surgical procedures led to weight loss and improvement or resolution of diabetes. Global biochemical profiling was used to evaluate changes occurring in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients experiencing either less extreme sleeve gastrectomy or a full gastric bypass. We were able to identify changes in metabolism that were affected by standard preoperation liquid weight loss diet as well as by bariatric surgery itself. Preoperation weight-loss diet was associated with a strong lipid metabolism signature largely related to the consumption of adipose reserves for energy production. Glucose usage shift away from glycolytic pyruvate production toward pentose phosphate pathway, via glucose-6-phosphate, appeared to be shared across all patients regardless of T2D status or bariatric surgery procedure. Our results suggested that bariatric surgery might promote antioxidant defense and insulin sensitivity through both increased heme synthesis and HO activity or expression. Changes in histidine and its metabolites following surgery might be an indication of altered gut microbiome ecology or liver function. This initial study provided broad understanding of how metabolism changed globally in morbidly obese nondiabetic and T2D patients following weight-loss surgery. PMID:26881244

  8. Bariatric Surgery: Does It Play a Role in Fertility-Preserving Treatment Among Obese Young Women With Endometrial Cancer?

    PubMed

    Benito, Virginia; López-Tomassetti, Eudaldo; Esparza, Miriam; Arencibia, Octavio; Andújar, Miguel; Prieto, Mercedes; Lubrano, Amina

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old nulliparous woman with a history of obesity (body mass index 36.2 kg/m(2)), type 2 diabetes, and polycystic ovary syndrome, who was diagnosed with grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma without radiological evidence of myometrial invasion or metastatic disease. After failure of a fertility-preserving treatment with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device, bariatric surgery was proposed to treat the obesity and improve control of her type 2 diabetes in an attempt to increase the chances of obtaining response to local treatment. Nine months after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and 18 months after insertion of the intrauterine device, the patient reached normal body weight (body mass index 20.3 kg/m(2)) and showed complete response to treatment. As far as we know, this is the first published case of an adolescent obese patient treated with bariatric surgery concomitantly with fertility-preserving management of endometrial cancer. We propose that bariatric surgery may play a role as an adjuvant therapy in fertility-preserving treatment of endometrial cancer with local progestin, in which it could enhance remission rates and reduce recurrence.

  9. Expectations and patients’ experiences of obesity prior to bariatric surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Catherine Verity; Thompson, Andrew R; Allmark, Peter; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to understand the experiences and expectations of people seeking bariatric surgery in England and identify implications for behavioural and self-management interventions. Design A qualitative study using modified photovoice methods, triangulating photography with semistructured indepth interviews analysed using framework techniques. Setting Areas served by two bariatric surgery multidisciplinary teams in the north of England. Participants 18 adults (14 women and 4 men) who accepted for bariatric surgery, and were aged between 30 and 61 years. Participants were recruited through hospital-based tier 4 bariatric surgery multidisciplinary teams. Results The experiences of participants indicates the nature and extent of the burden of obesity. Problems included stigmatisation, shame, poor health, physical function and reliance on medications. Participants expected surgery to result in major physical and psychological improvement. They described how this expectation was rooted in their experiences of stigma and shame. These feelings were reinforced by previous unsuccessful weight loss attempts. Participants expected extreme and sometimes unrealistic levels of sustained weight loss, as well as improvements to physical and mental health. The overall desire and expectation of bariatric surgery was of ‘normality’. Participants had received previous support from clinicians and in weight management services. However, they reported that their expectations of surgery had not been reviewed by services, and expectations appeared to be unrealistic. Likewise, their experience of stigmatisation had not been addressed. Conclusions The unrealistic expectations identified here may negatively affect postoperative outcomes. The findings indicate the importance of services addressing feelings of shame and stigmatisation, and modifying patient's expectations and goals for the postoperative period. PMID:26857104

  10. Polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial hyperplasia: an overview of the role of bariatric surgery in female fertility.

    PubMed

    Charalampakis, Vasileios; Tahrani, Abd A; Helmy, Ahmed; Gupta, Janesh K; Singhal, Rishi

    2016-12-01

    One of the most effective methods to tackle obesity and its related comorbidities is bariatric surgery. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometrial hyperplasia (EH), which are associated with increased risk of endometrial carcinoma, have been identified as potentially new indications for bariatric surgery. PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women in the reproductive age and is associated with several components of the metabolic syndrome such as obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. EH is a pre-cancerous condition which arises in the presence of chronic exposure to estrogen unopposed by progesterone such as both in PCOS and obesity. The main bariatric procedures are Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. These procedures are well established and when correctly selected and performed by experienced bariatric surgeons, they can achieve significant weight loss and remission of obesity related co-morbidities. Studies have shown that bariatric surgery can play an important role in the management of patients with PCOS and improve fertility. Similarly, bariatric surgery has a positive effect on endometrial hyperplasia, making surgically induced weight loss a potentially attractive option for endometrial cancer prevention and treatment. Obesity has an adverse impact on spontaneous pregnancy, assisted reproduction methods and feto-maternal outcomes. After bariatric surgery obese women with subfertility can achieve spontaneous pregnancy. However, while bariatric surgery reduces the risk of pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes, there is an increased risk of small for gestational age and possible increased risk of stillborn or neonatal death. In this article we will review the evidence regarding the use of bariatric surgery as a treatment modality in patients with PCOS and EH. We also provide an overview of the common bariatric procedures.

  11. Pre- to Postoperative Physical Activity Changes in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Self-Report vs. Objective Measures

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Jakicic, John M.; Unick, Jessica L.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G. Dean; Ryder, Beth A.; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery patients report significant pre- to postoperative increases in physical activity (PA). However, it is unclear whether objective measures would corroborate these changes. The present study compared self-reported and accelerometer-based estimates of changes in moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) from pre- (pre-op) to 6 months postsurgery (post-op). Twenty bariatric surgery (65% laparoscopic-adjustable gastric banding, 35% gastric bypass) patients (46.2 ± 9.8 years, 88% female, pre-op BMI = 50.8 ± 9.7 kg/m2) wore RT3 accelerometers as an objective measure of MVPA and completed the Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ) as a subjective measure before and 6 months after bariatric surgery. Time (min/week) spent in MVPA was calculated for the PPAQ and RT3 (≥1-min and ≥10-min bouts) at pre-op and post-op. Self-reported MVPA increased fivefold from pre-op to post-op (44.6 ± 80.8 to 212.3 ± 212.4 min/week; P < 0.005). By contrast, the RT3 showed nonsignificant decreases in MVPA for both ≥1-min (186.0 ± 169.0 to 151.2 ± 118.3 min/week) and ≥10-min (41.3 ± 109.3 to 39.8 ± 71.3 min/ week) bouts. At pre-op, the percentage of participants who accumulated ≥150-min/week of MVPA in bouts ≥10-min according to the PPAQ and RT3 was identical (10%). However, at post-op, 55% of participants reported compliance with the recommendation compared to 5% based on RT3 measurement (P = 0.002). Objectively-measured changes in MVPA from pre-op to 6 months post-op appear to be much smaller than self-reported changes. Further research involving larger samples is needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether self-report and objective PA measures are differentially associated with surgical weight loss outcomes. PMID:20379143

  12. Data Investigation of Bariatric Surgery Outcome and Economic Savings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    these conditions. These interventions also come at significant financial cost, have variable success, and are still being evaluated to determine their......bariatric procedures performed in the eligible population could be increased to 15% (scenario 2) or 20% (scenario 3) to estimate their financial impact

  13. Primary experience of bariatric surgery in a newly established private obesity center

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shurafa, Haider; Elzaafarany, Ahmed H.; Albenmousa, Ali; Balata, Mona G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the outcomes of different types of bariatric surgeries in a single newly established private obesity center. Methods: Retrospectively, we included patients who were entered in the registry for bariatric surgeries in the Obesity Unit, Riyadh National Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2013 and September 2014, and completed one year of follow up. Baseline characteristics, percent excess weight loss, and safety data were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 79 patients were included. Based on the type of surgery, patients were divided into 3 groups: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic minigastric bypass (MGBP), and laparoscopic vertical sleeve gastrectomy (SG). After one year, RYGB and MGB patients lost more weight than SG patients. No mortality, or leak were reported and one patient had reoperation after revision laparoscopic RYGB for bleeding. There was one readmission, while 4 patients visited the emergency room for vomiting and dehydration (2 patients), anemia (one patient), and port site infection (one patient). Conclusion: Bariatric surgeries are safe when carried out by an experienced bariatric surgeon in the private sector. The outcome of this series is similar to the published results from large international obesity databases. PMID:27652359

  14. Factors Associated with Suicide Ideation in Severely Obese Bariatric Surgery-Seeking Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Fettich, Karla C.; Tierney, Megan; Cummings, Hakeemah; Berona, Johnny; Weissman, Jessica; Ward, Amanda; Christensen, Kara; Southward, Matthew; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Mitchell, James; Coccaro, Emil

    2012-01-01

    There are high rates of suicide ideation and/or behavior in severely obese individuals. The potential contributors to suicide ideation in a sample of 334 severely obese bariatric surgery candidates was explored. Lack of college education, a history of suicide ideation and/or behavior, psychological distress, hopelessness, loneliness, history of…

  15. A Qualitative Assessment of the My True Body Bariatric Surgery Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Tracy; Mamary, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: The My True Body (MTB) group intervention incorporates cognitive restructuring and social support into bariatric surgery preparation. Purpose: To identify and describe program components that support long-term behavioral modifications and influence confidence in healthy weight maintenance. Methods: Semistructured telephone interviews…

  16. Reduced Survival in Bariatric Surgery Candidates Delayed or Denied by Lack of Insurance Approval.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eleisha; Ghaderi, Iman; Overby, D Wayne; Farrell, Timothy M

    2016-02-01

    Bariatric surgery reduces mortality for Americans who meet candidacy criteria and have insurance coverage. Unfortunately, some medically suitable candidates are denied or delayed during insurance approval processes. The long-term impact of such care delays on survival is unknown. Using a prospectively maintained bariatric intake database, we identified consecutive applicants who were evaluated and medically cleared by our multidisciplinary care team and for whom insurance approval was requested. We compared survival in those who were initially approved by their insurance carriers (controls) and those who were initially denied coverage (subjects). Mortality was determined using the Social Security Death Index. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted and the log-rank test for significance was applied. From August 2003 to December 2008, 463 patients (391 females, mean age 45 ± 10 years, mean body mass index 52.5 ± 9.4 kg/m(2)) were medically cleared for a bariatric procedure. Of these, 363 were approved by insurance on initial request, whereas 100 were denied. Given the study's intention to measure the aggregate impact of delays and denials, nine patients who later came to operation after appeal or coverage change were maintained in the subject cohort. During 0- to 113-month follow-up, six subjects (6%) died compared with seven controls (1.9%), corresponding to a statistically significant survival benefit for patients initially approved for bariatric surgery without delay or denial (P < 0.001). In conclusion, access to bariatric surgical care was impeded by insurance certification processes in 22 per cent of medically acceptable candidates. Processes that delay or restrict efficient access to bariatric surgery are associated with a 3-fold mortality increase.

  17. The Exchange of Social Support on Online Bariatric Surgery Discussion Forums: A Mixed-Methods Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Molly E; Friedman, Aliza; Meisner, Brad A; Cassin, Stephanie E

    2017-03-10

    Bariatric surgery patients often experience physical and psychosocial stressors, and difficulty adjusting to significant lifestyle changes. As a result, social support groups that provide patients with support, coping skills, and nutritional information are valuable components of bariatric care. Support group attendance at bariatric centers is associated with greater post-surgery weight loss; however, several barriers hinder attendance at in-person support groups (e.g., travel distance to bariatric centers). Consequently, online support forums are an increasingly utilized resource for patients both before and after surgery. This study examined and described the type and frequency of social support provided on a large online bariatric surgery forum. A total of 1,412 messages in the pre- (n = 822) and post-surgery (n = 590) sections of the forum were coded using qualitative content analysis according to Cutrona and Suhr's (1992) Social Support Behavior Code model (i.e., including informational, tangible, esteem, network, and emotional support types). The majority of messages provided informational and emotional support regarding: a) factual information about the bariatric procedure and nutrition; b) advice for coping with the surgery preparation process, and physical symptoms; and c) encouragement regarding adherence to surgical guidelines, and weight loss progress. Network, esteem, and tangible support types were less frequent than informational and emotional support types. The results inform healthcare providers about the types of social support available to bariatric patients on online support forums and, thus, encourage appropriate referrals to this resource.

  18. Prevalence and degree of sexual dysfunction in a sample of women seeking bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Vithiananthan, Siva; Leahey, Tricia M.; Thomas, J. Graham; Sax, Harry C.; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Giovanni, Jeannine; Wing, Rena R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexual functioning is shown to be impaired in women who are obese, particularly those seeking bariatric surgery. However, most prior studies evaluating sexual function in these populations have not used validated measures. We used the validated Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to assess prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in a sample of over 100 women evaluated for bariatric surgery. Methods The FSFI was administered to reportedly sexually active women during their preoperative evaluation. Scores for individual FSFI domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain) ranging from 0(or 1.2) to 6 were summed to produce a FSFI-total score (range = 2-36). A FSFI-total cut-off score of ≤ 26.55 was used to identify participants with FSD. Participants' FSFI- total and domain scores were compared to previously published norms available for women diagnosed with female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) and healthy controls. Results Sixty-one of the 102 participants (59.8%) had FSFI-total scores ≤ 26.55, indicative of FSD. Older age and menopause were associated with FSD. Compared to published norms, bariatric surgery candidates had FSFI domain scores that were lower than the control group (ps <0.0001) but higher than the FSAD group (ps <0.0001), except for desire where scores were similar. Conclusion Women seeking bariatric surgery are clearly a population with substantial sexual function impairment, with 60% of participants reporting FSD. These findings highlight the need to initiate routine assessment of sexual functioning in this population and examine whether weight loss following bariatric surgery contributes to reversal of FSD. PMID:19733514

  19. Binge eating in bariatric surgery candidates: The role of insecure attachment and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Shakory, Sharry; Van Exan, Jessica; Mills, Jennifer S; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Keating, Leah; Taube-Schiff, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    Binge eating has a high prevalence among bariatric patients and is associated with post-surgical weight gain. This study examined the potential mediating role of emotion regulation difficulties in the relation between attachment insecurity and binge eating among this population. Participants were 1388 adult pre-bariatric surgery candidates from an accredited bariatric surgery assessment centre in Toronto, Ontario. Participants completed measures of psychological functioning, including attachment style and emotion regulation. Mediation analyses revealed that difficulties with emotion regulation mediated a positive association between insecure-anxious attachment and binge eating. An insecure-avoidant attachment was found to have a non-significant association with binge eating when examining the total effect. However, when difficulties with emotion regulation were controlled for in the model to examine its role as a mediator, this association became significant, and emotion regulation difficulties also mediated the relationship between attachment avoidance and binge eating. These findings suggest that difficulties in emotion regulation may be an important clinical issue to address in order to reduce binge eating in adult bariatric surgery candidates.

  20. All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Associated with Bariatric Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Tapan S.; Davidson, Lance E.; Hunt, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether or not nonsurgical intentional or voluntary weight loss results in reduced mortality has been equivocal, with long-term mortality following weight loss being reported as increased, decreased, and not changed. In part, inconsistent results have been attributed to the uncertainty of whether the intentionality of weight loss is accurately reported in large population studies and also that achieving significant and sustained voluntary weight loss in large intervention trials is extremely difficult. Bariatric surgery has generally been free of these conflicts. Patients voluntarily undergo surgery and the resulting weight is typically significant and sustained. These elements, combined with possible non-weight loss-related mechanisms, have resulted in improved comorbidities, which likely contribute to a reduction in longterm mortality. This paper reviews the association between bariatric surgery and long-term mortality. From these studies, the general consensus is that bariatric surgical patients have: 1) significantly reduced long-term all-cause mortality when compared to severely obese non-bariatric surgical control groups; 2) greater mortality when compared to the general population, with the exception of one study; 3) reduced cardiovascular-, stroke-, and cancer-caused mortality when compared to severely obese non-operated controls; and 4) increased risk for externally caused death such as suicide. PMID:26496931

  1. Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery in Mouse Models of Circadian Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Turek, Fred W.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Mounting evidence supports a link between circadian disruption and metabolic disease. Humans with circadian disruption (e.g., night-shift workers) have an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases compared to the non-disrupted population. However, it is unclear if the obesity and obesity-related disorders associated with circadian disruption respond to therapeutic treatments as well as individuals with other types of obesity. Subjects/Methods Here, we test the effectiveness of the commonly used bariatric surgical procedure, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG) in mouse models of genetic and environmental circadian disruption. Results VSG led to a reduction in body weight and fat mass in both ClockΔ19 mutant and constant-light mouse models (P < .05), resulting in an overall metabolic improvement independent of circadian disruption. Interestingly, the decrease in body weight occurred without altering diurnal feeding or activity patterns (P > .05). Within circadian-disrupted models, VSG also led to improved glucose tolerance and lipid handling (P < .05). Conclusions Together these data demonstrate that VSG is an effective treatment for the obesity associated with circadian disruption, and that the potent effects of bariatric surgery are orthogonal to circadian biology. However, since the effects of bariatric surgery are independent of circadian disruption, VSG cannot be considered a cure for circadian disruption. These data have important implications for circadian-disrupted obese patients. Moreover, these results reveal new information about the metabolic pathways governing the effects of bariatric surgery as well as of circadian disruption. PMID:25869599

  2. The Relationship Between Length of Stay and Readmissions in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Alex W.; Frelich, Matthew J.; Sahr, Natasha A.; Hohmann, Samuel F.; Wang, Tao; Gould, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmissions are a quality indicator in bariatric surgery. In recent years, length of stay following bariatric surgery has trended down significantly. We hypothesized that a shorter postoperative hospitalization does not increase the likelihood of readmission. Methods The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of academic medical centers and affiliated hospitals. The UHC’s clinical database contains information on inpatient stay and returns (readmissions) up to 30 days post-discharge. A multicenter analysis of outcomes was performed using data from the January 2009 to December 2013 for patients 18 years and older. Patients were identified by bariatric procedure ICD-9 codes and restricted by diagnosis codes for morbid obesity. Results A total of 95,294 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 45.4 (±0.11) years and 73,941 (77.6%) subjects were female. There were 5,423 (5.7%) readmissions within the study period. Patients with hospitalizations of 3 days and more than 3 days were twice and four times as likely to be readmitted than those with hospitalizations of one day, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with longer postoperative hospitalizations were more likely to be readmitted following bariatric surgery. Early discharge does not appear to be associated with increased readmission rates. PMID:26032831

  3. Improvement of migraine headaches in severely obese patients after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vithiananthan, S.; Nash, J.M.; Thomas, J.G.; Wing, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Research increasingly suggests that obesity is an exacerbating factor for migraine. However, it is less clear whether weight loss may help to alleviate migraine in obese individuals. We examined whether weight loss after bariatric surgery is associated with improvements in migraine headaches. Methods: In this prospective observational study, 24 patients who had migraine according to the ID-Migraine screener were assessed before and 6 months after bariatric surgery. At both time points, patients had their weight measured and reported on frequency of headache days, average headache pain severity, and headache-related disability over the past 90 days via the Migraine Disability Assessment questionnaire. Changes in headache measures and the relation of weight loss to these changes were assessed using paired-sample t tests and logistic regression, respectively. Results: Patients were mostly female (88%), middle-aged (mean age 39.3), and severely obese (mean body mass index 46.6) at baseline. Mean (±SD) number of headache days was reduced from 11.1 ± 10.3 preoperatively to 6.7 ± 8.2 postoperatively (p < 0.05), after a mean percent excess weight loss (%EWL) of 49.4%. The odds of experiencing a ≥50% reduction in headache days was related to greater %EWL, independent of surgery type (p < 0.05). Reductions in severity were also observed (p < 0.05) and the number of patients reporting moderate to severe disability decreased from 12 (50.0%) before surgery to 3 (12.5%) after surgery (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Severely obese migraineurs experience marked alleviation of headaches after significant weight reduction via bariatric surgery. Future studies are needed to determine whether more modest, behaviorally produced weight losses can effect similar migraine improvements. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that bariatric surgery is associated with reduction of migraine headaches in severely obese individuals. PMID:21444898

  4. Becoming a normal guy: Men making sense of long-term bodily changes following bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Groven, Karen Synne; Galdas, Paul; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, research on bodily changes following bariatric surgery has focused predominantly on women, leaving the long-term experience of men relatively unexplored. In this paper, we draw on interviews with men who have undergone an irreversible gastric bypass procedure to explore their bodily changes more than 4 years post-surgery. We apply a phenomenological framework that draws on Leder's perspectives on the “disappearing” and “dys-appearing” body, combined with a gender-sensitive lens that draws on Connell's theory of hegemonic masculinity and Robertson's conceptions of embodied masculinity. Findings Our principal finding was that the men negotiated their bodily changes following bariatric surgery in profoundly ambivalent ways. Although they enthusiastically praised the surgery for improving their health, self-esteem, and social functioning, they also emphasized their efforts to cope with post-surgical side effects and life-threatening complications. Our analysis elaborates on their efforts to adjust to and come to terms with these changes, focusing on episodes of hypoglycemia, severe pain and internal herniation, and the significance of physical activity and exercise. Conclusions Our findings point to the need to acknowledge men's ways of making sense of profound and ongoing bodily changes following bariatric surgery and how these negotiations are closely intertwined with masculine ideals of embodiment and social value. PMID:26641203

  5. The association between reduced inflammation and cognitive gains after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A.W.; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bariatric surgery is associated with improved cognitive function, though the mechanisms are unclear. Elevated inflammation is common in obesity and associated with impaired cognition. Inflammation decreases after bariatric surgery, implicating it as a possible mechanism for cognitive improvement. The objective of this study was to examine whether reduced inflammation is a possible mechanism for post-operative cognitive improvement in bariatric surgery patients. Methods Participants were 77 bariatric surgery patients who completed cognitive testing before surgery and one year post-surgery. Cognitive domains assessed were attention/executive function, language, and memory. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was assessed at both time points. Results Patients exhibited pre-operative cognitive impairment, though attention/executive (M±SDbaseline= 53.57 ± 8.68 vs.M±SDfollow-up= 60.32 ± 8.19) and memory (M±SDbaseline= 44.96 ± 7.98 vs.M±SDfollow-up= 51.55 ± 8.25) improved one year post-surgery. CRP was elevated at baseline and fell into the normative range post-surgery (M±SDbaseline= 0.9 ± 0.7vs.M±SDfollow-up= 0.2 ± 0.3 mg/dL). Pre-operative CRP was not associated with baseline cognitive function (β-values = -0.10 to 0.02) and changes in CRP also did not correspond to changes in cognition post-surgery (β-values = 0.02 to β = 0.11; ps>0.05 for all domains). A trend was detected for smaller improvements in memory among participants with elevated baseline CRP (>0.30 mg/dL) versus those with normal levels (Group x Time: p=0.083). Conclusions Improvements in hs-CRP were not associated with post-operative cognitive benefits. Future studies are needed to explore other inflammatory markers and potential mechanisms of cognitive improvement after bariatric surgery, including improved glycemic control and neurohormone changes. PMID:25478707

  6. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENTOF DUMPING SYNDROME AND ITS RELATION TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    CHAVES, Yasmin da Silva; DESTEFANI, Afrânio Côgo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The dumping syndrome is frequent in bariatric surgery. It is probably the most common syndrome following partial or complete gastrectomy. Its prevalence in partial gastrectomy can reach up to 50%, thus it can be a significant complication arising from some types of bariatric surgeries. Objective: Critical analysis on dumping syndrome, its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A literature review was performed using the key words: 'dumping syndrome', 'bariatric surgery' and 'rapid dumping syndrome'. Inclusion criteria were: books, original works, case reports and meta-analyzes, and the exclusion criterion was literature review. Concerning the publication time, articles were screened between 1960 and May 2015. Results: The dumping syndrome is complication arising from obesity surgeries, but also can be a result of vagus nerve damage. Diagnosis is done primarily through the use of questionnaires based on scores. Conclusion: The Sigstad score and Arts survey are valid means for assessing the dumping syndrome. Initial therapy consists in the adoption of dietary measures, short acting drugs administration. PMID:27683791

  7. Association between binge eating disorder and changes in cognitive functioning following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Alosco, Michael L; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Paul, Robert; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Gunstad, John

    2014-12-01

    Evidence suggests that both obesity and binge eating disorder (BED) may be associated with deficits in cognitive functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a lifetime history of BED would be associated with changes in several domains of cognitive functioning (attention, executive function, language, and memory) following bariatric surgery. Participants were 68 bariatric surgery patients who completed a computerized battery of cognitive tests within 30 days prior to undergoing surgery and again at a 12-Month postoperative follow-up. Results revealed that on the whole, participants displayed improvements from baseline to follow-up in attention, executive function, and memory, even after controlling for diagnostic history of depression; no changes were observed for language. However, individuals with and without a history of BED did not differ in changes in body mass index or in the degree of improvement in cognitive functioning from baseline to follow-up. Such results suggest that a history of BED does not influence changes in cognitive functioning following bariatric surgery. Future research will be needed to further clarify the role of BED in predicting cognitive function over time.

  8. Nephrolithiasis after bariatric surgery: A review of pathophysiologic mechanisms and procedural risk.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Umer Hasan; Duffy, Andrew J; Roberts, Kurt Eric; Shariff, Amir Hafeez

    2016-12-01

    Obesity alone is a known risk factor for nephrolithiasis, and bariatric surgery has been linked to a higher incidence of post-operative new-onset nephrolithiasis. The mean interval from bariatric surgery to diagnosis of nephrolithiasis, ranges from 1.5 to 3.6 years. The stone risk is greatest for purely malabsorptive procedures, intermediate for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and lowest for purely restrictive procedures (laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) where it approaches or is reduced below that of non-operative obese controls. A history of nephrolithiasis and increasing age at the time of surgery are both associated with an increased risk of new stone formation post-operatively. The underlying pathophysiologic changes following bariatric surgery include increased colonic absorption of oxalate leading to hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and increased urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation, which predispose to stone formation. The majority of incident stones are medically managed, with some requiring interventions in the form of lithotripsy or ureteroscopy.

  9. Complications of bariatric surgery: dumping syndrome, reflux and vitamin deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan; Deloose, Eveline

    2014-08-01

    Bariatric surgical procedure are increasingly and successfully applied in the treatment of morbid obesity. Nevertheless, these procedures are not devoid of potential long-term complications. Dumping syndrome may occur after procedures involving at least partial gastric resection or bypass, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy. Diagnosis is based on clinical alertness and glucose tolerance testing. Treatment may involve dietary measures, acarbose and somatostatin analogues, or surgical reintervention for refractory cases. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be aggravated by vertical banded gastroplasty and sleeve gastrectomy procedures, but pre-existing GERD may improve after RYGB and with adjustable gastric banding. Nutrient deficiencies constitute the most important long-term complications of bariatric interventions, as they may lead to haematological, metabolic and especially neurological disorders which are not always reversible. Malabsorptive procedures, poor postoperative nutrient intake, recurrent vomiting and poor compliance with vitamin supplement intake and regular follow-up are important risk factors. Preoperative nutritional assessment and rigourous postoperative follow-up plan with administration of multi-vitamin supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended in all patients.

  10. The influence of methods of bariatric surgery for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bužga, Marek; Maresova, Petra; Seidlerova, Adela; Zonča, Pavel; Holéczy, Pavol; Kuča, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The constantly growing incidence of obesity represents a risk of health complications for individuals, and is a growing economic burden for health care systems and society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bariatric surgery, specifically laparoscopic greater curve plication, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effect of bariatric surgery on the changes in blood pressure before, and 12 months after, surgery and in pharmacotherapy in the 12 months after surgery was analyzed. For achieving this purpose, 74 patients from the Obesity and Surgery Department of Vitkovice Hospital in Ostrava in the Czech Republic, were monitored. They were operated in 2011 and 2012. The Bonferroni method was used to test hypotheses about the impact of surgery on blood pressure and pharmacotherapy. One year after the surgery, systolic and diastolic blood pressure values decreased, both with no statistically significant difference between surgery types. Improvement was observed in 68% of cases, with 25% of patients discontinuing pharmacotherapy entirely. PMID:27143901

  11. Resistance to levothyroxine in a bariatric surgery patient: an indication for liquid formulation?

    PubMed

    Hommel, Christophe; Delgrange, Etienne

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old female patient with hypothyroidism who underwent bariatric surgery and developed severe hypothyroidism despite high doses of oral levothyroxine (L-T4) tablets. Initially, a high-dose L-T4 tablets absorption test was performed to exclude pseudo-malabsorption. In view of a modest increase in serum T4 levels, L-T4 liquid formulation absorption test was performed, and showed faster and more efficient absorption of thyroid hormones. We discuss the issue of distinguishing malabsorption from pseudo-malabsorption, review the literature concerning the benefits of liquid L-T4 in cases of impaired absorption such as bariatric surgery and consider the socio-economic implications of different liquid formulations.

  12. Which facets of mindfulness are related to problematic eating among patients seeking bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael E; Dalrymple, Kristy; Himes, Susan; Zimmerman, Mark

    2014-04-01

    There has been growing research indicating the potential positive benefits of mindfulness-based interventions for obesity, but few studies have examined the relationship of mindfulness processes to obesity-related behaviors, particularly among clinical populations such as bariatric surgery candidates. The current study examined the relationship of specific mindfulness facets to a variety of problematic eating behaviors assessed through diagnostic interviews in a clinical sample of 820 patients seeking bariatric surgery. Results indicated that greater mindfulness on specific facets, particularly acting with awareness, was related to less binge and emotional eating. Greater mindfulness was also related, though less consistently, to less habitual overeating and grazing. The observing facet was generally unrelated to problematic eating, but in a few cases being more observant related to having greater eating problems. The results of the study and future directions are discussed in relation to research on problematic eating in obesity and mindfulness-based interventions.

  13. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Adipokine-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Goktas, Zeynep; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Shen, Chwan-Li; Boylan, Mallory; Mo, Huanbiao; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Over a third of the US population is obese and at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and other metabolic disorders. Obesity is considered a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition that is primarily attributed to expansion and inflammation of adipose tissues. Indeed, adipocytes produce and secrete numerous proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines known as adipokines. When the balance of these adipokines is shifted toward higher production of proinflammatory factors, local inflammation within adipose tissues and subsequently systemic inflammation occur. These adipokines including leptin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, vaspin, and retinol binding protein-4 can regulate inflammatory responses and contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. These effects are mediated by key inflammatory signaling molecules including activated serine kinases such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase and serine kinases inhibitor κB kinase and insulin signaling molecules including insulin receptor substrates, protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), and nuclear factor kappa B. Bariatric surgery can decrease body weight and improve insulin resistance in morbidly obese subjects. However, despite reports suggesting reduced inflammation and weight-independent effects of bariatric surgery on glucose metabolism, mechanisms behind such improvements are not yet well understood. This review article focuses on some of these novel adipokines and discusses their changes after bariatric surgery and their relationship to insulin resistance, fat mass, inflammation, and glucose homeostasis. PMID:23772224

  14. Current practices of obesity pharmacotherapy, bariatric surgery referral and coding for counselling by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Scott; Turner, M.; Gallagher, C.; Dietz, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Rates of obesity pharmacotherapy use, bariatric surgery and intensive behavioural counselling have been extremely low. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to survey healthcare provider beliefs, practice and knowledge regarding obesity management. Methods Primary care physicians (PCPs), OB‐GYN physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) responded to a web‐based survey related to drug therapy practice, bariatric surgery referral and reimbursement coding practice. Results Rates of reported use of obesity pharmacotherapy appear to be increasing among PCPs, which is likely related to the approval of four new obesity pharmacotherapy agents since 2012. Rates of pharmacotherapy use among OB‐GYNs and NPs appear much lower. Similarly, few PCPs are averse to recommending bariatric surgery, but aversion among OB‐GYNs and NPs is significantly higher. Conclusion Together, these observations suggest that OB‐GYN and NP populations are important targets for education about obesity management. Very few PCPs, OB‐GYNs or NPs use behavioural counselling coding for obesity. Better understanding of why this benefit is not being fully used could inform outreach to improve counselling rates. PMID:27708843

  15. Effects of bariatric surgery on adipokine-induced inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Goktas, Zeynep; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Shen, Chwan-Li; Boylan, Mallory; Mo, Huanbiao; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Over a third of the US population is obese and at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and other metabolic disorders. Obesity is considered a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition that is primarily attributed to expansion and inflammation of adipose tissues. Indeed, adipocytes produce and secrete numerous proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines known as adipokines. When the balance of these adipokines is shifted toward higher production of proinflammatory factors, local inflammation within adipose tissues and subsequently systemic inflammation occur. These adipokines including leptin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, vaspin, and retinol binding protein-4 can regulate inflammatory responses and contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. These effects are mediated by key inflammatory signaling molecules including activated serine kinases such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase and serine kinases inhibitor κB kinase and insulin signaling molecules including insulin receptor substrates, protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), and nuclear factor kappa B. Bariatric surgery can decrease body weight and improve insulin resistance in morbidly obese subjects. However, despite reports suggesting reduced inflammation and weight-independent effects of bariatric surgery on glucose metabolism, mechanisms behind such improvements are not yet well understood. This review article focuses on some of these novel adipokines and discusses their changes after bariatric surgery and their relationship to insulin resistance, fat mass, inflammation, and glucose homeostasis.

