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Sample records for bariatric surgery risks

  1. Kidney stone risk following modern bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D; Canales, Benjamin K

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers.

  2. Bariatric surgery, a risk factor for rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    García-García, M L; Campillo-Soto, A; Martín-Lorenzo, J G; Torralba-Martínez, J A; Lirón-Ruiz, R; Aguayo-Albasini, J L

    2013-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of bariatric surgery. We report a case of this complication and its consequences, in a patient who had undergone bariatric surgery, with a very high creatine kinase (CK) concentration, and whose renal function failed. Obesity causes a range of effects on all major organ systems. Knowledge of these effects and issues specific to the intensive care unit care of bariatric patients can help to predict and manage this underestimated complication in this population in which early diagnosis can alter the outcome.

  3. Risks and benefits of bariatric surgery: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Brethauer, Stacy A; Chand, Bipan; Schauer, Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Patients typically lose more than 50% of their excess weight after bariatric surgery. Obesity-related diseases markedly improve, reducing cardiovascular risk and improving life expectancy. Obese patients lose more weight with bariatric surgery than with medical weight-loss treatment.

  4. [Does bariatric surgery reduce cancer risk?].

    PubMed

    Czernichow, Sébastien; Carette, Claire

    2013-05-01

    Obesity affects about 15 % of the French population, and is associated with numerous morbidities, including some cancers. In this context the diagnosis of cancer is a frequently more delayed, and with higher mortality. Methods of restrictive or malabsorptive bariatric surgery were largely developed for the treatment of severe or morbid obesity, and have significant benefits not only in terms of weight, but also on the cardiometabolic profile. Moreover, it seems that bariatric surgery, in a weight-dependent or - independent manner, exerts a favorable effect on the incidence and mortality of cancer.

  5. [Benefits and risks of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Wildi, Stefan; Müller, Markus K; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Weber, Markus

    2006-05-01

    The rapid increase of morbid obesity has become an important task in the Western world in recent years. Since conservative treatments have failed to prove sufficient efficacy, surgery has turned out to be the most powerful option in treating morbid obesity. In this paper, the different surgical techniques with their advantages and drawbacks are presented. In general, there are restrictive, malabsorptive and combinations of both procedures available. The adjustable gastric banding (Figure 1) represents a purely restrictive operation. It is useful for patients with a relatively low body mass index (BMI) and a good understanding and control of their eating habits. By contrast, the duodenal switch (Figure 2) stands for a mainly malabsorptive procedure that might be indicated in patients with a very high BMI. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (Figure 3) is the most widely used bariatric procedure worldwide. It combines restriction and malabsorption. Today, almost two thirds of all bariatric procedures are performed laparoscopically, which has further enhanced the use of surgery in the treatment of morbid obesity. In conclusion, the treatment of morbid obesity represents a significant challenge in the Western world, and bariatric surgery plays a paramount role in the fight against overweight.

  6. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their

  7. Effect of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risk profile.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Helen M; Meron-Eldar, Shai; Brethauer, Stacy A; Schauer, Philip R; Young, James B

    2011-11-15

    Obesity is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD) and CV mortality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to resolve or improve CVD risk factors, to varying degrees. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the impact of bariatric surgery on CV risk factors and mortality. A systematic review of the published research was performed to evaluate evidence regarding CV outcomes in morbidly obese bariatric patients. Two major databases (PubMed and the Cochrane Library) were searched. The review included all original reports reporting outcomes after bariatric surgery, published in English, from January 1950 to July 2010. In total, 637 studies were identified from the initial screen. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 52 studies involving 16,867 patients were included (mean age 42 years, 78% women). The baseline prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia was 49%, 28%, and 46%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 34 months (range 3 to 155), and the average excess weight loss was 52% (range 16% to 87%). Most studies reported significant decreases postoperatively in the prevalence of CV risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Mean systolic pressure reduced from to 139 to 124 mm Hg and diastolic pressure from 87 to 77 mm Hg. C-reactive protein decreased, endothelial function improved, and a 40% relative risk reduction for 10-year coronary heart disease risk was observed, as determined by the Framingham risk score. In conclusion, this review highlights the benefits of bariatric surgery in reducing or eliminating risk factors for CVD. It provides further evidence to support surgical treatment of obesity to achieve CVD risk reduction.

  8. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their

  9. Endoscopy after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malli, Chrysoula P.; Sioulas, Athanasios D.; Emmanouil, Theodoros; Dimitriadis, George D.; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic with significant morbidity and mortality. Weight loss results in reduction of health risks and improvement in quality of life, thus representing a goal of paramount importance. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious choice compared to conservative alternatives including diet, exercise, drugs and behavioral modification to treat obese patients. Following bariatric operations, patients may present with upper gastrointestinal tract complaints that warrant endoscopic evaluation and the various bariatric surgery types are often linked to complications. A subset of these complications necessitates endoscopic interventions for accurate diagnosis and effective, minimal invasive treatment. This review aims to highlight the role of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to evaluate and potentially treat surgery-related complications and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27366025

  10. Bariatric surgery risks, benefits, and care of the morbidly obese.

    PubMed

    Owens, Tracy Martinez

    2006-06-01

    The American Society for Bariatric Surgery defines morbid obesity as a lifelong, progressive, life-threatening, genetically-related, costly, multi-factorial disease of excess fat storage with multiple comorbidities. Obesity satisfies the definition of morbid obesity when it reaches the point of significant risk for obesity-related comorbidities. These significant comorbidities often result in either significant physical disability or even death. Obesity results from excessive accumulation of fat that exceeds the body skeletal and physical standards. Morbid obesity is defined as being at least 100 lb heavier than ideal body weight, or a body mass index (BMI) of 40. BMI is calculated as weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared. This article focuses on the causes, treatment, and perioperative nursing care of patients who are morbidly obese.

  11. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  12. [Bariatric surgery and multidisciplinary treatment for obesity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-chun

    2011-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatment options for obesity. Compared with laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery has demonstrated more benefits and surgical risks. Bariatric surgery can result in the decreases in multiple gastrointestinal hormone levels, which can partially explain the mechanisms behind weight loss and resolution of diabetes after bariatric surgery. The management after bariatric surgery should be multidisciplinary and comprehensive, including dietary adjustment, physical exercise, behavioral intervention, and drug therapy.

  13. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  14. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  15. Change in fracture risk and fracture pattern after bariatric surgery: nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Catherine; Jean, Sonia; Gamache, Philippe; Lebel, Stéfane; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Biertho, Laurent; Michou, Laëtitia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether bariatric surgery increases the risk of fracture. Design Retrospective nested case-control study. Setting Patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the province of Quebec, Canada, between 2001 and 2014, selected using healthcare administrative databases. Participants 12 676 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, age and sex matched with 38 028 obese and 126 760 non-obese controls. Main outcome measures Incidence and sites of fracture in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery compared with obese and non-obese controls. Fracture risk was also compared before and after surgery (index date) within each group and by type of surgery from 2006 to 2014. Multivariate conditional Poisson regression models were adjusted for fracture history, number of comorbidities, sociomaterial deprivation, and area of residence. Results Before surgery, patients undergoing bariatric surgery (9169 (72.3%) women; mean age 42 (SD 11) years) were more likely to fracture (1326; 10.5%) than were obese (3065; 8.1%) or non-obese (8329; 6.6%) controls. A mean of 4.4 years after surgery, bariatric patients were more susceptible to fracture (514; 4.1%) than were obese (1013; 2.7%) and non-obese (3008; 2.4%) controls. Postoperative adjusted fracture risk was higher in the bariatric group than in the obese (relative risk 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.55) and non-obese (1.44, 1.29 to 1.59) groups. Before surgery, the risk of distal lower limb fracture was higher, upper limb fracture risk was lower, and risk of clinical spine, hip, femur, or pelvic fractures was similar in the bariatric and obese groups compared with the non-obese group. After surgery, risk of distal lower limb fracture decreased (relative risk 0.66, 0.56 to 0.78), whereas risk of upper limb (1.64, 1.40 to 1.93), clinical spine (1.78, 1.08 to 2.93), pelvic, hip, or femur (2.52, 1.78 to 3.59) fractures increased. The increase in risk of fracture reached significance only for

  16. Bariatric metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Scopinaro, N

    2014-08-01

    According to the WHO, the worldwide prevalence of obesity body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m² nearly doubled between 1980 and 2008, with 10% of men and 14% of women and a total of more than half a billion adults (aged >20 years old) being classed as obese. At least 2.8 million people die each year worldwide as a result of being overweight or obese, usually from the inevitable related comorbidities. It has been reported that approximately 65% of the worlds population inhabits countries where overweight and obesity are responsible for higher mortality than underweight. The recently published Interdisciplinary European Guidelines on Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery note that despite the WHO stating that excess weight is considered the fifth leading risk for deaths worldwide, it has not yet been possible to successfully curb the obesity epidemic. Moreover, severe obesity (BMI>35 kg/m²) represents a rapidly growing segment of the epidemic in which the negative effects on health and disability are especially marked. Excess weight drastically elevates a persons risk of developing a number of non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, stroke, dyslipidaemia, sleep apnoea, cancer, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and other serious comorbidities. The WHO emphasises that 44% of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 23% of ischaemic heart disease and around 741% of certain cancers are attributable to overweight and obesity. In the majority of European countries, overweight and obesity are responsible for about 80% of cases of type 2 diabetes, 35% of cases of ischaemic heart disease and 55% of cases of hypertensive disease among adults. Additionally, a range of debilitating conditions such as osteoarthritis, respiratory difficulties, gallbladder disease, infertility, and psychosocial problems, among others, which lead to reduced life expectancy, quality of life and disability, are extremely costly in terms of both absence from work and use of health resources. Noteworthy, the

  17. Fracture Risk After Bariatric Surgery: A 12-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to impair bone health. This study aimed to investigate the fracture risk in patients after bariatric surgery versus propensity score-matched controls. The authors used the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and identified 2064 patients who underwent bariatric surgery during 2001 to 2009. These patients were matched to 5027 obese patients who did not receive bariatric surgery, using propensity score matching accounting for age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and the year morbid obesity was diagnosed. The authors followed the surgical and control cohorts to death, any diagnosis of fracture, or December 31, 2012, whichever occurred first. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative rates of fractures in the surgical group and control group. At the end of the 12-year study period, there were 183 fractures in the surgical group (mean follow-up 4.8 years) and 374 fractures in the matched control group (mean follow-up 4.9 years). Overall, there was a 1.21-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.43] significantly increased risk of fracture in the surgical group compared with the control group. Stratified by surgical procedures, malabsorptive procedures showed a significantly higher fracture risk (1.47, 95% CI: 1.01-2.15). The Kaplan-Meier estimated fracture rates were 1.60% at 1 year, 2.37% at 2 years, 1.69% at 5 years, and 2.06% after 5 years for the surgical patients, compared with 1.51%, 1.65%, 1.53%, and 1.42%, respectively, for the matched controls. Adjusted analysis showed a trend towards an increased fracture risk, 1 to 2 years after bariatric surgery. (1.42, 95% CI: 0.99-2.05). Bariatric surgery was significantly associated with an increased risk of fractures, mainly with malabsorptive procedures, with a trend of an increased fracture risk 1 to 2 years after surgery. These results provide further evidence for the adverse effects of bariatric

  18. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techniques have contributed to reduced operative time, length of stay, and complications. The development in bariatric surgery has been exceptional, resulting in a dramatic increase of the number of procedures performed world wide during the last decades. Although, a complex bariatric procedure can be performed with operative mortality no greater than cholecystectomy, specific procedure-related complications and other drawbacks must be taken into account. The evolution of laparoscopy will be the legacy of the 21st century and at present, day-care surgery and further reduction of the operative trauma is in focus. The impressive effects on comorbid conditions have prompted the adoption of minimal invasive bariatric procedures into the field of metabolic surgery. PMID:25386062

  19. Alcohol and Other Addictive Disorders Following Bariatric Surgery: Prevalence, Risk Factors and Possible Etiologies.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Kristine J; Engel, Scott G; Wonderlich, Joseph A; Pollert, Garrett A; Sondag, Cindy

    2015-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective intervention for significant and sustained weight loss in obese individuals. While patients often realize numerous improvements in obesity-related comorbidities and health-related quality of life, a small minority of patients have less optimal outcomes following bariatric surgery. The literature on the emergence of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) following bariatric surgery has grown in the past several years and collectively provides convincing evidence that a significant minority of patients develop new-onset AUDs following bariatric surgery. Rouxen-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has generally been associated with the risk of developing an AUD, while laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding generally has not, in several large studies. One theory that has been discussed at some length is the idea of 'addiction transfer' wherein patients substitute one 'addiction' (food) for a new 'addiction' (alcohol) following surgery. Animal work suggests a neurobiological basis for increased alcohol reward following RYGB. In addition, several pharmacokinetic studies have shown rapid and dramatically increased peak alcohol concentrations following RYGB. The prevalence of alcohol and other addictive disorders and potential etiological contributors to post-operative AUDs will be explored.

  20. Cardiovascular benefits of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Glenn K; Cha, Yong-Mei

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing in the United States and worldwide, bringing with it an excess of morbidity and premature death. Obesity is strongly associated with both traditional cardiovascular risk factors as well as direct effects on hemodynamics and cardiovascular structure and function. In fact, cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in obese patients. Often, lifestyle and pharmacological weight-loss interventions are of limited efficacy in severely obese patients. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a feasible option to achieve substantial and sustained weight loss in this group of patients. It is a safe procedure with low in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates even in groups that are considered higher risk for surgery (e.g., the elderly), especially if performed in high-volume centers. There is observational evidence that bariatric surgery in severely obese patients is associated with both a reduction of traditional cardiovascular risk factors as well as improvement in cardiac structure and function. Marked decreases in the levels of inflammatory and prothrombotic markers, as well as markers of subclinical atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction, are seen after bariatric surgery. This article summarizes the existing evidence regarding the cardiovascular benefits in patients following bariatric surgery.

  1. Psychopharmacology and Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Roerig, James L; Steffen, Kristine

    2015-11-01

    Currently, it has been demonstrated that psychotropic drugs, particularly antidepressants, are frequently prescribed for patients who seek bariatric surgery. Many bariatric surgery patients have a history of a mood disorder. Unlike medications for diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia, which are generally reduced and at times discontinued, postsurgery antidepressants use is only slightly reduced. The Roux-en-Y procedure is most frequently associated with alteration in drug exposure. Medication disintegration, dissolution, absorption, metabolism and excretion have been found to be altered in postbariatric patients, although data are sparse at this time. This paper will review the current evidence regarding the effect of bariatric surgery on drug treatment including mechanism of interference as well as the extent of changes identified to date. Data will be presented as controlled trials followed by case series and reports.

  2. BARIATRIC SURGERY REVERSES METABOLIC RISK IN PATIENTS TREATED IN OUTPATIENT LEVEL

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA-NETO, Epifânio Feitosa; VÁZQUEZ, Cecília Mª Passos; SOARES, Fabiana Melo; da SILVA, Danielle Góes; de SOUZA, Márcia Ferreira Cândido; BARBOSA, Kiriaque Barra Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Background The conventional treatment of obesity presents unsatisfactory results on weight loss and its long-term sustainability, therefore bariatric surgery has been suggested as an effective therapy, determining sustainable long-term weight loss, reversal of components of cardiometabolic risk and improved quality and life expectancy. Aim To investigate the clinical component of the cardiometabolic risk in patients undergoing bariatric surgery assisted on outpatient basis. Methods The sample consisted of 47 patients with ages between 18 and 60 years, 72% females. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were prospectively evaluated by using the Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities scale. Results Occurred improvement in these co-morbidities within 12 months after surgery. Co-morbidities resolved were greater than those improved. Conclusion The study revealed that the Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities is a system that can be effectively used to quantify the degree of reduction of the severity of the cardiometabolic risk in response to bariatric surgery. PMID:24676297

  3. Bariatric surgery to treat obesity.

    PubMed

    Kissler, Hermann J; Settmacher, Utz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has become a global health problem that contributes to numerous life-threatening and disabling diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. The long-term results of traditional weight loss therapies, including diet, exercise, and medications, are relatively poor. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment of morbidly obese patients to allow substantial, sustained weight loss and to improve or resolve obesity-associated comorbidities, thereby reducing mortality. According to US practice guidelines, patients qualify for bariatric surgery with a body mass index of 35 kg/m(2) and associated comorbidities, or a body mass index of 40 kg/m(2), after failure of conservative weight loss measures. Currently, the established procedures in the United States are the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. The surgeries vary substantially in their postoperative amount of weight loss, resolution of comorbidities, nutritional requirements, and nature and severity of complications. There is no perfect bariatric surgery, an informed risk and benefit assessment should be made by each patient. The procedures are safe, with a mortality rate of 0.3%. Sustained weight loss depends finally on patient re-education in terms of diet, need for regular exercise, and careful bariatric follow-up evaluation.

  4. Adolescent bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Daniel S; Fallon, Sara C; Brandt, Mary L

    2012-08-01

    Pediatric obesity has increased from a relatively uncommon problem to one of the most important public health problems facing children today. Typical "adult" diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, have become increasingly prevalent in the pediatric population. The earlier presentation of these comorbidities will have a significant impact for the future because this population of children will require more medical resources at an earlier age and will have a significantly decreased life expectancy. The significant morbidity of obesity in the pediatric population has led to consideration of more aggressive treatment protocols for obesity in children, including the introduction of surgical management at an earlier age. Surgery for obesity in adolescents has particular risks and benefits that must be accounted for when considering this approach. The unique psychological and emotional needs of adolescent patients make the patient selection process and perioperative management substantially different from those of adult patients. Initial outcomes of bariatric surgery in adolescents are comparable to those seen in adults in the short term. However, the long-term effects of these procedures on the adolescent population are not known. This review discusses the epidemiology of pediatric obesity, the indications for operative therapy in adolescent patients, the common surgical procedures used for weight loss, the reported outcomes of these procedures, and the importance of multidisciplinary management for this unique patient population.

  5. Endocrine and Metabolic Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option for obese patients; however, it carries substantial risks, including procedure-related complications, malabsorption, and hormonal disturbance. Recent years have seen an increase in the bariatric surgeries performed utilizing either an independent or a combination of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. We review some complications of bariatric procedures more specifically, hypoglycemia and osteoporosis, the recommended preoperative assessment and then regular follow up, and the therapeutic options. Surgeon, internist, and the patient must be aware of the multiple risks of this kind of surgery and the needed assessment and follow up. PMID:26458852

  6. Body Contouring After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Jo M; Steffen, Kristine J; Sarwer, David B

    2015-11-01

    Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery generally experience rapid and dramatic weight loss. While the weight loss typically confers significant health benefits, an undesirable consequence is often excessive quantities of hanging, surplus skin. Some patients undergo body-contouring surgery (BCS) in order to improve health, mobility, appearance and psychological adjustment. While the majority of post-bariatric patients desire BCS in one or more body regions, a small percentage of patients receive such surgeries. Lack of knowledge about procedures, cost and (in the USA and several other countries) difficulty obtaining insurance reimbursement likely prevents many patients from undergoing BCS. Those who do undergo BCS appear to be at heightened risk for wound-healing complications. Despite these complications, the majority of patients report satisfactory BCS outcomes. The extant literature in this area provides a great deal of information about these issues; nevertheless, additional research is needed to further inform clinical management and improve patient outcomes.

  7. Body Contouring After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Jo M; Steffen, Kristine J; Sarwer, David B

    2015-11-01

    Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery generally experience rapid and dramatic weight loss. While the weight loss typically confers significant health benefits, an undesirable consequence is often excessive quantities of hanging, surplus skin. Some patients undergo body-contouring surgery (BCS) in order to improve health, mobility, appearance and psychological adjustment. While the majority of post-bariatric patients desire BCS in one or more body regions, a small percentage of patients receive such surgeries. Lack of knowledge about procedures, cost and (in the USA and several other countries) difficulty obtaining insurance reimbursement likely prevents many patients from undergoing BCS. Those who do undergo BCS appear to be at heightened risk for wound-healing complications. Despite these complications, the majority of patients report satisfactory BCS outcomes. The extant literature in this area provides a great deal of information about these issues; nevertheless, additional research is needed to further inform clinical management and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26395601

  8. Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrine System Fact Sheet Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System February, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors John ... could have both benefits and risks for your endocrine system—the network of glands that produce, store, and ...

  9. [Obesity, bariatric surgery and future fertility].

    PubMed

    Tsur, Abraham; Machtinger, Ronit; Segal-Lieberman, Gabriella; Orvieto, R

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is an increasingly widespread health problem. In addition to comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease, obesity has a significant impact on reproductive life, including infertility, miscarriages and high prevalence of pregnancy complications. The present review describes the possible benefits of bariatric surgery regarding fertility and pregnancy outcome. It is well established that bariatric surgery leads to regular ovulatory cycles and improves spontaneous conception rates in obese women. While pregnancy after bariatric surgery is safe and associated with reduced pregnancy complications, pregnant women following bariatric surgery are still at high risk for preterm births and small dimensions of gestational age offsprings. The optimal interval that should be kept between surgery and subsequent pregnancy is controversial, with recent studies emphasizing the importance of nutritional balance rather than the time from surgery to conception as being the most important determinant. Strict peri-conceptional surveillance is mandatory in order to prevent nutritional deficiencies and for the early diagnosis of abnormal fetal growth.

  10. Pregnancy and neonatal outcome after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kent; Lieberman, Nicky; Sheiner, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic is changing the face of maternal-fetal medicine. One in five women is obese at time of conception, and increasing numbers of parturients have undergone bariatric surgery. Recent publication of large, population-based studies and comparison studies of preoperative and post-operative pregnancies have highlighted new risks and benefits to the mother and child. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to effectively reduce the risk of complications such as fetal macrosomia, gestational diabetes mellitus, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; however, women who become pregnant after bariatric surgery may constitute a unique obstetric population with an increased risk for preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants. In this article, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the impact of maternal bariatric surgery on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Aortic rupture during reoperative bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hostiuc, Sorin; Dragoteanu, Constantin; Asavei, Victor; Negoi, Ionut

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity has become a very common problem worldwide, causing severe health-related consequences including cardiovascular or metabolic diseases, arthritis, sleep apnea, or an increased risk of cancer. Bariatric surgery was shown to be the only way to achieve sustainable weight loss and to decrease the frequency and severity of metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities. The purpose of this article is to present a case of bariatric surgery complicated with lesion of the aorta with a lethal outcome. PMID:27163425

  12. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity: risks and benefits in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C; McCullough, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Obesity is one of the most preventable causes of morbidity and mortality of the 21st century. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been a largely overlooked consequence of obesity; however, accumulating evidence elucidates the association. Obesity is at the core, promoting a cascade of secondary pathologies including diabetes, dyslipidemia, inflammation, hypertension, and the metabolic syndrome; these comorbidities constitute great risk for CKD. With the diagnosis of CKD, there is an increased threat of cardiovascular disease and the attendant increase in morbidity and mortality rates. Substantial weight loss in the obese population can be effectively achieved and maintained through bariatric surgery, which confers major health benefits by producing resolution or improvement of obesity-related comorbidities. This surgical procedure presents an early hazard of acute on chronic kidney failure, which is offset by a potential improvement in the risk of CKD progression with anticipated improvement in hypertension, diabetes, and CKD risk factors. Future research is needed to describe the clinical course and risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the CKD population.

  13. Informed decision-making for bariatric surgery: benefits, risks, uncertainties and choices.

    PubMed

    Sarela, Abeezar I

    2014-12-01

    Decision-making is a critical aspect of good surgical care, and this principle is particularly important in bariatric surgery. Adequate communication of information to patients is essential in order to facilitate optimal uptake of bariatric surgery and choice of the most suitable procedure. This article reviews the most relevant advances in understanding of long-term efficacy associated with gastric banding, gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

  14. Skin changes after bariatric surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Ana Paula Dornelles da Silva; Weber, Magda Blessmann

    2015-01-01

    Today, obesity is considered an epidemic all over the world and it is recognized as one of the major public health problems. Bariatric surgery is considered an appropriate therapeutic option for obesity with progressively increasing demands. The changes resulting from massive weight loss after bariatric surgery are related to numerous complications. This article will present the dermatological alterations that can be found after bariatric surgery. They will be subdivided into dermatoses that are secondary to metabolic and nutritional disorders, those derived from cutaneous structural modifications after major weight loss and the influence the latter may have in improving of certain dermatoses. PMID:25830984

  15. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; de Cleva, Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery. PMID:27458534

  16. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; de Cleva, Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery. PMID:27458534

  17. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  18. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  19. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery A Patient’s Guide Bariatric (weight loss) surgery is a treatment ... This guide for patients is based on The Endocrine Society’s practice guidelines for physicians that focus on ...

  20. Is bariatric surgery safe in academic centers?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jose; Sung, Jimmy; Anderson, Wayne; Stone, Jack; Gallagher, Scott; Shapiro, David; Rosemurgy, Alex; Murr, Michel M

    2002-09-01

    Contemporary outcomes of bariatric surgery are not well defined. Our aim was to document the outcomes of bariatric surgery on the basis of surgeon caseload and affiliation. We analyzed prospectively collected Florida-wide hospital discharge data. Forty-four surgeons undertook bariatric surgery in 933 patients during 1999. The ten surgeons who averaged more than two operations/month undertook 764 operations; 162 (17%) were done by academic surgeons. Complications [14% vs 7% (P = 0.008, chi-square)], length of stay (5 +/- 0.7 vs 4 +/- 0.1 days), and hospital charges (in thousands) ($31 +/- 4.0 vs $24 +/- 0.4) were greater in academic than in community-based centers (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank-sum). However, 36 per cent of patients operated upon by academic surgeons had a high Severity Index compared with only 16 per cent of patients operated upon by community-based surgeons (P < 0.001, chi-square). In high-risk patients complications (40% vs 46%), length of stay (7 +/- 1.0 vs 6 +/- 0.4 days), and hospital charges (in thousands) ($42 +/- 6 vs $35 +/- 2) were similar between academic and community-based surgeons. We conclude that outcomes of bariatric surgery in high-risk patients are similar among academic and community-based surgeons. Academic surgeons undertake bariatric surgery in high-risk patients more frequently than community-based surgeons, which underlies their increased complication rate. These prospectively collected data reflect surgical outcomes more accurately than clinical series and will impact our practice of bariatric surgery.

  1. Treatment of Adult Obesity with Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Robin; Harrison, T Daniel; McGraw, Shaniqua L

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, approximately 179,000 bariatric surgery procedures were performed in the United States, including the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (42.1%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (34.2%), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (14.0%). Choice of procedure depends on the medical conditions of the patient, patient preference, and expertise of the surgeon. On average, weight loss of 60% to 70% of excess body weight is achieved in the short term, and up to 50% at 10 years. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs in 60% to 80% of patients two years after surgery and persists in about 30% of patients 15 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. The Roux-en-Y procedure carries an increased risk of malabsorption sequelae, which can be minimized with nutritional supplementation and surveillance. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5%. Cohort studies show that bariatric surgery reduces all-cause mortality by 30% to 50% at seven to 15 years postsurgery compared with patients with obesity who did not have surgery. Dietary changes, such as consuming protein first at every meal, and regular physical activity are critical for patient success after bariatric surgery. The family physician is well positioned to counsel patients about bariatric surgical options, the risks and benefits of surgery, and to provide long-term support and medical management postsurgery.

  2. Update on Adolescent Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nirav K; Wulkan, Mark L; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity remains a significant public health issue. Approximately 8% of adolescent girls and 7% of adolescent boys have severe (≥class 2) obesity. Adolescent severe obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, and persists into adulthood. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment available, resulting in major weight loss and resolution of important comorbid conditions. Clinical practice guidelines for pediatric obesity treatment recommend consideration of surgery after failure of behavioral approaches. Careful screening and postoperative management of patients by a multidisciplinary team is required. Long-term studies are needed to assess the impact of adolescent bariatric surgery. PMID:27519138

  3. Treatment of adult obesity with bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Robin; Garrison, Jordan M; Johnson, Mark S

    2011-10-01

    Bariatric surgery procedures, including laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, result in an average weight loss of 50 percent of excess body weight. Remission of diabetes mellitus occurs in approximately 80 percent of patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. The Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score can help identify patients with increased mortality risk from bariatric surgery. Complications and adverse effects are lowest with laparoscopic surgery, and vary by procedure and presurgical risk. The Roux-en-Y procedure carries an increased risk of malabsorption sequelae, which can be minimized with standard nutritional supplementation. Outcomes are also influenced by the experience of the surgeon and surgical facility. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5 percent. Although there have been no long-term randomized controlled trials, existing studies show that bariatric surgery has a beneficial effect on mortality. The family physician is well positioned to care for obese patients by discussing surgery as an option for long-term weight loss. Counseling about the procedure options, risks and benefits of surgery, and the potential reduction in comorbid conditions is important. Patient selection, presurgical risk reduction, and postsurgical medical management, with nutrition and exercise support, are valuable roles for the family physician.

  4. Bariatric surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes: benefits, risks, indications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A-J; De Flines, J; De Roover, A; Paquot, N

    2009-12-01

    Obesity plays a key role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and weight loss is a major objective, although difficult to achieve with medical treatments. Bariatric surgery has proven its efficacy in obtaining marked and sustained weight loss, and is also associated with a significant improvement in glucose control and even diabetes remission. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass appears to be more effective in diabetic patients than the restrictive gastroplasty procedure. This may be explained not only by greater weight reduction, but also by specific hormonal changes. Indeed, increased levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) may lead to improved beta-cell function and insulin secretion as well as reduced insulin resistance associated with weight loss. The presence of T2DM in obese individuals is a further argument to propose bariatric surgery, and even more so when diabetes is difficult to manage by medical means and other weight-related complications may occur. Bariatric surgery is associated with a better cardiovascular prognosis and reduced mortality, even though acute and long-term complications are present. The observation that surgical rerouting of nutrients triggers changes in the release of incretin hormones that, in turn, ameliorate the diabetic state in the absence of weight loss has led to the recent development of innovative surgical procedures. Thus, bariatric surgery may be said to be progressing towards so-called 'metabolic surgery', which merits further evaluation in patients with T2DM within a multidisciplinary approach that involves both surgeons and endocrinologists.

  5. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented. PMID:23676549

  6. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients.

    PubMed

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m(2), P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery. PMID:27516900

  7. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery. PMID:27516900

  8. Night eating syndrome: impact on bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Colles, Susan L; Dixon, John B

    2006-07-01

    Individuals with night eating syndrome (NES) display a time-delayed pattern of food intake, outside the natural circadian rhythm. High prevalence estimates have been reported among bariatric surgery candidates, and some evidence suggests that NES is positively associated with obesity, negatively associated with weight loss efficacy, and follows a chronic course. In order to evaluate current NES theory, and the association between NES and bariatric surgery, literature searches were conducted to identify relevant literature published in English up to 2005. Because of inconsistencies in NES characterization, and significant heterogeneity in study design and methods, a qualitative assessment of NES and its relation to bariatric surgery was then undertaken. Within the literature, variable NES definitions highlight the distinct lack of clarity as to which behavioral features constitute a clinically meaningful entity. Prevalence estimates appear high among persons seeking bariatric surgery; however, no consistent pre- or postoperative demographic, clinical, or psychological factors reliably differentiate NES from non-NES. Further examination of the clinical significance, correlates, and course of NES in general and surgical samples is important, given the link with obesity. The ways in which NES departs from "normal" eating behavior must be clarified. Behavioral and psychological traits of NES need elucidation, and the establishment of agreed diagnostic criteria is essential for research to move forward. Therapy options should focus on aspects of the syndrome that cause greatest impairment, distress, or health risk.

  9. How to choose and use bariatric surgery in 2015.

    PubMed

    Piché, Marie-Ève; Auclair, Audrey; Harvey, Jany; Marceau, Simon; Poirier, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Severe obesity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and represents a major health care problem with increasing incidence worldwide. Bariatric surgery, through its efficacy and improved safety, is emerging as an important available treatment for patients with severe obesity. Classically, bariatric surgery has been described as either a restrictive or a hybrid surgery, which is a combination of restriction and malabsorption. For most severely obese patients, bariatric surgery results in the remission of major obesity-related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Thus, bariatric surgery reduces cardiovascular risk burden, and overall mortality risk. Early complications (< 30 days) after bariatric surgery were reported to be < 10% and tend to be lower in restrictive surgeries compared with hybrid surgeries. Most common early complications reported are gastric and anastomosis leak (1.6%-5.1%), bleeding (0.5%-3.5%), and pulmonary embolism (0.2%-1%). Long-term complications (> 30 days) might differ depending on the type of bariatric surgery. According to the type of surgery and the type of study, the 30-day operative mortality rates differ from 0.1% to 1.2%. Studies on postoperative outcomes, investigations on weight loss physiology, and mechanism of action after bariatric surgery provide a better understanding of the bariatric surgery metabolic benefits. In this article, we present an overview of bariatric procedures with their effects, including risks and benefits, on the severely obese patients' health. It provides evidence to support surgical treatment of severe obesity to achieve cardiovascular disease risk reduction in severely obese patients.

  10. Adding Chemoprophylaxis to Sequential Compression May Not Reduce the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gagner, Michel; Selzer, Faith; Belle, Steve H.; Bessler, Marc; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory; Davis, Dan; Inabnet, William B.; Mitchell, James E.; Pomp, Alfons; Strain, Gladys; Pories, Walter J.; Wolfe, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation, the use of sequential compression devices on lower extremities peri-operatively, and early ambulation are thought to reduce venous thromboembolism (VTE) postoperatively and are recommended to reduce VTE risk. However, the evidence upon which this recommendation is based is not particularly strong. We demonstrate that even a large, multi-center cohort with carefully collected prospective data is inadequate to provide sufficient evidence to support, or refute, this recommendation. Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) participants from 10 centers in the United States who underwent their first bariatric surgery between March, 2005 and December, 2007 comprise the study group. We examined the ability to address the question of whether anti-coagulation therapy, in addition to sequential compression, reduces the 30 day incidence of VTE or death sufficiently to recommend the use of prophylactic anticoagulation, a therapy that is not without risk. Results Of 4416 patients, 396 (9.0%) received sequential compression alone, while the others also received anticoagulation therapy. The incidence of VTE within 30 days of surgery was small (0.25% among those receiving sequential compression alone, 0.47% when anticoagulation therapy was added), and the 30 days incidence of death was also small (0.25% vs. 0.34%, p = 0.76, for sequential compression alone vs. sequential compression plus anticoagulation therapy). Estimates of the number of cases required to address the question of whether there is a difference in outcome related to VTE chemoprophylaxis, or whether the outcome rates are equivalent, range from 13,680 to at least 35,760 patients, depending upon whether superiority or equivalence is being analyzed. Conclusion Sufficient evidence from a clinical trial study to determine whether prophylactic anticoagulation added to compression devices further prevents VTEs is not available and such a trial is likely to be impractical

  11. A Bariatric Surgery Primer for Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Jessica G; Halpern, Alan A; Hill, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery are now presenting to orthopedic surgeons for elective arthroplasties. In addition, orthopedic surgeons themselves are referring more patients for consideration of bariatric surgery in anticipation of future elective procedures. Although the full effects of bariatric surgery on metabolism are not yet known, the altered digestion associated with these surgeries poses several issues for orthopedic surgeons. In this article, we address 3 aspects of care of this class of patient: review of the most commonly performed procedures and their metabolic consequences; suggested preoperative assessment of bariatric patients for any conditions that should be corrected before surgery; and evaluation of outcomes of elective procedures performed after bariatric surgery. Awareness of the unique characteristics of this group of patients helps minimize the potential for complications of planned orthopedic surgeries.

  12. Nutritional and psychological considerations after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Song, Angela; Fernstrom, Madelyn H

    2008-01-01

    The anatomic and physiological changes resulting from bariatric surgery can affect both nutrition and psychological attitudes. Modifications of the gastrointestinal tract lead to a diminished ability to absorb nutrients, electrolytes, and bile salts, as well as deficiencies in iron, calcium, and other vitamins and minerals. Dehydration, lactose intolerance, and protein calorie malnutrition are other common sequelae. Alterations in bone metabolism increase long-term risk for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Noncompliance with postsurgical nutritional regimens has been estimated to occur in from one third to almost two thirds of cases and can exacerbate these complications. Psychological issues are often present in patients with morbid obesity and can affect surgical outcomes. These issues include mood and personality disorders, destructive eating behaviors, and poor body image. Nearly one third of patients undergoing bariatric surgery also have a history of substance abuse disorder. The literature suggests that although the mental health of patients improves as a result of bariatric surgery, the benefits may be transient, and problems such as negative personality profiles, detrimental eating patterns, and negative body image persist to some extent. Identification of presurgical psychiatric problems can help identify those patients more likely to achieve lasting weight loss when surgery is combined with long-term follow-up to minimize medical and psychological complications. PMID:19083527

  13. [Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients often have nutritional deficiencies, particularly in fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid and zinc. After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures. The latter result in more important weight loss but also increase the risk of more severe deficiencies. The protein deficiency associated with a decrease in the fat-free mass has been described in both procedures. It can sometimes require an enteral or parenteral support. Anemia can be secondary to iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency and even to vitamin B12 deficiency. Neurological disorders such as Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, or peripheral neuropathies may also be observed. Malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients, especially if diagnosed after by-pass surgery, rarely cause clinical symptoms. However, some complications have been reported such as bone demineralization due to vitamin D deficiency, hair loss secondary to zinc deficiency or hemeralopia from vitamin A deficiency. A careful nutritional follow-up should be performed during pregnancy after obesity surgery, because possible deficiencies can affect the health of both the mother and child. In conclusion, increased awareness of the risk of deficiency and the systematic dosage of micronutrients are needed in the pre- and postoperative period in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The case by case correction of these deficiencies is mandatory, and their systematic prevention should be evaluated.

  14. Psychosocial Interventions Pre and Post Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2015-11-01

    Despite positive results overall, a substantial number of patients experience poor long-term outcomes following bariatric surgery. One reason for variability in weight loss may be difficulty in making and sustaining changes in dietary intake and physical activity; post-surgery binge eating has also been associated with poorer weight outcomes. In this paper, we review available evidence on adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Although the literature is limited, evidence suggests that bariatric surgery patients may benefit from a comprehensive approach targeting diet, activity and psychological factors. We think the optimal time to initiate adjunctive intervention is after surgery, but before significant weight regain has occurred. Adaptive interventions incorporating advances in technology may prove to be effective for promoting behavioural self-management and psychosocial adjustment following bariatric surgery. For some patients, pharmacotherapy and reoperation may also play a role in a personalized approach to post-surgery care. PMID:26364715

  15. Bariatric surgery: a best practice article.

    PubMed

    Neff, Karl John Hans; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-02-01

    Bariatric surgery can effectively reduce body weight and treat obesity associated metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. There are also benefits for an individual's functional status and psychological health. A multi-disciplinary evaluation should be offered to the individual as the first essential step in considering bariatric surgery as a treatment. This evaluation should include a thorough medical assessment, as well as psychological and dietetic assessments. In this best practice article, we outline the current recommendations for referral for bariatric surgery. We also present the data for pre-operative assessment before bariatric surgery, with particular reference to cardiovascular disease and obstructive sleep apnoea. We describe the literature on outcomes after bariatric surgery, including the results for mortality, weight loss, remission of diabetes and associated endocrine disorders such as hypogonadism. Within this review, we will illustrate the impact of bariatric surgery on self-image, psychological health and perceived health and functional status. Finally, we briefly detail the potential complications of bariatric surgery, and offer advice on post-operative care and surveillance.

  16. The impact of bariatric surgery on obesity-related infertility and in vitro fertilization outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Orkun; Carr, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    Obesity-related infertility is one of the most common problems of reproductive-age obese women who desire childbearing. The various types of bariatric surgeries have proved effective in controlling excessive weight gain, improving fertility, and preventing certain maternal and fetal complications in these women. This article summarizes the current evidence regarding the impact of bariatric surgery on obesity-related infertility and in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. We have also attempted to draw conclusions about maternal and fetal risks and the benefits of bariatric surgery. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y procedures are the two most commonly performed bariatric surgeries. Bariatric surgery was believed to improve menstrual irregularity and increase ovulation rate in anovulatory obese women, which lead to increased pregnancy rates. Although there are data in the literature suggesting the improvement of both the ovulatory function and the spontaneous pregnancy rates in obese women who lost weight after bariatric surgery, most of these are case-control studies with a small number of patients. The data are insufficient to determine an ideal time interval for pregnancy after bariatric surgery; however, the general consensus is that pregnancy should be delayed 12 to 18 months after bariatric surgery to avoid nutritional deficiencies. Few data exist regarding IVF success rates in women who have undergone bariatric surgery. One pairwise study discussed five patients who underwent bariatric surgery followed by IVF that resulted in three term pregnancies in three patients after the first IVF cycle. Many studies reported reductions in obesity-related pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders after bariatric surgery. Although data are inconsistent, some studies reported increased rate of preterm delivery and small for gestational age infants after bariatric surgery. Pregnancies after bariatric surgery may be

  17. Bariatric surgery for pediatric extreme obesity: now or later?

    PubMed

    Inge, T H; Xanthakos, S A; Zeller, M H

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease of epidemic and global proportions that poses the most significant threat to the health of our younger generations. Those who are the most extremely affected bear the largest burden of health problems. In the US, extreme obesity affects approximately 9 million adults and 2 million children, and is associated with both immediate health problems and later health risk, including premature mortality. Present medical and behavioral interventions for extreme obesity in adults and children rarely result in the significant, durable weight loss necessary to improve health outcomes, prompting a search for more aggressive measures. Weight loss (bariatric) surgery has been advocated as an intervention for those with extreme obesity. In adults, bariatric surgery results in prolonged weight control and improvement in serious obesity comorbidities, namely type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. A surge in weight loss operations for adolescents has been observed recently, with a threefold increase in case volumes nationwide from 2000 to 2003. Current evidence suggests that after bariatric surgery, adolescents lose significant weight and serious obesity-related medical conditions and psychosocial status are improved. Thus it is reasonable to propose that bariatric surgery performed in the adolescent period may be more effective treatment for childhood-onset extreme obesity than delaying surgery for extremely obese youth until adulthood. This position has been echoed by a number of groups and an independent systematic review. Finally, it is conceivable that bariatric surgery performed in adulthood for childhood onset extreme obesity may not be as effective for comorbidity treatment as surgery performed earlier during adolescence. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence, which supports early rather than later use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of extreme obesity, and to present this

  18. Bariatric surgery: the indications in metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Neff, K J; le Roux, C W

    2014-01-01

    As well as the pronounced effect on body mass index (BMI), bariatric surgery is increasingly recognized as being associated with improvements in morbidity and mortality in a range of conditions, from airways disease to cancer. In metabolic disease, the impact of bariatric surgery is particularly obvious with marked improvements in glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to the point of effecting diabetes remission in some. Hypertension and dyslipidemia, key components of the metabolic syndrome, also respond to bariatric surgery. Despite the increasing evidence of benefit in metabolic disease, the major national guidelines for selecting candidates for bariatric surgery retain their emphasis on body weight. In these guidelines, a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) is needed to indicate surgery, even in those with profound metabolic disturbance. The recent International Diabetes Federation guidelines have identified the need to reorientate our focus from BMI to metabolic disease. In this review, we examine the developing indications for the use of bariatric surgery in metabolic disease. We will focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome. Within this, we will outline the data for using bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery, including those with a BMI <35 kg/m(2). PMID:23838610

  19. Bariatric surgery and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sabrina; le Roux, Carel W; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic dysregulation is the defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and can give rise to microvascular complications, specifically retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Pharmacological targeting of risk factors for microvascular complications can yield therapeutic gains, particularly in relation to retinopathy and nephropathy. Bariatric surgery is superior to intensified pharmacotherapy in relation to glycaemic control and can remediate dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Consequently, evidence of the effect of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications is now emerging in the literature. Examination of the recent published evidence base (covering the period 2011-2014) on the effects of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications reveals further evidence supportive of the efficacy of bariatric surgery in preventing the incidence and progression of albuminuria and arresting renal functional decline. Data on retinopathy are more ambivalent potentially representing the potential in some cases for a degree of surgery associated reactive hypoglycaemia to detract from the benefits of amelioration of hyperglycaemia. A significant gap in the literature remains in relation to the effects of surgery on diabetic neuropathy. Overall, there is a pressing need for prospective randomised controlled trials examining long-term microvascular outcomes following bariatric surgery in patients with T2DM.

  20. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Stoklossa, Carlene; Atwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain. PMID:24348530

  1. Nutrition care for patients with weight regain after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson Stoklossa, Carlene; Atwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20-30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20-25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence and Associations in a Bariatric Surgery Cohort from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, Faith; Smith, Mark D.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Inabnet, William B.; King, Wendy C.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Raum, William J.; Schrope, Beth; Steffen, Kristine J.; Wolfe, Bruce M.; Patterson, Emma J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome is associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease, sleep apnea, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, all common conditions in patients referred for bariatric surgery, and it may predict early postoperative complications. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, defined using updated National Cholesterol Education Program criteria, in adults undergoing bariatric surgery and compare the prevalence of baseline co-morbid conditions and select operative and 30-day postoperative outcomes by metabolic syndrome status. Methods: Complete metabolic syndrome data were available for 2275 of 2458 participants enrolled in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 (LABS-2), an observational cohort study designed to evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in obese adults. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 79.9%. Compared to those without metabolic syndrome, those with metabolic syndrome were significantly more likely to be men, to have a higher prevalence of diabetes and prior cardiac events, to have enlarged livers and higher median levels of liver enzymes, a history of sleep apnea, and a longer length of stay after surgery following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and gastric sleeves but not open RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Metabolic syndrome status was not significantly related to duration of surgery or rates of composite end points of intraoperative events and 30-day major adverse surgical outcomes. Conclusions: Nearly four in five participants undergoing bariatric surgery presented with metabolic syndrome. Establishing a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in bariatric surgery patients may identify a high-risk patient profile, but does not in itself confer a higher risk for short-term adverse postsurgery outcomes. PMID:24380645

  3. Role of endoscopy in the bariatric surgery of patients.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Forestieri, Pietro

    2014-06-28

    Obesity is an increasingly serious health problem in nearly all Western countries. It represents an important risk factor for several gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, hiatal hernia, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, Helicobacter pylori infection, colorectal polyps and cancer, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surgery is the most effective treatment to date, resulting in sustainable and significant weight loss, along with the resolution of metabolic comorbidities in up to 80% of cases. Many of these conditions can be clinically relevant and have a significant impact on patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There is evidence that the chosen procedure might be changed if specific pathological upper gastrointestinal findings, such as large hiatal hernia or Barrett's esophagus, are detected preoperatively. The value of a routine endoscopy before bariatric surgery in asymptomatic patients (screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy) remains controversial. The common indications for endoscopy in the postoperative bariatric patient include the evaluation of symptoms, the management of complications, and the evaluation of weight loss failure. It is of critical importance for the endoscopist to be familiar with the postoperative anatomy and to work in close collaboration with bariatric surgery colleagues in order to maximize the outcome and safety of endoscopy in this setting. The purpose of this article is to review the role of the endoscopist in a multidisciplinary obesity center as it pertains to the preoperative and postoperative management of bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24976715

  4. The use of contraception for patients after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Lech, Medard; Stefańska, Ewa; Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Smarkusz, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Obesity in women of reproductive age is a serious concern regarding reproductive health. In many cases of infertility in obese women, reduction of body weight may lead to spontaneous pregnancy, without the need for more specific methods of treatment. Bariatric surgery is safe and is the most effective method for body weight reduction in obese and very obese patients. In practice there are two bariatric techniques; gastric banding, which leads to weight loss through intake restriction, and gastric bypass, leads to weight loss through food malabsorption. Gastric bypass surgery (the more frequently performed procedure), in most cases, leads to changes in eating habits and may result in vomiting, diarrhea and rapid body mass reduction. There are reliable data describing the continuous increase in the number of women who are trying to conceive, or are already pregnant, following bariatric surgery. Most medical specialists advise women to avoid pregnancy within 12-18 months after bariatric surgery. This allows for time to recover sufficiency from the decreased absorption of nutrients caused by the bariatric surgery. During this period there is a need for the use of reliable contraception. As there is a risk for malabsorption of hormones taken orally, the combined and progestogen-only pills are contraindicated, and displaced by non-oral hormonal contraception or non-hormonal methods, including intrauterine devices and condoms. PMID:27629135

  5. Role of endoscopy in the bariatric surgery of patients

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Forestieri, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly serious health problem in nearly all Western countries. It represents an important risk factor for several gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, hiatal hernia, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, Helicobacter pylori infection, colorectal polyps and cancer, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surgery is the most effective treatment to date, resulting in sustainable and significant weight loss, along with the resolution of metabolic comorbidities in up to 80% of cases. Many of these conditions can be clinically relevant and have a significant impact on patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There is evidence that the chosen procedure might be changed if specific pathological upper gastrointestinal findings, such as large hiatal hernia or Barrett’s esophagus, are detected preoperatively. The value of a routine endoscopy before bariatric surgery in asymptomatic patients (screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy) remains controversial. The common indications for endoscopy in the postoperative bariatric patient include the evaluation of symptoms, the management of complications, and the evaluation of weight loss failure. It is of critical importance for the endoscopist to be familiar with the postoperative anatomy and to work in close collaboration with bariatric surgery colleagues in order to maximize the outcome and safety of endoscopy in this setting. The purpose of this article is to review the role of the endoscopist in a multidisciplinary obesity center as it pertains to the preoperative and postoperative management of bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24976715

  6. Bariatric surgery: assessing opportunities for value innovation.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, David P; Smith, Darlene B

    2005-03-01

    Obesity has been increasing over the past two decades, and the amount of medical and media attention given to bariatric surgery as a promising option for morbidly obese individuals is growing. The growth of bariatric surgery also has been attributed to improved surgical technique, the increase in surgeons trained in laparoscopic procedures, as well increased public awareness with celebrities having successfully undergone surgery. The number of surgeons and hospitals offering bariatric services is increasing. How then does a surgeon or a hospital develop a competitive strategy? The first step is to understand the health-care industry. The key forces are rivalry among present competitors, and the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers. While bariatric surgery currently is in a growth phase, time and competition will force practitioners to compete on the basis of price, unless they find true competitive advantage. Value innovation, is a means of creating new marketing space by looking across the conventionally defined boundaries of business--across substitute industries, across strategic groups, across buyer groups, across complementary product and service offerings, and across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry. One can compete by offering similar services focusing primarily on cost efficiencies as the key to profitability. Alternatively, one can break free from the pack by innovating and focusing on delivering superior value to the customer. As the market for bariatric surgery becomes increasingly overcrowded, profitable growth is not sustainable without developing a clear differential advantage in the market. Value innovation allows you to develop that advantage.

  7. Bariatric surgery: assessing opportunities for value innovation.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, David P; Smith, Darlene B

    2005-03-01

    Obesity has been increasing over the past two decades, and the amount of medical and media attention given to bariatric surgery as a promising option for morbidly obese individuals is growing. The growth of bariatric surgery also has been attributed to improved surgical technique, the increase in surgeons trained in laparoscopic procedures, as well increased public awareness with celebrities having successfully undergone surgery. The number of surgeons and hospitals offering bariatric services is increasing. How then does a surgeon or a hospital develop a competitive strategy? The first step is to understand the health-care industry. The key forces are rivalry among present competitors, and the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers. While bariatric surgery currently is in a growth phase, time and competition will force practitioners to compete on the basis of price, unless they find true competitive advantage. Value innovation, is a means of creating new marketing space by looking across the conventionally defined boundaries of business--across substitute industries, across strategic groups, across buyer groups, across complementary product and service offerings, and across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry. One can compete by offering similar services focusing primarily on cost efficiencies as the key to profitability. Alternatively, one can break free from the pack by innovating and focusing on delivering superior value to the customer. As the market for bariatric surgery becomes increasingly overcrowded, profitable growth is not sustainable without developing a clear differential advantage in the market. Value innovation allows you to develop that advantage. PMID:15846452

  8. [Bariatric surgery and patient therapeutic education].

    PubMed

    Mével, Katell

    2015-11-01

    Weight loss surgery or "bariatric surgery", used in cases of severe obesity, is a complex procedure aiming to reduce food intake. An increasingly accessible technique, it requires a long postoperative follow-up and a change in eating habits. Patient therapeutic education encourages the patient to become a player in their care.

  9. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  10. Bariatric surgery, safety and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2009-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent major health concerns in the USA. Weight loss is the most important aspect in T2D management, as it reduces both morbidity and mortality. Available lifestyle, behavioral, and pharmacological strategies provide just mild to moderate weight loss. The greatest degree of T2D prevention or T2D amelioration in obese subjects has been reported in subjects who underwent bariatric surgery. In the current review, we will describe various types of bariatric surgery, related safety profiles, and their effect on T2D, as well as the potential mechanisms involved in the remission of T2D. Finally, we hereby examine whether bariatric surgery may be considered a treatment for T2D in pregnant women, children, adolescents and subjects at least 65 years old. PMID:18830788

  11. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  12. Bariatric Surgery: Overview of Procedures and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John Magaña

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most efficient and long-lasting weight loss therapy available. Its safety has improved over tenfold over the last decade. With the advent of laparoscopy, mortality rates of are now under 1 per 1400 cases in accredited centers. Gastric bypass reduces diabetes-related mortality by 92% over 7 years and long lasting remission has been demonstrated in observational studies covering >10,000 patients and multiple randomized control trials. The benefit of bariatric surgery on diabetes is so substantial that these procedures should be considered in all type 2 diabetic patients with a BMI > 35 kg/m(2). PMID:27519136

  13. Pregnancy Following Bariatric Surgery-Medical Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ram Prakash; Syed, Akheel A

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is most commonly carried out in women of childbearing age. Whilst fertility rates are improved, pregnancy following bariatric surgery poses several challenges. Whilst rates of many adverse maternal and foetal outcomes in obese women are reduced after bariatric surgery, pregnancy is best avoided for 12-24 months to reduce the potential risk of intrauterine growth retardation. Dumping syndromes are common after bariatric surgery and can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in pregnancy. Early dumping occurs due to osmotic fluid shifts resulting from rapid gastrointestinal food transit, whilst late dumping is characterized by a hyperinsulinemic response to rapid absorption of simple carbohydrates. Dietary measures are the mainstay of management of dumping syndromes but pharmacotherapy may sometimes become necessary. Acarbose is the least hazardous pharmacological option for the management of postprandial hypoglycemia in pregnancy. Nutrient deficiencies may vary depending on the type of surgery; it is important to optimize the nutritional status of women prior to and during pregnancy. Dietary management should include adequate protein and calorie intake and supplementation of vitamins and micronutrients. A high clinical index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of surgical complications of prior weight loss procedures during pregnancy, including small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, gastric band erosion or migration and cholelithiasis. PMID:27488114

  14. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults.

    PubMed

    Arterburn, David E; Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-08-27

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process.

  15. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults

    PubMed Central

    Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process. PMID:25164369

  16. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Bruce M; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-05-27

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health, which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by nonsurgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the comorbidities, quality of life, and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea, and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors after weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality after weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed, and future research opportunities and summaries are stated.

  17. Nutrition and Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, Lukasz; Kobiela, Jarek; Abacjew-Chmylko, Anna; Chmylko, Lukasz; Wojanowska-Pindel, Magdalena; Kobiela, Paulina; Walerzak, Anna; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Stefaniak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an escalating problem in all age groups and it is observed to be more common in females than males. About 25% of women meet the criteria of obesity and one-third of them are in the reproductive age. Because morbid obesity requiring surgical treatment is observed with increasing frequency, surgeons and gynecologists are undergoing new challenges. It is not only a matter of women's health and their quality of life but also proper development of the fetus, which should be a concern during bariatric treatment. Therefore complex perinatal care has to be provided for morbid obesity patients. The paper reviews pregnancy and fertility issues in bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24555146

  18. Bariatric surgery and implications for stoma care.

    PubMed

    Swash, Carolyn

    In the UK, 62% of the population are now described as being either overweight or obese. People with weight-management issues are more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as having an increased risk of cancer, including bowel cancer. Following the initial National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance in 2006, revised in 2014, health professionals have a more proactive role in identifying people with weight-management issues and supporting them to achieve a weight that helps reduce their health risks. This includes referrals to bariatric surgeons for consideration for surgery if appropriate. One particular surgical procedure, the Roux-en-Y, is not reversible and alters the capacity of the stomach and function of the small bowel in order to achieve weight loss. Using a case study, this article will highlight the role of the stoma nurse in managing a patient, who previously had a Roux-en-Y procedure for weight loss and subsequently needed formation of a loop ileostomy after surgery for bowel cancer. PMID:26973009

  19. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY: CURRENT PRACTICES

    PubMed Central

    FLORES, Carolina Aita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of obesity on a global scale has alarmed health institutions, the general population and professionals involved in its treatment. Bariatric surgery has emerged as an effective and lasting alternative for weight reduction and improved general health. In this context and as part of a multidisciplinary team, psychologists are responsible for the preoperative psychological assessment of bariatric candidates. Aim To investigate how psychological assessments are occurring, including the identification of utilized resources; factors that are addressed; the duration of the process; existing protocols; and to evaluate the importance of this practice. Method A systematic review of national and international literature, through PubMed and Scielo's databases, using "psychological assessment", "obesity" and "surgery", as keywords. Conclusion There is an agreement about the main factors that should be investigated during the preoperative assessment, as well as the main contraindications for the surgical procedure. The importance of the psychological assessment is well established in the field of bariatric surgery. However, this area needs a standard protocol to guide the mental health professionals that deal with bariatric patients. PMID:25409969

  20. The Intestinal Microbiome in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Christine M.; Kleiman, Susan C.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Carroll, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    With nearly 39% of the worldwide adult population classified as obese, much of the globe is facing a serious public health challenge. Increasing rates of obesity, coupled with the failure of many behavioral and pharmacological interventions, have contributed to a rise in popularity of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity. Surgery-mediated weight loss was initially thought to be a direct result of mechanical alterations causing restriction and calorie malabsorption. However, the mounting evidence suggests that indirect factors influence the accumulation and storage of fat in patients that have undergone this procedure. Given the established impact the intestinal microbiota has on adiposity, it is likely that this complex enteric microbial community contributes to surgery-mediated weight loss and maintenance of weight loss post-surgery. In this review, we discuss the physiological and psychological traits exhibited by bariatric surgery candidates that can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Additionally, we detail the studies that investigated the impact of bariatric surgery on the intestinal microbiota in humans and mouse models of this procedure. PMID:26426680

  1. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    PubMed

    Frikke-Schmidt, H; O'Rourke, R W; Lumeng, C N; Sandoval, D A; Seeley, R J

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. © 2016 World Obesity.

