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Sample records for barium silicate basio3

  1. Identification of the man-made barium copper silicate pigments among some ancient Chinese artifacts through spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Q H; Yang, J C; Li, L; Dong, J Q; Zhao, H X; Liu, S

    2015-03-01

    This article describes the complementary application of non-invasive micro-Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to the characterization of some ancient Chinese silicate artifacts. A total of 28 samples dated from fourth century BC to third century AD were analyzed. The results of chemical analysis showed that the vitreous PbO-BaO-SiO2 material was used to sinter these silicate artifacts. The barium copper silicate pigments including BaCuSi4O10, BaCuSi2O6 and BaCu2Si2O7 were widely identified from colorful areas of the samples by Raman spectroscopy. In addition, other crystalline phases such as Fe2O3, BaSi2O5, BaSO4, PbCO3 and quartz were also identified. The present study provides very valuable information to trace the technical evolution of man-made barium copper silicate pigments and their close relationship with the making of ancient PbO-BaO-SiO2 glaze and glass.

  2. Identification of the man-made barium copper silicate pigments among some ancient Chinese artifacts through spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. H.; Yang, J. C.; Li, L.; Dong, J. Q.; Zhao, H. X.; Liu, S.

    2015-03-01

    This article describes the complementary application of non-invasive micro-Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to the characterization of some ancient Chinese silicate artifacts. A total of 28 samples dated from fourth century BC to third century AD were analyzed. The results of chemical analysis showed that the vitreous PbO-BaO-SiO2 material was used to sinter these silicate artifacts. The barium copper silicate pigments including BaCuSi4O10, BaCuSi2O6 and BaCu2Si2O7 were widely identified from colorful areas of the samples by Raman spectroscopy. In addition, other crystalline phases such as Fe2O3, BaSi2O5, BaSO4, PbCO3 and quartz were also identified. The present study provides very valuable information to trace the technical evolution of man-made barium copper silicate pigments and their close relationship with the making of ancient PbO-BaO-SiO2 glaze and glass.

  3. Template-Engaged Solid-State Synthesis of Barium Magnesium Silicate Yolk@Shell Particles and Their High Photoluminescence Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuncai; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-05-17

    This study presents a new synthetic method for fabricating yolk@shell-structured barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles through a template-engaged solid-state reaction. First, as the core template, (BaMg)CO3 spherical particles were prepared based on the coprecipitation of Ba(2+) and Mg(2+) . These core particles were then uniformly shelled with silica (SiO2 ) by using CTAB as the structure-directing template to form (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles with a core@shell structure. The (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles were then converted to yolk@shell barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles by an interfacial solid-state reaction between the (BaMg)CO3 (core) and the SiO2 (shell) at 750 °C. During this interfacial solid-state reaction, Kirkendall diffusion contributed to the formation of yolk@shell BMS particles. Thus, the synthetic temperature for the (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor is significantly reduced from 1200 °C with the conventional method to 750 °C with the proposed method. In addition, the photoluminescence intensity of the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor was found to be 9.8 times higher than that of the conventional (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor. The higher absorption of excitation light by the structure of the yolk@shell phosphor is induced by multiple light-reflection and -scattering events in the interstitial void between the yolk and the shell. When preparing the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor, a hydrogen environment for the solid-state reaction results in higher photoluminescence efficiency than nitrogen and air environments. The proposed synthetic method can be easily extended to the synthesis of other yolk@shell multicomponent metal silicates.

  4. Structural, Dielectric, and Interface Properties of Crystalline Barium Silicate Films on Si(100): A Robust High-κ Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S.; Hofmann, K. R.; Feldhoff, A.; Pfnür, H.

    2016-05-01

    The quality and crystallinity of ultrathin dielectric layers depend crucially on the details of interface formation and chemical stability. Using a combination of photoelectron (XPS) and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy, low-energy electron-diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we show that crystalline epitaxial layers of Ba2 SiO4 can be grown on Si(100) substrates from evaporated Ba in oxygen background atmosphere at 650 °C . Since the silicate is chemically by far more stable than the oxides of Si and Ba, an atomically sharp interface with no interface oxide is formed, as confirmed by XPS and TEM. However, the interface is rough on the atomic scale. dc and frequency-dependent electrical measurements reveal a relative dielectric constant of 22.8, low hysteresis in C V measurements, and low leakage currents but still fairly high interface trap densities.

  5. Barium enema

    MedlinePlus

    ... series; Colorectal cancer - lower GI series; Colorectal cancer - barium enema; Crohn disease - lower GI series; Crohn disease - barium enema; Intestinal blockage - lower GI series; Intestinal blockage - ...

  6. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  7. BARIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.

    1959-07-21

    A method of separating barium from nuclear fission products is described. In accordance with the invention, barium may be recovered from an acidic solution of neutron-irradiated fissionable material by carrying ihe barium cut of solution as a sulfate with lead as a carrier and then dissolving the barium-containing precipitate in an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine chelating reagent. The barium values together with certain other metallic values present in the diamine solution are then absorbed onto a cation exchange resin and the barium is selectively eluted from the resin bed with concentrated nitric acid.

  8. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The barium enema is a valuable diagnostic tool that helps detect abnormalities in the large intestine (colon). The barium enema, along with colonoscopy, remain standards in the diagnosis of colon cancer, ulcerative colitis, and other diseases of the colon.

  9. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A barium enema is performed to examine the walls of the colon. During the procedure, a well lubricated enema tube is inserted gently into the rectum. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast ...

  10. Eu(2+)-Activated Phase-Pure Oxonitridosilicate Phosphor in a Ba-Si-O-N System via Facile Silicate-Assisted Routes Designed by First-Principles Thermodynamic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Young Jun; Kim, Jin Kyu; Ju, Ji Young; Choi, Seul Ki; Park, Woon Ik; Jung, Ha-Kyun; Kim, Yongseon; Choi, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Eu(2+)-activated single phase Ba(2+)-oxonitridosilicate phosphors were prepared under a mild synthetic condition via silicate precursors, and their luminescent properties were investigated. Both the preferred oxonitridosilicate formation as for the available host compounds and thermodynamic stability within the Ba-Si-O-N system were elucidated in detail by the theoretical simulation based on the first-principles density functional theory. Those results can visualize the optimum synthetic conditions for Eu(2+)-activated highly luminescent Ba(2+)-oxonitridosilicates, especially Ba3Si6O12N2, as promising conversion phosphors for white LEDs, including Ba3Si6O9N4 and BaSi2O2N2 phases. To prove the simulated design rule, we synthesized the Ba3Si6O12N2:Eu(2+) phosphor using various silicate precursors, Ba2Si4O10, Ba2Si3O8, and BaSiO3, in a carbothermal reduction ambient and finally succeeded in obtaining a phase of pure highly luminescent oxonitridosilicate phosphor without using any solid-state nitride addition and/or high pressure synthetic procedures. Our study provides useful guidelines for robust synthetic procedures for developing thermally stable rare-earth-ion activated oxonitridosilicate phosphors and an established simulation method that can be effectively applied to other multigas systems. PMID:27518370

  11. Barium periostitis: an intraoral complication following barium swallow.

    PubMed

    Stanton, David C; Seeger, Douglas; Robinson, Brian T

    2007-05-01

    Barium is used with great frequency for various gastrointestinal radiographic studies. Complications arising from the use of barium are uncommon and can range from peritonitis, pneumonitis, vascular intravasation, allergic reactions, and even "barium appendicitis." We report a case of an unusual complication, periostitis, from the use of barium in a 46-year-old male.

  12. Barium bright and heavy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Katharina M.

    2013-02-01

    Katharina M. Fromm relates how barium and its ores went from a magical, glowing species that attracted witches and alchemists to components in a variety of compounds that are key parts of modern life.

  13. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  14. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient's medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test. PMID:25309769

  15. Barium stone impaction in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Y; Koyuncu, A; Osmanoglu, N

    1995-06-01

    Autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, abnormal sweating and constipation occur frequently in Parkinson's disease. In our case, barium meal used for upper gastrointestinal study caused barium stone formation and a paralytic-ileus-like syndrome. Therefore, attention should be paid while using barium meal for diagnostic purpose in Parkinsonism. PMID:7474296

  16. Barium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  17. Barium Stars: Theoretical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husti, Laura; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio

    2009-09-01

    Barium stars are extrinsic Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. They present the s-enhancement characteristic for AGB and post-AGB stars, but are in an earlier evolutionary stage (main sequence dwarfs, subgiants, red giants). They are believed to form in binary systems, where a more massive companion evolved faster, produced the s-elements during its AGB phase, polluted the present barium star through stellar winds and became a white dwarf. The samples of barium stars of Allen & Barbuy (2006) and of Smiljanic et al. (2007) are analysed here. Spectra of both samples were obtained at high-resolution and high S/N. We compare these observations with AGB nucleosynthesis models using different initial masses and a spread of 13C-pocket efficiencies. Once a consistent solution is found for the whole elemental distribution of abundances, a proper dilution factor is applied. This dilution is explained by the fact that the s-rich material transferred from the AGB to the nowadays observed stars is mixed with the envelope of the accretor. We also analyse the mass transfer process, and obtain the wind velocity for giants and subgiants with known orbital period. We find evidence that thermohaline mixing is acting inside main sequence dwarfs and we present a method for estimating its depth.

  18. [Barium intoxication: a case report].

    PubMed

    Jan, I S; Jong, Y S; Lo, H M

    1991-09-01

    Barium intoxication, a rare cause of hypokalemia, can sometimes result in respiratory paralysis and ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Herein, we report one such case. A 29-year-old man swallowed barium-contaminated fried flour-coated sweet potatoes. Then, abdominal discomfort, vomiting, diarrhea, progressive muscular weakness, apnea and ventricular tachycardia developed and laboratory data revealed profound hypokalemia. He regained his health after mechanical ventilation, anti-arrhythmic agent and aggressive potassium chloride supplement. Analysis of blood, urine and contaminated flour showed the presence of barium carbonate. Barium intoxication is a medical emergency which requires rapid therapy to prevent mortality.

  19. Materials Data on BaSiO3 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on BaSiO3 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Barium silicate glass/Inconel X-750 interaction. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Jr., P. V.; Siegel, W. T.; Miley, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    Water reactor safety programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have required the development of specialized instrumentation. An example is the electrical conductivity-sensitive liquid level transducer developed for use in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) in which the operation of the sensing probe relies upon the passage of current through the water between the center pin of the electrode and its shell such that when water is present the resulting voltage is low, and conversely, when water is absent the voltage is high. The transducer's ceramic seal is a hot-pressed glass ceramic; its metal housing is Inconel X-750. The ceramic material provides an essential dielectric barrier between the center pin and the outer housing. The operation of the probe as well as the integrity of the PWR environment requires a hermetically-bonded seal between the ceramic and the metal. However, during testing, an increasing number of probe assemblies failed owing to poor glass-to-metal seals as well as void formation within the ceramic. Therefore, a program was initiated to characterize the metallic surface with respect to pre-oxidation treatment and determine optimum conditions for wetting and bonding of the metal by the glass to obtain baseline data relevant to production of acceptable transducer seals.

  2. Control of grain growth using intergranular silicate phases in cubic yttria stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, A.A.; Imamura, P.H.; Mecartney, M.L.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1998-07-01

    Grain growth kinetics for 8 mol% yttria stabilized cubic zirconia (8Y-CSZ) were investigated. Optimal process parameters required to achieve a small grain size and full density for cubic 8Y-CSZ included a rapid heating rate (100 C/min) and hot isostatic pressing. Grain growth rates could also be controlled by the deliberate addition of 1 wt% of intergranular phases of borosilicate, barium silicate, and lithium aluminum silicate glasses. Lithium aluminum silicate, the intergranular phase with the highest solubility for yttria and zirconia, enhanced grain growth compared to control samples without grain boundary phases. The borosilicate intergranular phase, with the lowest solubility for yttria and zirconia, was the most effective in suppressing grain growth. Activation energies for grain growth were in the range of 400 kJ/mol, and the grain growth exponent ranged from 2 for lithium aluminum silicate containing samples, to 3 for pure samples, to 4 for barium silicate and borosilicate containing samples.

  3. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a

  4. On Barium Oxide Solubility in Barium-Containing Chloride Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2016-08-01

    Oxide solubility in chloride melts depends on temperature and composition of molten solvent. The solubility of barium oxide in the solvents with barium chloride content is essentially higher than that in molten alkali chlorides. Spectral data demonstrate the existence of oxychloride ionic groupings in such melts. This work presents the results of the BaO solubility in two molten BaCl2-NaCl systems with different barium chloride content. The received data together with earlier published results revealed the main regularities of BaO solubility in molten BaO-BaCl2-MCl systems.

  5. Barium light source method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  6. Silicate volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-03-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  7. The role of the Ganges-Brahmaputra mixing zone in supplying barium and [sup 226]Ra to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks ); Falkner, K.K. CNES, Toulouse ); Brown, E.T. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1993-07-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra river system is ranked fourth among world rivers as a source of freshwater to the oceans and is believed to supply more sediment to the ocean than any other; 1.5 [times] 10[sup 12] kg/yr (Milliman and Meade, 1983). Barium and [sup 226]Ra are typically enriched in waters where sediment-laden rivers enter the ocean. As such, the Ganges-Brahmaputra is likely to produce globally significant barium and [sup 226]Ra fluxes to the ocean. Water samples for barium and [sup 226]Ra were collected within four major channels of the Ganges-Brahmaputra mixing zone during a period of low sediment and freshwater discharge. The data suggest that in addition to suspended sediments supplied directly from rivers, river sediments deposited during high discharge in mangroves and on islands are desorbing barium and [sup 226]Ra to seawater. The release of barium and [sup 226]Ra from these sediment deposits is out-of-phase with the direct supply of sediments from the rivers. Estimates of the annual fluxes of barium and [sup 226]Ra from the Ganges-Brahmaputra mixing zone were also derived. The fluxes of barium and [sup 226]Ra are 5.3 [times] 10[sup 8] mol barium/yr and 9.5 [times] 10[sub 14] dpm radium/yr. The first silicate and phosphate mixing profiles for this system are reported. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  9. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  10. Processing science of barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Seymen Murat

    Barium titanate and barium strontium titanate thin films were deposited on base metal foils via chemical solution deposition and radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The films were processed at elevated temperatures for densification and crystallization. Two unifying research goals underpin all experiments: (1) To improve our fundamental understanding of complex oxide processing science, and (2) to translate those improvements into materials with superior structural and electrical properties. The relationships linking dielectric response, grain size, and thermal budget for sputtered barium strontium titanate were illustrated. (Ba 0.6Sr0.4)TiO3 films were sputtered on nickel foils at temperatures ranging between 100-400°C. After the top electrode deposition, the films were co-fired at 900°C for densification and crystallization. The dielectric properties were observed to improve with increasing sputter temperature reaching a permittivity of 1800, a tunability of 10:1, and a loss tangent of less than 0.015 for the sample sputtered at 400°C. The data can be understood using a brick wall model incorporating a high permittivity grain interior with low permittivity grain boundary. However, this high permittivity value was achieved at a grain size of 80 nm, which is typically associated with strong suppression of the dielectric response. These results clearly show that conventional models that parameterize permittivity with crystal diameter or film thickness alone are insufficiently sophisticated. Better models are needed that incorporate the influence of microstructure and crystal structure. This thesis next explores the ability to tune microstructure and properties of chemically solution deposited BaTiO3 thin films by modulation of heat treatment thermal profiles and firing atmosphere composition. Barium titanate films were deposited on copper foils using hybrid-chelate chemistries. An in-situ gas analysis process was developed to probe the organic removal and the

  11. Studies of hexacelsian and celsian barium aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuo-Tong

    1998-09-01

    The first part of this work (chapter 3) describes the reaction paths leading to the formation of BaAlsb2Sisb2Osb8 (BAS) from a mixture of gamma-BaCOsb3,\\ alpha-Alsb2Osb3, and amorphous SiOsb2 powders. Heat treatments conducted from 600 to 1200sp°C in air were used to transform the powder mixtures into hexacelsian BAS. The phase evolution to BAS was examined by x-ray diffraction. Several experiments were designed to microscopically reproduce the solid-solid interfaces expected during the synthesis of BAS and enabled the author to describe the different stages of the reaction. There exist two reaction paths in formation of BAS in this study: (1) formation of a series of barium silicates leading to BaO*2SiOsb2 (BSsb2) which then reacts with Alsb2Osb3 to form BAS and (2) formation of BaO*Alsb2Osb3 (BA) which then reacts with SiOsb2 to form BAS. The kinetics of the latter is slower than that of the former because the reaction between BaO*Alsb2Osb3 and SiOsb2 to form BAS includes a bond breaking process. The second part (chapter 4) of this research was undertaken to study the role of additives on the kinetics of the transformation of hexacelsian to celsian. Pre-synthesized hexacelsian powders doped with various additives were heated at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1400sp°C for 4 hrs. Semi-quantitative analysis of XRD was used to determine the extent of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation. This work was extended further to investigate the mechanisms involved in the transformation. Defect structures developed in the additive-containing celsian provide insights about the sites occupied by the cations added. Experimental results indicate that the doping of ˜0.99A cations in promoting the conversion of hexacelsian to celsian is by forming an interstitial solid solution in hexacelsian and ˜0.66A cations form a substitutional solid solution. In a kinetic study on the CaO- or MgO-enhanced transformation, values of rate constant, k, and Avlami constant, n, at

  12. Radium/Barium Waste Project

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Allen K.; Ellefson, Mark D.; McDonald, Kent M.

    2015-06-25

    The treatment, shipping, and disposal of a highly radioactive radium/barium waste stream have presented a complex set of challenges requiring several years of effort. The project illustrates the difficulty and high cost of managing even small quantities of highly radioactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-regulated waste. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research activities produced a Type B quantity of radium chloride low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in a number of small vials in a facility hot cell. The resulting waste management project involved a mock-up RCRA stabilization treatment, a failed in-cell treatment, a second, alternative RCRA treatment approach, coordinated regulatory variances and authorizations, alternative transportation authorizations, additional disposal facility approvals, and a final radiological stabilization process.

  13. Humidity sensing by nanocomposites of silver in silicate glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, B. N.; Kundu, T. K.; Banerjee, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2003-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles of diameters in the range 3.4 to 13.2 nm were grown within a silicate glass ceramics containing barium titanate phase. The glass ceramics were filled with silver particles by subjecting the former to a Na+-Ag+ ion exchange process followed by a reduction treatment in hydrogen. Silver particles were formed at the interfaces of the silicate glass and the barium titanate phases, respectively. The silver particle sizes could be varied by controlling the fractal structure of the crystalline phase by prior heat treatment. Electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on cold-pressed specimens of nanocomposite powders prepared as just stated. A five order of magnitude resistivity change was recorded in the case of nanocomposite specimen with a silver particle diameter of 10.1 nm in the relative humidity range of 25% to 85%. The resistivity of the nanocomposites was found to be controlled by a variable range hopping conduction. It is believed that the silver nanoparticles provide sites where physisorption of water molecules takes place which increases the number of localized states near the Fermi level.

  14. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, Y

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2x10(16) barium ions with energy 10-20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength.

  16. Absolute magnitudes and kinematics of barium stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A. E.; Luri, X.; Grenier, S.; Prevot, L.; Mennessier, M. O.; Figueras, F.; Torra, J.

    1997-03-01

    The absolute magnitude of barium stars has been obtained from kinematical data using a new algorithm based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The method allows to separate a sample into groups characterized by different mean absolute magnitudes, kinematics and z-scale heights. It also takes into account, simultaneously, the censorship in the sample and the errors on the observables. The method has been applied to a sample of 318 barium stars. Four groups have been detected. Three of them show a kinematical behaviour corresponding to disk population stars. The fourth group contains stars with halo kinematics. The luminosities of the disk population groups spread a large range. The intrinsically brightest one (M_v_=-1.5mag, σ_M_=0.5mag) seems to be an inhomogeneous group containing barium binaries as well as AGB single stars. The most numerous group (about 150 stars) has a mean absolute magnitude corresponding to stars in the red giant branch (M_v_=0.9mag, σ_M_=0.8mag). The third group contains barium dwarfs, the obtained mean absolute magnitude is characteristic of stars on the main sequence or on the subgiant branch (M_v_=3.3mag, σ_M_=0.5mag). The obtained mean luminosities as well as the kinematical results are compatible with an evolutionary link between barium dwarfs and classical barium giants. The highly luminous group is not linked with these last two groups. More high-resolution spectroscopic data will be necessary in order to better discriminate between barium and non-barium stars.

  17. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Kiwamoto, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2 x 10/sup 16/ barium ions with energy 10--20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength.

  18. Small barium rail gun for plasma injection.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, Y

    1980-03-01

    A small rail gun with a barium electrode can be operated at higher than one shot per second to produce more than 2x10(16) barium ions with energy 10-20 eV. The operation of the gun takes advantage of the external magnetic field for cross-field plasma injection into a trap. Up to 7 kG of the magnetic field examined, the gun performance improves with the increased magnetic field strength. PMID:18647050

  19. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  20. Barium compatibility of insulator material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, John M.; Zee, Ralph; Schuller, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The compatibility of insulator material systems in a barium environment was investigated. This work is part of an ongoing program to identify weaknesses in insulator/braze/refractory metal materials systems which provide electrical insulation in alkali-metal enhanced thermionic devices and other alkali-metal thermal-to-electric converters. Test articles consisting of alumina or sapphire insulators brazed to molybdenum via a nominal Cu-30% Ni braze, were exposed to barium vapor to ascertain possible reactions and/or failure mechanisms. The test matrix consisted of eight samples; 5 with a sapphire insulator, 3 with an alumina insulator. Each sample was exposed to a different combination of insulator/braze region temperature (1000 K or 1100 K) and partial pressure of barium (10-3 or 10-2 torr) for approximately 750 hours. Initial analysis indicated that the ceramic portions were free from corrosion and that the braze material was the weak link in the material system. Evidence of formation of a Cu-Ba intermetallic at the braze region was visible. Further analysis indicated that in some cases Al2O3 was being reduced by the Barium. The results of this research imply that use of Al2O3 based ceramics in a barium environment may be suspect to failures in the long term and that Cu-Ni brazes are not suitable for the barium environment.

  1. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  2. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping.

  3. Development of the barium shaped charge technique in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, J.

    1982-09-01

    In order to generate an artificial, barium luminescent cloud for the study of magnetic or electric field line configurations in the upper atmosphere, it is necessary to initiate a well collimated barium jet with an initial velocity of 8-12 km/sec by means of a shaped charge. Attention is presently given to recent developments in barium shaped charge techniques, including the molding of barium liners, the prevention of rust on the metallic barium charge, the production of a plane detonation wave, and a method for the ground testing of a barium ion jet.

  4. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  5. Constraining the oceanic barium cycle with stable barium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhimian; Siebert, Christopher; Hathorne, Ed C.; Dai, Minhan; Frank, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of barium (Ba) concentrations in seawater resembles that of nutrients and Ba has been widely used as a proxy of paleoproductivity. However, the exact mechanisms controlling the nutrient-like behavior, and thus the fundamentals of Ba chemistry in the ocean, have not been fully resolved. Here we present a set of full water column dissolved Ba (DBa) isotope (δ137BaDBa) profiles from the South China Sea and the East China Sea that receives large freshwater inputs from the Changjiang (Yangtze River). We find pronounced and systematic horizontal and depth dependent δ137BaDBa gradients. Beyond the river influence characterized by generally light signatures (0.0 to + 0.3 ‰), the δ137BaDBa values in the upper water column are significantly higher (+ 0.9 ‰) than those in the deep waters (+ 0.5 ‰). Moreover, δ137BaDBa signatures are essentially constant in the entire upper 100 m, in which dissolved silicon isotopes are fractionated during diatom growth resulting in the heaviest isotopic compositions in the very surface waters. Combined with the decoupling of DBa concentrations and δ137BaDBa from the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate this implies that the apparent nutrient-like fractionation of Ba isotopes in seawater is primarily induced by preferential adsorption of the lighter isotopes onto biogenic particles rather than by biological utilization. The subsurface δ137BaDBa distribution is dominated by water mass mixing. The application of stable Ba isotopes as a proxy for nutrient cycling should therefore be considered with caution and both biological and physical processes need to be considered. Clearly, however, Ba isotopes show great potential as a new tracer for land-sea interactions and ocean mixing processes.

  6. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  7. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  8. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  11. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... established a schedule for the conduct of this review (74 FR 62587, November 30, 2010). Subsequently, counsel... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  12. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Commission found that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (74 FR 31757... COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of... chloride from China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will proceed with a full...

  13. AES analysis of barium fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, G. N.; Makhnjuk, V. I.; Rumjantseva, S. M.; Shchekochihin, Ju. M.

    1993-06-01

    AES analysis of thin films of metal fluorides is a difficult problem due to charging and decomposition of such films under electron bombardment. We have developed a simple algorithm for a reliable quantitative AES analysis of metal fluoride thin films (BaF 2 in our work). The relative AES sensitivity factors for barium and fluorine were determined from BaF 2 single-crystal samples. We have investigated the dependence of composition and stability of barium fluoride films on the substrate temperature during film growth. We found that the instability of BaF 2 films grown on GaAs substrates at high temperatures (> 525°C) is due to a loss of fluorine. Our results show that, under the optimal electron exposure conditions, AES can be used for a quantitative analysis of metal fluoride thin films.

  14. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-01

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution.

  15. Substituted barium ferrites; sources of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrish, A. H.; Zhou, X. Z.; Yang, Zheng; Zeng, Hua-Xian

    1994-12-01

    The substituted barium ferrites BaFe12-2 xCo x Sn x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.4) and BaFe1-2xCo x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.9) have been studied. The site occupancies, as determined from Mössbauer spectra, have been used to interpret the changes in the magnetization and in the crystalline anisotropy.

  16. Nanoparticles of barium induce apoptosis in human phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mores, Luana; França, Eduardo Luzia; Silva, Núbia Andrade; Suchara, Eliane Aparecida; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nutrients and immunological factors of breast milk are essential for newborn growth and the development of their immune system, but this secretion can contain organic and inorganic toxins such as barium. Colostrum contamination with barium is an important issue to investigate because this naturally occurring element is also associated with human activity and industrial pollution. The study evaluated the administration of barium nanoparticles to colostrum, assessing the viability and functional activity of colostral mononuclear phagocytes. Methods Colostrum was collected from 24 clinically healthy women (aged 18–35 years). Cell viability, superoxide release, intracellular Ca2+ release, and phagocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the samples. Results Treatment with barium lowered mononuclear phagocyte viability, increased superoxide release, and reduced intracellular calcium release. In addition, barium increased cell death by apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that nanoparticles of barium in colostrum are toxic to cells, showing the importance of avoiding exposure to this element. PMID:26451108

  17. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  18. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  19. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  20. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  1. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  2. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  3. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, S.; Drake, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    Metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle (Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al. 1997). The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. In this work, we investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid. Experiments were performed in the Experimental Geochemistry Laboratory at the University of Arizona utilizing a non-end loaded piston cylinder apparatus with a barium carbonate pressure medium. Starting materials were created by combining the mafic and silicic compositions of Jaeger and Drake (2000) with Fe powder (~25 wt% of the total mixture) to achieve metal saturation. Small amounts of W, Ge, Ga2O3 and NiO powder (less than 2 wt% each) were also added to the starting compositions. The experiments were contained in a graphite capsule and performed with temperature and pressure fixed at 1400ºC and 1.5 GPa. Experimental run products were analyzed with the University of Arizona Cameca SX50 electron microprobe with four wavelength dispersive spectrometers and a PAP ZAF correction program. All experiments in our set are saturated with metal and silicate liquid, indicating that oxygen fugacity is below IW. Several of the runs also contain a gallium-rich spinel as an additional saturating phase. Quench phases are also present in the silicate liquid in all runs. The experimentally produced liquids have nbo/t values (calculated using the method of Mills, 1993) that range from 1.10 to 2.97. These values are higher than those calculated for the liquids in the Jaeger and Drake (2000) study. The higher nbo/t values are due to uptake of Fe by the melt. The initial silicate

  4. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  5. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped charges are discussed. Active experiments confirm that anomalous ionization processes may operate, but photoionization accounts for the production of the bulk of the barium ions. Pitch-angle diffusion and/or velocity-space diffusion may occur, but observations of barium ions moving upwards against gravity suggests that the ions retain a significant enough fraction of their initial perpendicular velocity to provide a mirror force. The barium ion plasmas should have a range of Alfven Mach numbers and plasma betas. Because the initial conditions can be predicted these active experiments should permit testing plasma instability hypotheses.

  6. The formation of cobalt-bearing ferromanganese crusts under fluid destruction of silicate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, S. O.; Safronov, P. P.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of fluid destruction of various silicate rocks under diffusion of flows of compressed gases (mainly carbonaceous) were studied. The gas condensate nature was ascertained for the forming alumoslilicate and ore (cobalt-iron-manganese hydroxide) substances produced under this fluid destruction in the forms of microcrusts and microconcretions. The ore condensates contained in high concentrations the typomorphic elements of oceanic ferromanganese formations (Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ce, and Pt). The elemental composition of the ore oxide substance formed under the destruction of various silicate matrices exhibits a definite degree of endemism with prevalence of the Co-Mn association. The pronounced concentration of barium is related to the substantially carbonaceous composition of the fluid systems. A cerium paradox is revealed: Ce3+ is oxidized into Ce4+ and absorbed by ferromanganese hydrogel and the minimum of cerium appears in rare-earth phosphates.

  7. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  8. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-24

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  9. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  10. Binding and leakage of barium in alginate microbeads.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Yrr A; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L

    2012-11-01

    Microbeads of alginate crosslinked with Ca(2+) and/or Ba(2+) are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared with high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. To reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation.

  11. Binding and Leakage of Barium in Alginate Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, Yrr A.; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M.; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbeads of alginate cross-linked with Ca2+ and/or Ba2+ are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared to high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. In order to reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation. PMID:22700168

  12. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  13. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  14. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula. PMID:15118720

  15. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  16. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  19. Barium appendicitis: A single institution review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Hideki; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review clinical experience with barium appendicitis at a single institution. METHODS A retrospective review of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 was performed. Age, gender, computed tomography (CT) scan findings if available, past history of barium studies, pathology, and the presence of perforation or the development of complications were reviewed. If the CT scan revealed high density material in the appendix, the maximum CT scan radiodensity of the material is measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Barium appendicitis is defined as: (1) patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis; (2) the patient has a history of a prior barium study; and (3) the CT scan shows high density material in the appendix. Patients who meet all three criteria are considered to have barium appendicitis. RESULTS In total, 396 patients were admitted with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the study period. Of these, 12 patients (3.0%) met the definition of barium appendicitis. Of these 12 patients, the median CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix was 10000.8 HU, ranging from 3066 to 23423 HU (± 6288.2). In contrast, the median CT scan radiodensity of fecaliths in the appendix, excluding patients with barium appendicitis, was 393.1 HU, ranging from 98 to 2151 HU (± 382.0). The CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendices of patients with barium appendicitis was significantly higher than in patients with nonbarium fecaliths (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Barium appendicitis is not rare in Japan. Measurement of the CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix may differentiate barium appendicitis from routine appendicitis. PMID:27721929

  20. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  1. Silicates in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocky, M. M.; Levenson, N. A.; Elitzur, M.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Armus, L.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Dust emission dominates the MIR spectra of ULIRGs, and the reprocessed radiation that emerges is independent of the underlying heating spectrum. Instead, the resulting emission depends sensitively on the geometric distribution of the dust, which we diagnose with comparisons of numerical simulations of radiative transfer. Quantifying the silicate emission and absorption features that appear near 10 and 18 μm requires a reliable determination of the continuum, and we demonstrate that including a measurement of the continuum at intermediate wavelength (between the features) produces accurate results at all optical depths. With high-quality spectra, we successfully use the silicate features to constrain the dust chemistry. The observations of the ULIRGs and local sight lines require dust that has a relatively high 18 μm/10 μm absorption ratio of the silicate features (around 0.5). Specifically, the cold dust of Ossenkopf et al. is consistent with the observations, while other dust models are not. We use the silicate feature strengths to identify two families of ULIRGs, in which the dust distributions are fundamentally different. Optical spectral classifications are related to these families. In ULIRGs that harbor an active galactic nucleus, the spectrally broad lines are detected only when the nuclear surroundings are clumpy. In contrast, the sources of lower ionization optical spectra are deeply embedded in smooth distributions of optically thick dust.