  16. The Impact of Impulsivity on Weight Loss Four Years after Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Schag, Kathrin; Mack, Isabelle; Giel, Katrin E; Ölschläger, Sabrina; Skoda, Eva-Maria; von Feilitzsch, Maximilian; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-11-14

    Bariatric surgery has serious implications on metabolic health. The reasons for a failure of bariatric surgery, i.e., limited weight loss, are multifactorial and include psychological factors. We established a theoretical model of how impulsivity is related to weight loss outcome. We propose that depressive symptoms act as a mediator between impulsivity and pathological eating behavior, and that pathological eating behavior has a direct impact on weight loss outcome. We calculated excessive weight loss (%EWL) and assessed self-reported impulsivity (using the Baratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-15) total score), depressive symptoms (the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score), and pathological eating behavior (the Eating Disorder Inventory 2 (EDI-2) total score) in 65 patients four years after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Regression and mediation analyses were computed to validate the theoretical model. The BIS-15, PHQ-9, and EDI-2 have medium to high correlations between each other, and EDI-2 correlated with %EWL. The mediation analysis yielded that the PHQ-9 represents a significant mediator between BIS-15 and EDI-2. The regression model between EDI-2 and %EWL was also significant. These results support our theoretical model, i.e., suggest that impulsivity has an indirect impact on weight loss outcome after bariatric surgery, mediated by depression and transferred through pathological eating behavior. Thus, the underlying psychological factors should be addressed in post-operative care to optimize weight loss outcome.

  17. The Impact of Impulsivity on Weight Loss Four Years after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schag, Kathrin; Mack, Isabelle; Giel, Katrin E.; Ölschläger, Sabrina; Skoda, Eva-Maria; von Feilitzsch, Maximilian; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has serious implications on metabolic health. The reasons for a failure of bariatric surgery, i.e., limited weight loss, are multifactorial and include psychological factors. We established a theoretical model of how impulsivity is related to weight loss outcome. We propose that depressive symptoms act as a mediator between impulsivity and pathological eating behavior, and that pathological eating behavior has a direct impact on weight loss outcome. We calculated excessive weight loss (%EWL) and assessed self-reported impulsivity (using the Baratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-15) total score), depressive symptoms (the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score), and pathological eating behavior (the Eating Disorder Inventory 2 (EDI-2) total score) in 65 patients four years after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Regression and mediation analyses were computed to validate the theoretical model. The BIS-15, PHQ-9, and EDI-2 have medium to high correlations between each other, and EDI-2 correlated with %EWL. The mediation analysis yielded that the PHQ-9 represents a significant mediator between BIS-15 and EDI-2. The regression model between EDI-2 and %EWL was also significant. These results support our theoretical model, i.e., suggest that impulsivity has an indirect impact on weight loss outcome after bariatric surgery, mediated by depression and transferred through pathological eating behavior. Thus, the underlying psychological factors should be addressed in post-operative care to optimize weight loss outcome. PMID:27854246

  18. Can medical therapy mimic the clinical efficacy or physiological effects of bariatric surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Miras, A D; le Roux, C W

    2014-01-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures performed has increased dramatically. This review discusses the clinical and physiological changes, and in particular, the mechanisms behind weight loss and glycaemic improvements, observed following the gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding bariatric procedures. The review then examines how close we are to mimicking the clinical or physiological effects of surgery through less invasive and safer modern interventions that are currently available for clinical use. These include dietary interventions, orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pramlintide, dapagliflozin, the duodenal–jejunal bypass liner, gastric pacemakers and gastric balloons. We conclude that, based on the most recent trials, we cannot fully mimic the clinical or physiological effects of surgery; however, we are getting closer. A ‘medical bypass' may not be as far in the future as we previously thought, as the physician's armamentarium against obesity and type 2 diabetes has recently got stronger through the use of specific dietary modifications, novel medical devices and pharmacotherapy. Novel therapeutic targets include not only appetite but also taste/food preferences, energy expenditure, gut microbiota, bile acid signalling, inflammation, preservation of β-cell function and hepatic glucose output, among others. Although there are no magic bullets, an integrated multimodal approach may yield success. Non-surgical interventions that mimic the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery, with a reduced morbidity and mortality burden, remain tenable alternatives for patients and health-care professionals. PMID:24213310

  19. Salt taste after bariatric surgery and weight loss in obese persons

    PubMed Central

    Maedge, Julia; Lam, Linda; Blasche, Gerhard; Shakeri-Leidenmühler, Soheila; Kundi, Michael; Ludvik, Bernhard; Langer, Felix B.; Prager, Gerhard; Schindler, Karin; Dürrschmid, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the perception of salty taste in obese patients, especially after bariatric surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse possible differences in salt detection thresholds and preferences for foods differing in salt content in obese persons before and after bariatric surgery with weight loss compared to non-obese individuals. Methods. Sodium chloride detection thresholds and liking for cream soups with different salt concentrations were studied with established tests. Moreover, a brief salt food questionnaire was assessed to identify the usage and awareness of salt in food. Results. The results showed similar mean sodium chloride detection thresholds between non-obese and obese participants. After bariatric surgery a non-significant increase in the salt detection threshold was observed in the obese patients (mean ± SD: 0.44 ± 0.24 g NaCl/L before OP vs. 0.64 ± 0.47 g NaCl/L after OP, p = 0.069). Cream soup liking between controls and obese patients were not significantly different. However, significant sex specific differences were detected with the tested women not liking the soups (p < 0.001). Results from the food questionnaire were similar between the groups. Conclusion. No differences between non-obese persons and obese patients were shown regarding the salt detection threshold. However, due to highly significant differences in soup liking, sex should be taken into consideration when conducting similar sensory studies. PMID:27330856

  20. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures.

  1. Current challenges in providing bariatric surgery in France: A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Czernichow, Sébastien; Paita, Michel; Nocca, David; Msika, Simon; Basdevant, Arnaud; Millat, Bertrand; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is a well-accepted procedure for severe and massive obesity management. We aimed to determine trends, geographical variations, and factors influencing bariatric surgery and the choice of procedure in France in a large observational study.The Health Insurance Fund for Salaried Workers (Caisse National Assurance Maladie Travailleurs Salariés) covers about 86% of the French population. The Système National d'Information Inter-régimes de l'Assurance Maladie database contains individualized and anonymized patient data on all reimbursements for healthcare expenditure. All types of primary bariatric procedures (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or omega loop, adjustable gastric banding [AGB], or longitudinal sleeve gastrectomy [LSG]) performed during 2011 to 2013 were systematically recorded. Surgical techniques performed by region of residence and age-range relative risks with 95% confidence intervals of undergoing LSG or RYGB versus AGB were computed.In 2013, LSG was performed more frequently than RYGB and AGB (57% vs 31% and 13%, respectively). A total of 41,648 patients underwent a bariatric procedure; they were predominantly female (82%) with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 40 (±12) years and a body mass index ≥40 kg/m for 68% of them. A total of 114 procedures were performed in patients younger than 18 years and 2381 procedures were performed in patients aged 60 years and older. Beneficiaries of the French universal health insurance coverage for low-income patients were more likely to undergo surgery than the general population. Large nationwide variations were observed in the type choice of bariatric surgical procedures. Significant positive predictors for undergoing RYGB compared to those for undergoing AGB were as follows: referral to a center performing a large number of surgeries or to a public hospital, older age, female gender, body mass index ≥50 kg/m, and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, or

  2. Bariatric surgery for a patient with a HeartMate II ventricular assist device for destination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Kathleen L; Allen, Carrie; Lohmann, Douglas; Severyn, Donald A; Schaub, Richard D; Kauffman, Kelly E; Hodges, Jeffrey R; Woodhall, Lorna; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Eckert, Chad E; Kormos, Robert L

    2013-03-01

    A patient with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device who had a body mass index of 52 needed gastric bypass surgery in order to qualify for a heart transplant. Unlike previous experience in which the surgery was performed at the implant hospital, the gastric bypass surgery in this case was performed at a bariatric center of excellence that was a separate facility from the implant hospital. The artificial heart program of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center worked with the bariatric center of excellence in scheduling the gastric bypass surgery using a multidisciplinary team approach at 2 hospitals to coordinate safe, high-quality patient care in a unique situation.

  3. Bariatric Surgery Patients' Perceptions of Weight-Related Stigma in Healthcare Settings Impair Post-surgery Dietary Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Raves, Danielle M.; Brewis, Alexandra; Trainer, Sarah; Han, Seung-Yong; Wutich, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Weight-related stigma is reported frequently by higher body-weight patients in healthcare settings. Bariatric surgery triggers profound weight loss. This weight loss may therefore alleviate patients' experiences of weight-related stigma within healthcare settings. In non-clinical settings, weight-related stigma is associated with weight-inducing eating patterns. Dietary adherence is a major challenge after bariatric surgery. Objectives: (1) Evaluate the relationship between weight-related stigma and post-surgical dietary adherence; (2) understand if weight loss reduces weight-related stigma, thereby improving post-surgical dietary adherence; and (3) explore provider and patient perspectives on adherence and stigma in healthcare settings. Design: This mixed methods study contrasts survey responses from 300 postoperative bariatric patients with ethnographic data based on interviews with 35 patients and extensive multi-year participant-observation within a clinic setting. The survey measured experiences of weight-related stigma, including from healthcare professionals, on the Interpersonal Sources of Weight Stigma scale and internalized stigma based on the Weight Bias Internalization Scale. Dietary adherence measures included patient self-reports, non-disordered eating patterns reported on the Disordered Eating after Bariatric Surgery scale, and food frequencies. Regression was used to assess the relationships among post-surgical stigma, dietary adherence, and weight loss. Qualitative analyses consisted of thematic analysis. Results: The quantitative data show that internalized stigma and general experiences of weight-related stigma predict worse dietary adherence, even after weight is lost. The qualitative data show patients did not generally recognize this connection, and health professionals explained it as poor patient compliance. Conclusion: Reducing perceptions of weight-related stigma in healthcare settings and weight bias internalization could

  4. Tobacco use and substance use disorders as predictors of postoperative weight loss 2 years after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Claire E; Gabriele, Jeanne M; Baillie, Lauren E; Dubbert, Patricia M

    2012-10-01

    Although evaluations of tobacco and substance use disorders (SUDs) are required before bariatric surgery, the impact of these factors on postsurgical outcomes is unclear. This study describes (1) the prevalence of tobacco and SUDs in 61 veterans undergoing bariatric surgery, (2) associations between presurgical tobacco use and postsurgical weight loss, and (3) relationships between presurgical SUDs and postsurgical weight loss. Height, weight, tobacco, and SUDs were assessed from medical charts at presurgery and 6, 12, and 24 months postsurgery. Thirty-three patients (55%) were former or recent tobacco users; eight (13%) had history of SUDs. All patients who quit smoking within 6 months before surgery resumed after surgery, which was associated with increased weight loss at 6 and 12 months. Presurgical SUDs were related to marginally worse weight loss at 12 and 24 months. Bariatric surgery candidates with history of smoking and/or SUDs might benefit from additional services to improve postsurgical outcomes.

  5. Screening pre-bariatric surgery patients for esophageal disease with esophageal capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashish; Boettcher, Erica; Fahmy, Marianne; Savides, Thomas; Horgan, Santiago; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Sedrak, Michael; Kalmaz, Denise

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if esophageal capsule endoscopy (ECE) is an adequate diagnostic alternative to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in pre-bariatric surgery patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective pilot study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ECE (PillCam ESO2, Given Imaging) vs conventional EGD in pre-bariatric surgery patients. Patients who were scheduled for bariatric surgery and referred for pre-operative EGD were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent ECE followed by standard EGD. Two experienced gastroenterologists blinded to the patient’s history and the findings of the EGD reviewed the ECE and documented their findings. The gold standard was the findings on EGD. RESULTS: Ten patients with an average body mass index of 50 kg/m2 were enrolled and completed the study. ECE identified 11 of 14 (79%) positive esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) findings and 14 of 17 (82%) combined esophageal and gastric findings identified on EGD. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the findings and no significant difference was found between ECE and EGD (P = 0.64 for esophageal/GEJ and P = 0.66 for combined esophageal and gastric findings respectively). Of the positive esophageal/GEJ findings, ECE failed to identify the following: hiatal hernia in two patients, mild esophagitis in two patients, and mild Schatzki ring in two patients. ECE was able to identify the entire esophagus in 100%, gastric cardia in 0%, gastric body in 100%, gastric antrum in 70%, pylorus in 60%, and duodenum in 0%. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the likelihood of identifying a positive finding using ECE compared with EGD in preoperative evaluation of bariatric patients. PMID:24115815

  6. [Is the morbid obesity surgery profitable in times of crisis? A cost-benefit analysis of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Santos, Raquel; Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Estévez Fernandez, Sergio; del Castillo Dejardin, Daniel; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Frutos Bernal, Dolores; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Masdevall Noguera, Carlos; Torres García, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Morbid obesity is a serious health problem whose prevalence is increasing. Expensive co-morbidities are associated to these patients, as well as a reduction in the survival. Bariatric surgery resolves the co-morbidities (type 2 diabetes mellitus, 86.6%; cardiovascular risk, 79.0%; obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, 83.6%; hypertension, 61.7%), reduces the mortality rate (among 31-40%), and increases the morbid obese patients survival over a 10-years period. It provides significant savings for the National Health System. The obese patients consume a 20% plus of health resources and 68% plus of drugs than general population. Bariatric surgery requires an initial investment (diagnosis-related group cost: 7,468 €), but it is recovered in a cost-effectiveness ratio of 2.5 years. Significant savings are obtained from the third year. To the direct economic benefits associated with reduced health expenditures it should be added an increase in tax collection (sick leave and unemployment reduction is estimated in 18%, with a productivity increase of 57% for self-employed people). Bariatric surgery is one of the most cost-effective procedures in the healthcare system.

  7. Guidelines on Vitamin D Replacement in Bariatric Surgery: Identification and Systematic Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Chakhtoura, M; Nakhoul, N; Akl, EA; Mantzoros, C; El Hajj Fuleihan, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option to reduce weight in morbidly obese individuals, but it results in a number of mineral and vitamin deficiencies. Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) attempt to balance those benefits and harms to provide guidance to physicians and patients. Objectives We compare and evaluate the quality of the evidence and of the development process of current CPGs that provide recommendations on vitamin D replacement in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, using a validated tool. Methods We searched 4 databases, with no time restriction, to identify relevant and current CPGs. Two reviewers assessed eligibility and abstracted data, in duplicate. They evaluated the quality of CPGs development process using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research, and Evaluation II (AGREE II) tool that consists of 6 domains. A content expert verified those assessments. Results We identified 3 eligible CPGs: (1) the Endocrine Society (ES) guidelines (2010); (2) the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), The Obesity Society (TOS), and the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery (ASBMS) guidelines (update 2013); and (3) the Interdisciplinary European (IE) guidelines on Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (latest update 2014). The ES and the AACE/TOS/ASBMS guidelines recommended high doses of vitamin D, varying from 3,000 IU daily to 50,000 IU 1-3 times weekly. Vitamin D doses were not mentioned in the IE guidelines. The recommendations were based on a low quality of evidence, if any, or limited to a single high quality trial, for some outcomes. In terms of quality, only the IE guidelines described their search methodology but none of the CPGs provided details on evidence selection and appraisal. None of the three CPGs rigorously assessed the preferences of the target population, resource implications, and the applicability of these guidelines. According to the AGREE II tool, we rated the ES guidelines as

  8. The influence of preoperative psychological factors on weight loss after bariatric surgery: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Petrucci, Ilaria; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Callari, Cosimo; Giustacchini, Piero; Sollazzi, Liliana; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bellantone, Rocco; Raffaelli, Marco

    2016-11-15

    Aim of this study was to investigate relationship between preoperative psychological factors and % total weight loss after gastric bypass. 76 adult patients scheduled for bariatric surgery were preoperatively asked to complete anxiety and depression Hamilton scales and Toronto Alexithymia Scale. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, body weight was assessed. At 6-month follow-up, alexithymic patients showed a poorer % total weight loss compared with non-alexithymic patients (p = .017), and moderately depressed patients showed a lower % total weight loss compared with non-depressed patients (p = .011). Focused pre- and postoperative psychological support could be useful in bariatric patients in order to improve surgical outcome.

  9. BINGE EATING DISORDER AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Ana Júlia Rosa Barcelos; PINTO, Sônia Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Background : Obesity decreases the quality of life, which is aggravated by the association of comorbidities, and the binge eating disorder is directly related to body image and predisposes to overweight. Aim: Evaluate association between the presence and the level of binge eating disorder and the quality of life of the obese candidates for bariatric surgery. Methods : Cross-sectional study analyzing anthropometric data (weight and height) and socioeconomics (age, sex, marital status, education and income). The application of Binge Eating Scale was held for diagnosis of Binge Eating Disorder and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-From Health Survey to assess the quality of life. Results : Total sample studied was 96 patients, mean age 38.15±9.6 years, 80.2% female, 67.7% married, 41% with complete and incomplete higher education, 77.1% with lower income or equal to four the minimum salary, 59.3% with grade III obesity. Binge eating disorder was observed in 44.2% of patients (29.9% moderate and 14.3% severe), and these had the worst scores in all domains of quality of life SF36 scale; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Only the nutritional status presented significant statistically association with the presence of binge eating disorder. Conclusion : High prevalence of patients with binge eating disorder was found and they presented the worst scores in all domains of quality of life. PMID:26537275

  10. Through Thick and Thin: Identifying Barriers to Bariatric Surgery, Weight Loss Maintenance, and Tailoring Obesity Treatment for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Westerveld, Donevan; Yang, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    More than one-third of the adults in the United States are obese. This complex metabolic disorder is associated with multiple comorbidities and increased all-cause mortality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be more effective than medical therapy and has been associated with weight loss maintenance and decreased mortality. In spite of these well-established benefits, less than 1% of candidates undergo surgery due to multiple factors, such as patient and physician perceptions and attitudes, patient-physician interaction, lack of resources, and cost burden. Furthermore, even in patients who do undergo bariatric surgery and/or alternate weight loss interventions, long-term weight control is associated with high-risk failure and weight regain. In this review, we highlight some of the current barriers to bariatric surgery and long-term weight loss maintenance and underscore the importance of an individualized multidisciplinary longitudinal strategy for the treatment of obesity. PMID:27314062

  11. Quasi-prospective, real-life monitoring of food craving post-bariatric surgery: comparison with overweight and normal weight women.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H; Tetley, D; Hill, A J

    2014-06-01

    Food cravings are common post-bariatric surgery, suggested as predictors of relapse and weight regain, but relatively unstudied, especially in the longer term. The present study investigated the frequency and nature of food craving experiences after gastric surgery in comparison with non-surgical control participants. Participants were 21 women, 4-38 months post-surgery (mean age = 44 years, 9 following gastric banding, 12 after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), and two comparison samples of 39 overweight dieters and 33 normal weight non-dieters. They completed a food craving record after every food craving, a daily mood assessment and a food diary over a 7-day period. Over the 299 craving episodes, savoury foods were the most commonly craved (40% of craving events), followed by chocolate (31%). Post-bariatric patients reported more and stronger cravings than normal weight non-dieters but at a similar frequency and strength to overweight dieters. Neither hunger nor negative mood distinguished the food cravings of post-bariatric patients from those of comparison participants, nor did the proportion that led to eating (58%). Food cravings should be anticipated post-bariatric surgery but no more so at 12 months post-surgery than by other overweight or obese individuals. Food cravings are not the product of extreme hunger nor do they have the connection with negative mood seen in disordered eating. In addition, the ability to fulfil cravings by eating the craved food is reduced by the surgery itself, although the duration of surgical restraint is uncertain.

  12. Measurement of disordered eating in bariatric surgery candidates: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katrina; Brennan, Leah

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of disordered eating are common among patients seeking bariatric surgery, and assessment of eating pathology is typical in pre-surgical evaluations. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the definitions, diagnostic criteria and measures used to assess disordered eating in adults seeking bariatric surgery. The review identified 147 articles featuring 34 questionnaires and 45 interviews used in pre-surgical assessments. The Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns Revised and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM were the most frequently used questionnaire and interview respectively. Variations to pre-surgical diagnostic criteria included changes to the frequency and duration criteria for binge eating, and inconsistent use of disordered eating definitions (e.g., grazing). Results demonstrate a paucity of measures designed specifically for an obese sample, and only 24% of questionnaires and 4% of interviews used had any reported psychometric evaluation in bariatric surgery candidates. The psychometric data available suggest that interview assessments are critical for accurately identifying binge episodes and other diagnostic information, while self-report questionnaires may be valuable for providing additional information of clinical utility (e.g., severity of eating, shape and weight-related concerns). Findings highlight the need for consensus on disordered eating diagnostic criteria and psychometric evaluation of measures to determine whether existing measures provide a valid assessment of disordered eating in this population. Consistent diagnosis and the use of validated measures will facilitate accurate identification of disordered eating in the pre-surgical population to enable assessment of suitability for surgery and appropriate targeting of treatment for disordered eating to optimise treatment success.

  13. COMPARISON OF HEPATIC PROFILE IN PRE AND POSTOPERATIVE OF BARIATRIC SURGERY: PRIVATE VS PUBLIC NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    NASCIMENTO, Taianne Machado; ALVES-JÚNIOR, Antônio; NUNES, Marco Antonio Prado; de FREITAS, Tiago Rodrigo Pereira; da SILVA, Marco Antonio Fontes Sarmento; ALVES, Maria Rosa Melo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated to several comorbidities, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which implicates in isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis. The latter may progress to severe manifestations such as liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Aim: To compare the presence of advanced liver fibrosis before and after bariatric surgery in patients of private and public health system. Methods: Patients from public and privative networks were studied before and after bariatric surgery. The presence or absence of advanced hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by NAFLD Fibrosis Score, a non-invasive method that uses age, BMI, AST/ALT ratio, albumin, platelet count and the presence or absence of hyperglycemia or diabetes. The characteristics of the two groups were compared. The established statistical significance criterion was p<0.05. Results: Were analyzed 40 patients with a mean age of 34.6±9.5 years for private network and 40.6± 10.2 years for public. The study sample, 35% were treated at private health system and 65% in the public ones, 38% male and 62% female. Preoperatively in the private network one (7.1%) patient had advanced liver fibrosis and developed to the absence of liver fibrosis after surgery. In the public eight (30.8%) patients had advanced liver fibrosis preoperatively, and at one year after the proportion fell to six (23%). Conclusion: The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in its advanced form is more prevalent in obese patients treated in the public network than in the treated at the private network and bariatric surgery may be important therapeutic option in both populations. PMID:26734800

  14. Eating Behavior and Eating Disorders in Adults Prior to Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Courcoulas, Anita; Dakin, George; Elder, Katherine; Engel, Scott; Flum, David; Kalarchian, Melissa; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Pender, John; Pories, Walter; Wolfe, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe eating patterns, prevalence of problematic eating behaviors, and determine factors associated with binge eating disorder (BED), prior to bariatric surgery. Method Prior to surgery, 2,266 participants (median age 46 years; 78.6% female; 86.9% white; median body mass index 45.9 kg/m2) of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 (LABS-2) study completed eating behavior survey items in the self-administered LABS-2 Behavior form. Other measures included the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, the LABS-2 Psychiatric and Emotional Test Survey, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12, the Short Form-36 Health Survey and Impact of Weight Quality of Life-Lite Survey. Results The vast majority (92.1%) of participants reported eating dinner regularly, while just over half (54.0%) reported eating breakfast regularly. Half of the participants reported eating at least 4 meals/week at restaurants; two meals/week were fast food. Loss of control eating was reported by 43.4%, night eating syndrome by 17.7%; 15.7% satisfied criteria for binge eating disorder (BED), 2% for bulimia nervosa. Factors that independently increased the odds of BED were being a college graduate, eating more times per day, taking medication for psychiatric or emotional problems, and having symptoms of alcohol use disorder, lower self-esteem and greater depressive symptoms. Discussion Prior to undergoing bariatric surgery a substantial proportion of patients report problematic eating behaviors. Several factors associated with BED were identified, most suggesting other mental health problems, including higher levels of depressive symptomotology. The strengths of this study include the large sample size, the multi-center design and use of standardized assessment practices. PMID:24719222

  15. Endoluminal solutions to bariatric surgery complications: A review with a focus on technical aspects and results

    PubMed Central

    Souto-Rodríguez, Raquel; Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a growing problem in developed countries, and surgery is the most effective treatment in terms of weight loss and improving medical comorbidity in a high proportion of obese patients. Despite the advances in surgical techniques, some patients still develop acute and late postoperative complications, and an endoscopic evaluation is often required for diagnosis. Moreover, the high morbidity related to surgical reintervention, the important enhancement of endoscopic procedures and technological innovations introduced in endoscopic equipment have made the endoscopic approach a minimally-invasive alternative to surgery, and, in many cases, a suitable first-line treatment of bariatric surgery complications. There is now evidence in the literature supporting endoscopic management for some of these complications, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, stomal and marginal ulcers, stomal stenosis, leaks and fistulas or pancreatobiliary disorders. However, endoscopic treatment in this setting is not standardized, and there is no consensus on its optimal timing. In this article, we aim to analyze the secondary complications of the most expanded techniques of bariatric surgery with special emphasis on those where more solid evidence exists in favor of the endoscopic treatment. Based on a thorough review of the literature, we evaluated the performance and safety of different endoscopic options for every type of complication, highlighting the most recent innovations and including comparative data with surgical alternatives whenever feasible. PMID:28360973

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qi; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhang, Nengwei; Xu, Guangzhong; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through treatment with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and to analyze the cost-effectiveness of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB in T2DM patients (BMI ≥ 28). A 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at Diabetes Surgery Centre, Beijing Shijitan Hospital in Beijing, China. Subjects were 80 patients ages 16 to 65 years with a body mass index of 28 kg/m2 or more and duration of T2DM no more than 15 years. Subjects were randomly assigned (1:1) to undergo either LSG (n = 40) or LRYGB (n = 40) between February 3, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Of those patients, 72 (90%) were available at follow-up at 2 years. These patients included 34 (85%) who underwent LSG and 38 (95%) who underwent LRYGB. This study presents the follow-up data at 2 years, which compared LSG and LRYGB in T2DM patients. Partial remission and complete remission were determined, and weight loss, BMI, changes in abdominal circumference, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. The cost-effectiveness of each type of bariatric surgery was analyzed with a Markov simulation model that yielded quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs. From our analysis results, LSG and LRYGB are both have taken a great effect on the reduction of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and bodyweight in patients with T2DM. The cost-effectiveness ratios of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB respectively are 1589.02, 1028.97, and 1197.44 dollars per QALY. Our analysis indicates that LSG appear to provide a cost-effective method of T2DM treatment for the patients. PMID:27196454

  17. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; ALMEIDA, Élia Cláudia de Souza; CAMILO, Silvia Maria Perrone; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; GUIMARÃES, Lucinda Calheiros; DUQUE, Ana Cristina da Rocha; ETCHEBEHERE, Renata Margarida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. Aim: To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. Methods: This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. Results: In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. Conclusion: There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. PMID:27683773

  18. Meta-analysis of bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zheng; Fu, Xing-li; Zhou, Hai-sen; Zhang, Wen; Tian, Zhi-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare short-term and long-term results of bariatric surgery vs non-surgical treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A systematic search was conducted in the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). All statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager version 5.3. The dichotomous data was calculated using risk ratio (RR) and continuous data was using mean differences (MD) along with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results A total of 8 RCTs with 619 T2DM patients were analyzed. Compared with non-surgical treatment group, bariatric surgery group was associated with higher rate T2DM remission (RR = 5.76, 95%CI:3.15-10.55, P < 0.00001), more reduction HbA1C (MD = 1.29, 95%CI: -1.70 to -0.87, P < 0.00001), more decrease fasting plasma glucose (MD = -36.38, 95%CI: -51.76 to -21.01, P < 0.00001), greater loss body weight (MD = -16.93, 95%CI: 19.78 to -14.08, P < 0.00001), more reduction body mass index (MD = -5.80, 95%CI: -6.95 to -4.64, P < 0.00001), more decrease triglyceride concentrations (MD = -51.27, 95%CI: -74.13 to -28.41, P < 0.0001), and higher increase density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD = 9.10, 95%CI: 7.99 to 10.21; P < 0.00001). But total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were no significant changes. Conclusion Bariatric surgery for T2DM is efficacious and improves short- and long-term outcomes as compared with non-surgical treatment. PMID:27626180

  19. ASSESSMENT OF BODY FAT IN OBESE PATIENTS PREOPERATIVELY FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDEZ, Mônica; TOIMIL, Rosana Farah; RASSLAN, Zied; ILIAS, Elias Jirjoss; GRADINAR, Ana Lúcia Torloni; MALHEIROS, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The study of body composition in patient candidates for bariatric surgery is directly related to the increase and distribution of body fat in the development of cardiovascular disease. Aim: To correlate anthropometric indicators and bioelectrical impedance in the assessment of body fat in female candidates for bariatric surgery. Methods: Cross-sectional, observational study of 88 women. The weight, height, body mass index and waist circumference data were evaluated in the anthropometric analysis. The body fat was determinate by bioelectrical impedance conducted according to the manufacturer´s recommended technique with a specific severe obesity formula. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the average waist circumference and body mass index for better analysis of the results. Results: The group had a mean age of 39.7 years (±7.2), average weight of 125.6 kg (±16.2), mean body mass index of 48.7 kg/m2 (±6.4) and the mean waist circumference 137.6 cm (±12.4). Negative and significant relationship between BMI values waist circumference and resistance obtained by bioelectrical impedance ​​were found. By analyzing the two groups the mean BMI and waist circumference, a significant relationship was observed, ie, the higher the degree of obesity less resistance was obtained by bioelectrical impedance. The higher is the obesity the lower is value found for resistance. Conclusion: The increase of anthropometric indicators (BMI and waist circumference) determined reduction in resistance and reactance obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis in obese women candidates to bariatric surgery. PMID:27683778

  20. Effects of bariatric surgery for knee complaints in (morbidly) obese adult patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Groen, V A; van de Graaf, V A; Scholtes, V A B; Sprague, S; van Wagensveld, B A; Poolman, R W

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis, and over the past 30 years the prevalence of obesity has more than doubled. In an advanced-stage knee osteoarthritis is treated with total knee arthroplasty, and the demand for primary total knee arthroplasties is expected to grow exponentially. However, total knee arthroplasty in obese patients is associated with more complications, longer hospital stay and higher costs. We aimed to determine the effects of bariatric surgery on knee complaints in (morbidly) obese (body mass index >30 kg m(-2) ) adult patients. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, TRIP, BIOSIS-Previews and reference lists of retrieved publications were systematically searched from earliest available up to 20 April 2014 for any English, German, French and Dutch studies. There was no restriction on study design. We included studies on the effect of surgically induced weight reduction on knee complaints in (morbidly) obese adult patients, with a minimal follow-up of 3 months. Studies on the effects of lipectomy or liposuction and studies in which patients had already received a total knee arthroplasty were excluded. Thirteen studies were included in this systematic review with a total of 3,837 patients. Although different assessment tools were used, an overall significant improvement in knee pain was seen in 73% out of the used assessments. All studies measuring intensity of knee pain, knee physical function and knee stiffness showed a significant improvement after bariatric surgery. The quality of evidence was very low or too low for most of the included studies and moderate for one study. Bariatric surgery with subsequent marked weight loss is likely to improve knee pain, physical function and stiffness in (morbidly) obese adult patients. However, with the current available evidence, there is need for high-quality studies.