  2. Bariatric Bypass Surgery to Resolve Complicated Childhood Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Elbanna, Abduh; Eldin, Mohammed Tag; Fathy, Mohammad; Osman, Osama; Abdelfattah, Mohammed; Safwat, Abdelrahman; Elkader, Mohammed Sedki Abd; Bilasy, Shymaa E.; salama, Khaled; Elnour, Asim A.; Shehab, Abdullah; Baghdady, Shazly; Amer, Mohamed; Alboraie, Mohamed; ragb, Aly; Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Abd

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Children obesity has become one of the most important public health problems in many countries worldwide. Although the awareness of childhood obesity as a modifiable health risk is high, but many societies do not prioritize this issue as a health care problem, which may lead to comorbidities and even premature death. Despite the rising interest in bariatric surgery for children, only laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is being considered in resolving childhood obesity who failed other dietary or drug therapies; however many of LSG procedures failed to reduce the weight in children or resulted in complications postsurgery. Here, we present a novel bariatric procedure to clue out a female child 13 years old presented with Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease-associated morbid obesity. The surgical bariatric technique applied both fundal resection and surgical bypass in pediatric obesity using the Elbanna novel bariatric technique. Bariatric surgical bypass may be considered in complicated-childhood cases who failed all other options. PMID:26656361

  3. Timing of bariatric surgery in people with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Busetto, Luca

    2015-05-01

    The use of bariatric surgery in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes in severely obese subjects has been included in the clinical practice recommendations released by the most influential diabetologic associations. However, the timing during the diabetic course in which this use may have the better benefit/risk ratio remains debated. Is it better to use surgery very early in the course of the disease in order to anticipate clinical deterioration, or we should favour a delayed approach in which we reserve the more risky surgery only to patients not adequately controlled with the maximal pharmacologic strategy? In this paper, past and recent evidences about the role of bariatric surgery in the different stages of the clinical course of type 2 diabetes have been revised, starting from pre-diabetes and ending to long-standing diabetic state with established or end-stage macro- and micro-vascular complications. Available evidences strongly advocate in favor of the application of bariatric surgery in the early phase of this course, possibly in the pre-diabetic or in very early diabetic stages. To reserve surgery to more advanced and complicated stages of the disease seems to confer less benefits for the clinical course of diabetes and exposes these more frail patients to the possible side effects of a rapid weight loss.

  4. Panniculectomy Combined with Bariatric Surgery by Laparotomy: An Analysis of 325 Cases.

    PubMed

    Colabianchi, Vincenzo; de Bernardinis, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Matteo; Langella, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of obese patients is much debated in the literature because of the significant intraoperative risks related to comorbidities presented by this type of patients. Recent literature suggests that panniculectomy should follow bariatric surgery after the patient's weight loss has been stabilized. However, when performed by laparotomy, bariatric surgery can be combined with panniculectomy. This paper presents the analysis of 325 cases of patients undergoing abdominal panniculectomy combined with bariatric surgery. The study highlights the risks, complications, and benefits of the combined procedure and describes a standardized technique for excision of a large abdominal panniculus in a short operating time.

  5. Panniculectomy Combined with Bariatric Surgery by Laparotomy: An Analysis of 325 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Colabianchi, Vincenzo; de Bernardinis, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Matteo; Langella, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of obese patients is much debated in the literature because of the significant intraoperative risks related to comorbidities presented by this type of patients. Recent literature suggests that panniculectomy should follow bariatric surgery after the patient's weight loss has been stabilized. However, when performed by laparotomy, bariatric surgery can be combined with panniculectomy. This paper presents the analysis of 325 cases of patients undergoing abdominal panniculectomy combined with bariatric surgery. The study highlights the risks, complications, and benefits of the combined procedure and describes a standardized technique for excision of a large abdominal panniculus in a short operating time. PMID:26682282

  6. The impact of renal function on outcomes of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Nicole A; Perez, Sebastian; Mondestin, Max; Davis, S Scott; Lin, Edward; Tata, Sudha; Kirk, Allan D; Larsen, Christian P; Pearson, Thomas C; Sweeney, John F

    2012-05-01

    The effect of CKD on the risks of bariatric surgery is not well understood. Using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use File, we analyzed 27,736 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2006 through 2008. Before surgery, 34 (0.12%) patients were undergoing long-term dialysis. Among those not undergoing dialysis, 20,806 patients (75.0%) had a normal estimated GFR or stage 1 CKD, 5011 (18.07%) had stage 2 CKD, 1734 (6.25%) had stage 3 CKD, 94 (0.34%) had stage 4 CKD, and 91 (0.33%) had stage 5 CKD. In an unadjusted analysis, CKD stage was directly associated with complication rate, ranging from 4.6% for those with stage 1 CKD or normal estimated GFR to 9.9% for those with stage 5 CKD (test for trend, P<0.001). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that CKD stage predicts higher complication rates (odds ratio for each higher CKD stage, 1.30) after adjustment for diabetes and hypertension. Although patients with higher CKD stage had higher complication rates, the absolute incidence of complications remained <10%. In conclusion, these data demonstrate higher risks of bariatric surgery among patients with worse renal function, but whether the potential benefits outweigh the risks in this population requires further study.

  7. [Clinical Practice after Bariatric Surgery: Problems and Complications].

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Martina

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery because of morbid obesity is increasing rapidly. Therefore, it is an important issue to be aware of outcome and complications after bariatric surgery. This mini-review presents a compilation of important gastrointestinal symptoms, as pain, diarrhea and dumping, and includes treatment options. It characterizes possible micronutrient deficiencies, gives instructions concerning the adaptation of drugs and illustrates possible adverse outcomes, such as excessive weight loss, insufficient weight loss and weight gain after bariatric surgery. PMID:26649955

  8. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1.

  9. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1.

  10. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. PMID:26892120

  11. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. PMID:26892119

  12. Treatment of Diabetes Prior to and after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, Anders; Hagström-Toft, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is increasing. Type 2 diabetes is common among patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The effect of bariatric surgery on glycemia is profound in patients with diabetes and might vary between different bariatric surgical procedures. Therefore, almost invariably, there is a need to adjust antidiabetic drug dosages in the postoperative period in order to prevent hypoglycemia. Moreover, preoperatively, very low calorie diet protocols are applied in many centers to facilitate surgery by reducing liver volume. Because low caloric intake will increase insulin sensitivity, there is also a need for dose adjustments of glucose-lowering drugs during this period as well. Guidelines for adjustments of antidiabetic treatment before and after bariatric surgery are scarce. In this article, an overview of different bariatric surgical procedures as well as their effects on diabetes are presented. Recommendations on the perioperative antidiabetic treatment are proposed. PMID:23063050

  13. Endoscopic therapies for leaks and fistulas after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhayani, Neil H; Swanström, Lee L

    2014-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for the medical comorbidities associated with morbid obesity. Though uncommon, staple line or anastomotic leaks after bariatric surgery are highly morbid events and challenging to treat. In selected patients without severe sepsis or distant pollution, endoscopic transluminal peritoneal drainage may provide source control. For leaks within 3 days of surgery, endoscopic stenting does not appear to speed closure but does permit oral nutrition. In uncomplicated situations, the risk of migration and resulting complications of enteric stents appear to overshadow the benefits. Initial treatment failures and leaks presenting more than 48 hours after surgery respond to enteric diversion by endoscopic stenting. Occlusion of the leak by injection of fibrin glue also shows promise; however, these case series are limited to a small number of patients. Endoclips may work best to occlude leaks and close fistulas if the epithelium is debrided. As suturing technology improves, direct internal closure of fistulas may prove feasible. Therapeutic endoscopy offers several technologies that can assist in the closure of early leaks and that are essential to the treatment of late leaks and fistulas after bariatric surgery.

  14. Recent advances in metabolic and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Flynn, C. Robb; Tamboli, Robyn A.; Abumrad, Naji N.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its associated medical conditions continue to increase and add significant burden to patients, as well as health-care systems, worldwide. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and its comorbidities, and resolution of diabetes is weight loss-independent in the case of some operations. Although these weight-independent effects are frequently described clinically, the mechanisms behind them are not well understood and remain an intense area of focus in the growing field of metabolic and bariatric surgery. Perceptions of the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial metabolic effects of metabolic/bariatric operations have shifted from being mostly restrictive and malabsorption over the last 10 to 15 years to being more neuro-hormonal in origin. In this review, we describe recent basic and clinical findings of the major clinical procedures (adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion) as well as other experimental procedures (ileal interposition and bile diversion) that recapitulate many of the metabolic effects of these complex operations in a simpler fashion. As the role of bile acids and the gut microbiome on metabolism is becoming increasingly well described, their potential roles in these improvements following metabolic surgery are becoming better appreciated. Bile acid and gut microbiome changes, in light of recent developments, are discussed in the context of these surgical procedures, as well as their implications for future study. PMID:27239296

  15. A review of the role of robotics in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Alibhai, Mustafa H; Shah, Shinil K; Walker, Peter A; Wilson, Erik B

    2015-09-01

    The epidemic of obesity continues to be a major health issue. It is now almost uniform that surgical procedures for weight loss are performed with minimally invasive techniques. This article reviews the literature regarding obesity-related health issues, in particular risk of malignancy, and the application of robotic technology in weight loss surgical procedures. With increasing literature and technology in surgical robotics, its application in the field of bariatric surgery continues to evolve.

  16. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Diabetic Retinopathy: Good, Bad, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Dora M.; le Roux, Carel W.

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, initially intended as a weight-loss procedure, is superior to standard lifestyle intervention and pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Intensive medical management of hyperglycemia is associated with improved microvascular outcomes. Whether or not the reduction in hyperglycemia observed after bariatric surgery translates to improved microvascular outcomes is yet to be determined. There is substantial heterogeneity in the data relating to the impact of bariatric surgery on diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes. This review aims to collate the recent data on retinal outcomes after bariatric surgery. This comprehensive evaluation revealed that the majority of DR cases remain stable after surgery. However, risk of progression of pre-existing DR and the development of new DR is not eliminated by surgery. Instances of regression of DR are also noted. Potential risk factors for deterioration include severity of DR at the time of surgery and the magnitude of glycated hemoglobin reduction. Concerns also exist over the detrimental effects of postprandial hypoglycemia after surgery. In vivo studies evaluating the chronology of DR development and the impact of bariatric surgery could provide clarity on the situation. For now, however, the effect of bariatric surgery on DR remains inconclusive. PMID:27766242

  17. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Renal Function in Obese Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhibin; Di, Jianzhong; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Weijie; Ren, Qinggui; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is an independent risk factor of development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on the benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with impaired kidney function have been conflicting. Objective To explore whether there is improvement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proteinuria or albuminuria after bariatric surgery. Methods We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, Embase, web of science and Cochrane for randomized, controlled trials and observational studies that examined bariatric surgery in obese subjects with impaired kidney function. Outcomes included the pre- and post-bariatric surgery GFR, proteinuria and albuminuria. In obese patients with hyperfiltration, we draw conclusions from studies using measured GFR (inulin or iothalamate clearance) unadjusted for BSA only. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results 32 observational studies met our inclusion criteria, and 30 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No matter in dichotomous data or in dichotomous data, there were statistically significant reduction in hyperfiltration, albuminuria and proteinuria after bariatric surgery. Limitations The main limitation of this meta-analysis is the lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Another limitation is the lack of long-term follow-up. Conclusions Bariatric surgery could prevent further decline in renal function by reducing proteinuria, albuminuria and improving glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients with impaired renal function. However, whether bariatric surgery reverses CKD or delays ESRD progression is still in question, large, randomized prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed. PMID:27701452

  18. Bariatric surgery in monogenic and syndromic forms of obesity.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Aayed R; Elahmedi, Mohamed; Alqahtani, Yara A

    2014-02-01

    Currently, no topic is more controversial in bariatric surgery than performing these procedures on children with monogenic and syndromic forms of obesity. The medical community and the caregivers of those patients are struggling to find a solution that can alleviate their suffering and save their life. In all forms of obesity, dieting and physical activity do not result in significant weight loss and is associated with a high rate of weight regain. Additionally, effective medical therapy is not available yet. While there is significant debate about the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the adolescent population, there is an increasing number of studies that demonstrate the success of this option for the appropriate patients. Similarly, our experience demonstrated the same success not only in normal children and adolescents but also in those with monogenic and syndromic form of obesity.

  19. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  20. Management and Prevention of Surgical and Nutritional Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Eric; Chand, Bipan

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is well-recognized for its effects on health, beyond weight-loss. It underwent a revolution recently with the growing performance of laparoscopic procedures, leading to enhanced recovery and a reduction in procedural risk. However, surgical complications, although rare, do develop. It is important to recognize the complications, and ideally prevent them from happening. This article reviews the risks of the four most commonly performed bariatric procedures, with an emphasis on technique and management in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The nutritional aspect of bariatric surgery is of the utmost importance, because catastrophic consequences have been linked to malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. PMID:27473805

  1. PRE- AND POSTOPERATIVE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: SOME BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES

    PubMed Central

    TEDESCO, Amanda Kaseker; BIAZOTTO, Rafaela; GEBARA, Telma Souza e Silva; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The bariatric surgery may cause some nutritional deficiencies. Aim: To compare the serum levels of biochemical markers, in iimmediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods: Non-concurrent prospective cross-sectional study. The analysis investigated data in medical charts of pre-surgical and immediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery, focusing total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein, vitamin B12 levels, folic acid, homocysteine values, iron and serum calcium at the referred period. Results: Twenty-nine patients of both genders were evaluated. It was observed weight loss from 108.53 kg to 78.69 kg after the procedure. The variable LDL-c had a significant difference, decreasing approximately 30.3 mg/dl after the surgery. The vitamin B12 serum average levels went from 341.9 pg/ml to 667.2 pg/ml. The triglycerides values were in a range of 129.6 mg/dl-173.3 mg/dl, and 81.9 mg/dl-105.3 mg/dl at the pre- and postoperative respectively. CRP levels fall demonstrated reduction of inflammatory activity. The variable homocysteine was tested in a paired manner and it did not show a significant changing before or after, although it showed a strong correlation with LDL cholesterol. Conclusion: Eligible patients to bariatric surgery frequently present pre-nutritional deficiencies, having increased post-surgical risks when they don´t follow an appropriate nutritional follow-up. PMID:27683780

  2. Appropriateness criteria for bariatric surgery: beyond the NIH guidelines.

    PubMed

    Yermilov, Irina; McGory, Marcia L; Shekelle, Paul W; Ko, Clifford Y; Maggard, Melinda A

    2009-08-01

    Careful selection of bariatric patients is critical for successful outcomes. In 1991, the NIH first established patient selection guidelines; however, some surgeons operate on individuals outside of these criteria, i.e., extreme age groups. We developed appropriateness criteria for the spectrum of patient characteristics including age, BMI, and severity of eight obesity-related comorbidities. Candidate criteria were developed using combinations of patient characteristics including BMI: > or =40 kg/m(2), 35-39, 32-34, 30-31, <30; age: 12-18, 19-55, 56-64, 65+ years old; and comorbidities: prediabetes, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, venous stasis disease, chronic joint pain, and gastroesophageal reflux (plus severity level). Criteria were formally validated on their appropriateness of whether the benefits of surgery clearly outweighed the risks, by an expert panel using the RAND/UCLA modified Delphi method. Nearly all comorbidity severity criteria for patients with BMI > or =40 kg/m(2) or BMI = 35-39 kg/m(2) in intermediate age groups were found to be appropriate for surgery. In contrast, patients in the extreme age categories were considered appropriate surgical candidates under fewer conditions, primarily the more severe comorbidities, such as diabetes and hypertension. For patients with a BMI of 32-34, only the most severe category of diabetes (Hgb A1c >9, on maximal medical therapy), is an appropriate criterion for those aged 19-64, whereas many mild to moderate severity comorbidity categories are "inappropriate." There is overwhelming agreement among the panelists that the current evidence does not support performing bariatric surgery in lower BMI individuals (BMI <32). This is the first development of appropriateness criteria for bariatric surgery that includes severity categories of comorbidities. Only for the most severe degrees of comorbidities were adolescent and elderly patients deemed appropriate for surgery. Patient selection for

  3. Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery in Adolescents: a Path to Decrease Adult Cardiovascular Mortality.

    PubMed

    Beamish, Andrew James; Olbers, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is a major health problem across all age groups and has escalated to pandemic proportions. The proportion of children with overweight or obesity has risen rapidly over recent decades, and it is recognized that most obese children become obese adults. Furthermore, BMI is the strongest CV risk factor to track from childhood into adulthood. As well as BMI, multiple CV risk factors begin in childhood and strong associations between these factors and BMI are evident. Clear evidence exists for the CV benefits of reversing obesity in adults, much of which examines the effects of bariatric surgery. The capacity of bariatric surgery to reliably achieve safe and lasting improvement in BMI is unparalleled, and the emerging evidence base in adolescent bariatric surgery has so far concurred. In the absence of effective alternatives, it appears that the increase in use of bariatric surgery in adolescents will continue.

  4. Recommendations for the presurgical psychosocial evaluation of bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Sogg, Stephanie; Lauretti, Jennifer; West-Smith, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    Psychosocial factors have significant potential to affect long-term outcomes of bariatric surgery, including emotional adjustment, adherence to the recommended postoperative lifestyle regimen, weight loss outcomes, and co-morbidity improvement and or resolution. Thus, it is recommended that bariatric behavioral health clinicians with specialized knowledge and experience be involved in the evaluation and care of patients both before and after surgery. The evaluating clinician plays a number of important roles in the multidisciplinary treatment of the bariatric patient. Central among these is the role of identifying factors that may pose challenges to optimal surgical outcome and providing recommendations to the patient and bariatric team on how to address these issues. This document outlines recommendations for the psychosocial evaluation of bariatric surgery patients, appropriate qualifications of those conducting these evaluations, communication of evaluation results and suggested treatment plan, and the extension of behavioral healthcare of the bariatric patient to the entire span of the surgical and postsurgical process.

  5. Severe vitamin A deficiency after malabsortive bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres García, Antonio J; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency may occur after malabsorptive bariatric surgery. However, it rarely entails important functionally limiting symptoms. We present the case of a woman who underwent bariatric surgery and developed ocular dryness, xeroderma and hearing loss due to severe vitamin A deficiency. We illustrate an outstanding and exceptional case of the consequences of an excessive and uncontrolled malabsorption.

  6. Development of a Pilot Telehealth Bariatric Surgery Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Carin K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to grow. Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and accepted in the treatment of obesity. Clinical candidates for bariatric surgery should have a BMI > 40 kg/m[superscript 2] alone, or a BMI > 35 kg/m[superscript 2] plus one comorbidity. A trend is emerging in the literature showing…

  7. Developing criteria for pediatric/adolescent bariatric surgery programs.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Marc; Kramer, Robert E; Fullmer, Michelle A; Polfuss, Michele; Porter, Renee; Ward-Begnoche, Wendy; Getzoff, Elizabeth A; Dreyer, Meredith; Stolzman, Stacy; Reichard, Kirk W

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of morbid obesity in adolescents is rising at an alarming rate. Comorbidities known to predispose to cardiovascular disease are increasingly being diagnosed in these children. Bariatric surgery has become an acceptable treatment alternative for morbidly obese adults, and criteria have been developed to establish center-of-excellence designation for adult bariatric surgery programs. Evidence suggests that bariatric surgical procedures are being performed with increasing numbers in adolescents. We have examined and compiled the current expert recommendations for guidelines and criteria that are needed to deliver safe and effective bariatric surgical care to adolescents.

  8. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VIDAL, Eduardo Arevalo; RENDON, Francisco Abarca; ZAMBRANO, Trino Andrade; GARCÍA, Yudoco Andrade; VITERI, Mario Ferrin; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins; RAMOS, Manoela Galvão; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. Aim: To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Methods: Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Results: Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Conclusion: Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. PMID:27683770

  9. Walking Capacity of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    King, WC; Engel, SG; Elder, KA; Chapman, WH; Eid, GM; Wolfe, BM; Belle, SH

    2011-01-01

    Background This study characterizes the walking limitations of bariatric surgery candidates by age and body mass index (BMI) and determines factors independently associated with walking capacity. Setting Multi-institutional at research university hospitals in the United States. Methods 2458 participants of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study (age: 18-78 y, BMI: 33-94 kg/m2) attended a pre-operative research visit. Walking capacity was measured via self-report and the 400 meter Long Distance Corridor Walk (LDCW). Results Almost two-thirds (64%) of subjects reported limitations walking several blocks, 48% had an objectively-defined mobility deficit, and 16% reported at least some walking aid use. In multivariable analysis, BMI, older age, lower income and greater bodily pain were independently associated (p<.05) with walking aid use, physical discomfort during the LDCW, inability to complete the LDCW, and slower time to complete the LDCW. Female sex, Hispanic ethnicity (but not race), higher resting heart rate, history of smoking, several comoribidities (history of stroke, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea, venous edema with ulcerations), and depressive symptoms were also independently related (p<.05) to at least one measure of reduced walking capacity. Conclusions Walking limitations are common in bariatric surgery candidates, even among the least severely obese and youngest patients. Physical activity counseling must be tailored to individuals' abilities. While several factors identified in this study (e.g., BMI, age, pain, comorbidities) should be considered, directly assessing walking capacity will facilitate appropriate goal-setting. PMID:21937285

  10. Bariatric surgery is associated with improvement in kidney outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex R; Chen, Yuan; Still, Christopher; Wood, G Craig; Kirchner, H Lester; Lewis, Meredith; Kramer, Holly; Hartle, James E; Carey, David; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E

    2016-07-01

    Severe obesity is associated with increased risk of kidney disease. Whether bariatric surgery reduces the risk of adverse kidney outcomes is uncertain. To resolve this we compared the risk of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline of ≥30% and doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 985 patients who underwent bariatric surgery with 985 patients who did not undergo such surgery. Patients were matched on demographics, baseline body mass index, eGFR, comorbidities, and previous nutrition clinic use. Mean age was 45 years, 97% were white, 80% were female, and 33% had baseline eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Mean 1-year weight loss was 40.4 kg in the surgery group compared with 1.4 kg in the matched cohort. Over a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 85 surgery patients had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (22 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). Over a median follow-up of 3.8 years, 177 patients in the matched cohort had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (50 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). In adjusted analysis, bariatric surgery patients had a significant 58% lower risk for an eGFR decline of ≥30% (hazard ratio 0.42, 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.55) and 57% lower risk of doubling of serum creatinine or ESRD (hazard ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.71) compared with the matched cohort. Results were generally consistent among subgroups of patients with and without eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), hypertension, and diabetes. Thus, bariatric surgery may be an option to prevent kidney function decline in severely obese individuals.

  11. Interest in Bariatric Surgery Among Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Katherine A.; Tavakkoli, Ali; Andrews, Robert A.; Seiger, Ashley N.; Bakker, Jessie P.; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) therapies are poorly tolerated. Bariatric surgery is a potential alternative but the level of interest in this intervention among OSA patients is unknown. Objectives Determine the proportion of OSA patients who would be interested in bariatric surgery. Setting Sleep clinics, United States. Methods Consecutive adult patients with untreated severe OSA and a body mass index of 35–45 kg/m2 were approached. Patients at low peri-operative risk and no urgent indication for OSA treatment were invited to a separate informational visit about bariatric surgery as primary treatment for OSA. Results Of 767 eligible patients, 230 (30.0%) were not at low peri-operative risk, 49 (6.4%) had drowsy driving, and 16 (2.1%) had no insurance coverage for bariatric surgery. Of the remaining 482 patients, over one-third (35.5%) were interested in bariatric surgery. Surgical interest was 47.2% in women vs. 27.6% in men (p <0.01) and 67.3% in diabetics vs. 31.0% in non-diabetics (p<0.01). In multivariable adjusted models, female gender (odds ratio 1.89, 95% CI [1.10–3.25]) and diabetes (odds ratio 3.97, 95% CI [1.97–8.01]) remained highly predictive of bariatric surgery interest. Conclusions Nearly two-thirds of obese patients with severe OSA are good candidates for bariatric surgery. Among candidates, over one-third are interested in this treatment. Interest rates are highest among women and diabetics, indicating that metabolic improvements continue to be a major driver of surgery even in patients with severe OSA. Given patient interest, the role of bariatric surgery should be routinely discussed with obese OSA patients. PMID:25892349

  12. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on the Spectrum of Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nostedt, Jordan J.; Bailey, Robert J.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming one of the most common causes of liver disease in the western world. The most significant risk factors are obesity and the metabolic syndrome for which bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective treatment. However, the effects of bariatric surgery on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, specifically liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, are not well established. We review published bariatric surgery outcomes with respect to nonalcoholic liver disease. On the basis of this review we suggest that bariatric surgery may provide a viable treatment option for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, including patients with fibrosis and compensated cirrhosis, and that this topic should be a target of future investigation. PMID:27777925

  13. [Bariatric surgery and pregnancy: literature review].

    PubMed

    Ferrand Miranda, Pedro; Contreras Rivas, Tomas; Leigh Pacciarini, Stephanie

    2014-02-14

    Obesity has currently reached epidemic proportions, both in Chile and in the world. This condition is associated to a variety of maternal complications in all stages of the vital cycle and during pregnancy. Medical treatment has not proved successful thus resulting in an increase in bariatric surgery in recent years, even when it is not first line treatment. This literature review aims to report updated results of surgical treatment for obesity before and during pregnancy with respect to fertility, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. It also looks into the possible effects of surgery on fetal development, and its relation to premature delivery, fetal macrosomy, low birth weight and neural tube defects, as well as effects on maternal and fetal outcomes, mainly in nutrition. Lastly, we suggest some recommendations that arise from this review on the role of contraception, nutrition and time between surgery and pregnancy.

  14. Internet marketing of bariatric surgery: contemporary trends in the medicalization of obesity.

    PubMed

    Salant, Talya; Santry, Heena P

    2006-05-01

    In the context of political, economic, and scientific anxiety around the 'epidemic' rise in obesity in the US, the social and historical forces engendering the medicalization of obesity have been widely discussed. However, the recent growth of bariatric-weight loss-surgery and the expanding presence of advertising for bariatric surgery on the Internet suggest the possible emergence of new loci and languages of medicalization. We sought to identify the nature and extent to which web advertising of bariatric surgery contributes to the medicalization of obesity by examining the design and textual content of 100 bariatric surgery center websites. We found that websites, through strategic use of text and images, consistently describe obesity as a serious disease that requires professional ascertainment and supervision, entails substantial individual suffering, and is remedied through the transformative yet low risk effects of bariatric surgery. In the process, social normalcy and risk reduction come to replace physical criteria as the basis for determining health. Further, websites draw upon contradictory discourses of medicalization; that is, they insist upon 'external' (e.g. genetics, environment) causes of obesity to legitimize surgical intervention while implicating individual behaviors in surgical failure. From this, we suggest that the economic and professional motivations underlying website advertisements for bariatric surgery may result in confusing messages being sent to prospective patients as well as the perpetuation of gendered notions of obesity and the entrenchment of health disparities. PMID:16289735

  15. Changes in fat intake, body fat composition and intra-abdominal fat after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Heesook; Jeong, Gui Ae; Cho, Gyu Seok; Lee, Min Hee; Kim, Soonkyung

    2014-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered to be the effective treatment alternative conducted over the lifetime for reducing weight in patients with clinically morbid obesity. For many patients, the benefits of weight loss, including decreases in blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure as well as increase in mobility, will outweigh the risks of surgical complications. But patients undergoing bariatric surgery have the least risk for long-term diet-related complications as reported in several studies. Thus, with an increasing number of severely obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, the multidisciplinary healthcare system will need to be managed continuously. Many nutrition support specialists will need to become familiar with the metabolic consequences for the frequent monitoring of nutrition status of the patients. South Korea has a very short history with bariatric surgery, and relatively few studies have been conducted on bariatric surgery. Therefore, the objective of this report was to compare the nutrient intake, weight loss, body fat composition, and visceral fat before and after the bariatric surgery.

  16. Bariatric Surgery: Bad to the Bone, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Lara

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is now a global epidemic affecting a significant and rapidly increasing number of adults, adolescents, and children. As the incidence of obesity has increased, so has the use of bariatric surgery as a medical solution. A growing number of studies now report that, despite calcium and vitamin D supplementation, the most frequently performed types of bariatric surgery, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the sleeve gastrectomy, cause significant ongoing bone loss. In resources available to the general public and to physicians, this adverse outcome is rarely mentioned or is attributed solely to reduced calcium absorption. Recent studies investigating micronutrient malabsorption and changes in a wide range of hormones induced by bariatric surgery now indicate that calcium malabsorption is the tip of a formidable iceberg. The current article, part 1 of a 2-part series, reviews the latest research findings confirming that obesity prevalence is skyrocketing and that bariatric surgery causes ongoing, accelerated bone loss. Part 1 also discusses the mechanisms through which the bariatric surgery-induced malabsorption of key nutrients adversely affects bone homeostasis. Part 2 discusses the specific changes seen in bone metabolism after bariatric surgery and reviews current data on the underlying mechanisms, in addition to nutrient malabsorption, which are thought to contribute to bariatric surgery-induced ongoing accelerated bone loss. These processes include mechanical unloading and changes in a wide variety of hormones (eg, leptin, adiponectin, testosterone, estradiol, serotonin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and gastric inhibitory peptide). Also, part 2 covers interventions that may help lessen bariatric surgery-induced bone loss, which are now beginning to appear in the medical literature. Bariatric surgery's adverse effects on bone must be widely recognized and protocols developed to prevent early onset osteoporosis in the recipients of an increasingly utilized

  17. Renal outcomes of bariatric surgery in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhavana B; Bhattacharya, Abhik; Agrawal, Varun

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a pandemic with several significant adverse health outcomes. Chronic kidney disease has been an overlooked consequence of obesity. Among diabetics, obesity is known to amplify the risk for kidney disease. Although bariatric surgery promises significant and sustained weight reduction with favorable impact on metabolic parameters such as glycemic control, hypertension and dyslipidemia, its impact on the renal complications of diabetes is poorly understood. This paper aims to comprehensively evaluate the evidence in the published literature on the impact of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease. While many observational studies have demonstrated significant reduction in proteinuria after bariatric surgery, there is paucity of data regarding changes in renal filtration function such as doubling of serum creatinine or progression to end stage kidney disease. No randomized controlled trials comparing medical vs. surgical therapy in obese adults with diabetic kidney disease exist, hence assessing the metabolic benefits vs. the surgical risks is important before recommending bariatric surgery to this growing patient population. Future studies require a collaborative effort between bariatric surgeons and nephrologists to measure long-term effects of bariatric surgery on renal outcomes incorporating evolving markers of kidney injury to advance this field.

  18. The benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gill, R S; Al-Adra, D P; Shi, X; Sharma, A M; Birch, D W; Karmali, S

    2011-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common progressive disease leading to joint pain and severe disability. It is a complex multifactorial disease leading to damage of cartilage, deposition of subchondral bone matrix and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Obesity is an emerging epidemic and also an important risk factor for osteoarthritis. Weight loss has been shown to improve pain and function in hip and knee joints with osteoarthritis. Bariatric surgery currently is the only evidence-based approach to marked weight loss in obese individuals. However, there is currently limited literature to evaluate the role of bariatric surgery in hip and knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to systematically review the literature regarding the effectiveness of bariatric surgery in obese adult patients in improving large weight-bearing joint (hip and knee) osteoarthritis. Published English-language manuscripts were considered for review inclusion. A comprehensive search of electronic databases using broad search terms was completed. From a total of 400 articles, eight articles were identified. A total of six studies were included for qualitative analysis. A general trend was identified indicating improved hip and knee osteoarthritis following marked weight loss secondary to bariatric surgery. This systematic review demonstrates that bariatric surgery may benefit obese patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. However, this review identifies the need for randomized controlled trials to clarify the role and indications for bariatric surgery.

  19. Bariatric surgery and non-alcoholic Fatty liver disease: current and potential future treatments.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Koki; Umemura, Akira; Baba, Shigeaki; Obuchi, Toru; Wakabayashi, Go

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasingly common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The diagnosis of NASH is challenging as most affected patients are symptom-free and the role of routine screening is not clearly established. Most patients with severe obesity who undergo bariatric surgery have NAFLD, which is associated insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and obesity-related dyslipidemia. The effective treatment for NAFLD is weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, antiobesity medication, or bariatric surgery. Among these treatments, bariatric surgery is the most reliable method for achieving substantial, sustained weight loss. This procedure is safe when performed by a skilled surgeon, and the benefits include reduced weight, improved quality of life, decreased obesity-related comorbidities, and increased life expectancy. Further research is urgently needed to determine the best use of bariatric surgery with NAFLD patients at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and its role in modulating complications of NAFLD, such as T2DM and cardiovascular disease. The current evidence suggests that bariatric surgery for patients with severe obesity decreases the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. However, further long-term studies are required to confirm the true effects before recommending bariatric surgery as a potential treatment for NASH.

  20. Bariatric Surgery and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Current and Potential Future Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Akira; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Koki; Umemura, Akira; Baba, Shigeaki; Obuchi, Toru; Wakabayashi, Go

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasingly common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The diagnosis of NASH is challenging as most affected patients are symptom-free and the role of routine screening is not clearly established. Most patients with severe obesity who undergo bariatric surgery have NAFLD, which is associated insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and obesity-related dyslipidemia. The effective treatment for NAFLD is weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, antiobesity medication, or bariatric surgery. Among these treatments, bariatric surgery is the most reliable method for achieving substantial, sustained weight loss. This procedure is safe when performed by a skilled surgeon, and the benefits include reduced weight, improved quality of life, decreased obesity-related comorbidities, and increased life expectancy. Further research is urgently needed to determine the best use of bariatric surgery with NAFLD patients at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and its role in modulating complications of NAFLD, such as T2DM and cardiovascular disease. The current evidence suggests that bariatric surgery for patients with severe obesity decreases the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. However, further long-term studies are required to confirm the true effects before recommending bariatric surgery as a potential treatment for NASH. PMID:25386164

  1. THE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION IS AMENDED AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY? AN INTEGRATIVE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    GREGORIO, Valeria Duarte; LUCCHESE, Roselma; VERA, Ivânia; SILVA, Graciele C.; SILVA, Andrecia; MORAES, Rayrane Clarah Chaveiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Bariatric surgery has been an alternative when conservative methods of weight loss fail. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery have an increased risk of up to 6.5% of problems related to alcohol Objective: Integrative review out to analyze the change of alcohol consumption in this public Method: Database was accessed from June of 2015 to January of 2016 by searching "bariatric surgery" AND "alcoholism", and their Portuguese equivalents. ScienceDirect, PubMed, Lilacs and Medline, besides manual search, were searched. To be included, the paper should have been published between 2005-2016 and related to bariatric surgery and alcoholism. Theses, dissertations, unpublished papers, case reports and theoretical studies were excluded, and a database was subsequently composed Results: In 2005 there was only a review of change in alcohol metabolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There were no publications in 2006. In 2007, only one study was published, and it did not meet the inclusion criteria. In 2010, there was an increase of 13% in publications and of 20% in 2012, reaching 40% in 2013 Conclusion: The prevalence and incidence of alcohol consumption in relation to the postoperative time was six months to three years with higher incidence for follow-up treatment by men. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass showed greater association with increased consumption of alcohol during the postoperative period. Alcohol consumption proved to be essential to be faced in bariatric surgery. PMID:27683790

  2. The role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Ji Chung; Howes, Noah

    2014-01-01

    The obesity epidemic contributes to approximately 44% of the world’s type 2 diabetes burden. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with morbid obesity as it improves glycaemia, blood pressure, lipids and inflammation. This review describes the evidence supporting the addition of bariatric surgery to the treatment algorithms used by diabetologists. We emphasize the need to view bariatric surgery as an adjuvant therapy which should not be used instead of but rather together with best medical therapy. PMID:24790729

  3. Bariatric Bypass Surgery to Resolve Complicated Childhood Morbid Obesity: Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    Elbanna, Abduh; Eldin, Mohammed Tag; Fathy, Mohammad; Osman, Osama; Abdelfattah, Mohammed; Safwat, Abdelrahman; Elkader, Mohammed Sedki Abd; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Salama, Khaled; Elnour, Asim A; Shehab, Abdullah; Baghdady, Shazly; Amer, Mohamed; Alboraie, Mohamed; Ragb, Aly; Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek

    2015-12-01

    Children obesity has become one of the most important public health problems in many countries worldwide. Although the awareness of childhood obesity as a modifiable health risk is high, but many societies do not prioritize this issue as a health care problem, which may lead to comorbidities and even premature death. Despite the rising interest in bariatric surgery for children, only laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is being considered in resolving childhood obesity who failed other dietary or drug therapies; however many of LSG procedures failed to reduce the weight in children or resulted in complications postsurgery.Here, we present a novel bariatric procedure to clue out a female child 13 years old presented with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease-associated morbid obesity. The surgical bariatric technique applied both fundal resection and surgical bypass in pediatric obesity using the Elbanna novel bariatric technique.Bariatric surgical bypass may be considered in complicated-childhood cases who failed all other options.

  4. MEDICATION USE FOLLOWING BARIATRIC SURGERY: FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH EARLY DISCONTINUATION

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Amy L.; Nelson, Tracy; Pettine, Stefan; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication discontinuation is a common result of bariatric surgery. The influence of individual patient characteristics and surgical outcomes on overall and specific medication discontinuation is not well understood. The purpose of the current study was to assess changes in medication use and identify individual characteristics and surgical outcomes associated with medication discontinuation among bariatric patients. Methods The patients included in the current study received bariatric surgery from the Northern Colorado Surgical Associates of Fort Collins, Colorado between October 2007 and September 2010. Demographic, weight, health, and medication data from 400 patients with at least one 6 or 12 month post-operative appointment were extracted from the Bariatric Outcome Longitudinal Database (BOLD). Multivariate regression analyses were used to investigate how patient factors affect total medication use over time, use of medications grouped by co-morbidity postoperatively, and use of specific medication classes post-operatively. Results Baseline co-morbidities, particularly type 2 diabetes (T2DM), male sex, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery were significantly associated with decreased total medication use following surgery. Weight loss, systemic disease, sex, baseline co-morbidities, surgical complications, and race were significantly associated with continued use of specific medications following surgery. Conclusions Bariatric surgery can help patients with certain characteristics discontinue medications, but is not effective for all patients. Baseline health, sex, race, bariatric procedure, surgical complications, and post-operative weight loss may affect how bariatric patients’ medication use changes pre-operatively to post-operatively. PMID:24234778

  5. Management of patients with type 2 diabetes before and after bariatric surgery: evolution and microvascular complications.

    PubMed

    Chuah, L L; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly seen as a treatment option for patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe complex obesity (SCO). There is however no consensus on how to manage this cohort preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients with T2DM having cardiac surgery benefit from glycaemic optimisation prior to surgery. National Health Service Diabetes in the United Kingdom recommends that glucose is optimised prior to all elective surgery. However, bariatric surgery such as gastric bypass (RYGB) is distinct from general surgery. Glycaemic control improves immediately after RYGB and thus all T2DM patients need a review of their glucose lowering medications postoperatively. Preoperatively most bariatric centres use a low calorie diet (LCD) which improved glycaemic control and may predisposed patients using insulin or sulphonylureas to risks of hypoglycaemia. There are no protocols and consensus among bariatric centres on how best to manage patients with T2DM preoperatively and postoperatively. Moreover patients with difficult to control T2DM are at risk of microvascular complications of diabetes. So far, there is little evidence on the impact of bariatric surgery on diabetes nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy. In conclusion, bariatric surgery improves glycaemic control; however, there are limited studies, and no guidelines on how to manage patients with T2DM pre and postoperatively. Given the increasing proportion of T2DM patients referred for bariatric surgery, there is a need to review current practice on how to manage these patients in the short term and long term with a specific focus on improving end organ damage such as retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy.

  6. Temperament and Personality in Bariatric Surgery-Resisting Temptations?

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Müller, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Temperament and personality traits can serve as both risk factors as well as protective factors in the development of morbid obesity. In the present review, we present an overview of studies focusing on the relationship between temperament/personality and morbid obesity in pre-operative and postoperative bariatric surgery patients. We consider studies that focus on both a categorical and dimensional point of view on temperament/personality, as well as studies based on cross-sectional and longitudinal designs. Finally, we will integrate the research findings, discuss the implications for assessment and treatment and formulate suggestions for future research.

  7. Malabsorption as a Therapeutic Approach in Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Billeter, Adrian T.; Fischer, Lars; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Senft, Jonas; Müller-Stich, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of obese patients will lead to a more frequent use of bariatric procedures in the future. Compared to conservative medical therapy, bariatric procedures achieve greater weight loss and superior control of comorbidities, resulting in improved overall mortality. Methods A search for current literature regarding mechanisms, indications, and outcomes of bariatric surgery was performed. Results In order to care for patients after bariatric surgery properly, it is important to understand its mechanisms of action and effects on gastrointestinal physiology. Recent investigations indicate that the beneficial effects of bariatric procedures are much more complex than simply limiting food intake or an associated malabsorption. Changes in gastrointestinal hormone secretion, energy expenditure, intestinal bacterial colonization, bile acid metabolism, and epigenetic modifications resulting in altered gene expression are likely responsible for the majority of the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures divert the flow of bile and pancreatic enzymes from food and therefore limit the digestion and absorption of nutrients, resulting in reduced calorie intake and subsequent weight loss. Essential micronutrients such as vitamins and trace elements are also absorbed to a lesser extent, potentially leading to severe side effects. Conclusion To prevent malnutrition, dietary supplementation and regular control of micronutrient levels are mandatory for patients undergoing malabsorptive bariatric procedures, in whom the fat-soluble vitamins A and D are commonly deficient. PMID:26288594

  8. [Beginnings of bariatric and metabolic surgery in Spain].

    PubMed

    Baltasar, Aniceto; Domínguez-Adame, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When bariatric and metabolic surgery initially began in Spain, it was a subject of debate, due to not knowing exactly who were the first surgeons to perform it. A study has revealed the authors of the first interventions.

  9. Bariatric Surgery in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; De Alwis, Nimantha; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Small, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recognised as an effective treatment strategy for obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An increasing number of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus also suffer with obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities but the role of bariatric and metabolic surgery in this group of patients is unclear. This systematic review investigates published English language scientific literature to understand the results of bariatric surgery in obese patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We found that these patients can experience significant weight loss and comorbidity resolution with bariatric surgery. Though most patients also see a decline in total insulin requirement, glycaemic control remains difficult. Most of the patients reported in literature have undergone gastric bypass but data is insufficient to recommend any particular procedure.

  10. Lifestyle management for enhancing outcomes after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa; Turk, Melanie; Elliott, Jennifer; Gourash, William

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric surgery has been safe and effective for treatment of severe obesity and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Nonetheless, weight loss and health outcomes vary considerably across individuals. Although the factors associated with outcomes are not fully understood, postoperative weight loss following any type of bariatric surgery is largely dependent on the extent to which patients can make and sustain changes in eating and activity. Therefore, lifestyle management including diet, exercise, and behavior modification is critical to helping patients achieve long-term weight loss. Pharmacotherapy and reoperation may also play a role after bariatric surgery. In this article, we highlight recent research findings in all of these areas to provide suggestions for how to enhance outcomes following bariatric surgery. Research on the mechanisms for weight loss and improvements in T2D following the different surgical procedures is needed to support the development of more personalized approaches to the multidisciplinary management of severe obesity. PMID:25142721

  11. 30-day Mortality after Bariatric Surgery: Independently Adjudicated Causes of Death in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark D.; Patterson, Emma; Wahed, Abdus S.; Belle, Steven H.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory F.; Flum, David R.; Machado, Laura; Mitchell, James E.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Pories, Walter; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Schrope, Beth; Staten, Myrlene; Ude, Akuezunkpa; Wolfe, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mortality following bariatric surgery is a rare event in contemporary series, making it difficult for any single center to draw meaningful conclusions as to cause of death. Nevertheless, much of the published mortality data come from single center case series and reviews of administrative databases. These sources tend to produce lower mortality estimates than those obtained from controlled clinical trials. Furthermore, information about the causes of death and how they were determined is not always available. The aim of the present report is to describe in detail all deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS). Methods LABS is a 10-center observational cohort study of bariatric surgical outcomes. Data were collected prospectively for bariatric surgeries performed between March 2005 and April 2009. All deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery were identified, and cause of death assigned by an independent Adjudication Subcommittee, blinded to operating surgeon and site. Results 6118 patients underwent primary bariatric surgery. 18 deaths (0.3%) occurred within 30-days of surgery. The most common cause of death was sepsis (33% of deaths), followed by cardiac causes (28%) and pulmonary embolism (17%). For one patient cause of death could not be determined despite examination of all available information. Conclusions This study confirms the low 30-day mortality rate following bariatric surgery. The recognized complications of anastomotic leak, cardiac events, and pulmonary emboli accounted for the majority of 30-day deaths. PMID:21866378

  12. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  13. Natural Orifice Surgery (NOS) Using StomaphyX™ for Repair of Gastric Leaks after Bariatric Revisions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Gastric leaks represent serious complications of bariatric surgery. With the increasing popularity and performance of bariatric procedures, the incidence of leaks and associated complications are expected to increase. Minimally invasive natural orifice surgery represents a novel and promising approach to gastric leak management, especially for morbidly obese patients who are at much higher risk from open or laparoscopic surgical procedures. The present article reports two cases of the safe and successful use of the EndoGastric Solutions StomaphyX™ device to alter the flow of gastric contents and repair gastric leaks resulting from bariatric revision surgery. Both patients were at a high risk and could not undergo another open or laparoscopic surgery to correct the leaks that were not healing. The StomaphyX procedures lasted approximately 30 min, were performed without any complications, and resulted in the resolution of the gastric leaks in both patients. PMID:18438622

  14. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications. PMID:24497896

  15. The Meaning of Awaiting Bariatric Surgery Due to Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Engström, My; Wiklund, Malin; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Lönroth, Hans; Forsberg, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the association between the objective conditions of health and the subjective perceptions of morbidly obese patients appears to be poor. The use of objective indicators alone produces results totally unrelated to the feelings and experiences of the bariatric patients studied. No study has approached the bariatric patient from both an inside and a preoperative perspective. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of awaiting bariatric surgery due to morbid obesity. Method: Twenty-three patients admitted to a Swedish University Hospital for bariatric surgery were included. Data were collected by interviews and the analysis was performed using the phenomenological hermeneutics method developed by Lindseth and Norberg. Main Findings: Two structural thematic analyses revealed six main themes: experiencing food as a complex element in life, feeling hopeless regarding weight loss, living in fear of future sickness and death, living a restricted life, being ignored by health care professionals and hoping for control and opportunities. The informants experienced addiction to food and dependence on others for managing their daily life, which constituted an infringement of their freedom. Loss of control meant giving in to the desire for food, but also being subjected to stigmatizing remarks from persons in their environment or uncaring approaches from health care professionals. Conclusion: Being scheduled for bariatric surgery meant developing an awareness of how completely dependent they were on surgery for their survival and prospective health. The scheduled bariatric surgery constituted tangible confirmation that weight loss and restored health were possible. PMID:21660178

  16. The Effect of Bariatric Surgeries on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassanian, Mazen; Al-Mulhim, Amnah; Al-Sabhan, Atheer; Al-Amro, Shaden; Bamehriz, Fahad; Abdo, Ayman; Al Khalidi, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A review of published data addressing hepatic histopathological, metabolical, and functional changes following gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass surgery, and biliopancreatic with duodenal switch surgeries on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is currently the most common chronic liver disease. Owing to the strong relationship between obesity and NAFLD, the idea of weight reduction as a method to treat NAFLD has rapidly emerged. Bariatric surgery has proved to be the most efficient method for weight reduction; hence, their beneficial effects on NAFLD have been evaluated by several studies. A literature review of published data was performed during the years 2012-2014 using PubMed with the following key words: Bariatric, NAFLD, steatosis, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, gastric banding, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). Exclusion criteria were non-English articles and inherited NAFLD, pregnancy-induced NAFLD, and children. The majority of published data are in favor of indicating that bariatric surgeries improve the histologic and metabolic changes associated with NAFLD. The suggested mechanisms are: The reversal of IR, reduction of inflammatory markers, and improved histological features of NAFLD. Accordingly, bariatric surgeries are potentially one of the future methods in treating patients with morbid obesity and NAFLD. However, some questions remain unanswered, such as whether timing of surgery, type of surgery most effective, and whether bariatric surgeries are capable of curing the disease. Long-term and well-designed prospective studies are needed to address these issues. PMID:25253361

  17. Is Bariatric Surgery an Effective Treatment for Type II Diabetic Kidney Disease?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Allon N; Wolfe, Bruce

    2016-03-01

    Type II diabetic kidney disease is devastating to patients and society alike. This review will evaluate bariatric surgery as a treatment for diabetic kidney disease primarily through its ability to induce and maintain regression of type II diabetes. The review begins by outlining the global challenge of diabetic kidney disease, its link to obesity, and the comparative benefits of bariatric surgery on weight and type II diabetes. It then surveys comprehensively the relevant literature, which reports that although bariatric surgery is associated with reductions in albuminuria, its effect on harder clinical end points like progression of diabetic kidney disease is not known. The review also includes a critical assessment of the risks and costs of bariatric surgery and concludes by acknowledging the major knowledge gaps in the field and providing research strategies to overcome them. Until these knowledge gaps are filled, clinicians will be forced to rely on their own subjective judgment in determining the benefit-risk ratio of bariatric surgery for patients with diabetic kidney disease.

  18. Preoperative Interventions for Patients Being Considered for Bariatric Surgery: Separating the Fact from Fiction.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Parmar, Chetan; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative interventions aimed at patients referred for bariatric surgery continue to divide funders, commissioners, and practitioners alike. A number of preoperative interventions and variables have been used to influence patient selection. Many of these are believed to lead to better postoperative outcomes by helping target a limited resource (bariatric surgery) at those most likely to benefit. Inevitably, this leads to competition amongst patients and some being denied benefits of surgery. There is a risk that these strategies for resource allocation may actually deprive the most vulnerable and those most in need. This review examines evidence and justification behind popular preoperative interventions for patients being considered for bariatric surgery patients in the light of published English language scientific literature.

  19. Bariatric surgery and diabetes remission: Who would have thought it?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu; Kota, Sunil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity are increasingly common and major global health problems. The Edmonton obesity staging system clearly pointed towards increased mortality proportionate to the severity of obesity. Obesity itself triggers insulin resistance and thereby poses the risk of T2DM. Both obesity and T2DM have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality and this calls for institution of effective therapies to deal with the rising trend of complications arising out of this dual menace. Although lifestyle changes form the cornerstone of therapy for both the ailments, sustained results from this modalities is far from satisfactory. While Look AHEAD (action for HEAalth in diabetes) study showed significant weight loss, reduction in glycated hemoglobin and higher remission rate of T2DM at 1st year following intensive lifestyle measures; recurrence and relapse rate bounced back in half of subjects at 4 years, thereby indicating that weight loss and glycemic control is difficult to maintain in the long term with lifestyle interventions. Same recurrence phenomenon was also observed with pharmacotherapy with rimonabant, sibutramine and orlistat. Bariatric surgery has been seen to associate with substantial and sustained weight loss in morbidly obese patients. Interestingly, bariatric surgeries also induce higher rates of short and long-term diabetes remission. Although the exact mechanism behinds this diabetes remission are not well understood; improved insulin action, beta-cell function and complex interplay of hormones in the entero-insular axis appears to play a major role. This article reviews the effectiveness of bariatric procedures on remission or improvement in diabetes and put a perspective on its implicated mechanisms. PMID:26425464

  20. Pregnancy and foetal outcome after bariatric surgery: a review of recent studies.

    PubMed

    Dalfrà, Maria Grazia; Busetto, Luca; Chilelli, Nino Cristiano; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2012-09-01

    It is well known that maternal obesity has adverse effects on the health of offspring, causing immediate and long-term morbidities. The various types of procedure coming under the heading of bariatric surgery have proved effective in preventing some maternal and foetal complications in morbidly obese pregnant women. This review aims to assess the role, the risks and the benefits of bariatric surgery for mothers and offspring. According to recent findings, pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in morbidly obese women who have undergone bariatric surgery depend to some extent on the type of surgery used. Maternal complications, nutritional defects and intestinal obstruction are more frequently reported after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) than after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) procedures, whereas caesarean section, preterm delivery and neonatal death are more commonly reported after RYGB than after LAGB. The authors of the only long-term follow-up study conducted on this subject reported that the rate of obesity in the children dropped by 52% after bariatric surgery for the mother, and the cases of severe obesity decreased by 45%. Data on pregnancy and bariatric surgery confirm that the procedure is more effective than dietary measures alone in morbidly obese women, and that pregnancy outcome is generally favorable after surgery. Some studies have indicated, nonetheless, that pregnancies after bariatric surgery are at higher risk: the women affected require special medical attention, particularly as concerns gastrointestinal symptoms and vitamin deficiencies, warranting nutritional/dietary counselling by a multidisciplinary team before, during and after pregnancy.

  1. Emotional and Affective Temperaments in Smoking Candidates for Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mombach, Karin Daniele; de Souza Brito, Cesar Luis; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel; Casagrande, Daniela Schaan; Mottin, Claudio Cora

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of smoking habits in severe obesity is higher than in the general population. There is some evidence that smokers have different temperaments compared to non-smokers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the associations between smoking status (smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers) and temperament characteristics in bariatric surgery candidates. Methods We analyzed data on temperament of 420 bariatric surgery candidates, as assessed by the AFECTS scale, in an exploratory cross-sectional survey of bariatric surgery candidates who have been grouped into smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers. Results We detected significant statistical differences in temperament related to the smoking status in this population after controlling the current use of psychiatric medication. Smokers had higher anxiety and lower control than non-smokers. Ex-smokers with BMI >50 kg/m2 presented higher coping and control characteristics than smokers. Conclusions Smoking in bariatric surgery candidates was associated with lower control and higher anxious temperament, when controlled by current use of psychiatric medication. Smokers with BMI >50 kg/m2 presented lower coping and control than ex-smokers. Assessment of temperament in bariatric surgery candidates may help in decisions about smoking cessation treatment and prevention of smoking relapse after surgery. PMID:26987115

  2. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  3. The effect of the Ontario Bariatric Network on health services utilization after bariatric surgery: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Elnahas, Ahmad; Jackson, Timothy D.; Okrainec, Allan; Austin, Peter C.; Bell, Chaim M.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2009, the Ontario Bariatric Network was established to address the exploding demand by Ontario residents for bariatric surgery services outside Canada. We compared the use of postoperative hospital services between out-of-country surgery recipients and patients within the Ontario Bariatric Network. Methods: We conducted a population-based, comparative study using administrative data held at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We included Ontario residents who underwent bariatric surgery between 2007 and 2012 either outside the country or at one of the Ontario Bariatric Network's designated centres of excellence. The primary outcome was use of hospital services in Ontario within 1 year after surgery. Results: A total of 4852 patients received bariatric surgery out of country, and 5179 patients underwent surgery through the Ontario Bariatric Network. After adjustment, surgery at a network centre was associated with a significantly lower utilization rate of postoperative hospital services than surgery out of country (rate ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 to 0.97). No statistically significant differences were found with respect to time in critical care or mortality. However, the physician assessment and reoperation rates were significantly higher among patients who received surgery at a network centre than among those who had bariatric surgery out of country (rate ratio 4.10, 95% CI 3.69 to 4.56, and rate ratio 1.84, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.53, respectively). Interpretation: The implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary provincial program to replace outsourcing of bariatric surgical services was associated with less use of postoperative hospital services by Ontario residents undergoing bariatric surgery. Future research should include an economic evaluation to determine the costs and benefits of the Ontario Bariatric Network. PMID:27730113

  4. The role for prophylaxis inferior vena cava filters in patients undergoing bariatric surgery: replacing anecdote with evidence.

    PubMed

    Shamian, Ben; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2012-12-01

    The number of patients choosing surgical alternatives for weight reduction continues to increase. Despite common thromboembolic preventive methods, which include perioperative subcutaneous heparin injections, early mobilization, and sequential compression devices, postoperative deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolism remains a devastating complication after bariatric surgery. The role prophylactic inferior vena cava (IVC) filters may play in bariatric surgery remains controversial, and this article aims to address the risks and benefits of prophylactic IVC filters in high-risk bariatric patients and suggest an evidence-based algorithm for their use.