  2. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  3. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  6. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  11. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  12. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  13. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  16. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  17. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  18. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  1. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  2. Proton conductivity of potassium doped barium zirconates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoxiang; Tao Shanwen; Irvine, John T.S.

    2010-01-15

    Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10%. Introducing extra potassium leads to the formation of second phase or YSZ impurities. The water uptake of barium zirconates was increased even with 5% doping of potassium at the A-site. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. The maximum solubility for yttrium at B-sites is around 15 at% after introducing 1 wt% zinc. The conductivity of Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} at 600 deg. C is 2.2x10{sup -3} S/cm in wet 5% H{sub 2}. The activation energies for bulk and grain boundary are 0.29(2), 0.79(2) eV in wet 5% H{sub 2} and 0.31(1), 0.74(3) eV in dry 5% H{sub 2}. A power density of 7.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at 718 deg. C was observed when a 1 mm thick Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} pellet was used as electrolyte and platinum electrodes. - Graphical abstract: Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10 %. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. Five percent doping of potassium at A-site can double the total conductivity.

  3. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples

  4. Metallurgical Properties and Phase Transformations of Barium-Strontium Modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, M. A.; Sulimova, I. S.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Dmitrienko, V. I.; Horoshun, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallurgical properties and phase transformations of barium-strontium modifier were tested in laboratory conditions resembling steel processing in furnace and ladle. When heating barium-strontium modifier start of melting, kinetics of decomposition, phase and structure transformation were studied. The concentrate under consideration has been revealed to be a complex mineral compound containing barytocalcite, calcite, calciostrontianite, dolomite and siderite. The reaction kinetics of decomposing mineral components of barium-strontium modifier to oxides does not considerably affect slag formation in conditions of out-of-furnace steel processing.

  5. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  6. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  7. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  8. Calculated emission rates for barium releases in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The optical emissions from barium releases in space are caused by resonance and fluorescent scattering of sunlight. Emission rates for the dominant ion and neutral lines are calculated assuming the release to be optically thin and the barium to be in radiative equilibrium with the solar radiation. The solar spectrum has deep Fraunhofer absorption lines at the primary barium ion resonances. A velocity component toward or away from the sun will Doppler shift the emission lines relative to the absorption lines and the emission rates will increase many-fold over the rest value. The Doppler brightening is important in shaped charge or satellite releases where the barium is injected at high velocities. Emission rates as a function of velocity are calculated for the 4554, 4934, 5854, 6142 and 6497 A ion emission lines and the dominant neutral line at 5535 A. Results are presented for injection parallel to the ambient magnetic field, B, and for injection at an angle to B.

  9. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  10. Barium stalactites: observations on their nature and significance.

    PubMed

    Aronchick, J; Laufer, I; Glick, S

    1983-11-01

    Stalactites--droplets of barium hanging from protrusions on the nondependent mucosal surface of the stomach and seen on double contrast studies--are described. Their importance in the diagnosis of polypoid lesions is shown.

  11. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Scholz, Michael; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-06-01

    Context. The formation of dust in winds of cool and highly evolved stars and the rate of injection of dust into the interstellar medium is not yet completely understood, despite the importance of the process for the evolution of stars and galaxies. This holds in particular for oxygen-rich stars, where it is still not known which process is responsible for the formation of the necessary seed particles of their silicate dust. Aims: We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. Methods: We solve the dust nucleation and growth equations in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element for a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the outer layers of a Mira variable, which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations. It is assumed that seed particles form through the clustering of SiO. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on published experimental data. The quantity of dust formed is calculated via a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Results: Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures. Subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found that sufficient dust forms that radiation pressure exceeds the gravitational pull of the stars such that the mass element is finally driven out of the star. Conclusions: Nucleation of dust particles by clustering of the abundant SiO molecules could be the mechanism that triggers silicate dust formation in Miras.

  12. Synthesis, photoluminescence and magnetic properties of barium vanadate nanoflowers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Chenguo; Xi, Yi; Peng, Chen; Wan, Buyong; He, Xiaoshan

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate was obtained for the first time. The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. Research highlights: {yields} In the paper, the flower-shaped barium vanadate were obtained for the first time. The CHM method used here is new and simple for preparation of barium vanadate. {yields} The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. The strong bluish-green emission was observed. {yields} The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers was found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g. {yields} The mechanisms of PL and magnetic property of barium vanadate nanoflowers have been discussed. -- Abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate has been obtained by the composite hydroxide mediated (CHM) method from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and BaCl{sub 2} at 200 {sup o}C for 13 h. XRD and XPS spectrum of the as-synthesized sample indicate it is hexagonal Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} with small amount of Ba{sub 3}VO{sub 4.8} coexistence. Scan electron microscope and transmission electron microscope display that the flower-shaped crystals are composed of nanosheets with thickness of {approx}20 nm. The UV-visible spectrum shows that the barium vanadate sample has two optical gaps (3.85 eV and 3.12 eV). Photoluminescence spectrum of the barium vanadate flowers exhibits a visible light emission centered at 492 and 525 nm which might be attributed to VO{sub 4} tetrahedron with T{sub d} symmetry in Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers has been found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, which is mainly due to the presence of a non

  13. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  14. 'Skidding' of the CRRES G-9 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Mitchell, H. G.; Fedder, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation study and experimental data of the CRRES G-9 ionospheric barium release are presented. The simulation study is based on a 2D electrostatic code that incorporates time-dependent coupling to the background plasma. It is shown that the densest portion of the barium ion cloud 'skids' about 15 km within the first three seconds following the release, consistent with the optical data analyses.

  15. Fatal barium chloride poisoning: four cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Sunnassee; Shaohua, Zhu; Liang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Barium is an alkaline earth metal which has a variety of uses including in the manufacturing industry and in medicine. However, adverse health effects and fatalities occur due to absorption of soluble barium compounds, notably the chloride, nitrate, and hydroxide, which are toxic to humans. Although rare, accidental and suicidal modes of poisoning are sporadically reported in the literature.We describe 4 cases of poisoning due to barium chloride in China. In witnessed cases, severe gastrointestinal symptoms, hypokalemia leading to muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were noted. Autopsy showed some nonspecific but common findings, such as subendocardial hemorrhage in the ventricles, visceral petechiae, and fatty changes in the liver. Interestingly, microscopic examination showed degenerative changes and amorphous, flocculent foamy materials in the renal tubules. Toxicology was relevant for barium in blood and tissues. Three of the cases were accidental and 1 homicidal in nature. A round-up of relevant literature on fatal barium compounds poisoning is also provided. Forensic pathologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of barium compound poisoning and especially look for any evidence of hypokalemia. Still, postmortem toxicological and histological studies are essential for an accurate identification of the cause of death.

  16. Glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a barium borosilicate glass by a non-isothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Soares, Roque S.; Lima, Maria M. A.; Monteiro, Regina C. C.

    2014-01-28

    The glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a glass with a molar composition 60BaO-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-10SiO{sub 2} were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under non-isothermal conditions. DSC curves exhibited an endothermic peak associated with the glass transition and two partially overlapped exothermic peaks associated with the crystallization of the glass. The dependence of the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and of the maximum crystallization temperature (T{sub p}) on the heating rate was used to determine the activation energy associated with the glass transition (E{sub g}), the activation energy for crystallization (E{sub c}), and the Avrami exponent (n). X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that barium borate (β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was the first crystalline phase to be formed followed by the formation of barium silicate (Ba{sub 5}Si{sub 8}O{sub 21}). The variations of activation energy for crystallization and of Avrami exponent with the fraction of crystallization (χ) were also examined. When the crystallization fraction (χ) increased from 0.1 to 0.9, the value of local activation energy (E{sub c}(χ)) decreased from 554 to 458 kJ/mol for the first exothermic peak and from 1104 to 831 kJ/mol for the second exothermic peak. The value determined for the Avrami exponent was near 2 indicating a similar one-dimensional crystallization mechanism for both crystalline phases. This was confirmed by the morphological studies performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on glass samples heat-treated at the first and at the second crystallization temperatures.

  17. Anastomotic stenosis of the descending colon caused by barium granuloma formation following barium peritonitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Tomizawa, Kenji; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Toda, Shigeo; Matoba, Shuichiro; Kuroyanagi, Hiroya; Oota, Yasunori

    2014-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture reportedly often recurs following barium peritonitis, regardless of whether the anastomotic diameter is initially sufficient. However, the causes of repetitive stricture have not been clarified. We report a case that suggests the pathophysiology of recurrent anastomotic strictures following barium peritonitis. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese man with idiopathic perforation of the descending colon after undergoing an upper gastrointestinal barium contrast study. After emergency peritoneal lavage and diverting colostomy, created using the perforated region, the patient recovered uneventfully and 3 months later, the colostomy was closed and the perforated colon was resected. However, 7 months after colostomy closure, abdominal distention gradually developed, and colonoscopy revealed an anastomotic stricture. The patient was referred to our hospital where he underwent resection of the anastomotic stricture. The surgical specimen exhibited barium granulomas not only in the subserosa of the entire specimen, but also in the submucosa and lamina propria localized in the anastomotic site. These findings suggest that barium was embedded in the submucosa and lamina propria with manipulation of the stapled anastomosis and that the barium trapped in the anastomotic site caused persistent inflammation, resulting in an anastomotic stricture.

  18. Barium determination in gastric contents, blood and urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the case of oral barium chloride poisoning.

    PubMed

    Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Sommerfeld, Karina; Hanć, Anetta; Grzegorowski, Adam; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Gaca, Michał; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A serious case of barium intoxication from suicidal ingestion is reported. Oral barium chloride poisoning with hypokalemia, neuromuscular and cardiac toxicity, treated with intravenous potassium supplementation and hemodialysis, was confirmed by the determination of barium concentrations in gastric contents, blood, serum and urine using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method. Barium concentrations in the analyzed specimens were 20.45 µg/L in serum, 150 µg/L in blood, 10,500 µg/L in urine and 63,500 µg/L in gastric contents. Results were compared with barium levels obtained from a non-intoxicated person.

  19. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  20. Prospects for Barium Tagging in Gaseous Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.; Rollin, E.; Smith, J.; Mommers, A.; Ackerman, N.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P.S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cook, S.; Coppens, A.; Daniels, T.; DeVoe, R.; Dobi, A.; Dolinski, M.J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Giroux, G.; /Bern U., LHEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Indiana U. /Indiana U., CEEM /Korea U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Alabama U. /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Bern U., LHEP /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2012-05-03

    Tagging events with the coincident detection of a barium ion would greatly reduce the background for a neutrino-less double beta decay search in xenon. This paper describes progress towards realizing this goal. It outlines a source that can produce large quantities of Ba++ in gas, shows that this can be extracted to vacuum, and demonstrates a mechanism by which the Ba++ can be efficiently converted to Ba+ as required for laser identification. It is clear from this study that electrospray is a convenient mechanism for producing Ba++ is gas at atmospheric pressure. It is likely that the source will perform just as effectively at higher pressures. Even though the source region has water vapour and methanol vapour at the 0.3% level, there is no evidence for molecular formation. The use of TEA offers an effective method to achieve the charge state conversion. The overall design of the ion extraction from high pressure to vacuum is very similar to the scheme proposed for the final detector and this appears to work well although the efficiency is not yet determined.

  1. Coherent control of photoionization of atomic barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Rekishu

    We present the results of our study on coherent control of photoionization of atomic barium. Our study focused on the understanding of the controllability, especially due to the effect of the coherent interaction between the atomic system and the laser field. The first half of the study investigates the mechanisms of the control behind the previously observed laser phase-insensitive product state control. The controllability of this excitation scheme, two-color two-photon resonantly enhanced excitation, was analyzed from two aspects, the role of ac Stark shift introduced by the strong laser field and the multi-pathway quantum mechanical interferences. We have analyzed the excitation scheme from the analysis of the photoelectron angular distribution measured using the excitation scheme and the monitoring of the intermediate state population. Analysis of the data as well as the numerical simulation showed clear understanding of the role of two mechanisms in the product state control reported. We also investigated the control of the phase lag during the product state control. We conducted the control of the phase lag in the study of asymmetric photoelectron angular distribution, which arises from the concurrent even-odd parity outgoing electron wave excitation. The phase lag was controlled in full range, 2pi, and the results were analyzed in terms of the role of autoionizing resonance structures as well as the nature of outgoing electron waves at different locations of the autoionizing resonances.

  2. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  3. Models for silicate melt viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Russell, K.; Moretti, R.; Mangiacapra, A.; Potuzak, M.; Romano, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The prediction of viscosity in silicate liquids, over the range of temperatures and compositions encountered in nature, remains one of the most challenging and elusive goals in Earth Sciences. Recent work has demonstrated that there are now sufficient experimental measurements of melt viscosity to create new viscosity models to replace previous Arrhenian models [1],[2] and extend the compositional range of more recent non-Arrhenian models [3]. Most recently, [4] have developed an empirical strategy for accurately predicting viscosities over a very wide range of anhydrous silicate melt compositions (e.g., rhyolite to basanite). Future models that improve upon this work, will probably extend the composition range of the model to consider, at least, H2O and other volatile components and may utilize a compositional basis that reflects melt structure. In preparation for the next generation model, we explore the attributes of the three most common equations that could be used to model the non-Arrhenian viscosity of multicomponent silicate melts. The equations for the non-Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity (η ) include: a) Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT): log η = A + B/(T - C) b) Adam and Gibbs (AG): log η = A + B/[T log (T/C)], and c) Avramov (Av): log η = A + [B/T]α We use an experimental database of approximately 900 high-quality viscosity measurements on silicate melts to test the ability of each equation to capture the experimental data. These equations have different merits [5]. VFT is purely empirical in nature. The AG model has a quasi-theoretical basis that links macroscopic transport properties directly to thermodynamic properties via the configurational entropy. Lastly, the model proposed by Avramov adopts a form designed to relate the fit parameter (α ) to the fragility of the melt. [1] Shaw, H.R., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [2] Bottinga Y. and Weill, D., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [3] Hess, K.U. and Dingwell, D.B, 1996, Am Min, 81

  4. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  5. Tailoring polymer properties with layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang

    Polymer layered silicate nanocomposites have found widespread applications in areas such as plastics, oil and gas production, biomedical, automotive and information storage, but their successful commercialization critically depends on consistent control over issues such as complete dispersion of layered silicate into the host polymer and optimal interaction between the layered silicates and the polymers. Polypropylene is a commercially important polymer but usually forms intercalated structures with organically modified layered silicate upon mixing, even it is pre-treated with compatibilizing agent such as maleic anhydride. In this work, layered silicate is well dispersed in ammonium modified polypropylene but does not provide sufficient reinforcement to the host polymer due to poor interactions. On the other hand, interactions between maleic anhydride modified polypropylene and layered silicate are fine tuned by using a small amount of maleic anhydride and mechanical strength of the resultant nanocomposites are significantly enhanced. In particular, the melt rheological properties of layered silicate nanocomposites with maleic anhydride functionalized polypropylene are contrasted to those based on ammonium-terminated polypropylene. While the maleic anhydride treated polypropylene based nanocomposites exhibit solid-like linear dynamic behavior, consistent with the formation of a long-lived percolated nanoparticle network, the single-end ammonium functionalized polypropylene based nanocomposites demonstrated liquid-like behavior at comparable montmorillonite concentrations. The differences in the linear viscoelasticity are attributed to the presence of bridging interaction in maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites, which facilitates formation of a long-lived silicate network mediated by physisorbed polymer chains. Further, the transient shear stress of the maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites in start-up of steady shear is a function of the shear

  6. New insights into the early stages of silica-controlled barium carbonate crystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiblmeier, Josef; Schürmann, Ulrich; Kienle, Lorenz; Gebauer, Denis; Kunz, Werner; Kellermeier, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the dynamic interplay between silica and carbonate during co-precipitation can result in the self-assembly of unusual, highly complex crystal architectures with morphologies and textures resembling those typically displayed by biogenic minerals. These so-called biomorphs were shown to be composed of uniform elongated carbonate nanoparticles that are arranged according to a specific order over mesoscopic scales. In the present study, we have investigated the circumstances leading to the continuous formation and stabilisation of such well-defined nanometric building units in these inorganic systems. For this purpose, in situ potentiometric titration measurements were carried out in order to monitor and quantify the influence of silica on both the nucleation and early growth stages of barium carbonate crystallisation in alkaline media at constant pH. Complementarily, the nature and composition of particles occurring at different times in samples under various conditions were characterised ex situ by means of high-resolution electron microscopy and elemental analysis. The collected data clearly evidence that added silica affects carbonate crystallisation from the very beginning (i.e. already prior to, during, and shortly after nucleation), eventually arresting growth on the nanoscale by cementation of BaCO3 particles within a siliceous matrix. Our findings thus shed light on the fundamental processes driving bottom-up self-organisation in silica-carbonate materials and, for the first time, provide direct experimental proof that silicate species are responsible for the miniaturisation of carbonate crystals during growth of biomorphs, hence confirming previously discussed theoretical models for their formation mechanism.Recent work has demonstrated that the dynamic interplay between silica and carbonate during co-precipitation can result in the self-assembly of unusual, highly complex crystal architectures with morphologies and textures

  7. Mononuclear barium diketonate polyamine adducts. Synthesis, structures, and use in MOCVD of barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, R.A.; Gordon, D.C.; Stauf, G.T.; Vaartstra, B.A.; Ostrander, R.L.; Rheingold, A.L.

    1994-11-01

    Mononuclear barium {beta}-diketonate Lewis base adducts have been synthesized by reaction of Ba(thd){sub 2} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) with polyamines 1,1,4,7,7-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (pmdt) and 1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyltriethylenetetramine (hmtt). The adducts [Ba(thd){sub 2}(pmdt)] (I) and [Ba(thd){sub 2}(hmtt)] (II) have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound I crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.577(3) {angstrom}, b = 23.547(7) {angstrom}, c = 15.963(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.21(2){degrees}, and Z = 4. Compound II crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.833(6) {angstrom}, b = 20.442(12) {angstrom}, c = 19.404(9) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.35(4){degrees}, and Z = 4. The adducts are seven- and eight-coordinate, respectively, with all nitrogen atoms of the polyamine bound to a single barium center. Compound I has been used for thin-film growth of BaTiO{sub 3} which has revealed that, compared to Ba(thd){sub 2}(tetraglyme), the polyamine adduct allows a larger temperature window for effective vapor transport. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  9. Acceleration of barium ions near 8000 km above an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.; Foeppl, H.

    1984-01-01

    A barium shaped charge, named Limerick, was released from a rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, on March 30, 1982, at 1033 UT. The release took place in a small auroral breakup. The jet of ionized barium reached an altitude of 8100 km 14.5 min after release, indicating that there were no parallel electric fields below this altitude. At 8100 km the jet appeared to stop. Analysis shows that the barium at this altitude was effectively removed from the tip. It is concluded that the barium was actually accelerated upward, resulting in a large decrease in the line-of-sight density and hence the optical intensity. The parallel electric potential in the acceleration region must have been greater than 1 kV over an altitude interval of less than 200 km. The acceleration region, although presumably auroral in origin, did not seem to be related to individual auroral structures, but appeared to be a large-scale horizontal structure. The perpendicular electric field below, as deduced from the drift of the barium, was temporally and spatially very uniform and showed no variation related to individual auroral structures passing through.

  10. Nanopatterned barium titanate on block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tu

    This dissertation describes the synthesis, the characterization and the modeling of a triblock copolymer of polystyrene(PS)-polybutadiene(PB)-polystyrene(PS) monolayer thin film patterned with nanometer sized cubic BaTiO3 crystals, with a focus on the influence of length scales and the hierarchical structure on the ferroelectric properties of BaTiO3. BaTiO3, a dielectric and a ferroelectric, is used extensively in multilayer capacitors, thermistors and electrooptic devices. Its ferroelectric properties are known to be size dependent in the nanometer scale. To gain further insight into the fundamental characteristics of BaTiO3 in the nanometer scale, BaTiO3 is crystallized, for the first time, in a confined environment hosted by a PS-PB-PS triblock copolymer monolayer thin film with nanodomains of tunable geometry and size. The engineering of the PS-PB-PS triblock copolymer monolayer thin film includes fractionation, elimination of interfacial interaction, control of film thickness and minimization of pinholes. The resulting monolayer contains cylindrical PS nanodomains embedded in a PB matrix. The film thickness, the diameter of the PS domain and the domain center-to-domain center distance are 31 nm, 15 nm and 31 nm respectively. Cubic BaTiO3 nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution of 10 nm are formed and located predominantly within the PB matrices by three steps: epoxidation-hydroxylation, barium titanation and vapor-phase hydrothermal process. The volume fraction of BaTiO3 phase is 0.0113. The effective dielectric constant of the BaTiO3/PS-PB-PS composite monolayer is 5.5 +/- 2.5. With the assistance of dielectric mixing rules, the dielectric constant of the cubic BaTiO3 phase is determined to be 160. The relative low dielectric constant of the BaTiO3 phase is usually explained by the critical size above which BaTiO3 particles are tetragonal and ferroelectric and below which particles are cubic and non-ferroelectric. But, the inconsistency of the

  11. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  12. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  13. Selectivity in biomineralization of barium and strontium.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Minna R; Wasserman, Brian; Finney, Lydia; McNulty, Ian; Legnini, Daniel; Vogt, Stefan; Joester, Derk

    2011-11-01

    The desmid green alga Closterium moniliferum belongs to a small number of organisms that form barite (BaSO(4)) or celestite (SrSO(4)) biominerals. The ability to sequester Sr in the presence of an excess of Ca is of considerable interest for the remediation of (90)Sr from the environment and nuclear waste. While most cells dynamically regulate the concentration of the second messenger Ca(2+) in the cytosol and various organelles, transport proteins rarely discriminate strongly between Ca, Sr, and Ba. Herein, we investigate how these ions are trafficked in C. moniliferum and how precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) crystals occurs in the terminal vacuoles. Towards this goal, we simultaneously visualize intracellular dynamics of multiple elements using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of cryo-fixed/freeze-dried samples. We correlate the resulting elemental maps with ultrastructural information gleaned from freeze-fracture cryo-SEM of frozen-hydrated cells and use micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) to determine sulfur speciation. We find that the kinetics of Sr uptake and efflux depend on external Ca concentrations, and Sr, Ba, and Ca show similar intracellular localization. A highly ion-selective cross-membrane transport step is not evident. Based on elevated levels of sulfate detected in the terminal vacuoles, we propose a "sulfate trap" model, where the presence of dissolved barium leads to preferential precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) due to its low solubility relative to SrSO(4) and CaSO(4). Engineering the sulfate concentration in the vacuole may thus be the most direct way to increase the Sr sequestered per cell, an important consideration in using desmids for phytoremediation of (90)Sr.

  14. Barium Levels in Soils and Centella asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ghim Hock; Yap, Chee Kong; Mahmood, Maziah; Tan, Soon Guan; Hamzah, Suhaimi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Centella asiatica and surface soils were collected from 12 sampling sites in Peninsular Malaysia, and the barium (Ba) concentrations were determined. The Ba concentration [μg/g dry weight (dw)] was 63.72 to 382.01 μg/g in soils while in C. asiatica, Ba concentrations ranged from 5.05 to 21.88 μg/g for roots, 3.31 to 11.22 μg/g for leaves and 2.37 to 6.14 μg/g for stems. In C. asiatica, Ba accumulation was found to be the highest in roots followed by leaves and stems. The correlation coefficients (r) of Ba between plants and soils were found to be significantly positively correlated, with the highest correlation being between roots-soils (r=0.922, p<005), followed by leaves-soils (r=0.890, p<005) and stems-soils (r=0.848, p<005). This indicates that these three parts of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. For the transplantation study, four sites were selected as unpolluted [(Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)], semi-polluted (Seri Kembangan and Balakong) and polluted sites (Juru). Based on the transplantation study under experimental field and laboratory conditions, Ba concentrations in C. asiatica were significantly (p<0.05) higher after three weeks of exposure at Seri Kembangan, Balakong and Juru. Thus, these experimental findings confirm that the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica can reflect the Ba levels in the soils where this plant is found. Three weeks after back transplantation to clean soils, the Ba levels in C. asiatica were still higher than the initial Ba level even though Ba elimination occurred. In conclusion, the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. PMID:24575242

  15. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  16. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  17. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium...

  18. Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

    1967-01-01

    A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

  19. White dwarf kicks and implications for barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Church, R. P.; Dermine, T.

    The barium stars have caused much grief in the field of binary stellar evolution. They are often eccentric when they should be circular and are not found to have periods longer than 104 days even though wind accretion should still be efficient at such separations. We address both these problems by introducing a kick to white dwarfs when they are born, thus solving the eccentricity problem, and imposing strong orbital angular momentum loss to shrink barium-star binaries down to the observed periods. Whilst our angular momentum prescription is hard to justify for the barium stars it shows that strong angular momentum loss is necessary to reproduce the observed period-eccentricity distribution. We are investigating whether this can be obtained from a circumbinary disc.

  20. Prompt ionization in the CRIT II barium releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Liou, K.; Rau, D.

    1992-05-01

    Observations of electron and ion distributions inside a fast neutral barium jet in the ionosphere show significant fluxes within 4 km of release, presumably related to beam plasma instability processes involved in the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. Electron fluxes exceeding 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm-str-sec-keV were responsible for ionizing both the streaming barium and ambient oxygen. Resulting ion fluxes seem to be consistent with 1-2 percent ionization of the fast barium, as reported by optical observations, although the extended spatial distribution of the optically observed ions is difficult to reconcile with the in situ observations. When the perpendicular velocity of the neutrals falls below critical values, these processes shut off. Although these observations resemble the earlier Porcupine experimental results (Haerendel, 1982), theoretical understanding of the differences between these data and that of earlier negative experiments is still lacking.

  1. Multiphoton laser ionization for energy conversion in barium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Y.; Kokaj, J.; Afrousheh, K.; Mathew, J.; Nair, R.; Pichler, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the ion detection of barium atoms in special heated ovens with a tungsten rod in the middle of the stainless steel tube. The tungsten rod was heated indirectly by the oven body heaters. A bias voltage between the cell body and the tungsten rod of 9 V was used to collect electrons, after the barium ions had been created. However, we could collect the electrons even without the bias voltage, although with ten times less efficiency. We studied the conditions for the successful bias-less thermionic signal detection using excimer/dye laser two-photon excitation of Rydberg states below and above the first ionization limit (two-photon wavelength at 475.79 nm). We employed a hot-pipe oven and heat-pipe oven (with inserted mesh) in order to generate different barium vapor distributions inside the oven. The thermionic signal increased by a factor of two under heat-pipe oven conditions.

  2. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. PMID:22129008

  3. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF BARIUM ENEMA FINDINGS IN HIRSCHSPRUNG'S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    PEYVASTEH, Mehran; ASKARPOUR, Shahnam; OSTADIAN, Nasrollah; MOGHIMI, Mohammad-Reza; JAVAHERIZADEH, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Hirschsprung's disease is the most common cause of pediatric intestinal obstruction. Contrast enema is used for evaluation of the patients with its diagnosis. Aim: To evaluate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiologic findings for diagnosis of Hirschsprung in patients underwent barium enema. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Imam Khomeini Hospital for one year starting from 2012, April. Sixty patients were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: neonates with failure to pass meconium, abdominal distention, and refractory constipation who failed to respond with medical treatment. Transitional zone, delay in barium evacuation after 24 h, rectosigmoid index (maximum with of the rectum divided by maximum with of the sigmoid; abnormal if <1), and irregularity of mucosa (jejunization) were evaluated in barium enema. Biopsy was obtained at three locations apart above dentate line. PPV, NPV, specificity , and sensitivity was calculated for each finding. Results: Mean age of the cases with Hirschsprung's disease and without was 17.90±18.29 months and 17.8±18.34 months respectively (p=0.983). It was confirmed in 30 (M=20, F=10) of cases. Failure to pass meconium was found in 21(70%) cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 90%, 80%, 81.8% and 88.8% respectively for transitional zone in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 76.7%, 83.3%, 78.1% and 82.1% respectively for rectosigmoid index .Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 46.7%, 100%, 100% and 65.2% respectively for irregular contraction detected in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 23.3%, 100%, 100% and 56.6% respectively for mucosal irregularity in barium enema. Conclusion: The most sensitive finding was transitional zone. The most specific findings were irregular contraction, mucosal irregularity, and followed by cobblestone appearance. PMID:27759777

  4. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  5. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  6. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  7. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  13. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  14. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  15. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  16. Barium and antimony distributions on the hands of nonshooters.

    PubMed

    Havakost, D G; Peters, C A; Koons, R D

    1990-09-01

    Barium and antimony levels from selected areas of the left and right hands of 269 nonshooters provide a database for interpretation of gunshot residue swab analysis results. The database represents a variety of activities of individuals sampled by collectors throughout the United States. Nonshooting exposure to barium and antimony can generally be distinguished from firearms-associated exposure by considering the relative levels of the elements, location on the hands, and condition of the swabs. Consistent definition of sampling procedures and accurate analytical results make this database applicable for interpretation of data generated by most gunshot residue swab examiners. PMID:2230685

  17. Comparison of endoscopy and barium swallow with marshmallow in dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Thompson, G

    1986-06-01

    Forty-four patients with dysphagia were examined both by endoscopy and by barium swallow with a marshmallow bolus. In these patients 36 stenoses were found: 34 by radiology and 30 by endoscopy. The radiologic criteria for stenosis included arrest of the marshmallow in a manner to support a column of barium and reproduction of the patient's symptoms at the time this occurred. Radiologic false negative findings were partly due to an inability by patients to swallow an adequate marshmallow bolus; endoscopic failures were associated with small endoscopes and mild stenoses.

  18. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoelectric effect in structures consisting of metal deposited barium titanate film silicon is described. A radio frequency sputtering technique is used to deposit ferroelectric barium titantate films on silicon and quartz. Film properties are measured and correlated with the photoelectric effect characteristics of the films. It was found that to obtain good quality pin hole free films, it is necessary to reduce the substrate temperature during the last part of the deposition. The switching ability of the device with internal applied voltage is improved when applied with a ferroelectric memory device.

  19. Ferroelastic domains in lead-free barium zirconate titanate - barium calcium titanate piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Matthias Claudius

    Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions. Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of

  20. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  1. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.; Sargent, B. A.; Koch, I.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μm feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.

  2. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  3. PROPOSED ORAL REFERENCE DOSE (RFD) FOR BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is a database of EPA's consensus opinion of the human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. A Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary were prepared for barium and compounds in 1998 ...

  4. Dynamics of a barium release in the magnetospheric tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Haerendel, G.

    1989-01-01

    The late time behavior of the May 13, 1985 magnetotail barium cloud is examined. The bulk dynamics of the cloud are studied based on triangulated data and data from Fabry-Perot Doppler velocity measurements. The changes in cloud morphology in relation to the in situ measurements made by the Ion Release Module satellite are discussed.

  5. Effects of light exposure on irradiated barium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Mauger, G.J.

    1993-04-20

    Small barium fluoride crystals have been irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma rays under various illumination conditions to establish the effect of photo-bleaching of the radiation-induced color centers. This paper describes results of a few different experiments conducted at LLNL over the past few weeks.

  6. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported.

  7. Noncollinear Optical Frequency Doubling in Strontium Barium Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunyagi, Arthur R.; Ulex, Michael; Betzler, Klaus

    2003-06-01

    The observation of a novel noncollinear optical second-harmonic generation mechanism is reported. In strontium barium niobate crystals, a circular cone of second-harmonic light is generated when a fundamental beam of intensive laser light is directed along the crystallographic c axis. It can be shown that the effect is caused by the nonlinear polarization of antiparallel ordered ferroelectric microdomains.