  1. Changes in Whole Blood Gene Expression in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Following Bariatric Surgery: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Stela Z.; Serre, David; Schauer, Philip; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background A pilot study was performed in order to investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on whole blood gene expression profiles in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Whole blood from eleven obese subjects with type 2 diabetes was collected in PAXgene tubes prior to and 6–12 months after bariatric surgery. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Illumina gene expression microarrays. Clinical and expression data were analyzed using a paired t-test, and correlations between changes in clinical trait and transcript levels were calculated. Pathways were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and DAVID gene ontology software. Overall, bariatric surgery resulted in significant reduction of body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, and normalization of glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The expression levels of 204 transcripts, representing 200 unique genes, were significantly altered after bariatric surgery. Among the significantly regulated genes were GGT1, CAMP, DEFA1, LCN2, TP53, PDSS1, OLR1, CNTNAP5, DHCR24, HHAT and SARDH, which have been previously implicated in lipid metabolism, obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. Selected findings were replicated by quantitative real-time-PCR. The changes in expression of seven transcripts, WDR35, FLF45244, DHCR24, TIGD7, TOPBP1, TSHZ1, and FAM8A1 were strongly correlated with the changes in body weight, fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin content. The top pathways associated with gene expression changes after bariatric surgery was lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and gene expression. Two antimicrobial peptides were among the transcripts with the largest changes in gene expression after bariatric surgery. Conclusions/Significance Data from this pilot study suggest that whole blood expression levels of specific transcripts may be useful as biomarkers associated with susceptibility for type 2 diabetes and/or therapeutic

  2. Potential applications of global protein expression analysis (proteomics) in morbid obesity and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Brandacher, Gerald; Golderer, Georg; Kienzl, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R; Margreiter, Raimund; Weiss, Helmut G

    2008-07-01

    Global protein expression analysis, known as proteomics, has emerged as a novel scientific technology currently successfully applied to several fields of medicine including cancer and transplantation. Thereby, a thorough exploration of the pathogenic mechanisms and a better understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases as well as identification of diagnostic biomarkers have been achieved. In this paper, we outline the basic principles and potential applications of this promising tool in bariatric surgery where proteomics might hold great potential for new insights into diagnostic and therapeutic decision making based on improved knowledge of metabolic regulations pre- and postsurgical interventions in morbidly obese patients.

  3. Effect of Weight Loss, Diet, Exercise, and Bariatric Surgery on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hannah, William N; Harrison, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD is the most common liver disease in developed countries. Weight reduction of 3% to 5% is associated with improved steatosis; reductions of 5% to 7% are necessary for decreased inflammation; with 7% to 10%, individuals may experience NAFLD/NASH remission and regression of fibrosis. No specific dietary intervention has proven beneficial beyond calorie restriction. Physical activity without weight loss seems to decrease hepatic steatosis. Bariatric surgery is associated with decreased cardiovascular risk and improved overall mortality in addition to reduction in hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis.

  4. Objective Assessment of Time Spent Being Sedentary in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Unick, Jessica L.; Jakicic, John M.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G. Dean; Ryder, Beth A.; Sax, Harry C.; Giovanni, Jeannine; Wing, Rena R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery candidates spend very little time in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (≥3 metabolic equivalents [METs]). This study examined (1) how much of their remaining time is spent in sedentary behaviors (SB<1.5 METs) compared to light-intensity activities (1.5–2.9 METs) and (2) whether sedentary time varies by BMI. Methods Daily time (hours, %) spent in SB was examined in 42 surgery candidates (BMI=49.5±7.9 kg/m2) using the SenseWear Pro2 Armband. Participants were stratified by BMI to assess the relationship between degree of obesity and SB. Results Participants wore the armband for 5.4±0.7 days and 13.3±1.7 h/day. On average, 81.4% (10.9±2.1 h/day) of this time was spent in SB. Participants with BMI≥50 spent nearly an hour more per day in SB than those with BMI 35–49.9 (p=0.01). Conclusions Bariatric surgery candidates spend over 80% of their time in SB. Reducing SB may help to increase physical activity in these patients. PMID:20393808

  5. An Untargeted Metabolomics Approach to Characterize Short-Term and Long-Term Metabolic Changes after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Narath, Sophie H.; Mautner, Selma I.; Svehlikova, Eva; Schultes, Bernd; Pieber, Thomas R.; Sinner, Frank M.; Gander, Edgar; Libiseller, Gunnar; Schimek, Michael G.; Sourij, Harald; Magnes, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently one of the most effective treatments for obesity and leads to significant weight reduction, improved cardiovascular risk factors and overall survival in treated patients. To date, most studies focused on short-term effects of bariatric surgery on the metabolic profile and found high variation in the individual responses to surgery. The aim of this study was to identify relevant metabolic changes not only shortly after bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) but also up to one year after the intervention by using untargeted metabolomics. 132 serum samples taken from 44 patients before surgery, after hospital discharge (1–3 weeks after surgery) and at a 1-year follow-up during a prospective study (NCT01271062) performed at two study centers (Austria and Switzerland). The samples included 24 patients with type 2 diabetes at baseline, thereof 9 with diabetes remission after one year. The samples were analyzed by using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS, HILIC-QExactive). Raw data was processed with XCMS and drift-corrected through quantile regression based on quality controls. 177 relevant metabolic features were selected through Random Forests and univariate testing and 36 metabolites were identified. Identified metabolites included trimethylamine-N-oxide, alanine, phenylalanine and indoxyl-sulfate which are known markers for cardiovascular risk. In addition we found a significant decrease in alanine after one year in the group of patients with diabetes remission relative to non-remission. Our analysis highlights the importance of assessing multiple points in time in subjects undergoing bariatric surgery to enable the identification of biomarkers for treatment response, cardiovascular benefit and diabetes remission. Key-findings include different trend pattern over time for various metabolites and demonstrated that short term changes should not necessarily be used to identify important long

  6. Trends in oral drug bioavailability following bariatric surgery: examining the variable extent of impact on exposure of different drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, Adam S; Henderson, Kathryn; Burgin, Angela; Ward, Nicola; Whittam, Janet; Ammori, Basil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To identify the most commonly prescribed drugs in a bariatric surgery population and to assess existing evidence regarding trends in oral drug bioavailability post bariatric surgery. METHODS A retrospective audit was undertaken to document commonly prescribed drugs amongst patients undergoing bariatric surgery in an NHS hospital in the UK and to assess practice for drug administration following bariatric surgery. The available literature was examined for trends relating to drug permeability and solubility with regards to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and main route of elimination. RESULTS No significant difference in the ‘post/pre surgery oral drug exposure ratio’ (ppR) was apparent between BCS class I to IV drugs, with regards to dose number (Do) or main route of elimination. Drugs classified as ‘solubility limited’ displayed an overall reduction as compared with ‘freely soluble’ compounds, as well as an unaltered and increased ppR. CONCLUSION Clinical studies establishing guidelines for commonly prescribed drugs, and the monitoring of drugs exhibiting a narrow therapeutic window or without a readily assessed clinical endpoint, are warranted. Using mechanistically based pharmacokinetic modelling for simulating the multivariate nature of changes in drug exposure may serve as a useful tool in the further understanding of postoperative trends in oral drug exposure and in developing practical clinical guidance. PMID:22463107

  7. EVALUATION OF THE THORACOABDOMINAL MOBILITY OF OBESE SUBJECTS IN PRE-BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VELOSO, Ana Paula Limongi Richardelli; CUSMANICH, Karla Garcez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity can affect the thorax, diaphragm, and alterations in respiratory function even if the lungs are within normality. The respiratory compliance is very reduced by the increase in fat mass. Aim: To evaluate the effect of the physical therapeutic respiratory exercises on the thoracoabdominal mobility of obese individuals in pre-bariatric surgery Methods: Cross-sectional and descriptive study, which used the cirtometry (axillary, xiphoid and abdominal) to evaluate the mobility of 74 individuals, 27 men and 47 women, in pre-bariatric surgery, assisted by the team EMAD, after eight weeks of physiotherapy, following a protocol of exercises, reevaluating and compared the measures pre and post intervention. Results: Had positive correlation abdominal mobility in the total volume of all participants (p=0.010) and also for all the measures in the measurement of residual volume in three levels (p=0.000). Comparing genders, in total volume, cirtometry abdominal greater for women (p=0.015) when compared to men and residual volume, significance for either men or women in all measurements (p=0.000). Conclusion: Obese patients that underwent the physiotherapeutic treatment during the preoperative period, had pré respiratory dynamics improved by the increase in the mobility of the chest cavity and by the improvement of respiratory conscience. PMID:27683774

  8. New obesity classification criteria as a tool for bariatric surgery indication

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Soldati, Laura; Sarlo, Francesca; Calvani, Menotti; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Di Renzo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Obesity plays relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, and metabolic factors. Due to the role of adipose tissue in lipid and glucose metabolism, and low grade inflammation, it is necessary to classify obesity on the basis of body fat composition and distribution, rather than the simply increase of body weight, and the Body Mass Index. The new term of adiposopathy (‘‘sick fat’’) clearly defines the pathogenic role of adipose tissue. Four phenotypes of obese individuals have been described: (1) normal weight obese (NWO); (2) metabolically obese normal weight; (3) metabolically healthy obese; and (4) metabolically unhealthy obese or “at risk” obese. Moreover, sarcopenic obesity has been related to all the phenotypes. The category of normal weight lean, represented by metabolically healthy normal weight has been classified to distinguish from NWO. It is crucial to recommend a bariatric surgery taking into account adiposopathy and sick fat that occurs with the expansion of fat mass, changing the inflammatory and metabolic profile of the patient. Body fat percentage and genetic polymorphism have to be evaluated to personalize the best bariatric surgery intervention. PMID:26811617

  9. Fatal Nonhepatic Hyperammonemia in ICU Setting: A Rare but Serious Complication following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sunil; Patel, Ronakkumar; Frunza-Stefan, Simona; Kaur, Harmanjot

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is well established in reducing weight and improving the obesity-associated morbidity and mortality. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy following bariatric surgery is rare but highly fatal if not diagnosed in time and managed aggressively. Both macro- and micronutrients deficiencies play a role. A 42-year-old Hispanic female with a history of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Procedure was brought to ED for progressive altered mental status. Physical exam was remarkable for drowsiness with Glasgow Coma Scale 11, ascites, and bilateral pedal edema. Labs showed elevated ammonia, low hemoglobin, low serum prealbumin, albumin, HDL, and positive toxicology. She remained obtunded despite the treatment with Narcan and flumazenil and the serum ammonia level fluctuated despite standard treatment with lactulose and rifaximin. Laboratory investigations helped to elucidate the etiology of the hyperammonemia most likely secondary to unmasking the functional deficiency of the urea cycle enzymes. Hyperammonemia in the context of normal liver function tests becomes diagnostically challenging for physicians. Severe hyperammonemia is highly fatal. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can alter the prognosis favorably. PMID:27144037

  10. Fuzzy obesity index (MAFOI) for obesity evaluation and bariatric surgery indication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Miyahira-Araujo Fuzzy Obesity Index (MAFOI) for being used as an alternative in bariatric surgery indication (BSI) is validated in this paper. The search for a more accurate method to evaluate obesity and to indicate a better treatment is important in the world health context. Body mass index (BMI) is considered the main criteria for obesity treatment and BSI. Nevertheless, the fat excess related to the percentage of Body Fat (%BF) is actually the principal harmful factor in obesity disease that is usually neglected. The aim of this research is to validate a previous fuzzy mechanism by associating BMI with %BF that yields the Miyahira-Araujo Fuzzy Obesity Index (MAFOI) for obesity evaluation, classification, analysis, treatment, as well for better indication of surgical treatment. Methods Seventy-two patients were evaluated for both BMI and %BF. The BMI and %BF classes are aggregated yielding a new index (MAFOI). The input linguistic variables are the BMI and %BF, and the output linguistic variable is employed an obesity classification with entirely new types of obesity in the fuzzy context, being used for BSI, as well. Results There is gradual and smooth obesity classification and BSI criteria when using the Miyahira-Araujo Fuzzy Obesity Index (MAFOI), mainly if compared to BMI or %BF alone for dealing with obesity assessment, analysis, and treatment. Conclusion The resulting fuzzy decision support system (MAFOI) becomes a feasible alternative for obesity classification and bariatric surgery indication. PMID:21838928

  11. The implications for the surgical community of bariatric surgery as a "cure" for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Josef E

    2013-07-01

    The United States is in the throes of an epidemic of morbid obesity and, parenthetically, type 2 diabetes. Recent data indicate that bariatric surgery, notably Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is valid not only for weight loss but also for a high success rate in the amelioration and perhaps "cure" of type 2 diabetes. It clearly is not weight loss alone, because the amelioration of type 2 diabetes occurs before weight loss. The mechanism needs to be elucidated and researched. For the first time since tuberculosis--before antitubercular drugs, when surgical procedures were the principal mechanism for dealing with tuberculosis--surgery has the opportunity to participate in the amelioration and perhaps cure of this epidemic and to regain its professional stature. Included in this article are the author's thoughts and suggestions on how we can keep control of weight loss and bariatric procedures that are valid treatments for morbid obesity and related type 2 diabetes. We should use this opportunity to stop the current conversion of surgeons from professionals to employees.

  12. The use of sugammadex for bariatric surgery: analysis of recovery time from neuromuscular blockade and possible economic impact

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edoardo; Zito Marinosci, Geremia; Romano, Giovanni Marco; Piazza, Ornella; Iannuzzi, Michele; Cirillo, Fabrizio; De Simone, Stefania; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular block (NMB) monitoring and use of reversal agents accelerate the recovery time and improve the workflow in the operating room. We aimed to compare recovery times after sugammadex or neostigmine administration, and estimate the time spent in operating theater and the possible economic impact of a faster recovery, in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods We conducted a retrospective study that analyzed data from records of morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40 kg/m2) undergoing elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery in which sugammadex or neostigmine were used to reverse NMB. Patients were divided in two groups: group 1 (sugammadex group [SUG]) received rocuronium and sugammadex for reversal and group 2 (neostigmine group [NEO]) received either rocuronium or cisatracurium and neostigmine. Data are presented as mean (standard deviation). Results Compared with NEO, SUG group showed shorter times to achieve train-of-four ratio of 0.9 (P<0.05) and an Aldrete score of 10 (P<0.05), a higher cost (€146.7 vs €3.6 [P<0.05]), plus a remarkable less duration of operating theater occupancy (P<0.05). Sugammadex cost accounted for 2.58% of the total cost per surgery, while neostigmine cost accounted for 0.06%. Total time saved in SUG group was 19.4 hours, which could be used to perform 12 extra laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies. Conclusion Reversal from NMB was significantly faster with sugammadex than with neostigmine. Although sugammadex was substantially more expensive, duration of operating theater occupancy was reduced with potentially workflow increase or personnel reduced cost. PMID:27418846

  13. Effects of bariatric surgery on male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism: comparison of laparoscopic gastric bypass with restrictive procedures.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Berniza; Galdón, Alba; Calañas, Alfonso; Peromingo, Roberto; Galindo, Julio; García-Moreno, Francisca; Rodriguez-Velasco, Gloria; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Vazquez, Clotilde; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric surgery results in the complete resolution of male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in many patients. However, the effects of different bariatric surgical procedures on male sexual hormone profiles and sexual dysfunction have not been compared to date. We compared the pre- and post-operative (at least 6 months after initial surgery) sex hormone profiles of 20 severely obese men submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) with 15 similar patients submitted to restrictive techniques (sleeve gastrectomy in 10 and adjustable gastric banding in 5). We calculated free testosterone (FT) levels from total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations. Fasting glucose and insulin levels served for homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR). MOSH was present in 25 and 16 of the 35 patients when considering TT and FT concentrations respectively, resolving after surgery in all but one of them. When considering all obese men as a whole, patients submitted to LGB or restrictive procedures did not differ in terms of excess weight loss, in the decrease of fasting glucose and insulin, HOMAIR and waist circumference, or in the increase of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, TT and FT levels. The improvement in TT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.390, P = 0.021), insulin (r = -0.425, P = 0.015) and HOMAIR (r = -0.380, P = 0.029), and with the increase in SHBG (r = 0.692, P < 0.001). The increase in FT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.360, P = 0.034). LGB and restrictive techniques are equally effective in producing a remission of MOSH.

  14. Neuro-modulation and bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Spector, D; Shikora, S

    2010-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions and is continuing to grow into one of the leading healthcare issues worldwide. With this development, bariatric surgery has emerged as an acceptable treatment for morbid obesity, generally achieving meaningful and sustained weight loss. In a surprising turn of events, bariatric surgery was also found to be the most effective therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This observation has sparked a great deal of research that has improved our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology; it has facilitated the development of medical treatment and is expanding the indications for bariatric surgery. It was traditionally accepted that bariatric surgery causes weight loss by restriction of gastric volume, intestinal malabsorption, or a combination of the two. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is considered a purely restrictive procedure that involves the placement of an adjustable band around the cardia of the stomach, creating a 15 ml pouch. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is the resection of the fundus all along the greater curvature of the stomach. LSG was once considered a restrictive procedure, but this presumption has recently come under scrutiny. Bilio-pancreatic diversion (BPD) is an example of a procedure that was considered predominantly malabsorptive. In this operation, the ingested nutrients are diverted from the stomach to the ileum, bypassing a large segment of proximal bowel. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) traditionally combines both mechanisms, partitioning a small pouch from the proximal stomach and diverting the ingested nutrients to the jejunum with a roux-en-Y gastro-jejunostomy. However, recent investigation suggests additional mechanisms of action including hormonal. Today, RYGB is the procedure of choice for morbidly obese patients. The effect of bariatric surgery on T2DM was initially described in 1995 by Pories et al., who reported that there was an overall T2DM resolution after RYGB of 82

  15. THE USE OF THE INTERNET BY THE PATIENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: CONTRIBUTIONS AND OBSTACLES FOR THE FOLLOW-UP OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    MARTINS, Michele Pereira; ABREU-RODRIGUES, Marcela; SOUZA, Juciléia Rezende

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background : Bariatric surgery is presented as the last treatment option for obesity. It requires from all candidates a multidisciplinary evaluation and monitoring throughout treatment. The non-adherence to follow-up with health care teams is related to weight regain. It's possible that the use of internet influences the doctor-patient relationship and patients replace medical care or information provided by health professionals for information from the internet. Aim : Identify and analyze the pattern of internet use by patients after bariatric surgery and check the influence of such use in attending medical appointments with the multidisciplinary team. Method : Electronic questionnaire available on the Internet was used to verify patient´s patterns of Internet use and its influence on in attending multidisciplinary care after surgery. Results : Of the 103 participants, 95% were female, 64% married, 59% with children and 54% with higher education. The mean age was 35.69 years and the mean duration of performing surgery, 11.74 months. The surgical technique that prevailed was Roux-en-Y gastric by-pass (90.3%), the local monitoring concentrated in the private care (93.2%). In the preoperative, most participants consulted more than three times with the surgeon (n=81), nutritionists (n=70), psychologist (n=70). After the surgery, p most patients maintained monitoring with the surgeon and nutritionist. Concerning the internet use, 51.5% accessed the internet in search of information about health and bariatric surgery every day. Facebook and search tools were the most used sites. Conclusion - Data showed the influence of the information contained on the Internet and the adherence to multidisciplinary monitoring. This fact requires the team to consider the use of the Internet as a variable that may interfere and must be handled during follow-up. It is suggested that an active participation of professionals on their websites and social networks and the

  16. Psychiatric symptoms and leptin in obese patients who were bariatric surgery candidates

    PubMed Central

    Changchien, Te-Chang; Tai, Chi-Ming; Huang, Chih-Kun; Chien, Chia-Chang; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a significant relationship between obesity and common mental symptoms (depression and anxiety symptoms). But the association between depression (or anxiety symptoms) and serum leptin is still unclear and controversial, despite the growing body of evidence supporting the existence of “leptin resistance” in obese persons. So we investigated whether common mental symptoms, obesity, and the interactive effect of these two factors have a relationship with leptin in obese patients who were candidates for bariatric surgery. Methods In all, 139 participants (mean age: 31.4 years, standard deviation: 9.3 years, 73.4% female) were enrolled at an obesity treatment center in southern Taiwan. Serum leptin levels and body mass index (BMI) were measured. The Chinese Health Questionnaire and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire were administered. Results The mean BMI of our participants was 39.4 kg/m2 (±6.8), and the mean leptin level was 24.5 ng/mL (±9.4). In the multivariate regression models, Chinese Health Questionnaire-by-BMI and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire-by-BMI interaction terms remained significant predictors of leptin level (β=0.16, P<0.0001; β=0.04, P<0.0001, respectively), after adjustment for age, sex, and history of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia, despite the inverse correlation between Chinese Health Questionnaire (or Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire) and leptin. In addition, female patients had significantly higher leptin levels than male patients. Conclusion The present findings confirmed that the relationship between common mental symptoms and leptin is modulated by obesity in severely obese patients. Future studies should focus on further measures of leptin receptors or signaling on the basis of these interactive effects in psychiatry. PMID:26316761

  17. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    PubMed Central

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  18. Comparison Between Marital Satisfaction and Self-Esteem Before and After Bariatric Surgery in Patients With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Lotfi, Tahereh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Mazaheri Meybod, Azadeh; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Jesmi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is one of the most common chronic diseases with important medical effects, as well as mental and social health problems. Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatments of morbid obesity. Objectives Because of the possible psychological changes, and its effects on weight loss after surgery, the current study aimed to compare marital satisfaction and self-confidence in patients with obesity before and after bariatric surgery in Rasoul-e-Akram hospital in 2013. Materials and Methods This prospective observational study was conducted on 69 candidates for bariatric surgery. Marital satisfaction and self-confidence were assessed before and six months after the surgery by Enrich marital satisfaction scale and Coopersmith self-esteem inventory. Descriptive statistics and T-tests were utilized to analyze data. Values of P ≤ 0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results Despite the improvement of sexual relationship, marital satisfaction scores significantly decreased from141.26 ± 12.75 to 139.42 ± 12.52 six months after the surgery (P = 0.002). Satisfaction in scales of conflict resolution and communication showed a descending pattern (P < 0.001). No significant difference was found between self-esteem before and after the surgery (P = 0.321). Conclusions Weight loss after bariatric surgery did not improve self-esteem and marital satisfaction six months post operatively; therefore, psychiatric assessment of patients before and after the surgery is crucial; since even if they are not associated with prognosis of the surgery, it is important to provide treatment for psychiatric problems. Prospective studies are recommended to assess post-operative changes of other psychological aspects. PMID:27822277

  19. Preoperative use of incentive spirometry does not affect postoperative lung function in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cattano, Davide; Altamirano, Alfonso; Vannucci, Andrea; Melnikov, Vladimir; Cone, Chelsea; Hagberg, Carin A

    2010-11-01

    Morbidly obese patients undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic bariatric surgery are considered at increased risk of a postoperative decrease in lung function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a systematic use of incentive spirometry (IS) prior to surgery could help patients to preserve their respiratory function better in the postoperative period. Forty-one morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI] > 40 kg/m²) candidates for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were consented in the study. All patients were taught how to use an incentive spirometer but then were randomized blindly into 2 groups. The control group was instructed to use the incentive spirometer for 3 breaths, once per day. The treatment group was requested to use the incentive spirometer for 10 breaths, 5 times per day. Twenty experimental (mean BMI of 48.9 ± 5.67 kg/m²) and 21 control patients (mean BMI of 48.3 ± 6.96 kg/m²) were studied. The initial mean inspiratory capacity (IC) was 2155 ± 650.08 (SD) cc and 2171 ± 762.98 cc in the experimental and control groups, respectively. On the day of surgery, the mean IC was 2275 ± 777.56 cc versus 2254.76 ± 808.84 cc, respectively. On postoperative day 1, both groups experienced a significant drop of their IC, with volumes of 1458 ± 613.87 cc (t test P < 0.001) and 1557.89 ± 814.67 cc (t test P < 0.010), respectively. Our results suggest that preoperative use of the IS does not lead to significant improvements of inspiratory capacity and that it is a not a useful resource to prevent postoperative decrease in lung function.

  20. Relevance of Adipose Tissue Stiffness Evaluated by Transient Elastography (AdipoScan™) in Morbidly Obese Patients before Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, Magali; Abdennour, Meriem; Liu, Yuejun; Hazrak, Hecham; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Le Naour, Gilles; Bedossa, Pierre; Torjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Miette, Véronique

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) in human obesity undergoes severe alteration such as fibrosis which is related to metabolic alterations and to less efficiency in losing weight after bariatric surgery. There is currently no non-invasive tool to assess fibrosis in scAT. Vibration Controlled Transient Elastography (VCTE) using FibroScan® is widely used to assess liver fibrosis in clinical practice. A novel device named AdipoScan™ which is based on VCTE has been developed by Echosens (Paris) so as to assess scAT. The objective of this study is to show the first AdipoScan clinical results. AdipoScan™ was assessed in vivo on 73 morbidly obese patients candidate for bariatric surgery who were enrolled in the Pitié Salpêtrière hospital. scAT shear wave speed measured by AdipoScan™ is significantly associated with scAT fibrosis, gender, hypertension status, total body fat mass assessed by DXA, hypertension status, glycemic, lipid, hepatic parameters and adiponectin. Results suggest that scAT evaluation before bariatric surgery can be useful in clinical practice since it is related to scAT fibrosis -who plays in role in weight loss resistance after bariatric surgery- and to obesity induced co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension liver dysfunction.

  1. A Cognitive-Behavioral Mindfulness Group Therapy Intervention for the Treatment of Binge Eating in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Irwin, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Binge eating is a negative indicator of post-surgical weight loss and health outcome in bariatric surgery patients (Hsu, Bentancourt, Sullivan, 1996). Cognitive-behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based practices have been shown to successfully treat binge eating (Agras, Telch, Arnow, Eldredge, & Marnell, 1997; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999). This…

  2. Changes in Testosterone Levels and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels in Extremely Obese Men after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laichuthai, Nitchakarn; Suwannasrisuk, Preaw; Houngngam, Natnicha; Udomsawaengsup, Suthep; Snabboon, Thiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obesity is a risk factor for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men. Weight loss has been shown to improve hypogonadism in obese men. This study evaluated the early changes in sex hormones profile after bariatric surgery. Methods. This is a prospective study including 29 morbidly obese men. Main outcomes were changes in serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (cFT), SHBG, estradiol, adiponectin, and leptin at 1 and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean age of patients was 31 ± 8 years and the mean BMI was 56.8 ± 11.7 kg/m2. Fifteen patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 14 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy. At baseline, 22 patients (75.9%) had either low TT levels (<10.4 nmol/L) or low cFT levels (<225 pmol/L). Total testosterone and SHBG levels increased significantly at 1 month after surgery (p ≤ 0.001). At 6 months after surgery, TT and cFT increased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) and 22 patients (75.9%) had normalized TT and cFT levels. There were no changes in estradiol levels at either 1 month or 6 months after surgery. Conclusions. Increases in TT and SHBG levels occurred early at 1 month after bariatric surgery while improvements in cFT levels were observed at 6 months after bariatric surgery. PMID:27725831

  3. Improved glucose metabolism following bariatric surgery is associated with increased circulating bile acid concentrations and remodeling of the gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Kaska, Lukasz; Sledzinski, Tomasz; Chomiczewska, Agnieszka; Dettlaff-Pokora, Agnieszka; Swierczynski, Julian

    2016-10-21

    Clinical studies have indicated that circulating bile acid (BA) concentrations increase following bariatric surgery, especially following malabsorptive procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RYGB). Moreover, total circulating BA concentrations in patients following RYGB are positively correlated with serum glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations and inversely correlated with postprandial glucose concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that the increased circulating BA concentrations following bariatric surgery - independently of calorie restriction and body-weight loss - could contribute, at least in part, to improvements in insulin sensitivity, incretin hormone secretion, and postprandial glycemia, leading to the remission of type-2 diabetes (T2DM). In humans, the primary and secondary BA pool size is dependent on the rate of biosynthesis and the enterohepatic circulation of BAs, as well as on the gut microbiota, which play a crucial role in BA biotransformation. Moreover, BAs and gut microbiota are closely integrated and affect each other. Thus, the alterations in bile flow that result from anatomical changes caused by bariatric surgery and changes in gut microbiome may influence circulating BA concentrations and could subsequently contribute to T2DM remission following RYGB. Research data coming largely from animal and cell culture models suggest that BAs can contribute, via nuclear farnezoid X receptor (FXR) and membrane G-protein-receptor (TGR-5), to beneficial effects on glucose metabolism. It is therefore likely that FXR, TGR-5, and BAs play a similar role in glucose metabolism following bariatric surgery in humans. The objective of this review is to discuss in detail the results of published studies that show how bariatric surgery affects glucose metabolism and subsequently T2DM remission.

  4. Improved glucose metabolism following bariatric surgery is associated with increased circulating bile acid concentrations and remodeling of the gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, Lukasz; Sledzinski, Tomasz; Chomiczewska, Agnieszka; Dettlaff-Pokora, Agnieszka; Swierczynski, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that circulating bile acid (BA) concentrations increase following bariatric surgery, especially following malabsorptive procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RYGB). Moreover, total circulating BA concentrations in patients following RYGB are positively correlated with serum glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations and inversely correlated with postprandial glucose concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that the increased circulating BA concentrations following bariatric surgery - independently of calorie restriction and body-weight loss - could contribute, at least in part, to improvements in insulin sensitivity, incretin hormone secretion, and postprandial glycemia, leading to the remission of type-2 diabetes (T2DM). In humans, the primary and secondary BA pool size is dependent on the rate of biosynthesis and the enterohepatic circulation of BAs, as well as on the gut microbiota, which play a crucial role in BA biotransformation. Moreover, BAs and gut microbiota are closely integrated and affect each other. Thus, the alterations in bile flow that result from anatomical changes caused by bariatric surgery and changes in gut microbiome may influence circulating BA concentrations and could subsequently contribute to T2DM remission following RYGB. Research data coming largely from animal and cell culture models suggest that BAs can contribute, via nuclear farnezoid X receptor (FXR) and membrane G-protein-receptor (TGR-5), to beneficial effects on glucose metabolism. It is therefore likely that FXR, TGR-5, and BAs play a similar role in glucose metabolism following bariatric surgery in humans. The objective of this review is to discuss in detail the results of published studies that show how bariatric surgery affects glucose metabolism and subsequently T2DM remission. PMID:27818587

  5. [Influence of Attachment Style on the Outcome of Bariatric Surgery - A Pilot Study].

    PubMed

    Appel, Johanna Elisabeth; Ift, Franziska; Kißler, Hermann; Kloos, Christof; Lehmann, Thomas; Strauß, Bernhard; Wick, Katharina

    2016-12-01

    Background: Bariatric surgery can lower body weight and comorbidities. Different factors might influence the outcome of this treatment. This pilot study examines whether patients' attachment style can influence surgical outcome. Methods: The sample consisted of 32 patients (f=24; m=8; BMI preoperative=47,8 kg/m(2)±5,2; age=53±9,84) who underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The following variables were assessed pre- and postoperatively via questionnaires: quality of life (BAROS), self esteem (SES), depression, anxiety, psychological distress (SCL-90R), feelings of hunger, cognitive control, irritated eating behaviour (FEV) and weight related variables (BMI, EWL%, EBL%, TBL). Attachment style was determined postoperatively using the BPQE. Results: None of the participating patients suffered from a binge eating disorder. There was no significant difference of the BMI at any time between the 12 securely attached (SA) patients and the 19 insecurely attachted (IA) patients. Compared to the SA patients IA patients preoperatively showed lower outcomes in variables concerning eating behaviour and mental health. Comparing the 2 groups postoperatively the IA patients achieved lower levels in variables concerning mental health than SA patients and did not reach the preoperative values of the SA patients. Both groups benefited from surgery related to weight loss, mental health and eating behaviour. There was no difference found in the development from pre- to postoperative between SA and IA patients. Discussion & Conclusion: Patients profit by a bariatric intervention independent of their attachment style. By evaluating the attachment style, it could be possible to individually optimize pre- and postoperative patients support in order to gain more effective surgery results. Follow up studies extended to multi-site assessment are required.