  5. Mechanisms underlying weight loss and metabolic improvements in rodent models of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing health risk with few successful treatment options and fewer still that target both obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities. Despite ongoing scientific efforts, the most effective treatment option to date was not developed from basic research but by surgeons observing outcomes in the clinic. Bariatric surgery is the most successful treatment for significant weight loss, resolution of type 2 diabetes and the prevention of future weight gain. Recent work with animal models has shed considerable light on the molecular underpinnings of the potent effects of these ‘metabolic’ surgical procedures. Here we review data from animal models and how these studies have evolved our understanding of the critical signalling systems that mediate the effects of bariatric surgery. These insights could lead to alternative therapies able to accomplish effects similar to bariatric surgery in a less invasive manner. PMID:25374275

  6. Interest, views and perceived barriers to bariatric surgery in patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Wharton, S; Serodio, K J; Kuk, J L; Sivapalan, N; Craik, A; Aarts, M-A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the interest, views and patient-perceived barriers to bariatric surgery among surgery-eligible patients. Surveys were completed at a weight management clinic and local hospital in Ontario, Canada. Patients were ≥18 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg m(-2) or BMI > 35 kg m(-2) with ≥1 comorbidity. The sample included 105 participants, 73.3% female, with a mean BMI of 46.6 ± 7.1 kg m(-2) . Only 33.3% of participants were interested in surgery; 50.5% of participants were not interested and 16.2% had mixed feelings. Participants identified risks (69.5%) and side effects (57.1%) as significant surgical barriers. Interested participants were more likely to perceive themselves as obese, were unhappy with their current weight loss method and were less likely to fear surgery (P < 0.05). The prevalence of comorbidities was not different by surgical interest (P = 0.17). Despite the effectiveness of bariatric surgery, the majority of qualified patients are not interested in surgery mainly due to the perceived risk of surgery in general and satisfaction with current non-surgical weight loss efforts. The self-perception of obesity, as opposed to medical comorbidities, may be a stronger driver of the decision to have bariatric surgery. It is unclear if patients are aware of the effectiveness of bariatric surgery to help improve comorbidities or if bariatric surgery is perceived as being more cosmetic in nature.

  7. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  8. Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors among Adolescents Receiving Bariatric Surgery: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, Jeanne; Freidl, Eve Khlyavich; Eicher, Julia; Zitsman, Jeffrey L.; Devlin, Michael J.; Hildebrandt, Tom; Sysko, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation and behavior (SI/B) among adolescents receiving bariatric surgery. Method Charts of 206 adolescents receiving bariatric surgery were reviewed. Cases with SI/B (current/lifetime reported at baseline or event occurring in the program n= 31, 15%) were case-matched on gender, age, and surgery type to 31 adolescents reporting current or past psychiatric treatment, and 31 adolescents denying lifetime SI/B or psychiatric treatment. Results Before surgery, adolescents with SI/B reported significantly lower total levels of health-related quality of life (p=0.01) and greater depressive symptoms (p=0.004) in comparison to candidates who never received psychiatric treatment. No significant differences were found between groups for the change in depressive symptoms or body mass index following surgery. Conclusions As in studies of adults, a notable subset of adolescents receiving bariatric surgery indicated pre- or post-operative SI/B. It is critical that clinicians evaluate and monitor adolescent patients undergoing bariatric surgery for risk of SI/B. PMID:26377705

  9. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; White, B; Viner, R M; Simmons, R K

    2013-08-01

    The number of obese young people continues to rise, with a corresponding increase in extreme obesity and paediatric-adolescent bariatric surgery. We aimed to (i) systematically review the literature on bariatric surgery in children and adolescents; (ii) meta-analyse change in body mass index (BMI) 1-year post-surgery and (iii) report complications, co-morbidity resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic literature search (1955-2013) was performed to examine adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversions operations among obese children and adolescents. Change in BMI a year after surgery was meta-analysed using a random effects model. In total, 637 patients from 23 studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant decreases in BMI at 1 year (average weighted mean BMI difference: -13.5 kg m(-2) ; 95% confidence interval [CI] -14.1 to -11.9). Complications were inconsistently reported. There was some evidence of co-morbidity resolution and improvements in HRQol post-surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to significant short-term weight loss in obese children and adolescents. However, the risks of complications are not well defined in the literature. Long-term, prospectively designed studies, with clear reporting of complications and co-morbidity resolution, alongside measures of HRQol, are needed to firmly establish the harms and benefits of bariatric surgery in children and adolescents.

  10. Nutritional deficiencies in obesity and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2009-10-01

    The presence of nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obesity may seem paradoxical in light of excess caloric intake, but several micronutrient deficiencies appear to be higher in prevalence in overweight and obese adults and children. Causes are multifactorial and include decreased consumption of fruits and vegetables, increased intake of high-calorie, but nutritionally poor-quality foods, and increased adiposity, which may influence the storage and availability of some nutrients. As the obesity epidemic continues unabated and the popularity of bariatric surgery rises for severely obese adults and adolescents, medical practitioners must be aware of pre-existing nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obese patients and appropriately recognize and treat common and rare nutritional deficiencies that may arise or worsen following bariatric surgery. This article reviews current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese and overweight individuals and those that commonly present after bariatric surgery and summarizes current recommendations for screening and supplementation.

  11. The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP).

    PubMed

    Osondu, Chukwuemeka U; Aneni, Ehimen C; Shaharyar, Sameer; Roberson, Lara; Rouseff, Maribeth; Das, Sankalp; Spatz, Erica; Younus, Adnan; Guzman, Henry; Brown, Doris; Santiago-Charles, Joann; Ochoa, Teresa; Mora, Joseph; Gilliam, Cynthia; Lehn, Virginia; Sherriff, Shoshana; Tran, Thinh; Gonzalez, Anthony; Virani, Salim; Feldman, Theodore; Agatston, Arthur S; Nasir, Khurram

    2016-10-01

    This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m(2). Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs.

  12. The Effectiveness of a Worksite Lifestyle Intervention Program on High-Risk Individuals as Potential Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: My Unlimited Potential (MyUP).

    PubMed

    Osondu, Chukwuemeka U; Aneni, Ehimen C; Shaharyar, Sameer; Roberson, Lara; Rouseff, Maribeth; Das, Sankalp; Spatz, Erica; Younus, Adnan; Guzman, Henry; Brown, Doris; Santiago-Charles, Joann; Ochoa, Teresa; Mora, Joseph; Gilliam, Cynthia; Lehn, Virginia; Sherriff, Shoshana; Tran, Thinh; Gonzalez, Anthony; Virani, Salim; Feldman, Theodore; Agatston, Arthur S; Nasir, Khurram

    2016-10-01

    This is a single-arm, pre and post effectiveness study that evaluated the impact of a comprehensive workplace lifestyle program on severe obesity among high cardiovascular disease risk individuals in a large, diverse employee population. Employees of Baptist Health South Florida were considered eligible to participate if they had 2 or more of the following cardiometabolic risk factors: total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%, body mass index ≥30kg/m(2). Participants received a personalized diet plan and physical activity intervention, and were followed for 1 year. Data on anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other biochemical measures were collected. Participants' body mass index was calculated and their eligibility for bariatric surgery (BS) also assessed. A total of 297 persons participated in the program; 160 participants completed all procedures through 12 months of follow-up. At baseline, 34% (n = 100) of all participants were eligible for BS. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 27% (n = 27) of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible after 12 months. Considering program completers only, 46% of BS eligible participants at baseline became ineligible. Irrespective of BS eligibility at 12 months, mean values of cardiometabolic risk factors among program completers improved after the follow-up period. Workplace wellness programs provide an important option for weight loss that can obviate the need for BS, reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and potentially reduce costs. However, in designing future worksite lifestyle interventions, measures should be taken to improve participation and retention rates in such programs. PMID:26760281

  13. Binge Eating Disorder and Medical Comorbidities in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Pories, Walter; Wolfe, Bruce; Flum, David R.; Spaniolas, Konstatinos; Bessler, Mark; Devlin, Michael; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Engel, Scott; Khandelwal, Saurobh; Yanovski, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether binge eating disorder (BED) status is associated with medical comorbidities in obese adults scheduled for bariatric surgery. Method The study utilized Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 data obtained from 6 clinical centers around the United States. This is a well-phenotyped cohort of individuals who were evaluated within 30 days prior to their scheduled surgery using standardized protocols. In the cohort, 350 participants were classified as having BED and 1875 as not having BED (non-BED). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether BED status was independently related to medical comorbidities. As an exploratory analysis, significance was based on nominal P-values (p<.05). Holm-adjusted P-values were also reported. Results After adjusting for age, sex, education and body mass index, BED status was independently associated with 4 of 15 comorbidities (i.e., impaired glucose levels (odds ratio [OR]=1.45 (95%CI: 1.12–1.87), high triglycerides (OR=1.28 (95%CI: 1.002–1.63) and urinary incontinence (OR=1.30 (95%CI: 1.02,1.66) all being more common among the BED sample, and severe walking limitations being less common in the BED sample (OR=0.53 (95%CI: 0.29–0.96)). With further adjustment for psychiatric/emotional health indicators, BED status was independently associated with 3 comorbidities (impaired glucose levels (OR=1.36 (95%CI: 1.04–1.79), cardiovascular disease (OR=0.50 (95%CI: 0.30–0.86) and severe walking limitations (OR=0.38 (95%CI: 0.19–0.77)). However, Holm’s adjusted P-values for all variables were greater than .05. Discussion The results suggest the possibility of a contribution of BED to risk of specific medical comorbidities in severely obese adults. PMID:25778499

  14. [Strategy and critical analysis of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Houben, J J; Barea, M; Maroquin, L; Isabo, O; Desmarets, A

    2007-09-01

    Bariatric surgery has considerably developed during the last 20 years in Belgium. The increase of prevalence of the morbid obesity and the development of multiple surgical procedures widened the spectrum of treatment. If a rigorous selection and a multidisciplinary approach of the patients are inescapable, the various decision-making algorithms plunge the practitioner into a certain confusion. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the advantages and the inconveniences of the different surgical treatments in light of the evolution of the principles and the objective results of the literature. Among the techniques proven and validated in the long run, one can mention the Silastic Ring Vertical Gastroplasty according to Mac Lean by minilaparotomy, the laparoscopic adjustable ring and the more recent gastric by pass. The evaluation of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and of duodenal switch is on course. The bilio-pancreatic by-pass according to Scopinaro remains strongly controversed. A meta-analysis of the literature confirms the success of the gastric bypass. Regarding to the long term follow-up, the adjustable gastric banding deceives. The sleeve gastrectomy should be analyzed in the long term. The preliminary results of a epidemiologic and financial study within a private hospital of Brussels reveals that the cost effective ratio is in favor the Silastic Ring Vertical Gastroplasty and the laparoscopic adjustable banding, as well in terms of public health support than the charge for the private insurance and the patient. The projection beyond 5 years reverses the tendency to plead in favor of the gastric by-pass. First with the hit-parade of comfort, food diversification, tolerance, gastro-esophageal reflux, and undoubtedly of the rate of recurrence, it supplants the others techniques for sweet eaters. The volume eaters can profit from a sleeve gastrectomy which undoubtedly supplants the Silastic Ring Vertical Gastroplasty responsible for late annular stenoses and

  15. News media reports of patient deaths following 'medical tourism' for cosmetic surgery and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article identifies and describes twenty-six reported cases of deaths of individuals who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Over half of the reported deaths occurred in two countries. Analysis of these news reports cannot be used to make causal claims about why the patients died. In addition, cases identified in news media accounts do not provide a basis for establishing the relative risk of traveling abroad for care instead of seeking elective cosmetic surgery at domestic health care facilities. Acknowledging these limitations, the case reports suggest the possibility that contemporary peer-reviewed scholarship is underreporting patient mortality in medical travel. The paper makes a strong case for promoting normative analyses and empirical studies of medical travel. In particular, the paper argues that empirically informed ethical analysis of 'medical tourism' will benefit from rigorous studies tracking global flows of medical travelers and the clinical outcomes they experience. The paper contains practical recommendations intended to promote debate concerning how to promote patient safety and quality of care in medical travel.

  16. Early metabolic improvement following bariatric surgery in morbidly obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Teeple, E A; Teich, S; Schuster, D P; Michalsky, M P

    2012-01-01

    Bariatric surgery results in durable weight loss and improved comorbidities. The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy of gastric bypass in reducing comorbid burden and improving metabolic status among morbidly obese adolescents. The medical records of 15 gastric bypass patients were retrospectively reviewed. Changes in metabolic markers were determined at baseline, 1 and 2 years post-operatively. Comparative analysis demonstrated significant improvement in weight, BMI, insulin, HbA1C, C-peptide, %B, %S, IR, cholesterol, percentile cholesterol, TG, percentile TG, HDL, percentile HDL, LDL, percentile LDL, and VLDL. Results support bariatric surgery as a treatment for morbidly obese adolescents with comorbidities.

  17. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures. PMID:27050404

  18. Preventing surgical site infections after bariatric surgery: value of perioperative antibiotic regimens

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Teena; Zhao, Jing J; Alangaden, George; Wood, Michael H; Kaye, Keith S

    2010-01-01

    Bariatric surgery for obesity has emerged as an effective and commonly used treatment modality. This paper reviews the surgical site infections (SSIs) that occur post bariatric surgery and SSI prevention. The benefit of bariatric surgery resulting in profound weight loss brings with it consequences in the form of postoperative complications that can have profound effects on morbidity and mortality in these patients. This paper sets out to define different types of SSIs that occur following bariatric surgery and to discuss existing literature on the critical aspects of SSI prevention and the appropriate use of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis for bariatric surgery. PMID:20545596

  19. Weight recidivism post-bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Brar, Balpreet; Shi, Xinzhe; Sharma, Arya M; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel W

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is considered a worldwide health problem of epidemic proportions. Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for patients with severe obesity, resulting in improved obesity-related co-morbidities and increased overall life expectancy. However, weight recidivism has been observed in a subset of patients post-bariatric surgery. Weight recidivism has significant medical, societal and economic ramifications. Unfortunately, there is a very limited understanding of how to predict which bariatric surgical patients are more likely to regain weight following surgery and how to appropriately treat patients who have regained weight. The objective of this paper is to systematically review the existing literature to assess the incidence and causative factors associated with weight regain following bariatric surgery. An electronic literature search was performed of the Medline, Embase and Cochrane library databases along with the PubMed US national library from January 1950 to December 2012 to identify relevant articles. Following an initial screen of 2,204 titles, 1,437 abstracts were reviewed and 1,421 met exclusion criteria. Sixteen studies were included in this analysis: seven case series, five surveys and four non-randomized controlled trials, with a total of 4,864 patients for analysis. Weight regain in these patients appeared to be multi-factorial and overlapping. Aetiologies were categorized as patient specific (psychiatric, physical inactivity, endocrinopathies/metabolic and dietary non-compliance) and operation specific. Weight regain following bariatric surgery varies according to duration of follow-up and the bariatric surgical procedure performed. The underlying causes leading to weight regain are multi-factorial and related to patient- and procedure-specific factors. Addressing post-surgical weight regain requires a systematic approach to patient assessment focusing on contributory dietary, psychologic, medical and surgical factors. PMID

  20. The growing role of bariatric surgery in the management of type 2 diabetes: evidences and open questions.

    PubMed

    Busetto, Luca; Sbraccia, Paolo; Frittitta, Lucia; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2011-09-01

    The use of bariatric surgery in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes has been recently endorsed in the clinical practice recommendations released by the most influential diabetologic associations. However, authoritative critic voices about the application of metabolic surgery in type 2 diabetes continue to appear in diabetologic literature. In this review, we will try therefore to understand what the reasons for this apparent dichotomy. In this paper, we revised what we believe are now clear evidences about the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with morbid obesity: the efficacy of bariatric surgery in metabolic control, the existence of plausible weight-independent metabolic mechanisms at least in some bariatric procedure, and the importance of the early referral to surgery in patients with firm indications. However, we stressed also the lack of clear high-quality long-term data about the effects of bariatric surgery in the prevention of both macro- and micro-vascular hard endpoints in patients with type 2 diabetes. The accrual of these results will be critical to completely clarify the risk/benefit ratio of bariatric surgery in diabetes, as compared to current pharmacologic therapies. This may be particularly important in patients in which data on long-term efficacy are still not completed, such as in patients with lower BMI levels. PMID:21717182

  1. [Bariatrica paraplegia patient and morbid obesity. New challenge in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Gros Herguido, Noelia; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Barranco Moreno, Antonio; Socas Macias, Maria; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Garcia-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2014-06-01

    The loss of mobility due to spinal cord injury is a risk factor for weight gain. Despite the well-documented outcomes of bariatric surgery in outpatients, little information is available about the surgery in paraplegic patients. We present two cases of patients with morbid obesity and spinal cord injury. After several attempts to lose weight conservatively, were assessed by the multidisciplinary team of our hospital and finally intervened by laparoscopic gastric bypass. After surgery have been no post-surgical complications. The patient in case 1, after two years of follow-up, a weight of 84 kg (BMI 25.08 kg/m2). Case 2, after a month of surgery has reduced weight and stopped taking antihypertensive therapy. It 's available to bariatric surgery as an important option to consider if all non-surgical interventions fail is highlighted.

  2. The Night Eating Syndrome (NES) in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    de Zwaan, Martina; Marschollek, Michael; Allison, Kelly C

    2015-11-01

    The night eating syndrome (NES) has been included into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as an example of an 'other-specified feeding or eating disorder'. The prevalence of NES has found to be higher in obese populations than in the general population and seems to rise with increasing body mass index. Recent studies suggest a prevalence of 2%-20% in bariatric surgery samples. Given that the core feature of this eating disorder may involve a shift in the circadian pattern of eating that disrupts sleep, and not the ingestion of objectively large amounts of food, it is a pattern that can continue after bariatric surgery. Nonetheless, symptoms of NES appear to decrease after weight loss surgery, and there is no evidence that pre-surgery NES negatively impacts weight loss following surgery. Prospective and longitudinal studies of the course of night eating symptoms are warranted using clear criteria and standardized assessment instruments.

  3. Bariatric surgery and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bower, Guy; Athanasiou, Thanos; Isla, Alberto M; Harling, Leanne; Li, Jia V; Holmes, Elaine; Efthimiou, Evangelos; Darzi, Ara; Ashrafian, Hutan

    2015-07-01

    The rising prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with the increasing global pandemic of obesity. These conditions cluster with type II diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome to result in obesity-associated liver disease. The benefits of bariatric procedures on diabetes and the metabolic syndrome have been recognized for some time, and there is now mounting evidence to suggest that bariatric procedures improve liver histology and contribute to the beneficial resolution of NAFLD in obese patients. These beneficial effects derive from a number of weight-dependent and weight-independent mechanisms including surgical BRAVE actions (bile flow changes, restriction of stomach size, anatomical gastrointestinal rearrangement, vagal manipulation, enteric hormonal modulation) and subsequent effects such as reduced lipid intake, adipocytokine secretion, modulation of gut flora, improvements in insulin resistance and reduced inflammation. Here, we review the clinical investigations on bariatric procedures for NAFLD, in addition to the mounting mechanistic data supporting these findings. Elucidating the mechanisms by which bariatric procedures may resolve NAFLD can help enhance surgical approaches for metabolic hepatic dysfunction and also contribute toward developing the next generation of therapies aimed at reducing the burden of obesity-associated liver disease.

  4. PROFILE OF PATIENTS WHO SEEK THE BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Paola Turchiello; PATIAS, Luciana Dapieve; ALVAREZ, Glauco da Costa; KIRSTEN, Vanessa Ramos; COLPO, Elisângela; de MORAES, Cristina Machado Bragança

    2015-01-01

    Background : Nowadays obesity is a chronic disease considered one of the greatest problems in public healthy. Showing to be effective in a short and long term, the bariatric surgery has emerged as an optional treatment for morbid obesity. Aim: Identify the profile of patients seeking bariatric surgery. Methods: Were interviewed 100 patients in preoperative nutritional monitoring of bariatric surgery. The study was conducted by applying a questionnaire prepared according to the research objectives. Results: From the individuals that were seeking bariatric surgery, 78% were female, 62% were married and 69% reported physical activity. The average age of those surveyed was 37±10.83 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 43.51± 6.25 kg/m². The comorbidity more prevalent in this group was high blood pressure (51%). In previous treatments for weight reduction, 92% have already done hypocaloric diet followed by anorectic drug (83%). The success of these treatments was reported by 92% of patients; however, the weight lost was recovered in less than one year of 75%. Patients with diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia had higher BMI values. The patients with comorbidities showed lower levels of BMI. Conclusion: The profile of patients who sought surgical treatment for their obesity were predominantly women with a family background of obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, especially hypertension and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26734799

  5. Bariatric Surgery and the Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kent; Alexander, Charlotte; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasingly common obstetrical problem. Due to the global escalation in the prevalence of obesity, as many as 15 % of pregnant women may soon be classified as having GDM. While often not diagnosed until late gestation, GDM is now recognized as a disorder of glucose and lipid metabolism, systemic inflammation, and insulin resistance that begins early in pregnancy. Recent large randomized trials have clarified the risk of maternal and neonatal complications caused by GDM, as well as the potential to ameliorate these risks. There is significant interest in the potential to reduce the risk for developing GDM in obese women through the performance of bariatric surgery (BS) before pregnancy. BS significantly reduces the risk for GDM, preeclampsia, and large neonates. However, it seems that the risk for small neonates and preterm delivery is increased. No significant differences are observed in regard to cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, or perinatal mortality. In this article, we address the effects of GDM on the mother and child, and explore the risks and benefits of BS in the obstetrical population.

  6. Patients’ perceptions of waiting for bariatric surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada waiting lists for bariatric surgery are common, with wait times on average > 5 years. The meaning of waiting for bariatric surgery from the patients’ perspective must be understood if health care providers are to act as facilitators in promoting satisfaction with care and quality care outcomes. The aims of this study were to explore patients’ perceptions of waiting for bariatric surgery, the meaning and experience of waiting, the psychosocial and behavioral impact of waiting for treatment and identify health care provider and health system supportive measures that could potentially improve the waiting experience. Methods Twenty-one women and six men engaged in in-depth interviews that were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis between June 2011 and April 2012. The data were subjected to re-analysis to identify perceived health care provider and health system barriers to accessing bariatric surgery. Results Thematic analysis identified inequity as a barrier to accessing bariatric surgery. Three areas of perceived inequity were identified from participants’ accounts: socioeconomic inequity, regional inequity, and inequity related to waitlist prioritization. Although excited about their acceptance as candidates for surgery, the waiting period was described as stressful, anxiety provoking, and frustrating. Anger was expressed towards the health care system for the long waiting times. Participants identified the importance of health care provider and health system supports during the waiting period. Recommendations on how to improve the waiting experience included periodic updates from the surgeon’s office about their position on the wait list; a counselor who specializes in helping people going through this surgery, dietitian support and further information on what to expect after surgery, among others. Conclusion Patients’ perceptions of accessing and

  7. Experimental Bariatric Surgery in Rats Generates a Cytotoxic Chemical Environment in the Gut Contents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia V.; Reshat, Reshat; Wu, Qianxin; Ashrafian, Hutan; Bueter, Marco; le Roux, Carel W.; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos; Marchesi, Julian R.; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Holmes, Elaine; Gooderham, Nigel J.

    2011-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, also known as metabolic surgery, is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, which also offers pronounced metabolic effects including the resolution of type 2 diabetes and a decrease in cardiovascular disease and long-term cancer risk. However, the mechanisms of surgical weight loss and the long-term consequences of bariatric surgery remain unclear. Bariatric surgery has been demonstrated to alter the composition of both the microbiome and the metabolic phenotype. We observed a marked shift toward Gammaproteobacteria, particularly Enterobacter hormaechei, following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in a rat model compared with sham-operated controls. Fecal water from RYGB surgery rats was highly cytotoxic to rodent cells (mouse lymphoma cell line). In contrast, fecal water from sham-operated animals showed no/very low cytotoxicity. This shift in the gross structure of the microbiome correlated with greatly increased cytotoxicity. Urinary phenylacetylglycine and indoxyl sulfate and fecal gamma-aminobutyric acid, putrescine, tyramine, and uracil were found to be inversely correlated with cell survival rate. This profound co-dependent response of mammalian and microbial metabolism to RYGB surgery and the impact on the cytotoxicity of the gut luminal environment suggests that RYGB exerts local and global metabolic effects which may have an influence on long-term cancer risk and cytotoxic load. PMID:21949514

  8. Maternal Micronutrient Deficiencies and Related Adverse Neonatal Outcomes after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review12

    PubMed Central

    Jans, Goele; Matthys, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annick; Lannoo, Matthias; Verhaeghe, Johan; Van der Schueren, Bart; Devlieger, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women with a history of bariatric surgery are at risk of micronutrient deficiencies as a result of the combination of physiologic changes related to pregnancy and iatrogenic postoperative alterations in the absorption and metabolism of crucial nutrients. This systematic review investigates micronutrient deficiencies and related adverse clinical outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted independently by 2 researchers to examine deficiencies of phylloquinone, folate, iron, calcium, zinc, magnesium, iodide, copper, and vitamins A, D, and B-12 in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery, together with subsequent outcomes in the neonates. The search identified 29 relevant cases and 8 cohort studies. The quality of reporting among the case reports was weak according to the criteria based on the CARE (CAse REporting) guidelines as was that for the cohort studies based on the criteria from the Cohort Study Quality Assessment list of the Dutch Cochrane Center. The most common adverse neonatal outcomes related to maternal micronutrient deficiencies include visual complications (vitamin A), intracranial hemorrhage (phylloquinone), neurological and developmental impairment (vitamin B-12), and neural tube defects (folate). On the basis of the systematically collected information, we conclude that the evidence on micronutrient deficiencies in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery and subsequent adverse neonatal outcomes remains weak and inconclusive. PMID:26178026

  9. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  10. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications. PMID:27668069

  11. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  12. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications. PMID:27668069

  13. [Bariatric and plastic surgery in obese adolescents: an alternative treatment].

    PubMed

    Dubern, Béatrice; Tounian, Patrice

    2014-06-01

    The increased frequency of extreme forms of obesity in adolescents and the disappointing results of conventional treatments are now leading pediatricians to consider bariatric or cosmetic surgery as the only real long-term effective therapeutic alternative. The two main techniques currently used for bariatric surgery in adolescents are gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding. Whatever the technique, weight loss is significant with improvement of comorbidities and quality of life. In addition, the complications are identical to those in adults and equally frequent. However, because of the particularities of this age, caution is still required. Adolescence is indeed characterized by specific nutritional needs, but also changes in body image in which surgery could have a negative effect. Currently, all obese teenagers making a request for bariatric surgery should have a comprehensive assessment with global care for at least 6 months. The indication is then discussed on a case-by-case basis by multidisciplinary teams and experts. To date, the type of surgery (gastric banding, gastric sleeve, or bypass) is still widely discussed. Based on experience with adults, we believe that gastric sleeve and bypass should be preferred. In addition, obesity in adolescents almost always involves psychosocial consequences, while somatic complications are rare. Thus, the care of adipo- or gynecomastia, abdominal fat excess, and concealed penis is essential and therefore justifies cosmetic surgery.

  14. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-11-27

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and those with BMI > 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  15. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  16. Resolution of Comorbidities and Impact on Longevity Following Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouse, Tammy; Brethauer, Stacy

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable treatment of severe obesity. In addition to weight loss, these operations result in significant improvement or resolution of many obesity-related comorbid diseases. There are now numerous studies demonstrating that bariatric surgery decreases all-cause mortality long-term compared with cohorts of patients who did not undergo surgery. Decreases in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular-related mortality are major contributors to this overall effect on life expectancy after bariatric surgery. PMID:27473797

  17. [Application of revisional operation in failure and complication of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingang

    2014-07-01

    For the vast majority of morbidly obese patients, surgical treatment remains the only effective way proven to maintain weight loss. Currently adjustable gastric banding (AGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass(RYGB) are the methods which are recognized as safe, reliable, effective for weight loss, and has been widely used. Along with the increase in the volume of bariatric operations, patients whose primary bariatric operation is not ideal and who need revision surgery are also increasing. Weight loss failure and postoperative complications are two of the main indications for revisional operation. A series of data indicate that revisional operation is an effective treatment for unsuccessful weight loss and complications of primary operation. Surgeons should choose reasonable, correct operation refer to the initial bariatric operation and results. For most patients, the benefits overweigh the risks.

  18. [Treatment of anemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency in patients with morbid obesity can occur before bariatric surgery due to its inflammatory component and after surgery as the result of implementing the malabsorptive techniques. For patients with morbid obesity, micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron and folate, should be suspected. Iron deficiency and other hematinics should be corrected, even when anemia has not been established. Normal ferritin levels do not allow us to rule out a possible iron deficiency, given that ferritin can increase due to the chronic inflammatory condition of obesity. After bariatric surgery, patients should take iron supplements; however, these supplements are frequently poorly tolerated. Rapid and effective correction of hemoglobin levels might require the intravenous administration of iron preparations.

  19. [Evolution of low back pain after bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Koulischer, S; Cadière, B; Cadière, G-B; Fabeck, L

    2015-01-01

    Although frequently called to mind by physicians, the relationship between overweight and low back pain is poorly understood and remains controversial. The present study aims to evaluate the evolution of low back pain in 65 patients planned for a bariatric surgery. The patients were enrolled prospectively. 54 patients (80%) could be evaluated 5 months after the procedure, and 47 patients (72%) were evaluated 22 months after surgery. Mean weight loss was 19 ± 9 kg (P < 0.001) at 22 months post-op. Patients demonstrated a statistically significant improvement of the NRS, Oswestry and SF-36 scores. This study suggests that low back pain might be reduced following bariatric surgery. However, the lack of dose-response effect is against a causal relationship between low back pain and obesity. Larger randomised controls are needed to determine a causal relationship.

  20. NUTRITIONAL REPERCUSSIONS IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    SILVEIRA-JÚNIOR, Sérgio; de ALBUQUERQUE, Maurício Mendes; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis; da ROSA, Luisa Salvagni; HYGIDIO, Daniel de Andrade; ZAPELINI, Raphaela Mazon

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies evaluated the association between nutritional disorders, quality of life and weight loss in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Aim To identify nutritional changes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and correlate them with weight loss, control of comorbidities and quality of life. Method A prospective cohort, analytical and descriptive study involving 59 patients undergoing bariatric surgery was done. Data were collected preoperatively at three and six months postoperatively, evaluating nutritional aspects and outcomes using BAROS questionnaire. The data had a confidence interval of 95%. Results The majority of patients was composed of women, 47 (79.7%), with 55.9% of the series with BMI between 40 to 49.9 kg/m². In the sixth month after surgery scores of quality of life were significantly higher than preoperatively (p<0.05) and 27 (67.5 %) patients had comorbidities resolved, 48 (81.3 %) presented BAROS scores of very good or excellent. After three and six months of surgery 16 and 23 presented some nutritional disorder, respectively. There was no relationship between the loss of excess weight and quality of life among patients with or without nutritional disorders. Conclusions Nutritional disorders are uncommon in the early postoperative period and, when present, have little or no influence on quality of life and loss of excess weight. PMID:25861070

  1. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis.

  2. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a review of the moral challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery for children and adolescents is becoming widespread. However, the evidence is still scarce and of poor quality, and many of the patients are too young to consent. This poses a series of moral challenges, which have to be addressed both when considering bariatric surgery introduced as a health care service and when deciding for treatment for young individuals. A question based (Socratic) approach is applied to reveal underlying moral issues that can be relevant to an open and transparent decision making process. Discussion A wide range of moral issues with bariatric surgery for children and adolescents is identified in the literature. There is a moral imperative to help obese minors avoiding serious health problems, but there is little high quality evidence on safety, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness for bariatric surgery in this group. Lack of maturity and family relations poses a series of challenges with autonomy, informed consent, assent, and assessing the best interest of children and adolescents. Social aspects of obesity, such as medicalization, prejudice, and discrimination, raise problems with justice and trust in health professionals. Conceptual issues, such as definition of obesity and treatment end-points, present moral problems. Hidden interests of patients, parents, professionals, industry, and society need to be revealed. Summary Performing bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents in order to discipline their behavior warrants reflection and caution. More evidence on outcomes is needed to be able to balance benefits and risks, to provide information for a valid consent or assent, and to advise minors and parents. PMID:23631445

  3. All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Associated with Bariatric Surgery: A Review.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ted D; Mehta, Tapan S; Davidson, Lance E; Hunt, Steven C

    2015-12-01

    The question of whether or not nonsurgical intentional or voluntary weight loss results in reduced mortality has been equivocal, with long-term mortality following weight loss being reported as increased, decreased, and not changed. In part, inconsistent results have been attributed to the uncertainty of whether the intentionality of weight loss is accurately reported in large population studies and also that achieving significant and sustained voluntary weight loss in large intervention trials is extremely difficult. Bariatric surgery has generally been free of these conflicts. Patients voluntarily undergo surgery and the resulting weight is typically significant and sustained. These elements, combined with possible non-weight loss-related mechanisms, have resulted in improved comorbidities, which likely contribute to a reduction in long-term mortality. This paper reviews the association between bariatric surgery and long-term mortality. From these studies, the general consensus is that bariatric surgical patients have: 1) significantly reduced long-term all-cause mortality when compared to severely obese non-bariatric surgical control groups; 2) greater mortality when compared to the general population, with the exception of one study; 3) reduced cardiovascular-, stroke-, and cancer-caused mortality when compared to severely obese non-operated controls; and 4) increased risk for externally caused death such as suicide.

  4. Assessing the obese diabetic patient for bariatric surgery: which candidate do I choose?

    PubMed Central

    Raffaelli, Marco; Sessa, Luca; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bellantone, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising in association with an increasing frequency of overweight and obesity. Bariatric-metabolic procedures are considered as additional therapeutic options, allowing improved diabetes control in most patients. Multiple factors play in concert to achieve the improvements in diabetic remission observed after bariatric-metabolic surgery. Several studies have demonstrated that bariatric-metabolic surgery is an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes when compared with conventional nonsurgical medical treatment. Because the best results are achievable in patients with a relatively short history of diabetes and less advanced controlled disease, the surgical option could be considered early, especially in morbid obese subjects (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) after failure of medical treatment. Patients with extensive weight loss are more likely to achieve type 2 diabetes remission after bariatric surgery. At present, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems the surgical procedure of choice because it has fewer risks than biliopancreatic diversion, and it is associated with higher weight loss and metabolic improvements compared with adjustable gastric banding. Recent evidences regarding the effectiveness of sleeve gastrectomy in diabetes remission have to be confirmed by controlled trials with longer follow-up. PMID:26089694

  5. Bariatric Bypass Surgery to Resolve Complicated Childhood Morbid Obesity: Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    Elbanna, Abduh; Eldin, Mohammed Tag; Fathy, Mohammad; Osman, Osama; Abdelfattah, Mohammed; Safwat, Abdelrahman; Elkader, Mohammed Sedki Abd; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Salama, Khaled; Elnour, Asim A; Shehab, Abdullah; Baghdady, Shazly; Amer, Mohamed; Alboraie, Mohamed; Ragb, Aly; Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek

    2015-12-01

    Children obesity has become one of the most important public health problems in many countries worldwide. Although the awareness of childhood obesity as a modifiable health risk is high, but many societies do not prioritize this issue as a health care problem, which may lead to comorbidities and even premature death. Despite the rising interest in bariatric surgery for children, only laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is being considered in resolving childhood obesity who failed other dietary or drug therapies; however many of LSG procedures failed to reduce the weight in children or resulted in complications postsurgery.Here, we present a novel bariatric procedure to clue out a female child 13 years old presented with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease-associated morbid obesity. The surgical bariatric technique applied both fundal resection and surgical bypass in pediatric obesity using the Elbanna novel bariatric technique.Bariatric surgical bypass may be considered in complicated-childhood cases who failed all other options. PMID:26656361

  6. Recent advances in bariatric/metabolic surgery: appraisal of clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are becoming a serious medical issue worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective and durable therapy for the treatment of morbid obese patients. Increasing data indicates bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery is an effective and novel therapy for not well controlled obese T2DM patients. The review of recent developments in bariatric/metabolic surgery covers 4 major fields. 1) Improvement of safety: recent advances in laparoscopic/metabolic surgery has made this minimal invasive surgery more than ten times safer than a decade ago. The safety profile of laparoscopic/metabolic surgery is compatible with that of laparoscopic cholecystectomy now. 2) New bariatric/metabolic surgery: laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is becoming the leading bariatric surgery because of its simplicity and efficacy. Other new procedures, such as gastric plication, banded plication, single anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass and Duodeno-jejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy have all been accepted as treatment modalities for bariatric/metabolic surgery. 3) Mechanism of bariatric/metabolic surgery: Restriction is the most important mechanism for bariatric surgery. Weight regain after bariatric surgery is usually associated with loss of restriction. Recent studies demonstrated that gut hormone, microbiota and bile acid changes after bariatric surgery may play an important role in durable weight loss as well as in T2DM remission. However, weight loss is still the cornerstone of T2DM remission after metabolic surgery. 4) Patient selection: patients who may benefit most from bariatric surgery was found to be patients with insulin resistance. For Asian T2DM patients, the indication of metabolic surgery has been set to those with not well controlled (HbA1c > 7.5%) disease and with their BMI > 27.5 Kg/m2. A novel diabetes surgical score, ABCD score, is a simple system for predicting the success of surgical

  7. Revisional Bariatric/Metabolic Surgery: What Dictates Its Indications?

    PubMed

    Ma, Pearl; Reddy, Subhash; Higa, Kelvin D

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric/metabolic surgery is currently the only effective long-term treatment for morbid obesity- and obesity-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, and dyslipidemia. In addition, bariatric/metabolic surgery has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of diabetes and cancer and prolong life when compared to non-surgical therapies. However, as obesity is a chronic disease, recidivism of weight and comorbid conditions can occur. In addition, the surgical construct can lead to long-term consequences such as marginal ulceration, bowel obstruction, reflux, and nutritional deficiencies. Despite these drawbacks, prospective randomized controlled studies and long-term longitudinal population-based comparative studies greatly favor surgical intervention as opposed to traditional lifestyle, diet, and exercise programs. Revisional surgery can be quite complex and technically challenging and may offer the patient a wide variety of solutions for treatment of weight recidivism and complications after primary operations. Given the paucity of high quality published data, we have endeavored to provide indications for revisions after bariatric surgery. PMID:27221504

  8. NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LIFE QUALITY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Paulo Roberto Bezerra; de SOUZA, Marcela Ramos; da SILVA, Evane Moises; da SILVA, Silvia Alves

    2014-01-01

    Background The obesity has achieved an alarming increase in recent years, which led this disease to global epidemic condition. Aim To evaluate the nutritional status as well as the quality of life of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods A transversal study was conducted with obese adults of both genders who underwent bariatric surgery by Fobi-Capella technique for at least 30 days. It was evaluated: age, gender, marital status, occupation, weight before surgery, current weight, height, preoperative and current BMI, weight loss and loss of excess weight percentages, presence of clinical manifestations and food intolerances. Results The sample consisted of 70 patients, being 81.4% female, 37.1% aged 30 to 39 years, 58.6% were married, 41.4% have undergone the bariatric surgery in the last 12 months. It was observed a reduction in BMI from 37.2 kg/m2 (one to three months) to 28.9 kg/m2 (>12 months) and consequent increase in weight loss and loss of excess weight percentages. The most frequent clinical manifestation was alopecia (62.9%). The most reported food intolerance was on the red meat (24%). According to the Baros questionnaire, 50% of patients were classified as having good quality of life. Conclusion The operation of Fobi-Capella proved to be effective in promoting gradual and lasting weight loss. Quality of life was considered good in most patients, indicating that the operation had a positive impact on their lives. PMID:25409963

  9. Bariatric surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes: a viable option.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Randall A

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing and is co-epidemic with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment of obesity has been less than adequate, particularly when managing morbidly obese patients. Research on T2DM has shown a number of new pharmacologic therapies along with the rapid employment of bariatric surgery. Improvement of T2DM, including its remission, after bariatric surgery has been recognized for more than a decade. However, not all procedures are the same. Restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, or a combination of both procedures have their own categorical risks and benefits. Which procedure to choose has to do with many patient selection factors, notwithstanding insurance coverage. Based on operative and postoperative mortality data, laparoscopically assisted gastric bypass (LAGB) has been shown to be the safest bariatric surgery procedure. However, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure is one of the most widely used for obese patients with T2DM. The mechanisms involved in weight loss and improved blood glucose control appear to involve increased insulin sensitivity, decreased lipotoxicity/inflammation, and changes in gut hormones/incretins. The safety of bariatric procedures has improved; complication rates are low and mortality is < 1% for all procedures. As a result of the dramatic, positive impact of bariatric procedures on T2DM in obese patients, physicians should be cautious during patient selection to avoid performing the procedure on patients who are overzealous about reported outcomes, but who are not candidates for the procedure. Other data gaps still exist regarding diabetes surgery, which must be filled using data from well-designed, well-implemented randomized controlled clinical trials. In the future, it will be prudent to compare surgical interventions with other rigorous medical interventions in more robust studies. A combination of surgical, medical, and behavioral interventions should be considered for treating obese

  10. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: More than a restrictive bariatric surgery procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Benaiges, David; Más-Lorenzo, Antonio; Goday, Albert; Ramon, José M; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Roux, Juana A Flores-Le

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a restrictive bariatric surgery technique that was first used as part of restrictive horizontal gastrectomy in the original Scopinaro type biliopancreatic diversion. Its good results as a single technique have led to a rise in its use, and it is currently the second most performed technique worldwide. SG achieves clearly better results than other restrictive techniques and is comparable in some aspects to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current gold standard in bariatric surgery. These benefits have been associated with different pathophysiologic mechanisms unrelated to weight loss such as increased gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and activation of hormonal mechanisms such as increased GLP-1 hormone and decreased ghrelin. The aim of this review was to highlight the salient aspects of SG regarding its historical evolution, pathophysiologic mechanisms, main results, clinical applications and perioperative complications. PMID:26557004

  11. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years. PMID:21935309

  12. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years. PMID:21935309

  13. STAMPEDE: Bariatric surgery gains more evidence based support

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recent large-scale trials of intensive medical management for obesity and diabetes have been disappointing. Observational studies and small-scale trials of bariatric surgery on DM patients have shown promising results. The effects of sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass in a larger cohort of patients with DM and obesity was tested in the STAMPEDE trial over a 3-year follow-up. PMID:25054119

  14. Through Thick and Thin: Identifying Barriers to Bariatric Surgery, Weight Loss Maintenance, and Tailoring Obesity Treatment for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Westerveld, Donevan; Yang, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    More than one-third of the adults in the United States are obese. This complex metabolic disorder is associated with multiple comorbidities and increased all-cause mortality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be more effective than medical therapy and has been associated with weight loss maintenance and decreased mortality. In spite of these well-established benefits, less than 1% of candidates undergo surgery due to multiple factors, such as patient and physician perceptions and attitudes, patient-physician interaction, lack of resources, and cost burden. Furthermore, even in patients who do undergo bariatric surgery and/or alternate weight loss interventions, long-term weight control is associated with high-risk failure and weight regain. In this review, we highlight some of the current barriers to bariatric surgery and long-term weight loss maintenance and underscore the importance of an individualized multidisciplinary longitudinal strategy for the treatment of obesity. PMID:27314062

  15. Functional communication as a predictor of depression and anxiety symptoms among adolescents seeking bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Curran, J L; Datto, G

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether functional communication and parent-adolescent relations prospectively predict anxiety and depression symptoms among severely obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Participants included 30 adolescents and their primary caregivers, who presented for enrolment in a study assessing the safety and efficacy of the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band. Adolescents and their caregivers completed questionnaires assessing anxiety and depression symptoms, functional communication, and parent-adolescent relations at baseline and immediately prior to having bariatric surgery. Regression analyses revealed that poorer parent reported functional communication at baseline predicted increases in adolescent reported anxiety and depression symptoms immediately prior to surgery (on average 8.8 months later), above and beyond baseline symptoms. Anxiety and depression symptoms did not predict functional communication over time. Parent-adolescent relations, as reported by the adolescent, were concurrently associated with adolescent reported depression symptoms at baseline, and were concurrently associated with adolescent reported anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as parent reported depression symptoms, immediately prior to surgery. Functional communication may be an important prospective risk factor for the development of anxiety and depression symptoms among severely obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery, whereas adolescent report of the parent-adolescent relationship appears to be concurrently related to anxiety and depression symptoms. Future research should examine whether specifically targeting communication skills and family relationships within psychological treatment would improve psychosocial functioning among severely obese adolescents.

  16. Vitamin, Mineral, and Drug Absorption Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Jaffe, Jane; Friedenberg, Lindsay; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity continues to rise throughout the world. Increasingly, bariatric surgery is used for those with morbid obesity as a pivotal approach to achieve weight loss. Along with substantial weight loss, malabsorption of essential vitamins, minerals, and drugs also occurs. Therefore, more than ever, a better understanding of the physiology and mechanisms by which these deficiencies occur is essential. We review the normal physiology of vitamin, mineral, and drug absorption. This is followed by a description of currently performed bariatric surgeries in the United States. A detailed review of specific nutrient and mineral deficiency states is presented, based on the most significant studies published in the last two decades. Of note, screening and supplementation recommendations have been included. Drug absorption data after these procedures is presented and discussed. Studies were identified by searching the Cochrane Registry and MEDLINE using relevant search terms, as well as through review of the reference section of included manuscripts. Conclusions Bariatric surgery can be effectively used to achieve sustainable weight-loss in morbidly obese patients. It simultaneously brings forth important functional consequences on nutrient deficiencies and drug absorption that clinician’s must be aware of. Further prospective, randomized research on specific procedures and deficiencies is required. PMID:22746302

  17. Best evidence topic: Should ventral hernia repair be performed at the same time as bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Sait, Mohammed Saif; Som, Robin; Borg, Cynthia Michelle; Chang, Avril; Ramar, Sasindran

    2016-11-01

    A best evidence topic has been constructed using a described protocol. The three-part question addressed was: In morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, when a ventral hernia is picked up in clinic or intraoperatively is concurrent repair of the hernia better than delayed repair after weight loss with regards to complication rates? Using the reported search, 179 papers were found. 5 studies were deemed to be suitable to answer the question. All 5 studies assessed were non randomised studies either retrospective or prospective and the overall quality of these studies was poor. The outcomes assessed were incidence of complications associated with hernia repair (recurrence, infection) and deferral of repair (small bowel obstruction). The patient's symptoms and anatomy is important in determining the timing of repair. The evidence does not provide a consensus for the optimal timing of ventral hernia repair for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, with some of the selected studies contradicting each other. However, the studies do affirm the risk of small bowel obstruction if hernias are left alone. The reported rate of surgical site infection is low when mesh repair is performed at the same time as weight loss surgery. Until large volume, high quality randomized control trials can be performed, a case by case approach is best, where the patients' symptoms, anatomy, type of bariatric surgery and their personal preferences are considered, and an open discussion on the risks and benefits of each approach is undertaken.

  18. Best evidence topic: Should ventral hernia repair be performed at the same time as bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Sait, Mohammed Saif; Som, Robin; Borg, Cynthia Michelle; Chang, Avril; Ramar, Sasindran

    2016-11-01

    A best evidence topic has been constructed using a described protocol. The three-part question addressed was: In morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, when a ventral hernia is picked up in clinic or intraoperatively is concurrent repair of the hernia better than delayed repair after weight loss with regards to complication rates? Using the reported search, 179 papers were found. 5 studies were deemed to be suitable to answer the question. All 5 studies assessed were non randomised studies either retrospective or prospective and the overall quality of these studies was poor. The outcomes assessed were incidence of complications associated with hernia repair (recurrence, infection) and deferral of repair (small bowel obstruction). The patient's symptoms and anatomy is important in determining the timing of repair. The evidence does not provide a consensus for the optimal timing of ventral hernia repair for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, with some of the selected studies contradicting each other. However, the studies do affirm the risk of small bowel obstruction if hernias are left alone. The reported rate of surgical site infection is low when mesh repair is performed at the same time as weight loss surgery. Until large volume, high quality randomized control trials can be performed, a case by case approach is best, where the patients' symptoms, anatomy, type of bariatric surgery and their personal preferences are considered, and an open discussion on the risks and benefits of each approach is undertaken. PMID:27642515

  19. Implementing enhanced recovery after bariatric surgery protocol: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Proczko, Monika; Kaska, Lukasz; Twardowski, Pawel; Stepaniak, Pieter

    2016-02-01

    While the demand for bariatric surgery is increasing, hospital capacity remains limited. The ERABS (Enhanced Recovery After Bariatric Surgery) protocol has been implemented in a number of bariatric centers. We retrospectively compared the operating room logistics and postoperative complications between pre-ERABS and ERABS periods in an academic hospital. The primary endpoint was the length of stay in hospital. The secondary endpoints were turnover times-the time required for preparing the operating room for the next case, induction time (from induction of anesthesia until a patient is ready for surgery), surgical time (duration of surgery), procedure time (duration of stay in the operating room), and the incidence of re-admissions, re-operations and complications during admission and within 30 days after surgery. Of a total of 374 patients, 228 and 146 received surgery following the pre-ERABS and ERABS protocols, respectively. The length of hospital stay was significantly shortened from 3.7 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.1-4.7) days to 2.1 (95 % CI 1.6-2.6) days (P < 0.001). Procedure (surgical) times were shortened by 15 (7) min and 12 (5) min for gastric bypass and gastric sleeve surgery, respectively (P < 0.001 for both), by introducing the ERABS protocol. Induction times were reduced from 15.2 (95 % CI 14.3-16.1) min to 12.5 (95 % CI 11.7-13.3) min (P < 0.001).Turnover times were shortened significantly from 38 (95 % CI 44-32) min to 11 (95 % CI 8-14) min. The incidence of re-operations, re-admissions and complications did not change.

  20. From bariatric to metabolic surgery: Looking for a "disease modifier" surgery for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cordera, Renzo; Adami, Gian Franco

    2016-01-25

    In this review the recent evolution of the comprehension of clinical and metabolic consequences of bariatric surgery is depicted. At the beginning bariatric surgery aim was a significant and durable weight loss. Later on, it became evident that bariatric surgery was associated with metabolic changes, activated by unknown pathways, partially or totally independent of weight loss. Paradigm of this "metabolic" surgery is its effects on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In morbid obese subjects it was observed a dramatic metabolic response leading to decrease blood glucose, till diabetes remission, before the achievement of clinically significant weight loss, opening the avenue to search for putative anti-diabetic "intestinal" factors. Both proximal duodenal (still unknown) and distal (GLP1) signals have been suggested as hormonal effectors of surgery on blood glucose decrease. Despite these findings T2DM remission was never considered a primary indication for bariatric surgery but only a secondary one. Recently T2DM remission in obese subjects with body mass index (BMI) greater than 35 has become a primary aim for surgery. This change supports the idea that "metabolic surgery" definition could more appropriate than bariatric, allowing to explore the possibility that metabolic surgery could represent a "disease modifier" for T2DM. Therefore, several patients have undergone surgery with a primary aim of a definitive cure of T2DM and today this surgery can be proposed as an alternative therapy. How much surgery can be considered truly metabolic is still unknown. To be truly "metabolic" it should be demonstrated that surgery could cause T2DM remission not only in subjects with BMI > 35 but also with BMI < 35 or even < 30. Available evidence on this topic is discussed in this mini-review.

  1. Technology for behavioral assessment and intervention in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J Graham; Bond, Dale S; Sarwer, David B; Wing, Rena R

    2011-01-01

    Patients' behaviors have a substantial effect on postoperative outcomes after bariatric surgery. Thus, studying patients' behaviors is essential to learning how to optimize postoperative outcomes. To be most effective, this research should use the best tools available for assessing patient behavior. However, the traditional methods of behavioral assessment (e.g., questionnaires and clinical interviews) rely primarily on patients' retrospective self-report, which is often inaccurate. Despite their significant shortcomings, these types of assessments continue to predominate. However, technological advances now allow for much greater accuracy in the assessment of patient behaviors by way of devices, such as accelerometers and palmtop computers. Accelerometers allow for patients' physical activity to be measured objectively in great detail, in real-time, in the patients' natural environment. Ecologic momentary assessment using a palmtop computer or mobile telephone allows the assessment of important behaviors, such as eating and activity behaviors, to be measured, with many of the same advantages. Furthermore, new computer-assisted technologies are in development that will further facilitate behavioral assessment. Technology also has the potential to play an important role in the delivery of behavioral interventions aimed at bariatric surgery patients, given that Internet-based treatments have already proved effective for nonoperative weight loss and are often highly cost-effective and easily disseminable. Future research should evaluate the efficacy of these programs for bariatric patients.

  2. Bariatric Surgery in Women: A Boon Needs Special Care During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Archana; Nigam, Aruna

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of health related disorder and has reached epidemic proportions not only in developed nations but also in developing countries like India. Bariatric surgery has become a popular alternative for obese women planning pregnancy. A multidisciplinary approach involving the obstetrician, the bariatric surgeon and the nutritionist is required to manage pregnancy following bariatric surgery. Early consultation should be done to determine baseline nutritional status and the importance of regular check-ups must be explained. Nutritional supplementation should be tailored to the patient's status and the type of bariatric surgery performed. PMID:26672514

  3. Bariatric Surgery in Women: A Boon Needs Special Care During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of health related disorder and has reached epidemic proportions not only in developed nations but also in developing countries like India. Bariatric surgery has become a popular alternative for obese women planning pregnancy. A multidisciplinary approach involving the obstetrician, the bariatric surgeon and the nutritionist is required to manage pregnancy following bariatric surgery. Early consultation should be done to determine baseline nutritional status and the importance of regular check-ups must be explained. Nutritional supplementation should be tailored to the patient’s status and the type of bariatric surgery performed. PMID:26672514

  4. Patient Expectations of Bariatric and Body Contouring Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Anne; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Pusic, Andrea; Roessler, Kirsten K.; Rose, Michael; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient expectations are important in bariatric and body contouring surgery because the goals include improvements in health-related quality of life, appearance, and body image. The aim of this study was to identify patient expectations along the weight loss journey and/or body contouring surgery. Methods: This qualitative study took an interpretive description approach. Between September 2009 and February 2012, 49 patients were interviewed postbody contouring surgery. Data were analyzed using a line-by-line approach whereby expectations were identified and labeled as expected, unexpected, or neutral. Constant comparison was used to ensure coding was done consistently. Interviews continued until no new themes emerged. Results: Participants described expectations according to appearance, health-related quality of life, and patient experience of care. Two areas stood out in terms of unmet expectations and included appearance and physical health, ie, recovery from body contouring surgery. Most participants, who underwent bariatric surgery, expected neither the extent of excess skin after weight loss nor how the excess skin would make them look and feel. For recovery, participants did not expect that it would be as long or as hard as it was in reality. Conclusions: A full understanding of outcomes and expectations for this patient population is needed to enhance patient education and improve shared medical decision making. Education materials should be informed by the collection of evidence-based patient-reported outcome information using measures such as the BODY-Q. A patient-reported outcome scale measuring patient expectations is needed for obese and bariatric patients. PMID:27200256

  5. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In June 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding strategies for successful management and treatment of diabetes. This project came about when the Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the Ministry’s newly released Diabetes Strategy. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified five key areas in which evidence was needed. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five areas: insulin pumps, behavioural interventions, bariatric surgery, home telemonitoring, and community based care. For each area, an economic analysis was completed where appropriate and is described in a separate report. To review these titles within the Diabetes Strategy Evidence series, please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/masabout.html, Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetics: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity: An Evidence-Based Summary Community-Based Care for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telemonitoring for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Application of the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model (ODEM) to Determine the Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Selected Type 2 Diabetes Interventions in Ontario Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery for the management of diabetes in morbidly obese people. This report summarized evidence specific

  6. The influence of methods of bariatric surgery for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bužga, Marek; Maresova, Petra; Seidlerova, Adela; Zonča, Pavel; Holéczy, Pavol; Kuča, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The constantly growing incidence of obesity represents a risk of health complications for individuals, and is a growing economic burden for health care systems and society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bariatric surgery, specifically laparoscopic greater curve plication, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effect of bariatric surgery on the changes in blood pressure before, and 12 months after, surgery and in pharmacotherapy in the 12 months after surgery was analyzed. For achieving this purpose, 74 patients from the Obesity and Surgery Department of Vitkovice Hospital in Ostrava in the Czech Republic, were monitored. They were operated in 2011 and 2012. The Bonferroni method was used to test hypotheses about the impact of surgery on blood pressure and pharmacotherapy. One year after the surgery, systolic and diastolic blood pressure values decreased, both with no statistically significant difference between surgery types. Improvement was observed in 68% of cases, with 25% of patients discontinuing pharmacotherapy entirely. PMID:27143901

  7. Actual Situation of Thromboembolic Prophylaxis in Obesity Surgery: Data of Quality Assurance in Bariatric Surgery in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Christine; Luderer, D.; Weiner, R.; Horbach, T.; Ludwig, K.; Benedix, F.; Wolff, Stefanie; Knoll, C.; Lippert, H.; Manger, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based data on optimal approach for prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis (VTE) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in bariatric operations is discussed. Using antithrombotic prophylaxis weight adjusted the risk of VTE and its complications have to be balanced with the increased bleeding risk. Methods. Since 2005 the current situation for bariatric surgery has been examined by quality assurance study in Germany. As a prospective multicenter observational study, data on the type, regimen, and time course of VTE prophylaxis were documented. The incidences of clinically diagnosed VTE or PE were derived during the in-hospital course and follow up. Results. Overall, 11,835 bariatric procedures were performed between January 2005 and December 2010. Most performed procedures were 2730 gastric banding (GB); 4901 Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGBP) procedures, and 3026 sleeve gastrectomies (SG). Study collective includes 72.5% (mean BMI 48.1 kg/m2) female and 27.5% (mean BMI 50.5 kg/m2) male patients. Incidence of VTE was 0.06% and of PE 0.08%. Conclusion. VTE prophylaxis regimen depends on BMI and the type of procedure. Despite the low incidence of VTE and PE there is a lack of evidence. Therefore, prospective randomized studies are necessary to determine the optimal VTE prophylaxis for bariatric surgical patients. PMID:22848807

  8. Food quality in the late postoperative period of bariatric surgery: an evaluation using the bariatric food pyramid.

    PubMed

    Soares, Fernando Lucas; Bissoni de Sousa, Larissa; Corradi-Perini, Carla; Ramos da Cruz, Magda Rosa; Nunes, Mario Gilberto Jesus; Branco-Filho, Alcides José

    2014-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the treatment of obesity, but lifestyle and diet should be monitored after this procedure to ensure success. The Bariatric Food Pyramid was created basing on long-term nutritional care that proposes a standard of healthy living and eating habits considering gastric capacity and specific nutritional needs. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the life habits and diet quality of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have been recovering for at least 6 months) based on the specific food pyramid. Retrospective data analysis was performed using medical records of patients who had been followed for at least 6 months after bariatric surgery. The following data were collected from patient records: age, gender, education level (years), BMI (preoperative and postoperative), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) relative to the time of surgery, frequency of physical activity, use of nutritional supplements, usual dietary intake history, and fluid intake. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 172 patient records. In this study, there was a low prevalence of physical activity, use of vitamin-mineral supplements, and water intake. There also was low consumption of protein, fruit, vegetables, and vegetable oils. In addition, intake of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats were higher than the recommendations established by the pyramid. The results indicate that patients who have undergone bariatric surgery have an inadequate diet according to food evaluation with the specific pyramid. In the long term, this may lead to weight gain and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

  9. Long-term Follow-up After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Puzziferri, Nancy; Roshek, Thomas B.; Mayo, Helen G.; Gallagher, Ryan; Belle, Steven H.; Livingston, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Bariatric surgery is an accepted treatment for obesity. Despite extensive literature, few studies report long-term follow-up in cohorts with adequate retention rates. OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of evidence and treatment effectiveness 2 years after bariatric procedures for weight loss, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in severely obese adults. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched from 1946 through May 15, 2014. Search terms included bariatric surgery, individual bariatric procedures, and obesity. Studies were included if they described outcomes for gastric bypass, gastric band, or sleeve gastrectomy performed on patients with a body mass index of 35 or greater, had more than 2 years of outcome information, and had follow-up measures for at least 80% of the initial cohort. Two investigators reviewed each study and a third resolved study inclusion disagreements. FINDINGS Of 7371 clinical studies reviewed, 29 studies (0.4%, 7971 patients) met inclusion criteria. All gastric bypass studies (6 prospective cohorts, 5 retrospective cohorts) and sleeve gastrectomy studies (2 retrospective cohorts) had 95% confidence intervals for the reported mean, median, or both exceeding 50% excess weight loss. This amount of excess weight loss occurred in 31% of gastric band studies (9 prospective cohorts, 5 retrospective cohorts). The mean sample-size–weighted percentage of excess weight loss for gastric bypass was 65.7% (n = 3544) vs 45.0% (n = 4109) for gastric band. Nine studies measured comorbidity improvement. For type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin <6.5% without medication), sample-size–weighted remission rates were 66.7% for gastric bypass (n = 428) and 28.6% for gastric band (n = 96). For hypertension (blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg without medication), remission rates were 38.2% for gastric bypass (n = 808) and 17.4% for gastric band (n = 247). For hyperlipidemia (cholesterol <200 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein >40

  10. Baropodometric analyses of patients before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Ivan Leo; Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical component of the ground reaction force, plantar pressure, contact area of the feet and double-support time using static and dynamic (gait) baropodometry before and after bariatric surgery. METHODS: Sixteen individuals with a body mass index of between 35 and 55 were evaluated before and after bariatric surgery. Thirteen patients (81.3%) were female and three (18.8%) male and their average age was 46±10 (21-60) years. An FSCAN system (version 3848) was used for baropodometric analyses (1 km/h and 3 km/h). The peak plantar pressure and ground reaction force were measured for the rear foot and forefoot. The double-support time and foot contact area were measured during gait. RESULTS: There were reductions in the ground reaction force in the forefoot and rear foot and in the foot contact area in all evaluations and of the double-support time at 3 km/h, as well as a significant reduction in the body mass index at six months post-surgery. The peak pressure did not vary at 1 km/h and at 3 km/h, reductions in peak pressure were observed in the left and right rear feet and left forefoot. CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss after bariatric surgery resulted in decreases in the ground reaction force and contact area of the foot. Plantar pressure was decreased at 3 km/h, especially in the forefoot. There was an increase in rhythm because of a reduction in the double-support time at 3 km/h. PMID:26602521

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  12. Chronic Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Blockade May Not Induce Hypotension During Anaesthesia for Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Guido; Di Salvo, Claudio; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Abramo, Antonio; Fierabracci, Paola; Magno, Silvia; Piaggi, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Santini, Ferruccio

    2016-06-01

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) for the treatment of hypertensive obese patients is steadily increasing. Some studies have reported that the use of these drugs was associated with an increased risk of hypotensive episodes, during general anaesthesia. The number of bariatric procedures is also increasing worldwide, but there is a lack of studies investigating the hypotensive effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers in severely obese patients during general anaesthesia for bariatric surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate hemodynamic changes induced by general anaesthesia in obese patients chronically treated with ACE-I or ARB compared to a control group not treated with antihypertensive therapy. Fourteen obese subjects (mean body mass index (BMI) 47.5 kg/m(2)) treated with ACE-I or ARB and twelve obese (mean BMI 45.7 kg/m2) controls not treated with antihypertensive therapy underwent general anaesthesia to perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored continuously and registered at different time points: T0 before induction, then at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min after induction, and the last time point taken following recovery from anaesthesia. A progressive reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was observed without significant differences between the two groups. A similar trend of heart rate values was observed. In conclusion, our pilot study suggests that RAS blockers may be continued during the perioperative period in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, without increasing the risk of hypotensive episodes.