  8. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  9. Silicate mineralogy of martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Burger, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts and basaltic cumulates from Mars (delivered to Earth as meteorites) carry a record of the history of that planet - from accretion to initial differentiation and subsequent volcanism, up to recent times. We provide new microprobe data for plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene from 19 of the martian meteorites that are representative of the six types of martian rocks. We also provide a comprehensive WDS map dataset for each sample studied, collected at a common magnification for easy comparison of composition and texture. The silicate data shows that plagioclase from each of the rock types shares similar trends in Ca-Na-K, and that K 2O/Na 2O wt% of plagioclase multiplied by the Al content of the bulk rock can be used to determine whether a rock is "enriched" or "depleted" in nature. Olivine data show that meteorite Y 980459 is a primitive melt from the martian mantle as its olivine crystals are in equilibrium with its bulk rock composition; all other olivine-bearing Shergottites have been affected by fractional crystallization. Pyroxene quadrilateral compositions can be used to isolate the type of melt from which the grains crystallized, and minor element concentrations in pyroxene can lend insight into parent melt compositions. In a comparative planetary mineralogy context, plagioclase from Mars is richer in Na than terrestrial and lunar plagioclase. The two most important factors contributing to this are the low activity of Al in martian melts and the resulting delayed nucleation of plagioclase in the crystallizing rock. Olivine from martian rocks shows distinct trends in Ni-Co and Cr systematics compared with olivine from Earth and Moon. The trends are due to several factors including oxygen fugacity, melt compositions and melt structures, properties which show variability among the planets. Finally, Fe-Mn ratios in both olivine and pyroxene can be used as a fingerprint of planetary parentage, where minerals show distinct planetary trends that may have been

  10. Ultra-low temperature processing of barium tellurate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Do-Kyun

    Ceramics, metals and polymers have unique electrical properties that are combined for electronic devices and systems. It necessitates lower processing temperatures for ceramics to be compatible with metal and polymer systems. In this thesis, the synthesis, crystal structure, and dielectric properties of barium tellurate are studied for temperatures between 500 and 900°C. Barium tellurate dielectric ceramics (BaTe4O9, BaTe 2O5, BaTe2O6, BaTeO3, BaTeO 4, and Ba2TeO5) are extensively investigated as new LTCC (Low-Temperature Cofired Ceramics) dielectric systems integrated with low resistivity metal electrodes such as silver and aluminum for microwave application. Studies on the phase formation and crystal structure through thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analysis, DSC-TGA) and X-ray diffraction phase analysis attest that barium tellurates are formed in the temperature range of 500 ˜ 900°C, through the sequential phase formations from Te-rich to Ba-rich phases. The oxygen coordination of the tellurium ion progresses from TeO4 to TeO6 via TeO 3+1 and TeO3 with increasing barium content as confirmed by structural analysis using infrared spectroscopy. High density barium tellurate ceramics are achieved at temperatures as low as 550°C, which provides the potential to be co-fired with low-melting aluminum metal electrodes in LTCC processing. Dielectric permittivity, loss, and temperature stability of barium tellurate dielectric ceramics were measured from 100 Hz to 13 GHz. Barium tellurate ceramics exhibit excellent microwave dielectric properties with intermediate dielectric permittivities and high quality factors (Q). The dielectric properties at microwave frequencies are epsilonr = 17.5, Qxf = 54700 GHz, TCf = -90 ppm/°C for BaTe4O9, epsilonr = 21, Qxf = 50300 GHz, TCf = -51 ppm/°C for BaTe2O6, epsilonr = 10, Qxf = 34000 GHz, TCf = -54 ppm/°C for BaTeO3, and epsilonr = 17, Qx f = 49600 GHz, TCf = -124 ppm/°C for Ba 2TeO5

  11. Preliminary study of the CRRES magnetospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary theoretical and computational analyses of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) magnetospheric barium releases are presented. The focus of the studies is on the evolution of the diamagnetic cavity which is formed by the barium ions as they expand outward, and on the structuring of the density and magnetic field during the expansion phase of the releases. Two sets of simulation studies are discussed. The first set is based upon a 2D ideal MHD code and provides estimates of the time and length scales associated with the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity. The second set uses a nonideal MHD code; specifically, the Hall term is included. This additional term is critical to the dynamics of sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, such as the CRRES barium releases, because it leads to instability of the expanding plasma. Detailed simulations of the G4 and G10 releases were performed. In both cases the expanding plasma rapidly structured: the G4 release structured at time t less than about 3 s and developed scale sizes of about 1-2 km, while the G10 release structured at time t less than about 22 s and developed scale sizes of about 10-15 km. It is also found that the diamagnetic cavity size is reduced from those obtained from the ideal MHD results because of the structure. On the other hand, the structuring allows the formation of plasma blobs which appear to free stream across the magnetic field; thus, the barium plasma can propagate to larger distances traverse to the magnetic field than the case where no structuring occurs. Finally, a new normal mode of the system was discovered which may be excited at the leading edge of the expanding barium plasma.

  12. Redox Processes in Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicconi, M. R.; de Ligny, D.

    2015-12-01

    Studies into the redox state of magmas provide important constrains on the formation and evolution of planetary bodies Indeed, oxygen fugacity is a key parameter in controlling the physical and chemical properties of melts and therefore it determine the possible interactions between reservoirs within the mantle and between the mantle and surface. It follows that redox mechanisms play a key role in determining the dynamics of the (inner and outer) terrestrial planets. The redox conditions that have accompanied basalt evolution on planetary bodies are known to be different, albeit with some similarities. The strongly reducing environments of the moon and meteorites have led to significant reduced mineralogical assemblages, whereas analogous terrestrial materials predominantly contain the corresponding oxidized compounds. Important geochemical elements such as Fe, Cr, V, Ce and Eu, exist in magmatic systems with different valences and coordination geometries, and the key subjects which need to be understood are: factors influencing redox mechanisms, and the effect on mineral assemblage, element partitioning, mass transfers processes and rheology of the melts. Examples on the study of Ce, Eu and Fe in silicate glasses/melts and on the parameters influencing their oxidation states will be provided.

  13. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies.

  14. Magnesium silicates adsorbents of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielczyk, Filip; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2007-08-01

    Studies were presented on production of highly dispersed magnesium silicate at a pilote scale. The process of silicate adsorbent production involved precipitation reaction using water glass (sodium metasilicate) solution and appropriate magnesium salt, preceded by an appropriate optimization stage. Samples of best physicochemical parameters were in addition modified (in order to introduce to silica surface of several functional groups) using the dry technique and various amounts of 3-isocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-thiocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, N-phenyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The so prepared samples were subjected to a comprehensive physicochemical analysis. At the terminal stage of studies attempts were made to adsorb phenol from its aqueous solutions on the surface of unmodified and modified magnesium silicates. Particle size distributions were determined using the ZetaSizer Nano ZS apparatus. In order to define adsorptive properties of studied magnesium silicates isotherms of nitrogen adsorption/desorption on their surfaces were established. Efficiency of phenol adsorption was tested employing analysis of post-adsorption solution.

  15. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  16. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  17. Fracture of Silicate Glasses: Ductile or Brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Jean-Pierre; Wiederhorn, Sheldon M.

    2004-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is used to investigate the possibility of cavity formation during crack growth in silicate glasses. Matching areas on both fracture surfaces were mapped and then compared. For silica glass, and soda-lime-silicate glass, the fracture surfaces matched to a resolution of better than 0.3 nm normal to the surface and 5 nm parallel to the surface. We could find no evidence for cavity formation in our study and suggest that completely brittle fracture occurs in glass.

  18. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  19. Design, testing, fabrication and launch support of a liquid chemical barium release payload (utilizing the liquid fluorine-barium salt/hydrazine system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A payload was designed which included a cryogenic oxidizer tank, a fuel tank, and burner section. Release of 30 lb of chemicals was planned to occur in 2 seconds at the optimum oxidizer to fuel ratio. The chemicals consisted of 17 lb of liquid fluorine oxidizer and 13 lb of hydrazine-barium salt fuel mixture. The fuel mixture was 17% barium chloride, 16% barium nitrate, and 67% hydrazine, and contained 2.6 lb of available barium. Two significant problem areas were resolved during the program: explosive valve development and burner operation. The release payload was flight tested, from Wallops Island, Virginia. The release took place at an altitude of approximately 260 km. The release produced a luminous cloud which expanded very rapidly, disappearing to the human eye in about 20 seconds. Barium ion concentration slowly increased over a wide area of sky until measurements were discontinued at sunrise (about 30 minutes).

  20. Surface studies of barium and barium oxide on tungsten and its application to understanding the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface studies have been made of multilayer and monolayer films of barium and barium oxide on a tungsten substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to synthesize the surface conditions that exist on an activated impregnated tungsten cathode and obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of operation of such cathodes. The techniques employed in these measurements were Auger spectroscopy and work-function measurements. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on oxidized tungsten by evaluating Auger spectra and work-function measurements. Data obtained from desorption studies of barium monolayers on a tungsten substrate in conjunction with Auger and work-function results have been interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impreganated cathode has a partial monolayer, rather than a monolayer, of barium on its surface.

  1. Observations and theory of the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Pongratz, M. B.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1987-01-01

    The barium releases in the magnetotail during the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) operation were monitored by ground-based imagers and by instruments on the Ion Release Module. After each release, the data show the formation of a structured diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grows until the dynamic pressure of the expanding ions balances the magnetic pressure on its surface. The magnetic field inside the cavity is zero. The barium ions collect on the surface of the cavity, producing a shell. Plasma irregularities form along magnetic field lines draped over the surface of the cavity. The scale size of the irregularities is nearly equal to the thickness of the shell. The evolution and structuring of the diamagnetic cavity are modeled using magnetohydrodynamics theory.

  2. Relationship of pheasant occurrence to barium in Illinois soils.

    PubMed

    Jones, R L

    1992-04-01

    Distribution of the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is nearly co-extensive with the boundary of Wisconsinan glaciation; this is an area of base-rich soils that are mostly developed in calcareous tills. Anderson and Stewart (1973) speculated that barium in the diet might be a factor limiting the pheasant establishment in habitats adjacent to areas of long-term sustaining populations in Illinois. Total Ba was calculated for soils of 74 conterminous counties for which there were pheasant population data. Barium over the range of about 480 to 700 mg kg(-1) soil was unrelated to pheasant occurrence or to population indeces. The selective eating of iron-manganese concretions that are enriched in Ba might present a unique pathway for Ba loading.

  3. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  4. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziana Genchi, Giada; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these ‘smart’ nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  5. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric films of barium titanate were synthesized on silicon and quartz substrates, and the photoelectric effect in the structure consisting of metal deposited ferroelectric barium titanate film silicon was studied. A photovoltage with polarity that depends on the direction of the remanent polarization was observed. The deposition of BaTiO3 on silicon and fused quartz substrates was accomplished by an rf sputtering technique. A series of experiments to study the growth of ferroelectric BaTiO3 films on single crystal silicon and fused quartz substrates were conducted. The ferroelectric character in these films was found on the basis of evidence from the polarization electric field hysteresis loops, capacitance voltage and capacitance temperature techniques and from X-ray diffraction studies.

  6. NASA/Max Planck Institute Barium Ion Cloud Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brence, W. A.; Carr, R. E.; Gerlach, J. C.; Neuss, H.

    1973-01-01

    NASA and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Munich, Germany, conducted a cooperative experiment involving the release and study of a barium cloud at 31,500 km altitude near the equatorial plane. The release was made near local magnetic midnight on Sept. 21, 1971. The MPE-built spacecraft contained a canister of 16 kg of Ba CuO mixture, a two-axis magnetometer, and other payload instrumentation. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate the interaction of the ionized barium cloud with the ambient medium and to deduce the properties of electric fields in the proximity of the release. An overview of the project is given to briefly summarize the organization, responsibilities, objectives, instrumentation, and operational aspects of the project.

  7. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation. PMID:27145888

  8. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  9. Numerical simulation of a radially injected barium cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.; Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of a radially symmetric barium injection experiment demonstrate that ions created by solar UV irradiation are electrostatically bound to the electrons which remain tied to the field lines on which they are created. Two possible instabilities are identified, but neither of them causes the barium plasma cloud to polarize in a way that would permit the plasma to keep up with the neutrals. In a second model, the velocity of the neutrals is allowed to be a function of the azimuthal angle. Here, a portion of the cloud does polarize in a way that allows a portion of the plasma to detach and move outward at the approximate speed of the neutrals. No rapid detachment is found when only the density of the neutrals is given an azimuthal asymmetry.

  10. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA).

  11. Synthesis and characterization of barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-González, M.A.; Mendoza-Suárez, G.; Padmasree, K.P.

    2013-10-15

    In this work, we prepared barium ferrite-silica (BaM-SiO{sub 2}) nanocomposites of different molar ratios by high-energy ball milling, followed by heat-treatment at different temperatures. The microstructure, morphology and magnetic properties were characterized for different synthesis conditions by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results indicate that 15 h of milling was enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase and to get a good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix. For milling periods beyond 15 h and heat treatment above 900 °C, the XRD patterns showed the presence of hematite phase caused by the decomposition of BaM. The agglomerate size observed through SEM analysis was around 150 nm with a good BaM dispersion into the SiO{sub 2} matrix. The highest saturation magnetization (Ms) value obtained was 43 emu/g and the corresponding coercivity (Hc) value of 3.4 kOe for the composition 60BaM-40SiO{sub 2} milled for 15 h and heat treated at 900 °C. This coercivity value is acceptable for the application in magnetic recording media. Highlights: • Barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites were prepared by high energy ball milling. • Optimal processing time is 15 h milling and heat treatment at 900 °C. • This is enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase. • Obtain good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix • Above this processing time shows the presence of increased amount of hematite.

  12. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  13. Barium thiolates and selenolates: syntheses and structural principles.

    PubMed

    Ruhlandt-Senge, K; Englich, U

    2000-11-17

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a family of barium thiolates and selenolates is described. The thiolates were synthesized by metallation of thiols, the selenolates by reductive insertion of the metal into the selenium-selenium bond of diorganodiselenides. Both reaction sequences were carried out by using barium metal dissolved in ammonia; this afforded barium thiolates and selenolates in good yield and purity. The structural principles displayed in the target compounds span a wide range of solid-state formulations, including monomeric and dimeric species, and separated ion triples, namely [Ba(thf)4(SMes*)2] (1; Mes* = 2,4,6-tBU3C6H2), [Ba(thf)4(SeMes*)2] (2), [Ba([18]crown-6)(hmpa)2][(SeMes*)2] (3), the dimeric [(Ba(py)3(thf)(SeTrip)2)2] (4; py = pyridine, Trip = 2,4.6-iPr3C6H2), and [Ba([18]crown-6)(SeTrip)2] (5). The full range of association modes is completed by [Ba([18]crown-6)(hmpa)SMes*][SMes*] (6) communicated earlier by this group. In the solid state, this compound displays an intermediate ion coordination mode: one anion is bound to the metal, while the second one is unassociated. Together these compounds provide structural information about all three different association modes for alkaline earth metal derivatives. This collection of structural data allows important conclusions about the influence of solvation and ligation on structural trends.

  14. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  15. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  16. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  17. BARIUM SULPHATE ABSORPTION AND THE SERUM DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-02-01

    The so-called syphilitic antibodies can be removed from a serum by means of absorption with barium sulphate. The removal is due either to an adsorption or a mechanical absorption. The activity of the syphilitic antibodies is thereby unimpaired. The readiness with which the absorption is accomplished with barium sulphate varies considerably with different syphilitic sera. That barium sulphate exerts the same absorbing effect upon non-syphilitic serum components is made evident by the interfering property which the latter manifest in the absorption experiment of the syphilitic antibodies. The selective removal of the serum components, other than the syphilitic antibodies, by means of barium sulphate absorption is, therefore, impossible. On the other hand, a partial removal of these components, with but little removal of the syphilitic antibodies, may be effected when the content of a given serum is poor in syphilitic antibodies and comparatively rich in the indifferent serum components. But this is impossible if the conditions are reversed. The main reasons why some negative syphilitic sera may be so modified by the barium sulphate treatment as to give positive reactions, are explained below, but these apply only to those methods in which inactivated serum is employed. The inactivation reduces the antibody content to about one-fourth to one-fifth of the original. When the serum is very rich in antibodies, this does not affect the result of the fixation test. But when the amount of the antibodies is small, the process of inactivation creates conditions quite unexpected. It may produce such a condition that a given amount of the serum contains, after inactivation, only one or two antibody units, while the other serum components remain undiminished. Here one must not lose sight of the vital fact that these apparently indifferent serum constituents are not at all indifferent in the fixation processes. They may possess affinities which are similar to those of complement

  18. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  19. Statistics of silicate units in binary glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddam, Anuraag; Montagne, Lionel; Ferreira, José M. F.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new model to determine the distribution of silicate units in binary glasses (or liquids). The model is based on statistical mechanics and assumes grand canonical ensemble of silicate units which exchange energy and network modifiers from the reservoir. This model complements experimental techniques, which measure short range order in glasses such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The model has potential in calculating the amounts of liquid-liquid phase segregation and crystal nucleation, and it can be easily extended to more complicated compositions. The structural relaxation of the glass as probed by NMR spectroscopy is also reported, where the model could find its usefulness.

  20. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. A review of the health impacts of barium from natural and anthropogenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Darrah, Thomas H; Miller, Richard K; Lyerly, H Kim; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing public awareness of the relatively new and expanded industrial barium uses which are potential sources of human exposure (e.g., a shale gas development that causes an increased awareness of environmental exposures to barium). However, absorption of barium in exposed humans and a full spectrum of its health effects, especially among chronically exposed to moderate and low doses of barium populations, remain unclear. We suggest a systematic literature review (from 1875 to 2014) on environmental distribution of barium, its bioaccumulation, and potential and proven health impacts (in animal models and humans) to provide the information that can be used for optimization of future experimental and epidemiological studies and developing of mitigative and preventive strategies to minimize negative health effects in exposed populations. The potential health effects of barium exposure are largely based on animal studies, while epidemiological data for humans, specifically for chronic low-level exposures, are sparse. The reported health effects include cardiovascular and kidney diseases, metabolic, neurological, and mental disorders. Age, race, dietary patterns, behavioral risks (e.g., smoking), use of medications (those that interfere with absorbed barium in human organism), and specific physiological status (e.g., pregnancy) can modify barium effects on human health. Identifying, evaluating, and predicting the health effects of chronic low-level and moderate-level barium exposures in humans is challenging: Future research is needed to develop an understanding of barium bioaccumulation in order to mitigate its potential health impacts in various exposured populations. Further, while occupationally exposed at-risk populations exist, it is also important to identify potentially vulnerable subgroups among non-occupationally exposed populations (e.g., elderly, pregnant women, children) who are at higher risk of barium exposure from drinking water and food.

  2. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  3. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  4. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  5. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  6. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  7. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  8. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  9. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  10. Thermoset polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    Nanocomposites are formed when phase mixing occurs on a nanometer length scale. Due to the improved phase morphology and interfacial properties, nanocomposites exhibit mechanical properties superior to conventional composites. Toyota researchers first demonstrated that organoclay could be exfoliated in a nylon-6 matrix to greatly improve the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymer, which has resulted in a practical application in the automobile industry. A great deal of research has been conducted on organic-inorganic hybrid composites in which smectite clays are used as reinforcement agents. However, little work has been devoted to derivatives of other layered inorganic solids. In the present work, the first examples of organic polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites have been prepared by formation of a cured epoxy polymer network in the presence of organo cation exchange forms of magadiite. The exfoliation of silicate nanolayers in the epoxy matrix was achieved by in-situ intragallery polymerization during the thermosetting process. In general, the tensile properties, solvent resistance, barrier properties and chemical stability of the polymer matrix are greatly improved by the embedded silicate nanolayers when the matrix is flexible (sub-ambient Tg). The improvement of properties are dependent on the silicate loading, the degree of nanolayer separation and interfacial properties. Interestingly, the exfoliation also affects the polymer elasticity in a favorable way. The mechanism leading to nanocomposite formation is proposed. One exfoliated epoxy-magadiite nanocomposite/composition possessed unique transparent optical properties. The exfoliation chemistry was successfully extended to the other members of the layered silicic acid family. A new approach also was developed to prepare thermoset epoxy polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites in which curing agents can be directly intercalated into the intragallery without the need for alkylammonium ions

  11. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  14. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  15. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  17. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  18. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  20. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  1. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  2. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  3. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  4. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  9. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  10. Ferroelectric phase transition of individual barium titanate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, Jonathan E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Yun, Wan Soo; Park, Hongkun

    2003-03-01

    Ferroelectric phase transition temperatures (T_c) of individual, single-crystalline barium titanate (BaTiO_3) nanowires are measured as a function of nanowire diameter, and the results are analyzed using a theoretical model based on the Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory. The measurements show that Tc is depressed as the nanowire diameter gets smaller, approaching room temperature when the diameter reaches 3 nm. The theoretical analysis reproduces the scaling relation between the Tc depression and nanowire diameter and provides information about the stability difference between the surface and bulk polarization. This work is supported by NSF.

  11. The barium ion jet experiments of the Porcupine project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    1980-06-01

    The injection of a barium plasma from a sounding rocket by the shaped charge technique offers several possibilities that cannot be achieved by conventional releases. This is due to high initial velocities of the atoms of up to 14 km/sec. Most of the the applications are related to the great heights that the ions can reach, but some depend directly on the initial momentum. Typical applications are: tracing at high altitudes, modifications, and alternate Ionization processes. Project Porcupine contributions in this field are summarized.

  12. Nanodielectric system for cryogenic applications: Barium titanate filled polyvinyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Duckworth, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    In the current study the focus is on dielectric properties (as a function of frequency and temperature) of a polymeric composite system composed of polyvinyl alcohol and barium titanate nano powder. In the investigations, the temperature range is between 50-295 K, and the frequency range is between $20\\ \\hertz-1\\ \\mega\\hertz$. Polarization and conduction processes are investigated in the linear regime. Dielectric breakdown strengths of samples are also reported. The materials presented have potential to be implemented in cryogenic capacitor or field grading applications.

  13. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  14. CNO and F abundances in the barium star HD 123396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Yong, D.; Meléndez, J.; Vásquez, S.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Barium stars are moderately rare, chemically peculiar objects, which are believed to be the result of the pollution of an otherwise normal star by material from an evolved companion on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Aims: We aim to derive carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine abundances for the first time from the infrared spectra of the barium red giant star HD 123396 to quantitatively test AGB nucleosynthesis models for producing barium stars via mass accretion. Methods: High-resolution and high S/N infrared spectra were obtained using the Phoenix spectrograph mounted at the Gemini South telescope. The abundances were obtained through spectrum synthesis of individual atomic and molecular lines, using the MOOG stellar line analysis program, together with Kurucz's stellar atmosphere models. The analysis was classical, using 1D stellar models and spectral synthesis under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We confirm that HD 123396 is a metal-deficient barium star ([Fe/H] = -1.05), with A(C) = 7.88, A(N) = 6.65, A(O) = 7.93, and A(Na) = 5.28 on a logarithmic scale where A(H) = 12, leading to [(C+N)/Fe] ≈ 0.5. The A(CNO) group, as well as the A(Na) abundances, is in excellent agreement with those previously derived for this star using high-resolution optical data. We also found A(F) = 4.16, which implies [F/O] = 0.39, a value that is substantially higher than the F abundances measured in globular clusters of a similar metallicity, noting that there are no F measurements in field stars of comparable metallicity. Conclusions: The observed abundance pattern of the light elements (CNO, F, and Na) recovered here as well as the heavy elements (s-process) studied elsewhere suggest that the surface composition of HD 123396 is well fitted by the predicted abundance pattern of a 1.5 M⊙ AGB model star with Z = 0.001. Thus, the AGB mass transfer hypothesis offers a quantitatively viable framework.

  15. Growth of strontium barium niobate: the liquidus solidus phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulex, Michael; Pankrath, Rainer; Betzler, Klaus

    2004-10-01

    The liquidus-solidus phase diagram of strontium barium niobate, Sr xBa 1Nb 2O 6, is determined over the whole existence region of the tetragonal phase. For this purpose, single crystals of various compositions within this range were grown. The compositions of the melts and the grown crystals as well as the corresponding liquidus temperatures were accurately determined. The tetragonal phase was found to exist from a lower limit with the crystal composition x=0.26 to an upper limit of x=0.87. The respective liquidus temperatures vary between 1452 and 1492C.

  16. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Methods Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, non-taster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40% w/v barium: non-carbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter) and sucrose (sweet). Mixed model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Results Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than non-tasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Conclusions Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  17. 75 FR 36629 - Barium Chloride From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Five-year (``Sunset'') Review, 74 FR 31412 (July 1, 2009). As a result of its review, the Department... Barium Chloride From China, 75 FR 33824 (June 15, 2010), and Barium Chloride from China (Inv. No. 731-TA... Commerce. DATES: Effective Date: June 28, 2010. SUMMARY: As a result of the determinations by...

  18. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability.

    PubMed

    Dietsch, Angela M; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2014-02-01

    Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, nontaster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40 % w/v barium: noncarbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter), and sucrose (sweet). Mixed-model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than nontasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  19. Evidence against barium in the mushroom Trogia venenata as a cause of sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanchun; Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Yoell, Shanze; Yu, Zefen; Zhang, Keqin; Xu, Jianping

    2012-12-01

    This study examined barium concentrations in the mushroom Trogia venenata, the leading culprit for sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, southwest China. We found that barium concentrations in T. venenata from Yunnan were low and comparable to other foods, inconsistent with barium concentrations in this mushroom as a significant contributor to these deaths.

  20. Occultation of the ATS-3 satellite by the AVEFRIA barium ion cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Simons, D.J.; Pongratz, M.B.; Clynch, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    During the AVEFRIA DOS barium release experiment, sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Defense Nuclear Agency in May 1978, the line of sight from one of the ground observation stations to the ATS-3 satellite was occulted by the barium ion cloud for a period of approximately five minutes. Optical measurements of the structured barium ion cloud were made with intensified cameras using the 455.4-nm wavelength fluorescent ion line. These measurements have been related to barium ion column density. During the occultation, the amplitude scintillations of the 136.47-MHz signal from the ATS-3 satellite were monitored. The optical measurements have been used to correlate the barium column density with the total electron content measurements and to calculate the scintillation index, S/sub 4/, and the two dimensional intensity pattern for comparison with the measured amplitude scintillations.

  1. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2014-01-01

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm the continuous high aspect ratio structure of barium titanate nanofibers after heat treatment. It is demonstrated that the CJS technique offers a highly efficient method for large-scale fabrication of ceramic nanofibers at production rates of up to 0.3 gram/minute. PMID:24563566

  2. Setting process of lime-based conservation mortars with barium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karatasios, Ioannis . E-mail: ikarat@ims.demokritos.gr; Kilikoglou, Vassilis; Colston, Belinda; Theoulakis, Panagiotis; Watt, David

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents the effect of barium hydroxide on the setting mechanism of lime-based conservation mortars, when used as an additive material. The study focuses on the monitoring of the setting process and the identification of the mineral phases formed, which are essential for furthering the study of the durability of barium mixtures against chemical degradation. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG) were used to monitor the setting processes of these mixtures and identify new phases formed. The results suggest that barium hydroxide is evenly distributed within the lime and produces a homogeneous binding material, consisting of calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), witherite (BaCO{sub 3}) and barium-calcium carbonate [BaCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}]. Finally, it was found that barium carbonate can be directly bonded to calcitic aggregates and therefore increases its chemical compatibility with the binding material.

  3. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  4. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  5. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  6. Dissolution of Barium from Barite in Sewage Sludges and Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F.; Pepi, M.; Burrini, D.; Kniewald, G.; Scali, D.; Lanciotti, E.

    1996-01-01

    High concentrations of total barium, ranging from 0.42 to 1.58 mg(middot)g(sup-1) (dry weight) were found in sludges of two sewage treatment plants near Florence, Italy. Barium concentrations in the suspended matter decreased as redox potential values changed from negative to positive. An anoxic sewage sludge sample was aerated, and 30% of the total barium was removed in 24 h. To demonstrate that barium was solubilized from barite by sulfate-reducing bacteria, a strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to study the solubilization of barium from barite under laboratory conditions. During cell growth with different concentrations of barite from 0.01 to 0.3 g(middot)liter(sup-1) (the latter is the MIC) as the only source of sulfates in the cultures, the D. desulfuricans strain accumulated barium up to 0.58 (mu)g(middot)mg(sup-1) (dry weight). Three times the quantity of barium was dissolved by bacteria than in the uninoculated medium (control). The unexpectedly low concentration of soluble barium (1.2 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)) with respect to the quantity expected (109 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)), calculated on the basis of the free H(inf2)S evolved from the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate from barite, was probably due to the formation of other barium compounds, such as witherite (BaCO(inf3)) and the transient species barium sulfide (BaS). The D. desulfuricans strain, growing on barite, formed visible aggregates. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that aggregates consisted of bacteria and barite. After 3 days of incubation, several autofluorescent crystals surrounded by a dissolution halo were observed. The crystals were identified as BaS by comparison with the commercial compound. PMID:16535353

  7. Growth of nanofibrous barium carbonate on calcium carbonate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeijer, Sara J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Barrett, Richard A.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2008-05-01

    Fibrous barium carbonate (BaCO 3/witherite) crystals 50-100 nm in diameter and several microns in length were grown on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) seeds at temperatures as low as 4 °C. The BaCO 3 fibers were deposited onto calcite rhombs or CaCO 3 films using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which was induced with the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (PAA). The structure and morphology of the resultant fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Fibers were successfully grown on calcite seeds of various morphologies, with a range of barium concentrations, and PAA molecular weight and concentration. Two categories of fibers were grown: straight and twisted. Both types of fibers displayed single-crystalline SAED diffraction patterns, but after examining high-resolution TEM lattice images, it was revealed that the fibers were in fact made up of nanocrystalline domains. We postulate that these nanocrystalline domains are well aligned due to a singular nucleation event (i.e., each fiber propagates from a single nucleation event on the seed crystal) with the nanocrystalline domains resulting from stresses caused by dehydration during crystallization of the highly hydrated precursor phase. These BaCO 3 fibers grown on calcite substrates further illustrate the robustness and non-specificity of the PILP process.

  8. Plasma waves associated with the first AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Luehr, H.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma waves observed during the March 21, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release are described. Electron plasma oscillations provided local measurements of the plasma density during both the expansion and decay phases. Immediately after the explosion, the electron density reached a peak of about 400,000/cu cm, and then started decreasing approximately as t to the -2.4 as the cloud expanded. About 6 minutes after the explosion, the electron density suddenly began to increase, reached a secondary peak of about 240/cu cm, and then slowly decayed down to the preevent level over a period of about 15 minutes. The density increase is believed to be caused by the collapse of the ion cloud into the diamagnetic cavity created by the initial expansion. The plasma wave intensities observed during the entire event were quite low. In the diamagnetic cavity, electrostatic emissions were observed near the barium ion plasma frequency, and in another band at lower frequencies. A broadband burst of electrostatic noise was also observed at the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. Except for electron plasma oscillations, no significant wave activity was observed outside of the diamagnetic cavity.

  9. Results of magnetospheric barium ion cloud experiment of 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, D.; Fricke, C. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The barium ion cloud experiment involved the release of about 2 kg of barium at an altitude of 31 482 km, a latitude of 6.926 N., and a longitude of 74.395 W. Significant erosion of plasma from the main ion core occurred during the initial phase of the ion cloud expansion. From the motion of the outermost striational filaments, the electric field components were determined to be 0.19 mV/m in the westerly direction and 0.68 mV/m in the inward direction. The differences between these components and those measured from balloons flown in the proximity of the extremity of the field line through the release point implied the existence of potential gradients along the magnetic field lines. The deceleration of the main core was greater than theoretically predicted. This was attributed to the formation of a polarization wake, resulting in an increase of the area of interaction and resistive dissipation at ionospheric levels. The actual orientation of the magnetic field line through the release point differed by about 10.5 deg from that predicted by magnetic field models that did not include the effect of ring current.

  10. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frédéric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C; Grey, Clare P; Haile, Sossina M

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol(-1), as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol(-1), to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities. PMID:23666383

  11. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frédéric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C.; Grey, Clare P.; Haile, Sossina M.

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29 kJ mol-1, as well as the general activation energy, 16 kJ mol-1, to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities.

  12. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    PubMed Central

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  13. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  14. Tracking bubble evolution inside a silicic dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Okumura, Satoshi; Arzilli, Fabio; Borrajo, Javier; Recio, Clemente; Ban, Masao; Gonzalo, Juan C.; Benítez, José M.; Douglas, Madison; Sasaki, Osamu; Franco, Piedad; Gómez-Barreiro, Juan; Carnicero, Asunción

    2016-10-01

    Pressure estimates from rapidly erupted crustal xenoliths constrain the depth of intrusion of the silicic lavas hosting them. This represents an opportunity for tracking magmatic bubble's evolution and quantifying the variation in bubble volume during rapid magma ascent through a volcanic dike just prior to eruption. The petrology, stable-isotope geochemistry and X-ray micro-tomography of dacites containing crustal xenoliths, erupted from a Neogene volcano in SE Spain, showed an increase in porosity from ~ 1.7 to 6.4% from ~ 19 to 13 km depth, at nearly constant groundmass and crystal volumes. This result provides additional constraints for experimental and numerical simulations of subvolcanic magma-crust degassing processes in silicic systems, and may allow the characterization of volcanic eruptive styles based on volatile content.

  15. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  16. Recycle of silicate waste into mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2011-04-15

    Template synthesis of porous carbon materials usually requires selective removal of template silica from the carbon/silica composites. It not only involves waste of valuable chemicals, but also poses significant environmental concerns including high waste treatment cost. Recycling of silicates released from such nanocasting methods is successfully performed for the first time to regenerate valuable mesoporous MCM and SBA type silica materials, which will not only help in saving valuable chemicals, but also in decreasing chemical waste, contributing in improvement of our environmental standards. This approach can thus improve cost effectiveness for the mass production of nanostructured carbon and others utilizing silica directed nanocasting method by recycling otherwise silicate waste into highly desirable valuable mesoporous silica.

  17. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    PubMed

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  18. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pengfei; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  19. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  20. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed.

  1. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed. PMID:26794953

  2. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  3. The Evolving Mixture of Barium Isotopes in Milky Way Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals in stars form through one of two types of neutron capture processes: the rapid r-process or slower s-process. The fraction of odd and even barium isotopes in stars can indicate which process predominantly contributed to a star’s heavy metals, since odd barium isotopes predominantly form through the r-process and even barium isotopes through the s-process. The “stellar model” predicts that older stars contain comparable amounts of odd and even barium isotopes, while the “classical model” states that they almost exclusively contain odd isotopes. This study investigated these competing models by analyzing high-resolution spectra of twelve Milky Way stars. These spectra were analyzed for the first time in this study. To quantify r- and s-process enrichment, we measured the odd barium isotope fraction in the stars by fitting models to the stars’ spectra. Generating models involved measuring the stars’ Doppler shift, resolution, and barium abundance. To reduce error margins we optimized resolution and barium abundance measurements by enhancing existing techniques through several rounds of revisions. Our results support the stellar model of heavy metal enrichment, and our proposed optimizations will enable future researchers to obtain a deeper understanding of chemical enrichment in the Universe. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program at the University of California Santa Cruz, Lick Observatory, and the National Science Foundation.

  4. Magnetic properties of Ni substituted Y-type barium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Mi Hee; Kim, Chul Sung

    2014-05-07

    Y-type barium hexaferrite is attractive material for various applications, such as high frequency antennas and RF devices, because of its interesting magnetic properties. Especially, Ni substituted Y- type hexaferrites have higher magnetic ordering temperature than other Y-type. We have investigated macroscopic and microscopic properties of Y-type barium hexaferrite. Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 2−x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) samples are prepared by solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as a network analyzer for high frequency characteristics. The XRD pattern is analyzed by Rietveld refinement method and confirms the hexagonal structure with R-3m. The hysteresis curve shows ferrimagnetic behavior. Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases with Ni contents. Ni{sup 2+}, which preferentially occupies the octahedral site with up-spin sub-lattice, has smaller spin value S of 1 than Co{sup 2+} having S = 3/2. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) measurement of Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 1.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} shows that Curie and spin transition temperatures are found to be 718 K and 209 K, respectively. The Curie temperature T{sub C} is increased with Ni contents, while T{sub S} is decreased with Ni. The Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures and fitted by using a least-squares method with six sextet of six Lorentzian lines for Fe sites, corresponding to the 3b{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}*, 6c{sub VI}, 18h{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}, and 3a{sub IV} sites at below T{sub C}. From Mössbauer measurements, we confirmed the spin state of Fe ion to be Fe{sup 3+} and obtained the isomer shift (δ), magnetic hyperfine field (H{sub hf}), and the occupancy ratio of Fe ions at six sub-lattices. The complex permeability and permittivity are measured between 100 MHz and 4 GHz, suggesting that Y-type barium hexaferrite is promising for antenna

  5. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  6. Barium and Neodymium Isotope Heterogeneities in Early Solar System Materials: Applications to Planetary Reservoir Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranen, M. C.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2005-12-01

    Heavy element isotopic heterogeneities in early Solar System materials may exist as a result of both incomplete mixing of pre-solar nucleosynthetic components in the Solar Nebula leading to different ratios of p-, r- and s-process isotopes in bulk planetary materials as well as heterogeneities caused by the decay of now extinct nuclides. Boyet and Carlson (2005) reported a difference in 142Nd/144Nd between Earths mantle and chondrites of about 20-30 ppm. Assuming that this difference was due to decay of 146Sm and that the Earth and chondrites formed with identical 146Sm/144Sm they inferred the formation of a deep enriched silicate layer (D'' ?) in the Earth that formed within the first 30 Myr of Solar System history. We have obtained a similar difference in 142Nd/144Nd between Earth and chondrites. However, we are now testing their interpretation with Ba isotope measurements of various chondrites. Barium is an ideal element for testing the origin of small isotopic anomalies because it has two isotopes (134 and 136) derived only from the s-process as well as three isotopes (135,137 and 138) derived from both the r- and s-process with 135Ba possibly having a contribution from the decay of now extinct 135Cs. Six chondrites: Allende (CV3), Peace River (L6), Murchison (CM2), Grady (H3.7), Guarena (H6), and Bruderheim (L6) were measured for Ba isotopic composition with a new generation TIMS instrument (a GV ISOPROBE-T). A terrestrial andesite, AGV-1, was also processed for use as our reference standard. Preliminary results indicate widespread heterogeneity in the fractionation corrected 137Ba/136Ba ratio between different meteorites and our terrestrial standard, as high as 25 ppm. Smaller anomalies are also seen in 134Ba/136Ba. These anomalies are likely caused by slight differences in the mixing proportions of r- and s-process Ba in Earth and chondrites. This calls into question whether or not the differences seen in 142Nd/144Nd are truly caused by early differentiation

  7. Imaging diagnosis--duodenobiliary reflux of barium sulfate during esophagogastrography in a dog.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Layla; Sharma, Ajay; Secrest, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A 4-year-old Australian cattle dog presented for regurgitation, 2 months after duodenal resection and anastomosis for a perforated duodenal ulcer. Duodenobiliary reflux of barium sulfate suspension was detected during fluoroscopic esophagogastrography. Follow-up radiography 2 hours later demonstrated persistence of the barium in the gallbladder and biliary tree. Ultrasonography showed an open sphincter of Oddi but no other morphological abnormalities with the gallbladder or biliary system. No side effects or bloodwork abnormalities were noted. This is the first case report of duodenobiliary reflux of barium in a dog. The pathophysiology of this phenomenon and its incidence and significance in human medicine are discussed.

  8. Using Barium Ions for Heavy-Atom Derivatization and Phasing of Xylanse ll from Trichoderma longibrachiatum

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseeva,N.; Allaire, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of barium chloride to produce a heavy-atom derivative of xylanase II crystals from Trichoderma longibrachiatum, which was obtained either by cocrystallization or soaking. SAD phasing led to interpretable electron-density maps that allowed unambiguous chain tracing. In the best case, with a data set collected at 9.5 keV, 88% of the residues were built, with 83% of the side chains assigned. The barium ions are found to mainly interact with main-chain carbonyl groups and water molecules. It is suggested that barium ions could also be used as a potential anomalous scatterer in the quick cryosoaking procedure for phasing.

  9. Optical-induced absorption tunability of Barium Strontium Titanate film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chunya; Ji, Jie; Yue, Jin; Rao, Yunkun; Yao, Gang; Li, Dan; Zeng, Ying; Li, Renkui; Xiao, Longsheng; Liu, Xinxing; Yao, Jianquan; Ling, Furi

    2016-10-01

    The absorption tunability of 100 nm thickness of ferroelectric Barium Strontium Titanate (Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3) thin films with different densities of pumped optical field is measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the range of 0.2 THz - 1.2 THz at 19 °C. Experimental results show that the absorption coefficient of BST film is approximately at 5000 cm-1-20000 cm-1 in the range of 0.2 THz - 1.2 THz and the absorption coefficient reached up to 16% when we applied the optical field up to 600 mW. The theoretical calculations reveal that increasing photoexcitation fluences is responsible for the increasing of transmission change in the conduction current density cause the absorption coefficient varied.

  10. Impact of vanadium ions in barium borate glass.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; Hammad, Ahmed H

    2015-02-25

    Combined optical and infrared spectral measurements of prepared barium borate glasses containing different concentrations of V2O5 were carried out. Vanadium containing glasses exhibit extended UV-visible (UV/Vis.) bands when compared with base binary borate glass. UV/Vis. spectrum shows the presence of an unsymmetrical strong UV broad band centered at 214 nm attributed to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for the preparation of such glass. The calculated direct and indirect optical band gaps are found to decrease with increasing the vanadium content (2.9:137 for indirect and 3.99:2.01 for direct transition). This change was discussed in terms of structural changes in the glass network. Infrared absorption spectra of the glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular and tetrahedral borate units. Electron spin resonance analyses indicate the presence of unpaired species in sufficient quantity to be identified and to confirm the spectral data.

  11. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-24

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1−xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba{sup 2+} ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba{sup 2+} ion in SBT lattice.

  12. Dynamics of the CRRES barium releases in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Mende, S. B.; Geller, S. P.; Miller, M.; Hoffman, R. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Pongratz, M.; Meredith, N. P.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) G-2, G-3, and G-4 ionized and neutral barium cloud positions are triangulated from ground-based optical data. From the time history of the ionized cloud motion perpendicular to the magnetic field, the late time coupling of the ionized cloud with the collisionless ambient plasma in the magnetosphere is investigated for each of the releases. The coupling of the ionized clouds with the ambient medium is quantitatively consistent with predictions from theory in that the coupling time increases with increasing distance from the Earth. Quantitative comparison with simple theory for the couping time also yields reasonable agreement. Other effects not predicted by the theory are discussed in the context of the observations.

  13. Study on a flexoelectric microphone using barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. R.; Huang, W. B.; Zhang, S. J.; Yuan, F. G.; Jiang, X. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a flexoelectric microphone was, for the first time, designed and fabricated in a bridge structure using barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3) ceramic and tested afterwards. The prototyped flexoelectric microphone consists of a 1.5 mm  ×  768 μm  ×  50 μm BST bridge structure and a silicon substrate with a cavity. The sensitivity and resonance frequency were designed to be 0.92 pC/Pa and 98.67 kHz, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured to be 74 dB. The results demonstrate that the flexoelectric microphone possesses high sensitivity and a wide working frequency range simultaneously, suggesting that flexoelectricity could be an excellent alternative sensing mechanism for microphone applications.

  14. Synthesis, microstructure and dielectric properties of zirconium doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rohtash; Asokan, K.; Patnaik, S.; Birajdar, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    We report on synthesis, microstructural and relaxor ferroelectric properties of Zirconium(Zr) doped Barium Titanate (BT) samples with general formula Ba(Ti1-xZrx)O3 (x=0.20, 0.35). These lead-free ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction route. The phase transition behavior and temperature dependent dielectric properties and composition dependent ferroelectric properties were investigated. XRD analysis at room temperature confirms phase purity of the samples. SEM observations revealed retarded grain growth with increasing Zr mole fraction. Dielectric properties of BZT ceramics is influenced significantly by small addition of Zr mole fraction. With increasing Zr mole fraction, dielectric constant decreases while FWHM and frequency dispersion increases. Polarization vs electric field hysteresis measurements reveal ferroelectric relaxor phase at room temperature. The advantages of such substitution maneuvering towards optimizing ferroelectric properties of BaTiO3 are discussed.

  15. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  16. Barium titanate nanocomposite capacitor FY09 year end report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Tyler E.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William; Fellows, Benjamin D.

    2009-11-01

    This late start RTBF project started the development of barium titanate (BTO)/glass nanocomposite capacitors for future and emerging energy storage applications. The long term goal of this work is to decrease the size, weight, and cost of ceramic capacitors while increasing their reliability. Ceramic-based nanocomposites have the potential to yield materials with enhanced permittivity, breakdown strength (BDS), and reduced strain, which can increase the energy density of capacitors and increase their shot life. Composites of BTO in glass will limit grain growth during device fabrication (preserving nanoparticle grain size and enhanced properties), resulting in devices with improved density, permittivity, BDS, and shot life. BTO will eliminate the issues associated with Pb toxicity and volatility as well as the variation in energy storage vs. temperature of PZT based devices. During the last six months of FY09 this work focused on developing syntheses for BTO nanoparticles and firing profiles for sintering BTO/glass composite capacitors.

  17. Nonlinear optical properties of calcium barium niobate epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Vigne, Sébastien; Hossain, Nadir; Chaker, Mohammed; Légaré, François

    2016-07-25

    We investigate the potential of epitaxial calcium barium niobate (CBN) thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition for optical frequency conversion. Using second harmonic generation (SHG), we analyze the polarization response of the generated signal to determine the ratios d15 / d32 and d33 / d32 of the three independent components of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in CBN thin film. In addition, a detailed comparison to the signal intensity obtained in a y-cut quartz allows us to measure the absolute value of these components in CBN thin film: d15 = 5 ± 2 pm / V, d32 = 3.1 ± 0.6 pm / V and d33 = 9 ± 2 pm / V.

  18. A buffer gas cooled beam of barium monohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Geoffrey; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    Significant advances in direct laser cooling of diatomic molecules have opened up a wide array of molecular species to precision studies spanning many-body physics, quantum collisions and ultracold dissociation. We present a cryogenic beam source of barium monohydride (BaH), and study laser ablation of solid precursor targets as well as helium buffer gas cooling dynamics. Additionally, we cover progress towards a molecular magneto-optical trap, with spectroscopic studies of relevant cooling transitions in the B2 Σ <--X2 Σ manifold in laser ablated molecules, including resolution of hyperfine structure and precision measurements of the vibrational Frank-Condon factors. Finally, we examine the feasibility of photo dissociation of trapped BaH molecules to yield optically accessible samples of ultracold hydrogen.

  19. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  20. Gamma radiation induced darkening in barium gallo-germanate glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Heng, Xiaobo; Tang, Guowu; Zhu, Tingting; Sun, Min; Shan, Xiujie; Wen, Xin; Guo, Jingyuan; Qian, Qi; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    Barium gallo-germanate (BGG) glass is an important glass matrix material used for mid-infrared transmission and mid-infrared fiber laser. In this study, we investigated the γ-ray irradiation induced darkening effect of BGG glass. Optical transmittance spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra were employed to investigate the γ-ray irradiation induced defects. Two kinds of Ge-related defects in the irradiated BGG glass, named Ge-related non-bridging oxygen hole center (Ge-NBOHC) and Ge-related electron centers (GEC), were verified. In addition, the absorption bands of the two defects have been separated and the peak absorptivity of Ge-NBOHC and GEC defects is at 375 nm and 315 nm, respectively. PMID:27137531

  1. Nonlinear optical properties of calcium barium niobate epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Vigne, Sébastien; Hossain, Nadir; Chaker, Mohammed; Légaré, François

    2016-07-25

    We investigate the potential of epitaxial calcium barium niobate (CBN) thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition for optical frequency conversion. Using second harmonic generation (SHG), we analyze the polarization response of the generated signal to determine the ratios d15 / d32 and d33 / d32 of the three independent components of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in CBN thin film. In addition, a detailed comparison to the signal intensity obtained in a y-cut quartz allows us to measure the absolute value of these components in CBN thin film: d15 = 5 ± 2 pm / V, d32 = 3.1 ± 0.6 pm / V and d33 = 9 ± 2 pm / V. PMID:27464195

  2. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  3. Semiclassical analysis of perturbed two-electron states in barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Kenneth A.

    Recent semiclassical studies of atomic spectra allow new insight into their electron dynamics. The semiclassical closed orbit theory demonstrates the influence of classical orbits in atomic photoabsorption spectra, and has been successfully used for one-electron alkali atoms. Atomic states with one highly-excited electron are known as Rydberg states. If an atom has two valence electrons, and the electrons are treated as independent of each other, then the atom will also have states with two excited electrons. The electrons are not actually independent, so these two different configurations will interact in an atom. If some of the "singly-excited" states occur near the energy of a "doubly-excited" state, then the resulting "perturbed states" are shifted from their hydrogenic positions and have several unusual properties not accounted for by closed orbit theory. We report the first use of closed orbit theory to describe the photoabsorption of perturbed two-electron atomic states. The experimental photoabsorption for two series of perturbed states in barium were measured as a function of electric field. A new extension of semiclassical closed orbit theory was found for perturbed states, using an energy-dependent quantum defect to account for the second valence electron. Scaled energy spectroscopy measurements, a successful analysis technique for one-electron atoms, proved unhelpful when studying perturbed barium states. This demonstrated that perturbed atoms have an important electron-electron interaction term in their Hamiltonian with non-alkali scaling. Our photoabsorption calculations for hydrogen, sodium and cesium verified our experimental calibration and our analysis of atomic core effects. We also show the mathematical equivalence of closed orbit theory and quantum defect theory for modeling the photoabsorption of perturbed atomic states in a field-free environment.

  4. Detection of the White Dwarf Companions of Barium Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, C. J.; Griffin, E.; McGahee, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Barium dwarfs are chemically peculiar F- and G-type stars that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements such as strontium and barium. They are believed to have derived their chemical peculiarities via mass transfer from a former AGB companion, now a white dwarf. These WD companions should be detectable in the far-ultraviolet if their effective temperatures exceed 10,000K. However, despite dedicated IUE searches, no WD companion has been directly detected. We have observed 4 Ba dwarfs with the GALEX ultraviolet space telescope (2 newly discovered Ba dwarfs have archival observations), and report here on the first unequivocal direct detection of a WD companion of a Ba dwarf, HD 15306, the hottest Ba dwarf known (F4 V). This WD companion is detected through a clear far-ultraviolet excess. Detection of the putative WD companions of the other observed Ba dwarfs is somewhat more problematical, as those stars have cooler effective temperatures and chromospheric activity can significantly affect their FUV fluxes. The disentanglement of WD FUV fluxes from FUV emission due to chromospheric activity requires comparison of the observed Ba dwarfs with F- and G-type dwarfs with archival GALEX photometry. We have selected a set of 68 F- and G-type dwarfs from the NStars program (Gray et al. 2003, 2006) that have good quality archival GALEX photometry and show a wide range of chromospheric activity. A comparison of these stars with the 5 remaining GALEX-observed Ba dwarfs suggests that one and perhaps two of these Ba dwarfs have detectable WD companions.

  5. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chuanjian E-mail: ksun@uestc.edu.cn; Yu, Zhong; Sun, Ke E-mail: ksun@uestc.edu.cn; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen; Yang, Yan

    2015-09-14

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 12−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f{sub 1}, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub bf2}, ω{sub kf1}, ω{sub af1}, ω{sub kf2}, and ω{sub bk} of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f{sub 1}, 4f{sub 2}, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub bf2} and ω{sub af1} decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub kf1}, ω{sub kf2}, and ω{sub bk} show a slight change.

  6. Barium and carbon fluxes in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Dehairs, Frank; Lansard, Bruno; Mucci, Alfonso; Navez, Jacques; Gratton, Yves; Prowe, Friederike; Chierici, Melissa; Fransson, Agneta; Papakyriakou, Tim N.; Sternberg, Erika; Miller, Lisa A.; Tremblay, Jean-ÉRic; Monnin, Christophe

    2011-09-01

    The seasonal and spatial variability of dissolved Barium (Ba) in the Amundsen Gulf, southeastern Beaufort Sea, was monitored over a full year from September 2007 to September 2008. Dissolved Ba displays a nutrient-type behavior: the maximum water column concentration is located below the surface layer. The highest Ba concentrations are typically observed at river mouths, the lowest concentrations are found in water masses of Atlantic origin. Barium concentrations decrease eastward through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Barite (BaSO4) saturation is reached at the maximum dissolved Ba concentrations in the subsurface layer, whereas the rest of the water column is undersaturated. A three end-member mixing model comprising freshwater from sea-ice melt and rivers, as well as upper halocline water, is used to establish their relative contributions to the Ba concentrations in the upper water column of the Amundsen Gulf. Based on water column and riverine Ba contributions, we assess the depletion of dissolved Ba by formation and sinking of biologically bound Ba (bio-Ba), from which we derive an estimate of the carbon export production. In the upper 50 m of the water column of the Amundsen Gulf, riverine Ba accounts for up to 15% of the available dissolved Ba inventory, of which up to 20% is depleted by bio-Ba formation and export. Since riverine inputs and Ba export occur concurrently, the seasonal variability of dissolved Ba in the upper water column is moderate. Assuming a fixed organic carbon to bio-Ba flux ratio, carbon export out of the surface layer is estimated at 1.8 ± 0.45 mol C m-2 yr-1. Finally, we propose a climatological carbon budget for the Amundsen Gulf based on recent literature data and our findings, the latter bridging the surface and subsurface water carbon cycles.

  7. Barium and Carbon fluxes in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Shadwick, E. H.; Woule Ebongue, V.; Lansard, B.; Navez, J.; Gratton, Y.; Prowe, F.; Mucci, A.; Chierici, M.; Fransson, A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Sternberg, E.; Miller, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    The seasonal and spatial variability of dissolved Barium (Ba) in the Amundsen Gulf, southeastern Beaufort Sea, was monitored over a full year from September 2007 to September 2008. Barium displays a nutrient-type behavior with the highest concentrations observed at river mouths. The water column maximum is located at the base of the surface layer with lower concentrations above and below. The lowest concentrations are found in water masses of Atlantic origin, and Ba concentrations decrease eastward through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. A three end-member mixing model comprising fresh water from sea-ice melt and rivers, as well as upper halocline water, was used to establish their relative contributions to the surface waters of the Amundsen Gulf. Based on water column and riverine Ba contributions, we assess the Ba depletion by particle sinking and subsequently estimate the carbon export production. In the upper 50 m of the water column of Amundsen Gulf, riverine Ba accounts for up to 15% of the dissolved Ba inventory, whereas up to 20% of the dissolved Ba inventory is depleted by barite (BaSO4) formation and export. Since riverine inputs and Ba export occur concurrently, the seasonal variability of dissolved Ba is moderate. Assuming a fixed organic carbon to barite flux ratio, carbon export out of the surface layer is estimated at 2 mol C m-2 yr-1. Finally, we propose a climatological carbon budget for the Amundsen Gulf based on recent literature data and our findings, the latter bridging the surface and subsurface water carbon cycles. This work is a contribution to the Canadian IPY programs CFL and GEOTRACES, to ArcticNet as well as to the IGBP/IHDP core project LOICZ.

  8. Adsorption of β-carotene on modified magnesium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Guo, Ning; Fu, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Modified flocculation magnesium silicate is prepared by a hydrothermal process at 120°C for 18 h after adding Al2(SO4)3 into the magnesium silicate gel. Compared with standard magnesium silicate with 328.116 m2 g-1 surface area, this modified magnesium silicate has a bigger BET surface area of 536.803 m2 g-1 and a lower interlayer water content. Modified magnesium silicate exhibits high β-carotene adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity of 364.96 mg g-1. It is shown that when suspended in organic solvent, this material can be used effectively for carotenoid separation. Furthermore, our results suggest that modified magnesium silicate may be a promising candidate as an absorbent in the decoloring of oil.

  9. Experiments of water formation on warm silicates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-10

    When dust grains have a higher temperature than they would have in dense clouds, and when H, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} have a negligible residence time on grains, the formation of water should still be possible via the hydrogenation of OH and Eley-Rideal-type reactions. We determined that the OH desorption energy from an amorphous silicate surface is at least 143 meV (1656 K). This is 400 K higher than the value previously used in chemical models of the interstellar medium and is possibly as high as 410 meV (4760 K). This extends the temperature range for the efficient formation of water on grains from about 30 K to at least 50 K, and possibly over 100 K. We do not find evidence that water molecules leave the surface upon formation. Instead, through a thermal programmed desorption experiment, we find that water formed on the surface of an amorphous silicate desorbs at around 160 K. We also measured the cross-sections for the reaction of H and D with an O{sub 3} layer on an amorphous silicate surface at 50 K. The values of the cross-sections, σ{sub H} = 1.6 ± 0.27 Å{sup 2} and σ{sub D} = 0.94 ± 0.09 Å{sup 2}, respectively, are smaller than the size of an O{sub 3} molecule, suggesting the reaction mechanism is more likely Eley-Rideal than hot-atom. Information obtained through these experiments should help theorists evaluate the relative contribution of water formation on warm grains versus in the gas phase.

  10. Noble gas diffusion in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, J.; Burnard, P.; Laporte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fractionated noble gas relative abundances (Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar and Xe/Ar) and isotopic compositions (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar, 20Ne/22Ne, 21Ne/22Ne) are found in volcanic materials, notably in pumices (1-3). This has generally been interpreted as fractionation resulting from diffusion. However, there is some disagreement as to whether this fractionation occurs during high temperature magmatic processes (3) or due to diffusion of air into solidified pyroclastic deposits (2). We show that differences in relative noble gas diffusivities (e.g. D4He vs D40Ar, where D is the diffusivity) and isotopic diffusivities (e.g. D40Ar vs D36Ar) reduce at high temperatures (Fig). These results predict minimal fractionation of noble gases during magmatic processes. However, it is important to note that these diffusivities were measured in silicate glasses; the relative noble diffusivities in silicate liquids are poorly known. We have developed a new experimental protocol which will to determine the diffusivities of the noble gases and their isotopes in the liquid state. A graphite crucible c. 0.3 mm diameter and c. 20mm deep is filled with powdered glass of the desired composition, heated to 1773 K for 15 minutes and quenched to form a glass cylinder within the crucible. The crucible is then placed in a low pressure (1 bar) controlled atmosphere vertical furnace and heated at high temperatures (1673-1773K) for 2 hours in a pure N2 atmosphere. At this point noble gases (He and Ar) are introduced into the furnace and allowed to diffuse into the cylinder of liquid for durations of between 30 and 90. After quenching, the glass cylinder, preserving its' diffusion profile, is sawed into c. 1mm thick discs which are measured by conventional noble gas mass spectrometry for noble gas abundances (He, Ar) and isotopes (40,38,36Ar). The results will be presented at the conference. References 1 Kaneoka, I. Earth Planet Sci Letts 48, 284-292 (1980). 2 Pinti, D. L., Wada, N. & Matsuda, J. J. Volcan

  11. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  12. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, D.

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  13. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  14. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  15. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  16. Lithium metaborate flux in silicate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingamells, C.O.

    1970-01-01

    Lithium metaborate is an effective flux for silicates and other rock-forming minerals. The glass resulting from fusion is mechanically strong, reasonably nonhygroscopic, and is readily soluble in dilute acids. These characteristics lead to its use in X-ray spectrography and in methods which require whole-rock solutions, such as atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Difficulties have been encountered in the use of such techniques : a high-quality reagent has been difficult to obtain ; fusion conditions must be rather closely controlled; graphite crucibles used in the fusions need special treatment. Methods for overcoming these difficulties are outlined. Selected procedures for various instrumental methods of analysis are described. ?? 1970.

  17. Iron-rich silicates in the Earth's D'' layer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wendy L; Meng, Yue; Shen, Guoyin; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Campbell, Andrew J; Heinz, Dion L; Shu, Jinfu; Caracas, Razvan; Cohen, Ronald E; Fei, Yingwei; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2005-07-12

    High-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that an iron-rich ferromagnesian silicate phase can be synthesized at the pressure-temperature conditions near the core-mantle boundary. The iron-rich phase is up to 20% denser than any known silicate at the core-mantle boundary. The high mean atomic number of the silicate greatly reduces the seismic velocity and provides an explanation to the low-velocity and ultra-low-velocity zones. Formation of this previously undescribed phase from reaction between the silicate mantle and the iron core may be responsible for the unusual geophysical and geochemical signatures observed at the base of the lower mantle.

  18. The Effects of Different Precursor Milling Processes on the Phase Evolution of Nanocrystalline Barium Hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataie, A.; Sheikhi-Moghaddam, K.; Kashani-Bozorg, S. F.; Sargheini, J.

    2010-03-01

    Nano-crystalline barium hexaferrite was synthesized using a coupled mechano-chemical processing (co-precipitation/mechanical milling); initially co-precipitated product prepared from aqueous solutions of iron and barium chlorides with a Fe/Ba molar ratio of 11 was mechanically milled employing two different milling processes (low energy jar mill and high energy planetary mill). The non-milled and milled co-precipitated materials were then annealed at various temperatures. The thermal properties, phase composition and morphology of samples were investigated. XRD and DTA/TGA results showed that formation of barium hexaferrite occurs at relatively low temperature using planetary milling technique. Also, no BaFe2O4 (intermediate non magnetic phase) was detected by XRD in the milled products. SEM studies exhibited that the mean particle size of barium hexaferrite dramatically increases with increasing annealing temperature from 700 to 1100° C.

  19. Severe acute cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Ya-Guang; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Su, Zhong-Xue; Xu, Jian; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong

    2012-10-21

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is considered as a possible etiological factor for severe cholangitis. We herein report a case of severe cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination. An adult male patient presented with epigastric pain was diagnosed as having choledocholithiasis by ultrasonography. EST was performed and the stone was completely cleaned. Barium examination was done 3 d after EST and severe cholangitis appeared 4 h later. The patient was recovered after treated with tienam for 4 d. Barium examination may induce severe cholangitis in patients after EST, although rare, barium examination should be chosen cautiously. Cautions should be also used when EST is performed in patients younger than 50 years to avoid the damage to the sphincter of Oddi.

  20. Numberical simulation of the effects of radially injected barium plasma in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The morphology of the ion cloud in the radial shaped charge barium injection was studied. The shape of the ion cloud that remains after the explosive products and neutral barium clears away was examined. The ion cloud which has the configuration of a rimless wagon wheel is shown. The major features are the 2.5 km radius black hole in the center of the cloud, the surrounding ring of barium ion and the spokes of barium ionization radiating away from the center. The cloud shows no evolution after it emerges from the neutral debris and it is concluded that it is formed within 5 seconds of the event. A numerical model is used to calculate the motion of ions and electrons subject to the electrostatic and lorenz forces.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of the orbital elements and abundances of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Niu, Ping; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Jun-Hong; Peng, Qiu-He

    2003-07-01

    We have carried out a series of Monte Carlo simulations to study the distributions of the orbital elements of normal red giant binary systems and barium stars with the wind accretion model under the condition of total angular momentum conservation. Since barium star systems have evolved from normal red giant binary systems, their distributions of orbital eccentricities and periods exhibit the characteristics of the final orbits of binaries after mass accretion. Our calculations show that in the process of wind accretion and in the mass-losing stage, the system gets bigger, and its orbital period increases, while the orbital eccentricity does not vary much. This can explain the various features in the distributions of the orbital elements of normal red giant binary systems and barium stars, as well as features in the distribution of the heavy-element abundances of barium stars.

  2. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  3. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  4. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  5. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  6. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  7. The value of the preoperative barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gedgaudas, R.K.; Kelvin, F.M.; Thompson, W.M.; Rice, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    The value of the barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses was studied in 44 patients. Findings from those barium-enema examinations and from pathological specimens from 37 patients who had malignant tumors and seven patients who had endometriosis were retrospectively analyzed to determine if the barium-enema examination is useful in differentiating extrinsic lesions with and without invasion of the colon. None of the 12 patients who had extrinsic lesions had any of the criteria that indicated bowel-wall invasion. These criteria included fixation and serrations of the bowel wall in all patients with invasion, and ulceration and fistulizaton in those patients who had complete transmural invasion. In patients with pelvic masses, the preoperative barium-enema examination may be useful to the surgeon in planning surgery and in preparing the patient for the possibility of partial colectomy or colostomy.

  8. A review of environmental characteristics and health effects of barium in public water supplies.

    PubMed

    Kojola, W H; Brenniman, G R; Carnow, B W

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review is made of sources, occurrence, removal, health effects and water quality standard of barium in public drinking water supplies. The primary source of naturally occurring barium in drinking water results from the leaching and eroding of this metal from sedimentary rocks into the aquifers of ground water. It is a localized problem in several areas of the United States. The removal of barium from drinking water appears to be most efficiently accomplished utilizing ion exchange softening. Health effects studies are based primarily on animal experimentation. Such effects include stimulation of smooth, striated, and cardiac muscle, elevation of blood pressure, initiation of catecholamine release, rapid and preferential deposition in bone, and excretion principally in the feces. Humans over 60 years of age appear to be at high risk to developing cardiac arrhythmias following the barium enema. The current United States drinking water standard of 1.0 mg/l is based on several faulty assumptions and should be critically reevaluated.

  9. Elevated Z line: a new sign of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Ahmad, Nuzhat A; Rubesin, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    We describe an elevated Z line as a new radiographic sign of Barrett's esophagus characterized by a transversely oriented, zigzagging, barium-etched line extending completely across the circumference of the midesophagus. An elevated Z line is rarely seen in other patients, so this finding should be highly suggestive of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms. If the patient is a potential candidate for surveillance, endoscopy and biopsy should be performed to confirm the presence of Barrett's esophagus.

  10. Photoemission studies with barium and LaB6 photocathodes and polarized laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, M. E.; Kwon, S. I.; Young, A. T.; Leung, K. N.; Kim, K.-J.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper, presented is a work on the optimization of the performance of barium photocathodes. Studies on the dependence of the quantum yield on the polarization and angle of incidence of the laser beam are conducted. Moreover, studies on single crystal LaB6 photocathodes are reported. This material possesses a lower quantum yield than barium, but chemically it is much less reactive and have a very good thermionic emission characteristics.

  11. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  12. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite: evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G.W.

    1983-12-02

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10/sup 11/ atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  13. Barium isotopes in allende meteorite: evidence against an extinct superheavy element.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R S; Anders, E; Shimamura, T; Lugmair, G W

    1983-12-01

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10(11) atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  14. Comparison of the reflectance characteristics of polytetrafluoroethylene and barium sulfate paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, C. L.; Schutt, J. B.; Shai, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the directional reflectance measurements taken on two tetrafluorethylene (TFE) paints formulated with silicone binders. Both paints are found to be more Lambertian than barium sulfate paint and pressed powder, although the pigment to binder ratios for barium sulfate and TFE paints are about 133 and 3.3 to 1, respectively. The TFE paints exhibit total visible reflectances above 90 percent and offer surfaces that are not significantly affected by water.

  15. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite - Evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10 to the 11th atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  16. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  17. SPM nanolithography of hydroxy-silicates.

    PubMed

    Valdrè, G; Moro, D; Hounsome, C M; Antognozzi, M

    2012-09-28

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is becoming a crucial technique with applications ranging from molecular and cell biology to medicine. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is one of the most useful tools for nanopatterning of flat surfaces. However, these patterns are usually built on homogeneous surfaces and require chemical functionalization to ensure specific affinity. Layered magnesium-aluminum hydroxide-silicates have already shown unique self-assembly properties on DNA molecules, due to their peculiar crystal chemistry based on alternating positive and negative crystal layers. However, patterns on these surfaces tend to be randomly organized. Here we show etching and oxidation at the nanometer scale of magnesium-aluminum hydroxide-silicates using the same SPM probe for the creation of organized nanopatterns. In particular, it is possible to produce three-dimensional structures in a reproducible way, with a depth resolution of 0.4 nm, lateral resolution of tens of nm, and a speed of about 10 μm s(-1). We report, as an example, the construction of an atomically flat charged pattern, designed to guide DNA deposition along predetermined directions without the need of any chemical functionalization of the surface. PMID:22948182

  18. Stability of foams in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Kutolin, Vladislav A.

    1993-12-01

    Bubble coalescence and the spontaneous disruption of high-porosity foams in silicate melts are the result of physical expulsion of interpore melt (syneresis) leading to bubble coalescence, and diffusive gas exchange between bubbles. Melt expulsion can be achieved either along films between pairs of bubbles, or along Plateau borders which represent the contacts between 3 or more bubbles. Theoretical evaluation of these mechanisms is confirmed by experimental results, enabling us to quantify the relevant parameters and determine stable bubble size and critical film thickness in a foam as a function of melt viscosity, surface tension, and time. Foam stability is controlled primarily by melt viscosity and time. Melt transport leading to coalescence of bubbles proceeds along inter-bubble films for smaller bubbles, and along Plateau borders for larger bubbles. Thus the average bubble size accelerates with time. In silicate melts, the diffusive gas expulsion out of a region of foam is effective only for water (and even then, only at small length scales), as the diffusion of CO 2 is negligible. The results of our analyses are applicable to studies of vesicularity of lavas, melt degassing, and eruption mechanisms.

  19. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  20. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Lithium alumino-silicate ion source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prabir Kumar; Seidl, Peter A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.; Mazaheri, Kavous

    2009-11-01

    We report experimental progress on Li+ source development in preparation for warm dense matter heating experiments. To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, we are pursuing the use of a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy singly ionized lithium beam and a thin target. Two kinds of lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate ion sources, β-spodumene and β-eucryptite, each of area 0.31 cm2, have been fabricated for ion emission measurements. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1200 to 1300 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Tight process controls were necessary in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the porous tungsten substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. Current density limit of the two kinds have been measured, and ion species identification of possible contaminants has been verified with a Wien (E x B) filter.

  2. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

  3. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  4. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  5. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  6. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  7. Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Anupriya; Deepa, M K; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-10-01

    A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release

  8. Defect Chemistry and Microstructure of Complex Perovskite Barium Zinc Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping

    1991-02-01

    This dissertation presents a systematic study of the characterization of the phase transitions, microstructures, defects and transport properties of undoped and doped complex perovskite barium zinc niobate (BZN). Complex perovskite BZN is a paraelectric material while its parent material barium titanate is ferroelectric. With codoping of (Zn + 2Nb) into Ti site, BaTiO_3 shows three distinguished features. First, the Curie temperature is lowered; second, the three phase transitions (cubic-tetragonal-orthorhombic-rhombohedral) coalesce; and lastly, the transition becomes diffuse showing a typical 2nd order phase transition compared with 1st order in undoped BaTiO_3. Complex microchemical ordering is another characteristic of BZN. Stoichiometric BZN shows a mixture of two types of ordering schemes. 1:1, 1:2 ordered microdomains and the disordered matrix co-exist. The 1:1 type ordering involves an internal charge imbalance which inhibits the growth of 1:1 type of ordered microdomains. The 1:2 type ordering is consistent with the chemical composition of BZN. These ordering patterns can be modified by either adjustment of the Zn/Nb ratio or by doping. The defect structure of the stoichiometric BZN is closely related to that of BaTiO_3. Stoichiometric BZN is an insulator with wide band gap (~ 3.70 eV). Undoped BZN has a high oxygen vacancy concentration which comes from three possible sources, such as unavoidable acceptor impurities, due to their natural abundance, Zn/Nb ratio uncertainty due to processing limitations, and high temperature ZnO loss due to sintering process. The oxygen vacancy concentration for undoped BZN lays in the neighborhood of 1500 ppm (atm.). The compensation defects for various dopants have also been identified. Both electrons and holes conduct by a small polaron mechanism. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpies of oxidation and reduction, mass action constants for intrinsic electronic disorder, oxidation and reduction have been

  9. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  10. SILICATES FOR CORROSION CONTROL IN BUILDING POTABLE WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicates have been used to control the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials. Previous work has shown that they are particularly useful in reducing the release of zinc from galvanized materials in hot water systems. Negatively charged silicate species were re...

  11. On the Filling Process Forming Silicic Segregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, K.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    Interdigitating silicic lenses are particularly well developed and well exposed in the Ferrar Dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Silicic segregations are texturally splotchy, have sharp upper contacts, and diffuse lower contacts that grade into normal dolerite. What is unusual about these 1- 2 m lenses is that the background sill shows very little compositional variation and yet the silicic segregations show wide compositional variation. In particular, silica content varies between 47 and 68%, and thus produces for the sill overall a bimodal composition. We have analyzed over 100 segregation samples in order to investigate the nature of the filling process. Previous work (Zavala & Marsh, 1999) has shown that segregations have compositions that correspond to interstitial liquid present at crystallinities between 59 and 63 % and temperatures between 1135° and 1115° . Additionally, it was noted that the large segregation lenses are not homogeneous and exhibit cyclic variations in silica content. This observation lead to the current study, in which new samples from the Peneplain Sill (235 to 241) show remarkable correlations between segregation texture, stratigraphic position and silica enrichment. Incompatibles like Zr indicate relatively low 35 to 40% concentrations of melt at the point of segregation extraction, which supports the notion that segregations formed by withdrawal of interstitial melt into tears as the solidification front (SF) became gravitationally unstable. The details of the filling process can also be gauged using chemical profiles normalized to segregation thickness. One group shows distinct multiple smaller cycles of silica enrichment versus depth, which suggests successive stages of opening. The other group shows a strong enrichment in silica followed by a steady decay to the base. The general form of this latter pattern measures the gradient in melt composition immediately below the segregation at the time of infilling. From

  12. The pulse of large silicic magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    Large silicic volcanic fields (LSVFs) are considered windows into the tops of upper crustal batholiths that are the foundations of the continental crust. The space-time-volume records of volcanism in LSVFs are therefore assumed to mirror the accumulation record of the associated upper crustal batholith. However, key questions about the link between the volcanic and plutonic realms remain to be addressed if this view is to be substantiated. Among these are: 1) What does the surface pattern of volcanism really tell us about the development of the plutonic system below? Do these eruptions represent evacuation from a distinct batch of magma that formed just prior to eruption or do they represent the periodic tapping of a long lived regional magma body? 2) What does the cyclicity of the large caldera systems and the regional concordance of eruptions tell us about the development of the magmatic systems beneath? Does the repose period represent the time scale of development of the next magma batch or does the erupted magma develop in a timescale much shorter than the repose period? 3) What does the self-organization of single batholithic scale magmatic systems, for instance the development of a zoned system, tell us about the dynamics and time scales over which these systems differentiate and evolve? We are addressing some of these questions in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes. Here, time scales of assembly and organization of batholith-scale silicic magma systems investigated using 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb in zircon connote: 1) Supereruptions in the APVC evacuated distinct magma batches that accumulated within a few hundred thousand years prior to eruption 2) The repose period of cyclic supervolcanic systems is considerably longer than the time scale to develop the next eruptible magma batch 3) Batholith scale-silicic magma chambers can develop significant zonations in time scales of a few hundred thousand years. Additionally, our data suggest quasi

  13. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  14. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in iron meteorites display an astonishing chemical and mineralogical variety, ranging from chondritic to highly fractionated, silica- and alkali-rich assemblages. In spite of this, their origin is commonly considered to be a simple one: mixing of silicates, fractionated or unfractionated, with metal. The latter had to be liquid in order to accommodate the former in a pore-free way which all models accomplish by assuming shock melting. II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions, including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. They also pose a formidable conundrum: young silicates are enclosed by very old metal. This and many other incompatibilities between models and reality forced the formulation of an alternative genetic model for irons. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  15. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  16. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, M.L.

    1997-01-07

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 13} pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass. 10 figs.

  17. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, Mari L.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 Si.sub.4 O.sub.13 pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs.sub.2 O and TiO.sub.2 loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO.sub.2 and Cs.sub.2 that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass.

  18. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  19. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  20. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  1. Barium from a mini r-process in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymann, D.

    1983-04-01

    McCulloch and Wasserburg (1978) have reported nonlinear isotopic anomalies in barium for two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite, known as EK-1-4-1 and C-1. In an attempt to account for these anomalies, it has been proposed that Ba from an r-process of nucleosynthesis, containing Ba-135 and Ba-137, was injected into the primeval color system but was not totally homogenized. Questions arise in connection with the relations of Xe isotopes in carbonaceous chondrites. This has prompted Heymann and Dziczkaniec (1979, 1980, 1981) to study the formation of r-Xe, r-Kr, and r-Te by the mini r-process which is thought to occur in the O, Ne-rich shells of Type II supernovae. Lee et al. (1979) have studied the formation of r-Ba, r-Nd, and r-Sm by the same process. Certain differences regarding the approaches used by Lee et al. and by Heymann and Dziczkaniec make it necessary to restudy the work of Lee et al. Attention is given to the survival probabilities of nuclear species of interest, taking into accounts the elements Cs, Ba, I, and Xe.

  2. Barium from a mini r-process in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.

    1983-01-01

    McCulloch and Wasserburg (1978) have reported nonlinear isotopic anomalies in barium for two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite, known as EK-1-4-1 and C-1. In an attempt to account for these anomalies, it has been proposed that Ba from an r-process of nucleosynthesis, containing Ba-135 and Ba-137, was injected into the primeval color system but was not totally homogenized. Questions arise in connection with the relations of Xe isotopes in carbonaceous chondrites. This has prompted Heymann and Dziczkaniec (1979, 1980, 1981) to study the formation of r-Xe, r-Kr, and r-Te by the mini r-process which is thought to occur in the O, Ne-rich shells of Type II supernovae. Lee et al. (1979) have studied the formation of r-Ba, r-Nd, and r-Sm by the same process. Certain differences regarding the approaches used by Lee et al. and by Heymann and Dziczkaniec make it necessary to restudy the work of Lee et al. Attention is given to the survival probabilities of nuclear species of interest, taking into accounts the elements Cs, Ba, I, and Xe.

  3. Thin film barium strontium titanate ferroelectric varactors for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hailing; Spatz, Devin; Wang, Shu; Shin, Eunsung; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-11-01

    Analog phase shifters are investigated with a periodic structure that includes Barium Strontium Titanate ferroelectric thin film varactors in shunt or serial connection to the coplanar waveguide transmission line. The phase shift is achieved by applying a DC bias to the varactors and changing the reactance in the circuit. The goal of this paper is to characterize the shunt capacitive varactors regarding the voltage dependence of the capacitance, loss tangent, and insertion losses at different bias voltages. Quality factor analysis is also conducted taking the parasitic effects into account. Repeated measurements show that the capacitance of a single cell is tuned from 0.8pF to 0.2pF under a DC bias of 0-10V while the loss tangent is kept under 0.01 in the frequency range of 0-40GHz. Insertion loss is tuned from -4dB to less than -0.6dB from 0 to 10V with a Figure of Merit of 14 degrees/dB at 10GHz and the total quality factor of the unit cell is around 6.7 to 10 at 10GHz with matched port impedance. By cascading 10-25 single unit cells, the phase shift is expected to reach 360 degrees with minimum insertion loss.

  4. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-05-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  5. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-08-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  6. Electrical properties of lanthanum doped barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Vijatovic Petrovic, M.M.; Bobic, J.D.; Ramoska, T.; Banys, J.; Stojanovic, B.D.

    2011-10-15

    Pure and lanthanum doped barium titanate (BT) ceramics were prepared by sintering pellets at 1300 deg. C for 8 h, obtained from nanopowders synthesized by the polymeric precursor method. XRD results showed formation of a tetragonal structure. The presence of dopants changed the tetragonal structure to pseudo-cubic. The polygonal grain size was reduced up to 300 nm with addition of lanthanum as a donor dopant. Determined dielectric properties revealed that lanthanum modified BT ceramics possessed a diffused ferroelectric character in comparison with pure BT that is a classical ferroelectric material. In doped BT phase transition temperatures were shifted to lower temperatures and dielectric constant values were much higher than in pure BT. A modified Currie Weiss law was used to explore the connection between the doping level and degree of diffuseness of phase transitions. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out at different temperatures in order to investigate electrical resistivity of materials and appearance of a PTCR effect. - Highlights: {yields} Pure and lanthanum doped BaTiO{sub 3} were prepared by polymeric precursors method. {yields} Change of structure from tetragonal to pseudo-cubic. {yields} Lanthanum as a donor dopant influenced on change of ferro-para phase transition. {yields} The diffuseness factor indicated the formation of diffuse ferroelectric material. {yields} Lanthanum affected on PTCR effect appearance in BT ceramics.

  7. Thermoelectric Properties of Barium Plumbate Doped by Alkaline Earth Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Andreza; Bhatta, Rudra; Pegg, Ian; Dutta, Biprodas

    Ceramic oxides are now being considered as a new class of thermoelectric materials because of their high stability at elevated temperatures. Such materials are especially suitable for use as prospective thermoelectric power generators because high temperatures are encountered in such operations. The present investigation uses barium plumbate (BaPbO3) as the starting material, the thermoelectric properties of which have been altered by judicious cation substitutions. BaPbO3 is known to exhibit metallic properties which may turn semiconducting as a result of compositional changes without precipitating a separate phase and/or altering the basic perovskite crystal structure. Perovskite structures are noted for their large interstitial spaces which can accommodate a large variety of ``impurity'' ions. As BaPbO3 has high electrical conductivity, σ = 2.43x105Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature, its thermopower, S, is relatively low, 23 μV/K, as expected. With a thermal conductivity, k, of 4.83Wm-1K-1, the figure of merit (ZT =S2 σ Tk-1) of BaPbO3 is only 0.01 at T = 300K. The objective of this investigation is to study the variation of thermoelectric properties of BaPbO3 as Ba and Pb ions are systematically substituted by alkaline earth ions.

  8. Properties of barium strontium titanate at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Nurul; Free, Charles

    2015-04-24

    The trend towards using higher millimetre-wave frequencies for communication systems has created a need for accurate characterization of materials to be used at these frequencies. Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) is a ferroelectric material whose permittivity is known to change as a function of applied electric field and have found varieties of application in electronic and communication field. In this work, new data on the properties of BST characterize using the free space technique at frequencies between 145 GHz and 155 GHz for both thick film and bulk samples are presented. The measurement data provided useful information on effective permittivity and loss tangent for all the BST samples. Data on the material transmission, reflection properties as well as loss will also be presented. The outcome of the work shows through practical measurement, that BST has a high permittivity with moderate losses and the results also shows that BST has suitable properties to be used as RAM for high frequency application.

  9. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  10. Growth of spherulites of strontium and barium sulfites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, T.; Koishi, M.

    1989-03-01

    The spherulites of SrSO 3 and BaSO 3 were synthesized in agar-agar gels (0-40°C). The reactants are sodium sulfite and the chloride of the respective metals. Each spherulite consists of fibrous crystals which are arranged minutely in a radial manner from the center. A linear relation was recognized between (mean diameter) 2 and reaction time in the same manner as the CaSO 3 · 0.5H 2O spherulite reported in our previous paper. The slopes of the lines, namely the growth rates of the spherulites, were greater in the order of calcium sulfite > strontium sulfite > barium sulfite. The ratio of (mean diameter) 2/time was dependent upon the concentration of the agar-agar gel (0.5%-2.0%) and the reaction temperature (0-40°C); the ratios decreased linearly with an increase of the gel concentration and increased with an increase of temperature.

  11. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ˜32 MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  12. Nanoscale inhomogeneities in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Sinha, S. K.; Lang, J. C.; Liu, X.; Haskel, D.; Moss, S. C.; Srajer, G.; Veal, B. W.; Wermeille, D.; Lee, D. R.; Haeffner, D. R.; Welp, U.; Wochner, P.

    2004-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source reveal that nanoscale inhomogeneities, electronic or structural in origin, form in yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x) superconductors and coexist with the superconducting (SC) state. Diffuse scattering from these inhomogeneous superstructures is due to atomic displacements with respect to equilibrium lattice sites (Z. Islam et al. Phys. Rev. B 66, 92501 (2002)), that are characterized by a wavevector of the form q=(q_x,0,0), where qx varies with hole doping from 2 unit cells (along shorter Cu-O-Cu direction) for very low doping to 4 unit cells at optimal doping. Interestingly, while these superstructures are 3-dimensionally ordered when the SC state is weakened (e.g., at x=0.4), as the doping increases, they become quasi 1D with correlation lengths comparable to SC coherence lengths in these cuprates. Recent first-principles calculations (D. de Fontaine et al., to be published) for the x=0.63 compound show that atomic displacements consistent with experimental data can be the result of ordering of O vacancies in YBCO. Models for various superstructures and their role in the phase diagram will be discussed.

  13. Electromagnetic properties and microwave absorbing characteristics of doped barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Hossienpour, A.; Morisako, A.; Saatchi, A.; Salehi, M.

    2006-07-01

    M-type barium hexaferrite BaFe 12-x(Mn 0.5Cu 0.5Ti) x/2O 19 ( x varying from 0 to 3 in steps of 1) have been synthesized by the usual ceramic sintering method. The ferrite powders possess hexagonal shape and are well separated from one another. The powder of these ferrites were mixed with polyvinylchloride plasticizer to be converted in to a microwave absorbing composite. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), ac susceptometer, vibrating sample magnetometer, and vector network analyzer were used to analyze its structure, electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties. The results showed that, the magnetoplumbite structures for all the samples have been formed. The sample having higher magnetic susceptibility and coercivity exhibits a larger microwave absorbing ability. Also, the present investigation demonstrates that microwave absorber using BaFe 12-x (Mn 0.5Cu 0.5Ti) x/2O 19 ( x=2 and 3)/polyvinylchloride can be fabricated for the applications over 15 GHz, with reflection loss more than -25 dB for specific frequencies, by controlling the molar ratio of the substituted ions.

  14. Abundance analysis of s-process enhanced barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-08-01

    Detailed chemical composition studies of stars with enhanced abundances of neutron-capture elements can provide observational constraints for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis studies and clues for understanding their contribution to the Galactic chemical enrichment. We present abundance results from high-resolution spectral analyses of a sample of four chemically peculiar stars characterized by s-process enhancement. High-Resolution spectra (R ˜42000) of these objects spanning a wavelength range from 4000 to 6800 Å, are taken from the ELODIE archive. We have estimated the stellar atmospheric parameters, the effective temperature Teff, the surface gravity log g, and metallicity [Fe/H] from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres. We report estimates of elemental abundances for several neutron-capture elements, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Dy. While HD 49641 and HD 58368 show [Ba/Fe] ≥ 1.16 the other two objects HD 119650 and HD 191010 are found to be mild barium stars with [Ba/Fe] ˜ 0.4. The derived abundances of the elements are interpreted on the basis of existing theories for understanding their origin and evolution.

  15. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-28

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ~32 MPa. We discuss results in the context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  16. Barium in landscape components of the western Transbaikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, V. K.

    2015-10-01

    Barium concentrations in parent materials, soils, and plants of the forest-steppe, steppe, and dry steppe landscapes of the Transbaikal region have been studied. The average concentration of this element in rocks and soils of this region exceeds its clarke by 1.8-2.1 times. A positive correlation between the contents of Ba in soils, soil-forming rocks, and plants has been found. The concentration of Ba in soils does not correlate with the soil pH and humus content. Distribution patterns of Ba in the soil profiles have been characterized. With respect to the coefficient of the biological uptake by plants, Ba is assigned to the group of low accumulation (0.55-0.65) for mineral soils and of strong accumulation (6.0) for alluvial bog soils. Average concentrations of Ba in the steppe, meadow, and cultivated vegetation of the region are 1.9-2.3 times higher in comparison with the average concentration of this element in plants of the continents. The biological migration of Ba is most active in meadow landscapes, whereas steppe landscapes are characterized by the least active biological migration of this element.

  17. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  18. DISORDERED SILICATES IN SPACE: A STUDY OF LABORATORY SPECTRA OF 'AMORPHOUS' SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Angela K.; Whittington, Alan G.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2011-10-20

    We present a laboratory study of silicate glasses of astrophysically relevant compositions including olivines, pyroxenes, and melilites. With emphasis on the classic Si-O stretching feature near 10 {mu}m, we compare infrared spectra of our new samples with laboratory spectra on ostensibly similar compositions, and also with synthetic silicate spectral data commonly used in dust modeling. Several different factors affect spectral features including sample chemistry (e.g., polymerization, Mg/Fe ratio, oxidation state, and Al-content) whereas different sample preparation techniques lead to variations in porosity, density, and water content. The convolution of chemical and physical effects makes it difficult to attribute changes in spectral parameters to any given variable. It is important that detailed chemical and structural characterization be provided along with laboratory spectra. In addition to composition and density, we measured the glass transition temperatures for the samples which place upper limits on the formation and/or processing temperatures of these solids in space. Popular synthetically generated optical functions do not have spectral features that match any of our glass samples. However, the {approx}10 {mu}m feature generated by the synthetic data rarely exactly matches the shape and peak position of astronomically observed silicate features. Our comparison with the synthetic spectra allows astronomers to determine likely candidates among our glass samples for matching astronomical observations.

  19. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  20. Lattice thermal conductivity of dense silicate glass at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The layered structure of the Earth's interior is generally believed to develop through the magma ocean differentiation in the early Earth. Previous seismic studies revealed the existence of ultra low velocity zones above the core mantle boundary (CMB) which was inferred to be associated with the remnant of a deep magma ocean. The heat flux through the core mantle boundary therefore would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, both lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals of the lower mantle. Recent experimental results on the radiative thermal conductivity of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals suggest that krad of dense silicate glasses could be remarkably lower than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases. In this case, the dense silicate melts will act as a trap for heat from the Earth's outer core. However, this conclusion remains uncertain because of the lack of direct measurements on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses/melts under lower mantle pressures up to date. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of dense silicate glass with basaltic composition under pressures relevant to the Earth's lower mantle in a diamond-anvil cell using time-domain thermoreflectance method. The study will assist the comprehension of thermal transport properties of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior and is crucial for understanding the dynamic and thermal evolution of the Earth's internal structure.

  1. Deep ocean biogeochemistry of silicic acid and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Simeon, J.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gruber, N.; Key, R. M.; Schlitzer, R.

    2007-03-01

    Observations of silicic acid and nitrate along the lower branch of the global conveyor belt circulation show that silicic acid accumulation by diatom opal dissolution occurs at 6.4 times the rate of nitrate addition by organic matter remineralization. The export of opal and organic matter from the surface ocean occurs at a Si:N mole ratio that is much smaller than this almost everywhere (cf. Sarmiento et al., 2004). The preferential increase of silicic acid over nitrate as the deep circulation progresses from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific is generally interpreted as requiring deep dissolution of opal together with shallow remineralization of organic matter (Broecker, 1991). However, Sarmiento et al. (2004) showed that the primary reason for the low silicic acid concentration of the upper ocean is that the waters feeding the main thermocline from the surface Southern Ocean are depleted in silicic acid relative to nitrate. By implication, the same Southern Ocean processes that deplete the silicic acid in the surface Southern Ocean must also be responsible for the enhanced silicic acid concentration of the deep ocean. We use observations and results from an updated version of the adjoint model of Schlitzer (2000) to confirm that this indeed the case.

  2. On the Stabilization of Ribose by Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Horton, Scott R.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Šponer, Jiří; Šponer, Judit E.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    The RNA-world theory hypothesizes that early Earth life was based on the RNA molecule. However, the notion that ribose, the sugar in RNA, is unstable still casts a serious doubt over this theory. Recently, it has been found that the silicate-mediated formose reaction facilitates the stabilization of ribose. Using accurate quantum chemical calculations, we determined the relative stability of the silicate complexes of arabinose, lyxose, ribose, and xylose with the intent to determine which would form predominantly from a formose-like reaction. Five stereoisomers were investigated for each complex. The stereoisomers of 2:1 ribose-silicate are the more stable ones, to the extent that the least stable of these is even more stable than the most stable stereoisomer of the other 2:1 sugar-silicate complexes. Thus, thermodynamically, a formose-like reaction in the presence of silicate minerals should preferentially form the silicate complex of ribose over the silicate complex of arabinose, lyxose, and xylose.

  3. High pressure–low temperature phase diagram of barium: Simplicity versus complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-11-30

    Barium holds a distinctive position among all elements studied upon densification. Indeed, it was the first example shown to violate the long-standing notion that high compression of simple metals should preserve or yield close-packed structures. From modest pressure conditions at room temperature, barium transforms at higher pressures from its simple structures to the extraordinarily complex atomic arrangements of the incommensurate and self-hosting Ba-IV phases. By a detailed mapping of the pressure/temperature structures of barium, we demonstrate the existence of another crystalline arrangement of barium, Ba-VI, at low temperature and high pressure. The simple structure of Ba-VI is unlike that of complex Ba-IV, the phase encountered in a similar pressure range at room temperature. First-principles calculations predict Ba-VI to be stable at high pressure and superconductive. The results illustrate the complexity of the low temperature-high pressure phase diagram of barium and the significant effect of temperature on structural phase transformations.

  4. Fabrication of barium/strontium carbonate coated amorphous carbon nanotubes as an improved field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, S.; Jha, A.; Das, N. S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2013-02-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature ˜250 ∘C in an air furnace. As-synthesized aCNTs were coated with the barium/strontium carbonate through a simple chemical process. The coating of barium/strontium carbonate was confirmed by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Morphology of the as-prepared samples was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Thermal gravimetric analysis showed that barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs are more stable than the pristine aCNTs. As-prepared barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs showed significantly improved field emission properties with a turn-on field as low as 2.5 V/μm. The variation of field emission characteristics of the barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs with interelectrode distances was also studied.

  5. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  6. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  7. The essential role of a poison center in handling an outbreak of barium carbonate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Deng, J F; Jan, I S; Cheng, H S

    1991-04-01

    Acute barium salt poisoning may cause acute hypokalemia and result in respiratory paralysis and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The early nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms of barium poisoning due to food contamination could be confused with other benign food poisonings. Early diagnosis and initiation of intensive supportive care is essential. We report an outbreak of acute barium carbonate poisoning, occurring at a family reunion party, which resulted in 9 hospital admissions. All of the victims initially developed nausea, vomiting, abdominal colic, dizziness and watery diarrhea followed by numbness of the face and distal extremities 1-2 h after ingesting fried flour-coated sweet potatoes. The flour was later confirmed to be contaminated with barium carbonate. One person died in the emergency room with a serum potassium level of 0.8 mEq/L. Two other victims developed ventricular tachycardia and respiratory paralysis but completely recovered with the treatment advice provided by the poison center. The poison center was successful in helping to make the correct diagnosis in a timely manner, immediately distribute the treatment protocol, and coordinate the laboratory confirmation of barium carbonate poisoning.

  8. Microstructures of Rare Silicate Stardust from Nova and Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S

    2011-01-01

    Most silicate stardust analyzed in the laboratory and observed around stellar environments derives from O-rich red giant and AGB stars [1,2]. Supernova (SN) silicates and oxides are comparatively rare, and fewer than 10 grains from no-va or binary star systems have been identified to date. Very little is known about dust formation in these stellar environments. Mineralogical studies of only three O-rich SN [3-5] and no nova grains have been performed. Here we report the microstructure and chemical makeup of two SN silicates and one nova grain.

  9. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  10. Thermally responsive aqueous silicate mixtures and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Vinson, E.F.

    1987-02-03

    A method is described of plugging or sealing a zone in a subterranean formation comprising: (a) contacting the zone with an aqueous silicate composition consisting essentially of (i) an aqueous solution containing an alkali metal silicate; and, (ii) a thermally responsive gelation activator selected from the group consisting of lactose, dextrose, fructose, galactose, mannose, mantose, xylose and mixtures thereof; and (b) activating the gelation activator in response to a thermal change in the composition within the formation whereby the silicate composition is caused to form a gel in the zone.

  11. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  12. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of Barium Zirconate Titanate (BZT) nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Simin; Aghayan, Mahdi; Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Behdani, Mohammad; Asoodeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    So far, the antibacterial activity of some organic and inorganic compounds has been studied. Barium zirconate titanate [Ba(ZrxTi1-x)O3] (x = 0.05) nanoparticle is an example of inorganic materials. In vitro studies have provided evidence for the antibacterial activity of this nanoparticle. In the current study, the nano-powder was synthesized by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction showed that the powder was single-phase and had a perovskite structure at the calcination temperature of 1000 °C. Antibacterial activity of the desired nanoparticle was assessed on two gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431 and Micrococcus luteus PTCC1625) and two gram-negative (Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c and clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria according to Radial Diffusion Assay (RDA). The results showed that the antibacterial activity of BZT nano-powder on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was acceptable. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this nano-powder was determined. The results showed that MIC values for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus were about 2.3 μg/mL, 7.3 μg/mL, 3 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was also evaluated and showed that the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus could be decreased at 2.3, 14, 3 and 18 μg/mL of BZT. Average log reduction in viable bacteria count in time-kill assay ranged between 6 Log10 cfu/mL to zero after 24 h of incubation with BZT nanoparticle. PMID:25763046

  13. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of Barium Zirconate Titanate (BZT) nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Simin; Aghayan, Mahdi; Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Behdani, Mohammad; Asoodeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    So far, the antibacterial activity of some organic and inorganic compounds has been studied. Barium zirconate titanate [Ba(ZrxTi₁-x)O₃] (x = 0.05) nanoparticle is an example of inorganic materials. In vitro studies have provided evidence for the antibacterial activity of this nanoparticle. In the current study, the nano-powder was synthesized by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction showed that the powder was single-phase and had a perovskite structure at the calcination temperature of 1000 °C. Antibacterial activity of the desired nanoparticle was assessed on two gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431 and Micrococcus luteus PTCC1625) and two gram-negative (Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c and clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria according to Radial Diffusion Assay (RDA). The results showed that the antibacterial activity of BZT nano-powder on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was acceptable. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this nano-powder was determined. The results showed that MIC values for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus were about 2.3 μg/mL, 7.3 μg/mL, 3 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was also evaluated and showed that the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus could be decreased at 2.3, 14, 3 and 18 μg/mL of BZT. Average log reduction in viable bacteria count in time-kill assay ranged between 6 Log₁₀ cfu/mL to zero after 24 h of incubation with BZT nanoparticle.

  14. TWO BARIUM STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 5822

    SciTech Connect

    Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; De Castro, D. B. E-mail: claudio@on.br

    2013-08-01

    Open clusters are very useful examples to explain the constraint of the nucleosynthesis process with the luminosities of stars because the distances of the clusters are better known than those of field stars. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the chemical composition of two red giants in the young open cluster NGC 5822, NGC 5822-2, and NGC 5822-201. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that NGC 5822-2 and -201 have, respectively, a mean overabundance of the elements created by the s-process, ''s'', with the notation [s/Fe] of 0.77 {+-} 0.12 and 0.83 {+-} 0.05. These values are higher than those for field giants of similar metallicity. We also found that NGC 5822-2 and -201 have, respectively, luminosities of 140 L{sub Sun} and 76 L{sub Sun }, which are much lower than the luminosity of an asymptotic giant branch star. We conclude that NGC 5822-2 and NGC 5822-201 are two new barium stars first identified in the open cluster NGC 5822. The mass transfer hypothesis is the best scenario to explain the observed overabundances.

  15. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  16. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  17. Copper isotopic composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Huang, Jian; Liu, Jingao; Wörner, Gerhard; Yang, Wei; Tang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Yi; Tang, Limei; Zheng, Jianping; Li, Shuguang

    2015-10-01

    Copper isotopes have been successfully applied to many fields in geochemistry, and in particular, as a strongly chalcophile element, the isotope systematics of Cu can be potentially applied as a proxy for crust-mantle and core-mantle differentiation processes. However, to date, the Cu isotopic composition of distinct silicate reservoirs in the Earth, as well as the behaviour of Cu isotopes during igneous processes and slab dehydration are not well constrained. To address these issues, here we report high-precision (±0.05‰; 2SD) Cu isotope data for 132 terrestrial samples including 28 cratonic peridotites, 19 orogenic peridotites, 70 basalts (MORBs, OIBs, arc basalts and continental basalts) and 15 subduction-related andesites/dacites sourced worldwide. The peridotites are classified into metasomatized and non-metasomatized groups, based upon their rare earth element (REE) patterns and the presence or lack of minerals diagnostic of metasomatism (e.g., phlogopite). The metasomatized peridotites span a wide range of δ65Cu values from -0.64 to +1.82‰, in sharp contrast to the non-metasomatized peridotites that exhibit a narrow range of δ65Cu from -0.15 to +0.18‰ with an average of + 0.03 ± 0.24 ‰ (2SD). Comparison between these two groups of peridotites demonstrates that metasomatism significantly fractionates Cu isotopes with sulfide breakdown and precipitation potentially shifting Cu isotopes towards light and heavy values, respectively. MORBs and OIBs have homogeneous Cu isotopic compositions (+ 0.09 ± 0.13 ‰; 2SD), which are indistinguishable from those of the non-metasomatized peridotites within uncertainty. This suggests that Cu isotope fractionation during mantle partial melting is limited, even if sulfides are a residual phase. Compared with MORBs and OIBs, arc and continental basalts are more heterogeneous in Cu isotopic composition. In particular, basalts that were collected from a traverse across the Kamchatka arc over a distance of 200 to 400

  18. Changes in the Small Intestine of a Cat Associated with Barium Sulphate Following Contrast Radiography.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, H; Oishi, M; Ohno, K; Tsuboi, M; Irie, N; Uchida, K; Tsujimoto, H

    2016-01-01

    A 7-year-old neutered male domestic short-haired cat that had undergone contrast radiography of the bowel with barium sulphate after acute episodes of vomiting 2 months previously, was presented with chronic vomiting, anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography revealed residual contrast enhancement and an obstruction of the small intestine. A contracted and stenosed ileum and distal jejunum were identified by exploratory laparotomy and surgically resected; subsequently, the clinical signs resolved. Histopathological examination of the ileum revealed mucosal ulceration with severe submucosal granulation tissue formation associated with scattered foreign crystalline material. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the crystals contained barium sulphate. This is the first report in animals of the rare complication of barium sulphate incorporation into the gastrointestinal mucosa after contrast radiography.

  19. The review of various synthesis methods of barium titanate with the enhanced dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, S. P.; Topare, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Barium Titanate is a very well known dielectric ceramic belongs to perovskite structure. It has very wide applications in the field of electronic, electro ceramic, electromechanical and electro-optical applications. Barium Titanate has very high dielectric constant as well as low dielectric loss. Substituted dielectrics are one of the most important technological compounds in modern electro ceramics. Its electrical properties can be tuned flexibly by a simple substitution technique. This has encouraged researchers to select a typical cation to be substituted at cationic sites. In the present paper, the review of various synthesis methods of Barium Titanate compound with the effect of different dopants, the grain size on the dielectric properties at various temperatures is discussed.

  20. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanates at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, Jai N.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were the following: to understand the phase transformations in barium and strontium titanates as the crystals go from one temperature to the other; and to study the dielectric behavior of barium and strontium titanate crystals at a microwave frequency of 9.12 GHz and as a function of temperature. Phase transition studies in barium and strontium titanate are conducted using a cylindrical microwave resonant cavity as a probe. The cavity technique is quite successful in establishing the phase changes in these crystals. It appears that dipole relaxation plays an important role in the behavior of the dielectric response of the medium loading the cavity as phase change takes place within the sample. The method of a loaded resonant microwave cavity as applied in this work has proven to be sensitive enough to monitor small phase changes of the cavity medium.

  1. Prompt ionization in the CRIT II barium releases. [Critical Ionization Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Liou, K.; Rau, D.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of electron and ion distributions inside a fast neutral barium jet in the ionosphere show significant fluxes within 4 km of release, presumably related to beam plasma instability processes involved in the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. Electron fluxes exceeding 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm-str-sec-keV were responsible for ionizing both the streaming barium and ambient oxygen. Resulting ion fluxes seem to be consistent with 1-2 percent ionization of the fast barium, as reported by optical observations, although the extended spatial distribution of the optically observed ions is difficult to reconcile with the in situ observations. When the perpendicular velocity of the neutrals falls below critical values, these processes shut off. Although these observations resemble the earlier Porcupine experimental results (Haerendel, 1982), theoretical understanding of the differences between these data and that of earlier negative experiments is still lacking.

  2. Plasma irregularities caused by cycloid bunching of the CRRES G-2 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Pongratz, M. B.; Simons, D. J.; Wolcott, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft carried a number of barium thermite canisters for release into the upper atmosphere. The barium release labeled G-2 showed evidence of curved irregularities not aligned with the ambient magnetic field B. The newly discovered curved structures can be explained by a process called cycloid bunching. Cycloid bunching occurs when plasma is created by photoionization of a neutral cloud injected at high velocity perpendicular to B. If the injection velocity is much larger than the expansion speed of the cloud, the ion trail will form a cycloid that has irregularities spaced by the product of the perpendicular injection speed and the ion gyroperiod, Images of the solar-illuminated barium ions are compared with the results of a three-dimensional kinetic simulation. Cycloid bunching is shown to be responsible for the rapid generation of both curved and field-aligned irregularities in the CRRES G-2 experiment.

  3. Observation and theory of the barium releases from the CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Scales, W. A.; Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between releases of barium from the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and enhanced auroral activity is discussed with reference to observational data. Barium releases were conducted at a variety of altitudes and injection velocities, and plasma irregularities are reported as a result of the interactions. Auroral activity increased within 5 min of each release, and references are made to the effects on diamagnetic cavities, bulk ion motion, and stimulated electron and ion precipitation. Artificially created structured diamagnetic cavities are noted for each release, plasma waves are generated by the high-speed ion clouds, and enhanced ionization is found in the critical ionization-velocity process. Barium releases are effective in stimulating electron precipitation, and the observed irregularities are related to cycloid bunching of the initial ion distributions.

  4. Measurements of barium photocathode quantum yields at four excimer laser wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loy, M.D.; Young, A.T.; Leung, K.N.

    1992-06-01

    The electron quantum yields from barium cathodes excited by excimer laser radiation at 193, 248, 308, and 351 nm have been determined. Experiments with different cathode surface preparation techniques reveal that deposition of barium film a few microns thick on a clean copper surface under moderate vacuum conditions achieves relatively high quantum efficiencies. Quantum yields measured from surfaces prepared in this manner are 2.3 x 10{sup -3} at 193 nm, 7.6 x 10{sup - 4} at 248 nm, 6.1 x 10{sup -4} at 308 nm, and 4.0 x 10{sup -4} at 351 nm. Other preparation techniques, such as laser cleaning of a solid barium surface, produced quantum yields that were at least an order of magnitude lower than these values.

  5. The L equals 6.7 quiet time barium shaped charge injection experiment 'Chachalaca'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Rieger, E. P.; Peek, H. M.; Bottoms, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Near dawn on October 9, 1972, UT, a barium plasma injection experiment was carried out from Poker Flat, Alaska, during quiet magnetic conditions (Kp equals 1+). The visible plasma flux tube produced was more diffuse than the flux tubes in previous experiments, but it could be tracked for 30 min out to an altitude of 2.5 earth radii. The flux tube remained integral for about 20 min, when a single striation separated from the main streak. Comparisons of the observed flux tube orientation with theoretical field models show no significant deviations ascribable to field-aligned currents. Cross-field drift rates of the foot of the flux tube indicate an E field of approximately 7 mV/m at 200-km altitude. Although an attempt was made via a jet aircraft flight, barium ions were not detected in the southern conjugate region. No energetic particle precipitation phenomena were observed which could be ascribed to the barium plasma injection.

  6. Highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires via hydrothermal synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowland, Christopher C.; Zhou, Zhi; Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a hydrothermal synthesis procedure that results in the growth of highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires. Using a multiple step, scalable hydrothermal reaction, a textured titanium dioxide film is deposited on titanium foil upon which highly aligned nanowires are grown via homoepitaxy and converted to barium titanate. Scanning electron microscope images clearly illustrate the effect the textured film has on the degree of orientation of the nanowires. The alignment of nanowires is quantified by calculating the Herman's Orientation Factor, which reveals a 58% improvement in orientation as compared to growth in the absence of the textured film. The ferroelectric properties of barium titanate combined with the development of this scalable growth procedure provide a powerful route towards increasing the efficiency and performance of nanowire-based devices in future real-world applications such as sensing and power harvesting.

  7. Barium isotopes in individual presolar silicon carbide grains from the Murchison meteorite.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M. R.; Davis, A. M.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.; Gallino, R.; Lugaro, M.; Univ. of Chicago; Washington Univ.; Univ. di Torino; Cambridge Univ.

    2003-09-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single 2.3-5.3 {mu}m presolar SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite were measured by resonant ionization mass spectrometry. Mainstream SiC grains are enriched in s-process barium and show a spread in isotopic composition from solar to dominantly s-process. In the relatively coarse grain size fraction analyzed, there are large grain-to-grain variations of barium isotopic composition. Comparison of single grain data with models of nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars indicates that the grains most likely come from low mass carbon-rich AGB stars (1.5 to 3 solar masses) of about solar metallicity and with approximately solar initial proportions of r- and s-process isotopes. Measurements of single grains imply a wide variety of neutron-to-seed ratios, in agreement with previous measurements of strontium, zirconium and molybdenum isotopic compositions of single presolar SiC grains.

  8. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Asteroidal Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin, Jason S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental process of planetary differentiation is the segregation of metal-sulfide and silicate phases, leading eventually to the formation of a metallic core. Asteroidal meteorites provide a glimpse of this process frozen in time from the early solar system. While chondrites represent starting materials, iron meteorites provide an end product where metal has been completely concentrated in a region of the parent asteroid. A complimentary end product is seen in metal-poor achondrites that have undergone significant igneous processing, such as angrites, HED's and the majority of aubrites. Metal-rich achondrites such as acapulcoite/lodranites, winonaites, ureilites, and metal-rich aubrites may represent intermediate stages in the metal segregation process. Among these, acapulcoite-lodranites and ureilites are examples of primary metal-bearing mantle restites, and therefore provide an opportunity to observe the metal segregation process that was captured in progress. In this study we use bulk trace element compositions of acapulcoites-lodranites and ureilites for this purpose.

  9. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 1012 mol Si per year, which makes them the major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under dSi-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm communities. On a global scale this behaviour might affect sediment–water dSi fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. PMID:26842428

  10. Nanostructure of Er3+ doped silicates.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nan; Hou, Kirk; Haines, Christopher D; Etessami, Nathan; Ranganathan, Varadh; Halpern, Susan B; Kear, Bernard H; Klein, Lisa C; Sigel, George H

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate nanostructural evolution resulting in highly increased photoluminescence in silicates doped with Er3+ ions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging, nano-energy dispersed X-ray (NEDX) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence analysis confirm the local composition and structure changes of the Er3+ ions upon thermal annealing. We studied two types of amorphous nanopowder: the first is of the composition SiO2/18Al2O3/2Er2O3 (SAE), synthesized by combustion flame-chemical vapor condensation, and the second is with a composition of SiO2/8Y2O3/2Er2O3 (SYE), synthesized by sol-gel synthesis (composition in mol%). Electron diffraction and HRTEM imaging clearly show the formation of nanocrystallites with an average diameter of approximately 8 nm in SAE samples annealed at 1000 degrees C and SYE samples annealed at 1200 degrees C. The volume fraction of the nanocrystalline phase increased with each heat treatment, eventually leading to complete devitrification at 1400 degrees C. Further XRD and NEDX analysis indicates that the nanocrystalline phase has the pyrochlore structure with the formula Er(x)Al(2-x)Si2O7 or Er(x)Y(2-x)Si2O7 and a surrounding silica matrix.

  11. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  12. Individual-specific transgenerational marking of fish populations based on a barium dual-isotope procedure.

    PubMed

    Huelga-Suarez, Gonzalo; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia-Valiente, America; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The present study focuses on the development and evaluation of an individual-specific transgenerational marking procedure using two enriched barium isotopes, (135)Ba and (137)Ba, mixed at a given and selectable molar ratio. The method is based on the deconvolution of the isotope patterns found in the sample into four molar contribution factors: natural xenon (Xe nat), natural barium (Ba nat), Ba135, and Ba137. The ratio of molar contributions between Ba137 and Ba135 is constant and independent of the contribution of natural barium in the sample. This procedure was tested in brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) kept in captivity. Trout were injected with three different Ba137/Ba135 isotopic signatures ca. 7 months and 7 days before spawning to compare the efficiency of the marking procedure at long and short term, respectively. The barium isotopic profiles were measured in the offspring by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each of the three different isotopic signatures was unequivocally identified in the offspring in both whole eggs and larvae. For 9 month old offspring, the characteristic barium isotope signatures could also be detected in the otoliths even in the presence of a high and variable amount of barium of natural isotope abundance. In conclusion, it can be stated that the proposed dual-isotope marking is inheritable and can be detected after both long-term and short-term marking. Furthermore, the dual-isotope marking can be made individual-specific, so that it allows identification of offspring from a single individual or a group of individuals within a given fish group.

  13. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  14. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    PubMed

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  15. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have identified two presolar silicate grains as polycrystalline assemblages, or equilibrated aggregates. These grains occur in a stardust-rich interplanetary dust particle (IDP). We propose these grains were annealed in the solar nebula.

  16. Barium hydrogen phosphate/gelatin composites versus gelatin-free barium hydrogen phosphate: synthesis and characterization of properties.

    PubMed

    Gashti, Mazeyar Parvinzadeh; Burgener, Matthias; Stir, Manuela; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-10-01

    Recently, attention has been spent on crystal growth of phosphate compounds in gels for studying the mechanism of in vitro crystallization processes. Here, we present a gel-based approach for the synthesis of barium hydrogen phosphate (BHP) crystals using single and double diffusion techniques in gelatin. The composite crystals were compared with analytical grade BHP powder, single and polycrystalline BHP materials using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning pyroelectric microscopy (SPEM), optical microscopy (OM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FTIR spectra showed surface adsorption of gelatin molecules by using BHP stacked sheets due to CH2 stretching, CH2 bending and amide I vibrations are found in a gelatin content of about 2% determined by dissolution. SEM shows various crystal morphologies of the BHP/gelatin composites forming bundled micro-flakes to irregular bundled needles and spheres different from gel-free crystals. The variety in morphology depends on the ion concentration, pH of gel as well as the method of crystal growth. SPEM investigation of BHP/gelatin aggregates revealed polar domains showing alteration of the polarization. Moreover, BHP/gelatin composite crystals showed a higher thermal stability in comparison with analytical grade BHP or/and BHP single crystals due to strong interactions between gelatin and BHP. The XRD diffraction analysis demonstrated that the single and double diffusion techniques in gelatin led to the formation of orthorhombic BHP. This study demonstrates that gelatin is a useful high molecular weight biomacromolecule for controlling the crystallization of a composite material by producing a variety of morphological forms. PMID:24996024

  17. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  18. Histopathological and microanalytical study of zirconium dioxide and barium sulphate in bone cement.

    PubMed Central

    Keen, C. E.; Philip, G.; Brady, K.; Spencer, J. D.; Levison, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To report the appearances of zirconium dioxide and barium sulphate in interface membranes, synovium, and other tissues around joint prostheses. METHODS: Histological sections from 23 specimens were reviewed by light microscopy and polarisation. Scanning electron microscopy and x ray microanalysis were performed on routinely processed paraffin wax sections. RESULTS: Polyethylene, metals, and polymethylmethacrylate cement debris were easily recognisable. Almost all the cement remnants contained either zirconium dioxide or barium sulphate, confirmed by microanalysis. The contrast media had characteristic light microscopic appearances. Zirconium was identified in macrophages away from cement remnants. CONCLUSION: The presence of radiographic contrast media in tissues around prosthetic joints is common but not widely recognised. Images PMID:1452794

  19. ION-EXCHANGE METHOD FOR SEPARATING RADIUM FROM RADIUM-BARIUM MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Fuentevilla, M.E.

    1959-06-30

    An improved process is presented for separating radium from an aqueous feed solution containing radium and barium values and a complexing agent for these metals. In this process a feed solutlon containing radium and barium ions and a complexing agent for said ions ls cycled through an exchange zone in resins. The radiumenriched resin is then stripped of radium values to form a regeneration liquid, a portion of which is collected as an enriched product, the remaining portion being recycled to the exchange zone to further enrich the ion exchange resin in radium.

  20. Physical states and properties of barium titanate films in a plane electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, V. B.; Kalinchuk, V. V.; Shakhovoi, R. A.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of a plane electric field on the phase states of barium titanate thin films under the conditions of forced deformation has been studied. The field dependence of a complete set of material constants has been taken in the region of the c-phase, where polarization losses are absent. The material constants are calculated using equations of the piezoelectric effect derived by linearizing the nonlinear equations of state from the phenomenological; theory for barium titanate. It has been shown that there is a critical value of the field at which the electromechanical coupling coefficient reaches a maximum.

  1. The structural properties of barium cobalt hexaferrite powder prepared by a simple heat treatment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Chetna; Jotania, Rajshree

    2016-05-01

    The W-type barium hexaferrite was prepared using a simple heat treatment method. The precursor was calcinated at 650°C for 3 hours and then slowly cooled to room temperature in order to obtain barium cobalt hexaferrite powder. The prepared powder was characterised by different experimental techniques like XRD, FTIR and SEM. The X-ray diffractogram of the sample shows W-and M phases. The particle size calculated by Debye Scherrer formula. The FTIR spectra of the sample was taken at room temperature by using KBr pallet method which confirms the formation of hexaferrite phase. The morphological study on the hexaferrite powder was carried out by SEM analysis.

  2. Electron quantum yields from a barium photocathode illuminated with polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.E.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Kim, K.J.; Kwon, S.I.; Leung, K.N.; Young, A.T.

    1993-05-01

    Photoemission measurements with a barium photo-cathode and a nitrogen laser are reported. The cathode is prepared by evaporating barium onto a copper disc. Radiation from a nitrogen laser (337 nm, 10 ns) is polarized and strikes the cathode surface at variable angles. An electron quantum yield as high as 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} is observed. The dependence of the quantum yield on the beam polarization and angle of incidence is investigated. The results indicate that higher quantum yields are achieved when the laser beam is incident at an angle of {approximately}55{degree} and is polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence.

  3. Photocurrent Characteristics of Mn-Doped Barium Titanate Ferroelectric Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Ryotaro; Ishikawa, Shotaro; Kitanaka, Yuuki; Oguchi, Takeshi; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the photocurrent characteristics of ferroelectric single crystals of nondoped barium titanate (BT) and Mn-doped barium titanate (Mn-BT). The introduction of 90° domain structures into the BT crystals markedly increased the photocurrent, which suggests that the separation of photoinduced carriers is significantly enhanced around 90° domain walls (DWs). The Mn doping led to a drastic increase in photocurrent, with a photon energy less than the band gap. Density functional theory calculations show that the large photocurrent observed for the Mn-BT crystals originates from the electron excitation from the O 2p valence band to the Mn eg defect level followed by carrier (hole) injection.

  4. Calcium barium niobate as a functional material for broadband optical frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yan; Chen, Xin; Lukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Swirkowicz, Marek; Koynov, Kaloian; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate the application of as-grown calcium barium niobate (CBN) crystal with random-sized ferroelectric domains as a broadband frequency converter. The frequency conversion process is similar to broadband harmonic generation in commonly used strontium barium niobate (SBN) crystal, but results in higher conversion efficiency reflecting a larger effective nonlinear coefficient of the CBN crystal. We also analyzed the polarization properties of the emitted radiation and determined the ratio of d32 and d33 components of the second-order susceptibility tensor of the CBN crystal.

  5. Meteorological support to the West German-United States Barium Ion Cloud Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, R. R.; Chamberlain, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    The objective of the Barium Ion Cloud Project was to study a barium ionized cloud released at an altitude of 5 earth radii. Accurate forecasting of weather conditions to prevail during the experiment period was critical to the project success. Good seeing conditions were required at all optical sites during the experiment. All meteorological support was the responsibility of the National Weather Service at Wallops Station, Virginia. Preliminary results confirm the scientists' theories of the magnetic fields and the existence of electric fields in the magnetosphere.

  6. Influence of erbium doping on phase transition and optical properties of strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Isabella-Ioana; Voelker, Uwe; Niemer, Alexander; Pankrath, Rainer; Podlozhenov, Sergey; Betzler, Klaus

    2009-11-01

    The optical properties of erbium impurities in strontium barium niobate are investigated measuring optical absorption and emission in the visible and near infrared spectral region. For the main fluorescence band at 1.55 μm, an anomalous dependence of the fluorescence decay time on dopant concentration is found which, however, can be consistently explained by reabsorption effects. A Judd-Ofelt analysis of the absorption spectra together with an appropriate analysis of the reabsorption yields a radiative quantum efficiency of approximately 60%. In addition, erbium dopants are shown to efficiently influence the phase transition temperature of strontium barium niobate.

  7. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  8. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  9. Growth rate controlled barium partitioning in calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetschl, Katja Elisabeth; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The barium (Ba) content and the Ba/Ca molar ratios in biogenic and abiotic carbonates have been widely used from the scientific community as a geochemical proxy especially in marine and early diagenetic settings. The Ba content of carbonate minerals has been earlier associated to changes in oceanic circulation that may have been caused by upwelling, changes in weathering regimes and river-runoff as well as melt water discharge. The physicochemical controls of Ba ion incorporation in the two most abundant CaCO3 polymorphs found in Earth's surface environments, i.e. calcite and aragonite, have adequately been studied only for calcite. These earlier studies (i.e. [1]) suggest that at increasing growth rate, Ba partitioning in calcite is increasing as well. In contrast, to date the effect of growth rate on the partitioning of Ba in aragonite remains questionable, despite the fact that this mineral phase is the predominant carbonate-forming polymorph in shallow marine environments. To shed light on the mechanisms controlling Ba ion uptake in carbonates in this study we performed steady-state Ba co-precipitation experiments with calcite and aragonite at 25°C. The obtained results for the partitioning of Ba in calcite are in good agreement with those reported earlier by [1], whereas those for aragonite indicate a reduction of Ba partitioning at elevated aragonite growth rates, with the partitioning coefficient value between solid and fluid to be approaching the unity. This finding is good agreement with the formation of a solid solution in the aragonite-witherite system, owing to the isostructural crystallography of the two mineral phases. Moreover, our data set provides new insights that are required for reconstructing the evolution of the Ba content of pristine marine versus diagenetically altered carbonate minerals commonly occurring in marine subfloor settings, as the thermodynamically less stable aragonite will transform to calcite enriched in Ba, whilst affecting

  10. Rapid ray motions in barium plasma clouds and auroras

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, E.M.; Hallinan, T.J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.; Swift, D.W.; Wallis, D.D. )

    1993-03-01

    Barium plasma clouds released at high latitudes characteristically become striated with many field-aligned rays. The rays which often resemble auroral features usually drift as a whole with the E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift of the cloud and alter position only slowly (order or tens of seconds). On two evenings in 1968, in releases from Andoya, Norway, anomalous field-aligned brightenings or emission enhancements of up to 3X were observed to move rapidly (10-20 km/s) through three different Ba[sup +] clouds. Similar effects were observed in Ba[sup +] clouds released from rockets launched from Poker Flat, Alaska: On March 21, 1973, in two Ba thermite releases and on March 22, 1980, in the Ba-shaped charge experiment Miss Peggy.' On these occasions, auroras on or near the Ba[sup +] L shell, also exhibited active rapid ray motions. This leads to the assumption that the two phenomena are related and the expectation that an explanation of the rapid ray motions in the Ba[sup +] clouds would lead to a better understanding of the physics of auroral ray motions and the auroral ionosphere. Seven possible mechanisms to produce the observed moving emission enhancements are discussed. Direct motion of an isolated Ba[sup +] ray past the other rays by E [times] B/B[sup 2] motion seems very unlikely due to the observed variations in the enhancements and the large E field required (> 500 mV/m). Compressional waves do not seem to be of sufficient amplitude or velocity. Absorption or radiation of Doppler shifted Ba[sup +] emissions by ions gyrating or moving at a few kilometers per second seems to be the most promising mechanism for producing the enhancements. The observations provide compelling evidence for the existence of transient electric fields of order 100 mV/m at altitudes as low as 200 km during active aurora with rapid ray motions. The affected regions have dimensions of order a few kilometers across B and move eastward at 10-20 km/s. 36 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Regeneration of barium carbonate from barium sulphide in a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor and utilization for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Zvimba, J N; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L T; Maree, J

    2012-01-01

    Batch regeneration of barium carbonate (BaCO(3)) from barium sulphide (BaS) slurries by passing CO(2) gas into a pilot-scale bubbling column reactor under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of BaCO(3) recovery in the Alkali Barium Calcium (ABC) desalination process and its use for sulphate removal from high sulphate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD). The effect of key process parameters, such as BaS slurry concentration and CO(2) flow rate on the carbonation, as well as the extent of sulphate removal from AMD using the recovered BaCO(3) were investigated. It was observed that the carbonation reaction rate for BaCO(3) regeneration in a bubbling column reactor significantly increased with increase in carbon dioxide (CO(2)) flow rate whereas the BaS slurry content within the range 5-10% slurry content did not significantly affect the carbonation rate. The CO(2) flow rate also had an impact on the BaCO(3) morphology. The BaCO(3) recovered from the pilot-scale bubbling column reactor demonstrated effective sulphate removal ability during AMD treatment compared with commercial BaCO(3).

  12. Erupted silicic cumulates in large ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Deering, C. D.; Huber, C.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    If chemical diversity in igneous rocks is dominated by crystal-liquid separation in open-system magma reservoirs, a significant number of crystal accumulation zones must be preserved in the crust and upper mantle. Such cumulates are conspicuous in mafic lithologies (MOR, layered mafic intrusions, lower crustal arc sections), but have rarely been described and/or are controversial in the silicic upper crust. Although it is possible to recognize signs of crystal accumulations in plutonic exposures, the fact that these batholiths are typically: 1) at least several millions of years old, 2) multi-stage, 3) deformed and 4) biased towards the youngest intrusive episodes, some ambiguity remains in how to interpret geochemical and textural observations. We have chosen to explore large zoned ignimbrites, which represent an instantaneous evacuation of an upper crustal magma reservoir, to isolate potential crystal accumulation zones. Late-erupted, crystal-rich scoria with unusual chemistries (e.g., high Ba, Zr, Eu/Eu*) have been found in multiple examples of these zoned ignimbrites around the world, including the 900+ km3 Ammonia Tanks and Carpenter Ridge Tuffs, both erupted during the Tertiary magmatic flare-up in the Western USA. As already suggested for the 7700 BP Crater Lake ignimbrite, such crystal-rich scoria have mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that are most convincingly explained by accumulation of low temperature minerals as highly-evolved melt escapes upward and pools at the top of large crystalline mushes. To account for the eruption of such crystal-rich zones (technically uneruptible with >50vol% crystals), some melting of low-temperature mineral phases is required; evidence for resorption textures in sanidine and quartz is commonplace in these scoria. The presence of mafic enclaves and/or mingling textures in such scoria indicate that recharge from below ultimately drove melting of part of the mineral assemblage within the cumulate rootzone, while

  13. Dietary intake of barium, bismuth, chromium, lithium, and strontium in a Spanish population (Canary Islands, Spain).

    PubMed

    González-Weller, Dailos; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Ángel José; González, Gara Luis; Caballero Mesa, José María; Revert Gironés, Consuelo; Burgos Ojeda, Antonio; Hardisson, Arturo

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze barium, bismuth, chromium, lithium, and strontium contents in food and beverages consumed by the population of the Canary Islands (Spain) as well as determine dietary intake of these metals in the archipelago as a whole and in its individual islands. To this end, 440 samples were analyzed by ICP-OES and GFAAS. Barium concentrations ranged from 5.210 ± 2.117 mg/kg in nuts to 0.035 ± 0.043 mg/L in water. Viscera exhibited the highest levels of bismuth (38.07 ± 36.80 mg/kg). The cold meat and sausages group stood out for its high chromium concentrations (0.494 ± 0.257 mg/kg). The highest concentration of lithium and strontium came out in nuts (8.761 ± 5.368 mg/kg and 9.759 ± 5.181 mg/kg, respectively). The total intakes of barium, bismuth, chromium, lithium, and strontium were 0.685, 1.274, 0.087, 3.674, and 1.923 mg/day, respectively. Cereals turned out to contribute most to the dietary intake of barium, bismuth, chromium, and lithium in the Canary Islands, while fruit contributes most to the strontium intake. We also performed a metal intake study by age and sex of the population and compared the outcome with data from other regions, both national and international.

  14. Assessment of Barium Sulphate Formation and Inhibition at Surfaces with Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (SXRD)

    SciTech Connect

    E Mavredaki; A Neville; K Sorbie

    2011-12-31

    The precipitation of barium sulphate from aqueous supersaturated solutions is a well-known problem in the oil industry often referred to as 'scaling'. The formation and growth of barite on surfaces during the oil extraction process can result in malfunctions within the oil facilities and serious damage to the equipment. The formation of barium sulphate at surfaces remains an important topic of research with the focus being on understanding the mechanisms of formation and means of control. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) was used to investigate the formation of barium sulphate on a stainless steel surface. The effect of Poly-phosphinocarboxylic acid (PPCA) and Diethylenetriamine-penta-methylenephosphonic acid (DETPMP) which are two commercial inhibitors for barium sulphate was examined. The in situ SXRD measurements allowed the identification of the crystal faces of the deposited barite in the absence and presence of the two inhibitors. The preferential effect of the inhibitors on some crystal planes is reported and the practical significance discussed.