  6. Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorder Dieting and Gallstones ​ Related Conditions and Diseases Obesity Type 2 Diabetes Sleep Apnea Heart Disease Your Digestive System and ... to the anus​.​ Related Research See more about obesity research at ... content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of ...

  7. Clinical profile, nursing diagnoses and nursing care for postoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Nathalia Helene; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Gouvêa, Mara Regina Ferreira; Echer, Isabel Cristina; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical profile, nursing diagnoses, and nursing care established for postoperative bariatric surgery patients. Method Cross-sectional study carried out in a hospital in southern Brazil with a sample of 143 patients. Data were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records between 2011 and 2012 and analyzed statistically. Results We found a predominance of adult female patients (84%) with class III obesity (59.4%) and hypertension (72%). Thirty-five nursing diagnoses were reported, among which the most frequent were: Acute Pain (99.3%), Risk for perioperative positioning injury (98.6%), and Impaired tissue integrity (93%). The most frequently prescribed nursing care were: to use protection mechanisms in the surgical patient positioning, to record pain as 5th vital sign, and to take vital signs. There was an association between age and comorbidities. Conclusion The nursing diagnoses supported the nursing care prescription, which enables the qualification of nursing assistance.

  8. Different Supplementation Regimes to Treat Perioperative Vitamin B12 Deficiencies in Bariatric Surgery: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Smelt, H J M; Pouwels, S; Smulders, J F

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B12 dosage in multivitamin supplementation in the current literature is quite variable. There is no consensus about the optimal treatment of vitamin B12 deficiency. A systematic literature search on different supplementation regimes to treat perioperative vitamin B12 deficiencies in bariatric surgery was performed. The methodological quality of ten included studies was rated using the Newcastle Ottawa scale and ranged from moderate to good. The agreement between the reviewers was assessed with a Cohen's kappa (0.69). The current literature suggests that 350 μg oral vitamin B12 is the appropriate dose to correct low vitamin B12 levels in many patients. Further research must focus on a better diagnosis of a vitamin B12 deficiency, the optimal dose vitamin B12 supplementation, and clinical relevance next to biochemical data.

  9. Life After Bariatric Surgery: Perceptions of Male Patients and Their Intimate Relationships.

    PubMed

    Moore, Darren D; Cooper, Clinton E

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the experiences of 20 men who have had bariatric surgery, focusing on their couple or marital relationships. The researcher concentrates on men's perspectives regarding relationship satisfaction, sexual intimacy, and social support after surgical intervention. Phenomenology and family systems theory were used to guide the study from which emerged three themes: (a) Unintended consequences (unpredicted problems occurring within intimate relationships); (b) Intimacy as bittersweet (experiencing increasing levels of intimacy, while still desiring more); and (c) Inconsistent social support (experiencing instances where social support is provided, while simultaneously experiencing other areas where social support is not provided). The study includes a rich description of the data, critical analysis, and discussion of clinical implications for therapists and other healthcare professionals.

  10. [An experience nursing an uncertain patient with complications after bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Lin, Menq-Wen; Yeh, Hui-Fang

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a nursing care case in which a 33-year-old housewife received laparoscopic bariatric surgery and developed complications requiring multiple subsequent hospital admissions. Throughout the course of treatment from June to September 2010, the patient repeatedly experienced anxiety, helplessness, and depression due to recurrent complications that resulted in her loss of confidence in the treatment provided by the surgical team. During her fourth hospitalization, the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Theory (MUIT) was applied to assess and establish the cause of her feelings of uncertainty toward her illness. Through a combination of reinforced emotional support, encouragement, disease consultation, individualized care measures, and improved doctor-patient communication, the patient's ability to care for herself improved and she regained confidence in control of her own physical condition. In addition, the active involvement of the patient's family throughout the course of treatment enabled her to persevere through the uncertain treatment period and successfully return to a normal life.

  11. Interventions to improve long-term weight loss in patients following bariatric surgery: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    McGrice, Melanie; Don Paul, Kathlene

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery aims to provide long-term weight loss and improvement in weight-related comorbidities. Unfortunately, some patients do not achieve predicted weight loss targets and many regain a portion of their lost weight within 2–10 years postsurgery. A review of the literature found that behavioral, dietary, psychological, physical, and medical considerations can all play a role in suboptimal long-term weight loss. Recommendations to optimize long-term weight loss include ensuring that the patient understands how the procedure works, preoperative and postoperative education sessions, tailored nutritional supplements, restraint with liquid kilojoules, pureed foods, grazing and eating out of the home, an average of 60 minutes of physical activity per day, and lifelong annual medical, psychological, and dietary assessments. PMID:26150731

  12. Positive peritoneal fluid fungal cultures in postoperative peritonitis after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Zappella, N; Desmard, M; Chochillon, C; Ribeiro-Parenti, L; Houze, S; Marmuse, J-P; Montravers, P

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative peritonitis (POP) is a common surgical complication after bariatric surgery (BS). We assessed the importance of positive fungal cultures in these cases of POP admitted to the intensive care unit. Clinical features and outcome were compared in 25 (41%) Candida-positive patients (6 (22%) fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata) and 36 patients without Candida infection. Candida infections were more commonly isolated in late-onset peritonitis and were often associated with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Risk factors for intensive care unit mortality (19.6%) were diabetes and superobesity. Candida infections, including fluconazole-resistant strains, are common in POP after BS. These data encourage the empirical use of a broad-spectrum antifungal agent.

  13. Using lifestyle medicine in U.S. health care to treat obesity: too many bariatric surgeries?

    PubMed

    Trilk, Jennifer L; Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2015-01-01

    More than one-third of Americans are classified as obese. Many clinicians perform bariatric surgery (BSx) when it is said that lifestyle intervention failed. However, BSx is medically complex, with extremely variable success, certain failures, major complications, and sometimes death. Although many studies declare BSx as more effective for producing weight loss than nonsurgical lifestyle management, these conclusions are flawed when lifestyle management between cohorts are not identical. Lifestyle behavior change is essential to success for both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss, as over 50% of BSx patients regain weight without lifestyle modification. Indeed, programs that include self-reward and reinforcement are extremely effective. It is therefore possible that successful BSx is simply an intrinsic reward for an intensive change in lifestyle behavior. Accounting for the costs and risks associated with BSx, providing state and federal resources for lifestyle behavior change programs could provide a key opportunity for the war against obesity.

  14. Effects of bariatric surgery on food cravings: do food cravings and the consumption of craved foods “normalize” after surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Bond, Dale S.; Raynor, Hollie; Roye, Dean; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Ryder, Beth A.; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The reported effects of bariatric surgery on food cravings have been inconsistent. Moreover, research has been largely limited to sweet cravings, and no study has examined whether surgery patients’ cravings differ from those of normal weight (NW) controls. Our objective was to use an empirically validated instrument to examine changes in bariatric surgery patients’ frequency of food cravings and consumption of craved foods from before to 3 and 6 months after surgery and to compare surgery patients’ frequency of food cravings to those of NW controls. The setting was private hospitals and research center in the United States. Methods Bariatric surgery patients (n = 32) and NW controls (n = 20) completed the Food Cravings Inventory and had their height and weight measured. Results Before surgery, the patients reported more overall cravings and cravings for high fat and fast foods and a greater consumption of craved high-fat foods than the NW controls. From before to 3 and 6 months after surgery, the patients had significant reductions in overall cravings for, and consumption of, craved foods, with specific effects for sweets and fast food; however, surgery had virtually no effect on the cravings for high-fat foods. Moreover, high-fat and fast food cravings did not reduce to normative levels. The postoperative patients were less likely to consume craved sweets than NW controls, and the patients’ postoperative weight loss was largely unrelated to food cravings. Conclusion Bariatric surgery is associated with significant reductions in food cravings and consumption of craved foods, with the exception of high-fat foods. Despite these decreases, patients’ cravings do not fully reduce to “normative” levels and are not associated with postoperative weight loss. PMID:21925967

  15. Exercise improves quality of life in bariatric surgery candidates: Results from the Bari-Active trial

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Thomas, J. Graham; King, Wendy C.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Ryder, Beth A.; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the impact of a pre-bariatric surgery physical activity intervention (PAI), designed to increase bout-related (≥10-minute) moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). METHODS Analyses included 75 adult participants (86.7% female; BMI=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or standard pre-surgical care (SC; n=35). PAI received six individual weekly counseling sessions to increase walking exercise. Participants wore an objective PA monitor for 7 days and completed the SF-36 Health Survey at baseline and post-intervention to evaluate bout-related MVPA and HRQoL changes, respectively. RESULTS PAI increased bout-related MVPA from baseline to post-intervention (4.4±5.5 to 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) versus no change (7.9±16.6 to 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). PAI reported greater improvements than SC on all SF-36 physical and mental scales (p<0.05), except role-emotional. In PAI, better baseline scores on the physical function and general health scales predicted greater bout-related MVPA increases (p<0.05), and greater bout-related MVPA increases were associated with greater post-intervention improvements on the physical function, bodily pain, and general health scales (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Increasing PA preoperatively improves physical and mental HRQoL in bariatric surgery candidates. Future studies should examine whether this effect improves surgical safety, weight loss outcomes, and postoperative HRQoL. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00962325 PMID:25611582

  16. NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS IN A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR SEVERE OBESITY AND PREOPERATIVE BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    MAGNO, Fernanda Cristina Carvalho Mattos; da SILVA, Monique Silveira; COHEN, Larissa; SARMENTO, Luciana d'Abreu; ROSADO, Eliane Lopes; CARNEIRO, João Régis Ivar

    2014-01-01

    Background Along with the augmentation in obesity rates in recent years, the demand for bariatric surgery has startlingly increased. Nutritional counseling in the preoperative period is very important because it contributes to higher success rate in the post-operative period. Aim To assess the nutritional status of patients in a multidisciplinary program for the treatment of severe obesity and pre-operatively for bariatric surgery, characterizing the consumption of healthy nutrients. Methods A retrospective analysis of 30 patients was conducted. Personal information, anthropometric data and dietary assessment by 24-hour food record were collected. The analysis of energy intake was performed in Dietpro 5.1 Professional® program. The statistical treatment of the caloric intake was performed by an ANOVA test with Bonferroni's post hoc and for anthropometric data the paired t test was used. Results From the total, 73% of the patients were women and 27% male, mean age was 48.4+12.9 and 49.8+8.1, respectively. A lower weight in the 5th appointment was observed when compared with the 1st one. There was a reduction in caloric intake in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th appointments when compared with the 1st. It was observed that in the 5th appointment more than 50% of the patients underwent six meals a day. There was an increase in the consumption of fruit along the appointments and 72.2% of patients consumed 1-2 servings of fruit a day. Vegetables intake was high in all appointments in the pre-operative period and, although low, the whole grain products consumption has increased during the pre-operative period achieving 30% of the study population. Conclusion There was a decrease in body weight, a trend in the decrease of the body mass index and waist circumference and quantitative and qualitative improvement of food consumption. PMID:25409962

  17. Analysis of health-related quality-of-life instruments measuring the impact of bariatric surgery: systematic review of the instruments used and their content validity.

    PubMed

    Tayyem, Raed; Ali, Abdulmajid; Atkinson, John; Martin, Colin R

    2011-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity has been steadily rising, reaching alarming levels. Obesity, particularly morbid obesity, carries significant health risks to the lives of affected patients, including physical, psychological, and social co-morbidities. Bariatric surgery provides the only effective and sustainable approach to treat morbid obesity and reverse its adverse effects. The reduction in well-being due to poor health in obesity may have adverse effects on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). There are numerous studies reporting HR-QOL in bariatric patients; however, there is a paucity of studies examining the psychometric properties of the HR-QOL instruments used. The main aim of this review is to identify the instruments used in assessing HR-QOL in bariatric patients and evaluate their content validity. We believe that this is the first systematic review of its kind to look in depth at various generic- and obesity-specific HR-QOL instruments that were used in bariatric surgery, and to analyze their content validity. A systematic and structured search of Ovid databases (1980-2009) was conducted using terms synonymous with bariatric surgery, combined with terms synonymous with HR-QOL instruments. A total of 112 relevant studies were identified, detailing the use of eight generic, nine obesity-specific, and numerous other condition-specific instruments. A conceptual framework comprising 20 domains pertinent to bariatric surgery and morbid obesity was proposed, against which the identified generic- and obesity-specific instruments were assessed. The results of this assessment showed that neither the generic nor the specific instruments were adequate instruments in terms of content validity. Given the lack of adequate HR-QOL instruments in the rapidly developing field of bariatric surgery, we suggest building a new bariatric-specific instrument informed by the proposed framework, which will then enable clinicians to assess the full impact of morbid

  18. Attenuated improvements in adiponectin and fat loss characterize type 2 diabetes non-remission status following bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Bena, James; Abood, Beth; Pothier, Claire E.; Bhatt, Deepak L; Nissen, Steven; Brethauer, Stacy A.; Schauer, Philip R.; Kirwan, John P.; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Bariatric surgery improves glycemic control, but not all patients achieve type 2 diabetes (T2D) remission. Thus, we aimed to identify metabolic determinants of T2D non-remission status following bariatric surgery at 12 and 24 months (m). Methods Forty adults (BMI: 36±3kg/m2, Age: 48±9y, HbA1c: 9.7±2%) undergoing bariatric surgery (i.e. RYGB or SG) were enrolled in STAMPEDE. T2D remission was defined as HbA1c <6.5% and fasting glucose <126 mg/dl without anti-diabetic medication. Indices of insulin secretion and sensitivity were calculated from plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide during a 120 min MMTT. Body fat (DXA), incretins (GLP-1, GIP, ghrelin), and adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, TNF-α, hs-CRP) were also assessed. Results At 24m, 37 subjects had follow-up data (n = 18 RYGB and n = 19 SG). Bariatric surgery-induced 40% and 27% T2D remission rates at 12 and 24m, respectively. Total fat/abdominal fat loss, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function (C-peptide0–120/Glucose0–120 × Matsuda index) improved more in remitters at 12 and 24m than non-remitters. Incretin levels were unrelated to T2D remission, but, compared to non-remitters, hs-CRP decreased and adiponectin increased more in remitters. Only baseline adiponectin predicted lower HbA1c at 12 and 24m, and elevated adiponectin correlated with enhanced β-cell function, lower triglycerides and fat loss. Conclusions Smaller rises in adiponectin, a mediator of insulin action and adipose mass, depict T2D non-remission up to 2 years after bariatric surgery. Adjunctive strategies promoting greater fat loss and/or raising adiponectin may be key for higher T2D remission rates after bariatric surgery. PMID:25132119

  19. Deep Neuromuscular Block Improves Surgical Conditions during Bariatric Surgery and Reduces Postoperative Pain: A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, Bart; Martini, Chris H.; Boon, Martijn; Olofsen, Erik; in ‘t Veld, Bas; Liem, Ronald S. L.; Knook, Mireille T. T.; Swank, Dingeman J.; Dahan, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background It remains unknown whether the administration of a deep neuromuscular block (NMB) during bariatric surgery improves surgical conditions and patient outcome. The authors studied the effect of deep versus moderate NMB in laparoscopic bariatric surgery on surgical conditions and postoperative pain. Methods and Results One hundred patients scheduled to undergo elective bariatric surgery were randomized to a deep NMB (post-tetanic-count 2–3) or a moderate NMB (train-of-four 1–2). The quality of the surgical field was scored using the Leiden-Surgical Rating Scale (L-SRS), a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (extremely poor conditions) to 5 (optimal conditions). Three surgeons scored the L-SRS at 10-min intervals during surgery; postoperative pain scores were obtained in the postanesthesia-care-unit (PACU) and on the ward. Mean (95% confidence interval) L-SRS scores in moderate NMB 4.2 (4.0–4.4) versus 4.8 (4.7–4.9) in deep NMB (p < 0.001). Moderate NMB resulted in 17% of scores at L-SRS scores of 1–3, while deep NMB resulted in 100% scores at the high end of the L-SRS (4–5). Deep NMB led to improved pain scores in the PACU (4.6 (4.2–4.9) versus 3.9 (3.6–4.4), p = 0.03) and reduced shoulder pain on the ward (1.8 (1.5–2.1) versus 1.3 (1.1–1.5), p = 0.03). A composite score of pain and opioid use in the PACU favoured deep NMB (p = 0.001). Conclusions In bariatric surgery, deep relaxation has advantages for surgeon and patient. Compared to moderate NMB, deep NMB produced stable and improved surgical conditions with less postoperative pain. PMID:27936214

  20. A Validation of an Intelligent Decision-Making Support System for the Nutrition Diagnosis of Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Cristina; Dias, João; Pinto, José S

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an important method for treatment of morbid obesity. It is known that significant nutritional deficiencies might occur after surgery, such as, calorie-protein malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia, and lack of vitamin B12, thiamine, and folic acid. Objective The objective of our study was to validate a computerized intelligent decision support system that suggests nutritional diagnoses of patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods There were fifteen clinical cases that were developed and sent to three dietitians in order to evaluate and define a nutritional diagnosis. After this step, the cases were sent to four bariatric surgery expert dietitians who were aiming to collaborate on a gold standard. The nutritional diagnosis was to be defined individually, and any disagreements were solved through a consensus. The final result was used as the gold standard. Bayesian networks were used to implement the system, and database training was done with Shell Netica. For the system validation, a similar answer rate was calculated, as well as the specificity and sensibility. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were projected to each nutritional diagnosis. Results Among the four experts, the rate of similar answers found was 80% (48/60) to 93% (56/60), depending on the nutritional diagnosis. The rate of similar answers of the system, compared to the gold standard, was 100% (60/60). The system sensibility and specificity were 95.0%. The ROC curves projection showed that the system was able to represent the expert knowledge (gold standard), and to help them in their daily tasks. Conclusions The system that was developed was validated to be used by health care professionals for decision-making support in their nutritional diagnosis of patients submitted to bariatric surgery. PMID:25601419

  1. IMPACT OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM DEFICIENCY IN THE BONES OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    CABRAL, Jefry Alberto Vargas; de SOUZA, Gabriela Pereira; NASCIMENTO, Juliana de Almeida; SIMONETI, Luis Fernando; MARCHESE, Carolina; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective tool in the control and treatment of severe obesity, but patients undergoing this procedure are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies by limiting the intake and absorption of many nutrients. Objective: To assess the impact of vitamin D deficiency and calcium in bone in patients after gastric bypass in Roux-en-Y, pointing directly at the type of administration, doses and effects after surgery. Method: Was conducted a systematic review with articles related to the topic of the last 10 years searched in PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Medline, Lilacs, Scielo and Cochrane using the headings "bariatric surgery", "bone", "obesity", "vitamin D '', "calcium" AND "absorption". Exclusion criteria to research on animals, smokers, pregnant women and patient treated with bisphosphonates. Results: Five articles were included in this review. All refer that bariatric surgery can lead to nutritional deficiencies and poor absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins and other micronutrients such as calcium. Conclusion: Patients submitted to RYGB should make use of multivitamins and minerals especially vitamin D and calcium to prevent bone fractures. Monitoring, treatment and control of risk factors are essential to prevent complications after this operation. PMID:27683792

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  3. The impact of a standardized program on short and long-term outcomes in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Aird, Lisa N F; Hong, Dennis; Gmora, Scott; Breau, Ruth; Anvari, Mehran

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there has been an improvement in short- and long-term clinical outcomes since 2010, when the Ontario Bariatric Network led a province-wide initiative to establish a standardized system of care for bariatric patients. The system includes nine bariatric centers, a centralized referral system, and a research registry. Standardization of procedures has progressed yearly, including guidelines for preoperative assessment and perioperative care.

  4. The role of gut adaptation in the potent effects of multiple bariatric surgeries on obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Randy J.; Chambers, Adam P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgical procedures such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are the most potent treatments available to produce sustained reductions in body weight and improvements in glucose regulation. While traditionally these effects are attributed to mechanical aspects of these procedures such as restriction and malabsorption, a growing body of evidence from mouse models of these procedures points to physiological changes that mediate the potent effects of these surgeries. In particular, there are similar changes in gut hormone secretion, bile acid levels and composition after both of these procedures. Moreover, loss-of-function of the nuclear bile acid receptor (FXR) greatly diminishes the effects of VSG. Both VSG and RYGB are linked to profound changes in the gut microbiome that also mediate at least some of these surgical effects. We hypothesize that surgical rearrangement of the gastrointestinal tract results in enteroplasticity caused by the high rate of nutrient presentation and altered pH in the small intestine that contribute to these physiological effects. Identifying the molecular underpinnings of these procedures provides new opportunities to understand the relationship of the gastrointestinal tract to obesity and diabetes as well as new therapeutic strategies to harness the effectiveness of surgery with less invasive approaches. PMID:25662404

  5. Enoxaparin venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in bariatric surgery: A best evidence topic.

    PubMed

    Parker, S G; McGlone, E R; Knight, W R; Sufi, P; Khan, O A

    2015-11-01

    A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: which is the best regimen of enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis for patients undergoing bariatric surgery? One hundred and twenty-five papers were identified using the reported literature search, of which four represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, country and date of publication, patient groups, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. All four studies are non-randomized cohort studies examining venous thromboembolism rates and major postoperative bleeding following varying regimens of Enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis. There is no level 1 evidence which significantly favors any particular thromboprophylaxis regimen. There is some evidence that extended duration of treatment of ten days after discharge significantly reduces the incidence of VTE compared to in-hospital treatment only, and that a higher incidence of post-operative bleeding occurs with a regimen that includes a pre-operative dose of Enoxaparin. With regard to dosage, for in-hospital treatment the higher dosage of 40 mg twice daily as opposed to 30 mg seems to significantly reduce the incidence of VTE without significantly affecting bleeding rate.

  6. Obesity and post-operative complications in patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Doyle, S L; Lysaght, J; Reynolds, J V

    2010-12-01

    As the prevalence of obesity continues to rise in society, an increasing number of patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery will be obese. Obesity is known to increase morbidity and mortality in the general population and thus is perceived as a risk factor for adverse post-surgical outcomes. This association is not clear-cut, however, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on the risk between obesity and specific complications, in particular relating to infection, wound healing, respiratory and venous thromboembolism. The paucity of studies, as well as a lack of consistency of definition of obesity, with an over-reliance on body mass index rather than body composition analysis, may underlie this confusion. Emerging concepts position central/visceral adipose tissue as potentially key to the pathogenesis of the comorbidities associated with obesity, thus this article reviews emerging research investigating the association between visceral obesity, the metabolic syndrome and resulting post-operative complications. It is hypothesized that the state of chronic inflammation and dysmetabolism observed in visceral obese patients negatively influences post-operative outcomes and represents a potential target for pharmaconutrition. The need for further research investigating the influence of visceral adiposity on immune function post surgery and its impact on post-operative morbidity and mortality is highlighted.

  7. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity: pre-operative assessment, surgical techniques and post-operative monitoring.

    PubMed

    Breznikar, Brane; Dinevski, D

    2009-01-01

    This observational clinical analysis included 246 patients who underwent surgery for adjustable gastric banding (AGB), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), or gastric bypass (GBP) between May 2005 and December 2008. The most frequent surgical procedure was for AGB (73.2% of patients). A thorough psychological evaluation of the patients was carried out, and pre- and post-operative psychological and dietary support was offered. A total of 111/120 (92.5%) AGB patients, 21/30 (70.0%) LSG patients and 8/36 (22.2%) GBP patients have been monitored for at least 1 year, and their mean weight losses (percentage excess weight loss) were 24.7 kg (52.4%), 46.0 kg (57.9%) and 40.5 kg (77.9%), respectively. The AGB procedure was associated with the fewest complications but is not appropriate for all patients. Good pre-operative psychological evaluation has been shown to be necessary for successful outcomes and, in the super-obese, we prefer to use LSG. Surgeons should learn the skills needed to perform laparoscopic Roux-en-Y GBP as it is likely to become the standard-of-care for the surgical treatment of obesity. The best outcomes following bariatric surgery are achieved with a multidisciplinary approach, including participation in a support group guided by a psychologist.

  8. Psychologists' evaluation of bariatric surgery candidates influenced by patients' attachment representations and symptoms of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Floor; Hinnen, Chris; Gerdes, Victor E A; Acherman, Yair; Brandjes, Dees P M

    2014-03-01

    This study examines whether patients self-reported attachment representations and levels of depression and anxiety influenced psychologists' evaluations of morbidly obese patients applying for bariatric surgery. A sample of 250 patients (mean age 44, 84 % female) who were referred for bariatric surgery completed questionnaires to measure adult attachment and levels of depression and anxiety. Psychologists rated patients' suitability for bariatric surgery using the Cleveland Clinic Behavioural Rating System (CCBRS), unaware of the results of the completed questionnaires. Attachment anxiety (OR = 2.50, p = .01) and attachment avoidance (OR = 3.13, p = .001) were found to be associated with less positive evaluations on the CCBRS by the psychologists, and symptoms of depression and anxiety mediated this association. This study strongly supports the notion that patients' attachment representations influence a psychologist's evaluation in an indirect way by influencing the symptoms of depression and anxiety patients report during an assessment interview. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Time-related increase in urinary testosterone levels and stable semen analysis parameters after bariatric surgery in men.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S; Kunselman, Allen R; Meadows, Juliana W; Kesner, James S; Krieg, Edward F; Rogers, Ann M; Cooney, Robert N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine the time-course in androgen and semen parameters in men after weight loss associated with bariatric surgery. Six men aged 18-40 years, meeting National Institutes of Health bariatric surgery guidelines, were followed between 2005 and 2008. Study visits took place at baseline, then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. All men underwent Roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB). At each visit, biometric, questionnaire, serum, and urinary specimens and seman analysis were collected. Urinary integrated total testosterone levels increased significantly (P < 0.0001) by 3 months after surgery, and remained elevated throughout the study. Circulating testosterone levels were also higher at 1 and 6 months after surgery, compared with baseline. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin levels were significantly elevated at all time points after surgery (P < 0.01 to P = 0.02). After RYGB surgery, no significant changes occurred in urinary oestrogen metabolites (oestrone 3-glucuronide), serum oestradiol levels, serial semen parameters or male sexual function by questionnaire. A threshold of weight loss is necessary to improve male reproductive function by reversing male hypogonadism, manifested as increased testosterone levels. Further serial semen analyses showed normal ranges for most parameters despite massive weight loss.

  10. BARIATRIC SURGERY IN THE ELDERLY: RESULTS OF A MEAN FOLLOW-UP OF FIVE YEARS

    PubMed Central

    PAJECKI, Denis; SANTO, Marco Aurelio; JOAQUIM, Henrique Dametto Giroud; MORITA, Flavio; RICCIOPPO, Daniel; de CLEVA, Roberto; CECCONELLO, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background : Surgical treatment of obesity in the elderly, particularly over 65, remains controversial; it is explained by the increased surgical risk or the lack of data demonstrating its long-term benefit. Few studies have evaluated the clinical effects of bariatric surgery in this population. Aim : To evaluate the results of surgical treatment of obesity in patients over 60 years, followed for an average period of five years. Method : This was a retrospective study evaluating 46 patients, 60 years or older, who underwent surgical treatment of obesity, by conventional gastric bypass technique (laparotomy). The average age was 64 years (60-71), mean BMI of 49.6 kg/m2 (38-66), mean follow-up of 5.9 years; 91% of patients were hypertensive, 56% diabetics and 39% had dyslipidemia. Results : The incidence of complications (major and minor) in patients under 65 years was 26% and over 65 years 37% (p=0.002). There were no deaths in the group with less than 65 years and there were two deaths (12.5%) over 65 years. The average loss of overweight over 65 years or less was 72% vs 68% (p=0.56). There was total control of the diabetes mellitus in 77% and partial in 23%, with no difference between groups. There was improvement in arterial hypertension in 56% of patients, also no difference between groups. The average LDL levels did not differ between the pre and postoperative (106 mg/dl to 102 mg/dl), an increase of HDL (56 mg/dl to 68 mg/dL) and reduced triglyceride levels (136 mg/dl to 109 mg/dl). There was no statistical difference in the variation of the cholesterol fractions and triglycerides between the groups. Two patients in the group with less than 65 years died in late follow-up, of brain tumor and pneumonia, three and five years after bariatric surgery, respectively. Conclusions : Surgical morbidity and mortality were higher in patients over 65 years, and this group had the same benefits observed in patients lower 65 years for weight loss and comorbidities control

  11. Lung function and left ventricular hypertrophy in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Paulo de Tarso; Domingos, Hamilton; Patusco, Luiz Armando Pereira; Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To look for correlations between lung function and cardiac dimension variables in morbidly obese patients, in order to test the hypothesis that the relative size of the small airways is independently correlated with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving 192 medical records containing a clinical protocol employed in candidates for bariatric surgery between January of 2006 and December of 2010. Results: Of the 192 patients evaluated, 39 (10 males and 29 females) met the inclusion criteria. The mean BMI of the patients was 49.2 ± 7.6 kg/m2, and the mean age was 35.5 ± 7.7 years. The FEF25-75/FVC, % correlated significantly with left ventricular posterior wall thickness and relative left ventricular posterior wall thickness, those correlations remaining statistically significant (r = −0.355 and r = −0.349, respectively) after adjustment for weight, gender, and history of systemic arterial hypertension. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that FVC and FEV1 were the major determinants of left ventricular mass (in grams or indexed to body surface area). Conclusions: A reduction in the relative size of the small airways appears to be independently correlated with obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy, regardless of factors affecting respiratory mechanics (BMI and weight), gender, or history of systemic arterial hypertension. However, FEV1 and FVC might be important predictors of left ventricular mass in morbidly obese individuals. PMID:26578134

  12. Medical follow up after bariatric surgery: nutritional and drug issues. General recommendations for the prevention and treatment of nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, O; Sirveaux, M A; Brunaud, L; Reibel, N; Quilliot, D

    2009-12-01

    This review is an update of the long-term follow-up of nutritional and metabolic issues following bariatric surgery, and also discusses the most recent guidelines for the three most common procedures: adjustable gastric bands (AGB); sleeve gastrectomy (SG); and roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP). The risk of nutritional deficiencies depends on the percentage of weight loss and the type of surgical procedure performed. Purely restrictive procedures (AGB, SG), for example, can induce digestive symptoms, food intolerance or maladaptative eating behaviours due to pre- or postsurgical eating disorders. GBP also has a minor malabsorptive component. Iron deficiency is common with the three types of bariatric surgery, especially in menstruating women, and GBP is also associated with an increased risk of calcium, vitamin D and vitamin B12 deficiencies. Rare deficiencies can lead to serious complications such as encephalopathy or protein-energy malnutrition. Long-term problems such as changes in bone metabolism or neurological complications need to be carefully monitored. In addition, routine nutritional screening, recommendations for appropriate supplements and monitoring compliance are imperative, whatever the bariatric procedure. Key points are: (1) virtually routine mineral and multivitamin supplementation; (2) prevention of gallstone formation with the use of ursodeoxycholic acid during the first 6 months; and (3) regular, life-long, follow-up of all patients. Pre- and postoperative therapeutic patient education (TPE) programmes, involving a new multidisciplinary approach based on patient-centred education, may be useful for increasing patients'long-term compliance, which is often poor. The role of the general practitioner has also to be emphasized: clinical visits and follow-ups should be monitored and coordinated with the bariatric team, including the surgeon, the obesity specialist, the dietitian and mental health professionals.