  13. Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Engström, My; Forsberg, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was an in-depth investigation of the change process experienced by patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective interview study was performed prior to as well as 1 and 2 years after surgery. Data analyses of the transcribed interviews were performed by means of the Grounded Theory method. A core category was identified: Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, feeling deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area. The control thus achieved in turn affected the participants' relationship to themselves, their roles in society, and the family as well as to health care. One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss. In family and society they set limits and in relation to health care staff they felt their concern and reported satisfaction with the surgery. After 2 years, fear of weight gain resurfaced and their self-image was modified to be more realistic. They were no longer totally self-confident about their condition, but realised that maintaining control was a matter of struggle to obtaining a foundation of sustainable control. Between 1 and 2 years after surgery, the physical control mechanism over eating habits started to more or less fade for all participants. An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome. PMID:21339891

  14. [Is the morbid obesity surgery profitable in times of crisis? A cost-benefit analysis of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Santos, Raquel; Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Estévez Fernandez, Sergio; del Castillo Dejardin, Daniel; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Frutos Bernal, Dolores; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Masdevall Noguera, Carlos; Torres García, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Morbid obesity is a serious health problem whose prevalence is increasing. Expensive co-morbidities are associated to these patients, as well as a reduction in the survival. Bariatric surgery resolves the co-morbidities (type 2 diabetes mellitus, 86.6%; cardiovascular risk, 79.0%; obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, 83.6%; hypertension, 61.7%), reduces the mortality rate (among 31-40%), and increases the morbid obese patients survival over a 10-years period. It provides significant savings for the National Health System. The obese patients consume a 20% plus of health resources and 68% plus of drugs than general population. Bariatric surgery requires an initial investment (diagnosis-related group cost: 7,468 €), but it is recovered in a cost-effectiveness ratio of 2.5 years. Significant savings are obtained from the third year. To the direct economic benefits associated with reduced health expenditures it should be added an increase in tax collection (sick leave and unemployment reduction is estimated in 18%, with a productivity increase of 57% for self-employed people). Bariatric surgery is one of the most cost-effective procedures in the healthcare system. PMID:23628503

  15. [Is the morbid obesity surgery profitable in times of crisis? A cost-benefit analysis of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Santos, Raquel; Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Estévez Fernandez, Sergio; del Castillo Dejardin, Daniel; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Frutos Bernal, Dolores; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Masdevall Noguera, Carlos; Torres García, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Morbid obesity is a serious health problem whose prevalence is increasing. Expensive co-morbidities are associated to these patients, as well as a reduction in the survival. Bariatric surgery resolves the co-morbidities (type 2 diabetes mellitus, 86.6%; cardiovascular risk, 79.0%; obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, 83.6%; hypertension, 61.7%), reduces the mortality rate (among 31-40%), and increases the morbid obese patients survival over a 10-years period. It provides significant savings for the National Health System. The obese patients consume a 20% plus of health resources and 68% plus of drugs than general population. Bariatric surgery requires an initial investment (diagnosis-related group cost: 7,468 €), but it is recovered in a cost-effectiveness ratio of 2.5 years. Significant savings are obtained from the third year. To the direct economic benefits associated with reduced health expenditures it should be added an increase in tax collection (sick leave and unemployment reduction is estimated in 18%, with a productivity increase of 57% for self-employed people). Bariatric surgery is one of the most cost-effective procedures in the healthcare system.

  16. An Untargeted Metabolomics Approach to Characterize Short-Term and Long-Term Metabolic Changes after Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Narath, Sophie H; Mautner, Selma I; Svehlikova, Eva; Schultes, Bernd; Pieber, Thomas R; Sinner, Frank M; Gander, Edgar; Libiseller, Gunnar; Schimek, Michael G; Sourij, Harald; Magnes, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently one of the most effective treatments for obesity and leads to significant weight reduction, improved cardiovascular risk factors and overall survival in treated patients. To date, most studies focused on short-term effects of bariatric surgery on the metabolic profile and found high variation in the individual responses to surgery. The aim of this study was to identify relevant metabolic changes not only shortly after bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) but also up to one year after the intervention by using untargeted metabolomics. 132 serum samples taken from 44 patients before surgery, after hospital discharge (1-3 weeks after surgery) and at a 1-year follow-up during a prospective study (NCT01271062) performed at two study centers (Austria and Switzerland). The samples included 24 patients with type 2 diabetes at baseline, thereof 9 with diabetes remission after one year. The samples were analyzed by using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS, HILIC-QExactive). Raw data was processed with XCMS and drift-corrected through quantile regression based on quality controls. 177 relevant metabolic features were selected through Random Forests and univariate testing and 36 metabolites were identified. Identified metabolites included trimethylamine-N-oxide, alanine, phenylalanine and indoxyl-sulfate which are known markers for cardiovascular risk. In addition we found a significant decrease in alanine after one year in the group of patients with diabetes remission relative to non-remission. Our analysis highlights the importance of assessing multiple points in time in subjects undergoing bariatric surgery to enable the identification of biomarkers for treatment response, cardiovascular benefit and diabetes remission. Key-findings include different trend pattern over time for various metabolites and demonstrated that short term changes should not necessarily be used to identify important long

  17. An Untargeted Metabolomics Approach to Characterize Short-Term and Long-Term Metabolic Changes after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Narath, Sophie H.; Mautner, Selma I.; Svehlikova, Eva; Schultes, Bernd; Pieber, Thomas R.; Sinner, Frank M.; Gander, Edgar; Libiseller, Gunnar; Schimek, Michael G.; Sourij, Harald; Magnes, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently one of the most effective treatments for obesity and leads to significant weight reduction, improved cardiovascular risk factors and overall survival in treated patients. To date, most studies focused on short-term effects of bariatric surgery on the metabolic profile and found high variation in the individual responses to surgery. The aim of this study was to identify relevant metabolic changes not only shortly after bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) but also up to one year after the intervention by using untargeted metabolomics. 132 serum samples taken from 44 patients before surgery, after hospital discharge (1–3 weeks after surgery) and at a 1-year follow-up during a prospective study (NCT01271062) performed at two study centers (Austria and Switzerland). The samples included 24 patients with type 2 diabetes at baseline, thereof 9 with diabetes remission after one year. The samples were analyzed by using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS, HILIC-QExactive). Raw data was processed with XCMS and drift-corrected through quantile regression based on quality controls. 177 relevant metabolic features were selected through Random Forests and univariate testing and 36 metabolites were identified. Identified metabolites included trimethylamine-N-oxide, alanine, phenylalanine and indoxyl-sulfate which are known markers for cardiovascular risk. In addition we found a significant decrease in alanine after one year in the group of patients with diabetes remission relative to non-remission. Our analysis highlights the importance of assessing multiple points in time in subjects undergoing bariatric surgery to enable the identification of biomarkers for treatment response, cardiovascular benefit and diabetes remission. Key-findings include different trend pattern over time for various metabolites and demonstrated that short term changes should not necessarily be used to identify important long

  18. Understanding the role of psychopathology in bariatric surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marek, R J; Ben-Porath, Y S; Heinberg, L J

    2016-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity; however, a subset of patients who undergo this procedure regain weight or achieve suboptimal weight loss results. A large number of studies have examined whether psychological variables play a role in weight loss surgery outcome. Although presurgical psychopathology has been found to be associated with suboptimal results in some studies, this literature is equivocal. These inconsistent findings are reviewed and considered in the context of contemporary models of psychopathology. More specifically, the review focuses on the limitations of atheoretical, descriptive diagnostic systems and examines whether comorbidity within the mood/anxiety disorders, impulse control/substance use disorders and thought disorders can account for the inconsistent findings reported to date. Contemporary models of psychopathology are highlighted and linked to the Research Domain Criteria, which have been advanced by the National Institute of Health. Means for assessing psychological constructs congruent with these models are reviewed. Recommendations are made for standardizing approaches to investigating how psychopathology contributes to suboptimal bariatric surgery outcomes. PMID:26783067

  19. PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS ELIGIBLE FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Graziela Aparecida Nogueira de Almeida; GIAMPIETRO, Helenice Brizolla; BELARMINO, Lídia Barbieri; SALGADO-JÚNIOR, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The psychologist who works in bariatric surgery has a role to receive, evaluate, prepare and educate the patient who will undergo the surgical procedure. Psychological evaluation becomes important in so far as allows us to obtain data on personal and familiar history and allow tracing of possible psychopathology. Aim: To collect data on psychological evaluations of patients in a bariatric surgery service of a public hospital in order to describe the psychological profile of patients in this service. Method: Data were collected from 827 patients between 2001 and 2015, using data from an interview, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Binge Eating Scale (BES). Results: The mean age of patients before surgery was 39 years+/- 10, the mean BMI was 51 kg/m²+7, and most patients (81%) were female. The average score on the BDI was 14.8+8 and women had significantly higher scores than men. On the BAI the average score was 11+8 and on the ECAP was 14+8, both with no difference between groups. Conclusions: Psychosocial characteristics of the patients points to the significant presence of indicators of depression, with low levels of anxiety and binge eating. PMID:27683771

  20. The impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindekilde, N; Gladstone, B P; Lübeck, M; Nielsen, J; Clausen, L; Vach, W; Jones, A

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to review the obesity literature in order to assess the impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life and the between-study variation by examining the standardized mean magnitude of effect in change in the levels of quality of life. The following databases EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies examining change in quality of life in adults receiving bariatric surgery for obesity. Seventy-two studies were included with a total of 9,433 participants treated for obesity with bariatric surgery. The average impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life corresponded to an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80-0.96), indicating that bariatric surgery has a significant positive influence on quality of life in general. The impact varied considerably across studies with bariatric surgery showing a significantly greater positive influence on physical quality of life compared to mental quality of life. Bariatric surgery is effective in improving quality of life, especially when looking at physical well-being. Greater focus on the psychological well-being of the person undergoing surgery for obesity may lead to a better post-surgery prognosis for more people.

  1. Health inequity in access to bariatric surgery: a protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is the only weight-loss treatment available that results in both sustained weight loss and improvements of obesity-related comorbidities. Individuals who meet the eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery are generally older, come from racial or ethnic minorities, are economically disadvantaged, and have low levels of education. However, the population who actually receives bariatric surgery does not reflect the individuals who need it the most. The objective is to conduct a systematic review of the literature exploring the inequities to the access of bariatric surgery. Methods/Design EMBASE and Medline databases will be searched for observational studies that compared at least one of the PROGRESS-PLUS sociodemographic characteristics of patients eligible for bariatric surgery to those who actually received the procedure. Articles published in the year 1980 to present with no language restrictions will be included. For inclusion, studies must only include adults (≥18 years old) who meet National Institutes of Health (NIH) eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery defined as having either (1) a body mass index (BMI) of 40 kg/m2 or greater; or (2) BMI of 35 kg/m2 or greater with significant weight-related comorbidities. Eligible interventions will include malabsorptive, restrictive, and mixed bariatric procedures. Discussion There appears to be inequities in access to bariatric surgery. In order to resolve the health inequity in the treatment of obesity, a synthesis of the literature is needed to explore and identify barriers to accessing bariatric surgery. It is anticipated that the results from this systematic review will have important implications for advancing solutions to minimize inequities in the utilization of bariatric surgery. http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42013004920. PMID:24559394

  2. [Nocturnal eating in obese patients prior to bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Rein, Anna Katharina; Mühlhans, Barbara; de Zwaan, Martina

    2007-11-01

    Nocturnal eating is common among obese patients prior to bariatric surgery. Little is known about the relationship between nocturnal eating, eating-related and general psychopathology, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). A group of 148 obese patients (mean BMI 49.3, SD 7.8) prior to bariatric surgery were investigated. We compared patients who reported nocturnal eating at least once in the last 4 weeks with patients without nocturnal eating episodes. Patients completed a battery of questionnaires assessing eating related and general psychopathology and quality of life. Twenty-nine (19.6%) patients reported nocturnal eating (eating after waking up at night) during the last 28 nights, men and women did not differ in frequency of nocturnal eating. Patients with nocturnal eating reported a significantly higher BMI (kg/m(2)), more feelings of hunger, and significantly more impairment in the mental aspects of HRQOL. The other measures of HRQOL showed only minor differences. Measures of general psychopathology (depression and anxiety) also differed significantly with nocturnal eating patients reporting significantly more impairment. Binge eating disorder and nocturnal eating showed no association.

  3. From bariatric to metabolic surgery: definition of a new discipline and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Bariatric surgery indicates a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) surgical procedures originally designed to induce weight reduction in morbidly obese patients. Benefits of bariatric surgery, however, extend well beyond weight loss and include dramatic improvement of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and reduction of overall mortality. Furthermore, studies in rodents and humans show that the anti-diabetes effect of certain bariatric procedures results from a variety of neuroendocrine and metabolic mechanisms secondary to changes in GI anatomy. The recognition that benefits and mechanisms of GI operations are not limited to weight reduction provided a rationale for the emergence of metabolic surgery intended as a surgical approach primarily aimed to the treatment of diabetes and metabolic disease. Consistent with the goals of improving glycemic and metabolic control, in contrast to mere weight loss, metabolic surgery implies the development of a new model of care distinct from traditional bariatric surgery. This paper discusses the definition of metabolic surgery and its clinical practice.

  4. IMPACT OF DEFICIENT NUTRITION IN BONE MASS AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Tatiana Munhoz da Rocha Lemos; PAGANOTO, Mariana; RADOMINSKI, Rosana Bento; BORBA, Victoria Zeghbi Cochenski

    2016-01-01

    Background: Essential nutrients are considered for the prevention of the bone loss that occurs after bariatric surgery. Aim: Evaluate nutrients involved in bone metabolism, and relate to serum concentrations of calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone, and the use of supplements and sun exposure on the bone mass of patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery. Methods: An observational study, with patients who had undergone the surgery 12 or more months previously, operated group (OG), compared to a control group (CG). Results: Were included 56 in OG and 27 in the CG. The mean age was 36.4±8.5 years. The individuals in the OG, compared to CG, consumed inadequate amounts of protein and daily calcium. The OG had a higher prevalence of low sun exposure, lower levels of 25OH Vitamin D (21.3±10.9 vs. 32.1±11.8 ng/dl), and increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone (68.1±32.9 vs. 39.9±11.9 pg/ml, p<0.001). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was present only in the OG (41.7%). The mean lumbar spine bone mineral density was lower in the OG. Four individuals from the OG had low bone mineral density for chronological age, and no one from the CG. Conclusion: The dietary components that affect bone mass in patients undergoing bariatric surgery were inadequate. The supplementation was insufficient and the sun exposure was low. These changes were accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism and a high prevalence of low bone mass in lumbar spine in these subjects. PMID:27120738

  5. [Bariatric surgery is more efficient than medical treatment in achieving remission in diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Klein, Mads; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2013-04-01

    Observational studies have shown that bariatric surgery can lead to remission of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMII), but randomized controlled trials have been lacking. Recently, randomized controlled trials comparing bariatric surgery with optimal medical treatment in patients suffering from poorly controlled DMII, have been performed. These trials show that bariatric surgery in general, and the malabsorptive procedures in particular, are more effective than medical treatment in achieving remission of DMII. These procedures should therefore be considered in the treatment of patients with DMII and obesity.

  6. The Use of Rat and Mouse Models in Bariatric Surgery Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Thomas A.; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been proven to be a crucial tool for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying bariatric surgery in general and individual techniques in particular. By using a translational approach, most of these studies have been performed in rodents and have helped to understand how bariatric surgery may or may not work. However, data from studies using animal models should always be critically evaluated for their transferability to the human physiology. It is, therefore, the aim of this review to summarize both advantages and limitations of data generated by animal based experiments designed to investigate and understand the physiological mechanisms at the root of bariatric surgery. PMID:27547753

  7. Bariatric Surgery in the Caribbean: Is It Safe in a Low-Volume, Third World Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Dilip; Singh, Yardesh; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Maharaj, Ravi; Teelucksingh, Surujpal

    2012-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a well-recognized modality of management of obesity. In addition to obesity, it effectively controls diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. It has been recommended that bariatric surgery should be done in “designated centers” of excellence where there is a high volume of case turnover. Caribbean nations are not spared from the global spread of the obesity epidemic; however, not many patients get the benefits of bariatric surgery. This study aimed to establish that bariatric surgery could be safely and efficiently undertaken in a low-volume center outside the “designated centers” with comparable patient outcomes even in a third world setting. Though “patient numbers” generally imply better outcome, in an environment where these numbers cannot be achieved, patients should not be denied the access to surgery once good outcomes are achieved. PMID:22645677

  8. Recent advances in the modification of taste and food preferences following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D; de Silva, Taniya; Tzeng, Tony H; Chiang, Monica C; Hsia, Daniel S

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence indicating that bariatric surgery provides durable weight loss and health benefits to patients who are obese and have comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, there are still many questions related to mechanisms of metabolic improvement, predictors of success/failure, and long term consequences, which need to be answered. More recently, there has been a particular interest in the modulation of taste and food preferences that occurs after bariatric surgery and how this affects weight loss in different individuals. Animal models as well as human studies have shed some light on the role of taste in changing food preferences and how these changes may affect weight loss after surgery. The goal of this review is to discuss the physiological and behavioral consequences of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and T2D, with particular emphasis on recent studies describing bariatric surgery-induced modifications in taste perception and food preferences.

  9. Kidney Function in Severely Obese Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nianzhou; Jenkins, Todd M; Nehus, Edward; Inge, Thomas H; Michalsky, Marc P; Harmon, Carroll M.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Brandt, Mary L.; Courcoulas, Anita; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe objective measures of kidney function and analyze factors associated with kidney dysfunction in severely obese adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery. Design and Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 242 adolescent participants in the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) study before weight loss surgery. Kidney status was assessed by measuring urine albumin creatinine ratio to determine microalbuminuria and by calculating serum cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to assess kidney function. Results Mean age and median body mass index (BMI) were 17.1 years and 50.5kg/m2, respectively; 76% were females and 65% were non-Hispanic white race. Fourteen percent of the cohort had microalbuminuria, and 3% had macroalbuminuria; 3% had eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2, and 7.1% had eGFR >150 ml/min/1.73m2. In adjusted analyses, female gender and increasing ferritin levels were significantly associated with the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. Increasing BMI and HOMA-IR values were significantly associated with lower eGFR. Conclusions A significant number of severely obese adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery have evidence of early kidney dysfunction. Longitudinal studies following weight loss surgery in these individuals are needed to determine whether these kidney abnormalities are reversible following weight loss therapy. PMID:25376399

  10. Race, socioeconomic status, and the use of bariatric surgery in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Birkmeyer, Nancy J O; Gu, Niya

    2012-02-01

    Studies examining the characteristics of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the USA have concluded that the procedure is not being used equitably. We used population-based data from Michigan to explore disparities in the use of bariatric surgery by gender, race, and socioeconomic status. We constructed a summary measure of socioeconomic status (SES) for Michigan postal ZIP codes using data from the 2000 census and divided the population into quintiles according to SES. We then used data from the state drivers' license list and 2004-2005 state inpatient and ambulatory surgery databases to examine population-based rates of morbid obesity and bariatric surgery in adults according to gender, race, and socioeconomic status. There is an inverse linear relationship between SES and morbid obesity. In the lowest SES quintile, 13% of females and 7% of males have a body mass index >40 compared to 4% of females and males in the highest SES quintile. Overall rates of bariatric surgery were highest for black females (29.4/10,000), followed by white (21.3/10,000), and other racial minority (8.6/10,000) females. Rates of bariatric surgery were low (<6/10,000) for males of all racial groups. An inverse linear relationship was observed between SES and rates of bariatric surgery among whites. However, for racial minorities, rates of surgery are lower in the lowest SES quintiles with the highest rates of bariatric surgery in the medium or highest SES quintiles. In contrast with prior studies, we do not find evidence of wide disparities in the use of bariatric surgery.

  11. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In June 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding strategies for successful management and treatment of diabetes. This project came about when the Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the Ministry’s newly released Diabetes Strategy. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified five key areas in which evidence was needed. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five areas: insulin pumps, behavioural interventions, bariatric surgery, home telemonitoring, and community based care. For each area, an economic analysis was completed where appropriate and is described in a separate report. To review these titles within the Diabetes Strategy Evidence series, please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/masabout.html, Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetics: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity: An Evidence-Based Summary Community-Based Care for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telemonitoring for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Application of the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model (ODEM) to Determine the Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Selected Type 2 Diabetes Interventions in Ontario Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery for the management of diabetes in morbidly obese people. This report summarized evidence specific

  12. Changes in Testosterone Levels and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels in Extremely Obese Men after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Laichuthai, Nitchakarn; Suwannasrisuk, Preaw; Houngngam, Natnicha; Udomsawaengsup, Suthep; Snabboon, Thiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obesity is a risk factor for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men. Weight loss has been shown to improve hypogonadism in obese men. This study evaluated the early changes in sex hormones profile after bariatric surgery. Methods. This is a prospective study including 29 morbidly obese men. Main outcomes were changes in serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (cFT), SHBG, estradiol, adiponectin, and leptin at 1 and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean age of patients was 31 ± 8 years and the mean BMI was 56.8 ± 11.7 kg/m2. Fifteen patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 14 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy. At baseline, 22 patients (75.9%) had either low TT levels (<10.4 nmol/L) or low cFT levels (<225 pmol/L). Total testosterone and SHBG levels increased significantly at 1 month after surgery (p ≤ 0.001). At 6 months after surgery, TT and cFT increased significantly (p ≤ 0.001) and 22 patients (75.9%) had normalized TT and cFT levels. There were no changes in estradiol levels at either 1 month or 6 months after surgery. Conclusions. Increases in TT and SHBG levels occurred early at 1 month after bariatric surgery while improvements in cFT levels were observed at 6 months after bariatric surgery. PMID:27725831

  13. Energetic Adaptations Persist after Bariatric Surgery in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Nancy F.; Brandt, Mary L.; Wong, William W.; Liu, Yan; Mehta, Nitesh R.; Wilson, Theresa A.; Adolph, Anne L.; Puyau, Maurice R.; Vohra, Firoz A.; Shypailo, Roman J.; Zakeri, Issa F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods post-surgery. Energetic, metabolic and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. Design and Methods At baseline and at 1.5, 6 and 12 months post-baseline, 24-h room calorimetry, body composition and fasting blood biochemistries were measured in eleven obese adolescents relative to five matched controls. Results In RYGB group, mean weight loss was 44±19 kg at 12 months. Total energy expenditure (TEE), activity EE, basal metabolic rate (BMR), sleep EE and walking EE significantly declined by 1.5 months (p=0.001) and remained suppressed at 6 and 12 months. Adjusted for age, sex, FFM and FM, EE was still lower than baseline (p=0.001). Decreases in serum insulin, leptin, and T3, gut hormones, and urinary norepinephrine (NE) paralleled the decline in EE. Adjusted changes in TEE, BMR and/or sleep EE were associated with decreases in insulin, HOMA, leptin, TSH, total T3, PYY3–36, GLP2 and urinary NE and epinephrine (p=0.001–0.05). Conclusions Energetic adaptations in response to RYGB-induced weight loss are associated with changes in insulin, adipokines, thyroid hormones, gut hormones and sympathetic nervous system activity, and persist 12 months post-surgery. PMID:25707380

  14. Medication Use Among Patients Prior to Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jennifer Padden; Gray, Erica L.; Yu, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to describe the most common medications reported by candidates for weight loss surgery and to consider the potential implications for patient care. Methods: A secondary data analysis of data from bariatric surgery patients enrolled in a randomized, controlled trial. At study entry, participants recorded their use of prescription medications they had taken in the previous 90 days. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)/Defined Daily Dose (DDD) Index 2014 was used to classify medications. Results: Participants (n=265) were 85.7% female and 83.0% white. Mean body mass index was 47.9±6.5 kg/m2, and age was 45.1±11 years. The average number of medications was 4.4±4.1, and the median was 3. The top three anatomical main groups were the cardiovascular system, alimentary tract and metabolism, and nervous system (28.2%, 21.6%, and 21.3% of all medications, respectively). The top therapeutic subgroups were drugs used in diabetes, psychoanaleptics, and agents acting on the renin-angiotensin system (12%, 11.3%, and 8.2% of all medications, respectively). Conclusions: Candidates for weight loss surgery report taking medications associated with obesity-related comorbidities such as diabetes, depression, and hypertension. Although many may be able to eliminate these medications, others will require close monitoring and dosage adjustment after surgery. PMID:26421247

  15. Nutritional Optic Neuropathy Caused by Copper Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Yuna; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed severe bilateral visual loss 4 years after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 24 years after vertical banded gastroplasty. Her serum copper level was 35 μg/dL (normal, 80-155 μg/dL). She was prescribed elemental copper tablets. Because her methylmalonic acid was slightly elevated, she received vitamin B12 injections as well. Five weeks later, she reported that her vision had improved and, at 10 months, her vision had recovered from 20/400 bilaterally to 20/25 in each eye. This case highlights the importance of checking copper levels in addition to the "more routine" vitamin levels, such as B1, B6, B12, E, and serum folate in patients with suspected nutritional optic neuropathy after bariatric surgery, particularly if it involved a bypass procedure. PMID:26828841

  16. The prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Khanbhai, M; Dubb, S; Patel, K; Ahmed, A; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    As bariatric surgery rates continue to climb, anaemia will become an increasing concern. We assessed the prevalence of anaemia and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Prospective data (anaemia [haemoglobin <12 g/dL], haematinics and length of hospital stay) was analysed on 400 hundred patients undergoing elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Results from a prospective database of 1530 patients undergoing elective general surgery were used as a baseline. Fifty-seven patients (14%) were anaemic pre-operatively, of which 98% were females. Median MCV (fL) and overall median ferritin (μg/L) was lower in anaemic patients (83 vs. 86, p=0.001) and (28 vs. 61, p<0.0001) respectively. In the elective general surgery patients, prevalence of anaemia was similar (14% vs. 16%) but absolute iron deficiency was more common in those undergoing bariatric surgery; microcytosis p<0.0001, ferritin <30 p<0.0001. Mean length of stay (days) was increased in the anaemic compared to in the non-anaemic group (2.7 vs. 1.9) and patients who were anaemic immediately post-operatively, also had an increased length of stay (2.7 vs. 1.9), p<0.05. Absolute iron deficiency was more common in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. In bariatric patients with anaemia there was an overall increased length of hospital stay.

  17. A Large Animal Survival Model to Evaluate Bariatric Surgery Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Simianu, Vlad V.; Sham, Jonathan G.; Wright, Andrew S.; Stewart, Skye D.; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael; Cummings, David E.; Flum, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) on type 2 diabetes mellitus is thought to result from upper and/or lower gut hormone alterations. Evidence supporting these mechanisms is incomplete, in part because of limitations in relevant bariatric-surgery animal models, specifically the lack of naturally insulin-resistant large animals. With overfeeding, Ossabaw swine develop a robust metabolic syndrome, and may be suitable for studying post-surgical physiology. Whether bariatric surgery is feasible in these animals with acceptable survival is unknown. Methods Thirty-two Ossabaws were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet to induce obesity and insulin resistance. These animals were assigned to RYGB (n = 8), RYGB with vagotomy (RYGB-V, n = 5), gastrojejunostomy (GJ, n = 10), GJ with duodenal exclusion (GJD, n = 7), or sham operation (n = 2) and were euthanized 60 days post-operatively. Post-operative changes in weight and food intake are reported. Results Survival to scheduled necropsy among surgical groups was 77%, living an average of 57 days post-operatively. Cardiac arrest under anesthesia occurred in 4 pigs. Greatest weight loss (18.0% ± 6%) and food intake decrease (57.0% ± 20%) occurred following RYGB while animals undergoing RYGB-V showed only 6.6% ± 3% weight loss despite 50.8% ± 25% food intake decrease. GJ (12.7% ± 4%) and GJD (1.2% ± 1%) pigs gained weight, but less than sham controls (13.4% ± 10%). Conclusions A survival model of metabolic surgical procedures is feasible, leads to significant weight loss, and provides the opportunity to evaluate new interventions and subtle variations in surgical technique (e.g. vagus nerve sparing) that may provide new mechanistic insights. PMID:27213116

  18. Changes in Weight and Comorbidities among Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: 1-Year Results from the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database

    PubMed Central

    Messiah, Sarah E.; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Winegar, Deborah; Sherif, Bintu; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Reichard, Kirk W.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Miller, Tracie L.; Livingstone, Alan S.; De La Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is one of the few effective treatments for morbid obesity but the weight loss and other health related outcomes for this procedure in large, diverse adolescent patient populations are not well characterized. Objective To analyze the prospective Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database (BOLD) to determine the weight loss and health related outcomes in adolescents. Setting BOLD data is collected from 423 surgeons at 360 facilities in the United States. Methods Main outcome measures included anthropometric and comorbidity status at baseline (n=890) and at 3 (n=786), 6 (n=541), and 12 (n=259) months after surgery. Adolescents (75% female; 68% non-Hispanic white, 14% Hispanic, 11% non-Hispanic black, and 6% other) age 11-to-19 years were included in the analyses. Results The overall one year mean weight loss for those who underwent gastric bypass surgery was more than twice that of those who underwent adjustable gastric band surgery (48.6 kg versus 20 kg, P<0.001). Similar results were found for all other anthropometric changes and comparisons over one year between surgery types (P<0.001). In general, gastric bypass patients reported more improvement versus adjustable gastric band patients in comorbidities one year after surgery. There were a total of 45 readmissions among gastric bypass patients and 10 among adjustable gastric band patients with 29 and 8 reoperations required, respectively. Conclusions Weight loss at 3-, 6-, and 12-months after surgery is approximately double in adolescent males and females who underwent gastric bypass surgery versus those who underwent adjustable gastric band surgery. Bariatric surgery can safely and substantially reduce weight and related comorbidities in morbidly obese adolescents for at least 1 year. PMID:22542199

  19. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  20. Beyond BMI: the need for new guidelines governing the use of bariatric and metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cummings, David E; Cohen, Ricardo V

    2014-02-01

    Bariatric surgery use is largely governed worldwide by a 1991 National Institutes of Health consensus statement that advocates BMI as the primary operative criterion and restricts surgery to severely obese patients. These guidelines have been enormously valuable in standardising practice, thereby facilitating accumulation of a copious database of information regarding long-term surgical benefits and risks, from vast clinical experience and research. However, the National Institutes of Health recommendations had important limitations from the outset and are now gravely outdated. They do not account for remarkable advances in minimally invasive surgical techniques or the development of entirely new procedures. In the two decades since they were crafted, we have gained far greater understanding of the dramatic, weight-independent benefits of some operations on metabolic diseases, especially type 2 diabetes, and of the inadequacy of BMI as a primary criterion for surgical selection. Furthermore, there is now a substantial and rapidly burgeoning body of level-1 evidence from randomised trials comparing surgical versus non-surgical approaches to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other metabolic diseases, including among only mildly obese or merely overweight patients. Herein, we present arguments to impel the development of new guidelines for the use of bariatric and so-called metabolic surgery to inform clinical practice and insurance compensation.

  1. Beyond BMI: the need for new guidelines governing the use of bariatric and metabolic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David E; Cohen, Ricardo V

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery use is largely governed worldwide by a 1991 National Institutes of Health consensus statement that advocates BMI as the primary operative criterion and restricts surgery to severely obese patients. These guidelines have been enormously valuable in standardising practice, thereby facilitating accumulation of a copious database of information regarding long-term surgical benefits and risks, from vast clinical experience and research. However, the National Institutes of Health recommendations had important limitations from the outset and are now gravely outdated. They do not account for remarkable advances in minimally invasive surgical techniques or the development of entirely new procedures. In the two decades since they were crafted, we have gained far greater understanding of the dramatic, weight-independent benefits of some operations on metabolic diseases, especially type 2 diabetes, and of the inadequacy of BMI as a primary criterion for surgical selection. Furthermore, there is now a substantial and rapidly burgeoning body of level-1 evidence from randomised trials comparing surgical versus non-surgical approaches to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other metabolic diseases, including among only mildly obese or merely overweight patients. Herein, we present arguments to impel the development of new guidelines for the use of bariatric and so-called metabolic surgery to inform clinical practice and insurance compensation. PMID:24622721

  2. Experiences of obesity among Saudi Arabian women contemplating bariatric surgery: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Alqout, Ohud; Reynolds, Frances

    2014-05-01

    This study explored experiences of obesity, its perceived causes and motives for surgery, as described by seven Saudi women contemplating bariatric surgery. The women experienced cultural restrictions on their physical and social activities. Obesity embodied these restrictions, attracting stigma and moral failure. Traditional clothing, foods, hospitality norms and limited outdoor female activities were regarded as barriers to weight loss. Bariatric surgery was chosen to protect health and to access normative female roles. Some were encouraged by relatives who had undergone surgery. Opting for surgery reflected both participants' sense of powerlessness to self-manage weight and the social acceptability, within their family context, of this biomedical approach.

  3. Experiences of obesity among Saudi Arabian women contemplating bariatric surgery: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Alqout, Ohud; Reynolds, Frances

    2014-05-01

    This study explored experiences of obesity, its perceived causes and motives for surgery, as described by seven Saudi women contemplating bariatric surgery. The women experienced cultural restrictions on their physical and social activities. Obesity embodied these restrictions, attracting stigma and moral failure. Traditional clothing, foods, hospitality norms and limited outdoor female activities were regarded as barriers to weight loss. Bariatric surgery was chosen to protect health and to access normative female roles. Some were encouraged by relatives who had undergone surgery. Opting for surgery reflected both participants' sense of powerlessness to self-manage weight and the social acceptability, within their family context, of this biomedical approach. PMID:23479306

  4. Resolution of Type 2 Diabetes Following Bariatric Surgery: Implications for Adults and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Radha; Brown, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery is now widely reported to ameliorate or resolve type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults. Some clinical investigators even suggest its use as an early therapeutic intervention for type 2 diabetes in patients not meeting standard criteria for bariatric surgery. However, little is known about the exact mechanisms explaining the metabolic consequences, and much active investigation is underway to identify hormonal changes leading to diabetes resolution. This review includes a detailed description of various bariatric surgical procedures, including the latest less-invasive techniques, and a summary of current data providing insight into the short- and long-term metabolic effects. We outline current hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these surgical procedures affect diabetes and report on morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the available data on bariatric surgery in adolescent patients, including special considerations in this potentially vulnerable population. PMID:20615109

  5. Place of upper endoscopy before and after bariatric surgery: A multicenter experience with 3219 patients

    PubMed Central

    Abd Ellatif, Mohamed E; Alfalah, Haitham; Asker, Walid A; El Nakeeb, Ayman E; Magdy, Alaa; Thabet, Waleed; Ghaith, Mohamed A; Abdallah, Emad; Shahin, Rania; Shoma, Asharf; Dawoud, Ibraheim E; Abbas, Ashraf; Salama, Asaad F; Ali Gamal, Maged

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the preoperative and postoperative role of upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in morbidly obese patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter retrospective study by reviewing the database of patients who underwent bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass, or laparoscopic minigastric bypass) in the period between 2001 June and 2015 August (Jahra Hospital-Kuwait, Hafr Elbatin Hospital and King Saud Medical City-KSA, and Mansoura University Hospital - Egypt). Patients with age 18-65 years, body mass index (BMI) > 40, or > 35 with comorbidities after failure of many dietetic regimen and acceptable levels of surgical risk were included in the study after having an informed signed consent. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of all morbidly obese patients. The patients’ preoperative data included clinical history including upper digestive symptoms and preoperative full workup including EGD. Only patients whose charts revealed weather they were symptomatic or not were studied. We categorized patients accordingly into two groups; with (group A) or without (group B) upper digestive symptoms. The endoscopic findings were categorized into 4 groups based on predetermined criteria. The medical record of patients who developed stricture, leak or bleeding after bariatric surgery was reviewed. Logestic regression analysis was used to identify preoperative predictors that might be associated with abnormal endoscopic findings. RESULTS: Three thousand, two hundred and nineteen patients in the study period underwent bariatric surgery (75% LSG, 10% LRYDB, and 15% MGB). Mean BMI was 43 ± 13, mean age 37 ± 9 years, 79% were female. Twenty eight percent had presented with upper digestive symptoms (group A). EGD was considered normal in 2414 (75%) patients (9% group A vs 66% group B, P = 0.001). The abnormal endoscopic findings were found high in those patients with upper digestive symptoms. Abnormal findings (one

  6. IMPACT OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM DEFICIENCY IN THE BONES OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    CABRAL, Jefry Alberto Vargas; de SOUZA, Gabriela Pereira; NASCIMENTO, Juliana de Almeida; SIMONETI, Luis Fernando; MARCHESE, Carolina; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective tool in the control and treatment of severe obesity, but patients undergoing this procedure are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies by limiting the intake and absorption of many nutrients. Objective: To assess the impact of vitamin D deficiency and calcium in bone in patients after gastric bypass in Roux-en-Y, pointing directly at the type of administration, doses and effects after surgery. Method: Was conducted a systematic review with articles related to the topic of the last 10 years searched in PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Medline, Lilacs, Scielo and Cochrane using the headings "bariatric surgery", "bone", "obesity", "vitamin D '', "calcium" AND "absorption". Exclusion criteria to research on animals, smokers, pregnant women and patient treated with bisphosphonates. Results: Five articles were included in this review. All refer that bariatric surgery can lead to nutritional deficiencies and poor absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins and other micronutrients such as calcium. Conclusion: Patients submitted to RYGB should make use of multivitamins and minerals especially vitamin D and calcium to prevent bone fractures. Monitoring, treatment and control of risk factors are essential to prevent complications after this operation. PMID:27683792

  7. Assessment of dietary habits, nutritional status and blood biochemical parameters in patients prepared for bariatric surgery: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Morbid obesity needs to be treated by bariatric procedures. Proper dietary preparation of patients before surgery conditions their postoperative status. Aim Assessment of dietary habits, nutritional status and biochemical parameters of the blood in patients being prepared for different bariatric procedures. Material and methods The study involved a group of 27 obese adults: 19 women (mean age: 40.4 ±13.9 years) and 8 men (mean age: 39.6 ±12.7 years) qualified for bariatric procedures. Body composition, dietary habits and selected biochemical parameters of blood were assessed. Statistical analysis of the results was conducted using Statistica 9.0. Results Daily food rations consumed by women provided 1910.6 ±915.9 kcal/day, and by men 2631 ±1463.2 kcal/day on average. In both groups, the consumption of major nutrients was found to be inadequate. In both groups, deficiency was observed in the dietary intake of folic acid and potassium. Additionally, there was a decrease in the intake of vitamin D3, calcium and iron in women and magnesium in men. In the two groups, disturbances were noted in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Conclusions Our study indicates the necessity for dietary instructions in bariatric patients with regard to proper dietary habits and to reduce the risk of malnutrition before and after surgery. PMID:23256020

  8. Why Bariatric surgery should be given high priority: an argument from law and morality.

    PubMed

    Persson, Karl

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, bariatric surgery has become an increasingly popular treatment of obesity. The amount of resources spent on this kind of surgery has led to a heated debate among health care professionals and the general public, as each procedure costs at minimum $14,500 and thousands of patients undergo surgery every year. So far, no substantial argument for or against giving this treatment a high priority has, however, been presented. In this article, I argue that regardless which moral perspective we consider--greatest need, utility or personal responsibility--the conclusion is that we should give bariatric surgery a high priority when allocating scarce resources in health care.

  9. Translating weight loss into agency: Men's experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2015-01-01

    Fewer men than women with severe obesity undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss, and knowledge about men's situation after surgery, beyond medical status, is lacking. Our aim was to explore men's experiences with life after bariatric surgery from a long-term perspective. We conducted in-depth interviews with 13 men, aged 28–60 years, between 5 and 7 years after surgery. The analysis was inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological method. We found that agency was pivotal for how the men understood themselves and their lives after surgery. Weight loss meant regaining opportunities for living and acting in unrestricted and independent daily lives, yet surgery remained a radical treatment with complex consequences. Turning to surgery had involved conceptualizing their own body size as illness, which the men had resisted doing for years. After surgery, the rapid and major weight loss and the feelings of being exhausted, weak, and helpless were intertwined. The profound intensity of the weight loss process took the men by surprise. Embodying weight loss and change involved an inevitable renegotiating of experiences connected to the large body. Having bariatric surgery was a long-term process that seemed unfinished 5 years after surgery. Restrictions and insecurity connected to health and illness persist, despite successful weight loss and embodied change. Bariatric surgery initiated a complex and long-lasting life-changing process, involving both increased capacity for agency and illness-like experiences. PMID:26066518

  10. Translating weight loss into agency: Men's experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2015-01-01

    Fewer men than women with severe obesity undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss, and knowledge about men's situation after surgery, beyond medical status, is lacking. Our aim was to explore men's experiences with life after bariatric surgery from a long-term perspective. We conducted in-depth interviews with 13 men, aged 28-60 years, between 5 and 7 years after surgery. The analysis was inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological method. We found that agency was pivotal for how the men understood themselves and their lives after surgery. Weight loss meant regaining opportunities for living and acting in unrestricted and independent daily lives, yet surgery remained a radical treatment with complex consequences. Turning to surgery had involved conceptualizing their own body size as illness, which the men had resisted doing for years. After surgery, the rapid and major weight loss and the feelings of being exhausted, weak, and helpless were intertwined. The profound intensity of the weight loss process took the men by surprise. Embodying weight loss and change involved an inevitable renegotiating of experiences connected to the large body. Having bariatric surgery was a long-term process that seemed unfinished 5 years after surgery. Restrictions and insecurity connected to health and illness persist, despite successful weight loss and embodied change. Bariatric surgery initiated a complex and long-lasting life-changing process, involving both increased capacity for agency and illness-like experiences. PMID:26066518

  11. Body image and quality of life in patients with and without body contouring surgery following bariatric surgery: a comparison of pre- and post-surgery groups

    PubMed Central

    de Zwaan, Martina; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Stroh, Christine E.; Teufel, Martin; Köhler, Hinrich; Tengler, Maxi; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Massive weight loss (MWL) following bariatric surgery frequently results in an excess of overstretched skin causing physical discomfort and negatively affecting quality of life, self-esteem, body image, and physical functioning. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 3 groups were compared: (1) patients prior to bariatric surgery (n = 79), (2) patients after bariatric surgery who had not undergone body contouring surgery (BCS) (n = 252), and (3) patients after bariatric surgery who underwent subsequent BCS (n = 62). All participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing body image (Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, MBSRQ), quality of life (IWQOL-Lite), symptoms of depression (PHQ-9), and anxiety (GAD-7). Results: Overall, 62 patients (19.2%) reported having undergone a total of 90 BCS procedures. The most common were abdominoplasties (88.7%), thigh lifts (24.2%), and breast lifts (16.1%). Post-bariatric surgery patients differed significantly in most variables from pre-bariatric surgery patients. Although there were fewer differences between patients with and without BCS, patients after BCS reported better appearance evaluation (AE), body area satisfaction (BAS), and physical functioning, even after controlling for excess weight loss and time since surgery. No differences were found for symptoms of depression and anxiety, and most other quality of life and body image domains. Discussion: Our results support the results of longitudinal studies demonstrating significant improvements in different aspects of body image, quality of life, and general psychopathology after bariatric surgery. Also, we found better AE and physical functioning in patients after BCS following bariatric surgery compared to patients with MWL after bariatric surgery who did not undergo BCS. Overall, there appears to be an effect of BCS on certain aspects of body image and quality of life but not on psychological aspects on the whole. PMID:25477839

  12. New obesity classification criteria as a tool for bariatric surgery indication.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Soldati, Laura; Sarlo, Francesca; Calvani, Menotti; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Di Renzo, Laura

    2016-01-14

    Obesity plays relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, and metabolic factors. Due to the role of adipose tissue in lipid and glucose metabolism, and low grade inflammation, it is necessary to classify obesity on the basis of body fat composition and distribution, rather than the simply increase of body weight, and the Body Mass Index. The new term of adiposopathy (''sick fat'') clearly defines the pathogenic role of adipose tissue. Four phenotypes of obese individuals have been described: (1) normal weight obese (NWO); (2) metabolically obese normal weight; (3) metabolically healthy obese; and (4) metabolically unhealthy obese or "at risk" obese. Moreover, sarcopenic obesity has been related to all the phenotypes. The category of normal weight lean, represented by metabolically healthy normal weight has been classified to distinguish from NWO. It is crucial to recommend a bariatric surgery taking into account adiposopathy and sick fat that occurs with the expansion of fat mass, changing the inflammatory and metabolic profile of the patient. Body fat percentage and genetic polymorphism have to be evaluated to personalize the best bariatric surgery intervention. PMID:26811617

  13. New obesity classification criteria as a tool for bariatric surgery indication.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Soldati, Laura; Sarlo, Francesca; Calvani, Menotti; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Di Renzo, Laura

    2016-01-14

    Obesity plays relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, and metabolic factors. Due to the role of adipose tissue in lipid and glucose metabolism, and low grade inflammation, it is necessary to classify obesity on the basis of body fat composition and distribution, rather than the simply increase of body weight, and the Body Mass Index. The new term of adiposopathy (''sick fat'') clearly defines the pathogenic role of adipose tissue. Four phenotypes of obese individuals have been described: (1) normal weight obese (NWO); (2) metabolically obese normal weight; (3) metabolically healthy obese; and (4) metabolically unhealthy obese or "at risk" obese. Moreover, sarcopenic obesity has been related to all the phenotypes. The category of normal weight lean, represented by metabolically healthy normal weight has been classified to distinguish from NWO. It is crucial to recommend a bariatric surgery taking into account adiposopathy and sick fat that occurs with the expansion of fat mass, changing the inflammatory and metabolic profile of the patient. Body fat percentage and genetic polymorphism have to be evaluated to personalize the best bariatric surgery intervention.

  14. Postoperative Follow-up After Bariatric Surgery: Effect on Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Kasten, Kevin R; Celio, Adam; Burruss, Matthew B; Pories, Walter J

    2016-04-01

    While adherence to long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery is a mandate for center of excellence certification, the effect of attrition on weight loss is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of postoperative follow-up on 12-month weight loss using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database (BOLD) dataset. Patients with complete follow-up (3, 6, and 12 months) were compared to patients who had one or more prior missed visits. There were 51,081 patients with 12-month follow-up data available. After controlling for baseline characteristics, complete follow-up was independently associated with excess weight loss ≥50%, and total weight loss ≥30%. Adherence to postoperative follow-up is independently associated with improved 12-month weight loss after bariatric surgery. Bariatric programs should strive to achieve complete follow-up for all patients.

  15. Weight Loss and Health Status 3 Years after Bariatric Surgery in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Inge, Thomas H.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Brandt, Mary L.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Zeller, Meg H.; Chen, Mike K.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.; Horlick, Mary; Buncher, C. Ralph

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bariatric surgery is increasingly considered for the treatment of adolescents with severe obesity, but few prospective adolescent-specific studies examining the efficacy and safety of weight-loss surgery are available to support clinical decision making. METHODS We prospectively enrolled 242 adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery at five U.S. centers. Patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (161 participants) or sleeve gastrectomy (67) were included in the analysis. Changes in body weight, coexisting conditions, cardiometabolic risk factors, and weight-related quality of life and postoperative complications were evaluated through 3 years after the procedure. RESULTS The mean (±SD) baseline age of the participants was 17±1.6 years, and the mean body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 53; 75% of the participants were female, and 72% were white. At 3 years after the procedure, the mean weight had decreased by 27% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25 to 29) in the total cohort, by 28% (95% CI, 25 to 30) among participants who underwent gastric bypass, and by 26% (95% CI, 22 to 30) among those who underwent sleeve gastrectomy. By 3 years after the procedure, remission of type 2 diabetes occurred in 95% (95% CI, 85 to 100) of participants who had had the condition at baseline, remission of abnormal kidney function occurred in 86% (95% CI, 72 to 100), remission of prediabetes in 76% (95% CI, 56 to 97), remission of elevated blood pressure in 74% (95% CI, 64 to 84), and remission of dyslipidemia in 66% (95% CI, 57 to 74). Weight-related quality of life also improved significantly. However, at 3 years after the bariatric procedure, hypoferritinemia was found in 57% (95% CI, 50 to 65) of the participants, and 13% (95% CI, 9 to 18) of the participants had undergone one or more additional intraabdominal procedures. CONCLUSIONS In this multicenter, prospective study of bariatric surgery in adolescents, we

  16. Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Program Characteristics: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study Experience

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, M.P.; Inge, T.H.; Teich, S.; Eneli, I.; Miller, R.; Brandt, M.L.; Helmrath, M.; Harmon, C.M.; Zeller, M.H.; Jenkins, T.M.; Courcoulas, A.; Buncher, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) has increased in response to the increasing prevalence of severe childhood obesity. Adolescents undergoing WLS require unique support, which may differ from adult programs. The aim of this study was to describe institutional and programmatic characteristics of centers participating in Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS), a prospective study investigating safety and efficacy of adolescent WLS. Methods Data were obtained from the Teen-LABS database and site survey completed by Teen-LABS investigators. The survey queried (1) institutional characteristics, (2) multidisciplinary team composition, (3) clinical program characteristics, and (4) clinical research infrastructure. Results All centers had extensive multidisciplinary involvement in the assessment, preoperative education and post-operative management of adolescents undergoing WLS. Eligibility criteria, pre-operative clinical and diagnostic evaluations were similar between programs. All programs have well developed clinical research infrastructure, use adolescent-specific educational resources, and maintain specialty equipment, including high weight capacity diagnostic imaging equipment. Conclusions The composition of clinical team and institutional resources are consistent with current clinical practice guidelines. These characteristics, coupled with dedicated research staff, have facilitated enrollment of 242 participants into Teen-LABS. PMID:24491361

  17. Adolescent bariatric surgery program characteristics: the Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) study experience.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Teich, Steven; Eneli, Ihuoma; Miller, Rosemary; Brandt, Mary L; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M; Zeller, Meg H; Jenkins, Todd M; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph C

    2014-02-01

    The number of adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) has increased in response to the increasing prevalence of severe childhood obesity. Adolescents undergoing WLS require unique support, which may differ from adult programs. The aim of this study was to describe institutional and programmatic characteristics of centers participating in Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS), a prospective study investigating safety and efficacy of adolescent WLS. Data were obtained from the Teen-LABS database, and site survey completed by Teen-LABS investigators. The survey queried (1) institutional characteristics, (2) multidisciplinary team composition, (3) clinical program characteristics, and (4) clinical research infrastructure. All centers had extensive multidisciplinary involvement in the assessment, pre-operative education, and post-operative management of adolescents undergoing WLS. Eligibility criteria and pre-operative clinical and diagnostic evaluations were similar between programs. All programs have well-developed clinical research infrastructure, use adolescent-specific educational resources, and maintain specialty equipment, including high weight capacity diagnostic imaging equipment. The composition of clinical team and institutional resources is consistent with current clinical practice guidelines. These characteristics, coupled with dedicated research staff, have facilitated enrollment of 242 participants into Teen-LABS.