  15. Thermochemical process for the production of hydrogen using chromium and barium compound

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1977-01-25

    Hydrogen is produced by a closed cyclic process involving the reduction and oxidation of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of Ba.sub.2 CrO.sub.4 and Ba.sub.3 (CrO.sub.4).sub.2.

  16. Low temperature phase barium borate: A new optical limiter in continuous wave and nano pulsed regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeela, C.; Girisun, T. C. Sabari

    2015-11-01

    Low temperature phase barium borate was synthesized by hydrothermal method. XRD analysis confirms the formation of γ-BBO or hydrated barium polyborate (Ba3B6O9(OH)6) which crystallizes in monoclinic system in the P2/c space group. The molecular structure analysis shows the presence of dominant BO4 unit and the hydrated nature of material. γ-BBO exhibits sharp absorption edge at 202 nm and highly transparency in the UV-Visible-NIR region. The peak at 347 nm in the emission spectrum is due to the presence of self-trapped exciton. The third order nonlinear optical properties and limiting behavior of low temperature barium borate in both pulsed and continuous wave regime were studied. The effective 2PA absorption coefficient of γ-BBO under ns pulse excitation is estimated to be 0.38 × 10-10 m/W. The nonlinear absorption coefficient, refractive index and optical susceptibility of the material in cw regime were found to be in the order of 10-5 m W-1, 10-12 m2 W-1, 10-6 esu respectively. In both regimes, low temperature phase barium borate exhibits better optical limiting properties than high temperature phase β-BBO.

  17. Barium versus Nonbarium Stimuli: Differences in Taste Intensity, Chemesthesis, and Swallowing Behavior in Healthy Adult Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Ahmed; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined the impact of barium on the perceived taste intensity of 7 different liquid tastant stimuli and the modulatory effect that these differences in perceived taste intensity have on swallowing behaviors. Method: Participants were 80 healthy women, stratified by age group (<40; >60) and genetic taste status…

  18. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-01

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities.

  19. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-01

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities. PMID:22639415

  20. The efficiency of a DTPA-based solvent in the dissolution of barium sulfate scale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Putnis, A.; Putnis, C.V.; Paul, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes kinetic experiments to determine the rate at which Ba ions are mobilized from crystalline barium sulfate into aqueous solution by a solvent in which the active ingredient is a strong chelating agent for Ba ions (DTPA -- diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid). The experiments define the temperature dependence and hence the activation energy of the dissolution process, the surface area dependence and most importantly the dependence on the concentration of the DTPA in solution. In a 0.05M DTPA solution the dissolution rate of barium sulfate is highly temperature dependent with an activation energy of {approximately}45 kJ/mol. This value suggests that the rate is controlled by the desorption of a BA-DTPA surface complex. Surface complexation is further identified as the key to barium sulfate dissolution by the observation that over the concentration range 0.5M to 0.05M DTPA the initial dissolution rate is inversely related to the DTPA concentration. The activation energy remains unaltered but the absolute dissolution rate is increased. In other words, a 0.05M DTPA solution is more efficient as a solvent than a 0.5M solution. This unexpected result is interpreted in terms of a passivation of the barium sulfate surface by the formation of a surface complex layer at high DTPA concentrations.

  1. Effects of barium and cadmium on the population development of the marine nematode Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina.

    PubMed

    Lira, V F; Santos, G A P; Derycke, S; Larrazabal, M E L; Fonsêca-Genevois, V G; Moens, T

    2011-10-01

    Offshore oil and gas drilling often involves the use of fluids containing barium and traces of other heavy metals. These may affect the environment, but information on their toxicity to benthic biota remains scant. Here, we present results of a 10-day bioassay with the marine nematode Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina at different loads of barium (0-10 ,000 ppm nominal concentrations) and cadmium (0-12 ppm) in the range of concentrations reported from drilling-impacted sediments. Barium did not affect the fitness and population development of R. (P.) marina at concentrations up to 300 ppm, but did cause a decrease in population abundance and an increase in development time from concentrations of 400-2000 ppm onwards. Increased mortality occurred at 4800 ppm Ba. For cadmium, LOEC and EC₅₀ values for total population abundance were 2.95 and 8.82 ppm, respectively. Cd concentrations as low as 2.40 to 2.68 caused a decrease in the abundance of adult nematodes, indicating that assays covering more generations would likely demonstrate yet more pronounced population-level effects. Our results indicate that oil and gas drilling activities may potentially have important implications for the meiobenthos through the toxicity of barium and associated metals like cadmium.

  2. New volatile strontium and barium imidazolate complexes for the deposition of group 2 metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Norman, John A T; Perez, Melanie; Kim, M S; Lei, Xinjian; Ivanov, Sergei; Derecskei-Kovacs, Agnes; Matz, Laura; Buchanan, Iain; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2011-12-19

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and experimental density function theory-derived properties of new volatile strontium and barium imidazolate complexes, which under atomic layer deposition conditions using ozone as a reagent can deposit crystalline strontium oxide at 375 °C.

  3. Effect of aluminum substitution on microwave absorption properties of barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianxun; Zhang, Qiguo; Gu, Mingyuan; Shen, Haigen

    2005-11-01

    Aluminum substituted barium hexaferrites were prepared by the self-propagating combustion method and subsequent calcination at 850 °C. The crystalline structure, complex permittivity, complex permeability, and hyperfine parameters of BaFe12-xAlxO19 (x varies from 1.5 to 2.3 in steps of 0.2) were measured with x-ray diffraction (XRD), vector network analyzer and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The XRD results show that all Al3+ ions enter into the lattice of hexagonal barium ferrite. The substitution of Al3+ ions can greatly affect the complex permittivity and permeability of barium ferrite. With increasing substitution, the real part of complex permittivity increases gradually, and the peaks of the imaginary part of complex permeability shift into higher frequency band. When the substitution amount x is 1.9, the largest movement of the peaks is 1.95 GHz, which indicates that the ferromagnetic resonant frequency of barium ferrite increases by 1.95 GHz. The Al3+ ions preferentially occupy the 4f2, 2a, 4f1, and 12k sites in the subcrystalline structure up to x =1.9, and then the Al3+ ions mainly occupy 12k sites. This change also results in 2b sites with a large quadrupole splitting. These occupations lead to a variable magnetocrystalline anisotropy field.

  4. Distribution and source of barium in ground water at Cattaraugus Indian Reservation, southwestern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Staubitz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved barium have been found in ground water from bedrock wells on the Seneca Nation of Indians Reservation on Cattaraugus Creek in southwestern New York. Concentrations in 1982 were as high as 23.0 milligrams per liter , the highest found reported from any natural ground-water system in the world. The highest concentrations are in a bedrock aquifer and in small lenses of saturated gravel between bedrock and the overlying till. The bedrock aquifer is partly confined by silt, clay, and till. The high barium concentrations are attributed to dissolution of the mineral barite (BaSO4), which is present in the bedrock and possibly in overlying silt, clay, or till. The dissolution of barite seems to be controlled by action of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which alter the BaSO4 equilibrium by removing sulfate ions and permitting additional barite to dissolve. Ground water from the surficial, unconsolidated deposits and surface water in streams contain little or no barium. Because barium is chemically similar to calcium, it probably could be removed by cation exchange or treatments similar to those used for water softening. (USGS)

  5. Effects of barium and cadmium on the population development of the marine nematode Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina.

    PubMed

    Lira, V F; Santos, G A P; Derycke, S; Larrazabal, M E L; Fonsêca-Genevois, V G; Moens, T

    2011-10-01

    Offshore oil and gas drilling often involves the use of fluids containing barium and traces of other heavy metals. These may affect the environment, but information on their toxicity to benthic biota remains scant. Here, we present results of a 10-day bioassay with the marine nematode Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina at different loads of barium (0-10 ,000 ppm nominal concentrations) and cadmium (0-12 ppm) in the range of concentrations reported from drilling-impacted sediments. Barium did not affect the fitness and population development of R. (P.) marina at concentrations up to 300 ppm, but did cause a decrease in population abundance and an increase in development time from concentrations of 400-2000 ppm onwards. Increased mortality occurred at 4800 ppm Ba. For cadmium, LOEC and EC₅₀ values for total population abundance were 2.95 and 8.82 ppm, respectively. Cd concentrations as low as 2.40 to 2.68 caused a decrease in the abundance of adult nematodes, indicating that assays covering more generations would likely demonstrate yet more pronounced population-level effects. Our results indicate that oil and gas drilling activities may potentially have important implications for the meiobenthos through the toxicity of barium and associated metals like cadmium. PMID:21855994

  6. Model NSR catalysts: Fabrication and reactivity of barium oxide layers on Cu(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsami, A.; Grillo, F.; Bowker, M.; Nix, R. M.

    2006-09-01

    The growth of barium oxide on a Cu(1 1 1) substrate, formed by the deposition of barium and its subsequent oxidation, yields stable BaO films which expose predominantly the BaO(1 0 0) surface. The interaction of the oxide films with common components of motor-vehicle exhaust gases (CO 2, H 2O, NO x) has been studied using surface analytical techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection IR spectroscopy (RAIRS). The spectroscopic identification of Ba(OH) 2, BaCO 3 and Ba(NO 2) 2 phases is discussed, and the relative stabilities and decomposition mechanisms of these materials when supported on Cu(1 1 1) is revealed by a combination of TPD and XPS. BaO is shown to be resistant to reaction with pure NO and NO/O 2 mixtures, but exposure to NO 2 leads to the rapid formation of barium nitrite. The formation of the nitrite is proposed to be the first-step in the production of barium nitrate, which has previously been shown to be the main phase involved in NO x storage and reduction (NSR) catalysis.

  7. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS...

  8. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS...

  9. Comment on "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains"

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Ishii, H

    2007-09-27

    In the paper entitled 'The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains' (A & A, 462, 667-676 (2007)), Min et al. explore non-spherical grain shape and composition in modeling the interstellar 10 and 20 {micro}m extinction features. This progression towards more realistic models is vitally important to enabling valid comparisons between dust observations and laboratory measurements. Min et al. proceed to compare their model results with GEMS (glass with embedded metals and sulfides) from IDPs (interplanetary dust particles) and to discuss the nature and origin of GEMS. Specifically, they evaluate the hypothesis of Bradley (1994) that GEMS are interstellar (IS) amorphous silicates. From a comparison of the mineralogy, chemical compositions, and infrared (IR) spectral properties of GEMS with their modeling results, Min et al. conclude: 'GEMS are, in general, not unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM'. This conclusion is based, however, on erroneous and incomplete GEMS data. It is important to clarify first that Bradley (1994) never proposed that GEMS are unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM, nor did he suggest that individual subnanogram mass GEMS are a representative sampling of the enormous mass of silicates in the diffuse ISM. Bradley (1994) simply showed that GEMS properties are consistent with those of IS amorphous silicates. It is widely accepted that circumstellar outflows are important sources of IS silicates, and whether GEMS are processed or not, the circumstellar heritage of some has been rigorously confirmed through measurements of non-solar oxygen (O) isotope abundances (Messenger et al., 2003; Floss et al., 2006). Keller et al. (2000) assert that even GEMS without detectable O isotope anomalies are probably also extrasolar IS silicates because they are embedded in carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H isotopic composition. (Much of the silicate dust in the ISM may be isotopically homogenized (Zhukovska et al., 2007)). Recent

  10. Silicic Arc Magmas And Silicic Slab Melts: The Melt-Rock Reaction Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, S. M.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Bolge, L. L.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Bindeman, I. N.; Stuart, F. M.; Zellmer, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    While a genetic link between silicic arc magmas and silicic melts from the subducted slab has long been proposed, this hypothesis is commonly refuted because most arc magmas lack a 'garnet-signature' which such slab melts must have. A comprehensive geochemical study of high-Mg# arc magmas from the Quaternary central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), however, shows that this conflict can be reconciled if melt-rock reaction processes in the mantle wedge were essential to arc magma formation. In the central MVB, monogenetic and composite volcanoes erupt high-Mg# basalts to andesites with highly variable trace element patterns. These magmas contain high-Ni olivines (olivine Ni higher than permissible for olivines in partial peridotite melts) with high 3He/4He = 7-8 Ra that provide strong evidence for silicic slab components that infiltrate the subarc mantle to produce olivine-free segregations of 'reaction pyroxenite' in the sources of individual volcanoes. Melting of silica-excess and silica-deficient reaction pyroxenites can then produce high-Mg# basaltic and dacitic primary melts that mix during ascent through mantle and crust to form high-Mg# andesites. Mass balance requires that reaction pyroxenites contain at least >15-18 wt%, and likely more, of slab component. However, because the HREE of the slab component are efficiently retained in the eclogitic slab, elements Ho to Lu in partial melts from reaction pyroxenites remain controlled by the mantle and maintain MORB-normalized Ho/Lun ˜1.15 close to unity. In contrast, the MREE to LREE and fluid mobile LILE of the arc magmas are either controlled, or strongly influenced, by slab-contributions. The origin from hybrid sources also shows in the major elements that are blends of mantle-derived elements (Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ti) and elements augmented by slab contributions (Si, Na, K, P, and possibly Al). Moreover, strong correlations between bulk rock SiO2, 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O (olivines) can be interpreted as mixtures of subarc

  11. Possible discovery of the r-process characteristics in the abundances of metal-rich barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, W. Y.; Zhang, B.; Shi, J. R.; Zhao, G.; Wang, W. J.; Niu, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We study the abundance distributions of a sample of metal-rich barium stars provided by Pereira et al. (2011, A&A, 533, A51) to investigate the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis in the metal-rich environment. Methods: We compared the theoretical results predicted by a parametric model with the observed abundances of the metal-rich barium stars. Results: We found that six barium stars have a significant r-process characteristic, and we divided the barium stars into two groups: r-rich barium stars (Cr > 5.0, [La/Nd] < 0) and normal barium stars. The behavior of the r-rich barium stars seems more like that of the metal-poor r-rich and CEMP-r/s stars. We suggest that the most possible formation mechanism for these stars is the s-process pollution, although their abundance patterns can be fitted very well when the pre-enrichment hypothesis is included. That we cannot explain them well using the s-process nucleosynthesis alone may be due to our incomplete knowledge on the production of Nd, Eu, and other relevant elements by the s-process in metal-rich and super metal-rich environments (see details in Pereira et al. 2011).

  12. Activities and volatilities of trace components in silicate melts: a novel use of metal-silicate partitioning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bernard J.; Wade, Jon

    2013-09-01

    Ian Carmichael spent 45 years thinking about and working on the activities of components in silicate melts and their use to estimate physicochemical conditions at eruption and in the source regions of igneous rocks. These interests, principally in major components such as SiO2, led us to think about possible ways of determining the complementary activity coefficients of trace components in silicate melts. While investigating the conditions of accretion and differentiation of the Earth, a number of authors have determined the partitioning of trace elements such as Co, Ni, Mo and W between liquid Fe metal and liquid silicate. These data have the potential to provide activity information for a large number of trace components in silicate melts. In order to turn the partitioning measurements into activities, however, we need to know the activity coefficient of FeO, γFeO in the silicate. We obtained γFeO as a function of melt composition by fitting a simple model to 83 experimental data for which the authors had measured the FeO content of the silicate melt in equilibrium with metal (Fe-bearing alloy) at known fO2. The compositional dependence of γFeO is weak, but, when calculated in the system Diopside-Anorthite-Forsterite, it decreases towards the Forsterite apex. A similar approach for Ni, for which twice as many data are available, leads to similar composition dependence of activity coefficient and confirms the suggestion that γNiO/γFeO is almost constant over a wide range of silicate melt composition. The activity coefficients for FeO were used in conjunction with measured Mo and W partitioning between Fe-rich metal and silicate melt to estimate activity coefficients for trace MoO2 and WO3 dissolved in silicate melt. When combined with data on Mo- and W-saturated silicate melts a strong dependence of activity coefficient is observed. Calculated in the system Diopside-Anorthite-Forsterite, both MoO2 and WO3 exhibit similar behaviour to FeO and NiO in that

  13. Cathodic arc deposition of barium oxide for oxide-coated cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Umstattd, R.; Pi, T.; Luhmann, N. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Monteiro, O.; Brown, I.

    1998-12-31

    Cathodic arc deposition is used to create a barium oxide plasma which is then deposited/implanted onto a cathode nickel substrate. The primary motivation for this work is the critical need for a reliable, repeatable thermionic cathode for the production of high power, microsecond duration microwave pulses. The deposition is performed by generating a cathodic arc discharge at the surface of a barium of barium-strontium alloy rod. The metal plasma thus created is deposited onto the target in the presence of small amounts of oxygen. Difficulties in handling the highly hygroscopic barium and strontium sources were addressed by encapsulating the source rods in thin nickel sleeves (nickel being the major constituent of the deposition target). Both filtered and unfiltered depositions were performed; the former in the interest of improving film quality and the latter in an effort to improve deposition rate. The plasma deposition is monitored via a rate thickness monitor, an optical emission spectrometer for plasma composition information, and an electrostatic probe for the density and temperature profile of the plasma. Good film adhesion is critical for oxide cathodes since they are continually cycled, this, substrates are pulse biased during deposition to encourage implantation. An initial test was performed in which a film of barium oxide approximately one micron in thickness was deposited onto a small section of a 1 in. diameter nickel cathode with better than expected mission results. These preliminary results will be presented together with the results from follow-up experiments done to improve overall coating quality and emission performance.

  14. Modeling of compositionally graded barium strontium titanate from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walizer, Laura Elizabeth

    Barium Strontium Titanate (BaxSr1-xTiO 3 or BST) is a Perovskite alloy of interest for both technological and intellectual reasons. Its ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties make it useful in a variety of electric components such as transducers and actuators, and BST in particular is a material of interest for the development of a ferroelectric RAM for computers.(1) The inclusion of SrTiO3, an incipient ferroelectric, and the fact that the properties of a BST system depend strongly on its relative composition of BaTiO3 (BT) and SrTiO3 (ST), make also this a material of high interest. (2) Compositionally graded systems are of further interest (see e.g., Refs. (3), (4), (5) and references therein), partly because their compositional grading leads to a built-in polarization gradient. Due to this, these systems could act as transcapacitors, devices which act as charge amplifiers in much the same way that transistors act as current amplifiers.(3), (4) Here, compositionally graded BST systems were modeled using a first-principles derived effective Hamiltonian method within Monte-Carlo simulation. (6) The graded systems under consideration had an average Ba composition of 70%. These systems were modeled under stress-free conditions, as well as, under epitaxial strain due to a SrTiO3 substrate. Both the degree of grading and the thickness of the layers were varied. The investigation revealed that graded BST systems behaved differently from bulk BST systems in several ways. First, some graded BST systems possessed both monodomain states qualitatively similar to those found in bulk systems (except that the polarization exhibited a "wave" behavior inside the graded systems), and also states with domain striping. Where this occurred, the monodomain state was lower in energy, and was therefore the ground-state, but the striped domain state was found to be metastable, representing a local energy minimum. Analyzing unstrained compositionally graded systems layer by layer

  15. Gas-phase molecular structure and energetics of anionic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Jorge, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    The gas-phase stabilities of linear, branched and cyclic silicates made of up to five silicon atoms were studied with density functional theory (DFT). The starting geometries for the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory were obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed that geometric parameters and charges are mainly affected by the degree of deprotonation. Charges on Si atoms are also influenced by their degree of substitution. The enthalpy of deprotonation of the neutral species was found to decrease with the size of the molecule, while the average deprotonation enthalpy of highly charged compounds increased with molecular size. Furthermore, the formation of rings in highly charged silicates is enthalpically preferred to chain growth. These observations result from two competing effects: the easier distribution of negative charge in silicates with low charge density and the strong intramolecular repulsions present in silicates with high charge density. As a consequence, highly charged silicates in the gas phase tend to be as small and as highly condensed as possible, which is in line with experimental observations from solution NMR.

  16. Properties of cometary crystalline silicate before and after perihelion passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline silicate is sometimes observed in comets as an 11.3-micron resonant emission feature, and may be used for probing the early solar nebula. Because the formation of the crystalline silicate requires high temperature, they are thought to be born from amorphous silicate at the inner region, and then transported toward the outer regions where comets were born. This transportation can produce the difference in the crystalline fraction in the cometary silicate dust between two dynamical types of comets, Oort-cloud comets (OCs) and Ecliptic comets (ECs), due to the different heliocentric distances of their birth places. The study of peak wavelengths in crystalline features is important to investigate the conditions of the crystalline silicate formation as well. Thus far, we don't have enough OC samples, while we have observed several ECs. Fortunately, we can observe three comets in this semester. In particular, C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a bright sungrazing comet, and we might expect possible splitting and exposing of pristine materials inside the nucleus after its perihelion passage. Observations at pre- and post-perihelion provide us precious information on the dust evolution of the comet. The comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), along with two other comets, is an unparalleled target for this study.

  17. Behavior of Np(VII, VI, V) in Silicate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Yusov, A B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2004-11-30

    Spectrophotometric methods were used to investigate the properties of neptunium(VII), (VI), and (V) in silicate solution. The transition of cationic neptunium(VII) to anionic species in non-complexing environments proceeds in the range of ?? 5.5 to 7.5. In the presence of carbonate, this transition occurs at ?? 10.0 to 11.5 and in silicate solutions at ?? 10.5-12.0. These findings show that cationic neptunium(VII) forms complexes with both carbonate and silicate and that the silicate complex is stronger than that of the carbonate. The competition of complex formation reactions for neptunium(VI) with carbonate and silicate and on the known complex stability constant of NpO2(CO3)34- allowed the NpO2SiO3 complex stability constant, log ? = 16.5, to be estimated. Determination of the formation constant of Np(V) complexes with SiO32- was not possible using similar methods.

  18. Structure and hard magnetic properties of barium hexaferrite with and without La 2O 3 prepared by ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, V.; Padaikathan, P.

    2002-03-01

    The barium hexaferrites have been prepared by ball milling of a BaO 2 and Fe 2O 3 mixture followed by thermal heat treatments. The structure and magnetic properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques. The effect of grain refiner was also studied and it was found that the hard magnetic properties were improved significantly. The sintered product of barium hexaferrite powders prepared from ball milling has higher coercive force than that of other barium hexaferrite made from oxide/carbonate.

  19. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  20. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  1. A search for OH masers in silicate carbon star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Dieter; Green, James; Horiuchi, Shinji; Etoka, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    We wish to observe 22 silicate carbon stars and candidates with the Tidbinbilla radio telescope with the aim to detect possible new OH maser emission. Among the silicate carbon stars, which often show water maser emission, only V778 Cyg and IRAS 18006-3213 are known to show OH maser emission, while the present sample has never been searched for OH masers. New OH masers could be used for future interferometric observations to determine the geometry of the emission region, which is of special interest since silicate carbon stars are believed to be binaries surrounded by an oxygen-rich disk. The complement of the present sample accessible on the Northern Sky was observed with the Nancay radio telescope in the OH maser lines yielding 6 new detections. The observations proposed here will complement observations with the Effelsberg and Tidbinbilla radio telescopes in the 22 GHz water maser line.

  2. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  3. Redox equilibria of multivalent ions in silicate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental studies were made on the compositional dependence of the redox equilibrium of Eu in synthetic silicate liquids, together with an empirical model describing the observed compositional dependence. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure the concentration ratio of Eu(2+) to Eu(3+) in various glasses formed by rapidly quenching silicate liquids. The compositional field studied comprised mixtures of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, and Na2O. The proposed model describes the Eu(2+)/Eu(3+) ratio over the entire compositional field in terms of parameters easily related to each glass composition. The general applicability and utility of the model is further demonstrated by its application to the Fe(2+)-Fe(3+), Ce(3+)-Ce(4+), and Cr(3+)-Cr(6+) redox reactions in binary alkali oxide silicate glasses of Li, Na, and K.

  4. Chromate/silicate aluminum surface treatment for heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.B.; Ramo, S.J. Jr.

    1993-08-10

    A process is described for surface treating an aluminum heat exchanger by successively immersing the heat exchanger within a series of chemical solutions to provided the heat exchanger with a corrosive-resistent hydrophilic coating; the process comprising the steps of: providing a cleaning mixture including 40 to 60 weight percent of nitric acid and 1 to 5 weight percent of sodium fluoride, adding water to the cleaning mixture to form an aqueous cleaning solution having a total concentration of cleaning mixture between 2.0 to 5.0 weight percent; providing a chromate mixture including 10 weight percent of chromium trioxide, 25 weight percent of nitric acid and between 10 to 11 weight percent of hydrofluoric acid, providing a chromate activator comprising less than 25 weight percent of molybdic acid and disodium salt, adding water and the chromate activator to the chromate mixture to form an aqueous chromate solution; providing a silicate mixture comprising 90 to 100 weight percent of silicate of soda and 0 to 10 weight percent of potassium hydroxide, adding water to the silicate mixture to form an aqueous silicate solution; immersing the heat exchanger within an aqueous cleaning solution, and removing the heat exchanger from the cleaning solution; immersing the cleansed heat exchanger in the aqueous chromate solution, and removing the heat exchanger from the chromate solution; immersing the chromed heat exchanger in the aqueous silicate solution, and subsequently removing the heat exchanger from the silicate solution; and characterized by maintaining the total concentration of chromate mixture within the aqueous chromate solution at 0.9 to 1.5 weight percent ([plus minus] 0.1%) and the total concentration of chromate activator within the aqueous chromate solution at 1.1 weight percent ([plus minus] 0.1 %) thereby providing the necessary chemical concentration for producing a corrosion-resistent hydrophilic coating which is substantially free from musty odor emission.

  5. MG Isotopic Measurement of FIB-Isolated Presolar Silicate Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, A.; Ito, M.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of presolar oxide and silicate grains are ascribed to origins in low-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars based on their O isotopic ratios. However, a minor population of these grains (< 10%) has O isotopic ratios incompatible with these sources. Two principle alternative sources are higher-than-solar metallicity (Z) stars or, more likely, supernovae (SN) [1-3]. These rare (Group 4) grains [3] are characterized by enrichments in O-18, and typically also enrichments in O-17. An even rarer subset of grains with extremely large enrichments in O-17 and smaller depletions in O-18 were suggested to come from binary star systems [2]. To establish the origins of these isotopically unusual grains, it is necessary to examine isotopic systems in addition to O. Presolar silicates offer several elements diagnostic of their stellar sources and nuclear processes, including O, Si, Mg, Fe and Ca. However, the database for minor element isotopic compositions in silicates is seriously lacking. To date only two silicate grains have been analyzed for Mg [4] or Fe [5]. One major complicating factor is their small size (average 230 nm), which greatly limits the number of measurements that can be performed on any one grain and makes it more difficult to obtain statistically relevant data. This problem is compounded because the grains are identified among isotopically solar silicates, which contribute a diluting signal in isotopic measurements [1]. Thus, relatively small isotopic anomalies are missed due to this dilution effect. By applying focused ion beam (FIB) milling, we obtain undiluted Mg isotopic ratios of isolated rare presolar silicate grains to investigate their sources.

  6. Formation of Magnesium Silicates is Limited around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, J. A., III

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) grains could be produced in the hydrogen dominant gas outflow from evolved stars in addition to amorphous oxide minerals. Astronomical observations have shown the existence of abundant silicate grains around evolved stars and we have long realized that most of the silicate grains are amorphous, based on the observed infrared features. Only high mass loss stars show the feature attributed to magnesium-rich crystalline silicate about 10-20 % respect to total silicates, so far. The lower degree of crystallinity observed in silicates formed in outflows of lower mass-loss-rate stars might be caused by the formation of magnesium silicide in this relatively hydrogen-rich environment. As a result of predominant distribution of magnesium into the silicide, the composition of interstellar amorphous silicates could be magnesium poor compared with silicon. Indeed, the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition (Floss et al. 2006; Keller & Messenger 2007). Infrared observations suggest that there is little or no crystalline forsterite in interstellar environments while there is an abundance of crystalline forsterite in our Solar System. If the forsterite is a result of the oxidation of interstellar magnesium silicide, then it is clear both why crystalline forsterite is stoichiometric olivine and why the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition. In addition, it may also explain why the chemical composition of olivine is iron poor. Unfortunately, magnesium silicide has never been detected via astronomical observation or in the analysis of primitive meteorites. I would suggest that future analysis of meteorites and theoretical calculations could confirm the possibility of the formation of magnesium silicide grains around evolved stars.

  7. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  8. Microstructure-processing-property relations in chemical solution deposited barium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechakupt, Tanawadee

    This thesis explored the microstructure-processing-property relationships in chemical solution deposited BaTiO3 films on Ni foils as model thin film capacitors. Different techniques, including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry were combined to provide better understanding of microstructure and interface quality of BaTiO3 thin films on Ni foil. It was found that high quality thin films could be prepared using rapid thermal annealing 750°C in N2 to crystallize the film without building up significant levels of NiO on the substrate. After building up the desired dielectric thickness, the films were heat-treated at 1000°C and later re-oxidized under controlled oxygen partial pressure conditions. The resulting films have dielectric constants of 1000-1300 which are stable as a function of temperature with loss tangents less than 2%. Furnace annealed barium titanate films on Ni foil were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray diffraction shows a well-crystallized polycrystalline perovskite phase in furnace annealed films with a high intensity of the 100 and 200 peaks. The films show equiaxed grains with average grain size of 42 nm. There are 5-6 grains across a 200 nm thick film, suggesting that it should be possible to use grain boundaries in films in order to control the capacitor reliability, as is done with bulk capacitors. NiO was detected by X-ray diffraction, but not by transmission electron microscopy, suggesting that the oxide is not a continuous barrier layer, but is distributed inhomogeneously over the surface. Electron energy loss microscopy shows the existence of C in barium titanate grains. In addition, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that an interfacial Ni-Ba alloy develops at the interface between the BaTiO3 film and the Ni foil. This would be consistent with very reducing partial pressures locally

  9. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lunar volcanic processes were dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits have long been suspected on the basis of spectral anomalies (red spots), landform morphologies, and the occurrence of minor granitic components in Apollo sample suites [e.g., 1-5]. The LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) measured thermal emission signatures considered diagnostic of highly silicic rocks in several red spot areas [6,7], within the Marius domes [8], and from the Compton-Belkovich feature on the lunar farside [9]. The present study focuses on the Lassell massif red spot (14.73°S, 350.97°E) located in northeastern Mare Nubium near the center of Alphonsus A crater. Here we use Diviner coverage co-projected with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images [10] and digital elevation models to characterize the Lassell massif geomorphology and composition. Localized Diviner signatures indicating relatively high silica contents correlate with spatially distinct morphologic features across the Lassell massif. These features include sub-kilometer scale deposits with clear superposing relationships between units of different silica concentrations. The zone with the strongest signal corresponds to the southern half of the massif and the Lassell G and K depressions (formerly thought to be impact craters [11]). These steep-walled pits lack any obvious raised rims or ejecta blankets that would identify them as impact craters; they are likely explosive volcanic vents or collapse calderas. This silica-rich area is contained within the historic red spot area [4], but does not appear to fully overlap with it, implying compositionally distinct deposits originating from the same source region. Low-reflectance deposits, exposed by impact craters and mass wasting across the massif, suggest either basaltic pyroclastics or minor late-stage extrusion of basaltic lavas through vents

  10. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  11. Discovery of ancient silicate stardust in a meteorite.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ann N; Zinner, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    We have discovered nine presolar silicate grains from the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Their anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions indicate formation in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Two grains are identified as pyroxene, two as olivine, one as a glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS), and one as an Al-rich silicate. One grain is enriched in 26Mg, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of 26Al and provides information about mixing processes in the parent star. This discovery opens new means for studying stellar processes and conditions in various solar system environments.

  12. Development of interfaces in oxide and silicate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.H.; Cain, M.G.; Doleman, P.

    1995-12-01

    Silicate and oxide matrix CMCs are being developed for application in advanced gas turbines. High-performance Silicate/Nicalon CMCs have been characterised mainly as materials for interface, process and mechanical modelling due to their limited thermal and oxidative stability. Saphikon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) monofilaments have been used in the development of interphase chemistry and processing via vapour and liquid-precursor methods. Prototype Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-matrix CMCs have been fabricated and exploration of alternative fibre/interphase chemistries conducted via reactivity studies up to 1600{degrees}C.

  13. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  14. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  15. Barium Cycling During the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: Evidence From Ba/Ca in Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. M.; Zachos, J. C.; Turekian, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) around 55 Ma reflects short-term, rapid climate change during a period of intense greenhouse climate. This interval is characterized by a negative carbon isotopic shift, interpreted as a release of methane from seafloor gas hydrate reservoirs. This perturbation of the carbon cycle is accompanied by significantly greater rates of euhedral barite accumulation in deep sea sediment commonly believed to be a reflection of elevated primary productivity in surface waters. An interpretation of higher productivity during the PETM, however, is contrary to microfossil assemblage data which indicates a decrease in primary productivity. It has also been suggested that the increase in barite accumulation during the PETM may have been the result of an increase in dissolved barium concentrations in the deep ocean coeval with methane release. This supposition has support from the fact that modern gas hydrate reservoirs are surrounded by pore waters with dissolved barium concentrations considerably higher than that of seawater. This investigation utilizes the barium content of foraminifera as a proxy to reconstruct changes in the barium concentration of the ocean. At 55 Ma, Ba/Ca decreases between 25 to 28% in the planktic foraminifer \\textit{Morozovella velascoensis}, indicating a decrease in the barium concentration of the surface ocean. These results bolster the theory that there was increased biogenic barite precipitation during the PETM. Changes in surface water temperature and pH may have altered species assemblages such that celestite (SrSO4) precipitating organisms enriched in barium as BaSO4 (possibly acantharia) were dominant, modifying the barite precipitation pathways, which affected water column barite cycling. Ba/Ca and Cd/Ca measurements on benthic foraminifera show a positive correlation with Mn/Ca, indicating contamination of manganese oxide coatings. This contamination is in part due to the greater surface to volume

  16. Spherical barium ferrite nanoparticles and hexaferrite single crystals for information data storage and RF devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalli, Jeevan Prasad

    Since their discovery in the early 1950's hexagonal ferrites or hexaferrites have been studied for a long time because of their technological applications, such as microwave devices and high density magnetic recording media. In this dissertation efforts have been made to address these two applications by developing nanosized spherical barium ferrite particles for advanced magnetic recording media, and hexaferrite single crystals for low loss RF devices. Accordingly, this dissertation consists of two parts; part one spherical barium ferrite nanoparticles for information data storage media, and part two hexaferrite single crystals for RF devices. Part I. Spherical Barium Ferrite Nanoparticles Hexagonal barium ferrite (H-BaFe) nanoparticles are good candidates for particulate recording media due to their high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, excellent chemical stability, and narrow switching field distribution. One major disadvantage of using H-BaFe particles for particulate recording media is their poor dispersion and a high degree of stacking that deteriorate the recording capability by creating large media noise and surface roughness. One way to solve and improve the recording performance of H-BaFe media is employing substantially nanosized spherical barium ferrite (S­BaFe) particles. Spherical shaped particles have low aspect ratio and only form a point-to-point contact, unlike the H-BaFe particles. Therefore, using S-BaFe particles not only decrease the degree of magnetic interaction between the particles but also can substantially increases the recording performance by improving the dispersion and SNR of the particles in the magnetic media. In this dissertation, two different approaches were employed successfully to synthesize S-BaFe nanoparticles in the range of 20-45 nm. Part II. Hexaferrite Single Crystals As wireless communication systems are flourishing, and the operating frequencies are increasing, there is a great demand for RF devices such as

  17. Core Formation Timescale, Silicate-Metal Equilibration, and W Diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Q.; Jacobsen, B.; Tinker, D.; Lesher, C.

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which material accreted to the proto-Earth and segregated to form the core was chemically and isotopically equilibrated with the silicate mantle is an outstanding problem in planetary science. This is particularly important when attempting to assign a meaningful age for planetary accretion and core formation based on Hf-W isotope systematics. The Earth and other terrestrial planets likely formed by accretion of previously differentiated planetesimals. For the planetesimals themselves the most important energy source for metal-silicate differentiation is the combined radioactive heating due to decay of 26Al (half-life 0.7 Ma) and 60Fe (half-life 1.5 Ma). It is expected that the fractionation of Hf and W during planetesimal core formation will lead to a divergence in the W isotopic compositions of the core and silicate portions of these bodies. This expectation is supported by the enormously radiogenic 182W signatures reported for basaltic eucrites. The observation that the W isotopic compositions of the silicate portions of Earth, Moon and Mars are similar and markedly less radiogenic than eucrites suggests that during planet accretion the pre-differentiated metallic core material containing low 182W must have equilibrated extensively with the more radiogenic (high 182W) silicate material to subdue the ingrowth of 182W in the silicate mantle of the planets. The standard theory of planet formation predicts that after runaway and oligarchic growth, the late stage of planet formation is characterized by impact and merging of Mars-sized objects. This is a tremendously energetic process estimated to raise the temperature of the proto-Earth to about 7000K (a temperature equivalent to a mass spectrometer's plasma source, which indiscriminately ionizes all incoming elements). After the giant impacts, the proto-Earth had a luminosity and surface temperature close to a low mass star for a brief period of time. Stevenson (1990) argued that emulsification caused

  18. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANIC/INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS - SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicate Technology Corporation's (STC's) technology for treating hazardous waste utilizes silicate compounds to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents in contaminated soils and sludges. STC has developed two groups of reagents: SOILSORB HM for treating wastes with inorgan...

  19. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  20. Enhanced constitutive invasion activity in human nontumorigenic keratinocytes exposed to a low level of barium for a long time.

    PubMed

    Thang, Nguyen D; Yajima, Ichiro; Ohnuma, Shoko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Ichihara, Gaku; Kato, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that exposure to barium for a short time (≤4 days) and at a low level (5 µM = 687 µg/L) promotes invasion of human nontumorigenic HaCaT cells, which have characteristics similar to those of normal keratinocytes, suggesting that exposure to barium for a short time enhances malignant characteristics. Here we examined the effect of exposure to low level of barium for a long time, a condition mimicking the exposure to barium through well water, on malignant characteristics of HaCaT keratinocytes. Constitutive invasion activity, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) protein expression and activity, and matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) protein expression in primary cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes, HaCaT keratinocytes, and HSC5 and A431 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were augmented following an increase in malignancy grade of the cells. Constitutive invasion activity, FAK phosphorylation, and MMP14 expression levels of HaCaT keratinocytes after treatment with 5 µM barium for 4 months were significantly higher than those of control untreated HaCaT keratinocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that exposure to a low level of barium for a long time enhances constitutive malignant characteristics of HaCaT keratinocytes via regulatory molecules (FAK and MMP14) for invasion.

  1. Follow-up barium study after a negative water-soluble contrast examination for suspected esophageal leak: is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas R; Holz, Grant S; Corwin, Michael T; Wood, Robert J; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of follow-up barium esophogram in diagnosing esophageal injury or leak if the initial water-soluble contrast examination of the esophagus is normal. An institutional review board (IRB)-approved retrospective review of all pediatric patients less than 18 years old referred to the radiology department for evaluation of esophageal injury or leak was performed for a 9-year period from 2005 to 2014. The majority of patients had unexplained pneumomediastinum, chest trauma (gunshot or puncture wound), or foreign body ingestion as the reason for the referral. Forty-nine patients (age range 10 days to 17 years) underwent an initial water-soluble esophogram immediately followed by a barium esophogram. Forty-six studies were negative on both water-soluble contrast and barium studies. Two studies were both positive on the initial water-soluble contrast and subsequent barium studies. A single study showed the esophageal leak only in the water-soluble study, with the follow-up barium exam being normal. The result of this study indicates that a single-contrast water-soluble esophogram alone is sensitive in the diagnosis of esophageal injury or leak. It has a 100 % sensitivity and negative predictive value. A follow-up barium esophogram only increases the study time and radiation dose to the patient.

  2. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  3. On the Dissolution Behavior of Sulfur in Ternary Silicate Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Park, Joo Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Sulfur dissolution behavior, in terms of sulfide capacity ( C S), in ternary silicate slags (molten oxide slags composed of MO - NO - SiO2, where M and N are Ca, Mn, Fe, and Mg), is discussed based on available experimental data. Composition dependence of the sulfur dissolution, at least in the dilute region of sulfur, may be explained by taking into account the cation-anion first-nearest-neighbor (FNN) interaction (stability of sulfide) and the cation-cation second-nearest-neighbor (SNN) interaction over O anion (oxygen proportions in silicate slags). When the Gibbs energy of a reciprocal reaction MO + NS = MS + NO is positive, the sulfide capacity of slags with virtually no SiO2 or low SiO2 concentration decreases as the concentration of MO increases. However, in some slags, as SiO2 concentration increases, replacing NO by MO at a constant SiO2 concentration may increase sulfide capacity when the basicity of NO is less than that of MO. This phenomenon is observed as rotation of iso- C S lines in ternary silicate slags, and it is explained by simultaneous consideration of the stability of sulfide and oxygen proportions in the silicate slags. It is suggested that a solution model for the prediction of sulfide capacity should be based on the actual dissolution mechanism of sulfur rather than on the simple empirical correlation.

  4. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    PubMed Central

    Skaug, V; Davies, R; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells. Images PMID:6318798

  5. Thermodynamic consistencies and anomalies among end-member silicate garnets.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    Materials with the garnet crystal structure include silicate minerals of importance both in geology, on account of their use in geothermobarometry, and industrially as abrasives. As a consequence of the former, there is considerable published thermodynamic information concerning them. We here examine this thermodynamic information for end-member silicate garnets (some of which are synthetic since not all occur in nature) for consistencies and anomalies, using thermodynamic relations between thermodynamic properties that we have established over recent years. The principal properties of interest are formula volume, heat capacity, entropy, formation enthalpy (from which the Gibbs energy may be obtained), and isothermal compressibility. A significant observation is that the ambient-temperature heat capacities of the silicate garnets are rather similar, whereas their ambient-temperature entropies are roughly proportional to their formula volumes. Evaluation of their Debye temperatures implies that their vibrational contributions to heat capacity are fully excited at ambient temperatures. The relatively small isothermal compressibilities of these garnets is related to the rigidity of their constituent silicate tetrahedra. We here establish additive single-ion values for each of the thermodynamic properties, which may be applied in estimating corresponding values for related materials.

  6. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  7. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets. PMID:18826918

  8. Potassium silicate-zinc oxide solution for metal finishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Examples of zinc dust formulations, which are not subject to cracking or crazing, are fire retardant, and have high adhesive qualities, are listed. The potassium silicate in these formulations has mol ratios of dissolved silica potassium oxide in the range 4.8 to 1 - 5.3 to 1.

  9. Electron stimulated hydroxylation of a metal supported silicate film.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Emmez, Emre; Pan, Qiushi; Yang, Bing; Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E; Sterrer, Martin; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Goikoetxea, Itziar; Wlodarczyk, Radoslaw; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Water adsorption on a double-layer silicate film was studied by using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Under vacuum conditions, small amounts of silanols (Si-OH) could only be formed upon deposition of an ice-like (amorphous solid water, ASW) film and subsequent heating to room temperature. Silanol coverage is considerably enhanced by low-energy electron irradiation of an ASW pre-covered silicate film. The degree of hydroxylation can be tuned by the irradiation parameters (beam energy, exposure) and the ASW film thickness. The results are consistent with a generally accepted picture that hydroxylation occurs through hydrolysis of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds in the silica network. Calculations using density functional theory show that this may happen on Si-O-Si bonds, which are either parallel (i.e., in the topmost silicate layer) or vertical to the film surface (i.e., connecting two silicate layers). In the latter case, the mechanism may additionally involve the reaction with a metal support underneath. The observed vibrational spectra are dominated by terminal silanol groups (ν(OD) band at 2763 cm(-1)) formed by hydrolysis of vertical Si-O-Si linkages. Film dehydroxylation fully occurs only upon heating to very high temperatures (∼ 1200 K) and is accompanied by substantial film restructuring, and even film dewetting upon cycling hydroxylation/dehydroxylation treatment.

  10. Fulgurites: A Look at Transient High Temperature Processes in Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, A. A.; Melosh, H. J.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fulgurites result from transient high temperature processes, and some have extremely reduced phases. We performed both modeling and a microprobe analysis of natural fulgurites. The modeling suggests vapor phase C causes reduction of silicate liquid. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Low-temperature crystallization of silicate dust in circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Molster, F J; Yamamura, I; Waters, L B; Tielens, A G; de Graauw, T; de Jong, T; de Koter, A; Malfait, K; van den Ancker, M E; van Winckel, H; Voors, R H; Waelkens, C

    1999-10-01

    Silicate dust in the interstellar medium is observed to be amorphous, yet silicate dust in comets and interplanetary dust particles is sometimes partially crystalline. The dust in disks that are thought to be forming planets around some young stars also appears to be partially crystalline. These observations suggest that as the dust goes from the precursor clouds to a planetary system, it must undergo some processing, but the nature and extent of this processing remain unknown. Here we report observations of highly crystalline silicate dust in the disks surrounding binary red-giant stars. The dust was created in amorphous form in the outer atmospheres of the red giants, and therefore must be processed in the disks to become crystalline. The temperatures in these disks are too low for the grains to anneal; therefore, some low-temperature process must be responsible. As the physical properties of the disks around young stars and red giants are similar, our results suggest that low-temperature crystallization of silicate grains also can occur in protoplanetary systems.

  12. Fate of silicate minerals in a peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip C.; Siegel, Donald I.; Hill, Barbara M.; Glaser, Paul H.

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of silicate weathering in a Minnesota mire indicates that quartz and aluminosilicates rapidly dissolve in anoxic, organic-rich, neutral- pH environments. Vertical profiles of pH, dissolved silicon, and major cations were obtained at a raised bog and a spring fen and compared. Profiles of readily extractable silicon, diatom abundance, ash mineralogy, and silicate surface texture were determined from peat cores collected at each site. In the bog, normally a recharge mound, dissolved silicon increases with depth as pH increases, exceeding the background silicon concentration by a factor of two. Silicate grain surfaces, including quartz, are chemically etched at this location, despite being in contact with pore water at neutral pH with dissolved silicon well above the equilibrium solubility of quartz. The increasing silica concentrations at circum-neutral pH are consistent with a system where silicate solubility is influenced by silica-organic-acid complexes. Silica-organic-acid complexes therefore may be the cause of the almost complete absence of diatoms in decomposed peat and contribute to the formation of silica-depleted underclays commonly found beneath coal.

  13. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  14. Comparative FeNi and Silicate Chronology in Portales Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    Re-Os and U-Pb data on Portales Valley suggest an early formation for the metal and silicates. These two chronometers and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd require a young disturbance. This is inconsistent with the 39 Ar-40 Ar age and in need of clarification.

  15. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  16. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  17. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  18. Structural effects of phosphorus inclusion in bioactive silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Tilocca, Antonio; Cormack, Alastair N

    2007-12-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of four bioactive silicate glasses containing between 0 (P0) and 12 (P12) mol % P2O5 have been carried out in order to elucidate the structural role of phosphorus in these materials. In particular, we have focused on structural features which can have a direct role in the bioactive mechanism of dissolution and bone bonding. The higher affinity of modifier Na and Ca cations for coordinating phosphate rather than silicate, together with the formation of P-O-Si linkages, lead to increasing repolymerization of the silicate network with increasing P2O5 content, which in principle would represent a negative effect of P inclusion on the glass bioactivity. However, this effect is counterbalanced by the concomitant increase in the amount of free orthophosphate groups, whose fast release is deemed to enhance the bioactivity. The strong affinity of the orthophosphates for calcium ions leads to a clear tendency toward separation of silicate-rich and phosphate-rich phases for the P12 composition. Although this could reduce the bioactivity in the case of P12, in general, the favorable balance between the effects mentioned above should result in a positive effect of partial Si --> P substitution on the glass bioactivity.

  19. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  20. ZnO doped sodium silicate preionize N2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Montaser; F, Sabry; S, A. Ibrahim

    1989-11-01

    An experimental study of the effect of ZnO doped sodium silicate thin film, used as a semiconductive preionizer on the output energy is presented. The output energy of the nitrogen laser increased by two folds. The performance of the preionizer can be controlled to match the discharge requirements.

  1. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  2. Effect of antioxidants and silicates on peroxides in povidone.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Rao, Venkatramana M; Desai, Divyakant S

    2012-01-01

    Reactive peroxides in povidone often lead to degradation of oxidation-labile drugs. To reduce peroxide concentration in povidone, the roles of storage conditions, antioxidants, and silicates were investigated. Povidone alone and its physical mixtures with ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, sodium sulfite, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were stored at 25 °C and 40 °C, at 11%, 32%, and 50% relative humidity. In addition, povidone solution in methanol was equilibrated with silicates (silica gel and molecular sieves), followed by solvent evaporation to recover povidone powder. Peroxide concentrations in povidone were measured. The concentration of peroxides in povidone increased under very-low-humidity storage conditions. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, and sodium sulfite reduced the peroxide concentration in povidone, whereas BHA and BHT did not. Water solubility appeared to determine the effectiveness of antioxidants. Also, some silicates significantly reduced peroxide concentration in povidone without affecting its functionality as a tablet binder. Porosity of silicates was critical to their ability to reduce the peroxide concentration in povidone. A combination of these approaches can reduce the initial peroxide concentration in povidone and minimize peroxide growth under routine storage conditions.

  3. A preliminary investigation of chlorine XANES in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. A.; Mavrogenes, J. A.; O'Neill, H. S.; Keller, N. S.; Jang, L.-Y.

    2008-10-01

    Chlorine speciation in silicate melts affects volatile exsolution, rheology, and thermodynamic properties of the melt but is poorly known. X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectra have been used to investigate Cl speciation in 26 silicate glasses and to test the hypothesis that Cl in silicate melts is hosted by species that combine Cl and network-modifying cations such as Ca and Mg. Results indicate that Cl in CMAS (CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2) plus Na2O, K2O, or MnO silicate glasses exists as a combination of Ca-Clx and Mg-Clx species or, possibly, as mixed Ca-Mgy-Clx species. The geometry and stoichiometry of the proposed species is unknown, but there are similarities between spectra from Ca-bearing melts and the spectra of hydrated CaCl2.2H2O, suggesting that the Ca-Clx species could have a salt-like atomic arrangement and ionic bonding. Further investigations using XANES, alternative spectroscopic techniques, and forward modeling approaches are required to distinguish between these possibilities.

  4. Salmonella colitis: assessment with double-contrast barium enema examination in seven patients.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Iida, M; Tominaga, M; Yao, T; Hirata, N; Fujishima, M

    1992-08-01

    To completely rule out the possibility of ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and other diseases, the authors analyzed the radiographic findings at double-contrast barium enema examination performed in seven patients with colitis caused by Salmonella organisms. In all patients, bacteriologic confirmation of nontyphoid Salmonella infection and radiographs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were obtained. Total colonoscopy was performed in five patients and sigmoidoscopy in one patient. In all patients, the radiographic findings were retrospectively analyzed. The descending colon and sigmoid colon were affected in six patients, whereas the rectum was affected in none. The findings included fine mucosal granularity (seven patients), loss of haustration (six patients), many fine ulcerations (five patients), and multiple ulcers (two patients). The radiographic features simulated those of ulcerative colitis, except for absence of rectal abnormality. It is concluded that double-contrast barium enema examination is useful for detection of fine mucosal changes. PMID:1620861

  5. Effect of CaF{sub 2} addition on optical properties of barium phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N. Manoj Rao, G. Venkateswara Akhila, B. E. Shashikala, H. D.

    2014-04-24

    Ternary barium phosphate glasses, (50−X)BaO−XCaF{sub 2}−50P{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been prepared by adding 0-10 mol% of CaF{sub 2} to binary barium phosphate glasses. The amorphous nature of the prepared glasses was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique. The UV-Visible absorption spectra have been recorded, optical band gap energy Eopt and Urbach energy Etail were determined. Shift in Eopt and Etail with increase in concentration of CaF{sub 2} is noted. FTIR analysis was carried out to investigate the short and intermediate-range orders in glasses. Shift of (P-O-P) band to higher wave number with the substitution of BaO with CaF{sub 2} shows the shortening of the phosphate chains. Hardness and density of glass samples were measured and correlated with the composition of glasses.

  6. Effect of CaF2 addition on optical properties of barium phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Manoj; Rao, G. Venkateswara; Akhila, B. E.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2014-04-01

    Ternary barium phosphate glasses, (50-X)BaO-XCaF2-50P2O5 have been prepared by adding 0-10 mol% of CaF2 to binary barium phosphate glasses. The amorphous nature of the prepared glasses was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique. The UV-Visible absorption spectra have been recorded, optical band gap energy Eopt and Urbach energy Etail were determined. Shift in Eopt and Etail with increase in concentration of CaF2 is noted. FTIR analysis was carried out to investigate the short and intermediate-range orders in glasses. Shift of (P-O-P) band to higher wave number with the substitution of BaO with CaF2 shows the shortening of the phosphate chains. Hardness and density of glass samples were measured and correlated with the composition of glasses.

  7. CORRELATED STRONTIUM AND BARIUM ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF ACID-CLEANED SINGLE MAINSTREAM SILICON CARBIDES FROM MURCHISON

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Pellin, Michael J.; Savina, Michael R.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Gyngard, Frank; Käppeler, Franz; Cristallo, Sergio; Dillmann, Iris

    2015-04-10

    We present strontium, barium, carbon, and silicon isotopic compositions of 61 acid-cleaned presolar SiC grains from Murchison. Comparison with previous data shows that acid washing is highly effective in removing both strontium and barium contamination. For the first time, by using correlated {sup 88}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and {sup 138}Ba/{sup 136}Ba ratios in mainstream SiC grains, we are able to resolve the effect of {sup 13}C concentration from that of {sup 13}C-pocket mass on s-process nucleosynthesis, which points toward the existence of large {sup 13}C pockets with low {sup 13}C concentrations in asymptotic giant branch stars. The presence of such large {sup 13}C pockets with a variety of relatively low {sup 13}C concentrations seems to require multiple mixing processes in parent asymptotic giant branch stars of mainstream SiC grains.

  8. Self-assembly of a tetrahedral 58-nuclear barium vanadium oxide cluster.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Katharina; Puscher, Bianka; Streb, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a molecular barium vanadium oxide cluster featuring high nuclearity and high symmetry. The tetrameric, 2.3 nm cluster H(5)[Ba(10)(NMP)(14)(H(2)O)(8)[V(12)O(33)](4)Br] is based on a bromide-centred, octahedral barium scaffold which is capped by four previously unknown [V(12)O(33)](6-) clusters in a tetrahedral fashion. The compound represents the largest polyoxovanadate-based heterometallic cluster known to date. The cluster is formed in organic solution and it is suggested that the bulky N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent ligands allow the isolation of this giant molecule and prevent further condensation to a solid-state metal oxide. The cluster is fully characterized using single-crystal XRD, elemental analysis, ESI mass spectrometry and other spectroscopic techniques.

  9. Magnetic and dielectric properties of 3Y-TZP/strontium doped barium ferrite composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Shan-Shan; Guo, Rui-Song; Cai, Guang-Lan; Guo, Wei-Na; Wu, Chen

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic and dielectric properties of 3Y-TZP/20 wt.% Ba1-xSrxFe12O19 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) composites prepared by solid state reaction method are investigated. The magnetic properties are improved in the composites with the strontium doped barium ferrite. When x = 0.25, the saturation magnetization of the ferrite reaches the maximum. This is due to the migration of Fe3+ induced by the Sr2+ doping. The dielectric properties are also improved in the composite with the strontium doped barium ferrite. When x = 0.5, the dielectric constant and dielectric loss possess the maximum. This is caused by the lattice distortion resulting from the Sr2+ doping. The dielectric properties are analyzed by the universal relaxation law.

  10. Correlated Strontium and Barium Isotopic Compositions of Acid-cleaned Single Mainstream Silicon Carbides from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Savina, Michael R.; Gallino, Roberto; Davis, Andrew M.; Bisterzo, Sara; Gyngard, Frank; Käppeler, Franz; Cristallo, Sergio; Dauphas, Nicolas; Pellin, Michael J.; Dillmann, Iris

    2015-04-01

    We present strontium, barium, carbon, and silicon isotopic compositions of 61 acid-cleaned presolar SiC grains from Murchison. Comparison with previous data shows that acid washing is highly effective in removing both strontium and barium contamination. For the first time, by using correlated 88Sr/86Sr and 138Ba/136Ba ratios in mainstream SiC grains, we are able to resolve the effect of 13C concentration from that of 13C-pocket mass on s-process nucleosynthesis, which points toward the existence of large 13C pockets with low 13C concentrations in asymptotic giant branch stars. The presence of such large 13C pockets with a variety of relatively low 13C concentrations seems to require multiple mixing processes in parent asymptotic giant branch stars of mainstream SiC grains.

  11. Characterization of individual barium titanate nanorods and their assessment as building blocks of new circuit architectures.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Kristina; Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Joan Daniel; Morante, Joan Ramon; Rečnik, Aleksander; Ceh, Miran

    2011-09-23

    In this work, we report on the integration of individual BaTiO(3) nanorods into simple circuit architectures. Polycrystalline BaTiO(3) nanorods were synthesized by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of barium titanate sol into aluminium oxide (AAO) templates and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed the presence of slabs of hexagonal polymorphs intergrown within cubic grains, resulting from the local reducing atmosphere during the thermal treatment. Electrical measurements performed on individual BaTiO(3) nanorods revealed resistivity values between 10 and 100 Ω cm, which is in good agreement with typical values reported in the past for oxygen-deficient barium titanate films. Consequently the presence of oxygen vacancies in their structure was indirectly validated. Some of these nanorods were tested as proof-of-concept humidity sensors. They showed reproducible responses towards different moisture concentrations, demonstrating that individual BaTiO(3) nanorods may be integrated in complex circuit architectures with functional capacities.

  12. Barium hexaferrite/graphene oxide: controlled synthesis and characterization and investigation of its magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddahfar, Mahnaz; Ramezani, Majid; Mostafa Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, barium hexaferrite nanocrystals (BaFe12O19) were successfully synthesized through the two-step sol-gel method in an aqueous solution in the presence of barium nitrate and iron (III) nitrate. Besides, the effect of the molar ratio of graphene oxide on the particle size and magnetic properties of final product was investigated. In this research, glucose plays a role as capping and chelating agent in the synthesis of BaFe12O19/graphene oxide. Moreover, it was found that the size, morphology, and magnetic properties of the final products could be greatly influenced by the molar ratio of graphene oxide. BaFe12O19/graphene oxide was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and energy-dispersive spectrometry.

  13. Inhibition of barium sulfate deposition by polycarboxylates of various molecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    van der Leeden, M.C.; van Rosmalen, G.M. )

    1990-02-01

    To establish a relationship between the molecular structure of polycarboxylates and their growth-retarding influence on barium sulfate, seeded-suspension-growth experiments were performed at various inhibitor concentrations and pH values. Two types of polycarboxylates with a molecular structure based on their polyacrylic or maleic acid were studied. The molecular structure of these compounds were varied by particle substitution with monomers containing hydroxyl, amide, and sulfonic acid, as well as hydrophobic groups. Hydrophobic groups are detrimental to good inhibitor performance, whereas the introduction of OH, NH {sub 2}, or SO {sub 3} H groups presents opportunities to enhance the inhibitor effectiveness. The sequence in performance of the compounds on barium sulfate was compared with the sequence formerly obtained for calcium sulfate dihydrate.

  14. Surface-initiated polymerization from barium titanate nanoparticles for hybrid dielectric capacitors.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Sergio A; Kim, Yunsang; Henry, Katherine; Kumar, Ritesh; Perry, Joseph W; Marder, Seth R

    2014-03-12

    A phosphonic acid is used as a surface initiator for the growth of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) from barium titanate (BTO) nanoparticles through atom transfer radical polymerization with activators regenerated by electron transfer. This results in the barium titanate cores embedded in the grafted polymer. The one-component system, PMMA-grafted-BTO, achieves a maximum extractable energy density of 2 J/cm(3) at a field strength of ∼220 V/μm, which exhibits a 2-fold increase compared to that of the composite without covalent attachment or the neat polymer. Such materials have potential applications in hybrid capacitors due to the high permittivity of the nanoparticles and the high breakdown strength, mechanical flexibility, and ease of processability due to the organic polymer. The synthesis, processing, characterization, and testing of the materials in capacitors are discussed.

  15. Microwave assisted synthesis and characterization of barium titanate nanoparticles for multi layered ceramic capacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Sundararajan; Shanmugavel, Balasivanandha Prabu

    2011-01-01

    Barium titanate is a common ferroelectric electro-ceramic material having high dielectric constant, with photorefractive effect and piezoelectric properties. In this research work, nano-scale barium titanate powders were synthesized by microwave assisted mechano-chemical route. Suitable precursors were ball milled for 20 hours. TGA studies were performed to study the thermal stability of the powders. The powders were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDX Analysis. Microwave and Conventional heating were performed at 1000 degrees C. The overall heating schedule was reduced by 8 hours in microwave heating thereby reducing the energy and time requirement. The nano-scale, impurity-free and defect-free microstructure was clearly evident from the SEM micrograph and EDX patterns. LCR meter was used to measure the dielectric constant and dielectric loss values at various frequencies. Microwave heated powders showed superior dielectric constant value with low dielectric loss which is highly essential for the fabrication of Multi Layered Ceramic Capacitors. PMID:24427875

  16. A critical velocity interaction between fast barium and strontium atoms and the terrestial ionospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C. S.; Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; Romick, G. J.; Hallinan, T. J.; Foeppl, H.

    1982-01-01

    A disk of barium and strontium vapor traveling radially outward, perpendicular to the geomagnetic field lines, may be created by the detonation of a high-explosive, radially shaped charge with a liner composed of the two metals in the upper atmosphere. Because of solar radiation resonance, both the barium and the strontium may be optically tracked. Observations indicate the early formation of the metal ions thus evolved into a disk-shaped, stellate structure with a dark hole at the center of a radial structure. The results of these experiments indicate that the process could occur on a cosmic scale, and that unconfirmed aspects of the theory relating to this process could be determined through variation of the parameters in future radial rocket experiments.

  17. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  18. The CAMEO barium release - E/parallel/ fields over the polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Miller, M. L.; Pongratz, M. B.; Smith, G. M.; Smith, L. L.; Mende, S. B.; Nath, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Four successive thermite barium releases at an altitude of 965 km over polar cap invariant latitudes 84 to 76 deg near magnetic midnight were conducted from the orbiting second stage of the vehicle that launched Nimbus 7; the releases were made as part of the CAMEO (Chemically Active Material Ejected in Orbit) program. This was the first opportunity to observe the behavior of conventional barium release when conducted at orbital velocity in the near-earth magnetic field. The principal unexpected characteristic in the release dynamics was the high, 1.4 to 2.6 km/s, initial Ba(+) expansion velocity relative to an expected velocity of 0.9 km/s. Attention is also given to neutral cloud expansion, initial ion cloud expansion, convective motion, and the characteristics of field-aligned motion. The possibility of measuring parallel electric fields over the polar cap by observing perturbations in the motion of the visible ions is assessed.

  19. Concomitant axial cineangiography and barium esophagography in the evaluation of vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, I L; Elliott, L P; Bargeron, L M

    1980-04-01

    Six vascular rings were evaluated using axial biplane cineangiography and concomitant barium esophagography. Three patients had a double aortic arch, two had a right aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery with a foreshortened left ligamentum arteriosum, and one had a pulmonary vascular sling. Barium was administered in the esophagus of the anesthetized patient followed by cineangiography. Five patients were evaluated using both the standard and four-chamber projection, while the sixth patient with the pulmonary sling was evaluated in the standard and sitting projection. With the four-chamber view, vascular rings were exposed and atypical features such as a small right aortic arch component and branch stenoses of the brachiocephalic arteries were revealed. Axial views with an esophagogram allow easier morphologic analysis and more precise definition of the vascular abnormality than conventional views. PMID:7360983

  20. Effect of Mg-Zr substitution and microwave processing on magnetic properties of barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manju; Kashyap, Subhash C.; Gupta, H. C.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of substitution of Mg-Zr for Fe in M-type barium hexaferrite (BHF) and of processing technique on the magnetic properties and microstructure has been reported in the present paper. Significant changes in magnetic properties have been observed on substituting Fe ions by Mg and Zr ions in M-type barium hexaferrite, i.e. BaFe12O19 as well as by single mode microwave processing. The single mode microwave processing of the undoped sample reduced the coercivity to nearly 25% of the value for the sintered sample along with the enhancement in magnetization, thereby making it suitable for memory devices. The improvement in magnetic properties is explained on the basis of microstructure. The addition of substituents, though assisted in the formation of single phase, it, however, degraded the magnetization besides decreasing the coercivity, possibly due to substitution at the octahedral sites.