  13. Early detection of changes in lung mechanics with oscillometry following bariatric surgery in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ubong; Hernandez, Paul; Dechman, Gail; Ellsmere, James; Maksym, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with respiratory symptoms that are reported to improve with weight loss, but this is poorly reflected in spirometry, and few studies have measured respiratory mechanics with oscillometry. We investigated whether early changes in lung mechanics following weight loss are detectable with oscillometry. Furthermore, we investigated whether the changes in lung mechanics measured in the supine position following weight loss are associated with changes in sleep quality. Nineteen severely obese female subjects (mean body mass index, 47.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2)) were evaluated using spirometry, oscillometry, plethysmography, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before and 5 weeks after bariatric surgery. These tests were conducted in both the upright and the supine position, and pre- and postbronchodilation with 200 μg of salbutamol. Five weeks after surgery, weight loss of 11.5 ± 2.5 kg was not associated with changes in spirometry and plethysmography, with the exception of functional residual capacity. There were also no changes in upright respiratory system resistance (Rrs) or reactance following weight loss. Importantly, however, in the supine position, weight loss caused a substantial reduction in Rrs. In addition, sleep quality improved significantly and was highly correlated with the reduction in supine Rrs. Prior to weight loss, subjects did not respond to the bronchodilator when assessed in the upright position with either spirometry or oscillometry; however, with modest weight loss, bronchodilator responsiveness returned to the normal range. Improvements in lung mechanics occur very early after weight loss, mostly in the supine position, resulting in improved sleep quality. These improvements are detectable with oscillometry but not with spirometry.

  14. Contribution of 32 GWAS-Identified Common Variants to Severe Obesity in European Adults Referred for Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yousseif, Ahmed; Pucci, Andrea; Santini, Ferruccio; Karra, Efthimia; Querci, Giorgia; Pelosini, Caterina; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of severe obesity, defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥35.0 kg/m2, is rising rapidly. Given the disproportionately high health burden and healthcare costs associated with this condition, understanding the underlying aetiology, including predisposing genetic factors, is a biomedical research priority. Previous studies have suggested that severe obesity represents an extreme tail of the population BMI variation, reflecting shared genetic factors operating across the spectrum. Here, we sought to determine whether a panel of 32 known common obesity-susceptibility variants contribute to severe obesity in patients (n = 1,003, mean BMI 48.4±8.1 kg/m2) attending bariatric surgery clinics in two European centres. We examined the effects of these 32 common variants on obesity risk and BMI, both as individual markers and in combination as a genetic risk score, in a comparison with normal-weight controls (n = 1,809, BMI 18.0–24.9 kg/m2); an approach which, to our knowledge, has not been previously undertaken in the setting of a bariatric clinic. We found strong associations with severe obesity for SNP rs9939609 within the FTO gene (P = 9.3×10−8) and SNP rs2815752 near the NEGR1 gene (P = 3.6×10−4), and directionally consistent nominal associations (P<0.05) for 12 other SNPs. The genetic risk score associated with severe obesity (P = 8.3×10−11) but, within the bariatric cohort, this score did not associate with BMI itself (P = 0.264). Our results show significant effects of individual BMI-associated common variants within a relatively small sample size of bariatric patients. Furthermore, the burden of such low-penetrant risk alleles contributes to severe obesity in this population. Our findings support that severe obesity observed in bariatric patients represents an extreme tail of the population BMI variation. Moreover, future genetic studies focused on bariatric patients may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of

  15. Frequency of periodontal pathogens and Helicobacter pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals submitted to bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    PATARO, André Luiz; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; ABREU, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; CORTELLI, José Roberto; FRANCO, Gilson Cesar Nobre; AQUINO, Davi Romeiro; COTA, Luis Otavio Miranda; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This cross-sectional study compared the frequency of oral periodontopathogens and H. pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals with or without periodontitis submitted to bariatric surgery. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-four men and women aged 18-65 were conveniently distributed into four groups. Two groups were composed of individuals who underwent bariatric surgery with (BP) (n=40) and without (BNP) (n=39) periodontitis and two obese control groups with (CP) (n=35) and without (CNP) (n=40) periodontitis. The oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, and Helicobacter pylori were detected by a polymerase chain reaction technique using saliva, tongue and stomach biopsy samples. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that periodontopathogens were highly frequent in the mouth (up to 91.4%). In the bariatric surgically treated group, orally, P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia were more frequent in periodontitis, while C. rectus was more frequent in non-periodontitis subjects. Stomach biopsies also revealed the high frequency of five oral species in both candidates for bariatric surgery (91.6%) and the bariatric (83.3%) groups. H. pylori was frequently detected in the mouth (50.0%) and stomach (83.3%). In the stomach, oral species and H. pylori appeared in lower frequency in the bariatric group. Conclusions Obese individuals showed high frequencies of periodontopathogens and H. pylori in their mouths and stomachs. Bariatric surgery showed an inverse microbial effect on oral and stomach environments by revealing higher oral and lower stomach bacterial frequencies. PMID:27383704

  16. A resting-state fMRI study of obese females between pre- and postprandial states before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiemerslage, Lyle; Zhou, Wei; Olivo, Gaia; Stark, Julia; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Sundbom, Magnus; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2017-02-01

    Past studies utilizing resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI), have shown that obese humans exhibit altered activity in brain areas related to reward compared to normal-weight controls. However, to what extent bariatric surgery-induced weight loss alters resting-state brain activity in obese humans is less well-studied. Thus, we measured the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations from eyes-closed, rsfMRI in obese females (n = 11, mean age = 42 years, mean BMI = 41 kg/m(2) ) in both a pre- and postprandial state at two time points: four weeks before, and four weeks after bariatric surgery. Several brain areas showed altered resting-state activity following bariatric surgery, including the putamen, insula, cingulate, thalamus and frontal regions. Activity augmented by surgery was also dependent on prandial state. For example, in the fasted state, activity in the middle frontal and pre- and postcentral gyri was found to be decreased after surgery. In the sated state, activity within the insula was increased before, but not after surgery. Collectively, our results suggest that resting-state neural functions are rapidly affected following bariatric surgery and the associated weight loss and change in diet.

  17. Decreased serum hepcidin and improved functional iron status 6 months after restrictive bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Freels, Sally; Holterman, Ai-xuan L; Galvani, Carlos; Ayloo, Subhashini; Vitello, Joseph; Braunschweig, Carol

    2010-10-01

    Excess adiposity is associated with low-grade inflammation and decreased iron status. Iron depletion in obesity is thought to be mediated by an inflammation-induced increase in the body's main regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin. Elevated hepcidin can result in iron depletion as it prevents the release of dietary iron absorbed into the enterocytes, limiting replenishment of body iron losses. Weight reduction is associated with decreased inflammation; however, the impact of reduced inflammation on iron status and systemic hepcidin in obese individuals remains unknown. We determined prospectively the impact of weight loss on iron status parameters, serum hepcidin, inflammation, and dietary iron in 20 obese premenopausal females 6 months after restrictive bariatric surgery. At baseline, the presence of iron depletion was high with 45% of the women having serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) >28.1 nmol/l. Differences between baseline and 6 months after surgery for BMI (47.56 vs. 39.55 kg/m(2); P < 0.0001), C-reactive protein (CRP) (10.83 vs. 5.71 mg/l; P < 0.0001), sTfR (29.97 vs. 23.08 nmol/l; P = 0.001), and serum hepcidin (111.25 vs. 31.35 ng/ml; P < 0.0001) were significantly lower, whereas hemoglobin (Hb) (12.10 vs. 13.30 g/dl; P < 0.0001) and hematocrit (Hct) (36.58 vs. 38.78%; P = 0.001) were significantly higher. Ferritin and transferrin saturation (Tsat) showed minimal improvement at follow-up. At baseline, hepcidin was not correlated with sTfR (r = 0.02); however, at follow-up, significant correlations were found (r = -0.58). Change in interleukin-6 (IL-6) from baseline was marginally associated with decreased log serum hepcidin (Δ IL-6: β = -0.22; P = 0.15), whereas change in BMI or weight was not. No significant difference in dietary iron was noted after surgery. Weight loss in obese premenopausal women is associated with reduced serum hepcidin and inflammation. Reduction in inflammation and hepcidin likely allow for enhanced dietary iron

  18. Coping with obesity stigma affects depressed mood in African-American and white candidates for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Fettich, Karla C; Chen, Eunice Y

    2012-05-01

    Depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking candidates is influenced by obesity stigma, yet the strategies for coping with this stigma are less well understood. This study hypothesized that coping strategies are significantly associated with depressed mood above and beyond demographic factors and frequency of weight-related stigma, with specific coping strategies differing between racial groups. Severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking adults (N = 234; 91 African Americans) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Stigmatizing Situations Inventory (SSI). Two hierarchical linear regressions were conducted separately for African Americans and whites. For both racial groups, age, sex, BMI, years overweight, annual income, and education level did not account for a significant portion of the variance in BDI scores. The frequency of stigmatizing situations and coping strategies significantly explained 16.4% and 33.2%, respectively, of the variance for whites, and 25.9% and 25%, respectively, for African Americans (P < 0.001). Greater depressed mood in whites was associated with older age, lower education, fewer positive self-statements, and less self-love and more crying; while in African Americans greater depressed mood was associated only with ignoring the situation (P < 0.05). The study found that regardless of race, depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking clients is related to the frequency of stigmatizing experiences and associated coping strategies. This suggests that efforts to reduce the deleterious effects of weight-related stigma need to focus both on reducing the frequency of stigmatization and on teaching effective coping strategies. These efforts also need to take into account the client's racial background.

  19. The Systemic Inflammome of Severe Obesity before and after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi, Ebymar; Rivas, Eva; Agustí, Alvar; Ríos, José; Barreiro, Esther; Vidal, Josep; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation. The “inflammome” is a network layout of the inflammatory pattern. The systemic inflammome of obesity has not been described as yet. We hypothesized that it can be significantly worsened by smoking and other comorbidities frequently associated with obesity, and ameliorated by bariatric surgery (BS). Besides, whether or not these changes are mirrored in the lungs is unknown, but obesity is often associated with pulmonary inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Objectives We sought to: (1) describe the systemic inflammome of morbid obesity; (2) investigate the effects of sex, smoking, sleep apnea syndrome, metabolic syndrome and BS upon this systemic inflammome; and, (3) determine their interplay with pulmonary inflammation. Methods We studied 129 morbidly obese patients (96 females; age 46±12 years; body mass index [BMI], 46±6 kg/m2) before and one year after BS, and 20 healthy, never-smokers, (43±7 years), with normal BMI and spirometry. Results Before BS, compared with controls, all obese subjects displayed a strong and coordinated (inflammome) systemic inflammatory response (adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, leptin, soluble tumor necrosis factor-receptor 1(sTNF-R1), and 8-isoprostane). This inflammome was not modified by sex, smoking, or coexistence of obstructive sleep apnea and/or metabolic syndrome. By contrast, it was significantly ameliorated, albeit not completely abolished, after BS. Finally, obese subjects had evidence of pulmonary inflammation (exhaled condensate) that also decreased after BS. Conclusions The systemic inflammome of morbid obesity is independent of sex, smoking status and/or comorbidities, it is significantly reduced by BS and mirrored in the lungs. PMID:25238542

  20. Exploring the concept of eating dyscontrol in severely obese patients candidate to bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Calderone, A; Mauri, M; Calabrò, P F; Piaggi, P; Ceccarini, G; Lippi, C; Fierabracci, P; Landi, A; Vitti, P; Santini, F

    2015-02-01

    Eating dyscontrol constitutes a potential negative predictor for the outcome of treatment strategies for obese patients. The aim of this study was to examine the qualitative characteristics of eating dyscontrol in obese patients who engage in binge eating (BE) compared with those who do not (NBE), and to analyse the relationship between eating dyscontrol and axis-I, axis-II, spectrum psychopathology using instruments that explore mood, panic-agoraphobic, social-phobic, obsessive-compulsive and eating disorders spectrum psychopathology (SCI-MOODS-SR, SCI-PAS-SR, SCI-SHY-SR, SCI-OBS-SR, SCI-ABS-SR). This was a cross-sectional study involving a clinical sample of adult obese patients with severe obesity (average body mass index = 45 ± 8 kg m(-2) ) and candidate to bariatric surgery who were recruited between November 2001 and November 2010 at the Obesity Center of the Endocrinology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa. All participants completed a face-to-face interview, including a diagnostic assessment of axes-I and II mental disorders (using the Structured Clinical Interview for Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition [SCID]-I and SCID-II) and filled out self-report spectrum instruments. Among obese patients not affected by BE, eating dyscontrol was highly represented. Indeed, 39.7% (N = 177) of subjects endorsed six or more items of the Anorexia-Bulimia Spectrum Self-Report, lifetime version domain exploring this behaviour. The cumulative probability of having axis-I, axis-II and a spectrum condition disorder increased significantly with the number of eating dyscontrol items endorsed. In both BE and NBE obese subjects, eating dyscontrol may represent an independent dimension strongly related to the spectrum psychopathology and axes I/II disorders. A systematic screening for eating dyscontrol symptoms by means of self-report spectrum instruments may be valuable to assign specific treatment strategies.

  1. Changes in SCD gene DNA methylation after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients are associated with free fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, Sonsoles; Martín-Núñez, Gracia Mª; García-Serrano, Sara; Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalo, Montserrat; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Rodriguez-Cañete, Alberto; Tinahones, Francisco; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Stearoyl CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD) is considered as playing an important role in the explanation of obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the DNA methylation SCD gene promoter is associated with the metabolic improvement in morbidly obese patients after bariatric surgery. The study included 120 subjects with morbid obesity who underwent a laparoscopic Roux-en Y gastric by-pass (RYGB) and a control group of 30 obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) to that found in morbidly obese subjects six months after RYGB. Fasting blood samples were obtained before and at six months after RYGB. DNA methylation was measured by pyrosequencing technology. DNA methylation levels of the SCD gene promoter were lower in morbidly obese subjects before bariatric surgery but increased after RYGB to levels similar to those found in the control group. Changes of DNA methylation SCD gene were associated with the changes of free fatty acids levels (r = −0.442, p = 0.006) and HOMA-IR (r = −0.249, p = 0.035) after surgery. RYGB produces an increase in the low SCD methylation promoter levels found in morbidly obese subjects. This change of SCD methylation levels is associated with changes in FFA and HOMA-IR. PMID:28393901

  2. Bariatric surgery-mediated weight loss and its metabolic consequences for type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Raghow, Rajendra

    2013-06-15

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity and its medical complications are being dealt with a combination of life style changes (e.g., healthier diet and exercise), medications and a variety of surgical interventions. The Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) are two of the most common weight loss surgeries for morbid obesity-associated metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. A vast majority of patients that undergo RYGB and LAGB are known to experience marked weight loss and attenuation of diabetes. A number of recent studies have indicated that the rates of remission in glycemic control and insulin sensitivity are significantly greater in patients that have undergone RYGB. A plausible hypothesis to explain this observation is that the gastric bypass surgery as opposed to the gastric banding procedure impinges on glucose homeostasis by a weight loss-independent mechanism. In a recent paper, Bradley et al have experimentally explored this hypothesis. The authors compared several clinical and laboratory parameters of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in cohorts of RYGB and LAGB patients before and after they lost approximately 20% of their body mass. After weight loss, both groups of patients underwent similar changes in their intra-abdominal and total adipose tissue volume, hepatic triglyceride and circulating leptin levels. The RYGB patients who lost 20% body mass, manifested higher postprandial output of glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1; these laboratory parameters remained unchanged in LABG patients. Irrespective of the observed differences in transient responses of RYGB and LAGB patients to mixed meal, the overall glycemic control as judged by glucose tolerance, multi-organ insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were nearly identical in the two groups. Both RYGB and LAGB patient cohorts also experienced similar changes in the expression of a number of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Based on

  3. Changes in the salivary protein profile of morbidly obese women either previously subjected to bariatric surgery or not.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Elsa; Simões, Carla; Rodrigues, Lénia; Costa, Ana Rodrigues; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Antunes, Célia; do Carmo, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Saliva is a non-invasive source of biomarkers useful in the study of physiological mechanisms. Moreover, this fluid has diverse functions, among which food perception and ingestion, making it particularly suitable for the study of obesity. The aims of this study were to assess changes in salivary proteome among morbidly obese women, with a view to provide information about mechanisms potentially related to the development of obesity, and to evaluate whether these changes persist after weight loss. Mixed saliva samples from morbidly obese women (N = 18) who had been either subjected (group O-BS) or not (group O) to bariatric surgery and women with normal weight (N = 14; group C) were compared for protein profiles, alpha-amylase abundance and enzymatic activity, and carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI abundance. Differences in salivary obese profiles were observed for 23 different spots. Zinc-alpha-2 glycoprotein-containing spots showed higher abundance in group O only, whereas cystatin S-containing spots presented higher abundance in the two groups of obese subjects. Most of the spots identified as salivary amylase were present at lower levels in group O-BS. With regard to the amylase enzymatic activity, increases were observed for group O and decreases for group O-BS. One interesting finding was the high correlation between levels of CA VI and body mass index in group O, which was not observed for groups O-BS or C. The differences between groups, mainly regarding salivary proteins involved in taste sensitivity and metabolism, point to the potential of using saliva in the study of obesity development.

  4. Endoscopic extraction of adjustable gastric bands after intragastric migration as a complication of bariatric surgery: technique and advice

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Pacheco, David; Rábago-Torre, Luis Ramon; Arias-Rivera, Maria; Ortega-Carbonel, Alejandro; Olivares-Valles, Ana; Alonso-Prada, Alicia; Vázquez-Echarri, Jaime; Herrera-Merino, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery has been the method most widely used to manage the extraction of gastric bands with inclusion as a late complication of bariatric surgery; however, surgical extraction entails morbidity and limits future surgical procedures. The development of endoscopic techniques has provided an important means of improving the treatment of this complication, enabling minimally invasive and safe procedures that have a high success rate. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients who had laparoscopic gastric banding complicated by intragastric migration and were treated endoscopically. A technique already described for managing this complication was employed. An MTW Endoskopie Dormia basket for mechanical lithotripsy or a standard 0.0035-in guidewire was placed around the band, and an MTW Endoskopie emergency lithotripter was used to section it, after which the band was extracted with a standard polypectomy snare. Also analyzed were the initial symptoms of patients with this complication, the mean time from surgery to development of the event, the success rate of endoscopic treatment, and complications, Results: A total of 127 patients had undergone gastric banding surgery in our Bariatric Surgery Center; of these, 12 patients (9.4 %) developed a complication such as intragastric migration of the band. Weight gain and pain were the main symptoms in 11 patients (92 %), and the mean time to the development of symptoms was 51.3 months. A single endoscopic treatment was successful in 7 of 9 patients (78 %). Only 1 complication, involving ventilation during anesthesia, occurred; no other adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: The endoscopic extraction of bands with inclusion is feasible and can be performed easily and successfully. The procedure is available in all hospitals and has a low incidence of related complications, so that unnecessary surgical procedures can be avoided. PMID:27556077

  5. Measurement and Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Emphasis on Mobile Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Thomas, J. Graham

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB—i.e. activities involving low energy expenditure and a sitting/reclining posture) may each have significant implications for weight loss and other bariatric surgery outcomes. While early studies suggested that patients typically comply with clinical recommendations to adopt habitual PA, these data were based on retrospective questionnaires. Conversely, recent studies incorporating mobile health (mHealth) technologies (e.g., objective monitors), which assess PA and SB in real-time and in the natural environment, show that most patients are inactive and highly sedentary preoperatively, and only make modest changes in these behaviors postoperatively. In addition to using mHealth technologies for obtaining accurate and detailed information on PA and SB, they are increasingly being employed to intervene on patients’ PA and SB and/or evaluate intervention outcomes. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to consider the benefits of using mHealth technology when studying and treating PA and SB in bariatric surgery patients. PMID:26331982

  6. Measurement and Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviours in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Emphasis on Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Bond, Dale S; Thomas, J Graham

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB-i.e. activities involving low-energy expenditure and a sitting/reclining posture) may each have significant implications for weight loss and other bariatric surgery outcomes. While early studies suggested that patients typically comply with clinical recommendations to adopt habitual PA, these data were based on retrospective questionnaires. Conversely, recent studies incorporating mobile health (mHealth) technologies (e.g. objective monitors), which assess PA and SB in real time and in the natural environment, show that most patients are inactive and highly sedentary pre-operatively and only make modest changes in these behaviours postoperatively. In addition to using mHealth technologies for obtaining accurate and detailed information on PA and SB, they are increasingly being employed to intervene on patients' PA and SB and/or evaluate intervention outcomes. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to consider the benefits of using mHealth technology when studying and treating PA and SB in bariatric surgery patients.

  7. Feasibility and Impact of a Combined Supervised Exercise and Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention following Bariatric Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jassil, Friedrich C.; Manning, Sean; Lewis, Neville; Steinmo, Siri; Kingett, Helen; Lough, Fiona; Pucci, Andrea B. F.; Cheung, W. H.; Finer, Nicholas; Walker, Judith; Doyle, Jaqueline; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lifestyle intervention programs after bariatric surgery have been suggested to maximise health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and impact of an 8-week combined supervised exercise with nutritional-behavioral intervention following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Methods. Eight female patients (44 ± 8 years old, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.2 kgm−2) completed the program. Before and after intervention, anthropometric measures, six-minute walk test (6MWT), physical activity level, eating behavior, and quality of life (QoL) were assessed. Percentage weight loss (%WL) outcomes were compared with a historical matched control group. Results. The program significantly improved functional capacity (mean increment in 6MWT was 127 ± 107 meters, p = 0.043), increased strenuous intensity exercise (44 ± 49 min/week, p = 0.043), increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (p = 0.034), reduced consumption of ready meals (p = 0.034), and improved “Change in Health” in QoL domain (p = 0.039). The intervention group exhibited greater %WL in the 3–12-month postsurgery period compared to historical controls, 12.2 ± 7.5% versus 5.1 ± 5.4%, respectively (p = 0.027). Conclusions. Lifestyle intervention program following bariatric surgery is feasible and resulted in several beneficial outcomes. A large randomised control trial is now warranted. PMID:26199740

  8. Clinical Correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale in a Sample of Obese Adolescents Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Christina A.; Sysko, Robyn; Bush, Jennifer; Pearl, Rebecca; Puhl, Rebecca M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Dovidio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties and clinical correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Sixty five adolescents enrolled in a bariatric surgery program at a large, urban medical center completed psychiatric evaluations, self-report questionnaires including the WBIS and other measures of psychopathology and physical assessments. The WBIS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .92). As in previous research with adults, the one underlying factor structure was replicated and 10 of the original 11 items were retained. The scale had significant partial correlations with depression (r = .519), anxiety (r = .465), social and behavioral problems (r = .364), quality of life (r = −.480), and eating (r = .579), shape (r = .815), and weight concerns (r = .545), controlling for body mass index. However, WBIS scores did not predict current or past psychiatric diagnosis or treatment or past suicidal ideation. Overall, the WBIS had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of obese treatment-seeking adolescents and correlated significantly with levels of psychopathology. These findings suggest that the WBIS could be a useful tool for healthcare providers to assess internalized weight bias among treatment-seeking obese youth. Assessment of internalized weight bias among this clinical population has the potential to identify adolescents who may benefit from information on coping with weight stigma which in turn can augment weight loss efforts. PMID:21593805

  9. Treating Every Needle in the Haystack: Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy and Severe Malnutrition After Bariatric Surgery-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeev; Suresh, Swetha; McClave, Stephen A; Cave, Matt

    2015-11-01

    Neurologic complications are not uncommon following bariatric surgery. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy (HAE) due to an acquired or unmasked urea cycle deficit is among the rarest of these. Pediatric nutrition support specialists are familiar with recognizing urea cycle deficits, but adult specialists may not be. Here we present a case of a patient initially misdiagnosed with cirrhosis who presented with recurrent HAE 4 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. She was diagnosed with a proximal urea cycle deficit and severe protein calorie malnutrition. The patient recovered with specialized nutrition and medical support targeting this condition. A literature review indicates multiple fatalities from this condition, indicating the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate nutrition support.

  10. The Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait in a bariatric surgery seeking population and ability to predict post-surgery weight loss at six months.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Nina M; LePage, Marie L; Goldman, Rachel L; O'Neil, Patrick M; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Byrne, T Karl

    2012-12-01

    Food cravings have been understudied in bariatric surgery patients and the Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait has not been validated in this population. Reliability and validity of the FCQ-T were examined and a regression analysis was run to determine whether or not preoperative scores on individual subscales of the instrument could predict weight loss at 6 months. The FCQ-T demonstrated excellent internal consistency in bariatric surgery-seeking patients, and individual subscales measuring emotion and mood were correlated with other measures of depression and anxiety. Endorsement of binge eating or emotional eating behaviors during a clinical interview was correlated with similar subscales on the FCQ-T. Higher scores on the subscale 'cues that may trigger food cravings' were associated with greater weight loss at 6 months post-surgery and higher scores on the subscale 'guilt from cravings and/or giving into them' was associated with less weight loss. Management of external cues may predict successful outcomes while emotional impact of cravings may indicate the need for further intervention to help manage specific food craving traits.

  11. Bariatric bypasses contribute to loss of bone mineral density but reduce axial back pain in morbidly obese patients considering spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many spine surgeons recommend stringent weight loss, including bariatric bypass procedures, prior to “elective” spine surgery (should not be for axial back pain alone) in morbidly obese patients (defined by a body mass index (BMI) of >40 mg/kg2 or >35 mg/kg2 with two or more major comorbidities) to reduce their greater risk for major perioperative complications. Although bypasses typically lead to marked weight reduction and even reduced axial back pain, they also promote unrecognized and often insufficiently treated vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density. Methods: Morbidly obese patients who are under consideration for “elective” spine operations (other than for back pain alone) are often told to lose weight. Some choose to undergo bariatric bypass procedures, but are unaware of the potential risks/complications of these procedures. Results: Within the first 2 years following most bariatric bypass procedures, patients experience not only marked loss of weight and muscle mass, but also significant vitamin D deficiency and loss of bone mineral density, increasing their susceptibility to fractures. Nevertheless, some patients also experience a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid spinal surgery. Conclusions: Morbidly obese patients under consideration for “elective” spine surgery may undergo bariatric bypass procedures that lead to a significant reduction of vitamin D levels and loss of bone mineral density. However, potential benefits may include a sufficient reduction of axial back pain to avoid surgery in a select subset of patients altogether. PMID:28217392

  12. Prediction of Exercise in Patients across Various Stages of Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of the Merits of the Theory of Reasoned Action versus the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Hillary R.; Gross, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the…

  13. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  14. GLP-2: A POORLY UNDERSTOOD MEDIATOR ENROLLED IN VARIOUS BARIATRIC/METABOLIC SURGERY-RELATED PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    CAZZO, Everton; GESTIC, Martinho Antonio; UTRINI, Murillo Pimentel; CHAIM, Felipe David Mendonça; GELONEZE, Bruno; PAREJA, José Carlos; CHAIM, Elinton Adami; MAGRO, Daniéla Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a gastrointestinal hormone whose effects are predominantly trophic on the intestinal mucosa. Aim: Critically evaluate the current literature on the influence of bariatric/metabolic surgery on the levels of GLP-2 and its potential clinical implications. Method s: Narrative review through online research on the databases Medline and Lilacs. There were six prospective human studies, two cross-sectional human studies, and three experimental animal studies selected. Results: There is evidence demonstrating significant increase in the levels of GLP-2 following gastric bypass, Scopinaro operation, and sleeve gastrectomy. There are no differences between gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy in regards to the increase in the GLP-2 levels. There is no correlation between the postoperative levels of GLP-2 and the occurrence of adequate or insufficient postoperative weight loss. Conclusion: GLP-2 plays significant roles on the regulation of nutrient absorption, permeability of gut mucosa, control of bone resorption, and regulation of satiety. The overall impact of these effects potentially exerts a significant adaptive or compensatory effect within the context of varied bariatric surgical techniques. PMID:28076485

  15. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability increases after long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; de Weijer, Barbara A; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke M; Janssen, Ignace; Berends, Frits J; van de Laar, Arnold; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Booij, Jan; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-07-01

    In several studies reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability was reported in obese subjects compared to lean controls. Whether this is a reversible phenomenon remained uncertain. We previously determined the short-term effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on striatal D2/3R availability (using [(123)I]IBZM SPECT) in 20 morbidly obese women. Striatal D2/3R availability was lower compared to controls at baseline, and remained unaltered after 6 weeks, despite significant weight loss. To determine whether long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss normalizes striatal D2/3R binding, we repeated striatal D2/3R binding measurements at least 2 years after RYGB in 14 subjects of the original cohort. In addition, we assessed long-term changes in body composition, eating behavior and fasting plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and glucose. Mean body mass index declined from 46±7kg/m(2) to 32±6kg/m(2), which was accompanied by a significant increase in striatal D2/3R availability (p=0.031). Striatal D2/3R availability remained significantly reduced compared to the age-matched controls (BMI 22±2kg/m(2); p=0.01). Changes in striatal D2/3R availability did not correlate with changes in body weight/fat, insulin sensitivity, ghrelin or leptin levels. Scores on eating behavior questionnaires improved and changes in the General Food Craving Questionnaire-State showed a borderline significant correlation with changes in striatal D2/3R availability. These findings show that striatal D2/3R availability increases after long-term bariatric-surgery induced weight loss, suggesting that reduced D2/3R availability in obesity is a reversible phenomenon.

  16. Bari-Active: A randomized controlled trial of a preoperative intervention to increase physical activity in bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Jakicic, John M.; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Habitual physical activity (PA) may help to optimize bariatric surgery outcomes; however objective PA measures show that most patients have low PA preoperatively and make only modest PA changes postoperatively. Patients require additional support to adopt habitual PA. Objectives: Test the efficacy of a preoperative PA intervention (PAI) versus standard pre-surgical care (SC) for increasing daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in bariatric surgery patients. Setting: University Hospital, United States. Methods: Outcomes analysis included 75 participants (86.7% women; 46.0±8.9 years; Body Mass Index [BMI]=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned preoperatively to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or SC (n=35). PAI received weekly individual face-to-face sessions with tailored instruction in behavioral strategies (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting) to increase home-based walking exercise. The primary outcome, pre- to post-intervention change in daily bout-related (≥10-min bouts) and total (≥1-minute bouts) MVPA minutes, was assessed objectively via a multi-sensor monitor worn for 7 days at baseline- and post-intervention. Results: Retention was 84% at the post-intervention primary end point. In intent-to-treat analyses with baseline value carried forward for missing data and adjusted for baseline MVPA, PAI achieved a mean increase of 16.6±20.6 minutes/day in bout-related MVPA (baseline: 4.4±5.5 to post-intervention: 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) compared to no change (−0.3±12.7 minutes/day; baseline: 7.9±16.6 to post-intervention: 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). Similarly, PAI achieved a mean increase of 21.0±26.9 minutes/day in total MVPA (baseline: 30.9±21.2 to post-intervention: 51.9±30.0 minutes/day), whereas SC demonstrated no change (− 0.1±16.3 minutes/day; baseline: 33.7±33.2 to post-intervention: 33.6±28.5 minutes/day) (p=0.001). Conclusions: With behavioral intervention, patients can significantly increase MVPA before bariatric

  17. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: understanding weight loss and improvements in type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott, William R; Batterham, Rachel L

    2011-07-01

    Obesity increases the likelihood of diseases like type 2 diabetes (T2D), heart disease, and cancer, and is one of the most serious public health problems of this century. In contrast to ineffectual prevention strategies, lifestyle modifications, and pharmacological therapies, bariatric surgery is a very effective treatment for morbid obesity and also markedly improves associated comorbidities like T2D. However, weight loss and resolution of T2D after bariatric surgery is heterogeneous and specific to type of bariatric procedure performed. Conventional mechanisms like intestinal malabsorption and gastric restriction do not fully explain this, and potent changes in appetite and the enteroinsular axis, as a result of anatomical reorganization and altered hormonal, neuronal, and nutrient signaling, are the portended cause. Uniquely these signaling changes appear to override vigorous homeostatic defenses of stable body weight and compelling self-gratifying motivations to eat and to reverse defects in beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Here we review mechanisms of weight loss and T2D resolution after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy bariatric surgery, two markedly different procedures with robust clinical outcomes.