  18. Ménage-à-trois of bariatric surgery, bile acids and the gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Raghow, Rajendra

    2015-04-15

    Bariatric surgeries have emerged as highly effective treatments for obesity associated type-2 diabetes mellitus. Evidently, the desired therapeutic endpoints such as rates of weight loss, lower levels of glycated hemoglobin and remission of diabetes are achieved more rapidly and last longer following bariatric surgery, as opposed to drug therapies alone. In light of these findings, it has been suspected that in addition to causing weight loss dependent glucose intolerance, bariatric surgery induces other physiological changes that contribute to the alleviation of diabetes. However, the putative post-surgical neuro-hormonal pathways that underpin the therapeutic benefits of bariatric surgery remain undefined. In a recent report, Ryan and colleagues shed new light on the potential mechanisms that determine the salutary effects of bariatric surgery in mice. The authors demonstrated that the improved glucose tolerance and weight loss in mice after vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) surgery were likely to be caused by post-surgical changes in circulating bile acids and farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) signaling, both of which were also mechanistically linked to changes in the microbial ecology of the gut. The authors arrived at this conclusion from a comparison of genome-wide, metabolic consequences of VSG surgery in obese wild type (WT) and FXR knockout mice. Gene expression in the distal small intestines of WT and FXR knockout mice revealed that the pathways regulating bile acid composition, nutrient metabolism and anti-oxidant defense were differentially altered by VSG surgery in WT and FXR(-/-) mice. Based on these data Ryan et al, hypothesized that bile acid homeostasis and FXR signaling were mechanistically linked to the gut microbiota that played a role in modulating post-surgical changes in total body mass and glucose tolerance. The authors' data provide a plausible explanation for putative weight loss-independent benefits of bariatric surgery and its relationship with

  19. Pre-Operative History of Depression and Cognitive Changes in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Obesity associated cognitive impairments may be partially reversible through bariatric surgery. Depression, a prevalent comorbidity in bariatric surgery candidates, is linked with cognitive impairment and poorer surgical outcomes in other populations. No study has examined the effects of pre-operative depression on cognitive changes in bariatric surgery patients. 67 bariatric surgery patients completed a computerized cognitive test battery prior to surgery and 12-months post-operatively. The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I disorders assessed Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Pre-surgery history of MDD was found in 47.8% of patients, but was not associated with greater baseline cognitive impairments. Repeated measures revealed improved cognitive abilities 12-months after surgery. Pre-surgery history of MDD did not influence post-operative cognitive function. Pre-operative history of MDD did not limit post-operative cognitive improvements. Larger studies with extended follow-ups are needed to clarify our findings and identify factors (e.g., older age) that may modify cognitive changes following surgery. PMID:25222138

  20. [Changes in the pattern of substance use after bariatric surgery: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Yamil; Kirsten, Kurt; Ponce de León, Consuelo; Fernández, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Even though the benefits of bariatric surgery are supported by scientific evidence, its indications and contraindications must be revised to avoid its indiscriminate use. Substance use is more common in patients subjected to bariatric surgery than in the general population. After surgery, an increase in alcohol abuse has been reported. We report a 41 years old male, with morbid obesity, alcohol and cocaine use. After bariatric surgery, his alcohol tolerance significantly decreased, increasing the doses of cocaine and starting to consume it without alcohol. His high anxiety level and paranoid delusions, motivated him to seek help in a rehabilitation center where a Substance Dependence Disorder was diagnosed and received initial treatment. The cause of this adverse effect needs further research. Functional and anatomic changes in the digestive tract lead to a greater alcohol absorption and reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Also neurochemical alterations may produce a displacement from compulsive use of food to compulsive use of addictive substances.

  1. [Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency, with or without anemia, before and after bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Jericó, Carlos; Bretón, Irene; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; de Oliveira, Ana Carla; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Tinahones, Francisco J; Vidal, Josep; Vilarrasa, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) is an increasingly used therapeutic option for severe obesity which allows patients to achieve sustained weight loss over time and resolution or improvement in most associated pathological conditions. Major mid- and long-term complications of BS include iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia, which may occur in up to 50% of cases and significantly impair patient quality of life. These changes may be present before surgery. The aim of this review was to prepare schemes for diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia before and after bariatric surgery.

  2. A review of psychological assessment instruments for use in bariatric surgery evaluations.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ryan J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lavery, Megan; Merrell Rish, Julie; Ashton, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for patients with extreme obesity and associated medical comorbidities; however, optimal surgical outcomes are not universal. Surgical societies, such as the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), recommend that patients undergo a presurgical psychological evaluation that includes reviewing patients' medical charts, conducting a comprehensive clinical interview, and employing some form of objective psychometric testing. Despite numerous societies recommending the inclusion of self-report assessments, only about 2/3 of clinics actively use psychological testing-some of which have limited empirical support to justify their use. This review aims to critically evaluate the psychometric properties of self-report measures when used in bariatric surgery settings and provide recommendations to help guide clinicians in selecting instruments to use in bariatric surgery evaluations. Recommended assessment batteries include use of a broadband instrument along with a narrowband eating measure. Suggestions for self-report measures to include in a presurgical psychological evaluation in bariatric surgery settings are also provided. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. A review of psychological assessment instruments for use in bariatric surgery evaluations.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ryan J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lavery, Megan; Merrell Rish, Julie; Ashton, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for patients with extreme obesity and associated medical comorbidities; however, optimal surgical outcomes are not universal. Surgical societies, such as the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), recommend that patients undergo a presurgical psychological evaluation that includes reviewing patients' medical charts, conducting a comprehensive clinical interview, and employing some form of objective psychometric testing. Despite numerous societies recommending the inclusion of self-report assessments, only about 2/3 of clinics actively use psychological testing-some of which have limited empirical support to justify their use. This review aims to critically evaluate the psychometric properties of self-report measures when used in bariatric surgery settings and provide recommendations to help guide clinicians in selecting instruments to use in bariatric surgery evaluations. Recommended assessment batteries include use of a broadband instrument along with a narrowband eating measure. Suggestions for self-report measures to include in a presurgical psychological evaluation in bariatric surgery settings are also provided. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27537008

  4. Psychometric Evaluation of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire for Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Hrabosky, Joshua I.; White, Marney A.; Masheb, Robin M.; Rothschild, Bruce S.; Burke-Martindale, Carolyn H.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing use of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) in bariatric surgery patients, little is known about the utility and psychometric performance of this self-report measure in this clinical group. The primary purpose of the current study was to evaluate the factor structure and construct validity of the EDE-Q in a large series of bariatric surgery candidates. Methods and Procedures Participants were 337 obese bariatric surgery candidates. Participants completed the EDE-Q and a battery of behavioral and psychological measures. Results Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) produced a 12-item, 4-factor structure of the EDE-Q. The four factors, interpreted as Dietary Restraint, Eating Disturbance, Appearance Concerns, and Shape/Weight Overvaluation, were found to be internally consistent and converged with other relevant measures of psychopathology. Discussion Factor analysis of the EDE-Q in bariatric surgery candidates did not replicate the original subscales but revealed an alternative factor structure. Future research must further evaluate the psychometric properties, including the factor structure, of the EDE-Q in this and other diverse populations and consider means of improving this measure's ability to best assess eating-related pathology in bariatric surgery patients. PMID:18379561

  5. The eating-related behaviours, disorders and expectations of candidates for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Opolski, M; Chur-Hansen, A; Wittert, G

    2015-08-01

    It is important that clinicians and researchers understand the possible eating-related difficulties experienced by pre-bariatric surgery candidates, as well as their expectations of how their eating and hunger will change after surgery. This review examines English-language publications related to the eating-related behaviours, disorders and expectations of bariatric candidates. Seventy-five articles related to binge eating disorder, grazing, night eating syndrome, emotional eating, food cravings and addiction, and pre-surgical expectations of post-surgical eating in this population were critically reviewed. A variety of often problematic eating behaviours appear more common in bariatric candidates than in non-obese populations. The literature suggests that 4-45% of candidates may have binge eating disorder, 20-60% may graze, 2-42% may have night eating syndrome, 38-59% may engage in emotional eating and 17-54% may fit criteria for food addiction. Binge eating may also be more prevalent in bariatric candidates than in similarly obese non-surgical individuals. Expectations of surgery are high, with pre-surgical candidates believing their bariatric procedure will virtually guarantee significantly improved eating behaviours. Study replications are needed, and further investigation into prevalence, impacts and candidate characteristics related to disordered eating behaviours, as well as candidates' expectations of eating after surgery, will be important. Further comparisons of bariatric candidates to similarly obese non-bariatric populations will be important to understand eating-related characteristics of candidates beyond those related to their weight. Future research may be improved by the use of validated measures, replicable methodologies, minimization of data collected in circumstances where respondents may been motivated to 'fake good', use of prospective data and consistent definitions of key terminology.

  6. Guillain-Barré syndrome (demyelinating) six weeks after bariatric surgery: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ishaque, Noman; Khealani, Bhojo A; Shariff, Amir H; Wasay, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been increasingly used to manage obesity. Many acute as well as chronic neurological complications have been reported after bariatric surgery including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). An autoimmune process has been postulated as the underlying pathophysiology. Most of the reported cases of GBS after bariatric surgery are of the axonal variety. Here, we report a case of a demyelinating variety of GBS in a young woman who presented with acute onset of progressive weakness and paresthesia of all limbs within six weeks after bariatric surgery. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rehabilitation. She had complete recovery on follow-up. We believe that onset of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), which is demyelinating variety of GBS, is associated with changes in immune system after bariatric surgery.

  7. Quality of Life, Body Image and Sexual Functioning in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Steffen, Kristine J

    2015-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the literature on quality of life, body image and sexual behaviour in individuals with extreme obesity and who undergo bariatric surgery. Quality of life is a psychosocial construct that includes multiple domains, including health-related quality of life, weight-related quality of life, as well as other psychological constructs such as body image and sexual functioning. A large literature has documented the impairments in quality of life and these other domains in persons with obesity and extreme obesity in particular. These impairments are believed to play an influential role in the decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery typically report significant improvements in these and other areas of psychosocial functioning, often before they reach their maximum weight loss. The durability of these changes as patients maintain or regain weight, however, is largely unknown.

  8. Bariatric surgery in type 1 diabetes mellitus; long-term experience in two cases.

    PubMed

    Fuertes-Zamorano, Nuria; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres García, Antonio J; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    In patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, recommendations for bariatric surgery are well established. However, no consensus exists regarding its role for the management of patients with type 1 diabetes and morbid obesity. We present the long-term follow-up of two women with type 1 diabetes, morbid obesity and associated comorbidities, who underwent malabsorptive bariatric surgery. More than four years after the procedure, both have a body mass index (BMI) within the normal range and HbA1c levels below 7%. Also, they have been able to reduce their insulin requirements in more than 50%, their associated comorbidities have disappeared, and their overall quality of life has significantly improved. We compare our results with other recently published ones, emphasizing potential indications of bariatric surgery for patients with type 1 diabetes.

  9. Quality of Life, Body Image and Sexual Functioning in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Steffen, Kristine J

    2015-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the literature on quality of life, body image and sexual behaviour in individuals with extreme obesity and who undergo bariatric surgery. Quality of life is a psychosocial construct that includes multiple domains, including health-related quality of life, weight-related quality of life, as well as other psychological constructs such as body image and sexual functioning. A large literature has documented the impairments in quality of life and these other domains in persons with obesity and extreme obesity in particular. These impairments are believed to play an influential role in the decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery typically report significant improvements in these and other areas of psychosocial functioning, often before they reach their maximum weight loss. The durability of these changes as patients maintain or regain weight, however, is largely unknown. PMID:26608946

  10. Analyses of balance and flexibility of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Bacha, Ivan Leo; Junior, Arthur Belarmino Garrido; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the postural control and flexibility of obese subjects before and both six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. To verify whether postural control is related to flexibility following weight reductions resulting from bariatric surgery. METHODS: The sample consisted of 16 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery. All assessments were performed before and six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Postural balance was assessed using an Accusuway® portable force platform, and flexibility was assessed using a standard chair sit and reach test (Wells' chair). RESULTS: With the force platform, no differences were observed in the displacement area or velocity from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. The displacement speed from the center of pressure was decreased at the six month after the surgery; however, unchanged from baseline at 12 months post-surgery. Flexibility increased over time according to the three measurements tested. CONCLUSIONS: Static postural balance did not change. The velocity of postural adjustment responses were increased at six months after surgery. Therefore, weight loss promotes increased flexibility. Yet, improvements in flexibility are not related to improvements in balance. PMID:26934236

  11. Self-report of gastrointestinal side effects after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Cheng, Yu; Levine, Michele D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on gastrointestinal (GI) side effects of bariatric surgery are limited due to incomplete reporting, cross sectional samples, and non-standardized assessments. Objective To report on GI side effects over the first 6 months following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Setting Academic Medical Center, United States. Methods One hundred forty-four patients completed a standardized clinical interview 6 months after operation, including questions on the occurrence and frequency of episodes of dumping syndrome, vomiting, and plugging for each of the past 6 months; monthly rates were stable, so results were averaged over the entire period. Although data were collected as part of a randomized controlled trial, randomization group and the interaction of group by surgical procedure were not related to GI side effects. Thus, results are reported by procedure only (RYGB; n = 87, LAGB; n= 56). Results RYGB patients had a higher preoperative Body Mass Index (BMI) than LAGB patients (46.8 ± 6.8 vs. 43.5 ± 4.8 kg/m2, respectively, p = 0.001), were more likely to report dumping (45.7% vs. 4.7%, p < 0.0001) and were less likely to report plugging (45.7% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.0005). Vomiting did not differ significantly by procedure (68.6% vs. 65.1%, p = 0.7). Most patients experienced each GI side effect less than once per week. Conclusions Although self-reported GI side effects were common over the first 6 months after operation, the frequency of episodes was relatively low. Longer-term follow-up is needed to determine whether symptoms worsen or improve over time. PMID:25443069

  12. Weight loss by calorie restriction versus bariatric surgery differentially regulates the HPA axis in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Bernadette E.; Hakala-Finch, Andrew P.; Kekulawala, Melani; Laub, Holly; Egan, Ann E.; Ressler, Ilana B.; Woods, Stephen C.; Herman, James P.; Seeley, Randy J.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral modifications for the treatment of obesity, including caloric restriction, have notoriously low long-term success rates relative to bariatric weight-loss surgery. The reasons for the difference in sustained weight loss are not clear. One possibility is that caloric restriction alone activates the stress-responsive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, undermining the long-term maintenance of weight loss, and that this is abrogated after bariatric surgery. Accordingly, we compared the HPA response to weight loss in 5 groups of male rats: (1) high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) rats treated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, n=7), (2) DIO rats treated with vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG, n=11), (3) DIO rats given sham surgery and subsequently restricted to the food intake of the VSG/RYGB groups (Pair-fed, n=11), (4) ad libitum-fed DIO rats given sham surgery (Obese, n=11) and (5) ad libitum chow-fed rats given sham surgery (Lean, n=12). Compared to Lean controls, food-restricted rats exhibited elevated morning (nadir) non-stress plasma corticosterone concentrations and increased hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin mRNA expression, indicative of basal HPA activation. This was largely prevented when weight loss was achieved by bariatric surgery. DIO increased HPA activation by acute (novel environment) stress and this was diminished by bariatric surgery-, but not pair-feeding-, induced weight loss. These results suggest that the HPA axis is differentially affected by weight loss from caloric restriction versus bariatric surgery, and this may contribute to the differing long-term effectiveness of these two weight-loss approaches. PMID:25238021

  13. Sociodemographic Differences and Time Trends of Bariatric Surgery in Sweden 1990–2010

    PubMed Central

    Memarian, Ensieh; Calling, Susanna; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Li, Xinjun

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to examine demographic and socioeconomic differences and time trends of bariatric surgery in Sweden during 1990–2010. Methods An open cohort of all individuals aged 20–64 years was followed between 1990 and 2010. Socioeconomic differences were examined during two periods: 1990–2005 and 2006–2010 using cumulative rates in a closed cohort. Hazard ratios (HRs) of bariatric surgery were calculated in these two periods using Cox regression models. Results A majority of the 22,198 individuals that underwent bariatric surgery were women (76.3 %). Women were more likely to undergo surgery in younger ages (30–39 years), while men were more likely to undergo surgery around 10 years later (40–49 years). The number of surgeries increased substantially during the second period. During the whole period, the dominating surgical method was gastric bypass contributing to 69.4 % of the procedures. HRs for bariatric surgery were highest for individuals with intermediate educational level and intermediate-low income in both periods. For married/cohabiting and/or employed individuals, the HRs were highest during the first period whereas an opposite pattern was seen in the second period. Conclusions Individuals in the lowest socioeconomic groups undergo bariatric surgery less often than those with intermediate income and educational level, although previous research has shown that those with low socioeconomic status have the highest rates of morbid obesity. The failure to identify eligible individuals for surgery may result in negative effects on those individuals with the largest need for weight loss. PMID:24817429

  14. Positive peritoneal fluid fungal cultures in postoperative peritonitis after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Zappella, N; Desmard, M; Chochillon, C; Ribeiro-Parenti, L; Houze, S; Marmuse, J-P; Montravers, P

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative peritonitis (POP) is a common surgical complication after bariatric surgery (BS). We assessed the importance of positive fungal cultures in these cases of POP admitted to the intensive care unit. Clinical features and outcome were compared in 25 (41%) Candida-positive patients (6 (22%) fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata) and 36 patients without Candida infection. Candida infections were more commonly isolated in late-onset peritonitis and were often associated with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Risk factors for intensive care unit mortality (19.6%) were diabetes and superobesity. Candida infections, including fluconazole-resistant strains, are common in POP after BS. These data encourage the empirical use of a broad-spectrum antifungal agent.

  15. Sperm parameters and male fertility after bariatric surgery: three case series.

    PubMed

    Sermondade, Nathalie; Massin, Nathalie; Boitrelle, Florence; Pfeffer, Jérôme; Eustache, Florence; Sifer, Christophe; Czernichow, Sébastien; Lévy, Rachel

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have underlined the impact of obesity on sperm parameters, but very few data are available on the effect of weight loss on male fertility. This article reports the case series of three male patients who underwent rapid and major weight loss following bariatric surgery and the consequences of this surgery on semen parameters and fertility. A severe worsening of semen parameters was observed during the months after bariatric surgery, including extreme oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, but azoospermia was not observed. This effect may hypothetically be the result of two opposite mechanisms: (i) the suppression of the deleterious effects of obesity; and (ii) the negative impact of both nutritional deficiencies and the release of toxic substances. Information about potential reproductive consequences of bariatric surgery should be given to patients and sperm cryopreservation before surgery proposed. However, for one case, the alterations of spermatogenesis were reversible 2 years after the surgical procedure. Finally, intracytoplasmic sperm injection with fresh spermatozoa after male bariatric surgery can be successful, as demonstrated here, where clinical pregnancies were obtained for two out of the three couples.

  16. High Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xanthakos, Stavra A.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Kleiner, David E.; Boyce, Tawny W.; Mourya, Reena; Karns, Rebekah; Brandt, Mary L.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Helmrath, Michael A.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Zeller, Meg H.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Little is known about the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) among severely obese adolescents or factors that determine its development. We investigated the prevalence of NAFLD in a multicenter cohort of adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery and factors associated with it. Methods We enrolled 242 adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery between March 2007 and February 2012 at 5 tertiary care centers into a multicenter, prospective observational cohort study. Intra-operative core liver biopsies were collected from 165 subjects; 17 were excluded because of insufficient liver tissue or use of hepatotoxic medications, so 148 remained in the study (mean age 16.8±1.6 y old; median body mass index [BMI], 52 kg/m2). Liver tissues were analyzed by histology using validated criteria. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed in 67 samples. Results NAFLD was present in 59% of this predominantly female (72%), white (68%), non-Hispanic (91%) cohort. Of subjects with NAFLD, 24% had borderline and 10% had definite nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Mild fibrosis (≤ stage 2) was observed in 18% of liver biopsies and stage 3 in 0.7%, but cirrhosis was not detected. Dyslipidemia was present in 78% of subjects, hypertension in 44%, and diabetes in 14%. More severe NAFLD was associated with increasing levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), fasting glucose level, hypertension (each P<.01) and white blood cell count (P=.04). Only diabetes was associated with detection of fibrosis (odds ratio, 3.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.93–6.56). Microarray analysis associated presence of NASH with altered expression of genes that regulate macrophage chemotaxis, cholesterol absorption, and fatty acid binding. Conclusions More than half of adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery in this cohort had NAFLD, yet the prevalence of severe or fibrotic NASH was low. Increasing severity of NAFLD was associated with level of ALT and cardio-metabolic risk factors

  17. Bariatric surgery outcomes: a single-center study in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Abusnana, Salah; Abdi, Sarah; Tagure, Brigette; Elbagir, Murtada; Maleckas, Almantas

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery has become an attractive treatment for severe obesity over the last decade, due to its impacts on weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the United Arab Emirates, a country where the rate of obesity is dramatically increasing bariatric surgery has gained popularity in recent years; however, published data on its outcomes in the Emirati population are lacking. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 95 patients who underwent bariatric surgery (ie, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) at the Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Weight outcomes and metabolic marker data were abstracted at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results Laparoscopic RYGB was the main procedure performed by our bariatric unit. All variables demonstrated postoperative improvement. An average excess weight loss of 68% was observed at 12 months. Fat mass was the body component that decreased the most, with an average reduction of 46%. Additionally, lipid profiles were significantly different (P<0.01) at 12 months, with triglyceride levels improving by 27% and low-density lipoprotein levels improving by 21%. Similarly, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels decreased significantly (P<0.001) in patients with type 2 diabetes, with an average reduction of 73%. Conclusion Our results show that a substantial short-term reduction in weight and significant improvements in metabolic markers followed bariatric surgery in severely obese Emirati patients. Our results are consistent with the outcomes of other internationally published studies. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether the favorable impacts of bariatric surgery can be sustained over the long term. PMID:26425103

  18. Perioperative Outcome of Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Inge, T.H.; Zeller, M.H.; Jenkins, T.M.; Helmrath, M.; Brandt, M.L.; Michalsky, M.P.; Harmon, C.M.; Courcoulas, A.; Horlick, M.; Xanthakos, S.A.; Dolan, L.; Mitsnefes, M.; Barnett, S.J.; Buncher, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    -term complication profile, supporting the early postoperative safety of WLS in select adolescents. Further longitudinal study of this cohort will permit accurate assessment of long-term outcomes for adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:24189578

  19. Complications of bariatric surgery--What the general surgeon needs to know.

    PubMed

    Healy, Paul; Clarke, Christopher; Reynolds, Ian; Arumugasamy, Mayilone; McNamara, Deborah

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important cause of physical and psychosocial morbidity and it places a significant burden on health system costs and resources. Worldwide an estimated 200 million people over 20 years are obese and in the U.K. the Department of Health report that 61.3% of people in the U.K. are either overweight or obese. Surgery for obesity (bariatric surgery) is being performed with increasing frequency in specialist centres both in the U.K. and Ireland and abroad due to the phenomenon of health tourism. Its role and success in treating medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension in obese patients will likely lead to an even greater number of bariatric surgery procedures being performed. Patients with early postoperative complications may be managed in specialist centres but patients with later complications, occurring months or years after surgery, may present to local surgical units for assessment and management. This review will highlight the late complications of the 3 most commonly performed bariatric surgery procedures that the emergency general surgeon may encounter. It will also highlight the complications that require urgent intervention by the emergency general surgeon and those that can be safely referred to a bariatric surgeon for further management after initial assessment and investigations.

  20. Recent advances in the modification of taste and food preferences following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D; de Silva, Taniya; Tzeng, Tony H; Chiang, Monica C; Hsia, Daniel S

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence indicating that bariatric surgery provides durable weight loss and health benefits to patients who are obese and have comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, there are still many questions related to mechanisms of metabolic improvement, predictors of success/failure, and long term consequences, which need to be answered. More recently, there has been a particular interest in the modulation of taste and food preferences that occurs after bariatric surgery and how this affects weight loss in different individuals. Animal models as well as human studies have shed some light on the role of taste in changing food preferences and how these changes may affect weight loss after surgery. The goal of this review is to discuss the physiological and behavioral consequences of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity and T2D, with particular emphasis on recent studies describing bariatric surgery-induced modifications in taste perception and food preferences. PMID:27245858

  1. Expectations and patients’ experiences of obesity prior to bariatric surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Catherine Verity; Thompson, Andrew R; Allmark, Peter; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to understand the experiences and expectations of people seeking bariatric surgery in England and identify implications for behavioural and self-management interventions. Design A qualitative study using modified photovoice methods, triangulating photography with semistructured indepth interviews analysed using framework techniques. Setting Areas served by two bariatric surgery multidisciplinary teams in the north of England. Participants 18 adults (14 women and 4 men) who accepted for bariatric surgery, and were aged between 30 and 61 years. Participants were recruited through hospital-based tier 4 bariatric surgery multidisciplinary teams. Results The experiences of participants indicates the nature and extent of the burden of obesity. Problems included stigmatisation, shame, poor health, physical function and reliance on medications. Participants expected surgery to result in major physical and psychological improvement. They described how this expectation was rooted in their experiences of stigma and shame. These feelings were reinforced by previous unsuccessful weight loss attempts. Participants expected extreme and sometimes unrealistic levels of sustained weight loss, as well as improvements to physical and mental health. The overall desire and expectation of bariatric surgery was of ‘normality’. Participants had received previous support from clinicians and in weight management services. However, they reported that their expectations of surgery had not been reviewed by services, and expectations appeared to be unrealistic. Likewise, their experience of stigmatisation had not been addressed. Conclusions The unrealistic expectations identified here may negatively affect postoperative outcomes. The findings indicate the importance of services addressing feelings of shame and stigmatisation, and modifying patient's expectations and goals for the postoperative period. PMID:26857104

  2. FROM COMPLEX EVOLVING TO SIMPLE: CURRENT REVISIONAL AND ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES FOLLOWING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    ZORRON, Ricardo; GALVÃO-NETO, Manoel Passos; CAMPOS, Josemberg; BRANCO, Alcides José; SAMPAIO, José; JUNGHANS, Tido; BOTHE, Claudia; BENZING, Christian; KRENZIEN, Felix

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a standard therapy in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding, although with good results in the literature, are showing higher rates of treatment failure to reduce obesity-associated morbidity and body weight. Other problems after bariatric may occur, as band erosion, gastroesophageal reflux disease and might be refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to a RYGB can be an effective alternative, as long as specific indications for revision are fulfilled. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse own and literature data on revisional bariatric procedures to evaluate best alternatives to current practice. Methods: Institutional experience and systematic review from the literature on revisional bariatric surgery. Results: Endoscopic procedures are recently applied to ameliorate failure and complications of bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20%. Transoral outlet reduction is currently an alternative method to reduce the gastrojejunal anastomosis. The diameter and volume of sleeve gastrectomy can enlarge as well, which can be reduced by endoscopic full-thickness sutures longitudinally. Dumping syndrome and severe hypoglycemic episodes (neuroglycopenia) can be present in patients following RYGB. The hypoglycemic episodes have to be evaluated and usually can be treated conventionally. To avoid partial pancreatectomy or conversion to normal anatomy, a new laparoscopic approach with remnant gastric resection and jejunal interposition can be applied in non-responders alternatively. Hypoglycemic episodes are ameliorated while weight loss is sustained. Conclusion: Revisional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery in patients with collateral symptomatic or treatment failure can be applied. Conventional non-surgical approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional surgery will be indicated. Former complex

  3. Contribution of 32 GWAS-Identified Common Variants to Severe Obesity in European Adults Referred for Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yousseif, Ahmed; Pucci, Andrea; Santini, Ferruccio; Karra, Efthimia; Querci, Giorgia; Pelosini, Caterina; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of severe obesity, defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥35.0 kg/m2, is rising rapidly. Given the disproportionately high health burden and healthcare costs associated with this condition, understanding the underlying aetiology, including predisposing genetic factors, is a biomedical research priority. Previous studies have suggested that severe obesity represents an extreme tail of the population BMI variation, reflecting shared genetic factors operating across the spectrum. Here, we sought to determine whether a panel of 32 known common obesity-susceptibility variants contribute to severe obesity in patients (n = 1,003, mean BMI 48.4±8.1 kg/m2) attending bariatric surgery clinics in two European centres. We examined the effects of these 32 common variants on obesity risk and BMI, both as individual markers and in combination as a genetic risk score, in a comparison with normal-weight controls (n = 1,809, BMI 18.0–24.9 kg/m2); an approach which, to our knowledge, has not been previously undertaken in the setting of a bariatric clinic. We found strong associations with severe obesity for SNP rs9939609 within the FTO gene (P = 9.3×10−8) and SNP rs2815752 near the NEGR1 gene (P = 3.6×10−4), and directionally consistent nominal associations (P<0.05) for 12 other SNPs. The genetic risk score associated with severe obesity (P = 8.3×10−11) but, within the bariatric cohort, this score did not associate with BMI itself (P = 0.264). Our results show significant effects of individual BMI-associated common variants within a relatively small sample size of bariatric patients. Furthermore, the burden of such low-penetrant risk alleles contributes to severe obesity in this population. Our findings support that severe obesity observed in bariatric patients represents an extreme tail of the population BMI variation. Moreover, future genetic studies focused on bariatric patients may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of

  4. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Köhler, Hinrich; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group) who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI Mpost = 30.54 kg/m2, SDpost = 5.14) were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group; BMI Mpre = 48.01 kg/m2, SDpre = 6.56). To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders (ICDs). No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms, and ICDs. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms can be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions. PMID:25566164

  5. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Köhler, Hinrich; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group) who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI M post = 30.54 kg/m(2), SDpost = 5.14) were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group; BMI M pre = 48.01 kg/m(2), SDpre = 6.56). To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders (ICDs). No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms, and ICDs. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms can be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions. PMID:25566164

  6. Post-Bariatric Surgery Changes in Quinolinic and Xanthurenic Acid Concentrations Are Associated with Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Verkindt, Hélène; Leloire, Audrey; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Yengo, Loïc; Allorge, Delphine; Froguel, Philippe; Pattou, François

    2016-01-01

    Background An increase of plasma kynurenine concentrations, potentially bioactive metabolites of tryptophan, was found in subjects with obesity, resulting from low-grade inflammation of the white adipose tissue. Bariatric surgery decreases low-grade inflammation associated with obesity and improves glucose control. Objective Our goal was to determine the concentrations of all kynurenine metabolites after bariatric surgery and whether they were correlated with glucose control improvement. Design Kynurenine metabolite concentrations, analysed by liquid or gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, circulating inflammatory markers, metabolic traits, and BMI were measured before and one year after bariatric surgery in 44 normoglycemic and 47 diabetic women with obesity. Associations between changes in kynurenine metabolites concentrations and in glucose control and metabolic traits were analysed between baseline and twelve months after surgery. Results Tryptophan and kynurenine metabolite concentrations were significantly decreased one year after bariatric surgery and were correlated with the decrease of the usCRP in both groups. Among all the kynurenine metabolites evaluated, only quinolinic acid and xanthurenic acid were significantly associated with glucose control improvement. The one year delta of quinolinic acid concentrations was negatively associated with the delta of fasting glucose (p = 0.019) and HbA1c (p = 0.014), whereas the delta of xanthurenic acid was positively associated with the delta of insulin sensitivity index (p = 0.0018). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has induced a global down-regulation of kynurenine metabolites, associated with weight loss. Our results suggest that, since kynurenine monoxygenase diverts the kynurenine pathway toward the synthesis of xanthurenic acid, its inhibition may also contribute to glucose homeostasis. PMID:27327770

  7. Factors Associated with Suicide Ideation in Severely Obese Bariatric Surgery-Seeking Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Fettich, Karla C.; Tierney, Megan; Cummings, Hakeemah; Berona, Johnny; Weissman, Jessica; Ward, Amanda; Christensen, Kara; Southward, Matthew; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Mitchell, James; Coccaro, Emil

    2012-01-01

    There are high rates of suicide ideation and/or behavior in severely obese individuals. The potential contributors to suicide ideation in a sample of 334 severely obese bariatric surgery candidates was explored. Lack of college education, a history of suicide ideation and/or behavior, psychological distress, hopelessness, loneliness, history of…

  8. A Qualitative Assessment of the My True Body Bariatric Surgery Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Tracy; Mamary, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: The My True Body (MTB) group intervention incorporates cognitive restructuring and social support into bariatric surgery preparation. Purpose: To identify and describe program components that support long-term behavioral modifications and influence confidence in healthy weight maintenance. Methods: Semistructured telephone interviews…

  9. Answers to Clinical Questions in the Primary Care Management of People with Obesity: Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Braverman-Panza, Jill; Horn, Deborah Bade

    2016-07-01

    The role of bariatric surgery in the management of patients with obesity is expanding owing to the amount of data that are accumulating; these data demonstrate significant short- and long-term health benefits, including control or remission of obesity-related complications, as well as acceptable long-term safety. PMID:27565108

  10. Primary experience of bariatric surgery in a newly established private obesity center

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shurafa, Haider; Elzaafarany, Ahmed H.; Albenmousa, Ali; Balata, Mona G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the outcomes of different types of bariatric surgeries in a single newly established private obesity center. Methods: Retrospectively, we included patients who were entered in the registry for bariatric surgeries in the Obesity Unit, Riyadh National Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2013 and September 2014, and completed one year of follow up. Baseline characteristics, percent excess weight loss, and safety data were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 79 patients were included. Based on the type of surgery, patients were divided into 3 groups: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic minigastric bypass (MGBP), and laparoscopic vertical sleeve gastrectomy (SG). After one year, RYGB and MGB patients lost more weight than SG patients. No mortality, or leak were reported and one patient had reoperation after revision laparoscopic RYGB for bleeding. There was one readmission, while 4 patients visited the emergency room for vomiting and dehydration (2 patients), anemia (one patient), and port site infection (one patient). Conclusion: Bariatric surgeries are safe when carried out by an experienced bariatric surgeon in the private sector. The outcome of this series is similar to the published results from large international obesity databases. PMID:27652359

  11. Course of Depressive Symptoms and Treatment in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS-2) Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Devlin, Michael J.; Flum, David; Garcia, Luis; Pender, John R.; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Marcus, Marsha D.; Schrope, Beth; Strain, Gladys; Wolfe, Bruce; Yanovski, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in depressive symptoms and treatment in the first three years following bariatric surgery. Design and Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 is an observational cohort study of adults (n=2,458) who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure at one of ten US hospitals between 2006–9. This study includes 2,148 participants who completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at baseline and ≥ one follow-up visit in years 1–3. Results At baseline, 40.4% self-reported treatment for depression. At least mild depressive symptoms (BDI score≥10) were reported by 28.3%; moderate (BDI score 19–29) and severe (BDI score ≥30) symptoms were uncommon (4.2% and 0.5%, respectively). Mild-to-severe depressive symptoms independently increased the odds (OR=1.75; p=.03) of a major adverse event within 30 days of surgery. Compared with baseline, symptom severity was significantly lower at all follow-up time points (e.g., mild-to-severe symptomatology was 8.9%, 6 months; 8.4%, 1yr; 12.2%, 2yrs; 15.6%, 3yrs; ps<.001), but increased between 1 and 3 years postoperatively (p<.01). Change in depressive symptoms was significantly related to change in body mass index (r=.42; p<0001). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has a positive impact on depressive features. However, data suggest some deterioration in improvement after the first postoperative year. PMID:24634371

  12. Reduced Survival in Bariatric Surgery Candidates Delayed or Denied by Lack of Insurance Approval.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eleisha; Ghaderi, Iman; Overby, D Wayne; Farrell, Timothy M

    2016-02-01

    Bariatric surgery reduces mortality for Americans who meet candidacy criteria and have insurance coverage. Unfortunately, some medically suitable candidates are denied or delayed during insurance approval processes. The long-term impact of such care delays on survival is unknown. Using a prospectively maintained bariatric intake database, we identified consecutive applicants who were evaluated and medically cleared by our multidisciplinary care team and for whom insurance approval was requested. We compared survival in those who were initially approved by their insurance carriers (controls) and those who were initially denied coverage (subjects). Mortality was determined using the Social Security Death Index. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted and the log-rank test for significance was applied. From August 2003 to December 2008, 463 patients (391 females, mean age 45 ± 10 years, mean body mass index 52.5 ± 9.4 kg/m(2)) were medically cleared for a bariatric procedure. Of these, 363 were approved by insurance on initial request, whereas 100 were denied. Given the study's intention to measure the aggregate impact of delays and denials, nine patients who later came to operation after appeal or coverage change were maintained in the subject cohort. During 0- to 113-month follow-up, six subjects (6%) died compared with seven controls (1.9%), corresponding to a statistically significant survival benefit for patients initially approved for bariatric surgery without delay or denial (P < 0.001). In conclusion, access to bariatric surgical care was impeded by insurance certification processes in 22 per cent of medically acceptable candidates. Processes that delay or restrict efficient access to bariatric surgery are associated with a 3-fold mortality increase. PMID:26874141

  13. Association between nutrient adequacy and psychosocial factors with overall rate of weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Vanoh, Divya; Shahar, Suzana; Mahmood, Nik Ritza Kosai Nik

    2015-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study that investigated the relationship between nutrient intake and psychosocial factors with the overall rate of weight loss after bariatric surgery among patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy in University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). Forty-three subjects (15 men and 28 women) were recruited for this study. Subjects completed assessment questionnaires including the Binge Eating Scale (BES), Beck Depression Inventory (BECK), Family Support Questionnaires, and the Index of Peer Relation (IPR). Results showed that the median overall rate of weight loss was 4.3±5.5 kg/month, which was lower when compared to the rate of weight loss at three months which was 5.0±5.6 kg/month. Pre-operative weight was the predictor of overall rate of weight loss (p<0.05, R²=0.52). Binge eating disorder (BED) and depression were also closely associated with each other after bariatric surgery (p<0.001, R²=0.46). Subjects with good compliance to dietary advice had lower scores on the binge eating scale. The mean caloric and protein intake was very low, only 562±310 kcal/day and 29.6±16.1 g/day. The intake of vitamin A, B-1, B-2, B-3, B-12, C, folate, and iron met the Malaysian Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI). However, the RNI for calcium, zinc, selenium, vitamin D, and vitamin E was not met. In conclusion, although bariatric surgery had many health benefits, several factors hindered weight loss after bariatric surgery. Health care professionals should closely monitor patients after bariatric surgery.

  14. Association between nutrient adequacy and psychosocial factors with overall rate of weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Vanoh, Divya; Shahar, Suzana; Mahmood, Nik Ritza Kosai Nik

    2015-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study that investigated the relationship between nutrient intake and psychosocial factors with the overall rate of weight loss after bariatric surgery among patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy in University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). Forty-three subjects (15 men and 28 women) were recruited for this study. Subjects completed assessment questionnaires including the Binge Eating Scale (BES), Beck Depression Inventory (BECK), Family Support Questionnaires, and the Index of Peer Relation (IPR). Results showed that the median overall rate of weight loss was 4.3±5.5 kg/month, which was lower when compared to the rate of weight loss at three months which was 5.0±5.6 kg/month. Pre-operative weight was the predictor of overall rate of weight loss (p<0.05, R²=0.52). Binge eating disorder (BED) and depression were also closely associated with each other after bariatric surgery (p<0.001, R²=0.46). Subjects with good compliance to dietary advice had lower scores on the binge eating scale. The mean caloric and protein intake was very low, only 562±310 kcal/day and 29.6±16.1 g/day. The intake of vitamin A, B-1, B-2, B-3, B-12, C, folate, and iron met the Malaysian Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI). However, the RNI for calcium, zinc, selenium, vitamin D, and vitamin E was not met. In conclusion, although bariatric surgery had many health benefits, several factors hindered weight loss after bariatric surgery. Health care professionals should closely monitor patients after bariatric surgery. PMID:26693745

  15. The Relationship Between Length of Stay and Readmissions in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Alex W.; Frelich, Matthew J.; Sahr, Natasha A.; Hohmann, Samuel F.; Wang, Tao; Gould, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmissions are a quality indicator in bariatric surgery. In recent years, length of stay following bariatric surgery has trended down significantly. We hypothesized that a shorter postoperative hospitalization does not increase the likelihood of readmission. Methods The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of academic medical centers and affiliated hospitals. The UHC’s clinical database contains information on inpatient stay and returns (readmissions) up to 30 days post-discharge. A multicenter analysis of outcomes was performed using data from the January 2009 to December 2013 for patients 18 years and older. Patients were identified by bariatric procedure ICD-9 codes and restricted by diagnosis codes for morbid obesity. Results A total of 95,294 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 45.4 (±0.11) years and 73,941 (77.6%) subjects were female. There were 5,423 (5.7%) readmissions within the study period. Patients with hospitalizations of 3 days and more than 3 days were twice and four times as likely to be readmitted than those with hospitalizations of one day, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with longer postoperative hospitalizations were more likely to be readmitted following bariatric surgery. Early discharge does not appear to be associated with increased readmission rates. PMID:26032831

  16. Malnutrition in pregnancy following bariatric surgery: three clinical cases of fetal neural defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bariatric surgery results in decreased food intake and a variable degree of malabsorption. Without adequate supplementation, the most common complications of this surgery are nutritional disorders. Pregnancy following surgery for obesity is a particular condition requiring strict monitoring of nutrient intake necessary for fetal development and a favourable neonatal prognosis. Patients Malnutrition in pregnancy and congenital neural malformations are reported in three women who had previously undergone bariatric surgery (1, 5 and 18 years before pregnancy, respectively). Two patients underwent the Roux en Y bypass and one bilio-pancreatic diversion with gastroplasty. None of the three received pre-conceptional nutritional counselling. Patients 1 and 2 did not undergo postoperative nutritional surveillance; nutrient supplementation was started at 22 and 20 weeks gestation, respectively. In patient 3, supplementation was stopped at six weeks gestation. Results Newborns 1 and 2 presented with dorsal myelomeningocele and ventricular dilation. Both underwent surgery and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted in the first month of life. Newborn 3 had microcephaly, bilateral microphthalmia and sensorineural deafness. Conclusions Diet and nutritional status, before and during pregnancy, play an important role in the early processes of fetal development and neonatal outcome. Women of childbearing age who have had bariatric surgery, should be encouraged to follow a well-balanced diet as part of a weight management strategy. They should be advised to take recommended maternal supplements. PMID:24929556

  17. Effect of ethnicity on weight loss among adolescents 1 year after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Messiah, Sarah E; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Winegar, Deborah; Sherif, Bintu; Arheart, Kristopher L; Reichard, Kirk W; Michalsky, Marc P; Lipshultz, Steven E; Miller, Tracie L; Livingstone, Alan S; de la Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether or not bariatric surgery weight outcomes vary by ethnicity in a large, nationally representative sample of adolescents. METHODS: The Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database was used for analysis and contains data on surgeries performed on adolescents from 2004 to 2010 from 423 surgeons at 360 facilities across the United States Adolescents (n = 827) between 11 and 19 years old who underwent either gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding surgery were included in the analysis. Outcome measures included changes in anthropometric measurements [weight (kg) and body mass index] from baseline to 3 (n = 739), 6 (n = 512), and 12 (n = 247) mo after surgery. RESULTS: A year after patients underwent either gastric bypass (51%) or adjustable gastric banding (49%) surgery, mean estimated weight loss for all ethnic groups differed by a maximum of only 1.5 kg, being 34.3 kg (95%CI: 30.0-38.5 kg) for Hispanics, 33.8 kg (95%CI: 27.3-40.3 kg) for non-Hispanic blacks, and 32.8 kg (95%CI: 30.9-34.7 kg) for non-Hispanic whites. No overall pairwise group comparisons were significant, indicating that no ethnic group had better weight loss outcomes than did another. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery substantially reduces the weight of severely obese adolescents at 1 year post-procedure with little variation by ethnicity and/or gender. These results suggest that bariatric surgery is a safe and reasonable treatment for all severely obese adolescents with the appropriate indications. PMID:24147204

  18. Identifying Barriers to Appropriate Use of Metabolic/Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment: Policy Lab Results.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Jennifer K; Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Hesketh, Rachel; Martin, Adam; Herman, William H; Rubino, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, few patients who may be appropriate candidates and may benefit from this type of surgery avail themselves of this treatment option. To identify conceptual and practical barriers to appropriate use of surgical procedures, a Policy Lab was hosted at the 3rd World Congress on Interventional Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes on 29 September 2015. Twenty-six stakeholders participated in the Policy Lab, including academics, clinicians, policy-makers, industry leaders, and patient representatives. Participants were provided with a summary of available evidence about the cost-effectiveness of bariatric/metabolic surgery and the costs of increasing the use of bariatric/metabolic surgery, using U.K. and U.S. scenarios as examples of distinct health care systems. There was widespread agreement among this group of stakeholders that bariatric/metabolic surgery is a legitimate and cost-effective approach to the treatment of type 2 diabetes in obese patients. The following four building blocks were identified to facilitate policy changes: 1) communicating the scale of the costs and harms associated with rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes; 2) properly articulating the role of bariatric/metabolic surgery for certain population groups; 3) identifying new funding sources for bariatric/metabolic surgery; and 4) incorporating bariatric/metabolic surgery into the appropriate clinical pathways. Although more research is needed to identify specific clinical scenarios for the prioritization of bariatric/metabolic surgery, the case appears to be strong enough to engage relevant policy-makers and practitioners in a concerted discussion of how to better use metabolic surgical resources in conjunction with other interventions in good diabetes practice.

  19. Bariatric surgery outcomes in a European Centre of Excellence (CoE).

    PubMed

    Fort, José Manuel; Vilallonga, Ramon; Lecube, Albert; Gonzalez, Oscar; Caubet, Enric; Mesa, Jordi; Armengol, Manel

    2013-08-01

    Bariatric Surgery Centres of Excellence have been promoted by the International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders European Chapter to improve outcomes and security of patients. A retrospective analysis of our prospective database has been performed. Between May 2001 and September 2012, we operated on 690 patients, first with open gastric bypass (2001-2005), then laparoscopy (2006-2009), introduced robotics and finally the Centre of Excellence period (2012). Complication rate was 18.9 % in the first period and 3 % in the last. We reoperated on 9 % of patients in two early periods and none in the last. Mortality rate was 2, 0.85, 0.47 and 0 % in the four periods. Teams that are just at the beginning of their experience in bariatric surgery in order to avoid complications and deal with better long-term results.

  20. Becoming a normal guy: Men making sense of long-term bodily changes following bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Groven, Karen Synne; Galdas, Paul; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, research on bodily changes following bariatric surgery has focused predominantly on women, leaving the long-term experience of men relatively unexplored. In this paper, we draw on interviews with men who have undergone an irreversible gastric bypass procedure to explore their bodily changes more than 4 years post-surgery. We apply a phenomenological framework that draws on Leder's perspectives on the “disappearing” and “dys-appearing” body, combined with a gender-sensitive lens that draws on Connell's theory of hegemonic masculinity and Robertson's conceptions of embodied masculinity. Findings Our principal finding was that the men negotiated their bodily changes following bariatric surgery in profoundly ambivalent ways. Although they enthusiastically praised the surgery for improving their health, self-esteem, and social functioning, they also emphasized their efforts to cope with post-surgical side effects and life-threatening complications. Our analysis elaborates on their efforts to adjust to and come to terms with these changes, focusing on episodes of hypoglycemia, severe pain and internal herniation, and the significance of physical activity and exercise. Conclusions Our findings point to the need to acknowledge men's ways of making sense of profound and ongoing bodily changes following bariatric surgery and how these negotiations are closely intertwined with masculine ideals of embodiment and social value. PMID:26641203

  1. The association between reduced inflammation and cognitive gains after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A.W.; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bariatric surgery is associated with improved cognitive function, though the mechanisms are unclear. Elevated inflammation is common in obesity and associated with impaired cognition. Inflammation decreases after bariatric surgery, implicating it as a possible mechanism for cognitive improvement. The objective of this study was to examine whether reduced inflammation is a possible mechanism for post-operative cognitive improvement in bariatric surgery patients. Methods Participants were 77 bariatric surgery patients who completed cognitive testing before surgery and one year post-surgery. Cognitive domains assessed were attention/executive function, language, and memory. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was assessed at both time points. Results Patients exhibited pre-operative cognitive impairment, though attention/executive (M±SDbaseline= 53.57 ± 8.68 vs.M±SDfollow-up= 60.32 ± 8.19) and memory (M±SDbaseline= 44.96 ± 7.98 vs.M±SDfollow-up= 51.55 ± 8.25) improved one year post-surgery. CRP was elevated at baseline and fell into the normative range post-surgery (M±SDbaseline= 0.9 ± 0.7vs.M±SDfollow-up= 0.2 ± 0.3 mg/dL). Pre-operative CRP was not associated with baseline cognitive function (β-values = -0.10 to 0.02) and changes in CRP also did not correspond to changes in cognition post-surgery (β-values = 0.02 to β = 0.11; ps>0.05 for all domains). A trend was detected for smaller improvements in memory among participants with elevated baseline CRP (>0.30 mg/dL) versus those with normal levels (Group x Time: p=0.083). Conclusions Improvements in hs-CRP were not associated with post-operative cognitive benefits. Future studies are needed to explore other inflammatory markers and potential mechanisms of cognitive improvement after bariatric surgery, including improved glycemic control and neurohormone changes. PMID:25478707

  2. Guidelines for the follow-up of patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, Mary; Parretti, Helen M; Hughes, Carly A; Sharma, Manisha; Woodcock, Sean; Puplampu, Tamara; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Clare, Kenneth; MacMillan, Iris; Joyce, Jacqueline; Sethi, Su; Barth, Julian H

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery can facilitate weight loss and improvement in medical comorbidities. It has a profound impact on nutrition, and patients need access to follow-up and aftercare. NICE CG189 Obesity emphasized the importance of a minimum of 2 years follow-up in the bariatric surgical service and recommended that following discharge from the surgical service, there should be annual monitoring as part of a shared care model of chronic disease management. NHS England Obesity Clinical Reference Group commissioned a multi-professional subgroup, which included patient representatives, to develop bariatric surgery follow-up guidelines. Terms of reference and scope were agreed upon. The group members took responsibility for different sections of the guidelines depending on their areas of expertise and experience. The quality of the evidence was rated and strength graded. Four different shared care models were proposed, taking into account the variation in access to bariatric surgical services and specialist teams across the country. The common features include annual review, ability for a GP to refer back to specialist centre, submission of follow-up data to the national data base to NBSR. Clinical commissioning groups need to ensure that a shared care model is implemented as patient safety and long-term follow-up are important. PMID:27166136

  3. Differential Effects of Bariatric Surgery Versus Exercise on Excessive Visceral Fat Deposits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Zong; Huang, Yi-Luan; Wu, Carol C; Wang, Yen-Chi; Pan, Hsiang-Ju; Huang, Chin-Kun; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare differential impacts of bariatric surgery and exercise-induced weight loss on excessive abdominal and cardiac fat deposition.Excessive fat accumulation around the heart may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Recent evidences have suggested that bariatric surgery results in relatively less decrease in epicardial fat compared with abdominal visceral fat and paracardial fat.Sixty-four consecutive overweight or obese subjects were enrolled in the study. Clinical characteristics and metabolic profiles were recorded. The volumes of abdominal visceral adipose tissue (AVAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT), epicardial (EAT), and paracardial adipose tissue (PAT) were measured by computed tomography in the bariatric surgery group (N = 25) and the exercise group (N = 39) at baseline and 3 months after intervention. Subjects in both the surgery and exercise groups showed significant reduction in body mass index (15.97%, 7.47%), AVAT (40.52%, 15.24%), ASAT (31.40, 17.34%), PAT (34.40%, 12.05%), and PAT + EAT (22.31%, 17.72%) (all P < 0.001) after intervention compared with baseline. In both the groups, the decrease in EAT was small compared with the other compartments (P < 0.01 in both groups). Compared with the exercise group, the surgery group had greater loss in abdominal and cardiac visceral adipose tissue (AVAT, ASAT, PAT, EAT+PAT) (P < 0.001), but lesser loss in EAT (P = 0.037).Compared with the exercise group, bariatric surgery results in significantly greater percentage loss of excessive fat deposits except for EAT. EAT, but not PAT, was relatively preserved despite weight reduction in both the groups. The physiological impact of persistent EAT deserves further investigation.

  4. Obese African-American Women’s Perspectives on Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Cheryl Sterling; Chang, Judy C.; Ford, Angela F.

    2007-01-01

    Background African-American (AA) women have higher rates of obesity and obesity-related diseases but are less likely than other women to undergo bariatric surgery or have success with conventional weight loss methods. Objective To explore obese AA women’s perceptions regarding barriers to weight loss and bariatric surgery. Design Focus groups to stimulate interactive dialogue about beliefs and attitudes concerning weight management. Participants and Approach We partnered with a community organization to recruit women who were AA, were ≥18 years old, and had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30 kg/m2. We audiotaped the 90-minute focus groups and used content analysis for generating and coding recurring themes. Results In our sample of 41 participants, the mean age was 48.8 years and mean BMI was 36.3. Most participants were unmarried, had some postsecondary education, and reported good or fair health. About 85% knew someone who had undergone bariatric surgery. Qualitative analysis of 6 focus group sessions revealed that the most common barriers to weight loss were lack of time and access to resources; issues regarding self-control and extrinsic control; and identification with a larger body size. Common barriers to bariatric surgery were fears and concerns about treatment effects and perceptions that surgery was too extreme or was a method of last resort. Conclusions Only through the elimination of barriers can AA women receive the care needed to eliminate excess weight and prevent obesity-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:17447097

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of atypical presentations of hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanagin, Brody A; Mitchell, Myrosia T; Thistlethwaite, William A; Alverdy, John C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery dramatically alters the normal stomach anatomy resulting in a significant incidence of hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although the majority of patients remain asymptomatic, many complain of severe heartburn refractory to medical management and additional highly atypical symptoms. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment regarding four cases of symptomatic hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery presenting with atypical symptoms in the University Hospital, USA. Four patients presented following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or duodenal switch/pancreaticobiliary bypass (DS) with disabling and intractable midepigastric abdominal pain characterized as severe and radiating to the jaw, left shoulder, and midscapular area. The pain in all cases was described as paroxysmal and not necessarily associated with eating. All four patients also experienced nausea, vomiting, and failure to thrive at various intervals following laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Routine workup failed to produce any clear mechanical cause of these symptoms. However, complimentary use of multidetector CT and upper gastrointestinal contrast studies eventually revealed the diagnosis of hiatal hernia. Exploration identified the presence of a type I hiatal hernia in all four patients, with the stomach staple lines densely adherent to the diaphragm and parietal peritoneum. Operative intervention led to immediate and complete resolution of symptoms. The presence of a hiatal hernia following bariatric surgery can present with highly atypical symptoms that do not resolve without operative intervention. Recognition of this problem should lead to the consideration of surgery in cases where patients are dependent on artificial nutritional support and whose symptoms are poorly controlled with medication alone.

  6. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENTOF DUMPING SYNDROME AND ITS RELATION TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    CHAVES, Yasmin da Silva; DESTEFANI, Afrânio Côgo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The dumping syndrome is frequent in bariatric surgery. It is probably the most common syndrome following partial or complete gastrectomy. Its prevalence in partial gastrectomy can reach up to 50%, thus it can be a significant complication arising from some types of bariatric surgeries. Objective: Critical analysis on dumping syndrome, its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A literature review was performed using the key words: 'dumping syndrome', 'bariatric surgery' and 'rapid dumping syndrome'. Inclusion criteria were: books, original works, case reports and meta-analyzes, and the exclusion criterion was literature review. Concerning the publication time, articles were screened between 1960 and May 2015. Results: The dumping syndrome is complication arising from obesity surgeries, but also can be a result of vagus nerve damage. Diagnosis is done primarily through the use of questionnaires based on scores. Conclusion: The Sigstad score and Arts survey are valid means for assessing the dumping syndrome. Initial therapy consists in the adoption of dietary measures, short acting drugs administration. PMID:27683791

  7. Association between binge eating disorder and changes in cognitive functioning following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Alosco, Michael L; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Paul, Robert; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Gunstad, John

    2014-12-01

    Evidence suggests that both obesity and binge eating disorder (BED) may be associated with deficits in cognitive functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a lifetime history of BED would be associated with changes in several domains of cognitive functioning (attention, executive function, language, and memory) following bariatric surgery. Participants were 68 bariatric surgery patients who completed a computerized battery of cognitive tests within 30 days prior to undergoing surgery and again at a 12-Month postoperative follow-up. Results revealed that on the whole, participants displayed improvements from baseline to follow-up in attention, executive function, and memory, even after controlling for diagnostic history of depression; no changes were observed for language. However, individuals with and without a history of BED did not differ in changes in body mass index or in the degree of improvement in cognitive functioning from baseline to follow-up. Such results suggest that a history of BED does not influence changes in cognitive functioning following bariatric surgery. Future research will be needed to further clarify the role of BED in predicting cognitive function over time.

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Predicts Post-Load Hypoglycemia following Bariatric Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Itariu, Bianca K.; Zeyda, Maximilian; Prager, Gerhard; Stulnig, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Postprandial hypoglycemia is a complication following gastric bypass surgery, which frequently remains undetected. Severe hypoglycemic episodes, however, put patients at risk, e.g., for syncope. A major cause of hypoglycemia following gastric bypass is hyperinsulinemic nesidioblastosis. Since pancreatic islets in nesidioblastosis overexpress insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor α and administration of recombinant IGF-1 provokes hypoglycemia, our main objective was to investigate the occurrence of post-load hypoglycemia one year after bariatric surgery and its relation to pre- and post-operative IGF-1 serum concentrations. We evaluated metabolic parameters including 2 h 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and measured IGF-1 serum concentration in thirty-six non-diabetic patients (29 f/7 m), aged 41.3±2.0 y with a median (IQR) BMI of 30.9 kg/m2 (27.5–34.3 kg/m2), who underwent elective bariatric surgery (predominantly gastric bypass, 83%) at our hospital. Post-load hypoglycemia as defined by a 2 h glucose concentration <60 mg/dl was detected in 50% of patients. Serum insulin and C-peptide concentration during the OGTT and HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment–insulin resistance) were similar in hypoglycemic and euglycemic patients. Strikingly, pre- and post-operative serum IGF-1 concentrations were significantly higher in hypoglycemic patients (p = 0.012 and p = 0.007 respectively). IGF-1 serum concentration before surgery negatively correlated with 2 h glucose concentration during the OGTT (rho = −0.58, p = 0.0003). Finally, IGF-1 serum concentrations before and after surgery significantly predicted post-load hypoglycemia with odds ratios of 1.28 (95%CI:1.03–1.55, p = 0.029) and 1.18 (95%CI:1.03–1.33, p = 0.015), respectively, for each 10 ng/ml increment. IGF-1 serum concentration could be a valuable biomarker to identify patients at risk for hypoglycemia following bariatric surgery independently of a diagnostic OGTT

  9. Financial costs and patients’ perceptions of medical tourism in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David H.; Sheppard, Caroline E.; de Gara, Christopher J.; Karmali, Shahzeer; Birch, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Many Canadians pursue surgical treatment for severe obesity outside of their province or country — so-called “medical tourism.” We have managed many complications related to this evolving phenomenon. The costs associated with this care seem substantial but have not been previously quantified. We surveyed Alberta general surgeons and postoperative medical tourists to estimate costs of treating complications related to medical tourism in bariatric surgery and to understand patients’ motivations for pursuing medical tourism. Our analysis suggests more than $560 000 was spent treating 59 bariatric medical tourists by 25 surgeons between 2012 and 2013. Responses from medical tourists suggest that they believe their surgeries were successful despite some having postoperative complications and lacking support from medical or surgical teams. We believe that the financial cost of treating complications related to medical tourism in Alberta is substantial and impacts existing limited resources. PMID:26574702

  10. Abnormalities of Reproductive Function in Male Obesity Before and After Bariatric Surgery-A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Alberto; Faintuch, Joel; Cecconello, Ivan

    2015-07-01

    Young males represent one of the populations with the steepest increases in the incidence of obesity. They are also prone to significant derangements in sexual health and fertility. Despite a growing number of reports about female reproductive health, in the setting of bariatric surgery, males have received much less attention. In the current review of reproductive abnormalities in severe obese males before and after bariatric surgery, erectile function, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis status, sex hormones, semen quality, fertility and assisted reproductive techniques, along with analysis of adipokines, gut hormones, and environmental factors are addressed. Available evidence about weight loss benefits, both medical and surgical, are highlighted, along with perspectives for future investigations, which may be relevant for the patient, for the couple, and for the community alike.