  18. Comparison of consumption behavior and appetite sensations among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chun; Huang, Hsien-Hao; Chen, Shu-Chun; Chen, Tung-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Background The promising postsurgical weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D) from bariatric surgery can be attributed to modified eating physiology after surgical procedures. We sought to investigate the changes in the parameters of consumption behaviors and appetite sensations induced by a mixed meal tolerance test, and to correlate these alterations with age, body mass index, C-peptide levels, and duration of T2D 1 year after bariatric surgery. Methods A total of 16 obese patients with T2D who underwent mini-gastric bypass (GB) and 16 patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy (SG) were enrolled in this study and evaluated using a mixed meal tolerance test one year after surgery. A visual analogue scale was used for scoring appetite sensation at different time points. The area under the curve (AUC) and the incremental or decremental AUC (ΔAUC) were compared between the two groups. Results One year after surgery, a decreasing trend in the consumption time was observed in the GB group compared to the SG group, while the duration of T2D before surgery was negatively correlated with the post-operative consumed time in those after GB. Patients who underwent GB had significantly higher fasting scores for fullness and desire to eat, higher AUC0′–180′ of scores for desire to eat, as well as more effective post-meal suppression of hunger and desire to eat compared with those undergoing SG one year after surgery. Post-operative C-peptide levels were negatively correlated with ΔAUC0′–180′ for hunger and ΔAUC0′–180′ for desire to eat in the GB group, while negatively correlated with ΔAUC0′–180′ for fullness in the SG group. Discussion Patients with T2D after either GB or SG exhibit distinct nutrient-induced consumption behaviors and appetite sensations post-operatively, which may account for the differential effects on weight loss and glycemic control after different surgery. PMID:28344903

  19. Craniofacial surgery: present and future.

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, L A; Schut, L; Randall, P

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities for radical craniofacial restructuring have increased dramatically in the past 6 years with the development of craniofacial surgery. The field developed from a background of patients with major craniofacial birth defects allowing orderly planning and expansion to correction of a multitude of other craniofacial structural problems. The procedures concentrate upon changing the skeletal structures using extensive subperiostial dissection of soft tissue, and adding bone to fill in areas of deficiency. There are three grades of complexity in craniofacial procedures. After extensive soft tissue sub-periostial stripping about the orbits and upper face, the simplest form consists of onlay bone grafts. The next most complicated involves osteotomies to shift the face into a more normal position. In its most complicated form, abnormal proportions of bone are removed and the orbits or cranium are shifted into a new or normal position. We have had experience with 69 patients since September, 1972. Thirty-six have had intracranial procedures. Infection has been the most serious problem, and there have been no instances of death or blindness. A number of lesser problems occur. Future applications of craniofacial surgery are appearing with great frequency as more experience is gained with its uses. It has particular application in acute and late reconstruction of patients with traumatic defects about the face. Preventive osteotomies are an area with great potential, by releasing stenotic areas of bone and allowing the developing brain to mold the upper face and orbits. There is also applicability in surgery of tumors about the craniofacial structure and in cosmetic surgery. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 1d. Fig. 1e. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b. Fig. 2c. PMID:984925

  20. Ten-years of bariatric surgery in Brazil: in-hospital mortality rates for patients assisted by universal health system or a health maintenance organization

    PubMed Central

    KELLES, Silvana Márcia Bruschi; MACHADO, Carla Jorge; BARRETO, Sandhi Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an option for sustained weight loss for the morbidly obese patient. In Brazil coexists the Unified Health System (SUS) with universal coverage and from which depend 150 million Brazilians and supplemental health security, predominantly private, with 50 million beneficiaries. Aim To compare access, in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assisted in one or another system. Methods Data from DATASUS and IBGE were used for SUS patients' and database from one health plan of southeastern Brazil for the health insurance patients. Results Between 2001 and 2010 there were 24,342 and 4,356 surgeries performed in SUS and in the health insurance company, respectively. The coverage rates for surgeries performed in 2010 were 5.3 and 91/100.000 individuals in SUS and health insurance respectively. The rate of in-hospital mortality in SUS, considering the entire country, was 0.55 %, 0.44 % considering SUS Southeast, and 0.30 % for the health insurance. The costs of surgery in the SUS and in the health insurance trend to equalization over the years. Conclusion Despite differences in access and characteristics that may compromise the outcome of bariatric surgery, patients treated at the Southeast SUS had similar rate of in-hospital mortality compared to the health insurance patients. PMID:25626935

  1. Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Insulin Resistant Humans Normalises Insulin Signalling but Not Insulin-Stimulated Glucose Disposal

    PubMed Central

    de Berker, David A. R.; May, Margaret T.; Hers, Ingeborg; Dayan, Colin M.; Andrews, Robert C.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Weight-loss after bariatric surgery improves insulin sensitivity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. To ascertain the effect of bariatric surgery on insulin signalling, we examined glucose disposal and Akt activation in morbidly obese volunteers before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), and compared this to lean volunteers. Materials and Methods The hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, at five infusion rates, was used to determine glucose disposal rates (GDR) in eight morbidly obese (body mass index, BMI=47.3±2.2 kg/m2) patients, before and after RYGB, and in eight lean volunteers (BMI=20.7±0.7 kg/m2). Biopsies of brachioradialis muscle, taken at fasting and insulin concentrations that induced half-maximal (GDR50) and maximal (GDR100) GDR in each subject, were used to examine the phosphorylation of Akt-Thr308, Akt-473, and pras40, in vivo biomarkers for Akt activity. Results Pre-operatively, insulin-stimulated GDR was lower in the obese compared to the lean individuals (P<0.001). Weight-loss of 29.9±4 kg after surgery significantly improved GDR50 (P=0.004) but not GDR100 (P=0.3). These subjects still remained significantly more insulin resistant than the lean individuals (p<0.001). Weight loss increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle Akt-Thr308 and Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, P=0.02 and P=0.03 respectively (MANCOVA), and Akt activity towards the substrate PRAS40 (P=0.003, MANCOVA), and in contrast to GDR, were fully normalised after the surgery (obese vs lean, P=0.6, P=0.35, P=0.46, respectively). Conclusions Our data show that although Akt activity substantially improved after surgery, it did not lead to a full restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. This suggests that a major defect downstream of, or parallel to, Akt signalling remains after significant weight-loss. PMID:25876175

  2. Factor structure and item analysis of the Yale Food Addiction Scale in obese candidates for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Heckel, Daniela; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Converging research suggests phenomenological and neurobiological similarities between excessive food consumption and addictive behaviour in substance dependence. Recently, the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) has been proposed for the assessment of addictive eating behaviour. The German version of the YFAS was administered to obese individuals seeking bariatric surgery (N = 96). Factor structure, internal consistency, and item statistics were analysed. Forty participants (41.70%) received a food addiction diagnosis. The one-factorial structure of the YFAS, which has been found in non-clinical samples, could be confirmed. All but three items had factor loadings > .50. Internal consistency was α = .82. Item analysis revealed that items related to unsuccessful attempts to cut down and consumption despite physical and emotional problems were endorsed by the majority of participants. Findings support the use of the YFAS in clinical populations, while applicability of some items differs between clinical and non-clinical samples.

  3. Metabolic Complications of Bypass Surgery for Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Devantoy, S.; Garré, J.B.; Gohier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative complications resulting from bariatric surgery can lead to severe vitamin-deficiency states. A patient who underwent bariatric bypass surgery and later developed Wernicke’s encephalopathy prompted us to present her interesting case history for discussion. Although bariatric surgery is known to be a risk factor for Wernicke’s encephalopathy, this diagnosis is only rarely evoked in the postoperative course. We recommend that the occurrence of digestive, psychiatric or neurological symptoms after bariatric surgery should suggest a thiamine deficiency that must be promptly assessed. Without waiting for the results, thiamine supplementation should be initiated. PMID:24179375

  4. The Alberta population-based prospective evaluation of the quality of life outcomes and economic impact of bariatric surgery (APPLES) study: background, design and rationale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Extreme obesity affects nearly 8% of Canadians, and is debilitating, costly and ultimately lethal. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment available; is associated with reductions in morbidity/mortality, improvements in quality of life; and appears cost-effective. However, current demand for surgery in Canada outstrips capacity by at least 1000-fold, causing exponential increases in already protracted, multi-year wait-times. The objectives and hypotheses of this study were as follows: 1. To serially assess the clinical, economic and humanistic outcomes in patients wait-listed for bariatric care over a 2-year period. We hypothesize deterioration in these outcomes over time; 2. To determine the clinical effectiveness and changes in quality of life associated with modern bariatric procedures compared with medically treated and wait-listed controls over 2 years. We hypothesize that surgery will markedly reduce weight, decrease the need for unplanned medical care, and increase quality of life; 3. To conduct a 3-year (1 year retrospective and 2 year prospective) economic assessment of bariatric surgery compared to medical and wait-listed controls from the societal, public payor, and health-care payor perspectives. We hypothesize that lower indirect, out of pocket and productivity costs will offset increased direct health-care costs resulting in lower total costs for bariatric surgery. Methods/design Population-based prospective cohort study of 500 consecutive, consenting adults, including 150 surgically treated patients, 200 medically treated patients and 150 wait-listed patients. Subjects will be enrolled from the Edmonton Weight Wise Regional Obesity Program (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), with prospective bi-annual follow-up for 2 years. Mixed methods data collection, linking primary data to provincial administrative databases will be employed. Major outcomes include generic, obesity-specific and preference-based quality of life assessment

  5. Efficacy of a liquid low-energy formula diet in achieving preoperative target weight loss before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lone V; Nielsen, Mette S; Schmidt, Julie B; Pedersen, Sue D; Sjödin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A preoperative weight loss of 8 % is a prerequisite to undergo bariatric surgery (BS) in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 7- or an 11-week low-energy diet (LCD) for achieving preoperative target weight before BS. A total of thirty obese patients (BMI 46·0 (sd 4·4) kg/m(2)) followed an LCD (Cambridge Weight Plan(®), 4184 kJ/d (1000 kcal/d)) for 7 or 11 weeks as preparation for BS. Anthropometric measurements including body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), blood parameters and blood pressure were assessed at weeks 0, 7 and 11. At week 7, the majority of patients (77 %) had reached their target weight, and this was achieved after 5·4 (sem 0·3) weeks. Mean weight loss was 9·3 (sem 0·5) % (P < 0·01) and consisted of 41·6 % fat-free mass (FFM) and 58·4 % fat mass. The weight loss was accompanied by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (7·1 (sem 2·3) and 7·3 (sem 1·8) mmHg, respectively, all P < 0·01) as well as an improved metabolic profile (8·2 (sem 1·8) % decrease in fasting glucose (P < 0·01), 28·6 (sem 6·4) % decrease in fasting insulin (P < 0·01), 23·1 (sem 2·2) % decrease in LDL (P < 0·01), and 9·7 (sem 4·7) % decrease in TAG (P < 0·05)). Weight, FFM and fat mass continued to decrease from week 7 to 11 (all P < 0·01), whereas no additional improvements was observed in the metabolic parameters. Severely obese patients can safely achieve preoperative target weight on an LCD within 7 weeks as part of preparation for BS. However, the considerable reduction in FFM in severely obese subjects needs further investigation.

  6. Bariatric Outcomes and Obesity Modeling: Study Meeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-17

    to obesity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Bariatric Surgery , Cost Effectiveness, Surgical Outcome 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a. REPORT...EFFECTIVENESS MODEL OVERVIEW  Two parts: 1) Decision Tree and 2) Natural History Model  Results: Bariatric Surgery is cost-effective compared to no...9,300 for AGB $10,600 for LRYGB AGB: Adjustable gastric banding LRYGB: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass A Financial Model of Bariatric Surgery for

  7. Effect of adding intrathecal morphine to a multimodal analgesic regimen for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic bariatric surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Othman, Ahmed Hassan; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmad Mohammad; Taha, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain control after bariatric surgery is a major challenge. Our objective was to study the efficacy and safety of intrathecal (IT) morphine 0.3 mg added to bupivacaine 0.5% for postoperative pain after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Methods: After local ethics committee approval, 100 morbidly obese patients scheduled for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Group I received IT 0.3 mg morphine (0.3 mL) added to 1.2 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%; Group II received IT 0.3 mL saline added to 1.2 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%, immediately before induction of general anaesthesia. For both groups, 60 mg ketorolac and 1000 mg paracetamol were infused 30 minutes before the end of surgery. After wound closure, 20 mL bupivacaine 0.25% was infiltrated at wound edges. Results: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was significantly lower in group I immediately, 30 minutes and 1 hour postoperatively. Time to first ambulation, return of intestinal sounds and hospital stay were shorter in group I than group II (p < 0.05); total morphine consumption was significantly lower in group I than group II (p < 0.05). Sedation score was significantly higher in group I immediately postoperatively, while at 30 minutes, 1, 2 and 6 hours postoperatively sedation scores were significantly higher in group II. Itching was significantly higher in group I. Conclusion: The addition of IT morphine to a multimodal analgesic regimen after laparoscopic bariatric surgery was an effective and safe method that markedly reduced postoperative pain, systemic opioid consumption and length of hospital stay. PMID:27867510

  8. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery can be performed safely in secondary health care centres with a dedicated service corridor to an affiliated tertiary health care centre

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background Canada needs to increase capacity for bariatric surgery to reduce the wait for this cost-effective, life-saving surgery. The aim of this study was to test whether laparoscopic bariatric surgery, including gastric bypass, can be delivered safely in secondary health care centres (SHCCs). Methods In this prospective cohort study, patients received bariatric surgery at an SHCC that had no intensive care unit but had a dedicated operating room and ward teams and a patient-monitoring environment. Patients with life-threatening complications were transferred to an affiliated tertiary health care centre (THCC) via a dedicated “service corridor.” Results In all, 830 patients were treated: 676 at the SHCC and 154 at the THCC. Gastric bypass was performed in 85.4%, gastric band in 11.1% and gastric sleeve in 3.5%. The body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in the THCC than the SHCC group (mean 54.4 [standard deviation (SD) 9.7] v. 47.5 [SD 7.4]). Obesity-associated diseases were similar between the groups. Major complications occurred in 2.6% of SHCC patients and 1.7% of THCC patients. Seven patients (1%) required direct transfer to the THCC, and all were treated successfully. There were 2 deaths (1.3%) in the THCC and none in the SHCC groups (combined mortality 0.2%). Weight loss was equivalent up to the fourth year of the study. Conclusion With proper patient selection, a dedicated health care team and a service corridor to an affiliated THCC, laparoscopic bariatric surgery, including gastric bypass can be performed safely in SHCCs. Further study is needed to determine whether the model can be applied across Canada. PMID:23883507

  9. Reliability, validity, and utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in assessments of bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Wygant, Dustin B; Boutacoff, Lana I; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2013-12-01

    In the current study, we examined the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2011) scores in a sample of 759 bariatric surgery candidates. We provide descriptives for all scales, internal consistency and standard error of measurement estimates for all substantive scales, external correlates of substantive scales using chart review and self-report criteria, and relative risk ratios to assess the clinical utility of the instrument. Results generally support the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of MMPI-2-RF scale scores in the psychological evaluation of bariatric surgery candidates. Limitations, future directions, and practical application of these results are discussed.

  10. Impact of bariatric surgery on ghrelin and obestatin levels in obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Donglei; Jiang, Xun; Ding, Weixing; Zhang, Dingyu; Yang, Lei; Zhen, Chengzhu; Lu, Liesheng

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy on weight control by different bariatric surgeries and investigate the ghrelin and obestatin changes after these surgeries in obesity and nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Obese rats were randomly assigned to receive sleeve gastrectomy (SG, n = 8), minigastric bypass (MGBP, n = 8), roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP, n = 8), and sham operation (SO, n = 4). Another 4 rats served as control. Besides, Goto-Kakisaki (GK) rats were also randomly divided into similar groups except for total gastrectomy (TG, n = 8) group. The results showed that in obese rats, weigh loss in RYGBP group was similar to that in MGBP group but larger than that in SG group. Ghrelin significantly increased in RYGB group, but obestatin increased in MGBP group. Ghrelin/obestatin ratio significantly decreased in SG group. In GK rats, weight loss was most obvious in TG group. Postoperatively, ghrelin was significantly increased in MGBP and RYGB groups but decreased in TG group. Obestatin also showed an increase in MGBP and RYGB groups. Ghrelin/obestatin in TG group decreased significantly. In conclusion, RYGB and MGBP may be more suitable for obese rats, but TG may be the best strategy for T2DM rats to control weight with different mechanisms.

  11. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Ghrelin and Obestatin Levels in Obesity or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Donglei; Jiang, Xun; Ding, Weixing; Zhang, Dingyu; Yang, Lei; Zhen, Chengzhu; Lu, Liesheng

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy on weight control by different bariatric surgeries and investigate the ghrelin and obestatin changes after these surgeries in obesity and nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Obese rats were randomly assigned to receive sleeve gastrectomy (SG, n = 8), minigastric bypass (MGBP, n = 8), roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP, n = 8), and sham operation (SO, n = 4). Another 4 rats served as control. Besides, Goto-Kakisaki (GK) rats were also randomly divided into similar groups except for total gastrectomy (TG, n = 8) group. The results showed that in obese rats, weigh loss in RYGBP group was similar to that in MGBP group but larger than that in SG group. Ghrelin significantly increased in RYGB group, but obestatin increased in MGBP group. Ghrelin/obestatin ratio significantly decreased in SG group. In GK rats, weight loss was most obvious in TG group. Postoperatively, ghrelin was significantly increased in MGBP and RYGB groups but decreased in TG group. Obestatin also showed an increase in MGBP and RYGB groups. Ghrelin/obestatin in TG group decreased significantly. In conclusion, RYGB and MGBP may be more suitable for obese rats, but TG may be the best strategy for T2DM rats to control weight with different mechanisms. PMID:24672803

  12. [Role of general practioners in the follow-up of bariatric surgery in the province of Liege].

    PubMed

    Gaspard, S; Ketterer, F; Belche, J L; Berrewaerts, M A; Giet, D

    2014-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the place and role of general practitioners in the follow-up of patients submitted to bariatric surgery in the province of Liège. The results of the analysis were compared with clinical practice guidelines published by the French Haute Autorité de Santé (HAS). Fifteen interviews were conducted with GPs who follow up operated patients. The results highlight the GPs' wish to fully participate in the follow-up of those patients. Their medical supervision is centered on the HAS clinical practice guidelines, taking into account the intake deficiencies as well as the patient's psychological experience. However, some aspects are disregarded, mainly because of a lack of theoretical knowledge (some biological parameters, pregnancy and contraception). The short consultation time along with the poor communication with the hospital multidisciplinary team were mentioned as obstacles to a good quality follow-up. Progress is still needed to reach the clinical practice guidelines. However, there is a wish to better collaborate. Organising coordination meetings between professionals along with an early implication of the GP - even before surgery - represent possible solutions.

  13. Obesity and the role of bariatric surgery in the surgical management of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Carter, Jonathan T; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Scharf, Keith; Roslin, Mitchell; Kallies, Kara J; Morton, John M; Kothari, Shanu N

    2017-01-01

    Obesity accelerates the development of osteoarthritis of the knee and hip by exerting deleterious effects on joints through both biomechanical and also systemic inflammatory changes. The objective of this review was to evaluate the impact of obesity on lower limb biomechanics and total joint arthroplasty outcomes, as well as weight changes after joint arthroplasty and the role of bariatric surgery among patients requiring joint arthroplasty. The currently published data indicate that weight loss increases swing time, stride length, gait speed, and lower extremity range of motion. Total joint arthroplasty improves pain and joint function, but does not induce significant weight loss in the majority of patients. Bariatric surgery improves gait biomechanics, and in the severely obese patient with osteoarthritis improves pain and joint function. The evidence for supporting bariatric surgery before total joint arthroplasty is limited to retrospective reports with conflicting results. Fundamental clinical questions remain regarding the optimal management of morbid obesity and lower extremity arthritis, which should be the focus of future collaborations across disciplines providing care to patients with both conditions.

  14. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Brigatto, Patrícia; Carbinatto, Jéssica C.; Costa, Carolina M.; Montebelo, Maria I. L.; Rasera-Júnior, Irineu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20), IPPB Group (n=20) and BIPAP Group (n=20), then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP), inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP), in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p<0.05), regardless of the technique used, with no significant difference among the techniques (p>0.05). Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05), but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques. PMID:25590448

  15. Changes in Plasma Levels of N-Arachidonoyl Ethanolamine and N-Palmitoylethanolamine following Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Females with Impaired Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mallipedhi, Akhila; Prior, Sarah L.; Dunseath, Gareth; Bracken, Richard M.; Barry, Jonathan; Caplin, Scott; Eyre, Nia; Morgan, James; Baxter, John N.; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.; Sarmad, Sarir; Barrett, David A.; Bain, Stephen C.; Luzio, Steve D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. We examined endocannabinoids (ECs) in relation to bariatric surgery and the association between plasma ECs and markers of insulin resistance. Methods. A study of 20 participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, and C-peptide were recorded preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively with plasma ECs (AEA, 2-AG) and endocannabinoid-related lipids (PEA, OEA). Results. Gender-specific analysis showed differences in AEA, OEA, and PEA preoperatively with reductions in AEA and PEA in females postoperatively. Preoperatively, AEA was correlated with 2-hour glucose (r = 0.55, P = 0.01), HOMA-IR (r = 0.61, P = 0.009), and HOMA %S (r = −0.71, P = 0.002). OEA was correlated with weight (r = 0.49, P = 0.03), waist circumference (r = 0.52, P = 0.02), fasting insulin (r = 0.49, P = 0.04), and HOMA-IR (r = 0.48, P = 0.05). PEA was correlated with fasting insulin (r = 0.49, P = 0.04). 2-AG had a negative correlation with fasting glucose (r = −0.59, P = 0.04). Conclusion. Gender differences exist in circulating ECs in obese subjects. Females show changes in AEA and PEA after bariatric surgery. Specific correlations exist between different ECs and markers of obesity and insulin and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25874237

  16. To eat or not to eat; is that really the question? An evaluation of problematic eating behaviors and mental health among bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Miller-Matero, Lisa Renee; Armstrong, Rachel; McCulloch, Katherine; Hyde-Nolan, Maren; Eshelman, Anne; Genaw, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Problematic eating behaviors, such as emotional eating, and food addiction, may affect weight; however, little is known about these eating behaviors, especially among those seeking bariatric surgery. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of problematic eating behaviors and to investigate their relationship with other eating behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and psychiatric symptoms. There were 142 patients who completed a required psychiatric evaluation prior to bariatric surgery. Of these, 16.9 % met criteria for a food addiction and 25.4-40.7 % endorsed emotional eating, depending on type of emotional eating. The number of food addiction symptoms endorsed was related to emotional eating. Both food addiction and emotional eating were related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, surprisingly, BMI was not related to a food addiction diagnosis, emotional eating scores, or psychiatric symptoms. Results from this study suggest that problematic eating behaviors are occurring among bariatric surgery candidates. Furthermore, this study may help to address the conflicting research regarding the effects of psychiatric symptoms on weight-loss outcomes. Perhaps it is the problematic eating behaviors (e.g., food addiction and emotional eating) that are associated with psychiatric symptoms that could be influencing outcomes. Future research should evaluate treatments for problematic eating behaviors and whether treatments improve weight-loss success.

  17. Gastric Bypass Surgery: What Happens If I Regain the Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brethauer SA, et al. Systematic review on reoperative bariatric surgery. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. 2014;10: ... systematic-review-on-reoperative. Accessed Feb. 27, 2015. Bariatric surgery misconceptions. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. ...

  18. Weight-Loss Surgery May Help Obese Patients Beat Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... five years after weight-loss surgery, known as bariatric surgery, those who had the procedure showed better improvements ... spokesman for the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, "Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable ...

  19. Bariatric surgery among kidney transplant candidates and recipients: Analysis of the United States Renal Data System and literature review1

    PubMed Central

    Modanlou, Kian A.; Muthyala, Umadevi; Xiao, Huiling; Schnitzler, Mark A.; Salvalaggio, Paolo R.; Brennan, Daniel C.; Abbott, Kevin C.; Graff, Ralph J.; Lentine, Krista L.

    2009-01-01

    Limited data exist on the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery (BS) in patients with kidney failure. We examined Medicare billing claims within USRDS registry data (1991–2004) to identify BS cases among renal allograft candidates and recipients. Of 188 cases, 72 were performed pre-listing, 29 on the waitlist, and 87 post-transplant. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was the most common procedure. Thirty-day mortality after BS performed on the waitlist and post-transplant was 3.5%, and one transplant recipient lost their graft within 30 days after BS. BMI data were available for a subset and suggested median excess body weight loss of 31%-61%. Comparison to published clinical trials of BS in populations without kidney disease indicates comparable weight loss but higher post-BS mortality in the USRDS sample. Given the substantial contributions of obesity to excess morbidity and mortality, BS warrants prospective study as a strategy for improving outcomes before and after kidney transplantation. PMID:19384163

  20. GLYCEMIC BEHAVIOR IN 48 HOURS POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND NON DIABETIC SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Lucas Freitas; TISOTT, Caroline Gewehr; SILVANO, Diego Machado; CAMPOS, Camila Mafalda Mouta; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no indication for surgery taking only into account the glycemic condition, results have shown that benefits can be obtained in glycemic control with bariatric surgery. Aim : To compare the glycemic behavior among type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients within 48 h after bariatric surgery, and clarify whether there is a reduction in blood glucose level in obese patients with diabetes before the loss of weight excess. Methods : Descriptive epidemiological study with prospective cohort design with 31 obese patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. The patients were controlled with hemoglucotests in different periods of time: preoperative, postoperative and each 6 h after surgery for 48 h. Results : Average ambulatory blood glucose in diabetics was 120.7±2.9 mg/dl vs 91.8±13.9 mg/dl in the nondiabetic. After 48 h there was decrease in diabetics to 100.0±17.0 mg/dl (p=0.003), while the non-diabetic group did not change significantly (102.7±25.4 mg/dl; p=0.097). There were no differences between the surgical techniques. There were no death. Conclusions : Diabetic patients significantly reduced blood glucose after surgery regardless of the use of exogenous insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:26537269

  1. Endoscopic esophageal self-expanding stent implantation WallFlex™ (Boston Scientific) in the management of a gastrocutaneous fistula, as a complication of sleeve bariatric gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Dariusz; Pawłowski, Wiktor; Ziomek, Agnieszka; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Janczak, Dawid; Janus, Werner; Chabowski, Mariusz

    2015-06-01

    The study presented a case of a gastrocutaneous fistula, as a result of bariatric sleeve gastrectomy. The discussion considered the main pathogenesis, etiology, diagnostics and endoscopic treatment using the implantation of covered esophageal stents. Special attention was placed upon the multifactorial origin of this life-threatening clinical condition, typical for bariatric surgery.

  2. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student–Newman–Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals. PMID:25711878

  3. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Gandarillas, Mónica; Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals.

  4. Cardiac arrest during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in a bariatric patient with drug-associated long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M

    2011-01-01

    Obese patients often may demonstrate an acquired prolonged QTc interval due to alteration in cardiac physiology, electrolyte disturbances, and/or medication use. Intraoperatively, bariatric surgery may further contribute additional cardiac stressors to obese patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS). We present a case report of an obese woman with LQTS who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and sustained an intraoperative cardiac arrest. We discuss identification, prevention, and treatment strategies for LQTS in the bariatric surgery patient.

  5. SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS): protocol for a national prospective cohort study of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jennifer; Stewart, Sally; Munro, Jane; Grieve, Eleanor; Lean, Mike; Lindsay, Robert S; Bruce, Duff; Ali, Abdulmajid; Briggs, Andrew; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of bariatric surgery for large-scale, long-term weight loss is well established. However, many questions remain over the continual benefits and cost-effectiveness of that weight loss for overall health, particularly when accounting for potential complications and adverse events of surgery. Health research institutes in the UK and the USA have called for high-quality longitudinal cohort studies of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assessing outcomes such as surgical complications, mortality, diabetes remission, microvascular complications, cardiovascular events, mental health, cost and healthcare use. Methods and analysis SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS) is a national, prospective, observational, cohort study of patients undergoing primary bariatric surgical procedures in Scotland. This study aims to recruit 2000 patients and conduct a follow-up for 10 years postbariatric surgery using multiple data collection methods: surgeon-recorded data, electronic health record linkage, and patient-reported outcome measures. Outcomes measured will include: mortality, weight change, diabetes, surgical, cardiovascular, cancer, behavioural, reproductive/urological and nutritional variables. Healthcare utilisation and economic productivity will be collected to inform cost-effectiveness analysis. Ethics and dissemination The study has received a favourable ethical opinion from the West of Scotland Research Ethics committee. All publications arising from this cohort study will be published in open-access peer-reviewed journals. All SCOTS investigators (all members of the research team at every recruiting site) will have the ability to propose research suggestions and potential publications using SCOTS data; a publications committee will approve all requests for use of SCOTS data and propose writing committees and timelines. Lay-person summaries of all research findings will be published simultaneously on the SCOTS website (http

  6. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors recommend weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery ) for very overweight teens if they've tried ... it is at a children's hospital with a bariatric surgery program that involves a team of specialists. Members ...

  7. Monitoring and normalising a lack of appetite and weight loss. A discursive analysis of an online support group for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, Jo; Seymour-Smith, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    A significant adjustment in eating practices is required before and after bariatric surgery, yet we know relatively little about how patients manage these changes. In this paper, we explored how members of an online bariatric support group constructed their appetite and weight loss. Two hundred and eighty four online posts were collected, covering a period of just over a year, and analysed using discursive psychology. We found that a lack of appetite post-surgery was oriented to as something that was positively evaluated yet a cause for concern. Indeed, members monitored their food intake and marked out food consumption as a necessary activity in line with notions of healthy eating. Through monitoring members also normalised periods of weight stabilisation and were inducted into a group philosophy which encouraged a more holistic approach to post-surgery 'success'. Our analysis also highlights how monitoring and policing work as social support mechanisms which help to maintain weight management. Thus we argue, in line with others, that weight management, typically depicted as an individual responsibility, is bound up with the social practices of the online support group. We suggest that clinical advice about a loss of appetite and periods of weight stabilisation post-surgery perhaps need further explanation to patients.

  8. Biochemical response and the effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Hughes, Tyler; Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah

    2013-03-01

    A general method is introduced for calculating the biochemical response to pharmaceuticals, surgeries, or other medical interventions. This method is then applied in a simple model of the response to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in obese diabetic patients. We specifically address the amazing fact that glycemia correction is usually achieved immediately after RYGB surgery, long before there is any appreciable weight loss. Many studies indicate that this result is not due merely to caloric restriction, and it is usually attributed to an increase in glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels observed after the surgery. However, our model indicates that this mechanism alone is not sufficient to explain either the largest declines in glucose levels or the measured declines in the homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The most robust additional mechanism would be production of a factor which opens an insulin-independent pathway for glucose transport into cells, perhaps related to the well-established insulin-independent pathway associated with exercise. Potential candidates include bradykinin, a 9 amino acid peptide. If such a substance were found to exist, it would offer hope for medications which mimic the immediate beneficial effect of RYGB surgery. Supported by Qatar Biomedical Research Institute and Science Program at Texas A&M University at Qatar

  9. Prediction of exercise in patients across various stages of bariatric surgery: a comparison of the merits of the theory of reasoned action versus the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Hillary R; Gross, Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the prediction of exercise. As exercise is not a completely volitional behavior, it is hypothesized that the TPB is a superior theoretical model for the prediction of exercise intentions and behavior. This study tested validity of the TPB in a sample of bariatric patients and further validated its improvement over the TRA in predicting exercise adherence at different operative stages. Results generally confirmed research hypotheses. Superiority of the TPB model was validated in this sample of bariatric patients, and Perceived Behavioral Control emerged as the single-best predictor of both exercise intentions and self-reported behavior. Finally, results suggested that both subjective norms and attitudes toward exercise played a larger role in the prediction of intention and behavior than previously reported.

  10. Operative strategies for patients with failed primary bariatric procedures.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Helena; Vines, Larissa; Schiesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat obesity and its sequelae. With the increasing incidence of obesity, the number of bariatric procedures has dramatically increased in recent years. The perioperative morbidity reached a very low level, and nearly all revisional bariatric procedures are primarily minimally invasive today. About 10-25% of the patients undergoing bariatric surgery require a revision at some point after their initial operation. Consequently, revisional bariatric surgery has emerged as a distinct practice, performed mainly at tertiary centers, to resolve complications caused by the primary operation and to provide satisfactory weight loss. In this review, our personal experience with revisional bariatric surgery is discussed against the background of the available literature. We further attempt to define major indications for revisional bariatric surgery and balance them with perioperative and long-term morbidity as well as the surgical outcome.