  11. ANALYSIS OF FOOD TOLERANCE IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY USING THE QUESTIONNAIRE QUALITY OF ALIMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    STUMPF, Matheo Augusto Morandi; RODRIGUES, Marcos Ricardo da Silva; KLUTHCOVSKY, Ana Claudia Garabeli Cavalli; TRAVALINI, Fabiana; MILLÉO, Fábio Quirillo

    2015-01-01

    Background : Due to the increased prevalence of obesity in many countries, the number of bariatric surgeries is increasing. They are considered the most effective treatment for obesity. In the postoperative there may be difficulties with the quality of alimentation, tolerance to various types of food, as well as vomiting and regurgitation. Few surveys are available to assess these difficulties in the postoperative. Aim : To perform a systematic literature review about food tolerance in patients undergoing bariatric surgery using the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation", and compare the results between different techniques. Method : A descriptive-exploratory study where the portals Medline and Scielo were used. The following headings were used in english, spanish and portuguese: quality of alimentation, bariatric surgery and food tolerance. A total of 88 references were found, 14 used the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation" and were selected. Results : In total, 2745 patients were interviewed of which 371 underwent to gastric banding, 1006 to sleeve gastrectomy, 1113 to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 14 to biliopancreatic diversion associated with duodenal switch, 83 were non-operated obese, and 158 non-obese patients. The questionnaire showed good acceptability. The biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared to other techniques, but it was evaluated in a single article with a small sample. The longer the time after the operation, the better is the food tolerance. Comparing the sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there are still controversial results in the literature. The gastric banding had the worst score of food tolerance among all the techniques evaluated. Conclusion: The questionnaire is easy and fast to assess the food tolerance in patients after bariatric surgery. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared

  12. BARIATRIC SURGERY IN THE ELDERLY: RESULTS OF A MEAN FOLLOW-UP OF FIVE YEARS

    PubMed Central

    PAJECKI, Denis; SANTO, Marco Aurelio; JOAQUIM, Henrique Dametto Giroud; MORITA, Flavio; RICCIOPPO, Daniel; de CLEVA, Roberto; CECCONELLO, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background : Surgical treatment of obesity in the elderly, particularly over 65, remains controversial; it is explained by the increased surgical risk or the lack of data demonstrating its long-term benefit. Few studies have evaluated the clinical effects of bariatric surgery in this population. Aim : To evaluate the results of surgical treatment of obesity in patients over 60 years, followed for an average period of five years. Method : This was a retrospective study evaluating 46 patients, 60 years or older, who underwent surgical treatment of obesity, by conventional gastric bypass technique (laparotomy). The average age was 64 years (60-71), mean BMI of 49.6 kg/m2 (38-66), mean follow-up of 5.9 years; 91% of patients were hypertensive, 56% diabetics and 39% had dyslipidemia. Results : The incidence of complications (major and minor) in patients under 65 years was 26% and over 65 years 37% (p=0.002). There were no deaths in the group with less than 65 years and there were two deaths (12.5%) over 65 years. The average loss of overweight over 65 years or less was 72% vs 68% (p=0.56). There was total control of the diabetes mellitus in 77% and partial in 23%, with no difference between groups. There was improvement in arterial hypertension in 56% of patients, also no difference between groups. The average LDL levels did not differ between the pre and postoperative (106 mg/dl to 102 mg/dl), an increase of HDL (56 mg/dl to 68 mg/dL) and reduced triglyceride levels (136 mg/dl to 109 mg/dl). There was no statistical difference in the variation of the cholesterol fractions and triglycerides between the groups. Two patients in the group with less than 65 years died in late follow-up, of brain tumor and pneumonia, three and five years after bariatric surgery, respectively. Conclusions : Surgical morbidity and mortality were higher in patients over 65 years, and this group had the same benefits observed in patients lower 65 years for weight loss and comorbidities control

  13. Use of Foley's catheter to control port-site bleeding in bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Priego-Jimenez, Pablo; Paiva-Coronel, Gabriel Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Abdominal wall bleeding in the port-site insertion placed during laparoscopic bariatric surgery is often difficult to control. From January 2005 to August 2011, 226 patients underwent bariatric surgery at our institutions. Seventeen patients (7.5%) presented port-site bleeding that could not be controlled with electrocautery and Foley's catheter (24 F) was used for bleeding inhibition. Of the 17 patients, there were 12 females (70.6%) and five males (29.4%) with a mean age of 38.35 years. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 44.2. Most of bleeding port-sites were located in hypochondrium and were 12-mm size. After the catheter removal (median 36 h), bleeding did not recur in any case. There were no other complications related to the port-side bleeding and the Foley catheter placement. Hospital stay was not prolonged due to the use of the Foley catheter. Port-site bleeding in bariatric surgery is a frequent complication. In up to 7.5% of the cases, the haemorrhage cannot be controlled with electrocautery. Compression with Foley catheter balloon is a safe and efficient method to stop bleeding.

  14. Current practices of obesity pharmacotherapy, bariatric surgery referral and coding for counselling by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Scott; Turner, M.; Gallagher, C.; Dietz, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Rates of obesity pharmacotherapy use, bariatric surgery and intensive behavioural counselling have been extremely low. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to survey healthcare provider beliefs, practice and knowledge regarding obesity management. Methods Primary care physicians (PCPs), OB‐GYN physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) responded to a web‐based survey related to drug therapy practice, bariatric surgery referral and reimbursement coding practice. Results Rates of reported use of obesity pharmacotherapy appear to be increasing among PCPs, which is likely related to the approval of four new obesity pharmacotherapy agents since 2012. Rates of pharmacotherapy use among OB‐GYNs and NPs appear much lower. Similarly, few PCPs are averse to recommending bariatric surgery, but aversion among OB‐GYNs and NPs is significantly higher. Conclusion Together, these observations suggest that OB‐GYN and NP populations are important targets for education about obesity management. Very few PCPs, OB‐GYNs or NPs use behavioural counselling coding for obesity. Better understanding of why this benefit is not being fully used could inform outreach to improve counselling rates.

  15. Psychopathology in Bariatric Surgery Candidates: A Review of Studies Using Structured Diagnostic Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott; Crosby, Ross; Wonderlich, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are not uncommon among severely obese patients who present for bariatric surgery. This paper (1) reviews the results of the published studies using the structured interviews to assess psychopathology in bariatric surgery candidates; (2) compares the prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders across these studies with the data from other population samples; and (3) assesses whether sociodemographic variables appear to affect these prevalence rates. We searched online resources, PubMed, PsychINFO and reference lists of all the relevant articles to provide an overview of evidence so far and highlight some details in the assessment and comparisons of different samples in different countries. The prevalence estimates in the non- treatment obese group did not appear to differ substantially from the general population group in the US or the Italian population samples, although they were relatively higher for the German population. However, the rates of psychopathology in the bariatric surgery candidates were considerably higher than the other two population groups in all the samples. Overall, the most common category of lifetime Axis I disorders in all the studies was affective disorders, with anxiety disorders being the most common category of current Axis I disorders. Certain demographic characteristics are also associated with higher rates of psychopathology, such as, female gender, low socioeconomic status, higher BMI. Overall, methodological and sociodemographic differences make these studies difficult to compare and these differences should be taken into account when interpreting the results. PMID:24290079

  16. Salt taste after bariatric surgery and weight loss in obese persons

    PubMed Central

    Maedge, Julia; Lam, Linda; Blasche, Gerhard; Shakeri-Leidenmühler, Soheila; Kundi, Michael; Ludvik, Bernhard; Langer, Felix B.; Prager, Gerhard; Schindler, Karin; Dürrschmid, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the perception of salty taste in obese patients, especially after bariatric surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse possible differences in salt detection thresholds and preferences for foods differing in salt content in obese persons before and after bariatric surgery with weight loss compared to non-obese individuals. Methods. Sodium chloride detection thresholds and liking for cream soups with different salt concentrations were studied with established tests. Moreover, a brief salt food questionnaire was assessed to identify the usage and awareness of salt in food. Results. The results showed similar mean sodium chloride detection thresholds between non-obese and obese participants. After bariatric surgery a non-significant increase in the salt detection threshold was observed in the obese patients (mean ± SD: 0.44 ± 0.24 g NaCl/L before OP vs. 0.64 ± 0.47 g NaCl/L after OP, p = 0.069). Cream soup liking between controls and obese patients were not significantly different. However, significant sex specific differences were detected with the tested women not liking the soups (p < 0.001). Results from the food questionnaire were similar between the groups. Conclusion. No differences between non-obese persons and obese patients were shown regarding the salt detection threshold. However, due to highly significant differences in soup liking, sex should be taken into consideration when conducting similar sensory studies. PMID:27330856

  17. Can medical therapy mimic the clinical efficacy or physiological effects of bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Miras, A D; le Roux, C W

    2014-03-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures performed has increased dramatically. This review discusses the clinical and physiological changes, and in particular, the mechanisms behind weight loss and glycaemic improvements, observed following the gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding bariatric procedures. The review then examines how close we are to mimicking the clinical or physiological effects of surgery through less invasive and safer modern interventions that are currently available for clinical use. These include dietary interventions, orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pramlintide, dapagliflozin, the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner, gastric pacemakers and gastric balloons. We conclude that, based on the most recent trials, we cannot fully mimic the clinical or physiological effects of surgery; however, we are getting closer. A 'medical bypass' may not be as far in the future as we previously thought, as the physician's armamentarium against obesity and type 2 diabetes has recently got stronger through the use of specific dietary modifications, novel medical devices and pharmacotherapy. Novel therapeutic targets include not only appetite but also taste/food preferences, energy expenditure, gut microbiota, bile acid signalling, inflammation, preservation of β-cell function and hepatic glucose output, among others. Although there are no magic bullets, an integrated multimodal approach may yield success. Non-surgical interventions that mimic the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery, with a reduced morbidity and mortality burden, remain tenable alternatives for patients and health-care professionals. PMID:24213310

  18. Salt taste after bariatric surgery and weight loss in obese persons.

    PubMed

    Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Maedge, Julia; Lam, Linda; Blasche, Gerhard; Shakeri-Leidenmühler, Soheila; Kundi, Michael; Ludvik, Bernhard; Langer, Felix B; Prager, Gerhard; Schindler, Karin; Dürrschmid, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the perception of salty taste in obese patients, especially after bariatric surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse possible differences in salt detection thresholds and preferences for foods differing in salt content in obese persons before and after bariatric surgery with weight loss compared to non-obese individuals. Methods. Sodium chloride detection thresholds and liking for cream soups with different salt concentrations were studied with established tests. Moreover, a brief salt food questionnaire was assessed to identify the usage and awareness of salt in food. Results. The results showed similar mean sodium chloride detection thresholds between non-obese and obese participants. After bariatric surgery a non-significant increase in the salt detection threshold was observed in the obese patients (mean ± SD: 0.44 ± 0.24 g NaCl/L before OP vs. 0.64 ± 0.47 g NaCl/L after OP, p = 0.069). Cream soup liking between controls and obese patients were not significantly different. However, significant sex specific differences were detected with the tested women not liking the soups (p < 0.001). Results from the food questionnaire were similar between the groups. Conclusion. No differences between non-obese persons and obese patients were shown regarding the salt detection threshold. However, due to highly significant differences in soup liking, sex should be taken into consideration when conducting similar sensory studies. PMID:27330856

  19. Can medical therapy mimic the clinical efficacy or physiological effects of bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Miras, A D; le Roux, C W

    2014-03-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures performed has increased dramatically. This review discusses the clinical and physiological changes, and in particular, the mechanisms behind weight loss and glycaemic improvements, observed following the gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding bariatric procedures. The review then examines how close we are to mimicking the clinical or physiological effects of surgery through less invasive and safer modern interventions that are currently available for clinical use. These include dietary interventions, orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pramlintide, dapagliflozin, the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner, gastric pacemakers and gastric balloons. We conclude that, based on the most recent trials, we cannot fully mimic the clinical or physiological effects of surgery; however, we are getting closer. A 'medical bypass' may not be as far in the future as we previously thought, as the physician's armamentarium against obesity and type 2 diabetes has recently got stronger through the use of specific dietary modifications, novel medical devices and pharmacotherapy. Novel therapeutic targets include not only appetite but also taste/food preferences, energy expenditure, gut microbiota, bile acid signalling, inflammation, preservation of β-cell function and hepatic glucose output, among others. Although there are no magic bullets, an integrated multimodal approach may yield success. Non-surgical interventions that mimic the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery, with a reduced morbidity and mortality burden, remain tenable alternatives for patients and health-care professionals.

  20. Bariatric Surgery Patients' Perceptions of Weight-Related Stigma in Healthcare Settings Impair Post-surgery Dietary Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Raves, Danielle M.; Brewis, Alexandra; Trainer, Sarah; Han, Seung-Yong; Wutich, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Background: Weight-related stigma is reported frequently by higher body-weight patients in healthcare settings. Bariatric surgery triggers profound weight loss. This weight loss may therefore alleviate patients' experiences of weight-related stigma within healthcare settings. In non-clinical settings, weight-related stigma is associated with weight-inducing eating patterns. Dietary adherence is a major challenge after bariatric surgery. Objectives: (1) Evaluate the relationship between weight-related stigma and post-surgical dietary adherence; (2) understand if weight loss reduces weight-related stigma, thereby improving post-surgical dietary adherence; and (3) explore provider and patient perspectives on adherence and stigma in healthcare settings. Design: This mixed methods study contrasts survey responses from 300 postoperative bariatric patients with ethnographic data based on interviews with 35 patients and extensive multi-year participant-observation within a clinic setting. The survey measured experiences of weight-related stigma, including from healthcare professionals, on the Interpersonal Sources of Weight Stigma scale and internalized stigma based on the Weight Bias Internalization Scale. Dietary adherence measures included patient self-reports, non-disordered eating patterns reported on the Disordered Eating after Bariatric Surgery scale, and food frequencies. Regression was used to assess the relationships among post-surgical stigma, dietary adherence, and weight loss. Qualitative analyses consisted of thematic analysis. Results: The quantitative data show that internalized stigma and general experiences of weight-related stigma predict worse dietary adherence, even after weight is lost. The qualitative data show patients did not generally recognize this connection, and health professionals explained it as poor patient compliance. Conclusion: Reducing perceptions of weight-related stigma in healthcare settings and weight bias internalization could

  1. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Outcomes for Type 1 Diabetes after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Alexandra; Switzer, Noah J.; Dang, Jerry; Shi, Xinzhe; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel W.; Gill, Richdeep S.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-01-01

    Background. The utility of bariatric surgery in type 1 diabetes remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate glycemic control outcomes in obese patients with type 1 diabetes after bariatric surgery. Methods. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was completed. Inclusion criteria included human adult subjects with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 and a confirmed diagnosis of type 1 diabetes who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure. Results. Thirteen primary studies (86 patients) were included. Subjects had a mean age of 41.16 ± 6.76 years with a mean BMI of 42.50 ± 2.65 kg/m2. There was a marked reduction in BMI postoperatively at 12 months and at study endpoint to 29.55 ± 1.76 kg/m2 (P < 0.00001) and 30.63 ± 2.09 kg/m2 (P < 0.00001), respectively. Preoperative weighted mean total daily insulin requirement was 98 ± 26 IU/d, which decreased significantly to 36 ± 15 IU/d (P < 0.00001) and 42 ± 11 IU/d (P < 0.00001) at 12 months and at study endpoint, respectively. An improvement in HbA1c was also seen from 8.46 ± 0.78% preoperatively to 7.95 ± 0.55% (P = 0.01) and 8.13 ± 0.86% (P = 0.03) at 12 months and at study endpoint, respectively. Conclusion. Bariatric surgery in patients with type 1 diabetes leads to significant reductions in BMI and improvements in glycemic control. PMID:27375900

  2. [Psychological intervention to candidates for surgery bariatric in a public hospital in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mensorio, Marinna; Costa-Júnior, Áderson

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated a psychological intervention program to patients eligible for bariatric surgery, performing lifting coping strategies, anxiety manifestations and lifestyle changes, comparing them to obese patients without exposure to the intervention. The cognitive-behavioral program consists of 12 group sessions, in which they are addressed issues relevant to the process of habit change and preparation for surgery. The comparison of pre and post-intervention and between groups showed improvements in the experimental group. It is highlighted the importance of continued counseling as a promoter of skills required to face adverse situations of obesity and treatment. Studies with larger samples, and more attention to anxiety variables are suggested. PMID:27384631

  3. Bariatric Surgery in University Clinic Center Tuzla - Results After 30 Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetasevic, Emir; Pasic, Fuad; Beslin, Miroslav Bekavac; Ilic, Miroslav; Ahmetasevic, Dzenita; Mesic, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Project of Bariatric surgery in University clinic center (UCC) Tuzla has been initiated in 2009 as an idea of professor Dešo Mešić and soon after that Bariatric surgical team led by doctor Fuad Pasic has been created. Material and methods: Practical team education was realized in Croatia in hospital „Sisters of Mercy” under supervision of professor Miroslav-Bekavac Beslin. First bariatric operations in UCC Tuzla has been done in 2011 and it was biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) Scopinaro. Results and discussion: So far there has been done 30 operations and among them there have been used almost all operative modalities - restrictive, malabsorptive and combined (laparoscopic gastric banding-LAPGB, Roux-y mini gastric bypass, open and laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection, and over mentioned Scopinaro’s BPD). Beginning results are very promising according to the fact that almost all operated patients after one year stopped using antihypertensive, antidiabetic and antidepressant therapy, that average year’s weight loss is 35-100 kilograms and total satisfactions of patients after surgeries is obvious. PMID:27147808

  4. Synthetic agents in the context of metabolic/bariatric surgery: expanding the scope and impact of diabetes drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) - particularly with concurrent obesity ('diabesity') - is an intensifying global public-health problem. Medical needs and market opportunities in the T2D space have propelled discovery efforts aimed at inventing new synthetic T2D drugs differentiable by improved safety and efficacy and/or the ability to modulate emerging T2D targets. Particularly for moderately and severely obese individuals, weight-loss (bariatric) surgery offers an effective means of reducing obesity-driven T2D that is superior in many respects to medical T2D management. Yet, not all overweight or obese individuals with T2D qualify for bariatric surgery, and current healthcare resources are inadequate for applying surgical T2D control to more than a very small segment of qualified patients. Bariatric surgery is no guarantee of 'curative' T2D abrogation, significant rates of T2D non-remission or re-emergence having been observed in diabesity patients following bariatric procedures. Preoperative glucose control by oral hypoglycemic drugs reduces the chance of T2D recurrence post-surgery, and diabesity patients in whom glycemic indices have been improved by bariatric surgery may still require some level of T2D pharmacotherapy. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that synthetic T2D drugs can improve T2D-related outcomes following bariatric procedures, and current T2D drug-discovery efforts are being informed by the metabolic advantages associated with bariatric surgery. These circumstances intensify the need for and extend the impact of T2D drug discovery by demonstrating multiple levels of interplay between medical and surgical approaches to improve the health of individuals with diabesity and, perhaps, approach the overarching goal of decreasing long-term cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24397872

  5. Vitamin B6 intoxication after inappropriate supplementation with micronutrients following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cupa, N; Schulte, D M; Ahrens, M; Schreiber, S; Laudes, M

    2015-07-01

    A 50-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with intermittent diarrhoea, emesis and increasingly brown-coloured skin, mainly the in light-exposed areas, after biliopancreatic diversion for obesity treatment. Differential diagnoses such as adrenal insufficiency were ruled out, but biochemical analysis demonstrated unusual high pyridoxine serum levels (vitamin B6). History revealed the intake of 300 mg of vitamin B6 per day over 6 months as described by her general practitioner. All symptoms disappeared after the discontinuation of vitamin B6 supplementation. Importantly, in contrast to many other vitamins and supplements, there is no evidence in the literature of the occurrence of vitamin B6 deficiency after bariatric surgery. Therefore, supplementation of vitamins and supplements in bariatric patients has to be carefully considered according to the existing clinical guidelines, as uncritical oversupplementation of micronutrients might result in intoxication and serious illness as presented here.

  6. A gut feeling to cure diabetes: potential mechanisms of diabetes remission after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Min

    2014-12-01

    A cure for type 2 diabetes was once a mere dream but has now become a tangible and achievable goal with the unforeseen success of bariatric surgery in the treatment of both obesity and type 2 diabetes. Popular bariatric procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy exhibit high rates of diabetes remission or marked improvement in glycemic control. However, the mechanism of diabetes remission following these procedures is still elusive and appears to be very complex and encompasses multiple anatomical and physiological changes. In this article, calorie restriction, improved β-cell function, improved insulin sensitivity, and alterations in gut physiology, bile acid metabolism, and gut microbiota are reviewed as potential mechanisms of diabetes remission after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

  7. Other aspects of bariatric surgery: liver steatosis, ferritin and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, A E; Benetti, A; Folini, L; Merlotti, C; Frigè, F

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery developed in the late 1970 to treat severe hyperlipidemias in overweight individuals, not necessarily obese. Several techniques have been developed, and the concept has come first of a surgery for morbid obesity, then of a cure for diabetes in morbid obesity. There are other aspects of bariatric surgery that deserve attention, beyond BMI and diabetes, such as hypertension, poor life expectancy, increased prevalence of cancer, congestive heart failure, social inadequacy. The aim of this presentation is to review some recent development in clinical research, in the fields of liver steatosis, ferritin metabolism, and cholesterol metabolism. Liver steatosis, also called fatty liver encompasses a graduation of diseases with different clinical relevance and prognosis. NAFLD correlates with atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. There is now evidence that weight loss, obtained through diet or restrictive surgery, reduces the prevalence (and the severity) of NAFLD. An other issue is represented by serum ferritin concentrations, that are strongly associated with fibrosis, portal and lobular inflammation in NAFLD patients, especially in the presence of obesity. Body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non iron overload concentrations. Moreover, serum ferritin is an important and independent predictor of the development of diabetes. Weight loss is accompanied by reduction of ferritin, more after restrictive than malabsorptive surgery. Metabolic changes are greater after malabsorptive or mixed surgery than after purely restrictive surgery, and this has been ascribed to a greater weight loss. Studies comparing the two kinds of surgery indicate that, for the same amount of weight loss, decrease of cholesterol is greater with the former than with the latter techniques, and this difference is mainly due to a greater reduction of intestinal absorption of cholesterol. In the choice of surgery for the single patient, among

  8. Presence of Serum Ferritin before and after Bariatric Surgery: Analysis in Dentate and Edentulous Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mosquim, Victor; Sales Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Chaim, Elinton Adami

    2016-01-01

    Society has changed its own lifestyle, specially its eating habits and physical activities, leading to excessive weight and a sedentary behavior, which has contributed to obesity increase. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to obesity, allowing weight loss and its maintenance. However, it has been related high levels of iron deficiency after surgery. A person’s nutritional status might be affected by total or partial tooth loss. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study was to evaluate the levels of serum ferritin before and after bariatric surgery and to identify if there is a relation with tooth loss. The sample was composed of 50 patients selected and assisted at Amaral Carvalho Hospital, located in Jaú city, Brazil. The use and necessity of prosthesis, dental absence or presence, and serum ferritin dosage were evaluated. Student’s t test, Univariate analysis, Chi-square and Odds Ratio were adopted (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding the serum ferritin levels between dentate and edentulous patients prior to surgery (p = 0.436). After surgery, the serum ferritin levels were higher in edentulous patients (prosthesis users) when compared to the pre-surgical levels, and the post-surgical levels presented significant difference regarding the dentate patients (p = 0.024). It can be concluded that rehabilitated patients in postoperative period showed better levels of serum ferritin after surgical intervention. PMID:27695053

  9. Bariatric surgery to unload the stressed heart: a metabolic hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Algahim, Mohamed F.; Sen, Shiraj

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Data from the Framingham Study have reported a higher incidence of heart failure in obese individuals compared with a normal cohort. The body initially copes with the abundance of fuel present in an obese milieu by storing it in adipose tissue. However, when the storage capacity is exceeded, the excess energy is taken up and stored ectopically as fat in vital organs such as the heart. Indeed, intramyocardial lipid overload is present in hearts of obese patients, as well as in hearts of animal models of obesity, and is associated with a distinct gene expression profile and cardiac dysfunction. By imposing a metabolic stress on the heart, obesity causes it to hypertrophy and ultimately to fail. Conventional measures to treat obesity include diet, exercise, and drugs. More recently, weight loss surgery (WLS) has achieved increasing prominence because of its ability to reduce the neurohumoral load, normalize metabolic dysregulation, and improve overall survival. The effects of WLS on systemic metabolic, neurohumoral, and hemodynamic parameters are well described and include an early normalization of serum glucose and insulin levels as well as reduction in blood pressure. WLS is also associated with reverse cardiac remodeling, regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, and improved left ventricular and right ventricular function. By targeting the source of the excess energy, we hypothesize that WLS improves contractile function by limiting exogenous substrate availability to the metabolically overloaded heart. These changes have also been found to be associated with increased levels of adiponectin and improved insulin sensitivity. Taken together, the sustained beneficial effects of WLS on left ventricular mass and function highlight the need to better understand the mechanism by which obesity regulates cardiovascular physiology. PMID:22307676

  10. Ultrasonographic evaluation of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Djurić-Stefanović, A; Vasin, D; Jovanović, S; Lazić, Lj; Kovac, J; Popović, I; Bajec, Dj; Saranović, Dj

    2013-01-01

    Visceral fat is considered a key factor in the development of metabolic syndrome and other pathological conditions and diseases associated with obesity. Therefore, analysis of the dynamics of reducing the amount of abdominal visceral fat is important for evaluating the therapeutic effects of different modalities of obesity treatment, including bariatric surgery. In 53 obese patients visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue was measured by ultrasonography (US) before and after bariatric surgery, in the period of 1, 3, 6 months. At the same time, standard anthropometric parameters were assessed: body mass (m), BMI, waist circumference (WC), and hip circumference (HC). Five diameters of the visceral abdominal fat (VAF) were measured: IAFT (Intraabdominal Fat Thickness), LV (Lienal Vein), VF (Visceral Fat), MES sum (Mesenterial leafs) and Max PFT (Maximal Preperitoneal Fat Thickness), and three diameters of the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAF): Min SFT (Minimal Subcutaneous Fat), and MaxSFTa and MaxSFTb (Maximal Subcutaneous Fat Thickness a and b). Statistically significant decrease in all anthropometric parameters, except HC was registered 1, 3 and 6 months after the surgery. We registered the decline of almost all US diameters of abdominal adipose tissue in the follow-up period, but statistically significant decrease were found only in the diameters of visceral adipose tissue: IAFT after 1 and 3 months (p = 0.031 and p = 0.027); VF after 1 month (p = 0.031), LV after 6 months (p = 0.011), and MESsum after 3 and 6 months (p = 0.001 and p = 0.028), as well as MaxSFTb, at 1 month follow-up (p = 0.015). In the short-term follow-up period after the bariatric surgery, there was a significant decrease in body mass, BMI and WC, and ultrasonography revealed a significant reduction in the diameters of the visceral abdominal fat.

  11. COMPARISON OF HEPATIC PROFILE IN PRE AND POSTOPERATIVE OF BARIATRIC SURGERY: PRIVATE VS PUBLIC NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    NASCIMENTO, Taianne Machado; ALVES-JÚNIOR, Antônio; NUNES, Marco Antonio Prado; de FREITAS, Tiago Rodrigo Pereira; da SILVA, Marco Antonio Fontes Sarmento; ALVES, Maria Rosa Melo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated to several comorbidities, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which implicates in isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis. The latter may progress to severe manifestations such as liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Aim: To compare the presence of advanced liver fibrosis before and after bariatric surgery in patients of private and public health system. Methods: Patients from public and privative networks were studied before and after bariatric surgery. The presence or absence of advanced hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by NAFLD Fibrosis Score, a non-invasive method that uses age, BMI, AST/ALT ratio, albumin, platelet count and the presence or absence of hyperglycemia or diabetes. The characteristics of the two groups were compared. The established statistical significance criterion was p<0.05. Results: Were analyzed 40 patients with a mean age of 34.6±9.5 years for private network and 40.6± 10.2 years for public. The study sample, 35% were treated at private health system and 65% in the public ones, 38% male and 62% female. Preoperatively in the private network one (7.1%) patient had advanced liver fibrosis and developed to the absence of liver fibrosis after surgery. In the public eight (30.8%) patients had advanced liver fibrosis preoperatively, and at one year after the proportion fell to six (23%). Conclusion: The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in its advanced form is more prevalent in obese patients treated in the public network than in the treated at the private network and bariatric surgery may be important therapeutic option in both populations. PMID:26734800

  12. Weight Loss and the Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Using Lifestyle Therapy, Pharmacotherapy, and Bariatric Surgery: Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Grams, J; Garvey, W Timothy

    2015-06-01

    Weight loss, whether achieved by lifestyle intervention, pharmacotherapy, or bariatric surgery, is highly effective as a primary interventional strategy in both the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. In high-risk patients with prediabetes and/or metabolic syndrome, weight loss effectively prevents progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and improves cardiovascular risk factors. These benefits are the result of improvements in insulin resistance, which is central to the pathophysiology of cardiometabolic disease. In patients with T2DM, weight loss improves glycemia, while reducing the need for conventional glucose-lowering medicines, by affecting all three processes that produce and sustain the hyperglycemic state, namely via increments in peripheral insulin sensitivity with improvements in insulin signal transduction at the cellular level, more robust insulin secretory responses, and reduced rates of hepatic glucose production. In both nondiabetic and diabetic subjects, hypocaloric feeding (e.g., treatment with very low-calorie diet or bariatric surgery) produces a rapid improvement in insulin sensitivity due to mobilization of fat from the intramyocellular, intrahepatocellular, and intra-abdominal compartments, and via a more long-term mechanism that correlates with the loss of total body fat. In diabetes, by improving glycemia, weight loss also enhances glucose homeostasis by reversing the defects in insulin action and secretion attributable to glucose toxicity. Regardless of the therapeutic approach, weight loss of ∼ 10 % maximally prevents future diabetes in patients with prediabetes or metabolic syndrome. In T2DM, greater degrees of weight loss lead to progressive improvements in glucose homeostasis. Therefore, when accompanied by greater weight loss, the metabolic benefits following bariatric surgery are generally more pronounced than those achieved following lifestyle and medical treatment. In addition, the mechanisms by which bariatric

  13. All Bariatric Surgeries Are Not Created Equal: Insights from Mechanistic Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Stefater, Margaret A.; Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E.; Chambers, Adam P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable scientific progress on the biological systems that regulate energy balance, we have made precious little headway in providing new treatments to curb the obesity epidemic. Diet and exercise are the most popular treatment options for obesity, but rarely are they sufficient to produce long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery, on the other hand, results in dramatic, sustained weight loss and for this reason has gained increasing popularity as a treatment modality for obesity. At least some surgical approaches also reduce obesity-related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. This success puts a premium on understanding how these surgeries exert their effects. This review focuses on the growing human and animal model literature addressing the underlying mechanisms. We compare three common procedures: Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). Although many would group together VSG and AGB as restrictive procedures of the stomach, VSG is more like RYGB than AGB in its effects on a host of endpoints including intake, food choice, glucose regulation, lipids and gut hormone secretion. Our strong belief is that to advance our understanding of these procedures, it is necessary to group bariatric procedures not on the basis of surgical similarity but rather on how they affect key physiological variables. This will allow for greater mechanistic insight into how bariatric surgery works, making it possible to help patients better choose the best possible procedure and to develop new therapeutic strategies that can help a larger portion of the obese population. PMID:22550271

  14. MASTICATORY FUNCTION OF OBESE CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY FROM DISTINCT SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES

    PubMed Central

    PASSERI, Celso Roberto; ANDRADE, Jacira Alves Caracik de Camargo; TOMAL, Karla Thaíza; PRACUCHO, Eduardo Marcucci; de CAMPOS, Livia Paschoalino; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity and metabolic syndrome can be labeled as worldwide outbreak; thus, both have led to serious public health problem. Oral health can be worsened by both, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Tooth loss harms masticatory function, essential status to whom will be submitted to bariatric surgery. Aim: Assess masticatory function of obese candidates to bariatric surgery, who belong to distinct socioeconomic class range, in order to recognize hazard factors and the bias of socioeconomic factor in this context. Methods: Observational cross-section study, with samples comprised by two groups of patients, with distinct socioeconomic class range, one of them belonging to public health system (SUSG) and the other to private clinic (CPG), candidates to bariatric surgery. Were assessed anthropometric data, comorbidities and medicines usage, blood tests, habits and the number of dental functional units. Results: The groups SUSG and CPG were homogeneous taking into account gender (p=0,890) and age range (p=0,170). The number of dental functional units was higher in the private group (p<0.001). The impaired masticatory function was rather present among public group (p<0.001) and female gender (p<0,001). Regarded as blood tests, fasting glucose was higher in female in SUSG (p<0,001). The following hazard factors have corroborated to have patients rated as impaired masticatory function: belong to public service (OR: 8.420, p=0.003), higher age (OR: 1.186, p<0.001), female gender (OR: 0.153, p=0.029), diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.545, p=0.045) and smokers (OR: 2.951, p=0.043). Conclusion: The general health and masticatory function of female SUSG were worse, highlighting the socioeconomic condition as hazard factor. PMID:27683777

  15. Changes of insulin sensitivity and secretion after bariatric/metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mingrone, Geltrude; Cummings, David E

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is classically characterized by failure of pancreatic β-cell function and insulin secretion to compensate for a prevailing level of insulin resistance, typically associated with visceral obesity. Although this is usually a chronic, progressive disease in which delay of end-organ complications is the primary therapeutic goal for medical and behavioral approaches, several types of bariatric surgery, especially those that include intestinal bypass components, exert powerful antidiabetes effects to yield remission of T2D in most cases. It has become increasingly clear that in addition to the known benefits of acute caloric restriction and chronic weight loss to ameliorate T2D, bariatric/metabolic operations also engage a variety of weight-independent mechanisms to improve glucose homeostasis, enhancing insulin sensitivity and secretion to varying degrees depending on the specific operation. In this paper, we review the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic diversion, and vertical sleeve gastrectomy on the primary determinants of glucose homeostasis: insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and, to the lesser extent that it is known, insulin-independent glucose disposal. A full understanding of these effects should help optimize surgical and device-based designs to provide maximal antidiabetes impact, and it holds the promise to identify targets for possible novel diabetes pharmacotherapeutics. These insights also contribute to the conceptual rationale for use of bariatric operations as "metabolic surgery," employed primarily to treat T2D, including among patients not obese enough to qualify for surgery based on traditional criteria related to high body mass index. PMID:27568471

  16. Effects of supervised resistance training on fitness and functional strength in patients succeeding bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Huck, Corey J

    2015-03-01

    Evidence to support exercise training guidelines for patients who have undergone bariatric surgery is exceedingly limited. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the feasibility of a 12-week supervised, resistance training (RT) program and its short-term effects on physical fitness and functional strength for this population. A total of 15 patients with morbid obesity who underwent bariatric surgery participated in this quasi-experimental study. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 7 patients (age: 53.6 ± 8.2 years, body mass index [BMI]: 37.7 ± 6.3 kg·m) in an RT program and 8 patients (age: 44.0 ± 9.7 years, BMI: 32.7 ± 4.2 kg·m) following usual care; no group characteristics were significantly different at baseline. Changes in body weight, body composition, (Equation is included in full-text article.)(estimated, Ebbeling), flexibility (Sit-and-Reach Test), hand grip strength, and functional strength (sit-to-stand test [STS]) were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks of follow-up. Adherence to RT was 84%, and no adverse events were reported. Both groups lost a significant amount of total body and fat mass; fat-free mass did not significantly change for either group. Flexibility and hand grip strength significantly improved in both groups; however, the improvements in flexibility for the RT group were significantly greater (p = 0.040). Only the RT group exhibited significant improvements in (Equation is included in full-text article.)(p = 0.025) and functional strength, STS (p = 0.002). In conclusion, supervised RT safely facilitates improvements in strength and physical functioning, increasing the patient's capacity to perform activities of daily living after bariatric surgery.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF BODY FAT IN OBESE PATIENTS PREOPERATIVELY FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDEZ, Mônica; TOIMIL, Rosana Farah; RASSLAN, Zied; ILIAS, Elias Jirjoss; GRADINAR, Ana Lúcia Torloni; MALHEIROS, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The study of body composition in patient candidates for bariatric surgery is directly related to the increase and distribution of body fat in the development of cardiovascular disease. Aim: To correlate anthropometric indicators and bioelectrical impedance in the assessment of body fat in female candidates for bariatric surgery. Methods: Cross-sectional, observational study of 88 women. The weight, height, body mass index and waist circumference data were evaluated in the anthropometric analysis. The body fat was determinate by bioelectrical impedance conducted according to the manufacturer´s recommended technique with a specific severe obesity formula. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the average waist circumference and body mass index for better analysis of the results. Results: The group had a mean age of 39.7 years (±7.2), average weight of 125.6 kg (±16.2), mean body mass index of 48.7 kg/m2 (±6.4) and the mean waist circumference 137.6 cm (±12.4). Negative and significant relationship between BMI values waist circumference and resistance obtained by bioelectrical impedance ​​were found. By analyzing the two groups the mean BMI and waist circumference, a significant relationship was observed, ie, the higher the degree of obesity less resistance was obtained by bioelectrical impedance. The higher is the obesity the lower is value found for resistance. Conclusion: The increase of anthropometric indicators (BMI and waist circumference) determined reduction in resistance and reactance obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis in obese women candidates to bariatric surgery. PMID:27683778

  18. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; ALMEIDA, Élia Cláudia de Souza; CAMILO, Silvia Maria Perrone; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; GUIMARÃES, Lucinda Calheiros; DUQUE, Ana Cristina da Rocha; ETCHEBEHERE, Renata Margarida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. Aim: To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. Methods: This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. Results: In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. Conclusion: There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. PMID:27683773

  19. Imaging in bariatric surgery: service set-up, post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Shah, V; Ahmed, A R; Blunt, D M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent and costly problem faced by the healthcare system. The role of bariatric surgery in managing obesity has also increased with evidence showing a reduction in long-term morbidity and mortality. There are unique challenges faced by the radiology department in providing an imaging service for this population of patients, from technical and staffing requirements through to the interpretation of challenging post-surgical images. We describe these challenges and provide an overview of the most frequently performed procedures, normal post-operative imaging findings and the appearance of common complications. PMID:21045066

  20. Self-determination and motivation for bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how obese individuals acquire their motivation to undergo weight loss surgery and characterized the motivations within the framework of the self-determination theory (SDT). Participants expecting to have bariatric surgery were recruited and participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview accounts characterized different types of motivation for individuals seeking surgical weight loss treatments on the SDT continuum of relative autonomy. This study demonstrated that the more one's motivation was internally regulated, related to one's personal life and supported for competency, the more personal and hopeful were the anecdotes participants mentioned in accounts, thus the more positive the surgical outcomes were anticipated. Study limitations and future research were discussed as was the need for a systematic scheme to categorize types of motivation within the SDT, a longitudinal approach to measure actual weight loss outcomes based on the patient's pre-surgical motivation, and a further investigation with a larger sample size and balanced gender ratio. Practical implications of the study findings were also discussed as a novel strategy to internalize bariatric patients' motivation, further helping to improve their long-term quality of life post-surgery.

  1. Self-determination and motivation for bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how obese individuals acquire their motivation to undergo weight loss surgery and characterized the motivations within the framework of the self-determination theory (SDT). Participants expecting to have bariatric surgery were recruited and participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview accounts characterized different types of motivation for individuals seeking surgical weight loss treatments on the SDT continuum of relative autonomy. This study demonstrated that the more one's motivation was internally regulated, related to one's personal life and supported for competency, the more personal and hopeful were the anecdotes participants mentioned in accounts, thus the more positive the surgical outcomes were anticipated. Study limitations and future research were discussed as was the need for a systematic scheme to categorize types of motivation within the SDT, a longitudinal approach to measure actual weight loss outcomes based on the patient's pre-surgical motivation, and a further investigation with a larger sample size and balanced gender ratio. Practical implications of the study findings were also discussed as a novel strategy to internalize bariatric patients' motivation, further helping to improve their long-term quality of life post-surgery. PMID:26708344

  2. Getting Off on the Right Foot: The Many Roles of the Psychosocial Evaluation in the Bariatric Surgery Practice.

    PubMed

    Sogg, Stephanie; Friedman, Kelli E

    2015-11-01

    A thorough and specialized pre-operative psychosocial assessment is an important part of a comprehensive bariatric treatment protocol. Over time, the presurgical psychosocial evaluation has evolved from a cut-and-dried process of recommending whether a patient should or should not undergo surgery to a more nuanced and multifaceted process that serves multiple functions. In this article, we review the many ways in which the pre-operative psychosocial evaluation can enhance patient outcomes and adjustment and even the functioning of the interdisciplinary bariatric surgery team. PMID:26294256

  3. Heart rate variability and cardio-respiratory coupling during sleep in patients prior to bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Trimer, R; Cabiddu, R; Mendes, R G; Costa, F S M; Oliveira, A D; Borghi-Silva, A; Bianchi, A M

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiac risk of morbidly and mortality and for the development and progression of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Severity of obesity negatively affects the heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with indication for bariatric surgery (BS). The purpose of this study is to determine if the severity of obesity alters the autonomic cardiac regulation and the cardio-respiratory coupling during sleep using spectral analysis of HRV and respiration variability signals (RS) in patients prior to BS. Twenty-nine consecutive preoperative BS and ten subjects (controls) underwent polysomnography. The spectral and cross-spectral parameters of the HRV and RS were computed during different sleep stages (SS). Spectral analysis of the HRV and RV indicated lower respiration regularity during sleep and a lower HRV in obese patients (OP) during all SS when compared with controls (p < 0.05). Severely (SO) and super-obese patients (SOP) presented lower values of low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio and LF power during REM sleep and higher HF power (p < 0.05), while morbidly obese (MO) patients presented lower LF/HF ratio and LF power in SS-S2 and higher HF power when compared to controls (p < 0.05). The cross-spectral parameters showed that SOP presented lower percentage of tachogram power coherent with respiration in SS-S3 when compared to controls (p < 0.05). Patients prior to BS presented altered HRV and RV in all SS. SO, MO, and SOP presented altered cardio-respiratory coupling during sleep, and these alterations are related with severity of obesity and OSA parameters.

  4. Fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglycerides in obese diabetic women after bariatric surgery: a 2-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Kunešová, M; Sedláčková, B; Bradnová, O; Tvrzická, E; Staňková, B; Šrámková, P; DoleŽalová, K; Kalousková, P; Hlavatý, P; Hill, M; Bendlová, B; Fried, M; Hainer, V; Vrbíková, J

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective method in the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types of bariatric procedures on remission of T2DM and on the fatty acid composition in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Patients included obese diabetic women who underwent bariatric surgery: biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), n=8, laparoscopic gastric banding (LAGB), n=9 or laparoscopic greater curvature plication (LGCP), n=12. Anthropometric characteristics and fatty acid composition of adipose tissue (FA AT) were analyzed before surgery, then 6 months and 2 years after surgery. FA AT was analyzed by gas chromatography. Diabetes remission was estimated. BPD was most efficient in inducing a remission of diabetes (p=0.004). Significantly higher increases in lauric (12:0), myristoleic (14:1n-5) and palmitoleic (16:1n-7) acids and delta-9 desaturase were found two years after BPD, suggesting higher lipogenesis in adipose tissue. Docosatetraenoic acid (22:4n-6) increased significantly after BPD, while docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) decreased 6 months after BPD and increased after 2 years. No changes were found after LAGB and LGCP after 2 years. Bariatric surgery led to significant changes in the fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue in severely obese diabetic women after six months and two years, and was partly influenced by the type of surgery used. PMID:26680476

  5. The ambivalence of losing weight after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Warholm, Christine; Marie Øien, Aud; Råheim, Målfrid

    2014-01-01

    This study is grounded in a phenomenological lifeworld perspective. It aims at providing rich descriptions of lived experience of the process of losing weight after obesity surgery. Two women participated in in-depth interviews four times each during the first postoperative year. Based on the women's experiences, a meaning structure--the ambivalence of losing weight after obesity surgery--was identified across the women's processes of change. This consisted of five core themes: movement and activity--freedom but new demands and old restraints; eating habits and digestion--the complexity of change; appearance--smaller, but looser; social relations--stability and change; and being oneself--vulnerability and self-assurance. These core themes changed over time in terms of dominance. The experience of ambivalence is discussed according to a phenomenological perspective of the body as lived experience. PMID:24480033

  6. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel; de FREITAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira; de ALMEIDA, Andréa Adriana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. Aim: To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. Method: A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were divided into two groups: intervention-group, who performed out-patient physiotherapy twice a week, from thirty to sixty days after surgery; and the control-group, who only followed home instructions. Both groups were evaluated before surgery and sixty days after surgery through manovacuometry, six-minute walk test and the Borg Scale of perceived exertion. Results: Twenty participants were included the intervention-group and twenty-three in the control-group. Both groups had significant and similar weight loss after surgery. The manovacuometry presented no differences comparing pre- and post-surgery and in the comparison between the groups. The result of the six-minute walk test for the intervention-group increased by 10.1% in the post-operative period in relation to pre-. The Borg scale of perceived exertion in the intervention-group in pre-surgery decreased by 13.5% in the post-surgery compared to pre-surgery. In the control-group there was no difference comparing pre- and post-operative values, as in the comparison with the intervention-group. Conclusion: The low-intensity exercise program, carried out between the 30th and the 60th day after bariatric surgery provided better functional capacity; did not change respiratory muscle strength; and improved the perceived exertion rate. PMID:27683775

  7. New obesity classification criteria as a tool for bariatric surgery indication

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Soldati, Laura; Sarlo, Francesca; Calvani, Menotti; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Di Renzo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Obesity plays relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, and metabolic factors. Due to the role of adipose tissue in lipid and glucose metabolism, and low grade inflammation, it is necessary to classify obesity on the basis of body fat composition and distribution, rather than the simply increase of body weight, and the Body Mass Index. The new term of adiposopathy (‘‘sick fat’’) clearly defines the pathogenic role of adipose tissue. Four phenotypes of obese individuals have been described: (1) normal weight obese (NWO); (2) metabolically obese normal weight; (3) metabolically healthy obese; and (4) metabolically unhealthy obese or “at risk” obese. Moreover, sarcopenic obesity has been related to all the phenotypes. The category of normal weight lean, represented by metabolically healthy normal weight has been classified to distinguish from NWO. It is crucial to recommend a bariatric surgery taking into account adiposopathy and sick fat that occurs with the expansion of fat mass, changing the inflammatory and metabolic profile of the patient. Body fat percentage and genetic polymorphism have to be evaluated to personalize the best bariatric surgery intervention. PMID:26811617

  8. Fatal Nonhepatic Hyperammonemia in ICU Setting: A Rare but Serious Complication following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sunil; Patel, Ronakkumar; Frunza-Stefan, Simona; Kaur, Harmanjot

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is well established in reducing weight and improving the obesity-associated morbidity and mortality. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy following bariatric surgery is rare but highly fatal if not diagnosed in time and managed aggressively. Both macro- and micronutrients deficiencies play a role. A 42-year-old Hispanic female with a history of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Procedure was brought to ED for progressive altered mental status. Physical exam was remarkable for drowsiness with Glasgow Coma Scale 11, ascites, and bilateral pedal edema. Labs showed elevated ammonia, low hemoglobin, low serum prealbumin, albumin, HDL, and positive toxicology. She remained obtunded despite the treatment with Narcan and flumazenil and the serum ammonia level fluctuated despite standard treatment with lactulose and rifaximin. Laboratory investigations helped to elucidate the etiology of the hyperammonemia most likely secondary to unmasking the functional deficiency of the urea cycle enzymes. Hyperammonemia in the context of normal liver function tests becomes diagnostically challenging for physicians. Severe hyperammonemia is highly fatal. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can alter the prognosis favorably. PMID:27144037

  9. EVALUATION OF THE THORACOABDOMINAL MOBILITY OF OBESE SUBJECTS IN PRE-BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    VELOSO, Ana Paula Limongi Richardelli; CUSMANICH, Karla Garcez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity can affect the thorax, diaphragm, and alterations in respiratory function even if the lungs are within normality. The respiratory compliance is very reduced by the increase in fat mass. Aim: To evaluate the effect of the physical therapeutic respiratory exercises on the thoracoabdominal mobility of obese individuals in pre-bariatric surgery Methods: Cross-sectional and descriptive study, which used the cirtometry (axillary, xiphoid and abdominal) to evaluate the mobility of 74 individuals, 27 men and 47 women, in pre-bariatric surgery, assisted by the team EMAD, after eight weeks of physiotherapy, following a protocol of exercises, reevaluating and compared the measures pre and post intervention. Results: Had positive correlation abdominal mobility in the total volume of all participants (p=0.010) and also for all the measures in the measurement of residual volume in three levels (p=0.000). Comparing genders, in total volume, cirtometry abdominal greater for women (p=0.015) when compared to men and residual volume, significance for either men or women in all measurements (p=0.000). Conclusion: Obese patients that underwent the physiotherapeutic treatment during the preoperative period, had pré respiratory dynamics improved by the increase in the mobility of the chest cavity and by the improvement of respiratory conscience. PMID:27683774

  10. The implications for the surgical community of bariatric surgery as a "cure" for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Josef E

    2013-07-01

    The United States is in the throes of an epidemic of morbid obesity and, parenthetically, type 2 diabetes. Recent data indicate that bariatric surgery, notably Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is valid not only for weight loss but also for a high success rate in the amelioration and perhaps "cure" of type 2 diabetes. It clearly is not weight loss alone, because the amelioration of type 2 diabetes occurs before weight loss. The mechanism needs to be elucidated and researched. For the first time since tuberculosis--before antitubercular drugs, when surgical procedures were the principal mechanism for dealing with tuberculosis--surgery has the opportunity to participate in the amelioration and perhaps cure of this epidemic and to regain its professional stature. Included in this article are the author's thoughts and suggestions on how we can keep control of weight loss and bariatric procedures that are valid treatments for morbid obesity and related type 2 diabetes. We should use this opportunity to stop the current conversion of surgeons from professionals to employees.

  11. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    PubMed Central

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  12. A Cognitive-Behavioral Mindfulness Group Therapy Intervention for the Treatment of Binge Eating in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Irwin, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Binge eating is a negative indicator of post-surgical weight loss and health outcome in bariatric surgery patients (Hsu, Bentancourt, Sullivan, 1996). Cognitive-behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based practices have been shown to successfully treat binge eating (Agras, Telch, Arnow, Eldredge, & Marnell, 1997; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999). This…

  13. Relevance of Adipose Tissue Stiffness Evaluated by Transient Elastography (AdipoScan™) in Morbidly Obese Patients before Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, Magali; Abdennour, Meriem; Liu, Yuejun; Hazrak, Hecham; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Le Naour, Gilles; Bedossa, Pierre; Torjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Miette, Véronique

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) in human obesity undergoes severe alteration such as fibrosis which is related to metabolic alterations and to less efficiency in losing weight after bariatric surgery. There is currently no non-invasive tool to assess fibrosis in scAT. Vibration Controlled Transient Elastography (VCTE) using FibroScan® is widely used to assess liver fibrosis in clinical practice. A novel device named AdipoScan™ which is based on VCTE has been developed by Echosens (Paris) so as to assess scAT. The objective of this study is to show the first AdipoScan clinical results. AdipoScan™ was assessed in vivo on 73 morbidly obese patients candidate for bariatric surgery who were enrolled in the Pitié Salpêtrière hospital. scAT shear wave speed measured by AdipoScan™ is significantly associated with scAT fibrosis, gender, hypertension status, total body fat mass assessed by DXA, hypertension status, glycemic, lipid, hepatic parameters and adiponectin. Results suggest that scAT evaluation before bariatric surgery can be useful in clinical practice since it is related to scAT fibrosis -who plays in role in weight loss resistance after bariatric surgery- and to obesity induced co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension liver dysfunction.

  14. Continued Loss in Visceral and Intermuscular Adipose Tissue in Weight-Stable Women Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ramos, Tatiana; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Janumala, Isaiah; Lin, Susan; Strain, Gladys W.; Thornton, John C.; Kang, Patrick; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Pomp, Alfons; Gallagher, Dympna

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess changes in total adipose tissue (TAT), subcutaneous (SAT), visceral (VAT), and intermuscular (IMAT) by whole-body MRI before surgery, at 12 months and 24 months post-surgery in a subset of participants of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2. Design and Methods From 0 to 12 months, n=20F and 3M; from 12 to 24 months, n=42F and 7M. Paired t-tests and GLM repeated measures examined changes in TAT, SAT, VAT, and IMAT at 12 and 24 months, with sex and age as covariates. Results Changes from 0 to 12 months, included weight (−41.9±12.1kg; −36%), TAT (−33.5±9.6kg; −56%), SAT (−29.2±8.2kg; −55%), VAT (−3.3±1.6kg; −73%), and IMAT (−0.99±0.68kg; −50%), all p<0.001. In females, from 12 to 24 months, despite relative weight stability (−1.8±6.5kg, −2%; p=0.085), VAT (−0.5±0.7kg; −30%; p<0.001) and IMAT (−0.2±0.4kg; −14%; p=0.012) decreased further. In males from 12 to 24 months, weight increased (5.1±5.2kg; 6%; p=0.04) with no significant changes in TAT or sub-depots. Conclusions Bariatric surgery continues to induce favorable changes in body composition, i.e., persistent adipose tissue loss at 24 months in the absence of further significant weight loss. PMID:25384375

  15. Daylong pituitary hormones in morbid obesity: effects of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Camastra, S; Manco, M; Frascerra, S; Iaconelli, A; Mingrone, G; Ferrannini, E

    2009-01-01

    Moderate obesity is known to be associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Less information is available on the hormonal status of patients with morbid obesity and on the effects of major weight loss. We studied 16 severely obese (BMI 40.6-69.9 kg/m(2)) nondiabetic patients and 7 nonobese (BMI range 24.6-27.7 kg/m(2)), sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. During 24 h in a metabolic ward, four meals were administered and hourly blood samples were drawn from a central venous catheter for the measurement of glucose, insulin, leptin, thyrotropic hormone (TSH), growth hormone (GH) and prolactin. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Studies were repeated 6 months after biliopancreatic diversion, a mainly malabsorptive surgical approach, which caused an average weight loss of 35+/-4 kg (or 26+/-2% of initial weight). Compared with controls, patients were hyperinsulinaemic (290+/-31 vs 88+/-4 pmol l(-1), P=0.0002), insulin resistant (23.5+/-2.8 vs 52.9+/-4.9 micromol min(-1) kg(FFM)(-1), P=0.0006) and hyperleptinaemic (52.5+/-5.8 vs 10.9+/-3 ng ml(-1), P=0.0002). Plasma TSH levels were increased throughout the day-night cycle (averaging 2.02+/-0.18 vs 1.09+/-0.19 muU ml(-1) of controls, P=0.01), whereas serum GH levels were suppressed (0.46+/-0.10 vs 3.01+/-1.15, P=0.002). Following surgery, the hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance were fully normalized; in concomitance with a major drop in leptin levels (to 14.4+/-2.7 ng ml(-1), P=0.02), TSH decreased and GH increased to near-normal levels. In the whole dataset, mean 24-h leptin levels were directly related to mean 24-h TSH levels after controlling for confounders this relationship was lost only after adjusting for fat mass. We conclude that in morbid obesity leptin is a determinant of changes in pituitary function.

  16. Improved glucose metabolism following bariatric surgery is associated with increased circulating bile acid concentrations and remodeling of the gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, Lukasz; Sledzinski, Tomasz; Chomiczewska, Agnieszka; Dettlaff-Pokora, Agnieszka; Swierczynski, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have indicated that circulating bile acid (BA) concentrations increase following bariatric surgery, especially following malabsorptive procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RYGB). Moreover, total circulating BA concentrations in patients following RYGB are positively correlated with serum glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations and inversely correlated with postprandial glucose concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that the increased circulating BA concentrations following bariatric surgery - independently of calorie restriction and body-weight loss - could contribute, at least in part, to improvements in insulin sensitivity, incretin hormone secretion, and postprandial glycemia, leading to the remission of type-2 diabetes (T2DM). In humans, the primary and secondary BA pool size is dependent on the rate of biosynthesis and the enterohepatic circulation of BAs, as well as on the gut microbiota, which play a crucial role in BA biotransformation. Moreover, BAs and gut microbiota are closely integrated and affect each other. Thus, the alterations in bile flow that result from anatomical changes caused by bariatric surgery and changes in gut microbiome may influence circulating BA concentrations and could subsequently contribute to T2DM remission following RYGB. Research data coming largely from animal and cell culture models suggest that BAs can contribute, via nuclear farnezoid X receptor (FXR) and membrane G-protein-receptor (TGR-5), to beneficial effects on glucose metabolism. It is therefore likely that FXR, TGR-5, and BAs play a similar role in glucose metabolism following bariatric surgery in humans. The objective of this review is to discuss in detail the results of published studies that show how bariatric surgery affects glucose metabolism and subsequently T2DM remission.

  17. Pre- to Post-operative Changes in Physical Activity: Report from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Hsu, Jesse Y; Belle, Steven H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Eid, George M; Flum, David R; Mitchell, James E; Pender, John R; Smith, Mark D; Steffen, Kristine J; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous studies report that bariatric surgery patients report more physical activity (PA) after surgery than before, but the quality of PA assessment has been questionable. Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 is a 10-center longitudinal study of adults undergoing bariatric surgery. Of 2458 participants, 455 were given an activity monitor, which records steps/minute, and an exercise diary before and 1 year after surgery. Mean step/day, active minutes/day, and high-cadence minutes/week were calculated for 310 participants who wore the monitor at least 10 hours/day for at least 3 days at both time points. Pre- and post-surgery PA were compared for differences using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Generalized Estimating Equations identified independent pre-operative predictors of post-operative PA. Results PA increased significantly (p<.0001) pre- to post-operative for all PA measures. Median values pre- and post-operative were: 7563 and 8788 steps/day; 309 and 340 active minutes/day; and 72 and 112 high-cadence minutes/week, respectively. However, depending on the PA measure, 24–29% of participants were at least 5% less active post-operative than pre-operative. Controlling for surgical procedure, sex, age and BMI, higher PA preoperative independently predicted higher PA post-operative (p<.0001, all PA measures). Less pain, not having asthma and self-report of increasing PA as a weight loss strategy pre-operative also independently predicted more high-cadence minutes/week post-operative (p<.05). Conclusion The majority of adults increase their PA level following bariatric surgery. However, most remain insufficiently active and some become less active. Increasing PA, addressing pain and treating asthma prior to surgery may have a positive impact on post-operative PA. PMID:21944951

  18. Pre- to postoperative physical activity changes in bariatric surgery patients: self report vs. objective measures.

    PubMed

    Bond, Dale S; Jakicic, John M; Unick, Jessica L; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G Dean; Ryder, Beth A; Sax, Harry C; Wing, Rena R

    2010-12-01

    Bariatric surgery patients report significant pre- to postoperative increases in physical activity (PA). However, it is unclear whether objective measures would corroborate these changes. The present study compared self-reported and accelerometer-based estimates of changes in moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) from pre- (pre-op) to 6 months postsurgery (post-op). Twenty bariatric surgery (65% laparoscopic-adjustable gastric banding, 35% gastric bypass) patients (46.2 ± 9.8 years, 88% female, pre-op BMI = 50.8 ± 9.7 kg/m(2)) wore RT3 accelerometers as an objective measure of MVPA and completed the Paffenbarger Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ) as a subjective measure before and 6 months after bariatric surgery. Time (min/week) spent in MVPA was calculated for the PPAQ and RT3 (≥ 1-min and ≥ 10-min bouts) at pre-op and post-op. Self-reported MVPA increased fivefold from pre-op to post-op (44.6 ± 80.8 to 212.3 ± 212.4 min/week; P < 0.005). By contrast, the RT3 showed nonsignificant decreases in MVPA for both ≥ 1-min (186.0 ± 169.0 to 151.2 ± 118.3 min/week) and ≥ 10-min (41.3 ± 109.3 to 39.8 ± 71.3 min/week) bouts. At pre-op, the percentage of participants who accumulated ≥ 150-min/week of MVPA in bouts ≥ 10-min according to the PPAQ and RT3 was identical (10%). However, at post-op, 55% of participants reported compliance with the recommendation compared to 5% based on RT3 measurement (P = 0.002). Objectively-measured changes in MVPA from pre-op to 6 months post-op appear to be much smaller than self-reported changes. Further research involving larger samples is needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether self-report and objective PA measures are differentially associated with surgical weight loss outcomes.

  19. Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  20. Effects of bariatric surgery on food cravings: do food cravings and the consumption of craved foods “normalize” after surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Bond, Dale S.; Raynor, Hollie; Roye, Dean; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Ryder, Beth A.; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The reported effects of bariatric surgery on food cravings have been inconsistent. Moreover, research has been largely limited to sweet cravings, and no study has examined whether surgery patients’ cravings differ from those of normal weight (NW) controls. Our objective was to use an empirically validated instrument to examine changes in bariatric surgery patients’ frequency of food cravings and consumption of craved foods from before to 3 and 6 months after surgery and to compare surgery patients’ frequency of food cravings to those of NW controls. The setting was private hospitals and research center in the United States. Methods Bariatric surgery patients (n = 32) and NW controls (n = 20) completed the Food Cravings Inventory and had their height and weight measured. Results Before surgery, the patients reported more overall cravings and cravings for high fat and fast foods and a greater consumption of craved high-fat foods than the NW controls. From before to 3 and 6 months after surgery, the patients had significant reductions in overall cravings for, and consumption of, craved foods, with specific effects for sweets and fast food; however, surgery had virtually no effect on the cravings for high-fat foods. Moreover, high-fat and fast food cravings did not reduce to normative levels. The postoperative patients were less likely to consume craved sweets than NW controls, and the patients’ postoperative weight loss was largely unrelated to food cravings. Conclusion Bariatric surgery is associated with significant reductions in food cravings and consumption of craved foods, with the exception of high-fat foods. Despite these decreases, patients’ cravings do not fully reduce to “normative” levels and are not associated with postoperative weight loss. PMID:21925967

  1. Interventions to improve long-term weight loss in patients following bariatric surgery: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    McGrice, Melanie; Don Paul, Kathlene

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery aims to provide long-term weight loss and improvement in weight-related comorbidities. Unfortunately, some patients do not achieve predicted weight loss targets and many regain a portion of their lost weight within 2–10 years postsurgery. A review of the literature found that behavioral, dietary, psychological, physical, and medical considerations can all play a role in suboptimal long-term weight loss. Recommendations to optimize long-term weight loss include ensuring that the patient understands how the procedure works, preoperative and postoperative education sessions, tailored nutritional supplements, restraint with liquid kilojoules, pureed foods, grazing and eating out of the home, an average of 60 minutes of physical activity per day, and lifelong annual medical, psychological, and dietary assessments. PMID:26150731

  2. Body image in obese patients before and after stable weight reduction following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Adami, G F; Meneghelli, A; Bressani, A; Scopinaro, N

    1999-03-01

    The role of possessing an abnormal body weight in the body image alterations of obese patients was evaluated in bariatric surgery subjects prior to and at long term after operation, when body weight and shape had become steadily normalized. Body image was assessed by the body dissatisfaction scale of the Eating Disorders Inventory, the Body Shape Questionnaire, and the Body Attitude Questionnaire. When the individuals were obese, a sharply impaired body image was observed; following operation, weight loss corresponded to normalization of body dissatisfaction, feeling of fatness, and physical attractiveness, whereas body disparagement and salience of shape, although improved in comparison to preoperative data, remained significantly different from that of controls. In the obese patients, some aspects of body image alterations are substantially accounted for by overweight status; other aspects reflect inner feelings, which are partially independent of the actual body weight and shape. PMID:10193918

  3. Bone loss after bariatric surgery: discordant results between DXA and QCT bone density

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elaine W.; Bouxsein, Mary; Roy, Adam E.; Baldwin, Chantel; Cange, Abby; Neer, Robert M; Kaplan, Lee M.; Finkelstein, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies, using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), have reported substantial bone loss after bariatric surgery. However, profound weight loss may cause artifactual changes in DXA areal bone mineral density (aBMD) results. Assessment of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) may be less susceptible to such artifacts. We assessed changes in BMD of the lumbar spine and proximal femur prospectively for 1 year using DXA and QCT in 30 morbidly obese adults undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and 20 obese non-surgical controls. At one year, subjects who underwent gastric bypass surgery lost 37 ± 2 kg compared with 3 ± 2 kg lost in the non-surgical controls (p<0.0001). Spine BMD declined more in the surgical group than in the non-surgical group whether assessed by DXA (−3.3 vs. −1.1%, p=0.034) or by QCT (−3.4 vs. 0.2%, p=0.010). Total hip and femoral neck aBMD declined significantly in the surgical group when assessed by DXA (−8.9 vs. −1.1%, p<0.0001 for the total hip and −6.1 vs. −2.0%, p=0.002 for the femoral neck), but no changes in hip vBMD were noted using QCT. Within the surgical group, serum P1NP and CTX levels increased by 82 ± 10% and by 220 ± 22%, respectively, by 6 months and remained elevated over 12 months (p<0.0001 for all). Serum calcium, vitamin D, and PTH levels remained stable in both groups. We conclude that moderate vertebral bone loss occurs in the first year after gastric bypass surgery. However, striking declines in DXA aBMD at the proximal femur were not confirmed with QCT vBMD measurements. These discordant results suggest that artifacts induced by large changes in body weight after bariatric surgery affect DXA and/or QCT measurements of bone, particularly at the hip. PMID:23929784

  4. Contribution of the distal small intestine to metabolic improvement after bariatric/metabolic surgery: Lessons from ileal transposition surgery.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae Jung; Ahn, Chang Ho; Cho, Young Min

    2016-04-01

    Roux-en Y gastric bypass is a highly effective bariatric/metabolic surgical procedure that can induce robust weight loss and even remission of type 2 diabetes. One of the characteristic consequences of Roux-en Y gastric bypass is the expedited nutrient delivery to the distal small intestine, where L-cells are abundant and bile acid reabsorption occurs. To examine the role of the distal small intestine in isolation from other components of Roux-en Y gastric bypass, the ileal transposition (IT) surgery has been used in various rat models. IT relocates the distal ileal segment to the upper jejunum distal to the ligament of Treitz without any other alterations in the gastrointestinal anatomy. Therefore, IT exposes the distal ileal tissue to ingested nutrients after a meal faster than the normal condition. Although there is some inconsistency in the effect of IT according to different types of rat models and different types of surgical protocols, IT typically improved glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity and induced weight loss, and the findings were more prominent in obese diabetic rats. Suggested mechanisms for the metabolic improvements after IT include increased L-cell secretion (e.g., glucagon-like peptides and peptide YY), altered bile acid metabolism, altered host-microbial interaction, attenuated metabolic endotoxemia and many others. Based on the effect of IT, we can conclude that the contribution of the distal small intestine to the metabolic benefits of bariatric/metabolic surgery is quite considerable. By unveiling the mechanism of action of IT, we might revolutionize the treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  5. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  6. A Validation of an Intelligent Decision-Making Support System for the Nutrition Diagnosis of Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Cristina; Dias, João; Pinto, José S

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an important method for treatment of morbid obesity. It is known that significant nutritional deficiencies might occur after surgery, such as, calorie-protein malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia, and lack of vitamin B12, thiamine, and folic acid. Objective The objective of our study was to validate a computerized intelligent decision support system that suggests nutritional diagnoses of patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods There were fifteen clinical cases that were developed and sent to three dietitians in order to evaluate and define a nutritional diagnosis. After this step, the cases were sent to four bariatric surgery expert dietitians who were aiming to collaborate on a gold standard. The nutritional diagnosis was to be defined individually, and any disagreements were solved through a consensus. The final result was used as the gold standard. Bayesian networks were used to implement the system, and database training was done with Shell Netica. For the system validation, a similar answer rate was calculated, as well as the specificity and sensibility. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were projected to each nutritional diagnosis. Results Among the four experts, the rate of similar answers found was 80% (48/60) to 93% (56/60), depending on the nutritional diagnosis. The rate of similar answers of the system, compared to the gold standard, was 100% (60/60). The system sensibility and specificity were 95.0%. The ROC curves projection showed that the system was able to represent the expert knowledge (gold standard), and to help them in their daily tasks. Conclusions The system that was developed was validated to be used by health care professionals for decision-making support in their nutritional diagnosis of patients submitted to bariatric surgery. PMID:25601419

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  8. Could the mechanisms of bariatric surgery hold the key for novel therapies? A report from the Pennington Scientific Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Tam, C. S.; Berthoud, H.-R.; Bueter, M.; Chakravarthy, M. V.; Geliebter, A.; Hajnal, A.; Holst, J.; Kaplan, L.; Pories, W.; Raybould, H.; Seeley, R.; Strader, A.; Ravussin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgery is the most effective method for promoting dramatic and durable weight loss in morbidly obese subjects. Furthermore, type 2 diabetes is resolved in over 80% of patients. The mechanisms behind the amelioration in metabolic abnormalities are largely unknown but may be due to changes in energy metabolism, gut peptides and food preference. The goal of this meeting was to review the latest research to better understand the mechanisms behind the ‘magic’ of bariatric surgery. Replication of these effects in a non-surgical manner remains one of the ultimate challenges for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Promising data on energy metabolism, gastrointestinal physiology, hedonic response and food intake were reviewed and discussed. PMID:21729236

  9. Gut hormones and leptin: impact on energy control and changes after bariatric surgery--what the future holds.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, Konstantinos; le Roux, Carel

    2012-10-01

    Obesity is now considered the new world epidemic. In an attempt to face this menace to public health, several treatments, apart from the traditional nutritional modification and oral medication, have been introduced, among them bariatric surgery and gut hormone-based treatments. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a powerful endocrine organ, releasing active peptides and influencing appetite and glycaemic control. Alteration of the GI tract, in ways that exaggerate the secretion and levels of the gut hormones, creates a new functional equilibrium that further contributes to weight loss. The purpose of this review is to explore the mechanisms that drive this gut hormone-derived body regulation, as well as the changes that occur to them after bariatric surgery. Close to that, leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue will be analysed, as its pathways are closely related to those of the gut hormones. Gut hormones are strongly implicated in energy control, and various effects of bariatric surgery in weight loss are directly related to the alteration of the levels of these hormones. PMID:22692670

  10. Neuro-Genetics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) as the Root Cause of “Addiction Transfer”: A New Phenomenon Common after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Bailey, John; Gonzalez, Anthony M; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Liu, Yijun; Giordano, John; Braverman, Eric; Gold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Now after many years of successful bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries directed at the obesity epidemic clinicians are reporting that some patients are replacing compulsive overeating with newly acquired compulsive disorders such as alcoholism, gambling, drugs, and other addictions like compulsive shopping and exercise. This review article explores evidence from psychiatric genetic animal and human studies that link compulsive overeating and other compulsive disorders to explain the phenomenon of addiction transfer. Possibly due to neurochemical similarities, overeating and obesity may act as protective factors reducing drug reward and addictive behaviors. In animal models of addiction withdrawal from sugar induces imbalances in the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and dopamine, similar to opiate withdrawal. Many human neuroimaging studies have supported the concept of linking food craving to drug craving behavior. Previously our laboratory coined the term Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) for common genetic determinants in predicting addictive disorders and reported that the predictive value for future RDS behaviors in subjects carrying the DRD2 Taq A1 allele was 74%. While poly genes play a role in RDS, we have also inferred that disruptions in dopamine function may predispose certain individuals to addictive behaviors and obesity. It is now known that family history of alcoholism is a significant obesity risk factor. Therefore, we hypothesize here that RDS is the root cause of substituting food addiction for other dependencies and potentially explains this recently described Phenomenon (addiction transfer) common after bariatric surgery. PMID:23483116

  11. Time Related Increase in Urinary Testosterone Levels and Stable Semen Analysis Parameters after Bariatric Surgery in Men

    PubMed Central

    Legro, Richard S; Kunselman, Allen R; Meadows, Juliana W; Kesner, James S; Krieg, Edward F; Rogers, Ann M; Cooney, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the time-course in androgen and semen parameters in men after weight loss associated with bariatric surgery with a prospective cohort study of 6 male subjects, age 18-40 years, meeting NIH bariatric surgery guidelines, conducted in 2005-2008, with study visits at baseline, then 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. All men had a Roux-en-y-Gastric-Bypass (RYGB) performed at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. We collected at each visit biometric, questionnaire, serum, and urinary specimens as well as a semen analysis. Urinary integrated total testosterone levels increased significantly by 3 months after surgery, and remained elevated throughout the study. Circulating testosterone levels were also higher at 1 and 6 months after surgery, compared to baseline. Serum SHBG levels were significantly elevated at all time points post-operatively. After RYGB surgery, there were no significant changes in urinary estrogen metabolites (estrone 3-glucuronide) or serum estradiol levels, serial semen parameters, or male sexual function by questionnaire. This study supports the idea that a threshold of weight loss is necessary to improve male reproductive function by reversing male hypogonadism, manifested as increased testosterone levels. Further serial semen analysis results showed normal ranges for most parameters despite massive weight loss. PMID:25498592

  12. Healthcare utilization and costs in severely obese subjects before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Keating, Catherine L; Moodie, Marj L; Bulfone, Liliana; Swinburn, Boyd A; Stevenson, Christopher E; Peeters, Anna

    2012-12-01

    This study examined healthcare utilization and associated costs for a severely obese population before receiving bariatric surgery relative to an age- and sex-matched sample from the Australian general population. Severely obese subjects receiving laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) surgery in 2009 (n = 11,769) were identified. Utilization of medical services and pharmaceuticals in the 3.5 years before surgery were ascertained for each severely obese subject through linkage with Medicare, Australia's universal health insurance scheme. Equivalent data were retrieved for each subject from the matched general population sample (n = 140,000). Severely obese subjects utilized significantly more medical services annually compared to the general population (mean: 22.8 vs. 12.1/person, standardized incidence ratio (SIR): 1.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-1.89)), translating to twofold higher mean annual costs (Australian $1,140 vs. $567/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to consultations with general practitioners, psychiatrists/psychologists and other specialists, investigations for obstructive sleep apnea, and in vitro fertilization. Severely obese subjects also utilized significantly more pharmaceutical prescriptions annually (mean: 11.4 vs. 5.3/person, SIR 2.18 (95% CI: 2.17-2.19)), translating to 2.2-fold higher mean annual costs ($595/person vs. $270/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to diabetes drugs, lipid-modifying agents, psychoanaleptics, acid-related disorder drugs, agents acting on the rennin-angiotensin system, immunosuppressants, and obstructive airway disease drugs. Overall, healthcare costs in the severely obese population were more than double those incurred by the general population.

  13. Healthcare utilization and costs in severely obese subjects before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Keating, Catherine L; Moodie, Marj L; Bulfone, Liliana; Swinburn, Boyd A; Stevenson, Christopher E; Peeters, Anna

    2012-12-01

    This study examined healthcare utilization and associated costs for a severely obese population before receiving bariatric surgery relative to an age- and sex-matched sample from the Australian general population. Severely obese subjects receiving laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) surgery in 2009 (n = 11,769) were identified. Utilization of medical services and pharmaceuticals in the 3.5 years before surgery were ascertained for each severely obese subject through linkage with Medicare, Australia's universal health insurance scheme. Equivalent data were retrieved for each subject from the matched general population sample (n = 140,000). Severely obese subjects utilized significantly more medical services annually compared to the general population (mean: 22.8 vs. 12.1/person, standardized incidence ratio (SIR): 1.89 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-1.89)), translating to twofold higher mean annual costs (Australian $1,140 vs. $567/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to consultations with general practitioners, psychiatrists/psychologists and other specialists, investigations for obstructive sleep apnea, and in vitro fertilization. Severely obese subjects also utilized significantly more pharmaceutical prescriptions annually (mean: 11.4 vs. 5.3/person, SIR 2.18 (95% CI: 2.17-2.19)), translating to 2.2-fold higher mean annual costs ($595/person vs. $270/person). The greatest excess costs in the obese related to diabetes drugs, lipid-modifying agents, psychoanaleptics, acid-related disorder drugs, agents acting on the rennin-angiotensin system, immunosuppressants, and obstructive airway disease drugs. Overall, healthcare costs in the severely obese population were more than double those incurred by the general population. PMID:22627914

  14. Closure of the abdominal cavity after severe peritonitis in bariatric surgery utilizing a mesh and plastic device.

    PubMed

    de Menezes Ettinger, João Eduardo Marques Tavares; Azaro, Euler; dos Santos Filho, Paulo Vicente; Mello, Carlos Augusto Bastos; Pereira, Antonio Jorge Barretto; Fahel, Edvaldo

    2005-10-01

    The major cause of peritonitis in bariatric surgery is leakage of GI contents, which can have a catastrophic outcome for the bariatric patient. To resolve this serious problem, the surgeon must act quickly. This paper describes a 27-year-old female after gastric bypass with disruption of the gastroenterostomy and severe contamination and peritonitis. Closure of the anastomotic leak, drainage, and gastrostomy in the bypassed stomach were performed, but the abdomen could not be closed, due to dilated bowel and the intra-abdominal edema with the sepsis. Temporary laparostomy closure was performed; a plastic sheet with an overlying mesh was sutured to the fascial margins. Planned multiple reoperations permitted removal of necrotic and infected debris, with progressive approximation and ultimate closure of the fascia. This treatment resulted in a successful outcome for the patient.

  15. Impact of bariatric surgery on carotid artery inflammation and the metabolic activity in different adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Bucerius, Jan; Vijgen, Guy H E J; Brans, Boudewijn; Bouvy, Nicole D; Bauwens, Matthias; Rudd, James H F; Havekes, Bas; Fayad, Zahi A; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D; Mottaghy, Felix M

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we unravel a molecular imaging marker correlated with the known reduction of cardiovascular events (most commonly related to vulnerable plaques) in morbidly obese patients after bariatric surgery (BaS).We prospectively imaged 10 morbidly obese subjects with F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography before and 1 year after BaS. F-FDG uptake-which is enhanced in inflamed, atherosclerotic vessels and in metabolically active adipose tissues-was quantified in the carotids, pericardial adipose tissue (PAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), as well as brown adipose tissue (BAT). The degree of carotid inflammation was compared to lean and overweight controls.Carotid inflammation significantly declined leading to an F-FDG uptake comparable to the 2 control groups. Metabolic activity significantly decreased in PAT and VAT and increased in BAT.BaS leads to a normalization of carotid artery inflammation and a beneficial impact on the metabolic activity in PAT, VAT, and BAT that is related to the metabolic syndrome observed in this patient group.

  16. Lung function and left ventricular hypertrophy in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Paulo de Tarso; Domingos, Hamilton; Patusco, Luiz Armando Pereira; Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To look for correlations between lung function and cardiac dimension variables in morbidly obese patients, in order to test the hypothesis that the relative size of the small airways is independently correlated with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving 192 medical records containing a clinical protocol employed in candidates for bariatric surgery between January of 2006 and December of 2010. Results: Of the 192 patients evaluated, 39 (10 males and 29 females) met the inclusion criteria. The mean BMI of the patients was 49.2 ± 7.6 kg/m2, and the mean age was 35.5 ± 7.7 years. The FEF25-75/FVC, % correlated significantly with left ventricular posterior wall thickness and relative left ventricular posterior wall thickness, those correlations remaining statistically significant (r = −0.355 and r = −0.349, respectively) after adjustment for weight, gender, and history of systemic arterial hypertension. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that FVC and FEV1 were the major determinants of left ventricular mass (in grams or indexed to body surface area). Conclusions: A reduction in the relative size of the small airways appears to be independently correlated with obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy, regardless of factors affecting respiratory mechanics (BMI and weight), gender, or history of systemic arterial hypertension. However, FEV1 and FVC might be important predictors of left ventricular mass in morbidly obese individuals. PMID:26578134

  17. BINGE EATING DISORDER AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Ana Júlia Rosa Barcelos; PINTO, Sônia Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Background : Obesity decreases the quality of life, which is aggravated by the association of comorbidities, and the binge eating disorder is directly related to body image and predisposes to overweight. Aim: Evaluate association between the presence and the level of binge eating disorder and the quality of life of the obese candidates for bariatric surgery. Methods : Cross-sectional study analyzing anthropometric data (weight and height) and socioeconomics (age, sex, marital status, education and income). The application of Binge Eating Scale was held for diagnosis of Binge Eating Disorder and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-From Health Survey to assess the quality of life. Results : Total sample studied was 96 patients, mean age 38.15±9.6 years, 80.2% female, 67.7% married, 41% with complete and incomplete higher education, 77.1% with lower income or equal to four the minimum salary, 59.3% with grade III obesity. Binge eating disorder was observed in 44.2% of patients (29.9% moderate and 14.3% severe), and these had the worst scores in all domains of quality of life SF36 scale; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Only the nutritional status presented significant statistically association with the presence of binge eating disorder. Conclusion : High prevalence of patients with binge eating disorder was found and they presented the worst scores in all domains of quality of life. PMID:26537275

  18. Cardiorespiratory fitness and health-related quality of life in bariatric surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kolotkin, Ronette L; LaMonte, Michael J; Litwin, Sheldon; Crosby, Ross D; Gress, Richard E; Yanowitz, Frank G; Hunt, Steven C; Adams, Ted D

    2011-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is impaired in severely obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery. Little is known about the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and HRQOL in these individuals. We hypothesized that better HRQOL would be reported by those with higher CRF. In 326 gastric bypass patients (mean BMI = 46.5 ± 7.0; mean age=40.9 ± 10.1; 83.4% female), pre-surgical CRF was quantified as duration (minutes) of a submaximal treadmill test to 80% of age-predicted maximal heart rate (MHR). Patients completed both a general measure of HRQOL [the Medical Outcome Short Form 36 (SF-36)] and a weight-specific measure of HRQOL [Impact of Weight on Quality of Life--Lite]. Mean HRQOL scores were examined, controlling for age, gender, and BMI. Mean treadmill duration was 9.9 ± 3.1 min, and percent age-predicted MHR was 81.2 ± 3.0%. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness tended to be associated with better physical and weight-specific HRQOL. Adjustment for differences in gender, age, and BMI attenuated the significance of associations between fitness and physical measures from the SF-36, whereas adjustment eliminated significance of associations between fitness and weight-specific HRQOL in most cases. Results suggest that CRF confers some HRQOL benefits in severely obese adults, though these benefits may largely be explained by differences in age, gender, and BMI.

  19. Effect of weight loss on aerobic capacity in patients with severe obesity before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Shirley Aparecida Fabris; Faintuch, Joel; Sant'anna, Antonio Fernando

    2010-07-01

    Severe obesity has been associated with adverse effects on physical capacity. In a prospective study, the aerobic capacity of severely obese patients was measured in order to observe the physiological response to weight loss from bariatric surgery. Sixty-five consecutive patients (40.4 +/- 8.4 years old; 93.8% female; body mass index = 49.4 +/- 5.4 kg/m(2)) were evaluated before bariatric surgery and then 6 and 12 months after surgery. Aerobic capacity was assessed with a scientific treadmill to measure maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), heart rate, blood pressure, time on the treadmill, and distance walked (modified Bruce test). For the three observational periods, VO(2max) was 25.4 +/- 9.3, 29.8 +/- 8.1, and 36.7 +/- 8.3 ml/kg/min; time on the treadmill was 5.4 +/- 1.4, 6.4 +/- 1.6, and 8.8 +/- 1.0 min; and distance walked was 401.8 +/- 139.1, 513.4 +/- 159.9, and 690.5 +/- 76.2 m. For these variables, significant results (p = 0.0000) were observed for the two postoperative periods in relation to the preoperative period. Severely obese individuals increased their aerobic capacity after successful bariatric surgery. The data also suggests that a positive and progressive relationship between weight loss and improvement in fitness as a moderate loss of weight 6 months after surgery already showed some benefit and an additional reduction in weight was associated with a better performance in the aerobic capacity tests at the 12-month follow-up.

  20. Manual handling risks associated with the care, treatment and transportation of bariatric (severely obese) clients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Stephen P; Leggett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Carers of bariatric (morbidly obese) clients are exposed to manual handling injury risk throughout the journey that such clients take within the healthcare system. To identify the factors that affect risks associated with bariatric clients and the subsequent adoption of risk control measures focus groups were conducted in two Australian state capitals: a suburban region of Melbourne and a large regional Victorian town. Participants, were recruited from within the primary health care sector, ambulance services, fire services and funeral businesses. It was found that the risks to which nurses, ambulance officers, fire fighters, and funeral industry employees are exposed are significant. The injury risk is influenced by the nature and design of the range of environments within which client movement is undertaken; the limited range of handling equipment available for use with bariatric clients; and the efficacy of organisational procedures and training. Adoption of risk controls is hampered by the absence of a standard definition of the term ``bariatric'' and the gaps in information flow during the bariatric client journey through the health care system. Various definitions of bariatric are applied in different sectors and there are limitations to the use of both weight and body mass index in those definitions. PMID:21811036

  1. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following bariatric surgery: A rare but important complication

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bernadette; Heath, Dugal

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal Compartment Syndrome is a rare condition caused by excessive pressure within the gluteal compartments which leads to a number of potentially serious sequelae including rhabdomyolysis, nerve damage, renal failure and death. As bariatric patients are heavy and during prolonged bariatric procedures lie in one position for extended periods of time, they are especially susceptible to developing this complication. It is therefore essential that bariatric surgeons are aware of this complication and how to minimise the chances of it occurring and how to diagnose it. We describe a case of Gluteal Compartment Syndrome in a patient following a gastric bypass and review the aetiology, pathophysiology, treatment and prevention of this complication. PMID:25750728

  2. Early detection of changes in lung mechanics with oscillometry following bariatric surgery in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ubong; Hernandez, Paul; Dechman, Gail; Ellsmere, James; Maksym, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with respiratory symptoms that are reported to improve with weight loss, but this is poorly reflected in spirometry, and few studies have measured respiratory mechanics with oscillometry. We investigated whether early changes in lung mechanics following weight loss are detectable with oscillometry. Furthermore, we investigated whether the changes in lung mechanics measured in the supine position following weight loss are associated with changes in sleep quality. Nineteen severely obese female subjects (mean body mass index, 47.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2)) were evaluated using spirometry, oscillometry, plethysmography, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before and 5 weeks after bariatric surgery. These tests were conducted in both the upright and the supine position, and pre- and postbronchodilation with 200 μg of salbutamol. Five weeks after surgery, weight loss of 11.5 ± 2.5 kg was not associated with changes in spirometry and plethysmography, with the exception of functional residual capacity. There were also no changes in upright respiratory system resistance (Rrs) or reactance following weight loss. Importantly, however, in the supine position, weight loss caused a substantial reduction in Rrs. In addition, sleep quality improved significantly and was highly correlated with the reduction in supine Rrs. Prior to weight loss, subjects did not respond to the bronchodilator when assessed in the upright position with either spirometry or oscillometry; however, with modest weight loss, bronchodilator responsiveness returned to the normal range. Improvements in lung mechanics occur very early after weight loss, mostly in the supine position, resulting in improved sleep quality. These improvements are detectable with oscillometry but not with spirometry.

  3. Early detection of changes in lung mechanics with oscillometry following bariatric surgery in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ubong; Hernandez, Paul; Dechman, Gail; Ellsmere, James; Maksym, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with respiratory symptoms that are reported to improve with weight loss, but this is poorly reflected in spirometry, and few studies have measured respiratory mechanics with oscillometry. We investigated whether early changes in lung mechanics following weight loss are detectable with oscillometry. Furthermore, we investigated whether the changes in lung mechanics measured in the supine position following weight loss are associated with changes in sleep quality. Nineteen severely obese female subjects (mean body mass index, 47.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2)) were evaluated using spirometry, oscillometry, plethysmography, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before and 5 weeks after bariatric surgery. These tests were conducted in both the upright and the supine position, and pre- and postbronchodilation with 200 μg of salbutamol. Five weeks after surgery, weight loss of 11.5 ± 2.5 kg was not associated with changes in spirometry and plethysmography, with the exception of functional residual capacity. There were also no changes in upright respiratory system resistance (Rrs) or reactance following weight loss. Importantly, however, in the supine position, weight loss caused a substantial reduction in Rrs. In addition, sleep quality improved significantly and was highly correlated with the reduction in supine Rrs. Prior to weight loss, subjects did not respond to the bronchodilator when assessed in the upright position with either spirometry or oscillometry; however, with modest weight loss, bronchodilator responsiveness returned to the normal range. Improvements in lung mechanics occur very early after weight loss, mostly in the supine position, resulting in improved sleep quality. These improvements are detectable with oscillometry but not with spirometry. PMID:27109263

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qi; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhang, Nengwei; Xu, Guangzhong; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through treatment with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and to analyze the cost-effectiveness of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB in T2DM patients (BMI ≥ 28). A 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at Diabetes Surgery Centre, Beijing Shijitan Hospital in Beijing, China. Subjects were 80 patients ages 16 to 65 years with a body mass index of 28 kg/m2 or more and duration of T2DM no more than 15 years. Subjects were randomly assigned (1:1) to undergo either LSG (n = 40) or LRYGB (n = 40) between February 3, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Of those patients, 72 (90%) were available at follow-up at 2 years. These patients included 34 (85%) who underwent LSG and 38 (95%) who underwent LRYGB. This study presents the follow-up data at 2 years, which compared LSG and LRYGB in T2DM patients. Partial remission and complete remission were determined, and weight loss, BMI, changes in abdominal circumference, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. The cost-effectiveness of each type of bariatric surgery was analyzed with a Markov simulation model that yielded quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs. From our analysis results, LSG and LRYGB are both have taken a great effect on the reduction of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and bodyweight in patients with T2DM. The cost-effectiveness ratios of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB respectively are 1589.02, 1028.97, and 1197.44 dollars per QALY. Our analysis indicates that LSG appear to provide a cost-effective method of T2DM treatment for the patients. PMID:27196454

  5. [The psychiatric, psychological and addiction evaluation in bariatric surgery candidates: What should we assess, why and how?].

    PubMed

    Brunault, Paul; Gohier, Bénédicte; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Bourbao-Tournois, Céline; Frammery, Julie; Réveillère, Christian; Ballon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is indicated in obese patients with a BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) or ≥ 35 kg/m(2) with serious comorbidities, in second intention in patients who failed to achieve significant weight loss after a well-managed medical, nutritional and psychotherapeutic treatment for 6 to 12 months, and in patients who are aware of the consequences of bariatric surgery and who agree with a long term medical and surgical follow-up. Such a treatment requires a preoperative multidisciplinary assessment and management, which includes a mandatory consultation with a psychiatrist or a psychologist that should be member of the multidisciplinary staff and participate in these staffs. Although one of this consultation's aim is to screen for the few patients who for which surgery is contra-indicated, in most cases, the main aim of this assessment is to screen for and manage psychiatric and psychopathologic disorders that could be temporary contra-indication, because these disorders could lead to poorer postoperative outcome when untreated. By explaining to the patient how these disorders could affect postoperative outcome and which benefits he could retrieve from their management, the patient will increase his motivation for change and he will be more likely to seek professional help for these disorders. In all cases, a systematic examination of the patient's personality and his/her ability to understand the postoperative instructions is essential before surgery because clinicians should check that the patient is able to be adherent to postoperative instructions. In addition to clinical interview, use of self-administered questionnaires before the consultation might help to determine which psychiatric or psychopathologic factors should be more closely screened during the consultation. Psychiatric disorders and addictions are highly prevalent in this population (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders, binge eating disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, addictions, personality

  6. [The psychiatric, psychological and addiction evaluation in bariatric surgery candidates: What should we assess, why and how?].

    PubMed

    Brunault, Paul; Gohier, Bénédicte; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Bourbao-Tournois, Céline; Frammery, Julie; Réveillère, Christian; Ballon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is indicated in obese patients with a BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) or ≥ 35 kg/m(2) with serious comorbidities, in second intention in patients who failed to achieve significant weight loss after a well-managed medical, nutritional and psychotherapeutic treatment for 6 to 12 months, and in patients who are aware of the consequences of bariatric surgery and who agree with a long term medical and surgical follow-up. Such a treatment requires a preoperative multidisciplinary assessment and management, which includes a mandatory consultation with a psychiatrist or a psychologist that should be member of the multidisciplinary staff and participate in these staffs. Although one of this consultation's aim is to screen for the few patients who for which surgery is contra-indicated, in most cases, the main aim of this assessment is to screen for and manage psychiatric and psychopathologic disorders that could be temporary contra-indication, because these disorders could lead to poorer postoperative outcome when untreated. By explaining to the patient how these disorders could affect postoperative outcome and which benefits he could retrieve from their management, the patient will increase his motivation for change and he will be more likely to seek professional help for these disorders. In all cases, a systematic examination of the patient's personality and his/her ability to understand the postoperative instructions is essential before surgery because clinicians should check that the patient is able to be adherent to postoperative instructions. In addition to clinical interview, use of self-administered questionnaires before the consultation might help to determine which psychiatric or psychopathologic factors should be more closely screened during the consultation. Psychiatric disorders and addictions are highly prevalent in this population (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders, binge eating disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, addictions, personality

  7. Frequency of periodontal pathogens and Helicobacter pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals submitted to bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    PATARO, André Luiz; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; ABREU, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; CORTELLI, José Roberto; FRANCO, Gilson Cesar Nobre; AQUINO, Davi Romeiro; COTA, Luis Otavio Miranda; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This cross-sectional study compared the frequency of oral periodontopathogens and H. pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals with or without periodontitis submitted to bariatric surgery. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-four men and women aged 18-65 were conveniently distributed into four groups. Two groups were composed of individuals who underwent bariatric surgery with (BP) (n=40) and without (BNP) (n=39) periodontitis and two obese control groups with (CP) (n=35) and without (CNP) (n=40) periodontitis. The oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, and Helicobacter pylori were detected by a polymerase chain reaction technique using saliva, tongue and stomach biopsy samples. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that periodontopathogens were highly frequent in the mouth (up to 91.4%). In the bariatric surgically treated group, orally, P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia were more frequent in periodontitis, while C. rectus was more frequent in non-periodontitis subjects. Stomach biopsies also revealed the high frequency of five oral species in both candidates for bariatric surgery (91.6%) and the bariatric (83.3%) groups. H. pylori was frequently detected in the mouth (50.0%) and stomach (83.3%). In the stomach, oral species and H. pylori appeared in lower frequency in the bariatric group. Conclusions Obese individuals showed high frequencies of periodontopathogens and H. pylori in their mouths and stomachs. Bariatric surgery showed an inverse microbial effect on oral and stomach environments by revealing higher oral and lower stomach bacterial frequencies. PMID:27383704

  8. Carbon dioxide monitoring during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery in severely obese patients: transcutaneous versus end-tidal techniques.

    PubMed

    Dion, Joanna M; McKee, Chris; Tobias, Joseph D; Herz, Daniel; Sohner, Paul; Teich, Steven; Michalsky, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Various factors including severe obesity or increases in intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopy can lead to inaccuracies in end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) monitoring. The current study prospectively compares ET and transcutaneous (TC) CO2 monitoring in severely obese adolescents and young adults during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery. Carbon dioxide was measured with both ET and TC devices during insufflation and laparoscopic bariatric surgery. The differences between each measure (PETCO2 and TC-CO2) and the PaCO2 were compared using a non-paired t test, Fisher's exact test, and a Bland-Altman analysis. The study cohort included 25 adolescents with a mean body mass index of 50.2 kg/m2 undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. There was no difference in the absolute difference between the TC-CO2 and PaCO2 (3.2±3.0 mmHg) and the absolute difference between the PETCO2 and PaCO2 (3.7±2.5 mmHg). The bias and precision were 0.3 and 4.3 mmHg for TC monitoring versus PaCO2 and 3.2 and 3.2 mmHg for ET monitoring versus PaCO2. In the young severely obese population both TC and PETCO2 monitoring can be used to effectively estimate PaCO2. The correlation of PaCO2 to TC-CO2 is good, and similar to the correlation of PaCO2 to PETCO2. In this population, both of these non-invasive measures of PaCO2 can be used to monitor ventilation and minimize arterial blood gas sampling.

  9. Validity of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Measuring Changes in Body Water and Percent Fat After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Widen, Elizabeth M.; Strain, Gladys; King, Wendy C.; Yu, Wenwen; Lin, Susan; Goodpaster, Bret; Thornton, John; Courcoulas, Anita; Pomp, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have validated bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) following bariatric surgery. Methods We examined agreement of BIA (Tanita 310) measures of total body water (TBW) and percent body fat (%fat) before (T0) and 12 months (T12) after bariatric surgery, and change between T0 and T12 with reference measures: deuterium oxide dilution for TBW and three-compartment model (3C) for %fat in a subset of participants (n=50) of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2. Results T0 to T12 median (IQR) change in deuterium TBW and 3C %fat was −6.4 L (6.4 L) and −14.8 % (13.4 %), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between deuterium and BIA determined TBW [median (IQR) difference: T0 −0.1 L (7.1 L), p=0.75; T12 0.2 L (5.7 L), p=0.35; Δ 0.35 L(6.3 L), p=1.0]. Compared with 3C, BIA underestimated %fat at T0 and T12 [T0 −3.3 (5.6), p<0.001; T12 −1.7 (5.2), p=0.04] but not change [0.7 (8.2), p=0.38]. Except for %fat change, Bland-Altman plots indicated no proportional bias. However, 95 % limits of agreement were wide (TBW 15–22 L, %fat 19–20 %). Conclusions BIA may be appropriate for evaluating group level response among severely obese adults. However, clinically meaningful differences in the accuracy of BIA between individuals exist. PMID:24464517

  10. Coping with obesity stigma affects depressed mood in African-American and white candidates for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Fettich, Karla C; Chen, Eunice Y

    2012-05-01

    Depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking candidates is influenced by obesity stigma, yet the strategies for coping with this stigma are less well understood. This study hypothesized that coping strategies are significantly associated with depressed mood above and beyond demographic factors and frequency of weight-related stigma, with specific coping strategies differing between racial groups. Severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking adults (N = 234; 91 African Americans) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Stigmatizing Situations Inventory (SSI). Two hierarchical linear regressions were conducted separately for African Americans and whites. For both racial groups, age, sex, BMI, years overweight, annual income, and education level did not account for a significant portion of the variance in BDI scores. The frequency of stigmatizing situations and coping strategies significantly explained 16.4% and 33.2%, respectively, of the variance for whites, and 25.9% and 25%, respectively, for African Americans (P < 0.001). Greater depressed mood in whites was associated with older age, lower education, fewer positive self-statements, and less self-love and more crying; while in African Americans greater depressed mood was associated only with ignoring the situation (P < 0.05). The study found that regardless of race, depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking clients is related to the frequency of stigmatizing experiences and associated coping strategies. This suggests that efforts to reduce the deleterious effects of weight-related stigma need to focus both on reducing the frequency of stigmatization and on teaching effective coping strategies. These efforts also need to take into account the client's racial background. PMID:22282108

  11. Objective Assessment of Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Pre-through 3-Years Post- Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Bond, Dale S; Belle, Steven H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Patterson, Emma J; Mitchell, James E; Inabnet, William B; Dakin, George F; Flum, David R; Cook, Brian; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate change in sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) over three years following bariatric surgery. Methods A subset of participants in an observational study (n=473 of 2458; 79% female, median body mass index 45kg/m2) wore an activity monitor pre-surgery and at 1–3 annual post-surgery assessments. Results Over the first year, on average, sedentary time decreased from 573 (95%CI 563–582) to 545 (95%CI 534–555) min/d and moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) increased from 77 (95%CI: 71–84) to 106 (95%CI: 98–116) min/wk, or 7 (95%CI: 5–10) to 24 (95%CI: 18–29) min/wk in MVPA bouts ≥10 minutes. There were no changes in these parameters from years 1 to 3 (P for all>.05). The percentage of participants achieving ≥150 min/wk of bout-related MVPA was not different at year 3 [6.5% (95%CI: 3.1–12.7)] vs. pre-surgery [3.4% (95%CI: 1.8–5.0); p=.45]. Most participants followed SB and PA trajectories that paralleled mean change and were consistent with their pre-surgery position in relation to the group. Conclusions On average, bariatric surgical patients make small reductions in SB and increases in PA during the first post-surgery year, which are maintained through 3 years. Still, post-surgery PA levels fall short of PA guidelines for general health or weight control. PMID:26010326

  12. Exploratory evaluation of an obese population seeking bariatric surgery in an Italian public service.

    PubMed

    Bonfà, F; Marchetta, L; Avanzi, M; Baldini, E; Raselli, R; Uber, E; Cabrini, S

    2010-09-01

    Obesity is a difficult to treat multi-problematic disease. Bariatric surgery (BS) has been regarded as the most effective therapeutic option, however the outcomes strongly depend on baseline conditions and further behavioural modifications. Our aim was to assess the characteristics of severely obese patients seeking BS in a Public Health Service in Italy. Socio-demographic characteristics, eating habits and the presence of stressful situations associated to weight increase, as well as psychiatric disorders of 111 outpatients attending our BS Program were assessed. Twenty-seven percent of patients have familiar history of obesity (FHO). Differences between patients having or not having a FHO were found for several psychiatric conditions, including lower Bulimic symptoms (p=0.025) and lower use of Alcohol (p=0.045). A total of 28.8% of the participants reported a BED; those patients do not differ in BMI (p=0.437) from non-BED patients but had higher psychological disorders associated to eating disorder, as for example Bulimic symptoms (p=0.000), higher BES scores (p=0.000) and psychological distress, such as Depression (p=0.000). Nearly 50% of patients had any psychiatric disorders and depression was the most common disturbance (32.4%); anxiety disorder was present in 15.3% of patients. Moreover, patients who have disclosed traumatic episodes (11.7%) presented higher distress associated to eating disorder variables, such as BES (p=0.001) and EDI-2 BU scores (p=0.000) and presence of BED (p=0.001), and women are more likely to be in this group (p=0.043). Our report proposes that multiple causative factors play a role in obesity, and we need to take them all into account to plan a comprehensive pre- and post-surgical treatment plan. PMID:21150247

  13. Analysis of the Information Quality of Bariatric Surgery Smartphone Applications Using the Silberg Scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature that has evaluated the information quality of the current bariatric and obesity applications. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of currently available smartphone applications for bariatric-patient care using the Silberg scale. The two most widely used smartphone application online stores were searched in June 2014 and a total of 39 applications were evaluated. The average Silberg score of the 39 applications was 4.0 ± 1.76. The current gaps of information quality include the lack of provision of appropriate references, full disclosure of sponsorship, and accurate disclosure whether the application has been modified in the past month.

  14. Measurement and Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviours in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Emphasis on Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Bond, Dale S; Thomas, J Graham

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB-i.e. activities involving low-energy expenditure and a sitting/reclining posture) may each have significant implications for weight loss and other bariatric surgery outcomes. While early studies suggested that patients typically comply with clinical recommendations to adopt habitual PA, these data were based on retrospective questionnaires. Conversely, recent studies incorporating mobile health (mHealth) technologies (e.g. objective monitors), which assess PA and SB in real time and in the natural environment, show that most patients are inactive and highly sedentary pre-operatively and only make modest changes in these behaviours postoperatively. In addition to using mHealth technologies for obtaining accurate and detailed information on PA and SB, they are increasingly being employed to intervene on patients' PA and SB and/or evaluate intervention outcomes. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to consider the benefits of using mHealth technology when studying and treating PA and SB in bariatric surgery patients.

  15. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D; Claridy, Mechelle D; Earle, Rebecca L; Kaplan, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20-39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40-49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008-0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004-0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight. PMID:26339506

  16. Clinical correlates of the weight bias internalization scale in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Christina A; Sysko, Robyn; Bush, Jennifer; Pearl, Rebecca; Puhl, Rebecca M; Schvey, Natasha A; Dovidio, John F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties and clinical correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Sixty five adolescents enrolled in a bariatric surgery program at a large, urban medical center completed psychiatric evaluations, self-report questionnaires including the WBIS and other measures of psychopathology and physical assessments. The WBIS had high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.92). As in previous research with adults, the one underlying factor structure was replicated and 10 of the original 11 items were retained. The scale had significant partial correlations with depression (r = 0.19), anxiety (r = 0.465), social, and behavioral problems (r = 0.364), quality of life (r = -0.480), and eating (r = 0.579), shape (r = 0.815), and weight concerns (r = 0.545), controlling for BMI. However, WBIS scores did not predict current or past psychiatric diagnosis or treatment or past suicidal ideation. Overall, the WBIS had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of obese treatment-seeking adolescents and correlated significantly with levels of psychopathology. These findings suggest that the WBIS could be a useful tool for healthcare providers to assess internalized weight bias among treatment-seeking obese youth. Assessment of internalized weight bias among this clinical population has the potential to identify adolescents who might benefit from information on coping with weight stigma, which in turn may augment weight loss efforts. PMID:21593805

  17. Metabolic Complications of Bypass Surgery for Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Devantoy, S.; Garré, J.B.; Gohier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative complications resulting from bariatric surgery can lead to severe vitamin-deficiency states. A patient who underwent bariatric bypass surgery and later developed Wernicke’s encephalopathy prompted us to present her interesting case history for discussion. Although bariatric surgery is known to be a risk factor for Wernicke’s encephalopathy, this diagnosis is only rarely evoked in the postoperative course. We recommend that the occurrence of digestive, psychiatric or neurological symptoms after bariatric surgery should suggest a thiamine deficiency that must be promptly assessed. Without waiting for the results, thiamine supplementation should be initiated. PMID:24179375

  18. Prediction of Exercise in Patients across Various Stages of Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of the Merits of the Theory of Reasoned Action versus the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Hillary R.; Gross, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the…

  19. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  20. Proxy measures of vitamin D status – season and latitude – correlate with adverse outcomes after bariatric surgery in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2001–2010: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Canner, J. K.; Cheskin, L. J.; Prokopowicz, G. P.; Schweitzer, M. A.; Magnuson, T. H.; Steele, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To investigate the association between adverse surgical outcomes following bariatric surgery and proxy measures of vitamin D (VitD) status (season and latitude) in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Background Obesity is an independent risk factor for VitD deficiency (25(OH)D < 20 ng ml−1). VitD deficiency compounds the chronic inflammation of obesity, increasing the risk of adverse outcomes following bariatric surgery. Epidemiology has long used season and latitude as proxies for group VitD, as VitD status is largely determined by sun exposure, which is greatest during summer and at the Equator. Methods We assessed proxy measures of group VitD status. We compared surgeries in VitD Summer (July to September), Winter (January to March), and Fall/Spring (October to December and April to June) and in the North (≥37°N) vs. the South (<37°N). Results We identified 932,091 bariatric surgeries; 81.2% were women and 74.4% were white. Sex was unequally distributed by season (p = 0.005). Median age was 43.0 years (all groups). Most surgeries occurred in the North (64.8%). Adverse outcome rates ranged from 0.01% (wound infections) to 39.4% [prolonged length of stay {LOS}]. Season was inversely associated with wound infection (p = 0.018) and dehiscence (p = 0.001). Extended LOS was inversely correlated with season (p < 0.001). These relationships held after adjustment. Prolonged LOS (p < 0.001) and any complication (p = 0.108) were more common in the North. Conclusions We have demonstrated a graded relationship between seasonality and adverse outcomes following bariatric surgery. The association was strongest for dehiscence and prolonged LOS. These relationships held when using latitude. A prospective study measuring pre‐operative 25(OH)D concentration would strengthen the case for causality in adverse surgical outcomes.

  1. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability increases after long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; de Weijer, Barbara A; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke M; Janssen, Ignace; Berends, Frits J; van de Laar, Arnold; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Booij, Jan; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-07-01

    In several studies reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability was reported in obese subjects compared to lean controls. Whether this is a reversible phenomenon remained uncertain. We previously determined the short-term effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on striatal D2/3R availability (using [(123)I]IBZM SPECT) in 20 morbidly obese women. Striatal D2/3R availability was lower compared to controls at baseline, and remained unaltered after 6 weeks, despite significant weight loss. To determine whether long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss normalizes striatal D2/3R binding, we repeated striatal D2/3R binding measurements at least 2 years after RYGB in 14 subjects of the original cohort. In addition, we assessed long-term changes in body composition, eating behavior and fasting plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and glucose. Mean body mass index declined from 46±7kg/m(2) to 32±6kg/m(2), which was accompanied by a significant increase in striatal D2/3R availability (p=0.031). Striatal D2/3R availability remained significantly reduced compared to the age-matched controls (BMI 22±2kg/m(2); p=0.01). Changes in striatal D2/3R availability did not correlate with changes in body weight/fat, insulin sensitivity, ghrelin or leptin levels. Scores on eating behavior questionnaires improved and changes in the General Food Craving Questionnaire-State showed a borderline significant correlation with changes in striatal D2/3R availability. These findings show that striatal D2/3R availability increases after long-term bariatric-surgery induced weight loss, suggesting that reduced D2/3R availability in obesity is a reversible phenomenon. PMID:27184782

  2. The use of sugammadex for bariatric surgery: analysis of recovery time from neuromuscular blockade and possible economic impact

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edoardo; Zito Marinosci, Geremia; Romano, Giovanni Marco; Piazza, Ornella; Iannuzzi, Michele; Cirillo, Fabrizio; De Simone, Stefania; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular block (NMB) monitoring and use of reversal agents accelerate the recovery time and improve the workflow in the operating room. We aimed to compare recovery times after sugammadex or neostigmine administration, and estimate the time spent in operating theater and the possible economic impact of a faster recovery, in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods We conducted a retrospective study that analyzed data from records of morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40 kg/m2) undergoing elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery in which sugammadex or neostigmine were used to reverse NMB. Patients were divided in two groups: group 1 (sugammadex group [SUG]) received rocuronium and sugammadex for reversal and group 2 (neostigmine group [NEO]) received either rocuronium or cisatracurium and neostigmine. Data are presented as mean (standard deviation). Results Compared with NEO, SUG group showed shorter times to achieve train-of-four ratio of 0.9 (P<0.05) and an Aldrete score of 10 (P<0.05), a higher cost (€146.7 vs €3.6 [P<0.05]), plus a remarkable less duration of operating theater occupancy (P<0.05). Sugammadex cost accounted for 2.58% of the total cost per surgery, while neostigmine cost accounted for 0.06%. Total time saved in SUG group was 19.4 hours, which could be used to perform 12 extra laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies. Conclusion Reversal from NMB was significantly faster with sugammadex than with neostigmine. Although sugammadex was substantially more expensive, duration of operating theater occupancy was reduced with potentially workflow increase or personnel reduced cost. PMID:27418846

  3. Bari-Active: A randomized controlled trial of a preoperative intervention to increase physical activity in bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Jakicic, John M.; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Habitual physical activity (PA) may help to optimize bariatric surgery outcomes; however objective PA measures show that most patients have low PA preoperatively and make only modest PA changes postoperatively. Patients require additional support to adopt habitual PA. Objectives: Test the efficacy of a preoperative PA intervention (PAI) versus standard pre-surgical care (SC) for increasing daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in bariatric surgery patients. Setting: University Hospital, United States. Methods: Outcomes analysis included 75 participants (86.7% women; 46.0±8.9 years; Body Mass Index [BMI]=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned preoperatively to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or SC (n=35). PAI received weekly individual face-to-face sessions with tailored instruction in behavioral strategies (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting) to increase home-based walking exercise. The primary outcome, pre- to post-intervention change in daily bout-related (≥10-min bouts) and total (≥1-minute bouts) MVPA minutes, was assessed objectively via a multi-sensor monitor worn for 7 days at baseline- and post-intervention. Results: Retention was 84% at the post-intervention primary end point. In intent-to-treat analyses with baseline value carried forward for missing data and adjusted for baseline MVPA, PAI achieved a mean increase of 16.6±20.6 minutes/day in bout-related MVPA (baseline: 4.4±5.5 to post-intervention: 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) compared to no change (−0.3±12.7 minutes/day; baseline: 7.9±16.6 to post-intervention: 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). Similarly, PAI achieved a mean increase of 21.0±26.9 minutes/day in total MVPA (baseline: 30.9±21.2 to post-intervention: 51.9±30.0 minutes/day), whereas SC demonstrated no change (− 0.1±16.3 minutes/day; baseline: 33.7±33.2 to post-intervention: 33.6±28.5 minutes/day) (p=0.001). Conclusions: With behavioral intervention, patients can significantly increase MVPA before bariatric

  4. Analysis of the Information Quality of Bariatric Surgery Smartphone Applications Using the Silberg Scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature that has evaluated the information quality of the current bariatric and obesity applications. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of currently available smartphone applications for bariatric-patient care using the Silberg scale. The two most widely used smartphone application online stores were searched in June 2014 and a total of 39 applications were evaluated. The average Silberg score of the 39 applications was 4.0 ± 1.76. The current gaps of information quality include the lack of provision of appropriate references, full disclosure of sponsorship, and accurate disclosure whether the application has been modified in the past month. PMID:26424704

  5. Ten-years of bariatric surgery in Brazil: in-hospital mortality rates for patients assisted by universal health system or a health maintenance organization

    PubMed Central

    KELLES, Silvana Márcia Bruschi; MACHADO, Carla Jorge; BARRETO, Sandhi Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an option for sustained weight loss for the morbidly obese patient. In Brazil coexists the Unified Health System (SUS) with universal coverage and from which depend 150 million Brazilians and supplemental health security, predominantly private, with 50 million beneficiaries. Aim To compare access, in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assisted in one or another system. Methods Data from DATASUS and IBGE were used for SUS patients' and database from one health plan of southeastern Brazil for the health insurance patients. Results Between 2001 and 2010 there were 24,342 and 4,356 surgeries performed in SUS and in the health insurance company, respectively. The coverage rates for surgeries performed in 2010 were 5.3 and 91/100.000 individuals in SUS and health insurance respectively. The rate of in-hospital mortality in SUS, considering the entire country, was 0.55 %, 0.44 % considering SUS Southeast, and 0.30 % for the health insurance. The costs of surgery in the SUS and in the health insurance trend to equalization over the years. Conclusion Despite differences in access and characteristics that may compromise the outcome of bariatric surgery, patients treated at the Southeast SUS had similar rate of in-hospital mortality compared to the health insurance patients. PMID:25626935

  6. Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Insulin Resistant Humans Normalises Insulin Signalling but Not Insulin-Stimulated Glucose Disposal

    PubMed Central

    de Berker, David A. R.; May, Margaret T.; Hers, Ingeborg; Dayan, Colin M.; Andrews, Robert C.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Weight-loss after bariatric surgery improves insulin sensitivity, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. To ascertain the effect of bariatric surgery on insulin signalling, we examined glucose disposal and Akt activation in morbidly obese volunteers before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), and compared this to lean volunteers. Materials and Methods The hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, at five infusion rates, was used to determine glucose disposal rates (GDR) in eight morbidly obese (body mass index, BMI=47.3±2.2 kg/m2) patients, before and after RYGB, and in eight lean volunteers (BMI=20.7±0.7 kg/m2). Biopsies of brachioradialis muscle, taken at fasting and insulin concentrations that induced half-maximal (GDR50) and maximal (GDR100) GDR in each subject, were used to examine the phosphorylation of Akt-Thr308, Akt-473, and pras40, in vivo biomarkers for Akt activity. Results Pre-operatively, insulin-stimulated GDR was lower in the obese compared to the lean individuals (P<0.001). Weight-loss of 29.9±4 kg after surgery significantly improved GDR50 (P=0.004) but not GDR100 (P=0.3). These subjects still remained significantly more insulin resistant than the lean individuals (p<0.001). Weight loss increased insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle Akt-Thr308 and Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation, P=0.02 and P=0.03 respectively (MANCOVA), and Akt activity towards the substrate PRAS40 (P=0.003, MANCOVA), and in contrast to GDR, were fully normalised after the surgery (obese vs lean, P=0.6, P=0.35, P=0.46, respectively). Conclusions Our data show that although Akt activity substantially improved after surgery, it did not lead to a full restoration of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. This suggests that a major defect downstream of, or parallel to, Akt signalling remains after significant weight-loss. PMID:25876175

  7. Post-Bariatric Body Contouring Surgery After Weight Loss: Lessons Learned From an Obesity Epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    With the rise in obesity in the United States, there has been a similar increase in bariatric surgery. This has resulted in numerous patients losing significant weight with accompanying circumferential body contouring issues. This has led to an amazing increase in the number of body contouring procedures performed, both traditional excisional techniques as well as new emerging techniques emphasizing tissue preservation, rearrangement, and dermal reshaping. Although China's rates of obesity lag behind the United States, there is a recipe for obesity that will eventually surpass the United States. Thus, China has the opportunity to learn from the United States experience with regards to obesity treatment and contouring procedures after significant weight loss. Time will tell whether China will choose to use similar tissue preservation techniques to address issues of soft tissue ptosis and volume deficiency seen after significant weight loss, make refinements of these techniques, or develop new uniquely Chinese solutions.