  11. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  12. Shear stress and flow dynamics of the femoral vein among obese patients who qualify for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiewiora, Maciej; Piecuch, Jerzy; Glűck, Marek; Slowinska-Lozynska, Ludmila; Sosada, Krystyn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of obesity on wall shear stress and its relationship to erythrocyte aggregation. We studied 35 morbidly obese patients who were qualified for bariatric surgery. The control group consisted of 20 non-obese people. Blood rheological measurements were performed using the Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (Mechatronics, the Netherlands) and a cone-plate viscometer (Brookfield DV-II). The venous flow dynamics were assessed using a duplex ultrasound. The shear rate was estimated from the measured blood flow velocity and the diameter of the femoral vein. Venous wall shear stress was calculated from the whole blood viscosity and the shear rate. The shear rate (P < 0.005) and the venous wall shear stress (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in obese patients compared with the controls. The aggregation index (P < 0.001), syllectogram amplitude - AMP (P < 0.05) and Tslow (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the obese patients; the aggregation half-time (P < 0.001) and Tfast (P < 0.001) were decreased compared with the control group. Multivariate regression analyses found waist circumference (β -0.31, P < 0.05), thigh circumference (β 0.33, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.005) to be variables that independently influenced the shear rate. Nevertheless, the AMP (β 0.34, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.01) were independent predictors that influenced the wall shear stress. This study indicates that there is a relationship between wall shear stress in the femoral vein and the rheological impairment of the RBC among obese patients, but further studies are necessary to confirm this suggestion.

  13. Obesity and Bariatric Surgery Drive Epigenetic Variation of Spermatozoa in Humans.

    PubMed

    Donkin, Ida; Versteyhe, Soetkin; Ingerslev, Lars R; Qian, Kui; Mechta, Mie; Nordkap, Loa; Mortensen, Brynjulf; Appel, Emil Vincent R; Jørgensen, Niels; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hansen, Torben; Workman, Christopher T; Zierath, Juleen R; Barrès, Romain

    2016-02-09

    Obesity is a heritable disorder, with children of obese fathers at higher risk of developing obesity. Environmental factors epigenetically influence somatic tissues, but the contribution of these factors to the establishment of epigenetic patterns in human gametes is unknown. Here, we hypothesized that weight loss remodels the epigenetic signature of spermatozoa in human obesity. Comprehensive profiling of the epigenome of sperm from lean and obese men showed similar histone positioning, but small non-coding RNA expression and DNA methylation patterns were markedly different. In a separate cohort of morbidly obese men, surgery-induced weight loss was associated with a dramatic remodeling of sperm DNA methylation, notably at genetic locations implicated in the central control of appetite. Our data provide evidence that the epigenome of human spermatozoa dynamically changes under environmental pressure and offers insight into how obesity may propagate metabolic dysfunction to the next generation.

  14. Neuro-Genetics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) as the Root Cause of “Addiction Transfer”: A New Phenomenon Common after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Bailey, John; Gonzalez, Anthony M; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Liu, Yijun; Giordano, John; Braverman, Eric; Gold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Now after many years of successful bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries directed at the obesity epidemic clinicians are reporting that some patients are replacing compulsive overeating with newly acquired compulsive disorders such as alcoholism, gambling, drugs, and other addictions like compulsive shopping and exercise. This review article explores evidence from psychiatric genetic animal and human studies that link compulsive overeating and other compulsive disorders to explain the phenomenon of addiction transfer. Possibly due to neurochemical similarities, overeating and obesity may act as protective factors reducing drug reward and addictive behaviors. In animal models of addiction withdrawal from sugar induces imbalances in the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and dopamine, similar to opiate withdrawal. Many human neuroimaging studies have supported the concept of linking food craving to drug craving behavior. Previously our laboratory coined the term Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) for common genetic determinants in predicting addictive disorders and reported that the predictive value for future RDS behaviors in subjects carrying the DRD2 Taq A1 allele was 74%. While poly genes play a role in RDS, we have also inferred that disruptions in dopamine function may predispose certain individuals to addictive behaviors and obesity. It is now known that family history of alcoholism is a significant obesity risk factor. Therefore, we hypothesize here that RDS is the root cause of substituting food addiction for other dependencies and potentially explains this recently described Phenomenon (addiction transfer) common after bariatric surgery. PMID:23483116

  15. Neuro-Genetics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) as the Root Cause of "Addiction Transfer": A New Phenomenon Common after Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Bailey, John; Gonzalez, Anthony M; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Liu, Yijun; Giordano, John; Braverman, Eric; Gold, Mark

    2011-12-23

    Now after many years of successful bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries directed at the obesity epidemic clinicians are reporting that some patients are replacing compulsive overeating with newly acquired compulsive disorders such as alcoholism, gambling, drugs, and other addictions like compulsive shopping and exercise. This review article explores evidence from psychiatric genetic animal and human studies that link compulsive overeating and other compulsive disorders to explain the phenomenon of addiction transfer. Possibly due to neurochemical similarities, overeating and obesity may act as protective factors reducing drug reward and addictive behaviors. In animal models of addiction withdrawal from sugar induces imbalances in the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and dopamine, similar to opiate withdrawal. Many human neuroimaging studies have supported the concept of linking food craving to drug craving behavior. Previously our laboratory coined the term Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) for common genetic determinants in predicting addictive disorders and reported that the predictive value for future RDS behaviors in subjects carrying the DRD2 Taq A1 allele was 74%. While poly genes play a role in RDS, we have also inferred that disruptions in dopamine function may predispose certain individuals to addictive behaviors and obesity. It is now known that family history of alcoholism is a significant obesity risk factor. Therefore, we hypothesize here that RDS is the root cause of substituting food addiction for other dependencies and potentially explains this recently described Phenomenon (addiction transfer) common after bariatric surgery.

  16. Preservation of Fat-free Mass after Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of Malabsorptive and Restrictive Procedures.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jason; Miller, Megan; Perry, Brittonni; Ewing, Joseph A; Hale, Allyson L; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been shown to cause significant weight loss. However, fat-free mass (FFM) is often lost with this rapid weight change. It is suggested that the loss of FFM is minimized with restrictive-only procedures, such as the vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), when compared with malabsorptive surgery. The purpose of the study was to determine the difference in the postoperative loss of FFM between RYBG and VSG patients. We reviewed all patients who underwent RYGB or VSG between May 2012 and January 2013. Patients were evaluated one month before their procedure and 12 months after for comparison of results. Preoperative and postoperative body analysis data were procured using a body composition analysis device. Within the study period, 33 patients underwent a RYGB procedure and 20 patients a VSG. After 12 months, RYGB patients had an average increase of 38.15 per cent in their proportion of FFM, whereas VSG patients had an average FFM increase of 22.09 per cent, a statically significant difference (P = 0.004). The RYGB helps preserve overall FFM as compared with the VSG. These findings are unexpected because malabsorptive procedures require increased protein intake, resulting in a stronger likelihood of inadequate protein intake, which may lead to protein malnutrition.

  17. Changes in taste perception and eating behavior after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss in women

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Bradley, David; Eagon, J. Christopher; Sullivan, Shelby; Abumrad, Nada A.; Klein, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery causes greater weight loss than laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). We tested the hypothesis that RYGB has weight loss-independent effects on taste perception which influence eating behavior and contribute to the greater weight loss. Design and Methods Subjects were studied before and after ~20% weight loss induced by RYGB (n=17) or LAGB (n=10). We evaluated: taste sensitivity for sweet, salty and savory stimuli; sucrose and monosodium glutamate (MSG) preferences; sweetness palatability; eating behavior; and expression of taste-related genes in biopsies of fungiform papillae. Results Weight loss induced by both procedures caused the same decrease in: preferred sucrose concentration (−12±10%), perceived sweetness of sucrose (−7±5%), cravings for sweets and fast-foods (−22 ±5%), influence of emotions (−27±5%) and external food cues (−30±4%) on eating behavior, and expression of α-gustducin in fungiform papillae (all P-values <0.05). RYGB, but not LAGB, shifted sweetness palatability from pleasant to unpleasant when repetitively tasting sucrose (P=0.05). Neither procedure affected taste detection thresholds or MSG preferences. Conclusions LAGB and RYGB cause similar alterations in eating behaviors, when weight loss is matched. These changes in eating behavior were not associated with changes in taste sensitivity, suggesting other, as yet unknown, mechanisms are involved. PMID:24167016

  18. A Higher Meal Frequency May be Associated with Diminished Weight Loss after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Angela Gadelha; de Carvalho Costa, Maria José; Faintuch, Joel; Dias, Maria Carolina Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to investigate the relationship between meal frequency, the occurrence of vomiting and weight loss among patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass up to 9 months after surgery. METHODS Female patients (n = 80) were followed at 3-month intervals for 9 months. Weight, BMI, 24-hour dietary recall, drug consumption and vomiting episodes were recorded and compared with nutritional outcome. RESULTS The BMI values at 3, 6 and 9 months were 45.1 ± 9.7, 39.9 ± 7.6 and 35.4 ± 8.2 kg/m2, respectively. The corresponding choleric intakes were 535.6 ± 295.7, 677.1 ± 314.7 and 828.6 ± 398.2 kcal/day, and the numbers of daily meals were 5.0 ± 2.5, 4.7 ± 1.8 and 4.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The peak of vomiting episodes occurred within 6 months; however, patients tolerated this complication despite its high prevalence. A significant negative correlation between weight loss and diet fractioning, but not vomiting, was observed throughout the entire postoperative period (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS 1) Frequent small meals were associated with a reduction in weight loss after gastric bypass and a decrease in vomiting episodes at 6 months, and 2) vomiting did not interfere with nutritional outcome. Unless required because of vomiting or other reasons, multiple small meals may not be advantageous after such intervention. PMID:19936178

  19. Assessment of Ventilation Distribution during Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery: An Electrical Impedance Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz-Rudnicki, Michal; Gaszynski, Wojciech; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to assess changes of regional ventilation distribution at the level of the 3rd intercostal space in the lungs of morbidly obese patients as a result of general anaesthesia and laparoscopic surgery as well as the relation of these changes to lung mechanics. We also wanted to determine if positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O prevents the expected atelectasis in the morbidly obese patients during general anaesthesia. Materials and Methods. 49 patients completed the examination and were randomized to 2 groups: ventilated without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP 0) and with PEEP of 10 cm H2O (PEEP 10) preceded by a recruitment maneuver with peak inspiratory pressure of 40 cm H2O. Impedance Ratio (IR) was utilized to examine ventilation distribution changes as a result of anaesthesia, pneumoperitoneum, and change of body position. We also analyzed intraoperative respiratory mechanics and pulse oximetry values. Results. In both groups general anaesthesia caused a ventilation shift towards the nondependent lungs which was not further intensified after pneumoperitoneum. Reverse Trendelenburg position promoted homogeneous ventilation distribution. Respiratory system compliance was reduced after insufflation and improved after exsufflation of pneumoperitoneum. There were no statistically significant differences in ventilation distribution between the examined groups. Respiratory system compliance, plateau pressure, and pulse oximetry values were higher in PEEP 10. Conclusions. Changes of ventilation distribution in the obese do occur at cranial lung regions. During pneumoperitoneum alterations of ventilation distribution may not follow the direction of the changes of lung mechanics. In the obese patients PEEP level of 10 cm H2O preceded by a recruitment maneuver improves respiratory compliance and oxygenation but does not eliminate atelectasis induced by general anaesthesia.

  20. Assessment of Ventilation Distribution during Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery: An Electrical Impedance Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was to assess changes of regional ventilation distribution at the level of the 3rd intercostal space in the lungs of morbidly obese patients as a result of general anaesthesia and laparoscopic surgery as well as the relation of these changes to lung mechanics. We also wanted to determine if positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O prevents the expected atelectasis in the morbidly obese patients during general anaesthesia. Materials and Methods. 49 patients completed the examination and were randomized to 2 groups: ventilated without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP 0) and with PEEP of 10 cm H2O (PEEP 10) preceded by a recruitment maneuver with peak inspiratory pressure of 40 cm H2O. Impedance Ratio (IR) was utilized to examine ventilation distribution changes as a result of anaesthesia, pneumoperitoneum, and change of body position. We also analyzed intraoperative respiratory mechanics and pulse oximetry values. Results. In both groups general anaesthesia caused a ventilation shift towards the nondependent lungs which was not further intensified after pneumoperitoneum. Reverse Trendelenburg position promoted homogeneous ventilation distribution. Respiratory system compliance was reduced after insufflation and improved after exsufflation of pneumoperitoneum. There were no statistically significant differences in ventilation distribution between the examined groups. Respiratory system compliance, plateau pressure, and pulse oximetry values were higher in PEEP 10. Conclusions. Changes of ventilation distribution in the obese do occur at cranial lung regions. During pneumoperitoneum alterations of ventilation distribution may not follow the direction of the changes of lung mechanics. In the obese patients PEEP level of 10 cm H2O preceded by a recruitment maneuver improves respiratory compliance and oxygenation but does not eliminate atelectasis induced by general anaesthesia. PMID:28058262

  1. The comparison of severity and prevalence of major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder and eating disorders before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Matini, Diana; Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Ehtesham, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity is highly co-morbid with psychiatric disorders and may have effect on the quality of life. This study aimed to compare severity and prevalence rate of depression, anxiety and eating disorders and quality of life in severe obese patients before and 6 months after the gastric bypass surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study which conducted at Hazarat Rasool-Akram Hospital in Tehran, 2012. Questionnaires included demographic questions, eating disorder Inventory (EDI), The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) for quality of life, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and anxiety (HRSA). Participants were interviewed two times, before surgery and six months after, to determine changes of the disorders. Patients with the history of bariatric surgery, individuals younger than 18 year old and those who disagreed to join the study were excluded. Results: In assessing the eating disorder inventory-3rd version (EDI-3), Significant reduction in drive for thinness (DT) (p= 0.010), bulimia (B) (p< 0.0001) and body dissatisfaction mean (BD) (0.038) was observed at the 6-month follow-up. At this period, the mean for physical component summary of SF36, significantly decreased (p< 0.0001), however mental component summary did not significantly differ (p= 0.368); Also differences in severity of anxiety (p= 0.852), and depression in HRSD (p= 0.311), prevalence of depression (p= 0.189) and prevalence of general anxiety disorder according to SCID (p=0.167) did not differ significantly, at this period. Conclusion: Although weight loss after bariatric surgery improved the physical component of quality of life, this improvement did not affect the mental aspect of life, depression and anxiety and it seems that these psychopathologies need attention and treatment in addition to weight loss treatments in patients with obesity. PMID:25664310

  2. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass - discharge; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity ... Gloy VL, Briel M, Bhatt DL, et al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic ...

  3. The impacts of super obesity versus morbid obesity on red blood cell aggregation and deformability among patients qualified for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiewiora, Maciej; Piecuch, Jerzy; Glûck, Marek; Slowinska-Lozynska, Ludmila; Sosada, Krystyn

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the obesity degree on red blood cell aggregation and deformability. We studied 56 obese patients before weight loss surgery who were divided into two groups: morbid obesity and super obesity. The aggregation and deformability of RBCs were evaluated using a Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (Mechatronics, the Netherlands). The following parameters specific to the aggregation process were estimated: aggregation index (AI), aggregation half-time (t1/2) and threshold shear rate (γthr). RBC deformability was expressed as erythrocyte elongation (EI), which was measured at 18.49 Pa and 30.2 Pa shear stresses. Super obese patients presented significantly higher AI (P < 0.05) and γthr (P < 0.05) and significantly lower t1/2 (P < 0.05) compared with morbidly obese individuals. Multivariate analyses showed that fibrinogen (β 0.46, P < 0.01 and β 0.98, P < 0.01) and hematocrit (β 0.38, P < 0.05 and β 1.01, P < 0.01) independently predicted the AI in morbidly obese and super obese patients. Fibrinogen (β -0.4, P < 0.05 and β -0.91, P < 0.05) and hematocrit (β -0.38, P < 0.05 and β -1.11, P < 0.01) were also independent predictors of the t1/2 in both obese groups. The triglyceride level (β 0.32, P < 0.05) was an independent predictor of the t1/2 in the morbidly obese group. No differences in EI were observed between obese subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that the triglyceride level independently predicted EI at 18.49 Pa (β -0.42, P < 0.05 and β -0.53, P < 0.05) and 30.2 Pa (β -0.44, P < 0.01 and β -0.49, P < 0.05) in both obese groups. This study indicated that the obesity degree of patients who qualify for bariatric surgery affects RBC aggregation properties, but it does not indicate the reasons for this difference. Further studies are needed to determine factors associated with hyperaggregation in super obesity.

  4. Present and future advanced laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Homero; Díaz-Calderón, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    Modern laparoscopy, starting with Kurt Semm's insufflators and the first successful appendectomies, has only been around for approximately 30 years. Since those early successes, the technology has grown from the inception of basic laparoscopy to endoscopic surgery through natural orifices, and it continues to evolve by leaps and bounds with computer-assisted surgery and improved robotics in surgery. Without question, laparoscopy has revolutionized the way we perform standard surgery, especially relative to the techniques that had been used for hundreds of years. Despite the development of multiple novel technologies since the 1980s, very little has changed with regard to basic conceptualizations and practice of laparoscopy. In this review article, we will describe the highlights of recent advanced laparoscopic surgery procedures, their potential applications within the field of surgery, and how these advances may impact and improve future quality and patient outcomes.

  5. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Metabolic and Gut Microbiota Profile: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Magouliotis, Dimitrios E; Tasiopoulou, Vasiliki S; Sioka, Eleni; Chatedaki, Christina; Zacharoulis, Dimitrios

    2017-03-06

    We aim to review the available literature on obese patients treated with bariatric procedures, in order to assess their effect on the metabolic and gut microbiota profiles. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane library, and Scopus databases, in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Twenty-two studies (562 patients) met the inclusion criteria. This study points to significant amelioration of postoperative levels of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, HOMA-IR, food intake, and diabetes remission. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) decreased, while trimethylamine-n-oxide (TMAO); glucagon-like peptide 1, 2 (GLP-1, GLP-2); and peptide YY (PYY) increased postoperatively. Postoperative gut microbiota was similar to that of lean and less obese objects. Well-designed randomized trials are necessary to further assess the host metabolic-microbial cross-talk after bariatric procedures.

  6. [PRE-OPERATIVE IRON DEFICIENCY IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Magali Sanchez, Angela María; Pampillón, Natalia; Abaurre, Mariela; Omelanczuk, Pablo Esteban

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: la inflamación crónica inducida por la obesidad produce alteración de la homeostasis del hierro, llevando a deficiencia de hierro y a anemia de leve a moderada. Entre el 14 y el 43% de los pacientes pueden presentar déficit de hierro sin anemia antes de la cirugía. El tratamiento del déficit de hierro en el perioperatorio mejora el pronóstico y la calidad de vida de los pacientes. En ciertas situaciones, puede el hierro enovenoso (el cual evita el bloqueo del hierro en enterocitos y macrófagos), ser una alternativa segura y efectiva. Objetivos: 1) Valorar la prevalencia de ferropenia en pacientes obesos mórbidos candidatos a cirugía bariátrica. 2) Evaluar si la suplementación de hierro parenteral en pacientes ferropénicos es eficaz a la hora de prevenir el descenso de hematocritos tras la cirugía. Material y métodos: estudio prospectivo, observacional, que incluyó 89 pacientes obesos mórbidos sometidos a cirugía bariátrica. Se dividió la población en el preoperatorio (pre OP) según la condición de ferropenia o ausencia de ferropenia, y se analizó la evolución postoperatoria (post OP). Los pacientes ferropénicos fueron suplementados con 500 mg de hierro carboximaltosa endovenoso (EV) y evaluados en el post OP. Resultados: veintitrés pacientes (25,8%) presentaron ferropenia en el pre OP y 6 (6,74%) anemia. El 74,2% (66 pacientes) no tuvieron ferropenia. El grupo sin ferropenia al mes de la cirugía presentó: hematocrito: 41,30% ± 3,77; hemoglobina: 13,64 g/l ± 1,25 y saturación de transferrina 30,55 %. Los pacientes con ferropenia en el pre OP presentaron: hematocrito: 40,40% ± 3,03; hemoglobina: 13,40 g/l ± 1,07; saturación de transferrina: 15,50% ± 4,18 y ferritina: 87,10 ng/ ml ± 81,23 . En el post OP se observó descenso de hematocrito: 38,40% ± 3,17 (p:0,034). En pacientes ferropénicos, sin aporte de hierro EV (n = 15), el hematocrito y hemoglobina fueron de 41,2% ± 2,5 y 13,7 g/l ± 0,9, respectivamente, con

  7. Bariatric surgery and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Collier, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a relatively new and serious world-wide epidemic. Obesity is a stronger predictor in mortality than either poverty or smoking, and obesity is also now more prevalent than malnutrition. The prevalence of obesity continues to increase, ironically, the rate of increase of obesity is highest amongst the morbidly obesity. Obesity is the result of many factors resulting in concert, including poor dietary habits, reduced physical activity and genetic predisposition. With the rapid increase in obesity there has been a pronounced increase in obesity-related metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and many others. These co-morbidities are responsible for more than 2.5 million deaths, worldwide. The loss of life expectancy due to obesity is profound. In comparison to a normal weight individual Caucasian, a 25-year-old morbidly obese man has a 22% reduction in the expected remaining life span, representing an approximate loss of 12 years of life.

  8. [The development of bariatric surgery and the role of the First Surgical Clinic of the General Medical School Hospital and the First Medical School of Charles University in Prague in this specialty].

    PubMed

    Fried, M; Kasalický, M; Gürlich, R

    2001-10-01

    The authors discuss the development of bariatric surgery in Europe and the USA from its beginnings at the onset of the fifties. More detailed attention is paid in particular to the development of the method of gastric bandings and the role at the First Surgical Department in this field in "classical" as well as miniinvasive surgery. Results of gastric banding are summarized in 683 patients operated since 1983, in particular the numbers of early and late complications after laparotomies and laparoscopic operations, similarly as complications which are directly associated with gastric banding itself. In the conclusion it is stated that the First Surgical Department of the General Faculty Hospital and First Medical Faculty Charles University in Prague belong as regards their results in surgical treatment of obese subjects and the position in the field of bariatric surgery on an international scale to the foremost departments in this field worldwide.

  9. [Robots in general surgery: present and future].

    PubMed

    Galvani, Carlos; Horgan, Santiago

    2005-09-01

    Robotic surgery is an emerging technology. We began to use this technique in 2000, after it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Our preliminary experience was satisfactory. We report 4 years' experience of using this technique in our institution. Between August 2000 and December 2004, 399 patients underwent robotic surgery using the Da Vinci system. We performed 110 gastric bypass procedures, 30 Lap band, 59 Heller myotomies, 12 Nissen fundoplications, 6 epiphrenic diverticula, 18 total esophagectomies, 3 esophageal leiomyoma resections, 1 pyloroplasty, 2 gastrojejunostomies, 2 transduodenal sphincteroplasties, 10 adrenalectomies and 145 living-related donor nephrectomies. Operating times for fundoplications and Lap band were longer. After the learning curve, the operating times and morbidity of the remaining procedures were considerably reduced. Robot-assisted surgery allows advanced laparoscopic procedures to be performed with enhanced results given that it reduces the learning curve as measured by operating time and morbidity.

  10. Gastric Bypass Surgery: Who Is It For?

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of weight-loss surgery, collectively known as bariatric surgery, make surgical changes to your stomach and digestive ... et al. Assessment and preparation of patients for bariatric surgery. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2006;81(suppl):Sll. Chang ...

  11. [Minimally invasive spine surgery: past and present].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M V; Stienen, M N; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-11-18

    In the early twentieth century, the understanding of spine biomechanics and the advent of surgical techniques of the lumbar spine, led to the currently emerging concept of minimal invasive spine surgery, By reducing surgical access, blood loss, infection rate and general morbidity, functional prognosis of patients is improved. This is a real challenge for the spine surgeon, who has to maintain a good operative result by significantly reducing surgical collateral damages due to the relatively traumatic conventional access.

  12. Laparoscopic colon surgery: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Boushey, Robin P

    2006-08-01

    Since its first described case in 1991, laparoscopic colon surgery has lagged behind minimally invasive surgical methods for solid intra-abdominal organs in terms of acceptability, dissemination, and ease of learning. In colon cancer, initial concerns over port site metastases and adequacy of oncologic resection have considerably dampened early enthusiasm for this procedure. Only recently, with the publication of several large, randomized controlled trials, has the incidence of port site metastases been shown to be equivalent to that of open resection. Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has also been demonstrated to be at least equivalent to traditional laparotomy in terms of adequacy of oncologic resection, disease recurrence, and long-term survival. In addition, numerous reports have validated short-term benefits following laparoscopic resection for cancer, including shorter hospital stay, shorter time to recovery of bowel function, and decreased analgesic requirements, as well as other postoperative variables. In benign colonic disease, much less high-quality literature exists supporting the use of laparoscopic methods. Two recent randomized controlled trials have demonstrated some short-term benefits to laparoscopic ileocolic resection for CD, in addition to evident cosmetic advantages. On the other hand, the current evidence on laparoscopic surgery for UC does not support its routine use among nonexpert surgeons outside of specialized centers. Laparoscopic colonic resection for diverticular disease appears to provide several short-term benefits, although these advantages may not translate to cases of complicated diverticulitis. Despite the increasing acceptability of minimally invasive methods for the management of benign and malignant colonic pathologies, laparoscopic colon resection remains a prohibitively difficult technique to master. Numerous technological innovations have been introduced onto the market in an effort to decrease the steep learning

  13. USE OF POSITIVE PRESSURE IN THE BARIATRIC SURGERY AND EFFECTS ON PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PREVALENCE OF ATELECTASIS: RANDOMIZED AND BLINDED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    BALTIERI, Letícia; SANTOS, Laisa Antonela; RASERA-JUNIOR, Irineu; MONTEBELO, Maria Imaculada Lima; PAZZIANOTTO-FORTI, Eli Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background In surgical procedures, obesity is a risk factor for the onset of intra and postoperative respiratory complications. Aim Determine what moment of application of positive pressure brings better benefits on lung function, incidence of atelectasis and diaphragmatic excursion, in the preoperative, intraoperative or immediate postoperative period. Method Randomized, controlled, blinded study, conducted in a hospital and included subjects with BMI between 40 and 55 kg/m2, 25 and 55 years, underwent bariatric surgery by laparotomy. They were underwent preoperative and postoperative evaluations. They were allocated into four different groups: 1) Gpre: treated with positive pressure in the BiPAP mode (Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure) before surgery for one hour; 2) Gpos: BIPAP after surgery for one hour; 3) Gintra: PEEP (Positive End Expiratory Pressure) at 10 cmH2O during the surgery; 4) Gcontrol: only conventional respiratory physiotherapy. The evaluation consisted of anthropometric data, pulmonary function tests and chest radiography. Results Were allocated 40 patients, 10 in each group. There were significant differences for the expiratory reserve volume and percentage of the predicted expiratory reserve volume, in which the groups that received treatment showed a smaller loss in expiratory reserve volume from the preoperative to postoperative stages. The postoperative radiographic analysis showed a 25% prevalence of atelectasis for Gcontrol, 11.1% for Gintra, 10% for Gpre, and 0% for Gpos. There was no significant difference in diaphragmatic mobility amongst the groups. Conclusion The optimal time of application of positive pressure is in the immediate postoperative period, immediately after extubation, because it reduces the incidence of atelectasis and there is reduction of loss of expiratory reserve volume. PMID:25409961

  14. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  15. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19th century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20th century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections. PMID:26361403

  16. High-dose oral colecalciferol loading in obesity: impact of body mass index and its utility prior to bariatric surgery to treat vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    King, R J; Chandrajay, D; Abbas, A; Orme, S M; Barth, J H

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is associated with lower vitamin D levels compared with normal weight subjects, and if levels are not replaced prior to bariatric surgery, this can increase fracture risk as bone density typically falls post-operatively. We analysed the effect of body mass index (BMI) on vitamin D levels in response to 300 000 IU of colecalciferol in patients with vitamin D deficiency (<30 nmol L(-1) ). Patients were grouped according to their BMI as normal weight (20-24.9 kg m(-2) ), overweight (25-29.9 kg m(-2) ), obese class I (30-34.9 kg m(-2) ) and obese class II and above (>35 kg m(-2) ). The records were retrospectively analysed to investigate the effects of BMI on vitamin D (total 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D]), serum Ca(2+) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels at 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks compared with baseline. Compared with normal weight subjects, overweight and obese patients achieved lower mean peak total 25(OH)D levels (6 weeks post-loading), which was most significant in the class II and above group (mean total 25(OH)D levels 96.5 ± 24.2 nmol L(-1) and 72.42 ± 24.9 nmol L(-1) , respectively; P = 0.003). By 26 weeks, total 25(OH)D levels fell in all groups; however, there was now a significant difference between the normal weight subjects and all other groups (mean total 25(OH)D levels 84.1 ± 23.7 nmol L(-1) ; 58 ± 20 nmol L(-1) , P = 0.0002; 62.65 ± 19.2 nmol L(-1) , P = 0.005; 59.2 ± 21 nmol L(-1) , P = 0.005, respectively). Far fewer patients in the overweight and obese groups maintained levels above the recommended level of 75 nmol L(-1) 52 weeks post-loading (93%; 20%, P = 0.0003; 23%, P = 0.01; and 14%, P = 0.001, respectively). Alternative regimes for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency are needed in overweight and obese patients, especially those in whom bariatric surgery is planned.

  17. EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS ON BODY WEIGHT AND CLINICAL METABOLIC COMORBIDITIES IN BARIATRIC SURGERY SERVICE OF A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Cátia Ferreira; COHEN, Larissa; SARMENTO, Luciana d'Abreu; ROSA, Felipe Monnerat Marino; ROSADO, Eliane Lopes; CARNEIRO, João Régis Ivar; de SOUZA, Antônio Augusto Peixoto; MAGNO, Fernanda Cristina Carvalho Mattos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Due to the high failure rate observed in the clinical treatment of morbid obesity an increase in bariatric surgery indications, as an alternative for the control of obesity and comorbidities, is noticeable. Aim: To evaluate the performance of type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure and dyslipidemia in patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in late follow-up. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 59 patients included in the bariatric surgery program. Anthropometric (height and body weight) and laboratory (LDLc, HDLc, VLDLc, triglyceride -TG - and glucose) data were collected on pre- and postoperative stages, through medical records. Results: Among the patients, 86% were female aged 43±11, of whom 52% had attended high school. The average postoperative time was 7±3 years. During the postoperative period, there were decreases of weight and body mass index, respectively (133±06 kg vs 91±04 kg p<0.05 e 49±74 kg/m2 vs 33±79 kg/m2, p<0.05). In comparison to the preoperative stage, lower concentrations of glucose (101.00±26.99 vs 89,11±15.19, p=0.014), total cholesterol rates (179.00±37,95 vs 167.48±28,50, p=0.016), LDLc (104.30±33.12 vs 91.46±24.58, p=0.016), VLDLc (25.40±11,12 vs 15.68±7.40, p<0.01), and TG (143.35±86.35 vs 82.45±37.39, p<0.01) and higher concentrations of HDLc (43.53±8.23 vs 57.90±15.60, p<0.01) were identified in the postoperative stage. 40% of hypertensive patients were still undergoing high blood pressure treatment during the postoperative stage. There was remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia on 81% and 94% of the cases, respectively. Conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has proven itself to be an effective long term procedure, promoting weight loss, remission of DM2 and dyslipidemia. PMID:27683769

  18. Laser surgery in podiatric medicine--present and future.

    PubMed

    Borovoy, M; Fuller, T A; Holtz, P; Kaczander, B I

    1983-01-01

    Laser surgery in podiatric medicine is now in its most formative stages. Foot surgery lends itself to the utilization of the laser technique very readily. At the present time the laser is utilized in foot surgery at Sinai Hospital in Detroit for eradication of plantar verrucae, for excision of Morton's neuroma, for common nail pathology such as ingrown borders and traumatic ram's horn nails, and for correction of mycotic nail plates.

  19. Hemoptysis due to pulmonary pseudosequestration secondary to gastro-pulmonary fistula after a revisional bariatric operation.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Carlos Cerdán; Rodríguez, María Conde; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; García, Antonio José Torres

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with a history of a complicated revisional bariatric operation who developed a lung pseudosequestration secondary to a gastro-pulmonary fistula. As the patient presented with recurrent hemoptysis, she was initially submitted to embolization of the aberrant vessels and later to a definite operation, which consisted on a diversion of the gastric fistula into a Roux-en-Y intestinal loop. It is an exceptional case about late complications of bariatric surgery, and it underlines the importance of discarding these complications even when the clinical manifestations affect another anatomic region different from the operated abdomen.

  20. [Comparative study of the nutritional evolution of patients/candidates for bariatric surgery attended by the Unified Health System and the Supplemental Health Network].

    PubMed

    Santos, Helisregina do Nascimento; Lima, Juliana Menêses Santos; de Souza, Márcia Ferreira Cândido

    2014-05-01

    A cross-sectional comparative study was conducted on the nutritional evolution of severely obese patients who are candidates for bariatric surgery attended by the Unified Health System (SUS) and the Supplemental Health Network (RS). The average preoperative follow-up period was 14.3 ± 7.7 months in the SUS and 2.4 ± 1.7 months in the RS. There was a predominance of females among patients attended by the SUS (80.6%) and by the RS (75.7%). A significant reduction in weight, BMI and waist circumference (WC) and total cholesterol values of patients of both health networks was observed. Patients attended by the SUS showed no significant decrease in LDL, Triglycerides and Fasting Glycemia, while patients assisted by the RS showed a significant reduction of these values. The greater weight loss among SUS patients is explained by the fact that they had been monitored for a longer period. The insignificant reduction of most biochemical indicators of SUS patients can be justified by the fact that they had a more advanced degree of obesity.

  1. Comparison of reducing epicardial fat by exercise, diet or bariatric surgery weight loss strategies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, S W; Campbell, H

    2015-05-01

    The objectives were to determine whether epicardial fat (EAT) is subject to modification, and whether various strategies accomplish this end point and the relationship between weight loss and EAT. A systematic review of the literature following meta-analysis guidelines was conducted using the search strategy 'epicardial fat' OR 'epicardial adipose tissue' AND 'diet' OR 'exercise' OR 'bariatric surgery (BS)' OR 'change in body weight' limited to humans. Eleven articles were identified with 12 intervention approaches of which eight studies showed a statistically significant reduction in EAT. A random-effects meta-analysis suggests an overall significant reduction of 1.12 standardized units (95% CI = [-1.71, -0.54], P value < 0.01). While there is a large amount of heterogeneity across study groups, a substantial amount of this variability can be accounted for by considering intervention type and change in body mass index (BMI). These variables were incorporated into a random-effects meta-regression model. Using this analysis, significant EAT reduction occurred with diet and BS but not with exercise. BMI reductions correlated significantly with EAT reductions for diet-based interventions, i.e. for some but not all interventions. In conclusion, EAT, a factor that is significantly associated with coronary artery disease, can be modified. The type of intervention, in addition to the amount of weight loss achieved, is predictive of the amount of EAT reduction.

  2. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Endocrine and nutritional management of the post-bariatric surgery patient: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. J ... The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery medical guidelines for clinical practice for the perioperative ...

  3. The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP).

    PubMed

    Osondu, Chukwuemeka U; Aneni, Ehimen C; Shaharyar, Sameer; Roberson, Lara; Rouseff, Maribeth; Das, Sankalp; Spatz, Erica; Younus, Adnan; Guzman, Henry; Brown, Doris; Santiago-Charles, Joann; Ochoa, Teresa; Mora, Joseph; Gilliam, Cynthia; Lehn, Virginia; Sherriff, Shoshana; Tran, Thinh; Gonzalez, Anthony; Virani, Salim; Feldman, Theodore; Agatston, Arthur S; Nasir, Khurram

    2016-10-01

    This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m(2). Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs.

  4. [Bariatric surgery, stomas and other digestive tract reductions: Insufficient data and recommendations to adapt medicines regimens in therapeutic practice].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Élodie; Charpiat, Bruno; Mabrut, Jean-Yves; Dode, Xavier; Garcia, Stephan; Le Duff, Michel; Rose, François-Xavier; Ducerf, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Surgery modifying digestive tract may alter drugs pharmacokinetics. To maintain concentrations of active substance in their therapeutic ranges, a dosage adjustment or change of drug may be necessary. This is particularly important when no pharmacological or pharmacodynamic parameter reflecting the medication effectiveness is easily measurable. Our objective was to gather the information and documentary tools that can guide prescription in these patients with rearranged digestive tract. We searched information on the documentary portals of French agencies, on gray literature, on MEDLINE and in the summaries product characteristics. No information was found on the website of French agencies, sparse data were identified in gray literature. Some document are discordant, most are imprecise. One hundred and ten studies or case reports referenced on MEDLINE describe 79 medications pharmacokinetics after gastrointestinal surgery. Four are not available in France. Six literature reviews were found. Four summaries of product characteristics provided information related to drug absorption. No documentary tool adapted to clinical routine exists. This unsatisfactory situation is a barrier to optimal patients care. Information is available. It is however necessary to gather under an ergonomic shape adapted to clinical routine, bringing the surgery type, pharmacokinetic changes induced and what to do about the dose adjustment.

  5. Musculoskeletal Pain, Self-reported Physical Function, and Quality of Life in the Teen–Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Michalsky, Marc P.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Baughcum, Amy; Zeller, Meg H.; Brandt, Mary L.; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M.; Chen, Mike K.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity is associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain and is a risk factor for disability and osteoarthritis. OBJECTIVES To describe the prevalence, sites, and intensity of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents with severe obesity; to evaluate associations between musculoskeletal pain and self-reported physical function as well as weight-related quality of life; and to evaluate the association between musculoskeletal pain and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Teen–Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) is a prospective, observational study that collects standardized data on adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery at 5 US centers. We examined baseline data from this cohort between February 28, 2007, and December 30, 2011. We excluded adolescents with Blount disease and slipped capital femoral epiphyses. A total of 233 participants were included in these analyses. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain intensity of the lower back, hips, knees, and ankles/feet using the visual analog scale, categorizing musculoskeletal pain into lower back pain, lower extremity (hips, knees, and feet/ankles combined) pain, and no pain. We assessed self-reported physical function status with the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index and assessed weight-related quality of life with the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life–Kids measure. We adjusted for sex, race, age at surgery, body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and clinical depressive symptoms in regression analyses. RESULTS Among the 233 participants, the mean (SD) age at surgery was 17.1 (1.56) years and the median BMI was 50.4. Participants were predominantly female (77%), white (73%), and non-Hispanic (93%). Among the participants, 49% had poor functional status and 76% had musculoskeletal pain. Lower back pain was prevalent (63%), followed by ankle

  6. Weight Loss Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious medical problems. Weight loss surgery (also called bariatric surgery) can help very obese people lose weight. But ... Gastric banding is the simplest of the three weight loss surgeries. People who get it might not lose as ...

  7. Sex, Race, and the Quality of Life Factors Most Important to Patients’ Well-Being Among Those Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Roger B.; Jones, Dan B.; Apovian, Caroline A.; Chiodi, Sarah; Huskey, Karen W.; Hamel, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests obesity-related social stigma and impairment in work function may be the two most detrimental quality of life (QOL) factors to overall well-being among patients seeking weight loss surgery (WLS); whether the relative importance of QOL factors varies across patient sex and race/ethnicity is unclear. Methods We interviewed 574 patients seeking WLS at two centers. We measured patient’s health utility (preference-based well-being measure) as determined via standard gamble scenarios assessing patients’ willingness to risk death to achieve weight loss or perfect health. Multivariable models assessed associations between patients’ utility and five weight-related QOL domains stratified by gender and race: social stigma, self-esteem, physical function, public distress (weight stigma), and work life. Results Depending on patients’ sex and race/ethnicity, mean utilities ranged from 0.85 to 0.91, reflecting an average willingness to assume a 9–15 % risk of death to achieve their most desired health/weight state. After adjustment, African Americans (AAs) reported higher utility than Caucasians (+ 0.054, p=0.03), but utilities did not vary significantly by sex. Among Caucasian and AA men, impairment in physical functioning was the most important factor associated with diminished utility; social stigma was also a leading factor for Caucasian men. Among Caucasian women, self-esteem and work function appeared equally important. Social stigma was the leading contributor to utility among AA women; QOL factors did not appear as important among Hispanic patients. Conclusion AAs reported higher utilities than Caucasian patients. Individual QOL domains that drive diminished well-being varied across race/ethnicity and sex. PMID:26630951

  8. Nutrient Transporter Expression in the Jejunum in Relation to Body Mass Index in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Brian A.; Wood, G. Craig; Bennotti, Peter N.; Babu, Ellappan; Deshpande, Abhishek; Lent, Michelle R.; Petrick, Anthony; Gabrielsen, Jon; Strodel, William; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Still, Christopher D.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Rolston, David D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient tranters (NT) facilitate nutrient absorption and contribute to the regulation of circulating nutrients. In this cross-sectional study, we determined the associations between the level of obesity; mRNA abundance for NTs; and serum concentrations of amino acids, short-chain fatty acids, and glucose in patients with morbid obesity undergoing a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Proximal jejunal samples were obtained at the time of surgery from 42 patients (90% female, age = 42.6 ± 11.9 years, pre-operative body mass index (BMI) = 55.5 ± 11.3 kg/m2) undergoing a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. RNA was extracted from the jejunal mucosa and quantitative real-time–PCR was performed for the NTs studied. BMI negatively correlated with jejunal mRNA abundance of the amino acid NTs TauT (r = −0.625, p < 0.0001), ASCT2 (r = −0.320, p = 0.039), LAT1 (r = −0.304, p = 0.05). BMI positively correlated with jejunal mRNA abundance of the lactate/short-chain fatty acid NT SMCT1 (r = 0.543, p = 0.0002). Serum concentrations of the short-chain fatty acids, butyric, valeric, and isocaproic acid correlated positively with BMI (n = 30) (r = 0.45, r = 0.44, r = 0.36, p ≤ 0.05; respectively). Lower jejunal mRNA abundance for the amino acid NTs TauT, ASCT2, and LAT1 could protect against further obesity-related elevations in circulating amino acids. The positive correlation between BMI and the jejunal mRNA abundance of the high-affinity short-chain fatty acid/monocarboxylate transporter SMCT1 is intriguing and requires further investigation. PMID:27801863

  9. Recent Trends in Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic diseases including diabetes mellitus are severe medical problems that are increasing in prevalence worldwide and result in significant healthcare expenses. While behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches are partly effective in the short term, their effects are not long-lasting. Although previous studies have described bariatric surgery as the most effective treatment for obesity, it is associated with morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Endoluminal interventions performed entirely using gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy offer alternative approaches to the treatment of obesity that are safer and more cost-effective than current surgical approaches. The use of endoluminal techniques in the field of metabolic obesity disease has diverse promising applications including endoscopic gastroplasty, intragastric balloon, endoluminal malabsorptive bariatric procedures, and gastric electrical stimulation (GES) for the modulation of gastric emptying. This review discusses recent trends and roles in endoscopic bariatric therapies using the currently available endoluminal and transgastric technologies. PMID:28147471

  10. Diabetes And Nutritional Screening In Post-Bariatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pena, Maria E; Newaz, Trisha B

    2016-11-07

    With the rise of obesity there has been a concomitant increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). As a result, the term "diabesity" has become a popular disease entity in the past several years. When lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy fail to achieve successful weight loss and diabetes control, bariatric surgery is a recommended treatment option. Bariatric surgery has been shown to promote sustained T2DM remission in 30-63% of patients and improve other components of metabolic syndrome; thus a preferred term has been "metabolic surgery". As the practice of bariatric surgery for the treatment of T2DM increases, so will the number of patients with T2DM not achieving remission or with T2DM recurrence. There are currently no clear evidence-based guidelines delineating the proper management of T2DM in post-bariatric surgery patients. The focus of this review is to discuss current data on the efficacy of bariatric surgery in promoting T2DM remission, factors that predict T2DM remission and recurrence, and current treatment options for persistent hyperglycemia in post-bariatric surgery patients. To increase long-term T2DM remission and prevent or delay recurrence, post-bariatric surgery patients need close follow up to encourage adherence to healthy nutrition and lifestyle practices that will lead to sustained weight loss. In addition to this, patients need adequate nutritional supplementation and periodic screening for vitamin, mineral and protein deficiencies. Therefore, we will conclude with a brief review of current recommendations for nutritional deficiency screening and supplementation.

  11. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important.

  12. 76 FR 8294 - TRICARE Program; Surgery for Morbid Obesity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... regulation restricted eligibility for bariatric surgery to individuals who exceed their ideal weight for... may be extended, a matter of policy. In other words, new bariatric surgery procedures may be added to... Surgeons (ACS), Bariatric Surgery Center Network (BSCN) and American Society for Metabolic and...

  13. Indications and limitations of bariatric intervention in severely obese children and adolescents with and without nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Vajro, Pietro; Dezsofi, Antal; Fischler, Bjorn; Hadzic, Nedim; Jahnel, Joerg; Lamireau, Thierry; McKiernan, Patrick; McLin, Valerie; Socha, Piotr; Tizzard, Sarah; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Morbid obesity is strongly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. The present best treatment for NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is weight reduction through lifestyle modification. Because of frustrating inefficiency of such a therapeutic approach, bariatric surgery is increasingly performed in adolescents as an alternative option for weight reduction. Standards of care and consensus for indications are, however, scarce. We explore the indications and limitations of bariatric surgery in children with severe obesity with and without NASH and aim to provide guidance for the exceptional indications for adolescents with extreme obesity with major comorbidity that may benefit from these controversial interventions. Present evidence suggests that bariatric surgery can decrease the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis in NASH. Uncomplicated NAFLD is not an indication for bariatric surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is considered a safe and effective option for adolescents with extreme obesity, as long as an appropriate long-term follow-up is provided. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in adolescents and therefore should be considered investigational. Finally, sleeve gastrectomy and other types of weight loss surgery that have grown increasingly common in adults, still need to be considered investigational. Temporary devices may be increasingly being used in pediatrics; however, future studies, including a long-term risk analysis of patients who undergo surgery, are much needed to clarify the exact indications for bariatric surgery in adolescents.

  14. O-glycoside biomarker of apolipoprotein C3: responsiveness to obesity, bariatric surgery, and therapy with metformin, to chronic or severe liver disease and to mortality in severe sepsis and graft vs host disease.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Stephen B; Zhang, Yan; Wilson-Grady, Joshua; Monkkonen, Teresa; Nelsestuen, Gary L; Kasthuri, Raj S; Verneris, Michael R; Lund, Troy C; Ely, E Wesley; Bernard, Gordon R; Zeisler, Harald; Homoncik, Monika; Jilma, Bernd; Swan, Therese; Kellogg, Todd A

    2009-02-01

    The glyco-isoforms of intact apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3) were used to probe glycomic changes associated with obesity and recovery following bariatric surgery, liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and alcoholic liver cirrhosis, as well as severe, multiorgan diseases such as sepsis and graft vs host disease (GVHD). ApoC3 glyco-isoform ratios responded to unique stimuli that did not correlate with serum lipids or with other blood components measured in either a control population or a group of extremely obese individuals. However, glyco-isoform ratios correlated with obesity with a 1.8-fold change among subjects eligible for bariatric surgery relative to a nonobese control population. Bariatric surgery resulted in rapid change of isoform distribution to that of nonobese individuals, after which the distribution was stable in each individual. Although multiple simultaneous factors complicated effector attribution, the isoform ratios of very obese individuals were nearly normal for diabetic individuals on metformin therapy. Glyco-isoform ratios were sensitive to liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis C and alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The correlation coefficient with fibrosis was superior to that of current assays of serum enzyme levels. Diseases of pregnancy that can result in liver damage, HELLP syndrome and pre-eclampsia, did not alter ApoC3 glyco-isoform ratios. Early after umbilical cord blood transplantation the isoform ratios changed and returned to normal in long-term survivors. Larger changes were observed in persons who died. GVHD had little effect. Persons with severe sepsis showed altered ratios. Similar cut-points for mortality (3.5-fold difference from controls) were found for UCBT and sepsis. Similar values characterized liver cirrhosis. Overall, while changes of glyco-isoform ratios occurred in many situations, individual stability of isoform distribution was evident and large changes were limited to high-level disease. If ratio changes

  15. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  16. Fetal surgery for spina bifida: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Adzick, N Scott

    2013-02-01

    Open spina bifida or myelomeningocele (MMC) is a common birth defect that is associated with significant lifelong morbidity. Little progress has been made in the postnatal surgical management of the child with spina bifida. Postnatal surgery is aimed at covering the exposed spinal cord, preventing infection, and treating hydrocephalus with a ventricular shunt. Experimental and clinical evidence suggest that the primary cause of the neurologic defects associated with MMC is not simply incomplete neurulation, but rather chronic, mechanical and amniotic-fluid induced chemical trauma that progressively damages the exposed neural tissue during gestation. The cerebrospinal fluid leak through the MMC leads to hindbrain herniation and hydrocephalus. In utero repair of open spina bifida is now performed in selected patients and presents an additional therapeutic alternative for expectant mothers carrying a fetus with MMC. In the past, studies in animal models and clinical case series laid the groundwork for a clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of fetal MMC repair. In the present, a prospective, randomized study (the MOMS trial) has shown that fetal surgery for MMC before 26 weeks' gestation may preserve neurologic function, reverse the hindbrain herniation of the Chiari II malformation, and obviate the need for postnatal placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. However, this study also demonstrates that fetal surgery is associated with significant risks related to the uterine scar and premature birth. In the future, research will expand our understanding of the pathophysiology of MMC, evaluate the long-term impact of in-utero intervention, and to refine timing and technique of fetal MMC surgery using tissue engineering technology.

  17. Late-presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Bana Agha; Mesned, Abdu Rahman; Mohamad, Tagelden; Kabbani, Mohamad S.

    2015-01-01

    Late presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery is a rare complication and its management is well defined once the initial diagnosis in made timely and appropriately. In this report we described a child who underwent atrioventricular septal defect repair with a normal sinus rhythm during the postoperative period, as well as during the first 2 years of follow up. She subsequently developed complete heart block with bradycardia that required insertion of a pacemaker. Here we discuss this unusual late-presenting complication, possible risk factors, and management. PMID:26778907

  18. Esophageal dysmotility is present before surgery in isolated tracheoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Caroline; Aspirot, Ann; Morris, Melanie; Faure, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    After surgical correction of esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal body motility dysfunction has been reported in nearly all patients. Using high-resolution esophageal manometry before surgical repair in 2 children with isolated tracheoesophageal fistula, we sought to determine whether dysmotility was present before any surgical insult to test the hypothesis that dysmotility associated with esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula is related to intrinsic primary factors linked to abnormal development of the esophagus. Both had an abnormal esophageal motility: one exhibited hypomotility with distal contraction, whereas the other showed a complete aperistalsis pattern. This suggests that esophageal dysmotility is congenital in nature rather than secondary to surgery.

  19. International Conference on Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    YOUR TRUSTED ROVIDER OF STATE-OF-THE-ART BARIATRIC SURGICAL TOOLS AND EVICES. ETHICON ENDO- SURGERY EDGESM DELIVERS PREMIER 3ARIATRIC SERVICE...OFFER IN BARIATRIC SURGERY . ONGOING TREATMENT AND CARE. PRACTICE SUPPORT. AND PATIENT EDUCATION. © TODD DAWS( Bariatric Account Manager • ETHICON...with GERD (GERD). and 22 consecutive morbidly obese patients with GERD (MO-GERD) who were under evaluation for antireflux and bariatric surgery at

  20. Laser nano-surgery for neuronal manipulation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, Hori Pada; Chudal, Lalit; Mahapatra, Vasu; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical manipulation has enabled study of bio-chemical and bio-mechanical properties of the cells. Laser nanosurgery by ultrafast laser beam with appropriate laser parameters provides spatially-targeted manipulation of neurons in a minimal invasiveness manner with high efficiency. We utilized femto-second laser nano-surgery for both axotomy and sub-axotomy of rat cortical neurons. Degeneration and regeneration after axotomy was studied with and without external growth-factor(s) and biochemical(s). Further, axonal injury was studied as a function of pulse energy, exposure and site of injury. The ability to study the response of neurons to localized injury opens up opportunities for screening potential molecules for repair and regeneration after nerve injury. Sub-axotomy enabled transient opening of axonal membrane for optical delivery of impermeable molecules to the axoplasm. Fast resealing of the axonal membrane after sub-axotomy without significant long-term damage to axon (monitored by its growth) was observed. We will present these experimental results along with theoretical simulation of injury due to laser nano-surgery and delivery via the transient pore. Targeted delivery of proteins such as antibodies, genes encoding reporter proteins, ion-channels and voltage indicators will allow visualization, activation and detection of the neuronal structure and function.

  1. A review of studies comparing three laparoscopic procedures in bariatric surgery: sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Franco, Juan Victor A; Ruiz, Pablo Adrian; Palermo, Mariano; Gagner, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is a major worldwide problem in public health, reaching epidemic proportions in many countries, especially in urbanized regions. Bariatric procedures have been shown to be more effective in the management of morbid obesity, compared to medical treatments in terms of weight loss and its sustainability. The two most commonly performed procedures are laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), and the novel laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The MEDLINE database (cutoff date September 2010), LILACS, and the Cochrane Library were searched using the key words "gastric bypass," "sleeve gastrectomy," and "gastric banding." Only studies that compared at least two of the laparoscopic procedures were included. Reviews and meta-analysis, editorial letters or comments, case reports, animal or in vitro studies, comparisons with medical treatment, comparisons with open (non-laparoscopic) procedures were excluded. Most studies indicated that LRYGB and LSG could be more effective achieving weight loss than LAGB. However, LAGB seems to be a safer procedure with frequent, but less severe, long-term complications. Although not uniformly reported, a resolution of obesity-related comorbidities was achieved with most bariatric procedures. The three procedures have acceptable efficacy and safety. We believe that patients should be informed in detail on the advantages and disadvantages of each available procedure, possibly in several interviews and always accompanied by a specialized interdisciplinary team, warranting long-term follow-up.

  2. Knowing your bariatric practice: what's your insurance fee? What's your leverage?

    PubMed

    Frezza, Eldo E

    2006-07-01

    Healthcare today is a complex environment, and many states, regions and hospitals have been having problems in being solvent. Insurance co-payments have decreased, and the contract made with the physician depends on market leverage. We address contract problems in bariatric surgery and discuss how to try to divide bariatric surgery from general surgery practice, to get better insurance reimbursement. Creating leverage is also important: 1) how to attract new patients, and 2) how to add additional procedures, when necessary, to the initial bariatric surgery scheduled. Leverage can also be created by offering additional services, such as access to a dietician and exercise programs. By offering a variety of services, this will enhance not only the quality of care provided, but also the number of patients who will take advantage of your services, including bariatric surgery.

  3. National Adult Cardiac Surgery Registry: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Uva, Miguel Sousa; Mota, João Carlos

    2003-10-01

    A task force commission was created with the support of the Portuguese Society for Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery with the aim of organizing a National Adult Cardiac Surgery Registry, collecting clinical data and types of cardiac surgical procedure performed in Portugal. Selected variables include risk factors, cardiac status, preoperative hemodynamics, surgical procedure, hospital stay and mortality. Information is collected into a database in each institution and sent via the internet to a central database responsible for grouping and data analysis. It is hoped that this National Registry, through standardized data collection, will provide information on cardiac surgery activity in Portugal and its risk adjusted results.

  4. Past, present, and future of laparoscopic renal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavoussi, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Although laparoscopic renal surgery dates to almost 30 years ago, in which the first laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed in 1990, the history of laparoscopy extends back over 100 years, when laparoscopy was first performed on dogs. Over the last 30 years, laparoscopic renal surgery has seen many advancements in technology and technique. With the introduction of robotics and new instruments, renal surgery is becoming increasingly less invasive, and patients are having improved operative outcomes. As new technology develops, the envelope will continue to be pushed by urologists with the hope of improvement of patient outcomes and satisfaction. PMID:27995214

  5. Weight-loss surgery and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss surgery should receive care at an adolescent bariatric surgery center. There, a team of experts will give ... The studies that have been done on bariatric surgery in teens show ... as for adults. However, too little research has been done to ...

  6. Past, Present, and Future of Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Antoniou, George A; Antoniou, Athanasios I; Granderath, Frank-Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has generated a revolution in operative medicine during the past few decades. Although strongly criticized during its early years, minimization of surgical trauma and the benefits of minimization to the patient have been brought to our attention through the efforts and vision of a few pioneers in the recent history of medicine. The German gynecologist Kurt Semm (1927-2003) transformed the use of laparoscopy for diagnostic purposes into a modern therapeutic surgical concept, having performed the first laparoscopic appendectomy, inspiring Erich Mühe and many other surgeons around the world to perform a wide spectrum of procedures by minimally invasive means. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy soon became the gold standard, and various laparoscopic procedures are now preferred over open approaches, in the light of emerging evidence that demonstrates less operative stress, reduced pain, and shorter convalescence. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) may be considered further steps toward minimization of surgical trauma, although these methods have not yet been standardized. Laparoscopic surgery with the use of a robotic platform constitutes a promising field of investigation. New technologies are to be considered under the prism of the history of surgery; they seem to be a step toward further minimization of surgical trauma, but not definite therapeutic modalities. Patient safety and medical ethics must be the cornerstone of future investigation and implementation of new techniques.

  7. Robots in orthopaedic surgery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Bargar, William L

    2007-10-01

    Robots are increasingly being developed for use in surgery to aid physicians in providing more precision, especially during procedures requiring fine movements that may be beyond the scope of the human hand. In addition, robots enable the surgeon to provide improved accuracy and reproducibility with the goal of better outcomes. To date, most robotic surgical systems are in the design and experimental stage. For robotic systems to gain widespread acceptance in surgery, they must first prove their value in clinical application and ease of use as well as provide a favorable cost-to-benefit ratio. I provide an overview of the history of robotics in orthopaedic surgery and a review of their current applications with some predictions of the future for this technology.

  8. Recent Clinical Results of Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies as an Obesity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bazerbachi, Fateh; Vargas Valls, Eric J.; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in lifestyle interventions, anti-obesity medications, and metabolic surgery, the issue of health burden due to obesity continues to evolve. Interest in endoscopic bariatric techniques has increased over the years, as they have been shown to be efficacious, reversible, relatively safe, and cost effective. Further, these techniques offer a therapeutic window for some patients who may otherwise be unable to undergo bariatric surgery. This article aims to review the literature on the safety and efficacy of currently offered endoscopic bariatric techniques, as well as those that are in the pipeline of end-development and regulatory approval. PMID:28147472

  9. [Present and future developments of the virtual surgery and tele-virtual surgery system].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Otake, Yoshito; Kobayashi, Susumu; Hashizume, Makoto

    2004-04-01

    One of the applications available now in the medical field is the virtual surgery system. This system allows surgeons a safe place to master surgical techniques and to plan surgical procedures before the operation. To provide the system for use in a clinical situation, a soft tissue model and a force feedback device suited for the surgery is required. In this paper, we would like to introduce our virtual surgery system, which possesses a soft tissue model that can show accurate, real-time deformation and is equipped with a force feedback device that allows the user to experience the tactile sensations. In addition, we will introduce our tele-virtual surgery simulation system for training in the procedures used in robotic surgery.

  10. Horner Syndrome Following Thyroid Surgery: The Clinical and Pharmacological Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Giannaccare, Giuseppe; Gizzi, Corrado; Fresina, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical and pharmacological findings of a patient with iatrogenic Horner syndrome (HS) which occurred after thyroid surgery. Case Report: A 29-year-old man was referred to our emergency ward due to anisocoria and unilateral eyelid ptosis reported by the patient immediately after a recent thyroidectomy for a papillary carcinoma. Ophthalmologic examination revealed 3 mm ptosis of the right eyelid. In dim illumination, the right and left pupil size was measured 3 and 6 mm, respectively. In bright illumination, the amount of anisocoria decreased; the near pupillary reaction was intact. Brain and neck magnetic resonance imaging and chest radiography were normal. Pharmacological tests with 10% cocaine, 1% hydroxyamphetamine and 1% phenylephrine localized the interruption of the oculosympathetic pathway with postganglionic third-order neuron involvement. After 6 months of follow-up, no sign of recovery was recorded. Conclusion: Despite HS could appear to be a rare complication of thyroid surgery, it is of importance for the neck surgeons to be aware that oculosympathetic pathway (OSP) is a potentially vulnerable structure with close anatomical relationship with the thyroid gland, and for the ophthalmologists that HS may occur secondary to neck surgery and taking an accurate history is mandatory. PMID:27994816

  11. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 2. Operational and Medical Track: Abstracts and Presentations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity ........................................................... 78  Pilot Study of A Diabetes Prevention Program in A...Medical Research Symposium Volume 2 Operational & Medical 78 Budget Impact Analysis of Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity University of...Washington Rafael Alfonso Obesity is reported to increase mortality, morbidity, and costs. Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for

  12. Past, present and future of urological robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Menon, Mani

    2016-01-01

    The first urologic robotic program in the world was built at the Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Hospital Detroit, Michigan, in 2000 under the vision of surgical innovator, Dr. Mani Menon for the radical prostatectomy. The robot-assisted radical prostatectomy continues being modified with techniques to improve perioperative and surgical outcomes. The application of robotic surgical technique has since been expanded to the bladder and upper urinary tract surgery. The evolution of surgical technique and its expansion of application will continue to improve quality, outcome parameters and experience for the patients. PMID:26981588

  13. Body adiposity index (BAI) correlates with BMI and body fat pre- and post-bariatric surgery but is not an adequate substitute for BMI in severely obese women.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C D; Atalayer, D; Flancbaum, L; Geliebter, A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Body Adiposity Index (BAI), a new surrogate measure of body fat (hip circumference/[height 1.5-18]), has been proposed as a more accurate alternative to BMI. We compared BAI with BMI and their correlations with measures of body fat, waist circumference (WC), and indirect indices of fat pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). METHODS: Sixteen clinically severe obese (CSO) non-diabetic women (age = 33.9± 7.9 SD; BMI = 46.5±9.5 kg/m(2)) were assessed pre-surgery, and at 2 (n=9) and 5 mo (n=8) post-surgery. Body fat percentage (% fat) was estimated with bioimpedance analysis (BIA), air displacement plethysmography (ADP), and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). WC, an indicator of central fat, and both plasma leptin (ng/ml) and insulin (mU/l) concentrations were measured as indirect body fat indices. Pre- and post-surgery values were analyzed with Pearson correlations and linear regressions. RESULTS: BAI and BMI correlated significantly with each other pre-surgery and at each time point post surgery. BAI and BMI also correlated significantly with % fat from BIA and ADP; however, only BMI correlated significantly with % fat from DXA pre- and post-RYGB. BMI was the single best predictor of WC and leptin at 2 and 5 mo post-surgery and had significant longitudinal changes correlating with % fat from BIA and DXA as well as with leptin. DISCUSSION: Both BAI and BMI were good surrogates of % fat as estimated from BIA and ADP, but only BMI was a good surrogate of % fat from DXA in CSO women. Thus, BAI may not be a better alternative to BMI.

  14. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, David; Benedict, Stanley; Diederich, Chris; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw; Klibanov, Alexander; Larner, James

    2013-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a quickly developing technology with potential applications across a spectrum of indications traditionally within the domain of radiation oncology. Especially for applications where focal treatment is the preferred technique (for example, radiosurgery), MRgFUS has the potential to be a disruptive technology that could shift traditional patterns of care. While currently cleared in the United States for the noninvasive treatment of uterine fibroids and bone metastases, a wide range of clinical trials are currently underway, and the number of publications describing advances in MRgFUS is increasing. However, for MRgFUS to make the transition from a research curiosity to a clinical standard of care, a variety of challenges, technical, financial, clinical, and practical, must be overcome. This installment of the Vision 20/20 series examines the current status of MRgFUS, focusing on the hurdles the technology faces before it can cross over from a research technique to a standard fixture in the clinic. It then reviews current and near-term technical developments which may overcome these hurdles and allow MRgFUS to break through into clinical practice. PMID:23927296