  8. Post-Bariatric Body Contouring Surgery After Weight Loss: Lessons Learned From an Obesity Epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    With the rise in obesity in the United States, there has been a similar increase in bariatric surgery. This has resulted in numerous patients losing significant weight with accompanying circumferential body contouring issues. This has led to an amazing increase in the number of body contouring procedures performed, both traditional excisional techniques as well as new emerging techniques emphasizing tissue preservation, rearrangement, and dermal reshaping. Although China's rates of obesity lag behind the United States, there is a recipe for obesity that will eventually surpass the United States. Thus, China has the opportunity to learn from the United States experience with regards to obesity treatment and contouring procedures after significant weight loss. Time will tell whether China will choose to use similar tissue preservation techniques to address issues of soft tissue ptosis and volume deficiency seen after significant weight loss, make refinements of these techniques, or develop new uniquely Chinese solutions. PMID:27414005

  9. [Obesity associated risk using Edmonton staging in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    de Cos, Ana Isabel; Cardenas, Jersy J; Pelegrina, Beatriz; Roldan, M Concepción; Calvo, Isabel; Vázquez, Clotilde; Pallardo, Luis Felipe

    2014-09-20

    Con una prevalencia de obesidad mórbida del 1,2% en población española, los criterios de indicación para Cirugía Bariátrica (CB) no consideran comorbilidades ni estado funcional. Es necesaria una aproximación diagnóstica capaz de predecir mortalidad y sustentar criterios de priorización terapéutica. Objetivo: Aplicar la propuesta Edmonton como sistema de estadiaje clínico para la clasificación de pacientes en lista de espera de CB. Método: Se recogen datos de 81 pacientes (2011 – 2013), tras protocolo prequirúrgico. Se registra peso, talla, IMC, cintura, determinaciones bioquímicas, TA, presencia de enfermedad hepática, renal, osteoarticular, síndrome apnea-hipopnea del sueño (SAHS) y reflujo gastroesofágico. Se aplica a cada persona la propuesta de estadiaje de Edmonton, con 10 variables. Resultados: 67% mujeres. Edad media: 47 años, 18% con edad inferior a 30 años. IMC medio: 47 (37-67), 90% IMC > de 40. El 34% de los pacientes presentan SHAS y el 25% enfermedad por reflujo. Un 9% asocia IMC > 45, disglucosis- diabetes mellitus y SAHS. Aplicando el modelo de Edmonton, nueve pacientes (11%) se sitúan en el rango de mayor riesgo (estadío 3), 70% en rango de riesgo elevado (estadío 2), y 15 pacientes (18%), están incluidos en la condición de bajo riesgo. Ningún paciente se situaba en estadio 0, sin factores de riesgo asociados a obesidad. Conclusiones: El estadiaje de Edmonton nos aporta información sobre la presencia y extensión de co-mobilidades, que apoye la toma de decisiones terapéuticas. La capacidad predictiva de mortalidad de la propuesta de Edmonton podría ser útil para establecer criterios de priorización quirúrgica.

  10. USE OF POSITIVE PRESSURE IN THE BARIATRIC SURGERY AND EFFECTS ON PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PREVALENCE OF ATELECTASIS: RANDOMIZED AND BLINDED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    BALTIERI, Letícia; SANTOS, Laisa Antonela; RASERA-JUNIOR, Irineu; MONTEBELO, Maria Imaculada Lima; PAZZIANOTTO-FORTI, Eli Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background In surgical procedures, obesity is a risk factor for the onset of intra and postoperative respiratory complications. Aim Determine what moment of application of positive pressure brings better benefits on lung function, incidence of atelectasis and diaphragmatic excursion, in the preoperative, intraoperative or immediate postoperative period. Method Randomized, controlled, blinded study, conducted in a hospital and included subjects with BMI between 40 and 55 kg/m2, 25 and 55 years, underwent bariatric surgery by laparotomy. They were underwent preoperative and postoperative evaluations. They were allocated into four different groups: 1) Gpre: treated with positive pressure in the BiPAP mode (Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure) before surgery for one hour; 2) Gpos: BIPAP after surgery for one hour; 3) Gintra: PEEP (Positive End Expiratory Pressure) at 10 cmH2O during the surgery; 4) Gcontrol: only conventional respiratory physiotherapy. The evaluation consisted of anthropometric data, pulmonary function tests and chest radiography. Results Were allocated 40 patients, 10 in each group. There were significant differences for the expiratory reserve volume and percentage of the predicted expiratory reserve volume, in which the groups that received treatment showed a smaller loss in expiratory reserve volume from the preoperative to postoperative stages. The postoperative radiographic analysis showed a 25% prevalence of atelectasis for Gcontrol, 11.1% for Gintra, 10% for Gpre, and 0% for Gpos. There was no significant difference in diaphragmatic mobility amongst the groups. Conclusion The optimal time of application of positive pressure is in the immediate postoperative period, immediately after extubation, because it reduces the incidence of atelectasis and there is reduction of loss of expiratory reserve volume. PMID:25409961

  11. Night eating and loss of control over eating in bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Royal, Sarah; Wnuk, Susan; Warwick, Katie; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2015-03-01

    The goal was to examine the relationship between loss of control over eating (LOCE) and other variables, including eating pathology, in bariatric candidates. Two hundred and twenty-six participants completed measures of depressive symptoms, eating pathology, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and alcohol use. Participants were divided into those who did (n = 123) and did not (n = 103) report subjective LOCE. Participants with LOCE had significantly higher levels of night eating, depressive symptoms, and eating disorder psychopathology and lower mental HRQOL. There were no observed differences in alcohol use, dietary restraint, or physical HRQOL. This study highlights eating and mental health-related correlates of LOCE, providing evidence that it is associated with increased psychological burden in bariatric candidates. This is one of the first studies to report the relationship between LOCE and night eating in this group and future research could elaborate on these variables to determine their importance in long-term weight loss.

  12. Effect of bariatric surgery on humoral control of metabolic derangements in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: How it works

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkunar, Suleyman; Erdem, Hasan; Aktimur, Recep; Sozen, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes is a co-pandemic and a major health concern that is expanding. It has many psychosocial and economic consequences due to morbidity and mortality of this disease combination. The pathophysiology of obesity and related diabetes is complex and multifactorial. One arm of this disease process is the genetic susceptibility. Other arm is dependent on the intricate neuro-humoral factors that converge in the central nerve system. Gut hormones and the adipose tissue derived factors plays an important role in this delicate network. Bariatric surgery provides the only durable option for treatment of obesity and furthermore it provides a remission in the concomitant diseases that accompany obesity. This review provides a brief insight to all these mechanisms and tries to deduce the possible reasons of remission of type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery. PMID:26090370

  13. [Nutritional deficiencies and supplementation after metabolic surgery].

    PubMed

    Stroh, C; Meyer, F; Manger, T

    2016-09-01

    Increasing prevalence of morbid obesity in Germany is associated with an increasing number of bariatric surgical interventions.Based on the effectiveness of bariatric surgery with regard to a significant reduction of body weight and comorbidity as well as improvement of the quality of life compared with conservative measures, its value and impact has been substantially increased. Long-term metabolic deficits such as nutrient deficiencies can be considered the main risks of various restrictive, combined and malabsorptive procedures of bariatric surgery.The aim of this overview is to characterize metabolic complications after bariatric surgery and their prophylaxis, which require a temporary or permanent surveillance and, if necessary, effective supplementation.Bariatric surgical interventions such as gastric banding (GB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) can be subsequently associated with deficiencies related to B‑vitamins whereas iron, folate, and vitamins B1, B12 and D deficiencies might be consequences of malabsorptive procedures such as biliopancreatic diversion, duodenal switch and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.Due to possible metabolic and surgical complications after bariatric surgery, patients need to undergo life-long follow-up investigations. The currently available guidelines of the American Association of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery are the basis for the latest recommendations on supplementation and treatment in bariatric surgery. PMID:27277557

  14. The role of gut adaptation in the potent effects of multiple bariatric surgeries on obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Randy J.; Chambers, Adam P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgical procedures such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are the most potent treatments available to produce sustained reductions in body weight and improvements in glucose regulation. While traditionally these effects are attributed to mechanical aspects of these procedures such as restriction and malabsorption, a growing body of evidence from mouse models of these procedures points to physiological changes that mediate the potent effects of these surgeries. In particular, there are similar changes in gut hormone secretion, bile acid levels and composition after both of these procedures. Moreover, loss-of-function of the nuclear bile acid receptor (FXR) greatly diminishes the effects of VSG. Both VSG and RYGB are linked to profound changes in the gut microbiome that also mediate at least some of these surgical effects. We hypothesize that surgical rearrangement of the gastrointestinal tract results in enteroplasticity caused by the high rate of nutrient presentation and altered pH in the small intestine that contribute to these physiological effects. Identifying the molecular underpinnings of these procedures provides new opportunities to understand the relationship of the gastrointestinal tract to obesity and diabetes as well as new therapeutic strategies to harness the effectiveness of surgery with less invasive approaches. PMID:25662404

  15. To eat or not to eat; is that really the question? An evaluation of problematic eating behaviors and mental health among bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Miller-Matero, Lisa Renee; Armstrong, Rachel; McCulloch, Katherine; Hyde-Nolan, Maren; Eshelman, Anne; Genaw, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Problematic eating behaviors, such as emotional eating, and food addiction, may affect weight; however, little is known about these eating behaviors, especially among those seeking bariatric surgery. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of problematic eating behaviors and to investigate their relationship with other eating behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and psychiatric symptoms. There were 142 patients who completed a required psychiatric evaluation prior to bariatric surgery. Of these, 16.9 % met criteria for a food addiction and 25.4-40.7 % endorsed emotional eating, depending on type of emotional eating. The number of food addiction symptoms endorsed was related to emotional eating. Both food addiction and emotional eating were related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, surprisingly, BMI was not related to a food addiction diagnosis, emotional eating scores, or psychiatric symptoms. Results from this study suggest that problematic eating behaviors are occurring among bariatric surgery candidates. Furthermore, this study may help to address the conflicting research regarding the effects of psychiatric symptoms on weight-loss outcomes. Perhaps it is the problematic eating behaviors (e.g., food addiction and emotional eating) that are associated with psychiatric symptoms that could be influencing outcomes. Future research should evaluate treatments for problematic eating behaviors and whether treatments improve weight-loss success. PMID:24878835

  16. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Brigatto, Patrícia; Carbinatto, Jéssica C.; Costa, Carolina M.; Montebelo, Maria I. L.; Rasera-Júnior, Irineu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20), IPPB Group (n=20) and BIPAP Group (n=20), then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP), inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP), in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p<0.05), regardless of the technique used, with no significant difference among the techniques (p>0.05). Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05), but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques. PMID:25590448

  17. THE USE OF THE INTERNET BY THE PATIENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: CONTRIBUTIONS AND OBSTACLES FOR THE FOLLOW-UP OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    MARTINS, Michele Pereira; ABREU-RODRIGUES, Marcela; SOUZA, Juciléia Rezende

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background : Bariatric surgery is presented as the last treatment option for obesity. It requires from all candidates a multidisciplinary evaluation and monitoring throughout treatment. The non-adherence to follow-up with health care teams is related to weight regain. It's possible that the use of internet influences the doctor-patient relationship and patients replace medical care or information provided by health professionals for information from the internet. Aim : Identify and analyze the pattern of internet use by patients after bariatric surgery and check the influence of such use in attending medical appointments with the multidisciplinary team. Method : Electronic questionnaire available on the Internet was used to verify patient´s patterns of Internet use and its influence on in attending multidisciplinary care after surgery. Results : Of the 103 participants, 95% were female, 64% married, 59% with children and 54% with higher education. The mean age was 35.69 years and the mean duration of performing surgery, 11.74 months. The surgical technique that prevailed was Roux-en-Y gastric by-pass (90.3%), the local monitoring concentrated in the private care (93.2%). In the preoperative, most participants consulted more than three times with the surgeon (n=81), nutritionists (n=70), psychologist (n=70). After the surgery, p most patients maintained monitoring with the surgeon and nutritionist. Concerning the internet use, 51.5% accessed the internet in search of information about health and bariatric surgery every day. Facebook and search tools were the most used sites. Conclusion - Data showed the influence of the information contained on the Internet and the adherence to multidisciplinary monitoring. This fact requires the team to consider the use of the Internet as a variable that may interfere and must be handled during follow-up. It is suggested that an active participation of professionals on their websites and social networks and the

  18. Bariatric Surgery Restores Cardiac and Sudomotor Autonomic C-Fiber Dysfunction towards Normal in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, David C.; Wohlgemuth, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim was to evaluate the impact of bariatric surgery on cardiac and sudomotor autonomic C-fiber function in obese subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using sudorimetry and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Method Patients were evaluated at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. All subjects were assessed using SudoscanTM to measure electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) of hands and feet, time and frequency domain analysis of HRV, Neurologic Impairment Scores of lower legs (NIS-LL), quantitative sensory tests (QST) and sural nerve conduction studies. Results Seventy subjects completed up to 24-weeks of follow-up (24 non-T2DM, 29 pre-DM and 17 T2DM). ESC of feet improved significantly towards normal in T2DM subjects (Baseline = 56.71±3.98 vs 12-weeks = 62.69±3.71 vs 24-weeks = 70.13±2.88, p<0.005). HRV improved significantly in T2DM subjects (Baseline sdNN (sample difference of the beat to beat (NN) variability) = 32.53±4.28 vs 12-weeks = 44.94±4.18 vs 24-weeks = 49.71±5.19, p<0,001 and baseline rmsSD (root mean square of the difference of successive R-R intervals) = 23.88±4.67 vs 12-weeks = 38.06±5.39 vs 24-weeks = 43.0±6.25, p<0.0005). Basal heart rate (HR) improved significantly in all groups, as did weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), insulin and HOMA2-IR (homeostatic model assessment) levels improved significantly in pre-DM and T2DM subjects. On multiple linear regression analysis, feet ESC improvement was independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at baseline, and improvement in A1C at 24 weeks, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Sudomotor function improvement was not associated with baseline weight, BMI, % body fat or lipid levels. Improvement in basal HR was also independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at

  19. DNA methylation analysis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease suggests distinct disease-specific and remodeling signatures after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Markus; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Kolarova, Julia; Bens, Susanne; Itzel, Timo; Teufel, Andreas; Herrmann, Alexander; Brosch, Mario; Hinrichsen, Holger; Erhart, Wiebke; Egberts, Jan; Sipos, Bence; Schreiber, Stefan; Häsler, Robert; Stickel, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Krawczak, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Siebert, Reiner; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder in industrialized countries. Liver samples from morbidly obese patients (n = 45) with all stages of NAFLD and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. NAFLD-specific expression and methylation differences were seen for nine genes coding for key enzymes in intermediate metabolism (including PC, ACLY, and PLCG1) and insulin/insulin-like signaling (including IGF1, IGFBP2, and PRKCE) and replicated by bisulfite pyrosequening (independent n = 39). Transcription factor binding sites at NAFLD-specific CpG sites were >1,000-fold enriched for ZNF274, PGC1A, and SREBP2. Intraindividual comparison of liver biopsies before and after bariatric surgery showed NAFLD-associated methylation changes to be partially reversible. Postbariatric and NAFLD-specific methylation signatures were clearly distinct both in gene ontology and transcription factor binding site analyses, with >400-fold enrichment of NRF1, HSF1, and ESRRA sites. Our findings provide an example of treatment-induced epigenetic organ remodeling in humans.

  20. DNA methylation analysis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease suggests distinct disease-specific and remodeling signatures after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Markus; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Kolarova, Julia; Bens, Susanne; Itzel, Timo; Teufel, Andreas; Herrmann, Alexander; Brosch, Mario; Hinrichsen, Holger; Erhart, Wiebke; Egberts, Jan; Sipos, Bence; Schreiber, Stefan; Häsler, Robert; Stickel, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Krawczak, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Siebert, Reiner; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder in industrialized countries. Liver samples from morbidly obese patients (n = 45) with all stages of NAFLD and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. NAFLD-specific expression and methylation differences were seen for nine genes coding for key enzymes in intermediate metabolism (including PC, ACLY, and PLCG1) and insulin/insulin-like signaling (including IGF1, IGFBP2, and PRKCE) and replicated by bisulfite pyrosequening (independent n = 39). Transcription factor binding sites at NAFLD-specific CpG sites were >1,000-fold enriched for ZNF274, PGC1A, and SREBP2. Intraindividual comparison of liver biopsies before and after bariatric surgery showed NAFLD-associated methylation changes to be partially reversible. Postbariatric and NAFLD-specific methylation signatures were clearly distinct both in gene ontology and transcription factor binding site analyses, with >400-fold enrichment of NRF1, HSF1, and ESRRA sites. Our findings provide an example of treatment-induced epigenetic organ remodeling in humans. PMID:23931760

  1. GLYCEMIC BEHAVIOR IN 48 HOURS POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND NON DIABETIC SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Lucas Freitas; TISOTT, Caroline Gewehr; SILVANO, Diego Machado; CAMPOS, Camila Mafalda Mouta; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no indication for surgery taking only into account the glycemic condition, results have shown that benefits can be obtained in glycemic control with bariatric surgery. Aim : To compare the glycemic behavior among type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients within 48 h after bariatric surgery, and clarify whether there is a reduction in blood glucose level in obese patients with diabetes before the loss of weight excess. Methods : Descriptive epidemiological study with prospective cohort design with 31 obese patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. The patients were controlled with hemoglucotests in different periods of time: preoperative, postoperative and each 6 h after surgery for 48 h. Results : Average ambulatory blood glucose in diabetics was 120.7±2.9 mg/dl vs 91.8±13.9 mg/dl in the nondiabetic. After 48 h there was decrease in diabetics to 100.0±17.0 mg/dl (p=0.003), while the non-diabetic group did not change significantly (102.7±25.4 mg/dl; p=0.097). There were no differences between the surgical techniques. There were no death. Conclusions : Diabetic patients significantly reduced blood glucose after surgery regardless of the use of exogenous insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:26537269

  2. Alcohol and drug use among post-operative bariatric patients: A systematic review of the emerging research and its implications

    PubMed Central

    Spadola, Christine E.; Wagner, Eric F.; Dillon, Frank R.; Trepka, Mary Jo; de La Cruz Munoz, Nestor; Messiah, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Emerging research suggests that some bariatric surgery patients are at a heightened risk for developing substance use problems, especially alcohol use problems. Methods An exhaustive literature review was conducted in January 2015 to investigate all articles published that included data on post-operative alcohol use, alcohol use disorders, and illicit drug use among bariatric surgery patients. Results Twenty-three studies reported on alcohol and/or substance use among bariatric patients. Six studies longitudinally assessed alcohol use behaviors; three of these studies found an increase in alcohol use following surgery. Six studies were cross-sectional, and two studies assessed medical records. Five studies investigated the prevalence of admissions to substance abuse treatment, and three studies combined alcohol and drug use data in a single index. Six studies reported on illicit drug use and reported low-post-operative use. The studies' samples were primarily non-Hispanic white females in their upper 40s, and only 11 of the 23 studies utilized validated assessment instruments. Conclusions Studies employing longitudinal designs and large sample sizes indicate that bariatric patients who had the gastric bypass procedure are at an elevated risk for alcohol use problems post-operatively. Research also indicates that bariatric surgery patients might be over-represented in substance abuse treatment facilities. Risk factors for problematic post-operative alcohol use include regular or problematic alcohol use pre-surgery, male gender, younger age, tobacco use, and symptoms of attention deficient and hyperactivity disorder. As a whole, however, studies indicate bariatric surgery patients demonstrate a low prevalence of problematic alcohol use, and studies about gastric bypass patients are not entirely conclusive. Prospective, longitudinal studies are needed, utilizing standardized and validated alcohol assessment instruments that follow post-operative bariatric

  3. Risk management in surgery

    PubMed Central

    MESSANO, G.A.; SPAZIANI, E.; TURCHETTA, F.; CECI, F.; CORELLI, S.; CASCIARO, G.; MARTELLUCCI, A.; COSTANTINO, A.; NAPOLEONI, A.; CIPRIANI, B.; NICODEMI, S.; DI GRAZIA, C.; MOSILLO, R.; AVALLONE, M.; ORSINI, S.; TUDISCO, A.; AIUTI, F.; STAGNITTI, F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Malpractice is the responsible for the greatest number of legal claims. At the present time, legal actions against physicians in Italy are 15,000 per year, and a stunning increase about costs to refund patients injured by therapeutic and diagnostic errors is expected. The method for the medical prevention is “Risk Management”, that is the setting-up of organizational instruments, methods and actions that enable the measurement or estimation of medical risk; it allows to develop strategies to govern and reduce medical error. In the present work, the reconstruction about the history of risk management in Italy was carried out. After then the latest initiatives undertaken by Italy about the issue of risk management were examined. PMID:24091181

  4. Long-term incidence of symptomatic urolithiasis post-bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nicholas; Scheffler, Patrick; Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Court, Olivier; Christou, Nicolas V.; Andersen, Ross E.; Andonian, Sero

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of urolithiasis post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is higher when compared to the general population. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is routinely prescribed to these patients, yet compliance with these supplements is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of symptomatic de novo urolithiasis post-RYGB and compliance with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Methods: A standardized telephone questionnaire was administered to patients who underwent RYGB between 1996 and 2011. Personal and medical histories were obtained with emphasis on episodes of symptomatic urolithiasis and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Results: The response rate was 48% with 478 patients completing the telephone questionnaire. After a mean follow-up of 7.0 years (range: 1–15), the incidence of post-RYGB symptomatic urolithiasis was 7.3%, while the rate of de novo symptomatic urolithiasis was 5%. The overall median time to present with symptomatic urolithiasis was 3.1 years, with 3.3 years for de novo stone-formers, and 2.0 years for recurrent stone-formers (p = 0.38). In de novo stone-formers, 33% presented with symptomatic urolithiasis 4 to 14 years postoperatively. Compliance with calcium and vitamin D supplementation was 56% and 51%, respectively. Conclusions: Despite recall bias and lack of confirmatory imaging studies, a high postoperative incidence of symptomatic urolithiasis was found in a large sample of post-RYGB patients. A third of patients with de novo stones, presented with symptomatic urolithiasis 4 to 14 years postoperatively. Compliance with postoperative calcium and vitamin D supplementation was poor and needs improvement. PMID:25408808

  5. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student–Newman–Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals. PMID:25711878

  6. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Gandarillas, Mónica; Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals.

  7. SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS): protocol for a national prospective cohort study of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jennifer; Stewart, Sally; Munro, Jane; Grieve, Eleanor; Lean, Mike; Lindsay, Robert S; Bruce, Duff; Ali, Abdulmajid; Briggs, Andrew; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of bariatric surgery for large-scale, long-term weight loss is well established. However, many questions remain over the continual benefits and cost-effectiveness of that weight loss for overall health, particularly when accounting for potential complications and adverse events of surgery. Health research institutes in the UK and the USA have called for high-quality longitudinal cohort studies of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assessing outcomes such as surgical complications, mortality, diabetes remission, microvascular complications, cardiovascular events, mental health, cost and healthcare use. Methods and analysis SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS) is a national, prospective, observational, cohort study of patients undergoing primary bariatric surgical procedures in Scotland. This study aims to recruit 2000 patients and conduct a follow-up for 10 years postbariatric surgery using multiple data collection methods: surgeon-recorded data, electronic health record linkage, and patient-reported outcome measures. Outcomes measured will include: mortality, weight change, diabetes, surgical, cardiovascular, cancer, behavioural, reproductive/urological and nutritional variables. Healthcare utilisation and economic productivity will be collected to inform cost-effectiveness analysis. Ethics and dissemination The study has received a favourable ethical opinion from the West of Scotland Research Ethics committee. All publications arising from this cohort study will be published in open-access peer-reviewed journals. All SCOTS investigators (all members of the research team at every recruiting site) will have the ability to propose research suggestions and potential publications using SCOTS data; a publications committee will approve all requests for use of SCOTS data and propose writing committees and timelines. Lay-person summaries of all research findings will be published simultaneously on the SCOTS website (http

  8. Manual handling risks in the bariatric (obese) patient pathway in acute sector, community and ambulance care and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hignett, Sue; Griffiths, Paula

    2009-01-01

    As part of a larger research project the patient pathway was mapped for an emergency admission to identify the manual handling major risks. Focus group interviews were held with 25 key stakeholders from the acute, community and ambulance healthcare sectors and social services at 3 venues across the United Kingdom (UK). A detailed qualitative iterative analysis used 'cause and effect' or fishbone (Ishikawa) diagrams to identify key issues. Five themes emerged as generic risks throughout the bariatric patient pathway, these were: patient factors including body shape, mobility, pain, co-operation, privacy, comfort and dignity; building (or vehicle) space and design, including space, clearance, floor surface, and safe working load of floor; equipment (manual handling and clinical) and furniture, including fit, maximum weight capacity, availability, suitability, compatibility, size, and effort to move; communication both within and between organisations; and organisational and staff issues, including policies, culture and staff availability and training. It was concluded that buildings, vehicles and equipment need to be designed to 'fit' a range of bariatric shapes and sizes so that bariatric patients could be accommodated in safety and comfort, and with minimal loss of dignity.

  9. Monitoring and normalising a lack of appetite and weight loss. A discursive analysis of an online support group for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, Jo; Seymour-Smith, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    A significant adjustment in eating practices is required before and after bariatric surgery, yet we know relatively little about how patients manage these changes. In this paper, we explored how members of an online bariatric support group constructed their appetite and weight loss. Two hundred and eighty four online posts were collected, covering a period of just over a year, and analysed using discursive psychology. We found that a lack of appetite post-surgery was oriented to as something that was positively evaluated yet a cause for concern. Indeed, members monitored their food intake and marked out food consumption as a necessary activity in line with notions of healthy eating. Through monitoring members also normalised periods of weight stabilisation and were inducted into a group philosophy which encouraged a more holistic approach to post-surgery 'success'. Our analysis also highlights how monitoring and policing work as social support mechanisms which help to maintain weight management. Thus we argue, in line with others, that weight management, typically depicted as an individual responsibility, is bound up with the social practices of the online support group. We suggest that clinical advice about a loss of appetite and periods of weight stabilisation post-surgery perhaps need further explanation to patients. PMID:22342357

  10. Prediction of exercise in patients across various stages of bariatric surgery: a comparison of the merits of the theory of reasoned action versus the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Hillary R; Gross, Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the prediction of exercise. As exercise is not a completely volitional behavior, it is hypothesized that the TPB is a superior theoretical model for the prediction of exercise intentions and behavior. This study tested validity of the TPB in a sample of bariatric patients and further validated its improvement over the TRA in predicting exercise adherence at different operative stages. Results generally confirmed research hypotheses. Superiority of the TPB model was validated in this sample of bariatric patients, and Perceived Behavioral Control emerged as the single-best predictor of both exercise intentions and self-reported behavior. Finally, results suggested that both subjective norms and attitudes toward exercise played a larger role in the prediction of intention and behavior than previously reported.

  11. Biochemical response and the effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Hughes, Tyler; Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah

    2013-03-01

    A general method is introduced for calculating the biochemical response to pharmaceuticals, surgeries, or other medical interventions. This method is then applied in a simple model of the response to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in obese diabetic patients. We specifically address the amazing fact that glycemia correction is usually achieved immediately after RYGB surgery, long before there is any appreciable weight loss. Many studies indicate that this result is not due merely to caloric restriction, and it is usually attributed to an increase in glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels observed after the surgery. However, our model indicates that this mechanism alone is not sufficient to explain either the largest declines in glucose levels or the measured declines in the homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The most robust additional mechanism would be production of a factor which opens an insulin-independent pathway for glucose transport into cells, perhaps related to the well-established insulin-independent pathway associated with exercise. Potential candidates include bradykinin, a 9 amino acid peptide. If such a substance were found to exist, it would offer hope for medications which mimic the immediate beneficial effect of RYGB surgery. Supported by Qatar Biomedical Research Institute and Science Program at Texas A&M University at Qatar

  12. Shear stress and flow dynamics of the femoral vein among obese patients who qualify for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiewiora, Maciej; Piecuch, Jerzy; Glűck, Marek; Slowinska-Lozynska, Ludmila; Sosada, Krystyn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of obesity on wall shear stress and its relationship to erythrocyte aggregation. We studied 35 morbidly obese patients who were qualified for bariatric surgery. The control group consisted of 20 non-obese people. Blood rheological measurements were performed using the Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (Mechatronics, the Netherlands) and a cone-plate viscometer (Brookfield DV-II). The venous flow dynamics were assessed using a duplex ultrasound. The shear rate was estimated from the measured blood flow velocity and the diameter of the femoral vein. Venous wall shear stress was calculated from the whole blood viscosity and the shear rate. The shear rate (P < 0.005) and the venous wall shear stress (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in obese patients compared with the controls. The aggregation index (P < 0.001), syllectogram amplitude - AMP (P < 0.05) and Tslow (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the obese patients; the aggregation half-time (P < 0.001) and Tfast (P < 0.001) were decreased compared with the control group. Multivariate regression analyses found waist circumference (β -0.31, P < 0.05), thigh circumference (β 0.33, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.005) to be variables that independently influenced the shear rate. Nevertheless, the AMP (β 0.34, P < 0.05) and Tslow (β -0.47, P < 0.01) were independent predictors that influenced the wall shear stress. This study indicates that there is a relationship between wall shear stress in the femoral vein and the rheological impairment of the RBC among obese patients, but further studies are necessary to confirm this suggestion.

  13. Takotsubo Syndrome as a Cause of False Acute Abdomen in the Early Postoperative Period After Bariatric Surgery-a Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Fabio; Viegas, Carla; França, Enio; Kleuser, Klaus; de Barros, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome, also known as broken-heart syndrome, stress-induced cardiomyopathy or transient apical ballooning syndrome, is a transient disorder characterized by segmental left ventricular failure in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Most cases of Takotsubo syndrome are caused by acute stress that leads to a sudden, temporary weakening of the cardiac musculature. This stress triggers a rise in circulating catecholamine levels that results in acute ventricular dysfunction. In this report, we describe two cases of Takotsubo syndrome in the early postoperative period after bariatric surgery.

  14. Takotsubo Syndrome as a Cause of False Acute Abdomen in the Early Postoperative Period After Bariatric Surgery-a Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Fabio; Viegas, Carla; França, Enio; Kleuser, Klaus; de Barros, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome, also known as broken-heart syndrome, stress-induced cardiomyopathy or transient apical ballooning syndrome, is a transient disorder characterized by segmental left ventricular failure in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Most cases of Takotsubo syndrome are caused by acute stress that leads to a sudden, temporary weakening of the cardiac musculature. This stress triggers a rise in circulating catecholamine levels that results in acute ventricular dysfunction. In this report, we describe two cases of Takotsubo syndrome in the early postoperative period after bariatric surgery. PMID:27503323

  15. Increasing GLP-1 Circulating Levels by Bariatric Surgery or by GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Therapy: Why Are the Clinical Consequences so Different?

    PubMed Central

    Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The “incretin effect” is used to describe the observation that more insulin is secreted after the oral administration of glucose compared to that after the intravenous administration of the same amount of glucose. During the absorption of meals, the gut is thought to regulate insulin secretion by secreting a specific factor that targets pancreatic beta cells. Additional research confirmed this hypothesis with the discovery of two hormones called incretins: gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). During meals, specific cells in the gut (L and K enteroendocrine cells) secrete incretins, causing an increase in the blood concentrations of, respectively, GLP-1 and GIP. Bariatric surgery is now proposed during the therapeutic management of type 2 diabetes in obese or overweight populations. It has been hypothesized that restoration of endogenous GLP-1 secretion after the surgery may contribute to the postsurgical resolution of diabetes. In 2005, the commercialization of GLP-1 receptor agonists gave the possibility to test this hypothesis. A few years later, it is now accepted that GLP-1 receptor agonists and bariatric surgery differently improve type 2 diabetes. These differences between endogenous and exogenous GLP-1 on glucose homeostasis emphasized the dual properties of GLP-1 as a peptide hormone and as a neurotransmitter. PMID:27382574

  16. The Effect of Insurance Status on Pre- and Post-operative Bariatric Surgery Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Melissa A.; Lent, Michelle R.; Wood, G. Craig; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Irving, Brian A.; Argyropoulos, George; Foster, Gary D.; Still, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared pre- and post-surgical data and outcomes among gastric bypass patients based on the type of insurance (Medicaid, Medicare, or private). Methods Data were examined from 2553 consecutive RYGB patients at a rural ASMBS Center of Excellence. Results Participants were primarily female (80.5 %), Caucasian (97.1 %), and middle-aged (45.9 years). Medicaid patients’ BMI at consultation was significantly higher than the other two groups (p<0.001). Time to surgery was significantly longer for Medicaid (13.2 %) and Medicare (7.1 %) patients compared with privately insured patients (p<0.001). Pre-surgical weight loss and post-surgical percent of excess weight loss nadir did not differ among the groups. Type 2 diabetes remission rates were comparable across insurance groups. Conclusions Medicaid patients, although demographically different from their privately insured and Medicare counterparts, will benefit from surgery with comparable weight loss results and overall diabetes remission rates. PMID:25373925

  17. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy at a new bariatric surgery centre in Canada: 30-day complication rates using the Clavien–Dindo classification

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Vanessa; Twells, Laurie; Gregory, Deborah; Murphy, Raleen; Smith, Chris; Boone, Darrell; Pace, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has the highest rate of obesity in Canada, prompting the establishment of a bariatric surgery program at the Health Sciences Centre in NL. This retrospective study examined 30-day complication rates in more than 200 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) between May 2011 and February 2014. Methods We performed a chart review and collected data on 30-day postoperative complications. Complications were graded and reported using the Clavien–Dindo classification. Grades I and II were defined as minor and grades III and higher were defined as major complications. Results We reviewed the charts of the first 209 patients to undergo LSG. The mean body mass index was 49.2, 81% were women and the average age was 43 years. Comorbidities included hypertension (55.0%), obstructive sleep apnea (46.4%), dyslipidemia (42.1%), diabetes (37.3%), osteoarthritis (36.4%) and cardiovascular disease with previous cardiac stents (5.3%). Furthermore, 38.3% of patients reported psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression and anxiety. The overall 30-day complication rate was 15.3%. The complication rate for minor complications was 13.4% and for major complications was 1.9% (2 leaks, 1 stricture and 1 fistula). Conclusion Our results support the feasibility of safely performing LSG surgery at bariatric centres completing fewer than 125 procedures annually. PMID:27007089

  18. POST-BARIATRIC SURGERY WEIGHT REGAIN: EVALUATION OF NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF CANDIDATE PATIENTS FOR ENDOSCOPIC ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION

    PubMed Central

    CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; MARCHESINI, Simone Dallegrave; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is effective treatment for weight loss, but demand continuous nutritional care and physical activity. They regain weight happens with inadequate diets, physical inactivity and high alcohol consumption. Aim To investigate in patients undergoing Roux-Y-of gastroplasty weight regain, nutritional deficiencies, candidates for the treatment with endoscopic argon plasma, the diameter of the gastrojejunostomy and the size of the gastric pouch at the time of treatment with plasma. Methods A prospective 59 patients non-randomized study with no control group undergoing gastroplasty with recurrence of weight and candidates for the endoscopic procedure of argon plasma was realized. The surgical evaluation consisted of investigation of complications in the digestive system and verification of the increased diameter of the gastrojejunostomy. Nutritional evaluation was based on body mass index at the time of operation, in the minimum BMI achieved after and in which BMI was when making the procedure with plasma. The laboratory tests included hemoglobin, erythrocyte volume, ferritin, vitamin D, B12, iron, calcium, zinc and serum albumin. Clinical analysis was based on scheduled follow-up. Results Of the 59 selected, five were men and 51 women; were included 49 people (four men and 44 women) with all the complete data. The exclusion was due to the lack of some of the laboratory tests. Of this total 19 patients (38.7%) had a restrictive ring, while 30 (61.2%) did not. Iron deficiency anemia was common; 30 patients (61.2%) were below 30 with ferritin (unit); 35 (71.4%) with vitamin B12 were below 300 pg/ml; vitamin D3 deficiency occurred in more than 90%; there were no cases of deficiency of protein, calcium and zinc; glucose levels were above 99 mg/dl in three patients (6.12%). Clinically all had complaints of labile memory, irritability and poor concentration. All reported that they stopped treatment with the multidisciplinary team in the first year after

  19. Efficacy of a liquid low-energy formula diet in achieving preoperative target weight loss before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lone V; Nielsen, Mette S; Schmidt, Julie B; Pedersen, Sue D; Sjödin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A preoperative weight loss of 8 % is a prerequisite to undergo bariatric surgery (BS) in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 7- or an 11-week low-energy diet (LCD) for achieving preoperative target weight before BS. A total of thirty obese patients (BMI 46·0 (sd 4·4) kg/m(2)) followed an LCD (Cambridge Weight Plan(®), 4184 kJ/d (1000 kcal/d)) for 7 or 11 weeks as preparation for BS. Anthropometric measurements including body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), blood parameters and blood pressure were assessed at weeks 0, 7 and 11. At week 7, the majority of patients (77 %) had reached their target weight, and this was achieved after 5·4 (sem 0·3) weeks. Mean weight loss was 9·3 (sem 0·5) % (P < 0·01) and consisted of 41·6 % fat-free mass (FFM) and 58·4 % fat mass. The weight loss was accompanied by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (7·1 (sem 2·3) and 7·3 (sem 1·8) mmHg, respectively, all P < 0·01) as well as an improved metabolic profile (8·2 (sem 1·8) % decrease in fasting glucose (P < 0·01), 28·6 (sem 6·4) % decrease in fasting insulin (P < 0·01), 23·1 (sem 2·2) % decrease in LDL (P < 0·01), and 9·7 (sem 4·7) % decrease in TAG (P < 0·05)). Weight, FFM and fat mass continued to decrease from week 7 to 11 (all P < 0·01), whereas no additional improvements was observed in the metabolic parameters. Severely obese patients can safely achieve preoperative target weight on an LCD within 7 weeks as part of preparation for BS. However, the considerable reduction in FFM in severely obese subjects needs further investigation. PMID:27293559

  20. Efficacy of a liquid low-energy formula diet in achieving preoperative target weight loss before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lone V; Nielsen, Mette S; Schmidt, Julie B; Pedersen, Sue D; Sjödin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A preoperative weight loss of 8 % is a prerequisite to undergo bariatric surgery (BS) in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 7- or an 11-week low-energy diet (LCD) for achieving preoperative target weight before BS. A total of thirty obese patients (BMI 46·0 (sd 4·4) kg/m(2)) followed an LCD (Cambridge Weight Plan(®), 4184 kJ/d (1000 kcal/d)) for 7 or 11 weeks as preparation for BS. Anthropometric measurements including body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), blood parameters and blood pressure were assessed at weeks 0, 7 and 11. At week 7, the majority of patients (77 %) had reached their target weight, and this was achieved after 5·4 (sem 0·3) weeks. Mean weight loss was 9·3 (sem 0·5) % (P < 0·01) and consisted of 41·6 % fat-free mass (FFM) and 58·4 % fat mass. The weight loss was accompanied by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (7·1 (sem 2·3) and 7·3 (sem 1·8) mmHg, respectively, all P < 0·01) as well as an improved metabolic profile (8·2 (sem 1·8) % decrease in fasting glucose (P < 0·01), 28·6 (sem 6·4) % decrease in fasting insulin (P < 0·01), 23·1 (sem 2·2) % decrease in LDL (P < 0·01), and 9·7 (sem 4·7) % decrease in TAG (P < 0·05)). Weight, FFM and fat mass continued to decrease from week 7 to 11 (all P < 0·01), whereas no additional improvements was observed in the metabolic parameters. Severely obese patients can safely achieve preoperative target weight on an LCD within 7 weeks as part of preparation for BS. However, the considerable reduction in FFM in severely obese subjects needs further investigation.

  1. Musculoskeletal Pain, Self-reported Physical Function, and Quality of Life in the Teen–Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Michalsky, Marc P.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Baughcum, Amy; Zeller, Meg H.; Brandt, Mary L.; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M.; Chen, Mike K.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity is associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain and is a risk factor for disability and osteoarthritis. OBJECTIVES To describe the prevalence, sites, and intensity of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents with severe obesity; to evaluate associations between musculoskeletal pain and self-reported physical function as well as weight-related quality of life; and to evaluate the association between musculoskeletal pain and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Teen–Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) is a prospective, observational study that collects standardized data on adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery at 5 US centers. We examined baseline data from this cohort between February 28, 2007, and December 30, 2011. We excluded adolescents with Blount disease and slipped capital femoral epiphyses. A total of 233 participants were included in these analyses. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain intensity of the lower back, hips, knees, and ankles/feet using the visual analog scale, categorizing musculoskeletal pain into lower back pain, lower extremity (hips, knees, and feet/ankles combined) pain, and no pain. We assessed self-reported physical function status with the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index and assessed weight-related quality of life with the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life–Kids measure. We adjusted for sex, race, age at surgery, body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and clinical depressive symptoms in regression analyses. RESULTS Among the 233 participants, the mean (SD) age at surgery was 17.1 (1.56) years and the median BMI was 50.4. Participants were predominantly female (77%), white (73%), and non-Hispanic (93%). Among the participants, 49% had poor functional status and 76% had musculoskeletal pain. Lower back pain was prevalent (63%), followed by ankle

  2. Peripheral circadian misalignment: contributor to systemic insulin resistance and potential intervention to improve bariatric surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Kyle N; Hanlon, Erin C; Prachand, Vivek N; Brady, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Thirteen percent of the world's population suffers from obesity and 39% from being overweight, which correlates with an increase in numerous secondary metabolic complications, such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and results in significant weight loss and the amelioration of obesity-related comorbidities through changes in enteroendocrine activity, caloric intake, and alterations in gut microbiota composition. The circadian system has recently been found to be a critical regulatory component in the control of metabolism and, thus, may potentially play an important role in inappropriate weight gain. Indeed, some behaviors and lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of obesity are also risk factors for misalignment in the circadian clock system and for the metabolic syndrome. It is thus possible that alterations in peripheral circadian clocks in metabolically relevant tissues are a contributor to the current obesity epidemic. As such, it is plausible that postsurgical alterations in central circadian alignment, as well as peripheral gene expression in metabolic tissues may represent another mechanism for the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery may represent an opportunity to identify changes in the circadian expression of clock genes that have been altered by environmental factors, allowing for a better understanding of the mechanism of action of surgery. These studies could also reveal an overlooked target for behavioral intervention to improve metabolic outcomes following bariatric surgery. PMID:27465735

  3. Ventilation during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery: volume-controlled, pressure-controlled or volume-guaranteed pressure-regulated modes

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Joanna M; McKee, Chris; Tobias, Joseph D; Sohner, Paul; Herz, Daniel; Teich, Steven; Rice, Julie; Barry, N’ diris; Michalsky, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Managing ventilation and oxygenation during laparoscopic procedures in severely obese patients undergoing weight loss surgery presents many challenges. Pressure-controlled ventilation, volume-guaranteed (PCV-VG) is a dual-control mode of ventilation and an alternative to pressure (PC) or volume (VC) controlled ventilation. PCV-VG features a user-selected tidal volume target, that is auto-regulated and pressure controlled. We hypothesized that PCV-VG ventilation would provide improved oxygenation and ventilation during laparoscopic bariatric surgery with a lower peak inflating pressure (PIP) than either PC or VC ventilation. Methods: This was a prospective cross-over cohort trial (n = 20). In random sequence each patient received the three modes of ventilation for 20 minutes during the laparoscopic portion of the procedure. For all modes of ventilation the goal tidal volume was 6-8 mL/kg, and the respiratory rate was adjusted to achieve normocarbia. The PIP, exhaled tidal volume, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded every five minutes. At the end of 20 minutes, an arterial blood gas was obtained. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test. Results: PCV-VG and PC ventilation both resulted in significantly lower PIP (cmH2O) than VC ventilation (30.5 ± 3.0, 31.6 ± 4.9, and 36.3 ± 3.4 mmHg respectively; p < 0.01 for PCV-VG vs. VC and PC vs. VC). There was no difference in oxygenation (PaO2), ventilation (PaCO2) or hemodynamic variables between the three ventilation modes. Conclusions: In adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery, PCV-VG and PC were superior to VC ventilation in their ability to provide ventilation with the lowest PIP. PMID:25232415

  4. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ...

  5. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ...

  6. Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159815.html Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study Doctors should explore alternatives for pain ... have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers ...

  7. Bariatric emergencies: current evidence and strategies of management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for bariatric surgery is increasing and the postoperative complications are seen more frequently. The aim of this paper is to review the current outcomes of bariatric surgery emergencies and to formulate a pathway of safe management. Methods The PubMed and Google search for English literatures relevant to emergencies of bariatric surgery was made, 6358 articles were found and 90 papers were selected based on relevance, power of the study, recent papers and laparoscopic workload. The pooled data was collected from these articles that were addressing the complications and emergency treatment of bariatric patients. 830,998 patients were included in this review. Results Bariatric emergencies were increasingly seen in the Accident and Emergency departments, the serious outcomes were reported following complex operations like gastric bypass but also after gastric band and the causes were technical errors, suboptimal evaluation, failure of effective communication with bariatric teams who performed the initial operation, patients factors, and delay in the presentation. The mortality ranged from 0.14%-2.2% and increased for revisional surgery to 6.5% (p = 0.002). Inspite of this, mortality following bariatric surgery is still less than that of control group of obese patients (p = value 0.01). Conclusions Most mortality and catastrophic outcomes following bariatric surgery are preventable. The awareness of bariatric emergencies and its effective management are the gold standards for best outcomes. An algorithm is suggested and needs further evaluation. PMID:24373182

  8. Constipation Risk in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sevim; Atar, Nurdan Yalcin; Ozturk, Nilgun; Mendes, Guler; Kuytak, Figen; Bakar, Esra; Dalgiran, Duygu; Ergin, Sumeyra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Problems regarding bowel elimination are quite common in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Objectives: To determine constipation risk before the surgery, bowel elimination during postoperative period, and the factors affecting bowel elimination. Patients and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a general surgery ward of a university hospital in Zonguldak, Turkey between January 2013 and May 2013. A total of 107 patients were included in the study, who were selected by convenience sampling. Constipation Risk Assessment Scale (CRAS), patient information form, medical and nursing records were used in the study. Results: The mean age of the patients was found to be 55.97 ± 15.74 (year). Most of the patients have undergone colon (37.4%) and stomach surgeries (21.5%). Open surgical intervention (83.2%) was performed on almost all patients (96.3%) under general anesthesia. Patients were at moderate risk for constipation with average scores of 11.71 before the surgery. A total of 77 patients (72%) did not have bowel elimination problem during postoperative period. The type of the surgery (P < 0.05), starting time for oral feeding after the surgery (P < 0.05), and mobilization (P < 0.05) were effective on postoperative bowel elimination. Conclusions: There is a risk for constipation after abdominal surgery. Postoperative practices are effective on the risk of constipation. PMID:26380107

  9. "Omics" Prospective Monitoring of Bariatric Surgery: Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Outcomes Using Mixed-Meal Tolerance Test and Time-Resolved (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Thiago I B; Geloneze, Bruno; Pareja, José C; Calixto, Antônio R; Ferreira, Márcia M C; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2016-07-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery goes beyond weight loss to induce early beneficial hormonal changes that favor glycemic control. In this prospective study, ten obese subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes underwent bariatric surgery. Mixed-meal tolerance test was performed before and 12 months after RYGB, and the outcomes were investigated by a time-resolved hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabolomics. To the best of our knowledge, no previous omics-driven study has used time-resolved (1)H NMR-based metabolomics to investigate bariatric surgery outcomes. Our results presented here show a significant decrease in glucose levels after bariatric surgery (from 159.80 ± 61.43 to 100.00 ± 22.94 mg/dL), demonstrating type 2 diabetes remission (p < 0.05). The metabolic profile indicated lower levels of lactate, alanine, and branched chain amino acids for the operated subject at fasting state after the surgery. However, soon after food ingestion, the levels of these metabolites increased faster in operated than in nonoperated subjects. The lipoprotein profile achieved before and after RYGB at fasting was also significantly different, but converging 180 min after food ingestion. For example, the very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, N-acetyl-glycoproteins, and unsaturated lipid levels decreased after RYGB, while phosphatidylcholine and high-density lipoprotein increased. This study provides important insights on RYGB surgery and attendant type 2 diabetes outcomes using an "omics" systems science approach. Further research on metabolomic correlates of RYGB surgery in larger study samples is called for. PMID:27428253

  10. EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS ON BODY WEIGHT AND CLINICAL METABOLIC COMORBIDITIES IN BARIATRIC SURGERY SERVICE OF A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Cátia Ferreira; COHEN, Larissa; SARMENTO, Luciana d'Abreu; ROSA, Felipe Monnerat Marino; ROSADO, Eliane Lopes; CARNEIRO, João Régis Ivar; de SOUZA, Antônio Augusto Peixoto; MAGNO, Fernanda Cristina Carvalho Mattos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Due to the high failure rate observed in the clinical treatment of morbid obesity an increase in bariatric surgery indications, as an alternative for the control of obesity and comorbidities, is noticeable. Aim: To evaluate the performance of type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure and dyslipidemia in patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in late follow-up. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 59 patients included in the bariatric surgery program. Anthropometric (height and body weight) and laboratory (LDLc, HDLc, VLDLc, triglyceride -TG - and glucose) data were collected on pre- and postoperative stages, through medical records. Results: Among the patients, 86% were female aged 43±11, of whom 52% had attended high school. The average postoperative time was 7±3 years. During the postoperative period, there were decreases of weight and body mass index, respectively (133±06 kg vs 91±04 kg p<0.05 e 49±74 kg/m2 vs 33±79 kg/m2, p<0.05). In comparison to the preoperative stage, lower concentrations of glucose (101.00±26.99 vs 89,11±15.19, p=0.014), total cholesterol rates (179.00±37,95 vs 167.48±28,50, p=0.016), LDLc (104.30±33.12 vs 91.46±24.58, p=0.016), VLDLc (25.40±11,12 vs 15.68±7.40, p<0.01), and TG (143.35±86.35 vs 82.45±37.39, p<0.01) and higher concentrations of HDLc (43.53±8.23 vs 57.90±15.60, p<0.01) were identified in the postoperative stage. 40% of hypertensive patients were still undergoing high blood pressure treatment during the postoperative stage. There was remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia on 81% and 94% of the cases, respectively. Conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has proven itself to be an effective long term procedure, promoting weight loss, remission of DM2 and dyslipidemia. PMID:27683769

  11. Glaucoma risks in advanced corneal surgery.

    PubMed

    Maurino, Vincenzo; Aiello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating corneal transplant (PKP) surgery has been performed for centuries as the procedure of choice to restore vision in cases of advanced corneal disease. However, the last two decades have seen the introduction of lamellar corneal surgery (deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, DALK; Descemet stripping-automated endothelial keratoplasty, DSAEK; and Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty, DMEK) which has shown several advantages over PKP and has rapidly gained popularity, given its benefits. Glaucoma after corneal graft surgery is an important cause of visual loss and graft failure. The main risk factors for developing glaucoma after any type of corneal graft are steroid-related intraocular hypertension and pre-existing glaucoma. The incidence of glaucoma after corneal graft surgery varies according to the specific risk factors and the type of corneal graft performed. One major advantage of modern layer selective lamellar keratoplasty is the reduced risk of glaucoma compared with PKP. This reduced glaucoma risk after corneal lamellar graft surgery is mainly due to the less destructive surgical nature of the lamellar procedures and also the reduced use of postoperative steroid treatment. Glaucoma can complicate not only corneal transplantation but has also been observed following other anterior segment procedures from laser refractive surgery to keratoprosthesis. The aim of this chapter is to describe the incidence, etiology, and management of glaucoma after corneal transplant and some common corneal surgical procedures.

  12. Sex, Race, and the Quality of Life Factors Most Important to Patients’ Well-Being Among Those Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Roger B.; Jones, Dan B.; Apovian, Caroline A.; Chiodi, Sarah; Huskey, Karen W.; Hamel, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests obesity-related social stigma and impairment in work function may be the two most detrimental quality of life (QOL) factors to overall well-being among patients seeking weight loss surgery (WLS); whether the relative importance of QOL factors varies across patient sex and race/ethnicity is unclear. Methods We interviewed 574 patients seeking WLS at two centers. We measured patient’s health utility (preference-based well-being measure) as determined via standard gamble scenarios assessing patients’ willingness to risk death to achieve weight loss or perfect health. Multivariable models assessed associations between patients’ utility and five weight-related QOL domains stratified by gender and race: social stigma, self-esteem, physical function, public distress (weight stigma), and work life. Results Depending on patients’ sex and race/ethnicity, mean utilities ranged from 0.85 to 0.91, reflecting an average willingness to assume a 9–15 % risk of death to achieve their most desired health/weight state. After adjustment, African Americans (AAs) reported higher utility than Caucasians (+ 0.054, p=0.03), but utilities did not vary significantly by sex. Among Caucasian and AA men, impairment in physical functioning was the most important factor associated with diminished utility; social stigma was also a leading factor for Caucasian men. Among Caucasian women, self-esteem and work function appeared equally important. Social stigma was the leading contributor to utility among AA women; QOL factors did not appear as important among Hispanic patients. Conclusion AAs reported higher utilities than Caucasian patients. Individual QOL domains that drive diminished well-being varied across race/ethnicity and sex. PMID:26630951

  13. Comparison of reducing epicardial fat by exercise, diet or bariatric surgery weight loss strategies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, S W; Campbell, H

    2015-05-01

    The objectives were to determine whether epicardial fat (EAT) is subject to modification, and whether various strategies accomplish this end point and the relationship between weight loss and EAT. A systematic review of the literature following meta-analysis guidelines was conducted using the search strategy 'epicardial fat' OR 'epicardial adipose tissue' AND 'diet' OR 'exercise' OR 'bariatric surgery (BS)' OR 'change in body weight' limited to humans. Eleven articles were identified with 12 intervention approaches of which eight studies showed a statistically significant reduction in EAT. A random-effects meta-analysis suggests an overall significant reduction of 1.12 standardized units (95% CI = [-1.71, -0.54], P value < 0.01). While there is a large amount of heterogeneity across study groups, a substantial amount of this variability can be accounted for by considering intervention type and change in body mass index (BMI). These variables were incorporated into a random-effects meta-regression model. Using this analysis, significant EAT reduction occurred with diet and BS but not with exercise. BMI reductions correlated significantly with EAT reductions for diet-based interventions, i.e. for some but not all interventions. In conclusion, EAT, a factor that is significantly associated with coronary artery disease, can be modified. The type of intervention, in addition to the amount of weight loss achieved, is predictive of the amount of EAT reduction.

  14. Bariatric surgery in old age: a comparative study of laparoscopic Roux–en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy in an Asia centre of excellence

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Kun; Garg, Amit; Kuao, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Po-Chih; Hsin, Ming-Che

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery</