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Sample records for barium silicate basio3

  1. An Exceptionally Narrow Band-Gap (∼4 eV) Silicate Predicted in the Cubic Perovskite Structure: BaSiO3.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Yusa, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Ryo; Ohishi, Yasuo; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-09-05

    The electronic structures of 35 A(2+)B(4+)O3 ternary cubic perovskite oxides, including their hypothetical chemical compositions, were calculated by a hybrid functional method with the expectation that peculiar electronic structures and unique carrier transport properties suitable for semiconductor applications would be hidden in high-symmetry cubic perovskite oxides. We found unique electronic structures of Si-based oxides (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, and B = Si). In particular, the unreported cubic BaSiO3 has a very narrow band gap (4.1 eV) compared with conventional nontransition-metal silicates (e.g., ∼9 eV for SiO2 and the calculated value of 7.3 eV for orthorhombic BaSiO3) and a small electron effective mass (0.3m0, where m0 is the free electron rest mass). The narrow band gap is ascribed to the nonbonding state of Si 3s and the weakened Madelung potential. The existence of the predicted cubic perovskite structure of BaSiO3 was experimentally verified by applying a high pressure of 141 GPa. The present finding indicates that it could be possible to develop a new transparent oxide semiconductor of earth abundant silicates if the symmetry of its crystal structure is appropriately chosen. Cubic BaSiO3 is a candidate for high-performance oxide semiconductors if this phase can be stabilized at room temperature and ambient pressure.

  2. Sintering and foaming of barium silicate glass powder compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralf; Reinsch, Stefan; Agea-Blanco, Boris

    2016-10-01

    The manufacture of sintered glasses and glass-ceramics, glass matrix composites and glass-bounded ceramics or pastes is often affected by gas bubble formation. Against this background, we studied sintering and foaming of barium silicate glass powders used as SOFC sealants using different powder milling procedures. Sintering was measured by means of heating microscopy backed up by XPD, DTA, Vacuum Hot Extraction (VHE) and optical and electron microscopy. Foaming increased significantly as milling progressed. For moderately milled glass powders, subsequent storage in air could also promote foaming. Although the powder compacts were uniaxially pressed and sintered in air, the milling atmosphere sig¬ni¬ficantly affected foaming. The strength of this effect increased in the order Ar ? N2 < air < CO2. Conformingly, VHE studies revealed that the pores of foamed samples predominantly encapsulated CO2, even for powders milled in Ar and N2. Results of this study thus indicate that foaming is caused by carbonaceous species trapped on the glass powder surface. Foaming could be substantially reduced by milling in water and 10 wt% HCl.

  3. Insights into the discrepant luminescence for BaSiO3 :Eu(2+) phosphors prepared by solid-state reaction and precipitation reaction methods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Jingjing; Mao, Zhiyong; Yang, Yanfang; Wang, Dajian

    2017-09-01

    Two synthesis routes, solid-state reaction and precipitation reaction, were employed to prepare BaSiO3 :Eu(2+) phosphors in this study. Discrepancies in the luminescence green emission at 505 nm for the solid-state reaction method sample and in the yellow emission at 570 nm for the sample prepared by the precipitation reaction method, were observed respectively. A detail investigation about the discrepant luminescence of BaSiO3 :Eu(2+) phosphors was performed by evaluation of X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL)/photoluminescence excitation (PLE), decay time and thermal quenching properties. The results showed that the yellow emission was generated from the BaSiO3 :Eu(2+) phosphor, while the green emission was ascribed to a small amount of Ba2 SiO4 :Eu(2+) compound that was present in the solid-state reaction sample. This work clarifies the luminescence properties of Eu(2+) ions in BaSiO3 and Ba2 SiO4 hosts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Identification of the man-made barium copper silicate pigments among some ancient Chinese artifacts through spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Q H; Yang, J C; Li, L; Dong, J Q; Zhao, H X; Liu, S

    2015-03-05

    This article describes the complementary application of non-invasive micro-Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to the characterization of some ancient Chinese silicate artifacts. A total of 28 samples dated from fourth century BC to third century AD were analyzed. The results of chemical analysis showed that the vitreous PbO-BaO-SiO2 material was used to sinter these silicate artifacts. The barium copper silicate pigments including BaCuSi4O10, BaCuSi2O6 and BaCu2Si2O7 were widely identified from colorful areas of the samples by Raman spectroscopy. In addition, other crystalline phases such as Fe2O3, BaSi2O5, BaSO4, PbCO3 and quartz were also identified. The present study provides very valuable information to trace the technical evolution of man-made barium copper silicate pigments and their close relationship with the making of ancient PbO-BaO-SiO2 glaze and glass.

  5. Template-Engaged Solid-State Synthesis of Barium Magnesium Silicate Yolk@Shell Particles and Their High Photoluminescence Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuncai; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2016-05-17

    This study presents a new synthetic method for fabricating yolk@shell-structured barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles through a template-engaged solid-state reaction. First, as the core template, (BaMg)CO3 spherical particles were prepared based on the coprecipitation of Ba(2+) and Mg(2+) . These core particles were then uniformly shelled with silica (SiO2 ) by using CTAB as the structure-directing template to form (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles with a core@shell structure. The (BaMg)CO3 @SiO2 particles were then converted to yolk@shell barium magnesium silicate (BMS) particles by an interfacial solid-state reaction between the (BaMg)CO3 (core) and the SiO2 (shell) at 750 °C. During this interfacial solid-state reaction, Kirkendall diffusion contributed to the formation of yolk@shell BMS particles. Thus, the synthetic temperature for the (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor is significantly reduced from 1200 °C with the conventional method to 750 °C with the proposed method. In addition, the photoluminescence intensity of the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor was found to be 9.8 times higher than that of the conventional (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor. The higher absorption of excitation light by the structure of the yolk@shell phosphor is induced by multiple light-reflection and -scattering events in the interstitial void between the yolk and the shell. When preparing the yolk@shell (BaMg)SiO4 :Eu(3+) phosphor, a hydrogen environment for the solid-state reaction results in higher photoluminescence efficiency than nitrogen and air environments. The proposed synthetic method can be easily extended to the synthesis of other yolk@shell multicomponent metal silicates.

  6. Second Phase (BaGeO3, BaSiO3) Nanocolumns in YBa2Cu3O7-x Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, C. V.; Reichart, J.; Burke, J.; Wang, H.; Susner, M.; Sumption, M.; Barnes, P. N.

    2010-04-01

    YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) films with BaGeO3 (BGeO), BaSiO3 (BSiO) second phase additions were processed by pulsed laser deposition. Sectored targets with BGO or BSiO wedges as well as pre-mixed targets of YBCO, BGeO or BSiO with appropriate compositions were used to deposit YBCO+BGeO and YBCO+BSiO films on (100) single crystal LaAlO3 substrates. The cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs showed the presence of 20 nm diameter nanocolumns in the YBCO films of both the compositions. However, the critical transition temperature (Tc) of the films was found to significantly decrease. As a result, the critical current density (Jc) in applied magnetic fields was suppressed. The YBCO+BGeO and YBCO+BSiO films made with lower concentrations of additions showed slight improvement in Tc indicating that the substitution of Ge and Si in the lattice is possibly responsible for the Tc depression. This study shows that in addition to the ability to form nanocolumns, the chemical compatibility of BaSnO3 (BSO) and BaZrO3 (BZO) as observed in YBCO+BSO and YBCO+BZO is critical to process high Jc YBCO films.

  7. Barium boron aluminum silicate glass system for solid state optical gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, M. J.; Karczewski, J.; Jasinski, P.; Chrzan, A.; Kalinowski, P.; Szymczewska, D.; Jasinski, G.

    2016-11-01

    Recent increasing demand for new eco-friendly materials and for low cost fabrication process for use in optical sensors field, raise concern about alternative materials for this application. We have designed two glass-ceramics compositions from the quaternary ROAl2O3- SiO2-B2O3(R=Ba) alkali-earth aluminum silicate system, labeled B72 and B69, with high refractive index (>1.6), large values of Abbe number (94.0 and 53.0, respectively), and free of lead and arsenic. We present an analysis and discussion of experimental optical properties, thermal and thermo-chemical stability along with important properties such as transition temperature (Tg), onset of crystallization (Tx) as well transport properties as ionic conductivity behavior in the quaternary glass-ceramic system containing boron for use as optical sensors. Complex Impedance Spectra (Bode Plot) and Potentiodynamic Polarization curves (Tafel plots) measurements were carried out in the temperature range of 600 to 850°C. The most probable conductivity mechanism is a thermally activated process of mobile ions overcoming a potential barrier (EA), according to the Arrhenius regime. Here we report that charge transfer is caused by the flux of electrons, in the region of elevated temperatures (>700°C), and is affected by immiscibility of crystals, nucleation and growth type, that causes phase separation. We found conductivity (σ) values from 10-9 to 10-5 S/cm at temperatures between 700 and 850°C. Our results highlight a need for research on ion mobility in the glassy network above the transition range, and the effect cause by metastable immiscibility in the alkaline-earth glasses are exposed. The two glass compositions B72 and B69 can be tailored by proper use as glassy optical sensor.

  8. Barium enema

    MedlinePlus

    Lower gastrointestinal series; Lower GI series; Colorectal cancer - lower GI series; Colorectal cancer - barium enema; Crohn disease - lower GI series; Crohn disease - barium enema; Intestinal blockage - lower GI series; Intestinal blockage - ...

  9. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  10. BARIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.

    1959-07-21

    A method of separating barium from nuclear fission products is described. In accordance with the invention, barium may be recovered from an acidic solution of neutron-irradiated fissionable material by carrying ihe barium cut of solution as a sulfate with lead as a carrier and then dissolving the barium-containing precipitate in an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine chelating reagent. The barium values together with certain other metallic values present in the diamine solution are then absorbed onto a cation exchange resin and the barium is selectively eluted from the resin bed with concentrated nitric acid.

  11. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A barium enema is performed to examine the walls of the colon. During the procedure, a well lubricated enema tube is inserted gently into the rectum. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast ...

  12. A water-ethanol mixed-solution hydrothermal route to silicates nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xun . E-mail: wangxun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhuang Jing; Peng Qing; Li Yadong . E-mail: ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2005-07-15

    In this manuscript, series of silicates nanowires, such as calcium silicate, strontium silicate, barium silicate, zinc silicate and cadmium silicate, etc., have been successfully prepared from a water-ethanol mixed solution system through a hydrothermal synthetic way. The formation process of these silicates nanowires has been studied in detail. Due to their rich sources and possible novel properties from reduced dimensionalities, we believe that the synthesis of these silicates nanowires may bring some new opportunity in the solid state chemistry and nanoscience and technology fields, etc.

  13. Barium release system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A chemical system is described for releasing a good yield of free barium neutral atoms and barium ions in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium. The barium is released in the vapor phase so that it can be ionized by solar radiation and also be excited to emit resonance radiation in the visible range. The ionized luminous cloud of barium becomes a visible indication of magnetic and electrical characteristics in space and allows determination of these properties over relatively large areas at a given time.

  14. Eu(2+)-Activated Phase-Pure Oxonitridosilicate Phosphor in a Ba-Si-O-N System via Facile Silicate-Assisted Routes Designed by First-Principles Thermodynamic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Young Jun; Kim, Jin Kyu; Ju, Ji Young; Choi, Seul Ki; Park, Woon Ik; Jung, Ha-Kyun; Kim, Yongseon; Choi, Sungho

    2016-09-06

    Eu(2+)-activated single phase Ba(2+)-oxonitridosilicate phosphors were prepared under a mild synthetic condition via silicate precursors, and their luminescent properties were investigated. Both the preferred oxonitridosilicate formation as for the available host compounds and thermodynamic stability within the Ba-Si-O-N system were elucidated in detail by the theoretical simulation based on the first-principles density functional theory. Those results can visualize the optimum synthetic conditions for Eu(2+)-activated highly luminescent Ba(2+)-oxonitridosilicates, especially Ba3Si6O12N2, as promising conversion phosphors for white LEDs, including Ba3Si6O9N4 and BaSi2O2N2 phases. To prove the simulated design rule, we synthesized the Ba3Si6O12N2:Eu(2+) phosphor using various silicate precursors, Ba2Si4O10, Ba2Si3O8, and BaSiO3, in a carbothermal reduction ambient and finally succeeded in obtaining a phase of pure highly luminescent oxonitridosilicate phosphor without using any solid-state nitride addition and/or high pressure synthetic procedures. Our study provides useful guidelines for robust synthetic procedures for developing thermally stable rare-earth-ion activated oxonitridosilicate phosphors and an established simulation method that can be effectively applied to other multigas systems.

  15. Coastal barium cycling at the West Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, K. M.; Hendry, K. R.; Sherrell, R. M.; Meredith, M. P.; Venables, H.; Lagerström, M.; Morte-Ródenas, A.

    2017-05-01

    Barium cycling in the ocean is associated with a number of processes, including the production and recycling of organic matter, freshwater fluxes, and phenomena that affect alkalinity. As a result, the biogeochemical cycle of barium offers insights into past and present oceanic conditions, with barium currently used in various forms as a palaeoproxy for components of organic and inorganic carbon storage, and as a quasi-conservative water mass tracer. However, the nature of the oceanic barium cycle is not fully understood, particularly in cases where multiple processes may be interacting simultaneously with the dissolved and particulate barium pools. This is particularly the case in coastal polar regions such as the West Antarctic Peninsula, where biological drawdown and remineralisation occur in tandem with sea ice formation and melting, glacial meltwater input, and potential fluxes from shelf sediments. Here, we use a high-precision dataset of dissolved barium (Bad) from a grid of stations adjacent to the West Antarctic Peninsula in conjunction with silicic acid (Si(OH)4), the oxygen isotope composition of water, and salinity measurements, to determine the relative control of various coastal processes on the barium cycle throughout the water column. There is a strong correlation between Bad and Si(OH)4 present in deeper samples, but nevertheless persists significantly in surface waters. This indicates that the link between biogenic opal and barium is not solely due to barite precipitation and dissolution at depth, but is supplemented by an association between Bad and diatom tests in surface waters, possibly due to barite formation within diatom-dominated phytodetritus present in the photic zone. Sea-ice meltwater appears to exert a significant secondary control on barium concentrations, likely due to non-conservative biotic or abiotic processes acting as a sink for Bad within the sea ice itself, or sea-ice meltwater stimulating non-siliceous productivity that acts

  16. Barium bright and heavy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Katharina M.

    2013-02-01

    Katharina M. Fromm relates how barium and its ores went from a magical, glowing species that attracted witches and alchemists to components in a variety of compounds that are key parts of modern life.

  17. Optimized Photorefractive Barium Titanate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-11

    potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), 6 and barium sodium niobate Ba2 NaNbsO%1 ,7 were examined. Unfortu- nately, the high optical intensities required for...Phys. Lett., 15, 210 (1969) 14. J. J. Amodei. D. L. Staebler. and A. W. Stephens, "Holographic Storage in Doped Barium Sodium Niobate ". Appl. Phys...equipped with precise computer control of the pulling and rotation system. The cylindrical furnace was found to be susceptible to cracking due to

  18. Modeling and minimization of barium sulfate scale

    Treesearch

    Alan W. Rudie; Peter W. Hart

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the barium present in the pulping process exits the digester as barium carbonate. Barium carbonate dissolves in the bleach plant when the pH drops below 7 and, if barium and sulfate concentrations are too high, begins to precipitate as barium sulfate. Barium is difficult to control because a mill cannot avoid this carbonate-to-sulfate transition using...

  19. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  20. Barium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  1. Barium Peritonitis in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    KO, Jae Jin; MANN, F. A. (Tony)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Barium peritonitis is extremely rare, but is difficult to treat and may be life-threatening. Barium suspension leakage from the gastrointestinal tract into the abdominal cavity has a time-dependent and synergistically deleterious effect in patients who have generalized bacterial peritonitis. The severity of barium peritonitis is dependent on the quantity of barium in the abdominal cavity. Barium sulfate leakage results in hypovolemia and hypoproteinemia by worsening the exudation of extracellular fluid and albumin. Abdominal fluid analysis is a useful and efficient method to diagnose barium peritonitis. Serial radiographs may not be a reliable or timely diagnostic technique. Initial aggressive fluid resuscitation and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should be instituted promptly, followed quickly by celiotomy. During exploratory surgical intervention, copious irrigation and direct wiping with gauze are employed to remove as much barium as possible. Omentectomy should be considered when needed to expedite barium removal. Despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments, postoperative prognosis is guarded to poor due to complications, such as acute vascular shock, sepsis, diffuse peritonitis, hypoproteninemia, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest, small bowel obstruction related to progression of granulomas and adhesions in the abdominal cavity. Therefore, intensive postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are necessary to maximize chances for a positive outcome. For those that do survive, small bowel obstruction is a potential consequence due to progression of abdominal adhesions. PMID:24430662

  2. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a

  3. On Barium Oxide Solubility in Barium-Containing Chloride Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2016-08-01

    Oxide solubility in chloride melts depends on temperature and composition of molten solvent. The solubility of barium oxide in the solvents with barium chloride content is essentially higher than that in molten alkali chlorides. Spectral data demonstrate the existence of oxychloride ionic groupings in such melts. This work presents the results of the BaO solubility in two molten BaCl2-NaCl systems with different barium chloride content. The received data together with earlier published results revealed the main regularities of BaO solubility in molten BaO-BaCl2-MCl systems.

  4. Abundance analysis of barium and mild barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljanic, R.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; da Silva, L.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:We compare and discuss abundances and trends in normal giants, mild barium, and barium stars, searching for differences and similarities between barium and mild barium stars that could help shed some light on the origin of these similar objects. Also, we search for nucleosynthetic effects possibly related to the s-process that were observed in the literature for elements like Cu in other types of s-process enriched stars. Methods: High signal to noise, high resolution spectra were obtained for a sample of normal, mild barium, and barium giants. Atmospheric parameters were determined from the Fe i and Fe ii lines. Abundances for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd, were determined from equivalent widths and model atmospheres in a differential analysis, with the red giant ɛ Vir as the standard star. Results: The different levels of s-process overabundances of barium and mild barium stars were earlier suggested to be related to the stellar metallicity. Contrary to this suggestion, we found in this work no evidence of barium and mild barium having a different range in metallicity. However, comparing the ratio of abundances of heavy to light s-process elements, we found some evidence that they do not share the same neutron exposure parameter. The exact mechanism controlling this difference is still not clear. As a by-product of this analysis we identify two normal red giants misclassified as mild barium stars. The relevance of this finding is discussed. Concerning the suggested nucleosynthetic effects possibly related to the s-process, for elements like Cu, Mn, V and Sc, we found no evidence for an anomalous behavior in any of the s-process enriched stars analyzed here. However, further work is still needed since a clear [Cu/Fe] vs. [Ba/Fe] anticorrelation exists for other s-process enriched objects. Observations collected at ESO, La Silla, Chile, within the ON/ESO agreements. Tables 8-10 are only

  5. Tricalcium silicate cements with resins and alternative radiopacifiers.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Josette

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were the investigation of the setting mechanisms and characterization of radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based materials mixed with different liquid vehicles. Tricalcium silicate cement replaced with 20% of either zirconium oxide or barium zirconate radiopacifier was investigated. The cements were mixed with water, an epoxy resin, or a light-cured Bis-GMA-based resin. The setting mechanism and characterization of set materials after immersion in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) for 28 days were investigated by scanning electron microscopy of polished specimens and x-ray diffraction analysis. The bioactivity and surface microstructure of cements immersed in HBSS or water were also assessed by similar techniques together with leaching in solution investigated by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. The formation of calcium hydroxide as a by-product of cement reaction was affected by the type of radiopacifier and also by the resin vehicle used. Barium zirconate enhanced the formation of calcium hydroxide as indicated by both scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. The use of resins as vehicles reduced the formation of calcium hydroxide, with the Bis-GMA-based resin being mostly affected. Calcium hydroxide was deposited on the material surface regardless of the type of vehicle used. Formation of beta calcium phosphate was observed on materials containing barium zirconate radiopacifier immersed in HBSS. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy analysis showed high levels of calcium leached from materials by using water and light-curable resin as mixing vehicles. Barium was leached in solution, with the highest amount from the water-based mixtures. Zirconium leaching was negligible in materials containing zirconium oxide as radiopacifier, but leaching of zirconium was measurable in materials by using barium zirconate with tricalcium silicate. The resin type and composition of the radiopacifier

  6. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  7. Barium light source method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  8. Interaction between Barium Oxide and Barium Containing Chloride Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Korzun, Iraida V.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Antonov, Boris D.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal analysis was applied to determine the liquidus temperatures in the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2-BaO system, with BaO concentration varied from 0 to 6 mole%. The temperature dependence of the BaO solubility in the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2 eutectic melt was investigated; the thermodynamic parameters of BaO dissolution were calculated. The caloric effects of melting of the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2 eutectic with barium oxide and barium oxychloride additions were studied. The type, morphology, and composition of oxychloride ionic groupings in the melt were determined in situ using Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Barium Stars and Thermohaline Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Husti, Laura

    2008-01-24

    Barium stars are formed in binary systems through mass transfer from the carbon and s-element rich primary in the AGB phase, to the secondary star which is in a less evolved evolutionary stage. The mixing of the accreted material from the AGB donor with the envelope of the secondary results in a dilution of the s-element abundances. Dilution in red giants is explained by the occurence of the first dredge up, while in case of dwarfs thermohaline mixing would determine it. A comparison between the theoretical predictions of the AGB stellar models and the spectroscopical observations of a large sample of barium stars has been made. Dilution due to thermohaline mixing was taken into account when searching for best fits of the observational data. The importance of thermohaline mixing in barium dwarfs is discussed.

  10. 75 FR 33824 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China Determination On the basis of the record\\1\\ developed in the subject... order on barium chloride from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Barium Chloride from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-149 (Third Review). By order of the Commission...

  11. Use of barium-strontium carbonatite for flux welding and surfacing of mining machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, R. E.; Kozyrev, N. A.; Usoltsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The results of application of barium-strontium carbonatite for modifying and refining iron-carbon alloys, used for welding and surfacing in ore mining and smelting industry, are generalized. The technology of manufacturing a flux additive containing 70 % of barium-strontium carbonatite and 30 % of liquid glass is proposed. Several compositions of welding fluxes based on silicomanganese slag were tested. The flux additive was introduced in an amount of 1, 3, 5 %. Technological features of welding with the application of the examined fluxes are determined. X-ray spectral analysis of the chemical composition of examined fluxes, slag crusts and weld metal was carried out, as well as metallographic investigations of welded joints. The principal possibility of applying barium-strontium carbonatite as a refining and gas-protective additive for welding fluxes is shown. The use of barium-strontium carbonatite reduces the contamination of the weld seam with nonmetallic inclusions: non-deforming silicates, spot oxides and brittle silicates, and increases the desulfurizing capacity of welding fluxes.

  12. Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathi, L.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Rao, C.N.R.

    1984-05-01

    Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) prepared by the flux method is found to exhibit a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure similar to barium hexaaluminate. Morgan and Shaw as well as Iyi et al have recently reported the formation of a barium-rich phase of barium hexaaluminate possessing a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure of the magnetoplumbite structure. In view of the similarities between the layer structures of ..beta..-aluminas and the corresponding ferrites the authors have been carrying out electron microscopic investigations of potassium ..beta..-alumina and BaA1/sub 12/O/sub 19/ along with ferrites of similar compositions. They have obtained electron diffraction patterns of barium hexaaluminate identical to those obtained by Morgan and Shaw and Iyi et al, but more interestingly, they have found a phase of barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting the ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure.

  13. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  14. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  15. Processing science of barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Seymen Murat

    Barium titanate and barium strontium titanate thin films were deposited on base metal foils via chemical solution deposition and radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The films were processed at elevated temperatures for densification and crystallization. Two unifying research goals underpin all experiments: (1) To improve our fundamental understanding of complex oxide processing science, and (2) to translate those improvements into materials with superior structural and electrical properties. The relationships linking dielectric response, grain size, and thermal budget for sputtered barium strontium titanate were illustrated. (Ba 0.6Sr0.4)TiO3 films were sputtered on nickel foils at temperatures ranging between 100-400°C. After the top electrode deposition, the films were co-fired at 900°C for densification and crystallization. The dielectric properties were observed to improve with increasing sputter temperature reaching a permittivity of 1800, a tunability of 10:1, and a loss tangent of less than 0.015 for the sample sputtered at 400°C. The data can be understood using a brick wall model incorporating a high permittivity grain interior with low permittivity grain boundary. However, this high permittivity value was achieved at a grain size of 80 nm, which is typically associated with strong suppression of the dielectric response. These results clearly show that conventional models that parameterize permittivity with crystal diameter or film thickness alone are insufficiently sophisticated. Better models are needed that incorporate the influence of microstructure and crystal structure. This thesis next explores the ability to tune microstructure and properties of chemically solution deposited BaTiO3 thin films by modulation of heat treatment thermal profiles and firing atmosphere composition. Barium titanate films were deposited on copper foils using hybrid-chelate chemistries. An in-situ gas analysis process was developed to probe the organic removal and the

  16. Barium granuloma of the transverse colon.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, P. H.; Cameron, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    A case of barium sulphate granuloma of the transverse colon following gunshot wounds to the abdomen has been described. Scanning electron microscopy with electron probe microanalysis was used to confirm the presence of barium sulphate and the absence of lead or other elements related to the gunshot wounds. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:740599

  17. Hydration characteristics of calcium silicate cements with alternative radiopacifiers used as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Josette

    2010-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is composed of calcium silicate cement and bismuth oxide added for radiopacity. The bismuth oxide in MTA has been reported to have a deleterious effect on the physical and chemical properties of the hydrated material. This study aimed to investigate the hydration mechanism of calcium silicate cement loaded with different radiopacifiers for use as a root-end filling material. Calcium silicate cement loaded with barium sulfate, gold, or silver/tin alloy was hydrated, and paste microstructure was assessed after 30 days. In addition, atomic ratio plots of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca and Al/Ca were drawn, and X-ray energy dispersive analysis of the hydration products was performed to assess for inclusion of heavy metals. The leachate produced from the cements after storage of the cements in water for 28 days and the leaching of the radiopacifiers in an alkaline solution was assessed by using inductively coupled plasma. The hydrated calcium silicate cement was composed of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, ettringite, and monosulfate. Unhydrated cement particles were few. No heavy metals were detected in the calcium silicate hydrate except for the bismuth in MTA. Calcium was leached out early in large quantities that reduced with time. The barium and bismuth were leached in increasing amounts. Copper was the most soluble in alkaline solution followed by bismuth and barium in smaller amounts. The bismuth oxide can be replaced by other radiopacifiers that do not affect the hydration mechanism of the resultant material. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radium/Barium Waste Project

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Allen K.; Ellefson, Mark D.; McDonald, Kent M.

    2015-06-25

    The treatment, shipping, and disposal of a highly radioactive radium/barium waste stream have presented a complex set of challenges requiring several years of effort. The project illustrates the difficulty and high cost of managing even small quantities of highly radioactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-regulated waste. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research activities produced a Type B quantity of radium chloride low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in a number of small vials in a facility hot cell. The resulting waste management project involved a mock-up RCRA stabilization treatment, a failed in-cell treatment, a second, alternative RCRA treatment approach, coordinated regulatory variances and authorizations, alternative transportation authorizations, additional disposal facility approvals, and a final radiological stabilization process.

  19. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  20. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Acute barium nitrate intoxication treated by hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bahlmann, H; Lindwall, R; Persson, H

    2005-01-01

    A 22-year-old male was admitted to hospital with diarrhea and vomiting, cardiac arrhythmias, severe hypokalemia and gradual onset of muscular weakness. A potassium infusion was started, but for several hours serum potassium remained low. Evidence of toxic ingestion was initially lacking. When it became clear -- after a considerable delay -- that the patient had ingested barium nitrate, hemodialysis was started. This resulted in rapid clinical improvement with correction of hypokalemia and restored muscular function. Intoxication with barium causes hypokalemia, arrhythmias, muscular weakness and paralysis, often requiring respiratory support. This patient presented with symptoms typical of severe barium intoxication, non-responsive to potassium supplementation. There are few published reports on the use of hemodialysis in barium poisoning. This case confirms the possible benefit of hemodialysis in severe cases, where potassium supplementation alone is insufficient.

  3. Barium compatibility of insulator material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, John M.; Zee, Ralph; Schuller, Michael

    1997-01-01

    The compatibility of insulator material systems in a barium environment was investigated. This work is part of an ongoing program to identify weaknesses in insulator/braze/refractory metal materials systems which provide electrical insulation in alkali-metal enhanced thermionic devices and other alkali-metal thermal-to-electric converters. Test articles consisting of alumina or sapphire insulators brazed to molybdenum via a nominal Cu-30% Ni braze, were exposed to barium vapor to ascertain possible reactions and/or failure mechanisms. The test matrix consisted of eight samples; 5 with a sapphire insulator, 3 with an alumina insulator. Each sample was exposed to a different combination of insulator/braze region temperature (1000 K or 1100 K) and partial pressure of barium (10-3 or 10-2 torr) for approximately 750 hours. Initial analysis indicated that the ceramic portions were free from corrosion and that the braze material was the weak link in the material system. Evidence of formation of a Cu-Ba intermetallic at the braze region was visible. Further analysis indicated that in some cases Al2O3 was being reduced by the Barium. The results of this research imply that use of Al2O3 based ceramics in a barium environment may be suspect to failures in the long term and that Cu-Ni brazes are not suitable for the barium environment.

  4. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  5. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  6. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping.

  7. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  8. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  9. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  10. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  11. Constraining the oceanic barium cycle with stable barium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhimian; Siebert, Christopher; Hathorne, Ed C.; Dai, Minhan; Frank, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of barium (Ba) concentrations in seawater resembles that of nutrients and Ba has been widely used as a proxy of paleoproductivity. However, the exact mechanisms controlling the nutrient-like behavior, and thus the fundamentals of Ba chemistry in the ocean, have not been fully resolved. Here we present a set of full water column dissolved Ba (DBa) isotope (δ137BaDBa) profiles from the South China Sea and the East China Sea that receives large freshwater inputs from the Changjiang (Yangtze River). We find pronounced and systematic horizontal and depth dependent δ137BaDBa gradients. Beyond the river influence characterized by generally light signatures (0.0 to + 0.3 ‰), the δ137BaDBa values in the upper water column are significantly higher (+ 0.9 ‰) than those in the deep waters (+ 0.5 ‰). Moreover, δ137BaDBa signatures are essentially constant in the entire upper 100 m, in which dissolved silicon isotopes are fractionated during diatom growth resulting in the heaviest isotopic compositions in the very surface waters. Combined with the decoupling of DBa concentrations and δ137BaDBa from the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate this implies that the apparent nutrient-like fractionation of Ba isotopes in seawater is primarily induced by preferential adsorption of the lighter isotopes onto biogenic particles rather than by biological utilization. The subsurface δ137BaDBa distribution is dominated by water mass mixing. The application of stable Ba isotopes as a proxy for nutrient cycling should therefore be considered with caution and both biological and physical processes need to be considered. Clearly, however, Ba isotopes show great potential as a new tracer for land-sea interactions and ocean mixing processes.

  12. Surface treatment of barium gallogermanate laser glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Qian, Qi; Yang, Zhongmin

    2011-01-01

    The surface of barium gallogermanate glass is modified through HCl solution etching to remove the surface defects and contaminations. The etching process and mechanism for barium gallogermanate glass in hydrochloric acid are investigated, and its optimum conditions are determined. However, the HCl etching induces the insoluble etch product containing minute crystal particles on glass surface. By heating BGG glass at the optical fiber drawing temperature, the deposited surface layer turned to be amorphous again and results in the increase of the transmittance of glass. The results indicated that the HCl etching combined with subsequent high-temperature heat treatment is an effective approach to improve the surface quality of barium gallogermanate glass, which would reduce the optical loss of the final optical fiber.

  13. Barium iodide single-crystal scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Hull, Giulia; Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Drobshoff, Alexander; Payne, Stephen A.; Roy, Utpal N.; Cui, Yunlong; Bhattacharaya, Ajanta; Harrison, Melissa; Guo, Mingsheng; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We find that the high-Z crystal Barium Iodide is readily growable by the Bridgman growth technique and is less prone to crack compared to Lanthanum Halides. We have grown Barium Iodide crystals: undoped, doped with Ce 3+, and doped with Eu 2+. Radioluminescence spectra and time-resolved decay were measured. BaI II(Eu) exhibits luminescence from both Eu 2+ at 420 nm (~450 ns decay), and a broad band at 550 nm (~3 μs decay) that we assign to a trapped exciton. The 550 nm luminescence decreases relative to the Eu 2+ luminescence when the Barium Iodide is zone refined prior to crystal growth. We also describe the performance of BaI II(Eu) crystals in experimental scintillator detectors.

  14. Improved spectrophotometric analysis of barium styphnate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N E; Blasi, J A

    1983-01-01

    A spectrophotometric procedure to determine the purity of barium styphnate monohydrate based upon the absorbance of the styphnate ion at 326 and 413.3 nm has been developed. The purity is determined by comparing the absorbance of the styphnate ion in barium styphnate and in styphnic acid. Our investigation has shown that the molar absorptivity and lambda maxima of the styphnate ion are quite pH dependent; therefore, the pH is buffered to 6.8 to 7.0 with ammonium acetate. Under these conditions the molar absorptivity is 1.6 x 10/sup 4/ L/mol-cm. Analyses following the procedure in the Navy specification WS13444A using water were found to give low molar absorptivities (1.3 x 10/sup 4/ L/mol-cm) for the styphnic acid calibration resulting in erroneous values for barium styphnate purity.

  15. Kinetics of photoplasma of dense barium vapour

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I

    2015-03-31

    Barium vapour ionisation under laser photoexcitation of the resonance line at a wavelength of λ = 553.5 nm is studied numerically. Seed electrons, arising due to the associative ionisation of atoms, gain energy in superelastic collisions and lead to electron avalanche ionisation of the medium. The influence of radiative transfer in a cylindrical gas volume on the excitation kinetics of barium atoms, absorption dynamics of laser radiation and oscillation of ionisation-brightening wave under competition between ionising and quenching collisions of electrons with excited atoms is studied. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  16. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject review. DATES: Effective Date: April 9, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy...

  17. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of Commission... China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will proceed with a full review pursuant to... antidumping duty order on barium chloride from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  18. Barium Transport Process in Impregnated Dispenser Cathodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-25

    Distribution of Autoelectronic Emission from Single Crystal Metal Points. II. The Adsorption, Migration and Evaporation of Thorium, Barium, and Sodium on...1966, Alkaline Earth Tungstate : Equilibrium Instability in the M-W-O Systems, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 49, p. 385. 26 LABORAT)RY OPIRATI JS The Labratory

  19. Effects of Different Fabrication Techniques on the Yttrium-Barium-Copper Oxide High Temperature Superconductor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    lanthanum -barium-copper oxide, with a Tc of 35 K (9:1134), which was followed by a similar capound in which the lanthanum was replaced by yttrium, with a Tc...barium acetate, barium hydroxide, and barium fluoride . Barium oxide was not selected because it is not stable in air. Barium acetate was not used because...these two precursors could not be used in identical fabrication techniques. Barium fluoride was not selected because it only reacts at talperatures

  20. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  1. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  9. A detailed analysis of five barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, N.

    1985-09-01

    A model-atmosphere analysis of five barium stars is carried out, and a previous analysis of two others extended. The sample comprises types Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3, and Ba 5. High-resolution Reticon spectra recorded with the ESO Coude Echelle Spectrometer serve to determine abundances relative to the sun for typically 16 elements. The use of Reticon spectra improves the accuracy compared to previous analyses. Enhancements of s-process elements relative to iron by factors of 2 (HD 139195) to 30 (HD 92626) are found; neutron exposures span at least the range tau of about 0.06-0.6/mb. In the more extreme barium stars the C/O ratio is enhanced with respect to normal red giants by a factor 2.5 to 30.

  10. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  11. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  12. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  13. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  14. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  15. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  17. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, S.; Drake, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    Metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle (Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al. 1997). The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. In this work, we investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid. Experiments were performed in the Experimental Geochemistry Laboratory at the University of Arizona utilizing a non-end loaded piston cylinder apparatus with a barium carbonate pressure medium. Starting materials were created by combining the mafic and silicic compositions of Jaeger and Drake (2000) with Fe powder (~25 wt% of the total mixture) to achieve metal saturation. Small amounts of W, Ge, Ga2O3 and NiO powder (less than 2 wt% each) were also added to the starting compositions. The experiments were contained in a graphite capsule and performed with temperature and pressure fixed at 1400ºC and 1.5 GPa. Experimental run products were analyzed with the University of Arizona Cameca SX50 electron microprobe with four wavelength dispersive spectrometers and a PAP ZAF correction program. All experiments in our set are saturated with metal and silicate liquid, indicating that oxygen fugacity is below IW. Several of the runs also contain a gallium-rich spinel as an additional saturating phase. Quench phases are also present in the silicate liquid in all runs. The experimentally produced liquids have nbo/t values (calculated using the method of Mills, 1993) that range from 1.10 to 2.97. These values are higher than those calculated for the liquids in the Jaeger and Drake (2000) study. The higher nbo/t values are due to uptake of Fe by the melt. The initial silicate

  18. Nanoparticles of barium induce apoptosis in human phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mores, Luana; França, Eduardo Luzia; Silva, Núbia Andrade; Suchara, Eliane Aparecida; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nutrients and immunological factors of breast milk are essential for newborn growth and the development of their immune system, but this secretion can contain organic and inorganic toxins such as barium. Colostrum contamination with barium is an important issue to investigate because this naturally occurring element is also associated with human activity and industrial pollution. The study evaluated the administration of barium nanoparticles to colostrum, assessing the viability and functional activity of colostral mononuclear phagocytes. Methods Colostrum was collected from 24 clinically healthy women (aged 18–35 years). Cell viability, superoxide release, intracellular Ca2+ release, and phagocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the samples. Results Treatment with barium lowered mononuclear phagocyte viability, increased superoxide release, and reduced intracellular calcium release. In addition, barium increased cell death by apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that nanoparticles of barium in colostrum are toxic to cells, showing the importance of avoiding exposure to this element. PMID:26451108

  19. Rapid barium removal in the Delaware estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, H.A. III |; Kogut, M.B.

    1999-04-01

    Six profiles of dissolved barium covering the entire salinity range of the Delaware River and Bay estuary from March through September 1996 were collected and analyzed. The profiles are similar to one another in both shape and magnitude except for one attribute. A sudden ({le} 24 days), nearly complete (>90%) removal of dissolved Ba in midestuary occurs in mid-May followed by an 80% recovery in early June. This removal appears to be temporally and spatially coupled to the end of the spring bloom. Based on such episodic behavior, and on recent work with flocculation of diatom exudates, the authors conclude that the Ba depletion is caused by barite precipitation in the estuary during the late stages of the bloom. This would imply that lower estuary and inner coastal margin sediments associated with eutrophic estuaries receive a seasonal pulse of barite. The suddenness of this event also implies that sedimentary barite is strongly influenced by high productivity events. Comparison of the riverine Ba concentration with the effective riverine end member after desorptive barium release yields an estimated 30--40 nM Ba available from the suspended sediments as they enter the estuary. This estimate is supported by excess barium in unfiltered samples over filtered samples taken from the river and also by calculations done elsewhere.

  20. Barium hexaferrite suspensions for electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Ovtar, Simona; Lisjak, Darja; Drofenik, Miha

    2009-09-15

    In this investigation we have looked at the preparation of barium hexaferrite suspensions, with the stability of the magnetic barium hexaferrite particles being increased by the addition of a surfactant, dodecylbenzylsulfonic acid (DBSA). The influence of the solubility DBSA in different solvents and its adsorption onto the surfaces of particles with different sizes were determined from zeta-potential measurements. The most suitable and stable suspensions of barium hexaferrite particles, regardless of their sizes, were obtained in 1-butanol, and these were then used for a subsequent electrophoretic deposition. The microstructures of the deposits were examined with electron microscopy. The thickness and density of the deposits as a function of the electric field, the zeta-potential, the particle size, and the separation distance between the electrodes were investigated. The thickness of the deposits was found to increase with the increasing zeta-potential of the suspension and with the increasing separation distance between the electrodes. Denser deposits were obtained from the suspensions of smaller particles that had narrower particle size distributions.

  1. THE BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Sarah; Padera, Robert F.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    Micro- and nano- mesoporous silicate particles are considered potential drug delivery systems because of their ordered pore structures, large surface areas and the ease with which they can be chemically modified. However, few cytotoxicity or biocompatibility studies have been reported, especially when silicates are administered in the quantities necessary to deliver low-potency drugs. The biocompatibility of mesoporous silicates of particle sizes ~ 150 nm, ~ 800 nm and ~ 4 µm and pore sizes of 3 nm, 7 nm and 16 nm respectively are examined here. In vitro, mesoporous silicates showed a significant degree of toxicity at high concentrations with mesothelial cells. Following subcutaneous injection of silicates in rats, the amount of residual material decreased progressively over three months, with good biocompatibility on histology at all time points. In contrast, intra peritoneal and intra venous injections in mice resulted in death or euthanasia. No toxicity was seen with subcutaneous injection of the same particles in mice. Microscopic analysis of the lung tissue of the mice indicates that death may be due to thrombosis. Although local tissue reaction to mesoporous silicates was benign, they caused severe systemic toxicity. This toxicity could be mitigated by modification of the materials. PMID:18675454

  2. Cadmium, zinc, copper, and barium in foraminifera tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Edward A.

    1981-03-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, zinc, copper and barium have been determined on 2-mg samples of single-species foraminifera populations. Cleaning techniques were tested using North Atlantic core tops, and followed by a detailed downcore study for the last 30,000 years in South Atlantic core V22-174. Raw foram tests cleaned by crushing followed by ultrasonic removal of fine-grained material, and dissolved in a pH 5.5 acetate buffer, contain appreciable amounts of trace elements associated with ferromanganese and alumino-silicate contaminants. A reductive/complexing cleaning treatment reduces ferromanganese contamination by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Acetate buffers at pH 5.5 complex iron and raise the solubility of ferromanganese oxides; these buffers are unsuitable for separating carbonate lattice-bound trace elements from the fraction associated with ferromanganese phases. Improved mechanical and ultrasonic reductive cleaning combined with a mild dissolution in distilled water under 1 atm. P CO 2 reduces contaminant levels another order of magnitude. The Cd and Zn concentrations (order 10 -8 mole Cd/mole Ca and 10 -5 mole Zn/mole Ca) of species with low surface area show an increase with decreasing isotopic temperatures. This increase is consistent with the increasing concentrations of these metals from low values in surface waters to higher values at depth. The variance of Cd and Zn over the last 30,000 years in the central South Atlantic is consistent with the probable variability of the dissolved trace elements at the calcification levels of the species analyzed. Cu and Ba are irreproducible and probably sensitive to residual contaminant phases. The trace element content of the tests differs from levels observed in a recent coprecipitation study. Foraminifera may be a significant vector in zinc cycling in the ocean.

  3. Tin in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparoni, Guido

    An experimental technique that uses Re metal capsules as containers for tin-bearing systems has been developed and successfully used in the study of the compositional dependence of SnO2 solubility in silicate melts. These experiments have been performed in the absence of an aqueous fluid phase and oxygen fugacity (fO2) has been established by the addition of tin-metal to SnO2. This approach solves three long-standing problems in the study of SnO 2 solubility in silicate melts: (1) Alloying of noble-metal crucibles and corrosion of ceramic crucibles is avoided; (2) fO 2 is established by direct contact of a metal-oxide oxygen buffer; (3) Gaseous SnO is not lost to the furnace atmosphere. The Re-capsule technique, combined with evacuated silica-tube experiments, has been applied to the study of the system SnO-SiO2 at pressures of 1 atm and 10 kbar. SnO2 solubilities of up to 95 wt% SnO are reported. The system SnO-SiO2 is found to be a pseudo-binary of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2-SiO2. A revised phase diagram for the system SnO-SiO2 at a pressure ≈1 atm is provided, and a new phase diagram for the system SnOSiO2 at a pressure = 10 kbar has been constructed. These results are used to suggest the topology of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2SiO2. The Re-capsule technique has also been applied to the study of the subaluminous haplogranite system (SiO2NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi 3O8) at T = 1100°C, P = 10 kbar and fO 2 at Sn°-SnO2. Solubilities span the range of 41 to 80 wt% SnO. In the haplogranite system, the solubility of SnO2 increases with the proportion of normative SiO2, and SnO is found to expand the stability field of SiO2. In the feldspar join, Na-based melts dissolve a larger proportion of SnO than K-based melts. This effect is lost as SiO2 is progressively added to the feldspar join. Small amounts of F (1 wt%) are found to increase the solubility of SnO 2 by an equivalent 15 wt% normative quartz as shown with the Spor Mountain rhyolite. A comparison of SnO2 solubilities

  4. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped charges are discussed. Active experiments confirm that anomalous ionization processes may operate, but photoionization accounts for the production of the bulk of the barium ions. Pitch-angle diffusion and/or velocity-space diffusion may occur, but observations of barium ions moving upwards against gravity suggests that the ions retain a significant enough fraction of their initial perpendicular velocity to provide a mirror force. The barium ion plasmas should have a range of Alfven Mach numbers and plasma betas. Because the initial conditions can be predicted these active experiments should permit testing plasma instability hypotheses.

  5. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  6. Thermochemistry of Silicate Speciation in Aqueous Sodium Silicate Solutions: Ionization and Polymerization of Small Silicate Ion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-12

    reasonable success, but a number of simplifications were used. For instance, the polymerization equilibrium constants were assumed to be independent of...Another weakness lies in the functionality assumed for the ionization equilibrium constants . As will be discussed below, experimental data that the free...characterize silicate species in fairly complex alkaline silicate solutions and thereby to estimate a large number of equilibrium constants [27,28

  7. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  8. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  9. Binding and leakage of barium in alginate microbeads.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Yrr A; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L

    2012-11-01

    Microbeads of alginate crosslinked with Ca(2+) and/or Ba(2+) are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared with high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. To reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation.

  10. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  11. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. Acute barium intoxication following ingestion of ceramic glaze.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Bowie, D; Walker, R

    1998-09-01

    A case of deliberate overdose of barium sulphide in a psychiatric setting is presented, with resulting flaccid paralysis, malignant arrhythmia, respiratory arrest and severe hypokalaemia, but ultimately with complete recovery. The degree of paralysis appears to be related directly to serum barium levels. The value of early haemodialysis, particularly with respiratory paralysis and hypokalaemia, is emphasised.

  16. Barium strontium titanate powder obtained by polymeric precursor method

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, A.; Simoes, A.Z.; Cilense, M.; Zaghete, M.A.; Varela, J.A

    2003-03-15

    Pure barium strontium titanate powder, with Ba/Sr ratio of 80/20 was prepared by the polymeric precursor method (also called Pechini process). The powder was obtained after a calcination at 800 deg. C for 8 h and characterized by XRD, IR, BET and SEM. The requirements to avoid barium carbonate as a secondary phase are presented and discussed in detail.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this...

  18. Production of translationally cold barium monohalide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePalatis, M. V.; Chapman, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    We have produced sympathetically cooled barium monohalide ions BaX+ (X=F, Cl, Br) by reacting trapped, laser-cooled Ba+ ions with room-temperature gas-phase neutral halogen-containing molecules. Reaction rates for two of these (SF6 and CH3Cl) have been measured and were found to be in agreement with classical models. BaX+ ions are promising candidates for cooling to the rovibrational ground state, and our method presents a straightforward way to produce these polar molecular ions.

  19. Anisotropic thermal expansion of strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, Syed B.; Bellotti, Jeffrey A.; Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong Ho

    2005-06-01

    Strontium barium niobate is a tungsten-bronze ferroelectric crystal having a tetragonal unit cell. Low-temperature x-ray diffraction studies were performed on a single crystal of Sr0.75Ba0.25Nb2O6 to determine the thermal expansivity along the a- and c-axes. Negative thermal expansion was observed along the c direction while a positive thermal expansion was measured along the a axis. The anisotropic thermal expansion behavior is explained as arising due to the geometry of the crystal structure.

  20. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  1. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  2. Vacancy ordering in reduced barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, David I.; Reaney, Ian M.; Yang, Gaiying Y.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Randall, Clive A.

    2004-06-01

    A crystal structure is proposed for reduced barium titanate, BaTiO3-δ, δ≈0.33, formed during the degradation of Ni-BaTiO3 X7R multilayer ceramic capacitors. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction have been used in combination with computer simulations to show that oxygen vacancies accrete on every third pseudocubic {111} plane, resulting in a cell with space group P3m1. Additionally, from electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is proposed that Ti4+ is reduced to Ti3+ as a mechanism of charge compensation within oxygen-deficient octahedra.

  3. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin

  4. Barium appendicitis: A single institution review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Hideki; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review clinical experience with barium appendicitis at a single institution. METHODS A retrospective review of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 was performed. Age, gender, computed tomography (CT) scan findings if available, past history of barium studies, pathology, and the presence of perforation or the development of complications were reviewed. If the CT scan revealed high density material in the appendix, the maximum CT scan radiodensity of the material is measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Barium appendicitis is defined as: (1) patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis; (2) the patient has a history of a prior barium study; and (3) the CT scan shows high density material in the appendix. Patients who meet all three criteria are considered to have barium appendicitis. RESULTS In total, 396 patients were admitted with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the study period. Of these, 12 patients (3.0%) met the definition of barium appendicitis. Of these 12 patients, the median CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix was 10000.8 HU, ranging from 3066 to 23423 HU (± 6288.2). In contrast, the median CT scan radiodensity of fecaliths in the appendix, excluding patients with barium appendicitis, was 393.1 HU, ranging from 98 to 2151 HU (± 382.0). The CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendices of patients with barium appendicitis was significantly higher than in patients with nonbarium fecaliths (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Barium appendicitis is not rare in Japan. Measurement of the CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix may differentiate barium appendicitis from routine appendicitis. PMID:27721929

  5. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  6. Barium toxicity effects in soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Ryuichi; Jayachandran, Krish; Nguyen, Nguyen Tran; Boulenouar, Abdellah; Fujita, Kounosuke; Saneoka, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    Barium (Ba)-induced phytotoxicity at 100, 1000, or 5000 microM Ba in soybean plants (Glycine max) was investigated under hydroponic culture conditions. Soybean growth and leaf photosynthetic activity were significantly inhibited by all three levels of Ba treatments. In the case of photosynthetic activity, 5000 microM Ba treatment shutdown stomatal opening and perturbed carbon fixation metabolism and translocation. However, 100 and 1000 microM Ba treatments shut down stomatal opening and inhibited carbon fixation, but without perturbation of leaf carbon fixation-related metabolism. Potassium (K) absorption by soybean roots was also reduced in all three Ba treatments. This decreased K absorption reduced K localization at guard cells. Barium accumulation in guard cells also inhibited K transport from epidermal cells to guard cells. This lack of K in guard cells resulted in stomatal closure. As a result of inhibition of K transport into guard cells and stomatal shutdown, photosynthetic activity and plant productivity were inhibited. Our experiment indicates that Ba has phytotoxic effects on soybean plants by inhibiting photosynthesis.

  7. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate... system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with the exception of § 820.180, with respect to general...

  8. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M [Albuquerque, NM; Reinhardt, Frederick W [Albuquerque, NM; Odinek, Judy G [Rio Rancho, NM

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  9. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  10. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  11. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  12. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  14. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  16. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  17. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  18. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions...

  20. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  3. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  4. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  7. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  9. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  10. Hygienic importance of increased barium content in some fresh waters.

    PubMed

    Havlík, B; Hanusová, J; Rálková, J

    1980-01-01

    In surface waters of the mining and processing areas of uranium ore there is an increased content of free and bound barium ions due to the use of barium salts for the treatment of waste and mine waters containing radium. In model experiments with the algae Ankistrodesmus falcatus, Chlorella kessleri and Scenedesmus obliquus, we studied the effect of Ba2+ on the accumulation of 226Ra. It was found that the accumulation of radium by algae is negatively influenced with barium concentrations higher than 1 mg.l-1. The accumulation of barium of organisms of primary production was studied using 133BaCl2. At a barium content in the medium of 4.0, 0.46 and 0.04 mu. l-1, the algae accumulated 30-60% of the added amount of barium during an exposure of 15 days. Biochemical analyses showed that barium is bound to the cellular membrane and to other components of the algal cell that cannot be extracted with water or alcohol.

  11. Microstructure and magnetism in barium strontium titanate (BSTO)-barium hexaferrite (BaM) multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, N.A.; Heindl, R.; Srinath, S.; Srikanth, H. . E-mail: sharihar@cas.usf.edu; Dudney, N.J.

    2005-08-11

    High quality multilayers of barium ferrite (BaM) and barium strontium titanate (BSTO) were grown in optimized conditions on thermally oxidized Si(1 0 0) and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates using magnetron sputtering. As-grown films were amorphous and different annealing procedures were explored to stabilize crystalline phases. BSTO and BaM phases were identified using X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional scanning electron micrographs showed sharp interfaces between BSTO and BaM layers. Magnetic hysteresis loops obtained at various temperatures and field orientations showed a large coercivity ({approx}2500 Oe) consistent with the hard magnetic hexaferrite component. Hysteresis loops also revealed the distinct influence of magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropies at different temperature ranges.

  12. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  13. Proton conductivity of potassium doped barium zirconates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoxiang; Tao Shanwen; Irvine, John T.S.

    2010-01-15

    Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10%. Introducing extra potassium leads to the formation of second phase or YSZ impurities. The water uptake of barium zirconates was increased even with 5% doping of potassium at the A-site. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. The maximum solubility for yttrium at B-sites is around 15 at% after introducing 1 wt% zinc. The conductivity of Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} at 600 deg. C is 2.2x10{sup -3} S/cm in wet 5% H{sub 2}. The activation energies for bulk and grain boundary are 0.29(2), 0.79(2) eV in wet 5% H{sub 2} and 0.31(1), 0.74(3) eV in dry 5% H{sub 2}. A power density of 7.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at 718 deg. C was observed when a 1 mm thick Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} pellet was used as electrolyte and platinum electrodes. - Graphical abstract: Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10 %. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. Five percent doping of potassium at A-site can double the total conductivity.

  14. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  15. Metallurgical Properties and Phase Transformations of Barium-Strontium Modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, M. A.; Sulimova, I. S.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Dmitrienko, V. I.; Horoshun, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallurgical properties and phase transformations of barium-strontium modifier were tested in laboratory conditions resembling steel processing in furnace and ladle. When heating barium-strontium modifier start of melting, kinetics of decomposition, phase and structure transformation were studied. The concentrate under consideration has been revealed to be a complex mineral compound containing barytocalcite, calcite, calciostrontianite, dolomite and siderite. The reaction kinetics of decomposing mineral components of barium-strontium modifier to oxides does not considerably affect slag formation in conditions of out-of-furnace steel processing.

  16. Cometary Silicates: Interstellar and Nebular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    Evidence for interstellar material in comets is deduced from IR spectra, insitu measurements of Halley, and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs). IR spectra of comets reveal the spectrally active minerals: amorphous carbon, amorphous silicates, and (in some comets) crystalline silicates. Evidence suggests amorphous silicates are of interstellar origin while crystalline silicates are of nebular origin. 10 microns spectra of comets and submicron amorphous silicate spherules in CP IDPs have shapes similar to lines-of-sight through the ISM. Thermal emission models of cometary IR spectra require Fe-bearing amorphous silicates. Fe-bearing amorphous silicates may be Fe-bearing crystalline silicates formed in AGB outflows that are amorphized through He+ ion bombardment in supernova shocks in the ISM. Crystalline silicates in comets, as revealed by IR spectra, and their apparent absence in the ISM, argues for their nebular origin. The high temperatures (less than l000 K) at which crystals form or are annealed occur in the inner nebula or in nebular shocks in the 5-10 AU region. Oxygen isotope studies of CP IDPs show by mass only 1 % of the silicate crystals are of AGB origin. Together this suggests crystalline silicates in comets are probably primitive grains from the early solar nebula.

  17. Barium carbonate catalysis of carbon gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Ersolmaz, C.; Falconer, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of barium carbonate with carbon black was studied to understand catalyzed CO/sub 2/ gasification of carbon. Temperature-programmed reaction with isotopic labeling of the carbonate and the carbon showed that carbon dramatically accelerated with rate of BaCO/sub 3/ decomposition to form BaO and CO/sub 2/, which rapidly gasified carbon to form CO. Pure BaCO/sub 3/ was observed to exchange carbon dioxide with the gas-phase, and the exchange rate was significantly increased by carbon at higher temperatures, due to formation of a carbon-carbonate complex. The interaction of BaCO/sub 3/ and C to form a complex occurred well below gasification temperatures, and BaCO/sub 3/ did not decompose until after gasification began and the gas phase CO/sub 2/ concentration was low.

  18. Solar Twins and the Barium Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Arumalla B. S.; Lambert, David L.

    2017-08-01

    Several abundance analyses of Galactic open clusters (OCs) have shown a tendency for Ba but not for other heavy elements (La-Sm) to increase sharply with decreasing age such that Ba was claimed to reach [Ba/Fe] ≃ +0.6 in the youngest clusters (ages < 100 Myr) rising from [Ba/Fe] = 0.00 dex in solar-age clusters. Within the formulation of the s-process, the difficulty to replicate higher Ba abundance and normal La-Sm abundances in young clusters is known as the barium puzzle. Here, we investigate the barium puzzle using extremely high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 solar twins and measured the heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Sm with a precision of 0.03 dex. We demonstrate that the enhanced Ba ii relative to La-Sm seen among solar twins, stellar associations, and OCs at young ages (<100 Myr) is unrelated to aspects of stellar nucleosynthesis but has resulted from overestimation of Ba by standard methods of LTE abundance analysis in which the microturbulence derived from the Fe lines formed deep in the photosphere is insufficient to represent the true line broadening imposed on Ba ii lines by the upper photospheric layers from where the Ba ii lines emerge. Because the young stars have relatively active photospheres, Ba overabundances most likely result from the adoption of a too low value of microturbulence in the spectrum synthesis of the strong Ba ii lines but the change of microturbulence in the upper photosphere has only a minor affect on La-Sm abundances measured from the weak lines.

  19. A triangular heterometallic siloxide containing barium

    SciTech Connect

    Coan, P.S.; Streib, W.E.; Caulton, K.G. )

    1991-12-25

    Reaction of KOSiPh[sub 3] with Ba[sub 3](OSiPh[sub 3])[sub 6](THF) in THF displaces barium from the triangular reagent to yield a colorless solid. Recrystallization in the presence of MeOC[sub 2]H[sub 4]OMe(DME) yields KBa[sub 2](OSiPh[sub 3])[sub 5](DME)[sub 2], characterized by [sup 1]H and [sup 29]Si NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The molecule contains a triangular KBa[sub 2]([mu][sub 3]-OSiPh[sub 3])[sub 2]([mu][sub 2]-OSiPh[sub 3])[sub 3] core with [eta][sup 1] and [eta][sup 2]-DME ligation on each barium. The benzene-soluble molecule is fluxional in solution at both the OSiPh[sub 3] and the DME groups. At -70C in CH[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]/C[sub 6]D[sub 6], both [eta][sup 1]-DME/[eta][sup 2]-DME site exchange and intramolecular siloxide migration have been slowed, and the spectra are in agreement with retention of the solid-state structure in solution. Crystallographic data for KBa[sub 2](OSiPh[sub 3])[sub 5](DME)[sub 2] (-159C): a = 15.474 (3) [angstrom], b = 26.466 (6) [angstrom], c = 23.783 (5) [angstrom], [beta] = 99.80 (1)[degree] with Z = 4 in space group P2[sub 1]/n.

  20. Surface characterization of silicate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Cerruti, Marta

    2012-03-28

    The success of an implanted prosthetic material is determined by the early events occurring at the interface between the material and the body. These events depend on many surface properties, with the main ones including the surface's composition, porosity, roughness, topography, charge, functional groups and exposed area. This review will portray how our understanding of the surface reactivity of silicate bioceramics has emerged and evolved in the past four decades, owing to the adoption of many complementary surface characterization tools. The review is organized in sections dedicated to a specific surface property, each describing how the property influences the body's response to the material, and the tools that have been adopted to analyse it. The final section introduces the techniques that have yet to be applied extensively to silicate bioceramics, and the information that they could provide.

  1. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  2. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  3. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  4. Properties of Tricalcium Silicate Sealers.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Issam; Naaman, Alfred; Camilleri, Josette

    2016-10-01

    Sealers based on tricalcium silicate cement aim at an interaction of the sealer with the root canal wall, alkalinity with potential antimicrobial activity, and the ability to set in a wet field. The aim of this study was to characterize and investigate the properties of a new tricalcium silicate-based sealer and verify its compliance to ISO 6876 (2012). A new tricalcium silicate-based sealer (Bio MM; St Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon), BioRoot RCS (Septodont, St Maure de Fosses, France), and AH Plus (Dentsply, DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) were investigated. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis was performed. Furthermore, sealer setting time, flow, film thickness, and radiopacity were performed following ISO specifications. pH and ion leaching in solution were assessed by pH analysis and inductively coupled plasma. Bio MM and BioRoot RCS were both composed of tricalcium silicate and tantalum oxide in Bio MM and zirconium oxide in BioRoot RCS. In addition, the Bio MM contained calcium carbonate and a phosphate phase. The inorganic components of AH Plus were calcium tungstate and zirconium oxide. AH Plus complied with the ISO norms for both flow and film thickness. BioRoot RCS and Bio MM exhibited a lower flow and a higher film thickness than that specified for sealer cements in ISO 6876. All test sealers exhibited adequate radiopacity. Bio MM interacted with physiologic solution, thus showing potential for bioactivity. Sealer properties were acceptable and comparable with other sealers available clinically. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of novel tricalcium silicate-based endodontic cements with sintered radiopacifier phase.

    PubMed

    Xuereb, M; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D; Camilleri, Josette

    2016-06-01

    All implants, bone and endodontic cements need to be sufficiently radiopaque to be able to be distinguished from neighbouring anatomical structures post-operatively. For this purpose, radiopacifying materials are added to the cements to render them sufficiently radiopaque. Bismuth oxide has been quite a popular choice of radiopacifier in endodontic materials. It has been shown to cause dental discoloration. The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the properties of tricalcium silicate cement with alternative radiopacifiers, which are either inter-ground or sintered to the tricalcium silicate cement. Custom-made endodontic cements based on tricalcium silicate and 20 % barium, calcium or strontium zirconate, which were either inter-ground or sintered at high temperatures, were produced. The set materials stored for 28 days in Hank's balanced salt solution were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Assessment of pH, leaching, interaction with physiological solution, radiopacity, setting time, compressive strength and material porosity were investigated. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Angelus was used as control. Addition of radiopacifying materials improved the radiopacity of the material. The sintered cements exhibited the formation of calcium zirconate together with the respective radiopacifier phase. All materials produced calcium hydroxide on hydration, which interacted with tissue fluids forming hydroxyapatite on the material surface. The physical properties of the tricalcium silicate-based cements were comparable to MTA Angelus. A novel method of producing radiopaque tricalcium silicate-based cements was demonstrated. The novel materials exhibited properties, which were either comparable or else improved over the control. The novel materials can be used to replace MTA for root-end filling, perforation repair and other clinical applications where MTA is indicated.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal barium evaluation of duodenal pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Debi, Uma; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor

    2014-01-01

    Like other parts of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), duodenum is subject to a variety of lesions both congenital and acquired. However, unlike other parts of the GIT viz. esophagus, rest of the small intestine and large intestine, barium evaluation of duodenal lesions is technically more challenging and hence not frequently reported. With significant advances in computed tomography technology, a thorough evaluation including intraluminal, mural and extramural is feasible in a single non-invasive examination. Notwithstanding, barium evaluation still remains the initial and sometimes the only imaging study in several parts of the world. Hence, a thorough acquaintance with the morphology of various duodenal lesions on upper gastrointestinal barium examination is essential in guiding further evaluation. We reviewed our experience with various common and uncommon barium findings in duodenal abnormalities. PMID:25170399

  7. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  8. Calculated emission rates for barium releases in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The optical emissions from barium releases in space are caused by resonance and fluorescent scattering of sunlight. Emission rates for the dominant ion and neutral lines are calculated assuming the release to be optically thin and the barium to be in radiative equilibrium with the solar radiation. The solar spectrum has deep Fraunhofer absorption lines at the primary barium ion resonances. A velocity component toward or away from the sun will Doppler shift the emission lines relative to the absorption lines and the emission rates will increase many-fold over the rest value. The Doppler brightening is important in shaped charge or satellite releases where the barium is injected at high velocities. Emission rates as a function of velocity are calculated for the 4554, 4934, 5854, 6142 and 6497 A ion emission lines and the dominant neutral line at 5535 A. Results are presented for injection parallel to the ambient magnetic field, B, and for injection at an angle to B.

  9. Synthesis, photoluminescence and magnetic properties of barium vanadate nanoflowers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Chenguo; Xi, Yi; Peng, Chen; Wan, Buyong; He, Xiaoshan

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate was obtained for the first time. The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. Research highlights: {yields} In the paper, the flower-shaped barium vanadate were obtained for the first time. The CHM method used here is new and simple for preparation of barium vanadate. {yields} The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. The strong bluish-green emission was observed. {yields} The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers was found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g. {yields} The mechanisms of PL and magnetic property of barium vanadate nanoflowers have been discussed. -- Abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate has been obtained by the composite hydroxide mediated (CHM) method from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and BaCl{sub 2} at 200 {sup o}C for 13 h. XRD and XPS spectrum of the as-synthesized sample indicate it is hexagonal Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} with small amount of Ba{sub 3}VO{sub 4.8} coexistence. Scan electron microscope and transmission electron microscope display that the flower-shaped crystals are composed of nanosheets with thickness of {approx}20 nm. The UV-visible spectrum shows that the barium vanadate sample has two optical gaps (3.85 eV and 3.12 eV). Photoluminescence spectrum of the barium vanadate flowers exhibits a visible light emission centered at 492 and 525 nm which might be attributed to VO{sub 4} tetrahedron with T{sub d} symmetry in Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers has been found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, which is mainly due to the presence of a non

  10. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  11. Solar eclipse sign of intussusception on barium enema.

    PubMed

    Raveenthiran, V

    2002-01-01

    The colographic appearance of intussusception is variously described as a claw sign, pincer defect, shouldering effect, and coiled-spring pattern. This report adds a new radiographic sign to the list. An end-on view of an intussusception on barium enema shows a ring of contrast resembling a solar eclipse. Familiarity with this bizarre appearance is desirable, lest it may be mistaken for spillage of barium due to a colonic perforation.

  12. 'Skidding' of the CRRES G-9 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Mitchell, H. G.; Fedder, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation study and experimental data of the CRRES G-9 ionospheric barium release are presented. The simulation study is based on a 2D electrostatic code that incorporates time-dependent coupling to the background plasma. It is shown that the densest portion of the barium ion cloud 'skids' about 15 km within the first three seconds following the release, consistent with the optical data analyses.

  13. Glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a barium borosilicate glass by a non-isothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Soares, Roque S.; Lima, Maria M. A.; Monteiro, Regina C. C.

    2014-01-28

    The glass transition and crystallization kinetics of a glass with a molar composition 60BaO-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-10SiO{sub 2} were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under non-isothermal conditions. DSC curves exhibited an endothermic peak associated with the glass transition and two partially overlapped exothermic peaks associated with the crystallization of the glass. The dependence of the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and of the maximum crystallization temperature (T{sub p}) on the heating rate was used to determine the activation energy associated with the glass transition (E{sub g}), the activation energy for crystallization (E{sub c}), and the Avrami exponent (n). X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that barium borate (β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was the first crystalline phase to be formed followed by the formation of barium silicate (Ba{sub 5}Si{sub 8}O{sub 21}). The variations of activation energy for crystallization and of Avrami exponent with the fraction of crystallization (χ) were also examined. When the crystallization fraction (χ) increased from 0.1 to 0.9, the value of local activation energy (E{sub c}(χ)) decreased from 554 to 458 kJ/mol for the first exothermic peak and from 1104 to 831 kJ/mol for the second exothermic peak. The value determined for the Avrami exponent was near 2 indicating a similar one-dimensional crystallization mechanism for both crystalline phases. This was confirmed by the morphological studies performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on glass samples heat-treated at the first and at the second crystallization temperatures.

  14. Fatal barium chloride poisoning: four cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Sunnassee; Shaohua, Zhu; Liang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Barium is an alkaline earth metal which has a variety of uses including in the manufacturing industry and in medicine. However, adverse health effects and fatalities occur due to absorption of soluble barium compounds, notably the chloride, nitrate, and hydroxide, which are toxic to humans. Although rare, accidental and suicidal modes of poisoning are sporadically reported in the literature.We describe 4 cases of poisoning due to barium chloride in China. In witnessed cases, severe gastrointestinal symptoms, hypokalemia leading to muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were noted. Autopsy showed some nonspecific but common findings, such as subendocardial hemorrhage in the ventricles, visceral petechiae, and fatty changes in the liver. Interestingly, microscopic examination showed degenerative changes and amorphous, flocculent foamy materials in the renal tubules. Toxicology was relevant for barium in blood and tissues. Three of the cases were accidental and 1 homicidal in nature. A round-up of relevant literature on fatal barium compounds poisoning is also provided. Forensic pathologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of barium compound poisoning and especially look for any evidence of hypokalemia. Still, postmortem toxicological and histological studies are essential for an accurate identification of the cause of death.

  15. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure.

  16. Anastomotic stenosis of the descending colon caused by barium granuloma formation following barium peritonitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Tomizawa, Kenji; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Toda, Shigeo; Matoba, Shuichiro; Kuroyanagi, Hiroya; Oota, Yasunori

    2014-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture reportedly often recurs following barium peritonitis, regardless of whether the anastomotic diameter is initially sufficient. However, the causes of repetitive stricture have not been clarified. We report a case that suggests the pathophysiology of recurrent anastomotic strictures following barium peritonitis. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese man with idiopathic perforation of the descending colon after undergoing an upper gastrointestinal barium contrast study. After emergency peritoneal lavage and diverting colostomy, created using the perforated region, the patient recovered uneventfully and 3 months later, the colostomy was closed and the perforated colon was resected. However, 7 months after colostomy closure, abdominal distention gradually developed, and colonoscopy revealed an anastomotic stricture. The patient was referred to our hospital where he underwent resection of the anastomotic stricture. The surgical specimen exhibited barium granulomas not only in the subserosa of the entire specimen, but also in the submucosa and lamina propria localized in the anastomotic site. These findings suggest that barium was embedded in the submucosa and lamina propria with manipulation of the stapled anastomosis and that the barium trapped in the anastomotic site caused persistent inflammation, resulting in an anastomotic stricture.

  17. Silicate stabilization studies in propylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1999-08-01

    In most North American and many European coolant formulations, the corrosion inhibition of heat-rejecting aluminum surfaces is provided by alkali metal silicates. But, their tendency towards polymerization, leading to gelation and/or precipitation, can reduce the effectiveness of a coolant. This paper presents the results of experiments which illustrate formulation-dependent behavior of inorganic silicate in propylene glycol compositions. Specific examples of the effects of glycol matrix, stabilizer type, and hard water on silicate stabilization are provided.

  18. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  19. Barium determination in gastric contents, blood and urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the case of oral barium chloride poisoning.

    PubMed

    Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Sommerfeld, Karina; Hanć, Anetta; Grzegorowski, Adam; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Gaca, Michał; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A serious case of barium intoxication from suicidal ingestion is reported. Oral barium chloride poisoning with hypokalemia, neuromuscular and cardiac toxicity, treated with intravenous potassium supplementation and hemodialysis, was confirmed by the determination of barium concentrations in gastric contents, blood, serum and urine using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method. Barium concentrations in the analyzed specimens were 20.45 µg/L in serum, 150 µg/L in blood, 10,500 µg/L in urine and 63,500 µg/L in gastric contents. Results were compared with barium levels obtained from a non-intoxicated person.

  20. A review of bioactive silicate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2013-06-01

    Silicate bioceramics, as a new family of biomaterials, have received significant attention in their application to hard tissue regeneration. Some silicate bioceramics have shown excellent apatite mineralization in simulated body fluids and their ionic products have been shown to enhance the proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and gene expression of stem cells. In this paper, we review the advances in the research of silicate system bioceramics, including preparation methods, mechanical strength, apatite mineralization, dissolution and in vitro and in vivo biological properties. The biological properties and the corresponding mechanism have been highlighted. A look forward to the application of silicate bioceramics to bone regeneration is further suggested.

  1. Tailoring polymer properties with layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang

    Polymer layered silicate nanocomposites have found widespread applications in areas such as plastics, oil and gas production, biomedical, automotive and information storage, but their successful commercialization critically depends on consistent control over issues such as complete dispersion of layered silicate into the host polymer and optimal interaction between the layered silicates and the polymers. Polypropylene is a commercially important polymer but usually forms intercalated structures with organically modified layered silicate upon mixing, even it is pre-treated with compatibilizing agent such as maleic anhydride. In this work, layered silicate is well dispersed in ammonium modified polypropylene but does not provide sufficient reinforcement to the host polymer due to poor interactions. On the other hand, interactions between maleic anhydride modified polypropylene and layered silicate are fine tuned by using a small amount of maleic anhydride and mechanical strength of the resultant nanocomposites are significantly enhanced. In particular, the melt rheological properties of layered silicate nanocomposites with maleic anhydride functionalized polypropylene are contrasted to those based on ammonium-terminated polypropylene. While the maleic anhydride treated polypropylene based nanocomposites exhibit solid-like linear dynamic behavior, consistent with the formation of a long-lived percolated nanoparticle network, the single-end ammonium functionalized polypropylene based nanocomposites demonstrated liquid-like behavior at comparable montmorillonite concentrations. The differences in the linear viscoelasticity are attributed to the presence of bridging interaction in maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites, which facilitates formation of a long-lived silicate network mediated by physisorbed polymer chains. Further, the transient shear stress of the maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites in start-up of steady shear is a function of the shear

  2. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  3. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Monson, Todd C.

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage of 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.

  4. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    DOE PAGES

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage ofmore » 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.« less

  5. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  6. Prospects for Barium Tagging in Gaseous Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.; Rollin, E.; Smith, J.; Mommers, A.; Ackerman, N.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P.S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cook, S.; Coppens, A.; Daniels, T.; DeVoe, R.; Dobi, A.; Dolinski, M.J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Giroux, G.; /Bern U., LHEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Indiana U. /Indiana U., CEEM /Korea U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Alabama U. /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Bern U., LHEP /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2012-05-03

    Tagging events with the coincident detection of a barium ion would greatly reduce the background for a neutrino-less double beta decay search in xenon. This paper describes progress towards realizing this goal. It outlines a source that can produce large quantities of Ba++ in gas, shows that this can be extracted to vacuum, and demonstrates a mechanism by which the Ba++ can be efficiently converted to Ba+ as required for laser identification. It is clear from this study that electrospray is a convenient mechanism for producing Ba++ is gas at atmospheric pressure. It is likely that the source will perform just as effectively at higher pressures. Even though the source region has water vapour and methanol vapour at the 0.3% level, there is no evidence for molecular formation. The use of TEA offers an effective method to achieve the charge state conversion. The overall design of the ion extraction from high pressure to vacuum is very similar to the scheme proposed for the final detector and this appears to work well although the efficiency is not yet determined.

  7. High pressure FAST of nanocrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Martin B.; Delplanque, Jean -Pierre; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Monson, Todd C.

    2016-06-01

    Here, this work studies the microstructural evolution of nanocrystalline (<1 µm) barium titanate (BaTiO3), and presents high pressure in field-assisted sintering (FAST) as a robust methodology to obtain >100 nm BaTiO3 compacts. Using FAST, two commercial ~50 nm powders were consolidated into compacts of varying densities and grain sizes. Microstructural inhomogeneities were investigated for each case, and an interpretation is developed using a modified Monte Carlo Potts (MCP) simulation. Two recurrent microstructural inhomogeneities are highlighted, heterogeneous grain growth and low-density regions, both ubiqutously present in all samples to varying degrees. In the worst cases, HGG presents an area coverage of 52%. Because HGG is sporadic but homogenous throughout a sample, the catalyst (e.g., the local segregation of species) must be, correspondingly, distributed in a homogenous manner. MCP demonstrates that in such a case, a large distance between nucleating abnormal grains is required—otherwise abnormal grains prematurely impinge on each other, and their size is not distinguishable from that of normal grains. Compacts sintered with a pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures of 900 °C, were 99.5% dense and had a grain size of 90±24 nm. These are unprecedented results for commercial BaTiO3 powders or any starting powder of 50 nm particle size—other authors have used 16 nm lab-produced powder to obtain similar results.

  8. Barium Tagging for nEXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudenberg, Daniel; Brunner, Thomas; Varentsov, Victor; Devoe, Ralph; Dilling, Jens; Gratta, Giorgio; nEXO Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    nEXO is a next-generation experiment designed to search for 0 νββ -decay of Xe-136 in a liquid xenon time projection chamber. Positive observation of this decay would determine the neutrino to be a Majorana particle In order to greatly reduce background contributions to this search, the collaboration is developing several ``barium tagging'' techniques to recover and identify the decay daughter, Ba-136. ``Tagging'' may be available for a 2nd phase of nEXO and will push the sensitivity beyond the inverted neutrino-mass hierarchy. Tagging methods in testing for this phase include Ba-ion capture on a probe with identification by resonance ionization laser spectroscopy, and Ba capture in solid xenon on a cold probe with identification by fluorescence. In addition, Ba tagging for a gas-phase detector, appropriate for a later stage, is being tested. Here efficient ion extraction from heavy carrier gases is key. Detailed gas-dynamic and ion transport calculations have been performed to optimize for ion extraction. An apparatus to extract Ba ions from up to 10 bar xenon gas into vacuum using an RF-only funnel has been constructed and demonstrates extraction of ions from noble gases. We will present this system's status along with results of this R&D program.

  9. Nanoscale zinc silicate from phytoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, C. R.; Amarasinghe, R.; Freitas, J. A.; Culbertson, J. C.; Wollmershauser, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report a faster, less expensive method of producing zinc silicate nanoparticles. Such particles are used in high volume to make phosphors and anti-corrosion coatings. The approach makes use of phytoliths (plant rocks), which are microscopic, amorphous, and largely silicate particles embedded in plants, that lend themselves to being easily broken down into nanoparticles. Nanoparticles of Zn2SiO4 were produced in a two stage process. In the refinement stage, plant residue, mixed with an appropriate amount of ZnO, was heated in an argon atmosphere to a temperature exceeding 1400 °C for four to six hours and then heated in air at 650 °C to remove excess carbon. TEM shows 50-100 nm nanoparticles. Raman scattering indicates that only the -Zn2SiO4 crystalline phase was present. X-ray analysis indicated pure rhombohedral R 3 bar phase results from using rice/wheat husks. Both samples luminesced predominantly at 523 nm when illuminated with X-rays or UV laser light.

  10. Acceleration of barium ions near 8000 km above an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.; Foeppl, H.

    1984-01-01

    A barium shaped charge, named Limerick, was released from a rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, on March 30, 1982, at 1033 UT. The release took place in a small auroral breakup. The jet of ionized barium reached an altitude of 8100 km 14.5 min after release, indicating that there were no parallel electric fields below this altitude. At 8100 km the jet appeared to stop. Analysis shows that the barium at this altitude was effectively removed from the tip. It is concluded that the barium was actually accelerated upward, resulting in a large decrease in the line-of-sight density and hence the optical intensity. The parallel electric potential in the acceleration region must have been greater than 1 kV over an altitude interval of less than 200 km. The acceleration region, although presumably auroral in origin, did not seem to be related to individual auroral structures, but appeared to be a large-scale horizontal structure. The perpendicular electric field below, as deduced from the drift of the barium, was temporally and spatially very uniform and showed no variation related to individual auroral structures passing through.

  11. Preparation of barium hexaferrite powders using oxidized steel scales waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Ardita; Idayanti, Novrita; Kristiantoro, Tony

    2016-02-01

    Research on preparation of barium hexaferrite powders has been done using Hot Strip Mill scales as raw materials. Hot Strip Mill scales are oxidized steel scales waste from steel industrial process. The method used for preparing the barium hexaferrite powders was solid state reaction method. Oxidized steel scales were milled using ball mill for 10 hours, then screened through a 250 mesh sieve to obtain powders with maximum size of 63 µm. Powders were roasted at 600°C temperature for 4 hours to obtain hematite (Fe2O3) phase. Roasted powders were then mixed with barium carbonate, and were subsequently milled for 16 hours. After mixing, powders were calcined with an increasing rate of 10°C/min and maintained at 1100°C for 3 hours. Calcination process was performed to acquire barium hexaferrite phase. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization in conjunction with RIR analysis showed that 85 wt. % of barium hexaferrite is formed. The magnetic properties of powders were characterized using Permagraph. It is found the value of remanent induction is 1.09 kG, coercivity of 2.043 kOe, and the maximum energy product of 0.25 MGOe.

  12. Physical properties of an alumino-silicate waste form for cesium and strontium.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M.; Mertz, C.; Ferrandon, M.; Dietz, N.; Sandi-Tapia, G.

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing will be required to sustain nuclear power as a baseload energy supplier for the world. New reprocessing schemes offer an opportunity to develop a better strategy for recycling elements in the fuel and preparing stable waste forms. Advanced strategies could create a waste stream of cesium, strontium, rubidium, and barium. Some physical properties of a waste form containing these elements sintered into bentonite clay were evaluated. We prepared samples loaded to 27% by mass to a density of approximately 3 g/cm{sup 3}. Sintering temperatures of up to 1000 C did not result in volatility of cesium. Instead, the crystallinity noticeably increased in the waste form as temperatures increased from 600 to 1000 C. Assemblages of silicates were formed. Significant water evolved at approximately 600 C but no other gases were generated at higher temperatures.

  13. Physical properties of an alumino-silicate waste form for cesium and strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Mertz, C. J.; Ferrandon, M.; Dietz, N. L.; Sandi, G.

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing will be required to sustain nuclear power as a baseload energy supplier for the world. New reprocessing schemes offer an opportunity to develop a better strategy for recycling elements in the fuel and preparing stable waste forms. Advanced strategies could create a waste stream of cesium, strontium, rubidium, and barium. Some physical properties of a waste form containing these elements sintered into bentonite clay were evaluated. We prepared samples loaded to 27% by mass to a density of approximately 3 g/cm 3. Sintering temperatures of up to 1000 °C did not result in volatility of cesium. Instead, the crystallinity noticeably increased in the waste form as temperatures increased from 600 to 1000 °C. Assemblages of silicates were formed. Significant water evolved at approximately 600 °C but no other gases were generated at higher temperatures.

  14. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  15. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  16. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  17. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium...

  18. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium...

  19. Barium Levels in Soils and Centella asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ghim Hock; Yap, Chee Kong; Mahmood, Maziah; Tan, Soon Guan; Hamzah, Suhaimi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Centella asiatica and surface soils were collected from 12 sampling sites in Peninsular Malaysia, and the barium (Ba) concentrations were determined. The Ba concentration [μg/g dry weight (dw)] was 63.72 to 382.01 μg/g in soils while in C. asiatica, Ba concentrations ranged from 5.05 to 21.88 μg/g for roots, 3.31 to 11.22 μg/g for leaves and 2.37 to 6.14 μg/g for stems. In C. asiatica, Ba accumulation was found to be the highest in roots followed by leaves and stems. The correlation coefficients (r) of Ba between plants and soils were found to be significantly positively correlated, with the highest correlation being between roots-soils (r=0.922, p<005), followed by leaves-soils (r=0.890, p<005) and stems-soils (r=0.848, p<005). This indicates that these three parts of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. For the transplantation study, four sites were selected as unpolluted [(Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)], semi-polluted (Seri Kembangan and Balakong) and polluted sites (Juru). Based on the transplantation study under experimental field and laboratory conditions, Ba concentrations in C. asiatica were significantly (p<0.05) higher after three weeks of exposure at Seri Kembangan, Balakong and Juru. Thus, these experimental findings confirm that the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica can reflect the Ba levels in the soils where this plant is found. Three weeks after back transplantation to clean soils, the Ba levels in C. asiatica were still higher than the initial Ba level even though Ba elimination occurred. In conclusion, the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. PMID:24575242

  20. Barium Levels in Soils and Centella asiatica.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ghim Hock; Yap, Chee Kong; Mahmood, Maziah; Tan, Soon Guan; Hamzah, Suhaimi

    2013-08-01

    In this study, Centella asiatica and surface soils were collected from 12 sampling sites in Peninsular Malaysia, and the barium (Ba) concentrations were determined. The Ba concentration [μg/g dry weight (dw)] was 63.72 to 382.01 μg/g in soils while in C. asiatica, Ba concentrations ranged from 5.05 to 21.88 μg/g for roots, 3.31 to 11.22 μg/g for leaves and 2.37 to 6.14 μg/g for stems. In C. asiatica, Ba accumulation was found to be the highest in roots followed by leaves and stems. The correlation coefficients (r) of Ba between plants and soils were found to be significantly positively correlated, with the highest correlation being between roots-soils (r=0.922, p<005), followed by leaves-soils (r=0.890, p<005) and stems-soils (r=0.848, p<005). This indicates that these three parts of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. For the transplantation study, four sites were selected as unpolluted [(Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)], semi-polluted (Seri Kembangan and Balakong) and polluted sites (Juru). Based on the transplantation study under experimental field and laboratory conditions, Ba concentrations in C. asiatica were significantly (p<0.05) higher after three weeks of exposure at Seri Kembangan, Balakong and Juru. Thus, these experimental findings confirm that the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica can reflect the Ba levels in the soils where this plant is found. Three weeks after back transplantation to clean soils, the Ba levels in C. asiatica were still higher than the initial Ba level even though Ba elimination occurred. In conclusion, the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution.

  1. Selectivity in biomineralization of barium and strontium.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Minna R; Wasserman, Brian; Finney, Lydia; McNulty, Ian; Legnini, Daniel; Vogt, Stefan; Joester, Derk

    2011-11-01

    The desmid green alga Closterium moniliferum belongs to a small number of organisms that form barite (BaSO(4)) or celestite (SrSO(4)) biominerals. The ability to sequester Sr in the presence of an excess of Ca is of considerable interest for the remediation of (90)Sr from the environment and nuclear waste. While most cells dynamically regulate the concentration of the second messenger Ca(2+) in the cytosol and various organelles, transport proteins rarely discriminate strongly between Ca, Sr, and Ba. Herein, we investigate how these ions are trafficked in C. moniliferum and how precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) crystals occurs in the terminal vacuoles. Towards this goal, we simultaneously visualize intracellular dynamics of multiple elements using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of cryo-fixed/freeze-dried samples. We correlate the resulting elemental maps with ultrastructural information gleaned from freeze-fracture cryo-SEM of frozen-hydrated cells and use micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) to determine sulfur speciation. We find that the kinetics of Sr uptake and efflux depend on external Ca concentrations, and Sr, Ba, and Ca show similar intracellular localization. A highly ion-selective cross-membrane transport step is not evident. Based on elevated levels of sulfate detected in the terminal vacuoles, we propose a "sulfate trap" model, where the presence of dissolved barium leads to preferential precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) due to its low solubility relative to SrSO(4) and CaSO(4). Engineering the sulfate concentration in the vacuole may thus be the most direct way to increase the Sr sequestered per cell, an important consideration in using desmids for phytoremediation of (90)Sr.

  2. Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

    1967-01-01

    A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

  3. Barium-borate-flyash glasses: As radiation shielding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhpal; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Devinder; Thind, Kulwant Singh; Mudahar, Gurmel S.

    2008-01-01

    The attenuation coefficients of barium-borate-flyash glasses have been measured for γ-ray photon energies of 356, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using narrow beam transmission geometry. The photon beam was highly collimated and overall scatter acceptance angle was less than 3°. Our results have an uncertainty of less than 3%. These coefficients were then used to obtain the values of mean free path (mfp), effective atomic number and electron density. Good agreements have been observed between experimental and theoretical values of these parameters. From the studies of the obtained results it is reported here that from the shielding point of view the barium-borate-flyash glasses are better shields to γ-radiations in comparison to the standard radiation shielding concretes and also to the ordinary barium-borate glasses.

  4. White dwarf kicks and implications for barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Church, R. P.; Dermine, T.

    The barium stars have caused much grief in the field of binary stellar evolution. They are often eccentric when they should be circular and are not found to have periods longer than 104 days even though wind accretion should still be efficient at such separations. We address both these problems by introducing a kick to white dwarfs when they are born, thus solving the eccentricity problem, and imposing strong orbital angular momentum loss to shrink barium-star binaries down to the observed periods. Whilst our angular momentum prescription is hard to justify for the barium stars it shows that strong angular momentum loss is necessary to reproduce the observed period-eccentricity distribution. We are investigating whether this can be obtained from a circumbinary disc.

  5. Prompt ionization in the CRIT II barium releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Liou, K.; Rau, D.

    1992-05-01

    Observations of electron and ion distributions inside a fast neutral barium jet in the ionosphere show significant fluxes within 4 km of release, presumably related to beam plasma instability processes involved in the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. Electron fluxes exceeding 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm-str-sec-keV were responsible for ionizing both the streaming barium and ambient oxygen. Resulting ion fluxes seem to be consistent with 1-2 percent ionization of the fast barium, as reported by optical observations, although the extended spatial distribution of the optically observed ions is difficult to reconcile with the in situ observations. When the perpendicular velocity of the neutrals falls below critical values, these processes shut off. Although these observations resemble the earlier Porcupine experimental results (Haerendel, 1982), theoretical understanding of the differences between these data and that of earlier negative experiments is still lacking.

  6. Multiphoton laser ionization for energy conversion in barium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Y.; Kokaj, J.; Afrousheh, K.; Mathew, J.; Nair, R.; Pichler, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the ion detection of barium atoms in special heated ovens with a tungsten rod in the middle of the stainless steel tube. The tungsten rod was heated indirectly by the oven body heaters. A bias voltage between the cell body and the tungsten rod of 9 V was used to collect electrons, after the barium ions had been created. However, we could collect the electrons even without the bias voltage, although with ten times less efficiency. We studied the conditions for the successful bias-less thermionic signal detection using excimer/dye laser two-photon excitation of Rydberg states below and above the first ionization limit (two-photon wavelength at 475.79 nm). We employed a hot-pipe oven and heat-pipe oven (with inserted mesh) in order to generate different barium vapor distributions inside the oven. The thermionic signal increased by a factor of two under heat-pipe oven conditions.

  7. Electro-optical polycrystalline barium lanthanum titanium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, A.K.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a transparent electro-optic article. It comprises: of a barium lanthanum titanium niobate wherein substantially all grains are of a grain size between about 2 and about 20 micron, the article has a pore volume of less than about 1 percent, and the article has a grain size of between about 2 and about 20 microns. This patent also describes a method of forming transparent electro-optical barium lanthanum titanium niobate. It comprises: providing particles of barium carbonate, lanthanum oxide, titanium oxide, and niobium oxide, calcining the particles, sintering the calcined particles at a temperature of between about 1200{degrees} C and 1300{degrees} C. and a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}4} torr while under pressure to form a sintered mass, cooling the sintered mass, slicing the mass to form wafers, heating the wafers in an oxidizing atmosphere.

  8. Acute barium toxicity from ingestion of "snake" fireworks.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Heard, Kennon

    2009-12-01

    Ingestion of fireworks has been infrequently reported in the medical literature. We describe a case of acute barium poisoning following firework ingestion. A 35-year-old male with a history of severe mental retardation presented with vomiting and diarrhea following ingestion of 16 small fireworks ("color snakes" and "black snakes"). His condition rapidly deteriorated and he developed obtundation, wide complex dysrhythmias, and respiratory failure. Approximately 12 hours following ingestion, his serum potassium level was 1.5 mmol/L with a serum barium level of 20,200 microg/mL (reference range <200 microg/L). The patient eventually recovered with ventilatory support and potassium supplementation. Although firework ingestion is uncommon, clinicians should be prepared for potentially severe complications. In the case of barium poisoning, treatment consists of potassium supplementation, along with respiratory and hemodynamic support.

  9. Second Phase (BaGeO3, BaSiO3) Nanocolumns in Yba2Cu3O7-x Films (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    compositions were used to deposit YBCO +BGeO and YBCO +BSiO films on ( 100 ) single crystal LaAlO3 substrates. The cross- sectional transmission electron...micrographs showed the presence of 20 nm diameter nanocolumns in the YBCO films of both the compositions. However, the critical transition...were used to deposit YBCO +BGeO and YBCO +BSiO films on ( 100 ) single crystal LaAlO3 substrates. The cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs

  10. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules. PMID:27873810

  11. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Prabaharan, T.; Shyam, A.

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO3) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  12. Diagnosis of anastomotic leak: electrolyte detection versus barium fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    DeArmond, Daniel T; Carswell, Aimee; Louden, Christopher L; Simmons, Jeremy D; Bayer, Johanna; Das, Nitin A; Johnson, Scott B

    2013-06-15

    We recently described a new method of diagnosing anastomotic leak using the detection of electrical changes induced by electrolyte extravasation from a surgically created gastric leak site in experimental rats. We sought to compare the sensitivity and specificity of anastomotic leak detection for this method to that of upper gastrointestinal (GI) barium fluoroscopy. Experimental rats with a surgically created gastric leak site and controls were interrogated as to the presence of leak using either the electrolyte-gated leak detection method or upper GI barium fluoroscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of leak detection for the two methods were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of electrolyte-gated leak detection were both 100% (95% confidence interval 69-100%). Barium upper GI fluoroscopy misidentified one leak as a control and one control as a leak, for a sensitivity and specificity of 80% each (95% confidence interval 37-97%). No statistically significant difference was seen between electrolyte-gated leak detection and barium upper GI fluoroscopy in terms of the sensitivity and specificity of anastomotic leak detection. Electrolyte-gated leak detection was similarly sensitive and specific for anastomotic leak detection as upper GI barium fluoroscopy, the current standard. The electrolyte-gated method has the advantages of an inert contrast agent (normal saline) and the possibility of performing leak interrogation at the bedside. Electrolyte-gated leak detection might represent a plausible alternative to upper GI barium fluoroscopy for routine postoperative anastomotic leak surveillance after esophagectomy or other foregut surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN P-00...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN P-00...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN P-00...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN P-00...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  18. Phenotypic and behavioral defects caused by barium exposure in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, D-Y; Wang, Y

    2008-04-01

    To examine the possible phenotypic defects from barium exposure, a model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, was chosen to analyze the multiple toxicities in barium-exposed animals. Endpoints of life span, body size, brood size, generation time, head thrash, and body bend were selected for the assessment of barium toxicity. High concentrations (75 microM and 200 microM) of barium exposure caused severe life-span defects. Body sizes of exposed animals were markedly reduced compared to the controls, and high concentrations of barium exposure (75 microM and 200 microM) caused the appearance of vulva abnormality. In addition, barium exposure resulted in severe defects in reproductive capacity and reproductive speed. Body bends and head thrashes were also severely impaired after barium exposure. Furthermore, the stress responses to barium exposure suggest severe barium toxicity. The observed severe locomotion behavior and life-span defects in nematodes might be largely due to the deposition of barium toxicity in the muscle and intestine systems, respectively. Our data suggest that barium exposure could cause multiple biological defects by affecting the life span, development, reproduction, and locomotion behaviors. These multiple biological defects provide a new evaluation system to monitor the toxicity from barium exposure.

  19. Volatile Barium Beta-Diketonate Polyether Adducts. Synthesis, Characterization and Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-31

    Volatile Barium 13- Diketonate Polyether Adducts.... Synthesis , Characterization and Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition by Robin A. Gardiner...has been approved for public release and sale: its distribution is unlimited. Volatile, Barium B- Diketonate Polyether Adducts. Synthesis ...NO. NO. INO. ACCESSION NO. Arlington, VA 22217 II 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) Volatile Barium B- Diketonate Polyether Adducts

  20. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoelectric effect in structures consisting of metal deposited barium titanate film silicon is described. A radio frequency sputtering technique is used to deposit ferroelectric barium titantate films on silicon and quartz. Film properties are measured and correlated with the photoelectric effect characteristics of the films. It was found that to obtain good quality pin hole free films, it is necessary to reduce the substrate temperature during the last part of the deposition. The switching ability of the device with internal applied voltage is improved when applied with a ferroelectric memory device.

  1. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  2. Fatal Liver Damage After Barium Enemas Containing Tannic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Lucke, Hans H.; Hodge, Kenneth E.; Patt, Norman L.

    1963-01-01

    Tannic acid contained in the barium enema was found to have been the sole known potential hepatotoxin in four of the five cases of fulminating fatal liver failure that occurred in a 213-bed hospital over a period of 27 months. In the other case halothane anesthesia had also been administered. Autopsies (performed on four of the cases) did not suggest viral hepatitis but showed substantially indentical hepatic changes, not unlike those reported in the past following tannic acid exposure. Proof is not claimed that tannic acid was the cause of these deaths, but further investigation regarding the safety of its administration in barium enemas is advocated. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:14079135

  3. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  4. Enhancement of the crystallinity of barium titanate by using a uniform barium-carbonate surface coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Nak-Kwan; Yun, Ju-Young; Kim, Jin-Tae; Park, Jiho

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we modified the surfaces of BaTiO3 particles by using barium acetate and ammonium bicarbonate, and we studied the characteristics and sintering behaviors of the coated BaTiO3 particles. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the resultant coating layer was smooth and uniform without agglomerates. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis also revealed that the surface coating layer was composed of BaCO3. After calcination at 950 °C for 5 hours, the c/ a ratio of the coated particles was found to have increased without size growth while the uncoated particles showed size growth. We finally found that the BaCO3 layer acted as a barrier to inhibit particle growth during calcination.

  5. Ferroelastic domains in lead-free barium zirconate titanate - barium calcium titanate piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Matthias Claudius

    Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions. Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of

  6. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  7. Status of barium studies in the present era of oncology: Are they a history?

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Desai, Subash; Sable, Nilesh Pandurang; Thakur, Meenakshi Haresh

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of the modern imaging technologies, the present era of oncology is seeing steady decline in requests for barium studies due to the many reasons. It is prudent to mention here, that, barium examinations cannot be made obsolete! Our aim to preserve the age old technique of barium studies not only to keep it going on but also for the betterment and appropriate management of the patient. Our goal is not to “save” barium studies simply to keep this technology alive, per se, but rather to preserve barium radiology for the quality in patient care. PMID:28144086

  8. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  9. PROPOSED ORAL REFERENCE DOSE (RFD) FOR BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is a database of EPA's consensus opinion of the human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. A Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary were prepared for barium and compounds in 1998 ...

  10. Dynamics of a barium release in the magnetospheric tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Haerendel, G.

    1989-01-01

    The late time behavior of the May 13, 1985 magnetotail barium cloud is examined. The bulk dynamics of the cloud are studied based on triangulated data and data from Fabry-Perot Doppler velocity measurements. The changes in cloud morphology in relation to the in situ measurements made by the Ion Release Module satellite are discussed.

  11. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported.

  12. Stabilization of arsenic- and barium-rich glass manufacturing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fuessle, R.W.; Taylor, M.A.

    2000-03-01

    Effective solidification/stabilization (S/S) of arsenic- and barium-containing D004/D005 waste was accomplished by using a binder of cement with 40% class C fly ash and either ferrous sulfate or ferric sulfate as an additive. Addition of iron salts improves arsenic solidification/stabilization (S/S). Barium may be encapsulated within the stabilized matrix as barium sulfate. Recommended mole ratios for iron/arsenic and barium/sulfate are at least 6 and 1.2, respectively. A binder/waste ratio of 0.15 is volume efficient, but the mix design must be carefully controlled to achieve adequate S/S. In practice, the heterogeneity of waste and large-scale mix operations may preclude close control of reagent dosages, so a binder/waste ratio of 0.40 is preferable. Ferrous sulfate additive is preferable for arsenic S/S because it is effective over a wider range of mix designs and over a long-term curing period. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure results degraded with long curing time for some mix designs with ferric sulfate additive.

  13. Effects of light exposure on irradiated barium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Mauger, G.J.

    1993-04-20

    Small barium fluoride crystals have been irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma rays under various illumination conditions to establish the effect of photo-bleaching of the radiation-induced color centers. This paper describes results of a few different experiments conducted at LLNL over the past few weeks.

  14. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  15. Synthesis and surface properties of submicron barium sulfate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Bao; Li, Xinhai; Yin, Zhoulan; Guo, Xueyi

    2011-10-01

    Barium sulfate particles were synthesized in the presence of EDTA at room temperature. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared resonance (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structure and morphology of BaSO 4 particles. The effect of the preparation parameters on the particle size distribution and morphology was investigated. The conditional formation constants of Ba-EDTA at different pH values were calculated. The results show that the size and morphology of BaSO 4 particles can be effectively controlled by adding EDTA in the precipitation process. Among all the operation conditions, the pH value has significant effect on the particle size. The obtained barium sulfate particles are spherical and well dispersed at pH = 9-10. Zeta potentials of BaSO 4 were measured at different pH. The isoelectric point (IEP) of barium sulfate colloid appears at pH 6.92. The model of the solid-solution interface at a particle of BaSO 4 was presented. The FTIR result indicates that the surface of the prepared BaSO 4 absorbs the functional groups of EDTA, which lower the IEP of the barium sulfate particles.

  16. Dose audit and evaluation of work practices during barium procedures using digital radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Augustine, Philomina; Aparna, I; Raj, D Victor

    2004-10-01

    Effective dose and organ doses during barium procedures performed using digital radiography machines were estimated and the related work practices were evaluated. Measured values of dose area product (DAP) were used for the calculation of effective doses. One hundred and thirty eight patients undergoing barium procedures were included in the study. The use of additional 0.2 mm copper filter during barium procedures effectively reduced patient doses. The effective dose during barium swallow procedure varied from 0.03 mSv to 3.5 mSv; during barium meal it varied from 0.18 mSv to 2.62 mSv; and during barium enema it varied from 0.56 mSv to 4.24 mSv. Dose auditing was done on the basis of patient doses, imaging techniques and image quality. Selection of optimized exposure factors imparted lower dose to patients during barium procedures.

  17. Laser processing of siliceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzner, Michael; Lenk, Andreas; Wiedemann, Guenter R.; Hauptmann, Jan; Weiss, Hans J.; Ruemenapp, Thomas; Morgenthal, Lothar; Beyer, Eckhard

    2000-08-01

    Laser processing of siliceous materials becomes increasingly important. Analogous to the laser processing of conventional materials there are applications in the fields of cleaning, surface processing, cutting, etc. The present paper concerns the state of the art and new applications: (1) Laser cleaning of natural stone surfaces. The good disability allows restoration work to be carried out conveniently, as for example the complete removal of crusts or the removal to such degree that moisture is not trapped beneath. (2) Non-slip finish of polished natural stone surfaces: The excellent focusing of laser beams on spots as small as 100 micrometer and below can be exploited to produce macroscopically invisible structures on the surfaces of different materials. This permits microscopically small craters and lentil shaped depressions to be generated on the stone surface. Therefore it is possible to provide a non-slip finish to polished natural stone surfaces without noticeably impairing the gloss. (3) Concrete cutting: In Europe, and particularly in Germany, there is a growing demand for redevelopment of concrete apartment buildings, involving the removal of non-bearing walls and the cutting of openings. The temporal relocation of residents due to the noise and moisture from the use of diamond tools could be avoided by applying a laser cutting technology. With a 3 kW-Nd-YAG-laser, 70 mm concrete can be cut with rates up to 25 mm/min.

  18. Organically modified silicate aerogels, ``Aeromosils``

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.J.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Rubio-Alonso, F.

    1996-12-31

    Aerogels derived from sol-gel oxides such as silica have become quite scientifically popular because of their extremely low densities, high surface areas, and their interesting optical, dielectric, thermal and acoustic properties. However, their commercial applicability has thus far been rather limited, due in great part to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. In prior work by the research group, modifying silicate gel structures with flexible, organic containing polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane imparted significant compliance (even rubbery behavior) and hydrophobicity. These materials have been referred to as Ormosils. This study expounds on the current effort to extend these desirable properties to aerogels, and in-so-doing, creating novel ``Aeromosils``. Reactive incorporation of hydroxy-terminal polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into silica sol-gels was made using both acid and two-step acid/base catalyzed processes. Aerogels were derived by employing the supercritical CO{sub 2} technique. Analyses of microstructure were made using nitrogen adsorption (BET surface area and pore size distribution), and some mechanical strengths were derived from tensile strength testing. Interesting Aeromosil properties obtained include optical transparency, surface areas of up to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g, rubberiness, and better strength than corresponding silica aerogels with elongations at break exceeding 5% in some cases.

  19. Improved alkali-metal/silicate binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of inorganic binders utilizes potassium or sodium oxide/silicate dispersion and employs high mole ratio of silicon dioxide to alkali-metal binder. Binders are stable, inexpensive, extremely water resistant, and easy to apply.

  20. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies.

  1. Prometheus Silicates/Sulfur dioxide/NIMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-18

    The Prometheus region of Jupiter moon Io was imaged by NASA Galileo spacecraft in 1999. The maps made from spectrometer data show the interplay between hot silicates on the surface and sulfur dioxide frost.

  2. Preliminary study of the CRRES magnetospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary theoretical and computational analyses of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) magnetospheric barium releases are presented. The focus of the studies is on the evolution of the diamagnetic cavity which is formed by the barium ions as they expand outward, and on the structuring of the density and magnetic field during the expansion phase of the releases. Two sets of simulation studies are discussed. The first set is based upon a 2D ideal MHD code and provides estimates of the time and length scales associated with the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity. The second set uses a nonideal MHD code; specifically, the Hall term is included. This additional term is critical to the dynamics of sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, such as the CRRES barium releases, because it leads to instability of the expanding plasma. Detailed simulations of the G4 and G10 releases were performed. In both cases the expanding plasma rapidly structured: the G4 release structured at time t less than about 3 s and developed scale sizes of about 1-2 km, while the G10 release structured at time t less than about 22 s and developed scale sizes of about 10-15 km. It is also found that the diamagnetic cavity size is reduced from those obtained from the ideal MHD results because of the structure. On the other hand, the structuring allows the formation of plasma blobs which appear to free stream across the magnetic field; thus, the barium plasma can propagate to larger distances traverse to the magnetic field than the case where no structuring occurs. Finally, a new normal mode of the system was discovered which may be excited at the leading edge of the expanding barium plasma.

  3. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  4. Peralkaline silicic volcanic rocks in northwestern nevada.

    PubMed

    Noble, D C; Chipman, D W; Giles, D L

    1968-06-21

    Late Tertiary silicic ashflow tuffs and lavas peralkaline in chemical character (atomic Na + K greater than Al), mainly comendites, occur over wide areas in northwestern Nevada and appear to be widespread in southeastern Oregon. Such peralkaline rocks-which are not uncommon in the western United States-and other chemically unusual silicic rocks are found near the margins rather than toward the center of the Great Basin.

  5. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  6. Interpreting the 10 micron Astronomical Silicate Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowey, Janet E.

    1998-11-01

    10micron spectra of silicate dust in the diffuse medium towards Cyg OB2 no. 12 and towards field and embedded objects in the Taurus Molecular Cloud (TMC) were obtained with CGS3 at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). Cold molecular-cloud silicates are sampled in quiescent lines of sight towards the field stars Taurus-Elias 16 and Elias 13, whilst observations of the embedded young stellar objects HL Tau, Taurus-Elias 7 (Haro6-10) and Elias 18 also include emission from heated dust. To obtain the foreground silicate absorption profiles, featureless continua are estimated using smoothed astronomical and laboratory silicate emissivities. TMC field stars and Cyg OB2 no. 12 are modelled as photospheres reddened by foreground continuum and silicate extinction. Dust emission in the non-photospheric continua of HL Tau and Elias 7 (Haro6-10) is distinguished from foreground silicate absorption using a 10micron disk model, based on the IR-submm model of T Tauri stars by Adams, Lada & Shu (1988), with terms added to represent the foreground continuum and silicate extinction. The absorption profiles of HL Tau and Elias 7 are similar to that of the field star Elias 16. Fitted temperature indices of 0.43 (HL Tau) and 0.33 (Elias 7) agree with Boss' (1996) theoretical models of the 200-300K region, but are lower than those of IR-submm disks (0.5-0.61; Mannings & Emerson 1994); the modelled 10micron emission of HL Tau is optically thin, that of Elias 7 is optically thick. A preliminary arcsecond-resolution determination of the 10micron emissivity near θ1 Ori D in the Trapezium region of Orion and a range of emission temperatures (225-310K) are derived from observations by T. L. Hayward; this Ney-Allen emissivity is 0.6micron narrower than the Trapezium emissivity obtained by Forrest et al. (1975) with a large aperture. Published interstellar grain models, elemental abundances and laboratory studies of Solar System silicates (IDPs, GEMS and meteorites), the 10micron

  7. Design, testing, fabrication and launch support of a liquid chemical barium release payload (utilizing the liquid fluorine-barium salt/hydrazine system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A payload was designed which included a cryogenic oxidizer tank, a fuel tank, and burner section. Release of 30 lb of chemicals was planned to occur in 2 seconds at the optimum oxidizer to fuel ratio. The chemicals consisted of 17 lb of liquid fluorine oxidizer and 13 lb of hydrazine-barium salt fuel mixture. The fuel mixture was 17% barium chloride, 16% barium nitrate, and 67% hydrazine, and contained 2.6 lb of available barium. Two significant problem areas were resolved during the program: explosive valve development and burner operation. The release payload was flight tested, from Wallops Island, Virginia. The release took place at an altitude of approximately 260 km. The release produced a luminous cloud which expanded very rapidly, disappearing to the human eye in about 20 seconds. Barium ion concentration slowly increased over a wide area of sky until measurements were discontinued at sunrise (about 30 minutes).

  8. Surface studies of barium and barium oxide on tungsten and its application to understanding the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface studies have been made of multilayer and monolayer films of barium and barium oxide on a tungsten substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to synthesize the surface conditions that exist on an activated impregnated tungsten cathode and obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of operation of such cathodes. The techniques employed in these measurements were Auger spectroscopy and work-function measurements. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on oxidized tungsten by evaluating Auger spectra and work-function measurements. Data obtained from desorption studies of barium monolayers on a tungsten substrate in conjunction with Auger and work-function results have been interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impreganated cathode has a partial monolayer, rather than a monolayer, of barium on its surface.

  9. Surface studies of barium and barium oxide on tungsten and its application to understanding the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface studies have been made of multilayer and monolayer films of barium and barium oxide on a tungsten substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to synthesize the surface conditions that exist on an activated impregnated tungsten cathode and obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of operation of such cathodes. The techniques employed in these measurements were Auger spectroscopy and work-function measurements. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on oxidized tungsten by evaluating Auger spectra and work-function measurements. Data obtained from desorption studies of barium monolayers on a tungsten substrate in conjunction with Auger and work-function results have been interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impreganated cathode has a partial monolayer, rather than a monolayer, of barium on its surface.

  10. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  11. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric films of barium titanate were synthesized on silicon and quartz substrates, and the photoelectric effect in the structure consisting of metal deposited ferroelectric barium titanate film silicon was studied. A photovoltage with polarity that depends on the direction of the remanent polarization was observed. The deposition of BaTiO3 on silicon and fused quartz substrates was accomplished by an rf sputtering technique. A series of experiments to study the growth of ferroelectric BaTiO3 films on single crystal silicon and fused quartz substrates were conducted. The ferroelectric character in these films was found on the basis of evidence from the polarization electric field hysteresis loops, capacitance voltage and capacitance temperature techniques and from X-ray diffraction studies.

  12. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziana Genchi, Giada; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-01

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these ‘smart’ nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  13. Numerical simulation of a radially injected barium cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.; Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of a radially symmetric barium injection experiment demonstrate that ions created by solar UV irradiation are electrostatically bound to the electrons which remain tied to the field lines on which they are created. Two possible instabilities are identified, but neither of them causes the barium plasma cloud to polarize in a way that would permit the plasma to keep up with the neutrals. In a second model, the velocity of the neutrals is allowed to be a function of the azimuthal angle. Here, a portion of the cloud does polarize in a way that allows a portion of the plasma to detach and move outward at the approximate speed of the neutrals. No rapid detachment is found when only the density of the neutrals is given an azimuthal asymmetry.

  14. Observations and theory of the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Pongratz, M. B.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1987-01-01

    The barium releases in the magnetotail during the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) operation were monitored by ground-based imagers and by instruments on the Ion Release Module. After each release, the data show the formation of a structured diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grows until the dynamic pressure of the expanding ions balances the magnetic pressure on its surface. The magnetic field inside the cavity is zero. The barium ions collect on the surface of the cavity, producing a shell. Plasma irregularities form along magnetic field lines draped over the surface of the cavity. The scale size of the irregularities is nearly equal to the thickness of the shell. The evolution and structuring of the diamagnetic cavity are modeled using magnetohydrodynamics theory.

  15. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  16. Redox processes in highly yttrium-doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belous, Anatolii; V'yunov, Oleg; Kovalenko, Leonid; Makovec, Darko

    2005-05-01

    The changes of microstructure occurring during oxidation of the reduced form of yttrium-doped barium titanate (BaYxrad Ti1-x4+Tix3+O) have been studied. Samples were sintered under reduction conditions at P=10 Pa and oxidized by annealing at high temperatures (1150 and 1350 °C) in air. Depending on yttrium concentration, the oxidation of the reduced form of the yttrium-doped BaTiO 3 caused precipitation of the phase Ba 6Ti 17O 40 or the phases Ba 6Ti 17O 40 and Y 2Ti 2O 7. The precipitates had well-defined orientational relationships with the perovskite matrix. Oxidation of the reduced form of doped barium titanate results in formation of the phase BaYxrad Ti1-x/44+(VTi⁗)O responsible for increase in the resistance of outer grain layers, which lie between grain boundaries and grain.

  17. NASA/Max Planck Institute Barium Ion Cloud Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brence, W. A.; Carr, R. E.; Gerlach, J. C.; Neuss, H.

    1973-01-01

    NASA and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Munich, Germany, conducted a cooperative experiment involving the release and study of a barium cloud at 31,500 km altitude near the equatorial plane. The release was made near local magnetic midnight on Sept. 21, 1971. The MPE-built spacecraft contained a canister of 16 kg of Ba CuO mixture, a two-axis magnetometer, and other payload instrumentation. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate the interaction of the ionized barium cloud with the ambient medium and to deduce the properties of electric fields in the proximity of the release. An overview of the project is given to briefly summarize the organization, responsibilities, objectives, instrumentation, and operational aspects of the project.

  18. Photoionization and photoelectric loading of barium ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, A. V.; Churchill, L. R.; Griffin, P. F.; Chapman, M. S.

    2007-05-15

    Simple and effective techniques for loading barium ions into linear Paul traps are demonstrated. Two-step photoionization of neutral barium is achieved using a weak intercombination line (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1}, {lambda}=791 nm) followed by excitation above the ionization threshold using a nitrogen gas laser ({lambda}=337 nm). Isotopic selectivity is achieved by using a near Doppler-free geometry for excitation of the triplet 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1} state. Additionally, we report a particularly simple and efficient trap loading technique that employs an inexpensive uv epoxy curing lamp to generate photoelectrons.

  19. Dielectric function for doped graphene layer with barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Ramos, Manuel; Garces Garcia, Eric; Magana, Fernado; Vazquez Fonseca, Gerardo Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study is to calculate the dielectric function for a system formed with a graphene layer doped with barium titanate. Density functional theory, within the local density approximation, plane-waves and pseudopotentials scheme as implemented in Quantum Espresso suite of programs was used. We considered 128 carbon atoms with a barium titanate cluster of 11 molecules as unit cell with periodic conditions. The geometry optimization is achieved. Optimization of structural configuration is performed by relaxation of all atomic positions to minimize their total energies. Band structure, density of states and linear optical response (the imaginary part of dielectric tensor) were calculated. We thank Dirección General de Asuntos del Personal Académico de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, partial financial support by Grant IN-106514 and we also thank Miztli Super-Computing center the technical assistance.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-González, M.A.; Mendoza-Suárez, G.; Padmasree, K.P.

    2013-10-15

    In this work, we prepared barium ferrite-silica (BaM-SiO{sub 2}) nanocomposites of different molar ratios by high-energy ball milling, followed by heat-treatment at different temperatures. The microstructure, morphology and magnetic properties were characterized for different synthesis conditions by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results indicate that 15 h of milling was enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase and to get a good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix. For milling periods beyond 15 h and heat treatment above 900 °C, the XRD patterns showed the presence of hematite phase caused by the decomposition of BaM. The agglomerate size observed through SEM analysis was around 150 nm with a good BaM dispersion into the SiO{sub 2} matrix. The highest saturation magnetization (Ms) value obtained was 43 emu/g and the corresponding coercivity (Hc) value of 3.4 kOe for the composition 60BaM-40SiO{sub 2} milled for 15 h and heat treated at 900 °C. This coercivity value is acceptable for the application in magnetic recording media. Highlights: • Barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites were prepared by high energy ball milling. • Optimal processing time is 15 h milling and heat treatment at 900 °C. • This is enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase. • Obtain good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix • Above this processing time shows the presence of increased amount of hematite.

  1. Acute barium intoxication following ingestion of soap water solution.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nandita; Sharma, Chhavi Sarabpreert; Sai; Sharma, Jai Prakash

    2012-10-01

    We present a rare case in which a young girl ingested a solution of a hair-removing soap. The ingestion resulted in profound hypokalemia and severe acidosis leading to flaccid paralysis, respiratory arrest and ventricular arrhythmias. Ultimately the patient made complete recovery. The soapwas found to contain barium sulfide. The degree of paralysis and acidosis appeared to be directly related to serum potassium levels.

  2. Acute barium intoxication following ingestion of soap water solution

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nandita; Sharma, Chhavi Sarabpreert; Sai; Sharma, Jai Prakash

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case in which a young girl ingested a solution of a hair-removing soap. The ingestion resulted in profound hypokalemia and severe acidosis leading to flaccid paralysis, respiratory arrest and ventricular arrhythmias. Ultimately the patient made complete recovery. The soapwas found to contain barium sulfide. The degree of paralysis and acidosis appeared to be directly related to serum potassium levels. PMID:23559738

  3. Complex Impedance Studies of Optically Excited Strontium Barium Niobate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    has a tetragonal tungsten - bronze structure. The unit cell for this structure, illustrated below in Fig. 2.1, consists of ten oxygen octahedra joined...4 Kittel, pp. 373-374. 5 P. B. Jamieson, et al, “Ferroelectric Tungsten Bronze -Type Crystal Structures. I. Barium Strontium Niobate...Oxford, 1987). 2. C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, (Wiley, New York, 1986). 3. P. B. Jamieson, et al, “Ferroelectric Tungsten

  4. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA).

  5. Barium hexaferrite based on the waste products from electroplating processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A.S.; Stepanchikova, I.G.; Makarov, S.V.; Zaitsev, V.A.; Danilov, A.S.

    1987-11-01

    The authors assess the possibility of simultaneously treating and using waste electroplating slurries containing large amounts of iron hydroxides for obtaining barium hexaferrite ceramics. Differential thermal analysis was employed to determine the processing and recovery parameters and the resulting hexaferrites were tested, mechanically and by x-ray diffraction, for their mechanical and magnetic properties as well as for their phase composition and structure. The consequences of the process on pollution abatement are also evaluated.

  6. Texture and Microstructural Development in Gelcast Barium Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, David B.; Faber, Katherine T.; Kenik, Edward A

    2008-01-01

    The development of texture in barium hexaferrite by templated grain growth was studied as a function of the Fe2O3/BaCO3 ratio, B2O3 additions in the starting materials, and sintering temperature. A magnetic field was used to orient the template particles during the gelcasting process. Excess BaCO3 resulted in abnormal grain growth and maximized texture, while B2O3 additions promoted coarsening, but no abnormal grain growth.

  7. Barium isotopes in chondritic meteorites: implications for planetary reservoir models.

    PubMed

    Ranen, Michael C; Jacobsen, Stein B

    2006-11-03

    High-precision barium isotope measurements yielded differences of up to 25 parts per million in the 137Ba/136Ba ratio and 60 parts per million in the 138Ba/136Ba ratio between chondrites and Earth. These differences probably arose from incomplete mixing of nucleosynthetic material in the solar nebula. Chondritic meteorites have a slight excess of supernova-derived material as compared to Earth, demonstrating that the solar nebula was not perfectly homogenized upon formation.

  8. Barium isotopes reveal role of ocean circulation on barium cycling in the Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Stephanie L.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Pryer, Helena V.; Kinsley, Christopher W.; Pyle, Kimberley M.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Horner, Tristan J.

    2017-05-01

    We diagnose the relative influences of local-scale biogeochemical cycling and regional-scale ocean circulation on Atlantic barium cycling by analysing four new depth profiles of dissolved Ba concentrations and isotope compositions from the South and tropical North Atlantic. These new profiles exhibit systematic vertical, zonal and meridional variations that reflect the influence of both local-scale barite cycling and large-scale ocean circulation. Epipelagic decoupling of dissolved Ba and Si reported previously in the tropics is also found to be associated with significant Ba isotope heterogeneity. As such, we contend that this decoupling originates from the depth segregation of opal and barite formation but is exacerbated by weak vertical mixing. Zonal influence from isotopically-'heavy' water masses in the western North Atlantic evidence the advective inflow of Ba-depleted Upper Labrador Sea Water, which is not seen in the eastern basin or the South Atlantic. Meridional variations in Atlantic Ba isotope systematics below 2000 m appear entirely controlled by conservative mixing. Using an inverse isotopic mixing model, we calculate the Ba isotope composition of the Ba-poor northern end-member as +0.45 ‰ and the Ba-rich southern end-member +0.26 ‰, relative to NIST SRM 3104a. The near-conservative behaviour of Ba below 2000 m indicates that Ba isotopes can serve as an independent tracer of the provenance of northern- versus southern-sourced water masses in the deep Atlantic Ocean. This finding may prove useful in palaeoceanographic studies, should appropriate sedimentary archives be identified, and offers new insights into the processes that cycle Ba in seawater.

  9. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  10. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  11. Barium thiolates and selenolates: syntheses and structural principles.

    PubMed

    Ruhlandt-Senge, K; Englich, U

    2000-11-17

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a family of barium thiolates and selenolates is described. The thiolates were synthesized by metallation of thiols, the selenolates by reductive insertion of the metal into the selenium-selenium bond of diorganodiselenides. Both reaction sequences were carried out by using barium metal dissolved in ammonia; this afforded barium thiolates and selenolates in good yield and purity. The structural principles displayed in the target compounds span a wide range of solid-state formulations, including monomeric and dimeric species, and separated ion triples, namely [Ba(thf)4(SMes*)2] (1; Mes* = 2,4,6-tBU3C6H2), [Ba(thf)4(SeMes*)2] (2), [Ba([18]crown-6)(hmpa)2][(SeMes*)2] (3), the dimeric [(Ba(py)3(thf)(SeTrip)2)2] (4; py = pyridine, Trip = 2,4.6-iPr3C6H2), and [Ba([18]crown-6)(SeTrip)2] (5). The full range of association modes is completed by [Ba([18]crown-6)(hmpa)SMes*][SMes*] (6) communicated earlier by this group. In the solid state, this compound displays an intermediate ion coordination mode: one anion is bound to the metal, while the second one is unassociated. Together these compounds provide structural information about all three different association modes for alkaline earth metal derivatives. This collection of structural data allows important conclusions about the influence of solvation and ligation on structural trends.

  12. Barium as a potential indicator of phosphorus in agricultural runoff.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Joakim; Djodjic, Faruk; Wallin, Mats

    2012-01-01

    In many catchments, anthropogenic input of contaminants, and in particular phosphorus (P), into surface water is a mixture of agricultural and sewage runoff. Knowledge about the relative contribution from each of these sources is vital for mitigation of major environmental problems such as eutrophication. In this study, we investigated whether the distribution of trace elements in surface waters can be used to trace the contamination source. Water from three groups of streams was investigated: streams influenced only by agricultural runoff, streams influenced mainly by sewage runoff, and reference streams. Samples were collected at different flow regimes and times of year and analyzed for 62 elements using ICP-MS. Our results show that there are significant differences between the anthropogenic sources affecting the streams in terms of total element composition and individual elements, indicating that the method has the potential to trace anthropogenic impact on surface waters. The elements that show significant differences between sources are strontium (p < 0.001), calcium (p < 0.004), potassium (p < 0.001), magnesium (p < 0.001), boron (p < 0.001), rhodium (p = 0.001), and barium (p < 0.001). According to this study, barium shows the greatest potential as a tracer for an individual source of anthropogenic input to surface waters. We observed a strong relationship between barium and total P in the investigated samples (R(2) = 0.78), which could potentially be used to apportion anthropogenic sources of P and thereby facilitate targeting of mitigation practices.

  13. Toward remote ion-ion entanglement with barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Thomas W.; Auchter, Carolyn; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Blinov, Boris B.

    2015-03-01

    We present work toward remote entanglement of barium ions in traps separated by a few meters. A new version of an ion trap specialized for remote entanglement is introduced. The new trap allows for highly efficient collection of ion fluorescence while simultaneously minimizing ion micromotion and aligning the trap position precisely to the focus of an in-vacuum parabolic mirror by using a set of bias electrodes and a piezoelectric micro-positioning system. The success rate of the remote entanglement procedure depends strongly on the efficiency with which ion fluorescence can be coupled into an optical fiber. Characterization of our system in terms of ion fluorescence collection and fiber coupling efficiency is presented. Results demonstrating entanglement between a single barium ion and single spontaneously emitted photons are shown. The entanglement fidelity of the ion-photon state is measured to be 0.84(1) and a CHSH Bell signal of 2.303(36) finds violation of the CHSH version of the Bell inequality by over eight standard deviations. Barium's relatively long wavelength transitions make it an ideal candidate for our longer term goal of remote entanglement of ions separated by a kilometer or more. Such long distance remote entanglement should allow for a loophole-free verification of the violation of the Bell inequality.

  14. Optical, mechanical, and thermal properties of barium borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimerl, D.; Davis, L.; Velsko, S.; Graham, E. K.; Zalkin, A.

    1987-09-01

    We report measurements of all the material constants necessary to fully characterize barium borate as a nonlinear optical material. All data was taken on crystals supplied by Professor Chuangtien Chen, Fuzhou, People's Republic of China. We have determined the crystal structure, the optical absorption, the refractive indices from the UV to the near IR, the thermo-optic coefficients, the nonlinear optical or coefficients, the resistance to laser damage, the elastic constants, the thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and dielectric constants, and the fracture toughness. This data is used to evaluate barium borate for a variety of applications. We find that, in general, barium borate has a low acceptance angle, and that despite its higher optical nonlinearity, it is therefore not significantly more efficient than other commonly available materials, except in the UV below 250 nm. On the other hand, it has a high damage threshold, it is physically robust, it has good UV and IR transparency, and it has excellent average power capability. It permits deep UV generation, and has great potential for generating tunable visible and IR light as an optical parametric amplifier.

  15. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  16. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Dicalcium Silicate Based Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, N.; Chatterjee, A.

    2017-06-01

    It is imperative to develop low energy alternative binders considering the large amounts of energy consumed as well as carbon dioxide emissions involved in the manufacturing of ordinary Portland cement. This study is on the synthesis of a dicalcium silicate based binder using a low temperature hydrothermal route.The process consists of synthesizing an intermediate product consisting of a calcium silicate hydrate phase with a Ca:Si ratio of 2:1 and further thermal treatment to produce the β-Ca2SiO4 (C2S) phase.Effect of various synthesis parameters like water to solid ratio, dwell time and temperature on the formation of the desired calcium silicate hydrate phase is reported along with effect of heating conditions for formation of the β-C2S phase. Around 77.45% of β-C2S phase was synthesized by thermal treatment of the intermediate phase at 820°C.

  17. XANES and micro-Raman spectroscopy study of the barium titanosilicates BaTiSi2O7 and BaTiSi4O11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, A.; Pollastri, S.; Macova, P.; Palermo, A.; Peréz-Estébanez, M.; Gualtieri, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The coordination environment around Ti4+ in the photoluminescent compound BaTiSi2O7 and in BaTiSi4O11 was investigated with X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence of VTi in TiO5 pyramidal units with one short Ti-O bond involving the apical oxygen was detected in both compounds. Interpretation of the vibrational signal from the silicate framework suggested that BaTiSi4O11 is a metasilicate containing building units of SiO4 tetrahedra, which are larger than in other barium titanosilicates. These results confirmed the same structural environment of Ti4+ as recently disclosed by structure refinement of BaTiSi2O7 and provided new insights into the unknown structure of BaTiSi4O11 in the light of the study of its physical properties as potential functional material.

  18. Atomic force microscopy studies of twins in yttrium-doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, Simoni Maria; Hasegawa, Haroldo Lhou; Filho, Pedro Iris Paulin

    2006-11-01

    Barium titanate is the main constituent of PTC materials and their electric properties are sensitive to microstructure and defects, in atomic scale, that are significantly affected by processing parameters. The microstructure of barium titanate doped with yttrium was investigated using topographic images obtained by AFM in contact mode. The AFM images of barium titanate doped with yttrium showed the effect of large grains with double twins at different (1 1 1) planes.

  19. Thermochemical decomposition of water based on reactions of chromium and barium compounds.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, C E; Richardson, D M; Bredig, M A; Cheng, K

    1975-08-29

    A potentially useful thermochemical cycle developed for the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water consists of three chemical reactions that take place in the temperature range from 400 degrees to 1200 degrees K. The oxidation and reduction of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of barium chromate(IV) and barium chromate(V), the reactions which constitute the proposed cycle, have been demonstrated.

  20. Radiation losses in microwave Ku region by conducting pyrrole/barium titanate and barium hexaferrite based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Talwinder; Kumar, Sachin; Narang, S. B.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nanocomposites of substituted barium hexaferrite and barium titanate embedded in a polymer were synthesized via emulsion polymerization. The study was performed by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, a vibrating sample magnetometer and a vector network analyzer. It is found that maximum radiation loss occur at 16.09 GHz (-14.23 dB) frequency owing to the combined effect of conducting polymer, suitable dielectric and magnetic material. This suggests that prepared material is suitable for radiation losses. Micro structural study reveals the presence of all the phases of the compounds comprises composite. Benzene ring absorption band (at 1183 cm-1) in FT-IR spectra illustrates the presence of polymer. Surface morphology reveals the presence of array of particles encapsulated by the polymer.

  1. Electric field tunable 60 GHz ferromagnetic resonance response in barium ferrite-barium strontium titanate multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Yeal; Das, Jaydip; Krivosik, Pavol; Mo, Nan; Patton, Carl E.

    2009-05-01

    A magnetic-ferroelectric film heterostructure with a large electric field tuning of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) mode was fabricated. Pulse laser deposited 30 nm thick Pt electrodes and 3 μm thick barium strontium titanate films on Nb-doped strontium titanate substrates were capped with an unbonded 200 μm thick single crystal in-plane c-axis barium hexaferrite slab. The structure gives a 60 GHz FMR frequency shift of 16 MHz at a bias of 29 V, for an average response of 0.55 MHz/V. The maximum incremental tuning response at 29 V was 1.3 MHz/V. This is a hundredfold improvement over previous results.

  2. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  3. Reaction of silicate minerals to form tetramethoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Larry N; Schattenmann, Florian J; Jordan, Tracey M; Carnahan, James C; Flanagan, William P; Wroczynski, Ronald J; Lemmon, John P; Anostario, Joseph M; Othon, Michelle A

    2002-05-06

    Several silicon dioxide sources were used as reagents in the base-mediated reaction with dimethyl carbonate (DMC) to make tetramethoxysilane (Q'). Several commercially available diatomaceous earth materials were investigated. High throughput screening was employed to explore over 200 silicate rocks and minerals as alternative silicon dioxide sources for formation of Q' from DMC and base. Amorphous silicon dioxide materials are effective reagents for the Q' forming reaction. Effective silicon dioxide sources in addition to the diatomaceous earth materials include opal and various synthetic silicates (Li, Co, and Ca).

  4. Mafic silicates in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Iron-bearing olivines and pyroxenes occurring in Orgueil may represent a separate population distinct from the magnesian varieties previously reported. Compositions of these iron-bearing silicates are inconsistent with an origin by direct equilibrium condensation in the nebula. Such an origin is more plausible for the magnesian silicates, but lacks conclusive evidence. An extra-solar system origin for either mafic population is possible, though similarly lacking in evidence. About 15% of the olivines, randomly distributed with respect to iron content, retain particle track evidence of a precompaction irradiation.

  5. Statistics of silicate units in binary glasses.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Anuraag; Montagne, Lionel; Ferreira, José M F

    2016-09-28

    In this paper, we derive a new model to determine the distribution of silicate units in binary glasses (or liquids). The model is based on statistical mechanics and assumes grand canonical ensemble of silicate units which exchange energy and network modifiers from the reservoir. This model complements experimental techniques, which measure short range order in glasses such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The model has potential in calculating the amounts of liquid-liquid phase segregation and crystal nucleation, and it can be easily extended to more complicated compositions. The structural relaxation of the glass as probed by NMR spectroscopy is also reported, where the model could find its usefulness.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of ytterbium silicate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongfei; Gao, Yanfeng; Liu, Yun; Luo, Hongjie

    2010-02-15

    A simple, low-cost hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize 20-nm-diameter single-crystalline ytterbium silicate (Yb(2)Si(2)O(7) and Yb(2)SiO(5)) nanoparticles at 200 degrees C. This is nearly 1000 degrees C lower than that for the typical sol-gel route to ytterbium silicate powders. Obtained powders showed very low thermal conductivity, a suitable thermal expansion coefficient, and excellent thermal/structural stability, suggesting a potential application to environmental and thermal barrier coatings. Special focus was placed on assessing the hydrothermal reaction mechanism for particle formation.

  7. Sponge-associated bacteria mineralize arsenic and barium on intracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Ray; Mayzel, Boaz; Lavy, Adi; Polishchuk, Iryna; Levy, Davide; Fakra, Sirine C.; Pokroy, Boaz; Ilan, Micha

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic and barium are ubiquitous environmental toxins that accumulate in higher trophic-level organisms. Whereas metazoans have detoxifying organs to cope with toxic metals, sponges lack organs but harbour a symbiotic microbiome performing various functions. Here we examine the potential roles of microorganisms in arsenic and barium cycles in the sponge Theonella swinhoei, known to accumulate high levels of these metals. We show that a single sponge symbiotic bacterium, Entotheonella sp., constitutes the arsenic- and barium-accumulating entity within the host. These bacteria mineralize both arsenic and barium on intracellular vesicles. Our results indicate that Entotheonella sp. may act as a detoxifying organ for its host. PMID:28233852

  8. Effects of Different Barium Compounds on the Corrosion Resistance of Andalusite-Based Low-Cement Castables in Contact with Molten Al-Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabifiroozjaei, Esmaeil; Koshy, Pramod; Rastkerdar, Ebad

    2011-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interfacial phenomena between an Al alloy and andalusite low-cement castables (LCCs) containing fixed contents of barium compounds (BaO, BaSO4, and BaCO3) at 1123 K and 1433 K (850 °C and 1160 °C) using the Alcoa cup test. Interfacial reaction products and phases formed during heat treatment of the refractory samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The addition of both BaO and BaSO4 led to a significant reduction of alloy penetration into the refractory. Hexa-celsian formation was observed in both these refractories, which drastically increased their corrosion resistance. Barite decomposition was observed at 1373 K (1100 °C) in the presence of alumina and silica, which was the precursor for hexa-celsian formation. Barium silicates were formed in all samples containing additives; however, this did not have any major influence on the corrosion resistance. Solidified eutectics of BaSi2 and α-BaAl2Si2 formed in all these samples, which acted as an interfacial barrier that prevented additional molten aluminum penetration; however, the positive effect of intermetallic formation was offset by glassy phase formation in samples containing BaCO3 as the additive.

  9. Characterisation of mineralogical forms of barium and trace heavy metal impurities in commercial barytes by EPMA, XRD and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ansari, T M; Marr, I L; Coats, A M

    2001-02-01

    This study was carried out to characterise the mineralogical forms of barium and the trace heavy metal impurities in commercial barytes of different origins using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Qualitative EPMA results show the presence of typically eight different minerals in commercial barytes including barite (BaSO4), barium feldspar, galena (PbS), pyrite (FeS2), sphalerite (ZnS), quartz (SiO2), and silicates, etc. Quantitative EPMA confirms that the barite crystals in the barytes contain some strontium and a little calcium, whereas trace heavy metals occur in the associated minerals. Analysis of aqua regia extracts of barytes samples by ICP-MS has shown the presence of a large number of elements in the associated minerals. Arsenic, copper and zinc concentrations correlate closely in all 10 samples. The findings suggest that barytes is not, as traditionally thought, an inert mineral, but is a potentially toxic substance due to its associated heavy metal impurities, which can be determined by an aqua regia digest without the need for complete dissolution of the barite itself. X-ray powder diffraction was not informative as the complex barite pattern masks the very weak lines from the small amounts of associated minerals.

  10. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  13. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  14. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  15. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  16. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive...

  17. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  18. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  19. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  20. Dopant penetration studies through Hf silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo-Lopez, M. A.; Visokay, M. R.; Chambers, J. J.; Bevan, M. J.; LiFatou, A.; Colombo, L.; Kim, M. J.; Gnade, B. E.; Wallace, R. M.

    2005-02-01

    We present a study of the penetration of B, P, and As through Hf silicate (HfSixOy) and the effect of N incorporation in Hf silicate (HfSixOyNz) on dopant penetration from doped polycrystalline silicon capping layers. The extent of penetration through Hf silicate was found to be dependent upon the thermal annealing budget for each dopant investigated as follows: B(T⩾950°C/60s), P(T⩾1000°C/20s), and As (T⩾1050°C/60s). We propose that the enhanced diffusion observed for these dopants in HfSixOy, compared with that of SiO2 films, is related to grain boundary formation resulting from HfSixOy film crystallization. We also find that, as in the case of SiO2, N incorporation inhibits dopant (B, P, and As) diffusion through the Hf silicate and thus penetration into the underlying Si substrate. Only B penetration is clearly observed through HfSiON films for anneals at 1050 °C for durations of 10 s or longer. The calculated B diffusivity through the HfSixOyNz layer is D0=5.2×10-15cm2/s.

  1. Thermoset polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    Nanocomposites are formed when phase mixing occurs on a nanometer length scale. Due to the improved phase morphology and interfacial properties, nanocomposites exhibit mechanical properties superior to conventional composites. Toyota researchers first demonstrated that organoclay could be exfoliated in a nylon-6 matrix to greatly improve the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymer, which has resulted in a practical application in the automobile industry. A great deal of research has been conducted on organic-inorganic hybrid composites in which smectite clays are used as reinforcement agents. However, little work has been devoted to derivatives of other layered inorganic solids. In the present work, the first examples of organic polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites have been prepared by formation of a cured epoxy polymer network in the presence of organo cation exchange forms of magadiite. The exfoliation of silicate nanolayers in the epoxy matrix was achieved by in-situ intragallery polymerization during the thermosetting process. In general, the tensile properties, solvent resistance, barrier properties and chemical stability of the polymer matrix are greatly improved by the embedded silicate nanolayers when the matrix is flexible (sub-ambient Tg). The improvement of properties are dependent on the silicate loading, the degree of nanolayer separation and interfacial properties. Interestingly, the exfoliation also affects the polymer elasticity in a favorable way. The mechanism leading to nanocomposite formation is proposed. One exfoliated epoxy-magadiite nanocomposite/composition possessed unique transparent optical properties. The exfoliation chemistry was successfully extended to the other members of the layered silicic acid family. A new approach also was developed to prepare thermoset epoxy polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites in which curing agents can be directly intercalated into the intragallery without the need for alkylammonium ions

  2. A review of the health impacts of barium from natural and anthropogenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Darrah, Thomas H; Miller, Richard K; Lyerly, H Kim; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing public awareness of the relatively new and expanded industrial barium uses which are potential sources of human exposure (e.g., a shale gas development that causes an increased awareness of environmental exposures to barium). However, absorption of barium in exposed humans and a full spectrum of its health effects, especially among chronically exposed to moderate and low doses of barium populations, remain unclear. We suggest a systematic literature review (from 1875 to 2014) on environmental distribution of barium, its bioaccumulation, and potential and proven health impacts (in animal models and humans) to provide the information that can be used for optimization of future experimental and epidemiological studies and developing of mitigative and preventive strategies to minimize negative health effects in exposed populations. The potential health effects of barium exposure are largely based on animal studies, while epidemiological data for humans, specifically for chronic low-level exposures, are sparse. The reported health effects include cardiovascular and kidney diseases, metabolic, neurological, and mental disorders. Age, race, dietary patterns, behavioral risks (e.g., smoking), use of medications (those that interfere with absorbed barium in human organism), and specific physiological status (e.g., pregnancy) can modify barium effects on human health. Identifying, evaluating, and predicting the health effects of chronic low-level and moderate-level barium exposures in humans is challenging: Future research is needed to develop an understanding of barium bioaccumulation in order to mitigate its potential health impacts in various exposured populations. Further, while occupationally exposed at-risk populations exist, it is also important to identify potentially vulnerable subgroups among non-occupationally exposed populations (e.g., elderly, pregnant women, children) who are at higher risk of barium exposure from drinking water and food.

  3. Tungsten and barium transport in the internal plasma of hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport, and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from 8200 h and 30 352 h ion engine wear tests. Erosion and subsequent redeposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduce the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  4. High chloride content calcium silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojing; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Chloride is known to volatilize from silicate glass melts and until now, only a limited number of studies on oxychloride silicate glasses have been reported. In this paper we have synthesized silicate glasses that retain large amounts of CaCl2. The CaCl2 has been added to the calcium metasilicate composition (CaO·SiO2). Glasses were produced via a melt quench route and an average of 70% of the chloride was retained after melting. Up to 31.6 mol% CaCl2 has been successfully incorporated into these silicate glasses without the occurrence of crystallization. (29)Si MAS-NMR spectra showed the silicon being present mainly as a Q(2) silicate species. This suggests that chloride formed Cl-Ca(n) species, rather than Si-Cl bonds. Upon increasing the CaCl2 content, the Tg reduced markedly from 782 °C to 370 °C. Glass density and glass crystallization temperature decreased linearly with an increase in the CaCl2 content. However, both linear regressions revealed a breakpoint at a CaCl2 content just below 20 mol%. This might be attributed to a significant change in the structure and is also correlated with the nature of the crystallizing phases formed upon heat treatment. The glasses with less than 19.2 mol% CaCl2 crystallized to wollastonite, whilst the compositions with CaCl2 content equal to or greater than 19.2 mol% are thought to crystallize to CaCl2. In practice, the crystallization of CaCl2 could not occur until the crystallization temperature fell below the melting point of CaCl2. The implications of the results along with the high chloride retention are discussed.

  5. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  6. Silicate Dust in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanxia; Li, Aigen; Hao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hypothesizes that all AGNs are surrounded by an anisotropic dust torus and are essentially the same objects but viewed from different angles. However, little is known about the dust that plays a central role in the unification theory. There are suggestions that the AGN dust extinction law appreciably differs from that of the Galaxy. Also, the silicate emission features observed in type 1 AGNs appear anomalous (i.e., their peak wavelengths and widths differ considerably from that of the Galaxy). In this work, we explore the dust properties of 147 AGNs of various types at redshifts z≲ 0.5, with special attention paid to 93 AGNs that exhibit the 9.7 and 18 μm silicate emission features. We model their silicate emission spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find that 60/93 of the observed spectra can be well explained with “astronomical silicate,” while the remaining sources favor amorphous olivine or pyroxene. Most notably, all sources require the dust to be micron-sized (with a typical size of ∼1.5 ± 0.1 μm), much larger than submicron-sized Galactic interstellar grains, implying a flat or “gray” extinction law for AGNs. We also find that, while the 9.7 μm emission feature arises predominantly from warm silicate dust of temperature T ∼ 270 K, the ∼5–8 μm continuum emission is mostly from carbon dust of T ∼ 640 K. Finally, the correlations between the dust properties (e.g., mass, temperature) and the AGN properties (e.g., luminosity, black hole mass) have also been investigated.

  7. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  12. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  14. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  16. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  17. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  18. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  19. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  4. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Methods Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, non-taster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40% w/v barium: non-carbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter) and sucrose (sweet). Mixed model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Results Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than non-tasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Conclusions Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  5. Lack of effect of drinking water barium on cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wones, R G; Stadler, B L; Frohman, L A

    1990-04-01

    Higher cardiovascular mortality has been associated in a single epidemiological study with higher levels of barium in drinking water. The purpose of this study was to determine whether drinking water barium at levels found in some U.S. communities alters the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Eleven healthy men completed a 10-week dose-response protocol in which diet was controlled (600 mg cholesterol; 40% fat, 40% carbohydrate, 20% protein; sodium and potassium controlled at the subject's pre-protocol estimated intake). Other aspects of the subjects' lifestyles known to affect cardiac risk factors were controlled, and the barium content (as barium chloride) of the drinking water (1.5 L/day) was varied from 0 (first 2 weeks), to 5 ppm (next 4 weeks), to 10 ppm (last 4 weeks). Multiple blood and urine samples, morning and evening blood pressure measurements, and 48-hr electrocardiographic monitoring were performed at each dose of barium. There were no changes in morning or evening systolic or diastolic blood pressures, plasma cholesterol or lipoprotein or apolipoprotein levels, serum potassium or glucose levels, or urine catecholamine levels. There were no arrhythmias related to barium exposure detected on continuous electrocardiographic monitoring. A trend was seen toward increased total serum calcium levels with exposure to barium, which was of borderline statistical significance and of doubtful clinical significance. In summary, drinking water barium at levels of 5 and 10 ppm did not appear to affect any of the known modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Lack of effect of drinking water barium on cardiovascular risk factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wones, R.G.; Stadler, B.L.; Frohman, L.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Higher cardiovascular mortality has been associated in a single epidemiological study with higher levels of barium in drinking water. The purpose of this study was to determine whether drinking water barium at levels found in some U.S. communities-alters the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Eleven healthy men completed a 10-week dose-response protocol in which diet was controlled. Other aspects of the subjects' lifestyles known to affect cardiac risk factors were controlled, and the barium content (as barium chloride) of the drinking water was varied from 0, to 5 ppm, to 10 ppm. Multiple blood and urine samples, morning and evening blood pressure measurements, and 48-hr electrocardiographic monitoring were performed at each dose of barium. There were no changes in morning or evening systolic or diastolic blood pressures, plasma cholesterol or lipoprotein or apolipoprotein levels, serum potassium or glucose levels, or urine catecholamine levels. There were no arrythmias related to barium exposure detected on continuous electrocardiographic monitoring. A trend was seen toward increased total serum calcium levels with exposure to barium, which was of borderline statistical significance and of doubtful clinical significance. In summary, drinking water barium at levels of 5 and 10 ppm did not appear to affect any of the known modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.

  7. Replacement of SR 4990 by Barium Styphnate in the Mk 24 Actuator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the SR-4990 in the Mk 24 Actuator. Experimental work was performed with barium styphnate , lead mononitroresorcinate, and two manufactured powders...Candidate materials were first screened using a pressure bomb. Final testing was performed in the Mk 24 Actuator design. Test results showed that of the four candidates, barium styphnate is the best material for the Actuator Mk 24.

  8. Comparison of standardized bariums with varying rheological parameters on swallowing kinematics in males.

    PubMed

    Hind, Jacqueline; Divyak, Elizabeth; Zielinski, Jill; Taylor, Andrew; Hartman, Michael; Gangnon, Ronald; Robbins, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    This study measured dose-response of a range of commercially available liquid barium materials designed for use in videofluoroscopic oropharyngeal swallowing assessments, particularly as they relate to the necessity of adding a thickening agent for swallow safety. A group of 25 adult males representing various medical diagnoses consented to participate, with 16 qualifying to complete a videofluoroscopic swallowing assessment with liquid barium materials of three viscosities (nectar: 300 cP, thin honey: 1,500 cP, thick honey: 3,000 cP). Outcome measures included airway invasion (Penetration-Aspiration score), postswallow residue, and patient preference. Penetration-Aspiration and residue scores did not significantly differ between thin honey and thick honey bariums. Significantly more severe airway invasion was observed with nectar boluses than with two levels of honey boluses (p < 0.001). Significantly more residue was observed in the oral cavity (p < 0.002) and valleculae (p < 0.001) with thin and thick honey bariums than with nectar barium. Thin honey was rated as "easy" or "average" to drink by 67% of subjects, compared with 54% for thick honey. This study supports the use of thin honey barium over thick honey barium during videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments because the two honey bariums were comparable in terms of airway protection and postswallow residue in the oropharynx and the thin honey was preferred by patients.

  9. Barium versus nonbarium stimuli: differences in taste intensity, chemesthesis, and swallowing behavior in healthy adult women.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ahmed; Steele, Catriona M; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2014-06-01

    The authors examined the impact of barium on the perceived taste intensity of 7 different liquid tastant stimuli and the modulatory effect that these differences in perceived taste intensity have on swallowing behaviors. Participants were 80 healthy women, stratified by age group (<40; >60) and genetic taste status (supertasters; nontasters). Perceived taste intensity and chemesthetic properties (fizziness; burning-stinging) were rated for 7 tastant solutions (each prepared with and without barium) using the general Labeled Magnitude Scale. Tongue-palate pressures and submental surface electromyography (sEMG) were simultaneously measured during swallowing of these same randomized liquids. Path analysis differentiated the effects of stimulus, genetic taste status, age, barium condition, taste intensity, and an effortful saliva swallow strength covariate on swallowing. Barium stimuli were rated as having reduced taste intensity compared with nonbarium stimuli. Barium also dampened fizziness but did not influence burning-stinging sensation. The amplitudes of tongue-palate pressure or submental sEMG did not differ when swallowing barium versus nonbarium stimuli. Despite impacting taste intensity, the addition of barium to liquid stimuli does not appear to alter behavioral parameters of swallowing. Barium solutions can be considered to elicit behaviors that are similar to those used with nonbarium liquids outside the assessment situation.

  10. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  11. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  12. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-01

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1-xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba2+ ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba2+ ion in SBT lattice.

  13. The barium ion jet experiments of the Porcupine project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    1980-06-01

    The injection of a barium plasma from a sounding rocket by the shaped charge technique offers several possibilities that cannot be achieved by conventional releases. This is due to high initial velocities of the atoms of up to 14 km/sec. Most of the the applications are related to the great heights that the ions can reach, but some depend directly on the initial momentum. Typical applications are: tracing at high altitudes, modifications, and alternate Ionization processes. Project Porcupine contributions in this field are summarized.

  14. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  15. On the nature of striae in strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monchamp, R. R.; Mihalik, G. B.; Franks, L. A.

    1994-08-01

    Strontium barium niobate crystals were grown by the Czochralski technique. These crystals were 15-20 mm in diameter and 25 to 75 mm long. Two types of striae, designated as coarse and fine, were characterized. The coarse striae are optically dense and are spaced by 100 to 500 microns apart; the fine striae are optically less dense and spaced 5-50 microns apart. The origins of the striae are attributed to thermal fluctuations in the melt related to the control system and to rotation of the growing crystal in non-isothermal radial gradients. Analysis of the crystals indicated that the coarse striae may contain increased concentrations of sodium.

  16. Co,Ti,Mn-precipitated barium hexaferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Michalikova, M.; Gruskova, A.; Vicen, R.; Lipka, J.; Slama, J.

    1994-03-01

    Barium ferrites substituted Co, Ti, Mn, produced by the citrate method have been studied. The substitution x in BaCo{sub x}Ti{sub x}Mn{sub y}Fe{sub 12{minus}2x{minus}y}O{sub 19} has been varied from 0.2--2.0 i./f.u. and the substitution of Mn y = 0.1 i./f.u.. Magnetic parameters were measured by the vibration magnetometer. The mechanism of hexagonal structure formation has been checked by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  17. Evidence against barium in the mushroom Trogia venenata as a cause of sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanchun; Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Yoell, Shanze; Yu, Zefen; Zhang, Keqin; Xu, Jianping

    2012-12-01

    This study examined barium concentrations in the mushroom Trogia venenata, the leading culprit for sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, southwest China. We found that barium concentrations in T. venenata from Yunnan were low and comparable to other foods, inconsistent with barium concentrations in this mushroom as a significant contributor to these deaths.

  18. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  19. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  20. Evaluation of gastrointestinal tract transit times using barium-impregnated polyethylene spheres and barium sulfate suspension in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia) model.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Rebecca A; Cronin, Kimberly; Hoover, John P; Pechman, Robert D; Payton, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    Barium impregnated polyethylene spheres (BIPS) are used in small animal medicine as an alternative to barium sulfate for radiographic studies of the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the usefulness of BIPS as an alternative to barium suspension in measuring gastrointestinal (GI) transit time for avian species, ventrodorsal radiographs were used to follow the passage of BIPS and 30% barium sulfate suspension through the GI tracts of domestic pigeons (Columba livia). Gastrointestinal transit times of thirty 1.5-mm BIPS administered in moistened gelatin capsules and 30% barium sulfate suspension gavaged into the crop were compared in 6 pigeons. Although the barium suspension passed out of the GI tract of all pigeons within 24 hours, the 1.5-mm BIPS remained in the ventriculus for 368.0 +/- 176.8 hours and did not clear the GI tract for 424.0 +/- 204.6 hours. Although the times for passage of BIPS and 30% barium sulfate suspension from the crop into the ventriculus were not significantly different (P = .14), the times for passage of BIPS from the ventriculus into the large intestine-cloaca and for clearance from the GI tract of the pigeons were significantly longer (P < .001) than for the 30% barium sulfate suspension. From the results of this study, we conclude that BIPS are not useful for radiographically evaluating GI transit times in pigeons and are unlikely to be useful in other avian species that have a muscular ventriculus. BIPS may or may not be useful for evaluating GI transit times in species that lack a muscular ventriculus.

  1. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2014-01-01

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm the continuous high aspect ratio structure of barium titanate nanofibers after heat treatment. It is demonstrated that the CJS technique offers a highly efficient method for large-scale fabrication of ceramic nanofibers at production rates of up to 0.3 gram/minute. PMID:24563566

  2. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  3. Endotrophic Calcium, Strontium, and Barium Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus1

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (The University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Endotrophic calcium, strontium, and barium spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus. J. Bacteriol. 91:1333–1345. 1966.—Spores were produced by washed vegetative cells suspended in deionized water supplemented with CaCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2. Normal, refractile spores were produced in each case; a portion of the barium spores lost refractility and darkened. Thin-section electron micrographs revealed no apparent anatomical differences among the three types of spores. Analyses revealed that the different spore types were enriched specifically in the metal to which they were exposed during sporogenesis. The calcium content of the strontium and the barium spores was very small. From binary equimolar mixtures of the metal salts, endotrophic spores accumulated both metals to nearly the same extent. Viability of the barium spores was considerably less than that of the other two types. Strontium and barium spores were heat-resistant; however, calcium was essential for maximal heat resistance. Significant differences existed in the rates of germination; calcium spores germinated fastest, strontium spores were slower, and barium spores were slowest. Calcium-barium and calcium-strontium spores germinated readily. Endotrophic calcium and strontium spores germinated without the prior heat activation essential for growth spores. Chemical germination of the different metal-type spores with n-dodecylamine took place at the same relative rates as physiological germination. Heat-induced release of dipicolinic acid occurred much faster with barium and strontium spores than with calcium spores. The washed “coat fraction” from disrupted spores contained little of the spore calcium but most of the spore barium. The metal in this fraction was released by dilute acid. The demineralized coats reabsorbed calcium and barium at neutral pH. Images PMID:4956334

  4. Effects of chemesthetic stimuli mixtures with barium on swallowing apnea duration.

    PubMed

    Todd, J Tee; Butler, Susan G; Plonk, Drew P; Grace-Martin, Karen; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2012-10-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that swallowing apnea duration (SAD) will increase given barium versus water, chemesthetic stimuli (i.e., water < ethanol, acid, and carbonation) mixed with barium, age (older > younger), and genetic taste differences (supertasters > nontasters). Prospective group design. University Medical Center. Eighty healthy women were identified as nontasters and supertasters, equally comprising two age groups: 18 to 35 years and 60+ years. The KayPentax Swallowing Signals Lab was used to acquire SAD via nasal cannula during individually randomized swallows of 5 mL barium, 2.7% w/v citric acid with barium, carbonation with barium, and 50:50 diluted ethanol with barium. Data were analyzed using path analysis, with the mediator of chemesthetic perception, adjusted for repeated measures. Significant main effects of age (P = .012) and chemesthetic stimuli (P = .014) were found, as well as a significant interaction between chemesthetic stimuli and age (P = .028). Older women had a significantly longer SAD than younger women. Post hoc analyses revealed that barium mixed with ethanol elicited a significantly longer SAD than other bolus conditions, regardless of age group. There were no significant differences in SAD between barium and water conditions, and no significant effect of chemesthetic perception (P > .05). Ethanol added to barium elicited longer SAD compared to plain barium, but not the other chemesthetic conditions. Older women had a longer SAD than younger women in all conditions. These findings may influence design of future studies examining effects of various stimuli on SAD. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  6. Final report on the safety assessment of potassium silicate, sodium metasilicate, and sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    Potassium Silicate, Sodium Metasilicate, and Sodium Silicate combine metal cations with silica to form inorganic salts used as corrosion inhibitors in cosmetics. Sodium Metasilicate also functions as a chelating agent and Sodium Silicate as a buffering and pH adjuster. Sodium Metasilicate is currently used in 168 formulations at concentrations ranging from 13% to 18%. Sodium Silicate is currently used in 24 formulations at concentrations ranging from 0.3% to 55%. Potassium Silicate and Sodium Silicate have been reported as being used in industrial cleaners and detergents. Sodium Metasilicate is a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) food ingredient. Aqueous solutions of Sodium Silicate species are a part of a chemical continuum of silicates based on an equilibrium of alkali, water, and silica. pH determines the solubility of silica and, together with concentration, determines the degree of polymerization. Sodium Silicate administered orally is readily absorbed from the alimentary canal and excreted in the urine. The toxicity of these silicates has been related to the molar ratio of SiO2/Na2O and the concentration being used. The Sodium Metasilicate acute oral LD50 ranged from 847 mg/kg in male rats to 1349.3 mg/kg in female rats and from 770 mg/kg in female mice to 820 mg/kg in male mice. Gross lesions of variable severity were found in the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, larynx, lungs, and kidneys of dogs receiving 0.25 g/kg or more of a commercial detergent containing Sodium Metasilicate; similar lesions were also seen in pigs administered the same detergent and dose. Male rats orally administered 464 mg/kg of a 20% solution containing either 2.0 or 2.4 to 1.0 ratio of sodium oxide showed no signs of toxicity, whereas doses of 1000 and 2150 mg/kg produced gasping, dypsnea, and acute depression. Dogs fed 2.4 g/kg/day of Sodium Silicate for 4 weeks had gross renal lesions but no impairment of renal function. Dermal irritation of Potassium Silicate, Sodium

  7. Ultralow compressibility silicate without highly coordinated silicon.

    PubMed

    Scott, Henry P; Williams, Quentin; Knittle, Elise

    2002-01-07

    The bulk modulus of scheelite-structured ZrSiO(4) is 301.4+/-12.5 GPa, as derived from static compression experiments to 52.5 GPa. It is as stiff as the most incompressible known silicate, SiO(2) stishovite. This high incompressibility indicates that octahedrally coordinated silicon is not required to generate ultrastiff silicates: ZrSiO(4) scheelite is the most incompressible material containing SiO(4) tetrahedra. Its incompressibility is in accord with a semitheoretical relation we derive for the bulk modulus of scheelite-structured materials. Based upon correlations between incompressibility and hardness, scheelite-structured oxides may thus represent a new family of ultrahard materials.

  8. Tailored Nanocomposites of Polypropylene with Layered Silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Nakajima, H; Manias, E; Krishnamoorti, R

    2009-01-01

    The melt rheological properties of layered silicate nanocomposites with maleic anhydride (MA) functionalized polypropylene are contrasted to those based on ammonium-terminated polypropylene. While the MA functionalized PP based nanocomposites exhibit solid-like linear viscoelastic behavior, consistent with the formation of a long-lived percolated nanoparticle network, the single-end ammonium functionalized PP based nanocomposites demonstrated liquid-like behavior at comparable montmorillonite concentrations. The differences in the linear viscoelasticity are attributed to the presence of bridging interactions in MA functionalized nanocomposites. Further, the transient shear stress of the MA functionalized nanocomposites in start-up of steady shear is a function of the shear strain alone, and the steady shear response is consistent with that of non-Brownian systems. The weak dependence of the steady first normal stress difference on the steady shear stress suggests that the polymer chain mediated silicate network contributes to such unique flow behavior.

  9. Photoemission study of cerium silicate model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Tomáš; Matolín, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of silicon with cerium oxide was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using two model systems CeOx/Si(1 1 1) and Si/CeO2(1 1 1)/Cu(1 1 1) which can be used for fundamental studies in the field of microelectronics and heterogeneous catalysis. The interaction was found to be strong and lead to a formation of cerium silicate films of the proposed stoichiometry Ce4.67Si3O13. Their maximum thickness was limited by diffusion of silicon. Beside silicate other compounds were growing on the surface - SiO2, Si2O, Si, and CeO2. The assignment of the formed species is based on the interpretation of photoemission spectra involving the measurements of various reference O/Si and Sisbnd O/Cu systems.

  10. Topological Control on Silicates' Dissolution Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Kumar, Aditya; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-05-10

    Like many others, silicate solids dissolve when placed in contact with water. In a given aqueous environment, the dissolution rate depends on the composition and the structure of the solid and can span several orders of magnitude. Although the kinetics of dissolution depends on the complexities of both the dissolving solid and the solvent, a clear understanding of which structural descriptors of the solid control its dissolution rate is lacking. By pioneering dissolution experiments and atomistic simulations, we correlate the dissolution rates-ranging over 4 orders of magnitude-of a selection of silicate glasses and crystals to the number of chemical topological constraints acting between the atoms of the dissolving solid. The number of such constraints serves as an indicator of the effective activation energy, which arises from steric effects, and prevents the network from reorganizing locally to accommodate intermediate units forming over the course of the dissolution.

  11. Structural and optical study of tellurite-barium glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelowska, I.; Reben, M.; Burtan, B.; Sitarz, M.; Cisowski, J.; Yousef, El Sayed; Knapik, A.; Dudek, M.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this work was to determine the effect of barium oxide on the structural, thermal and optical properties of the TeO2-BaO-Na2O (TBN) and TeO2-BaO-WO3 (TBW) glass systems. Raman spectra allow relating the glass structure and vibration properties (i.e. vibrational frequencies and Raman intensities) with the glass composition. Raman spectra show the presence of TeO4 and TeO3+1/TeO3 units that conform with the glass matrix. Differential thermal analysis DTA, XRD measurements have been considered in term of BaO addition. The spectral dependence of ellipsometric angles of the tellurite-barium glass has been studied. The optical measurements were conducted on Woollam M2000 spectroscopic ellipsometer in spectral range of 190-1700 nm. The reflectance and transmittance measurements have been done on spectrophotometer Perkin Elmer, Lambda 900 in the range of 200-2500 nm (UV-VIS-NIR). From the transmittance spectrum, the energy gap was determined.

  12. Plasma waves associated with the first AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Luehr, H.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma waves observed during the March 21, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release are described. Electron plasma oscillations provided local measurements of the plasma density during both the expansion and decay phases. Immediately after the explosion, the electron density reached a peak of about 400,000/cu cm, and then started decreasing approximately as t to the -2.4 as the cloud expanded. About 6 minutes after the explosion, the electron density suddenly began to increase, reached a secondary peak of about 240/cu cm, and then slowly decayed down to the preevent level over a period of about 15 minutes. The density increase is believed to be caused by the collapse of the ion cloud into the diamagnetic cavity created by the initial expansion. The plasma wave intensities observed during the entire event were quite low. In the diamagnetic cavity, electrostatic emissions were observed near the barium ion plasma frequency, and in another band at lower frequencies. A broadband burst of electrostatic noise was also observed at the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. Except for electron plasma oscillations, no significant wave activity was observed outside of the diamagnetic cavity.

  13. Monte Carlo calculations of the microstructure of barium ferrite dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, N. S.; Coverdale, G. N.; Chantrell, R. W.; Parker, D. A.; Bissell, P. R.

    1998-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) model has been developed to investigate the influences of the volume packing fraction and applied field on the equilibrium microstructure of a dispersion of barium ferrite particles. We accounted for magnetostatic interaction effects by using a surface charge model which allows the calculation of the energy term required for the Metropolis-type MC algorithm. In addition to single particle moves, the model employs a clustering algorithm, based on particle proximity, in order to take into account the cooperative behaviour of the particles bound by magnetostatic energy. The stacks which are thought to be characteristic of barium ferrite systems are an example of this type of binding. Our study provides strong evidence, in agreement with experiment, for the formation of stacks both in the zero field and in the applied field equilibrium configurations. The simulation also predicts, by considering the effects of the packing density, that the dispersion properties are strongly affected by the mobility of these stacks. The equilibrium particle configurations have been investigated using a correlation function and visualized by computer graphics. The magnetic behaviour has been investigated by calculation of the magnetization curve.

  14. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    PubMed Central

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  15. Results of magnetospheric barium ion cloud experiment of 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, D.; Fricke, C. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The barium ion cloud experiment involved the release of about 2 kg of barium at an altitude of 31 482 km, a latitude of 6.926 N., and a longitude of 74.395 W. Significant erosion of plasma from the main ion core occurred during the initial phase of the ion cloud expansion. From the motion of the outermost striational filaments, the electric field components were determined to be 0.19 mV/m in the westerly direction and 0.68 mV/m in the inward direction. The differences between these components and those measured from balloons flown in the proximity of the extremity of the field line through the release point implied the existence of potential gradients along the magnetic field lines. The deceleration of the main core was greater than theoretically predicted. This was attributed to the formation of a polarization wake, resulting in an increase of the area of interaction and resistive dissipation at ionospheric levels. The actual orientation of the magnetic field line through the release point differed by about 10.5 deg from that predicted by magnetic field models that did not include the effect of ring current.

  16. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanjian; Yu, Zhong; Yang, Yan; Sun, Ke; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen

    2015-09-01

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba1-xLaxFe12-xCoxO19 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f1, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2, ωkf1, ωaf1, ωkf2, and ωbk of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f1, 4f2, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2 and ωaf1 decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ωkf1, ωkf2, and ωbk show a slight change.

  17. Barium titanate core--gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments.

    PubMed

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core-gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0-100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core-gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice.

  18. Synthesis of Barium Titanate Using Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Boston, Rebecca; Foeller, Philip Y; Sinclair, Derek C; Reaney, Ian M

    2017-01-03

    Novel synthetic routes to prepare functional oxides at lower temperatures are an increasingly important area of research. Many of these synthetic routes, however, use water as the solvent and rely on dissolution of the precursors, precluding their use with, for example, titanates. Here we present a low-cost solvent system as a means to rapidly create phase-pure ferroelectric barium titanate using a choline chloride-malonic acid deep eutectic solvent. This solvent is compatible with alkoxide precursors and allows for the rapid synthesis of nanoscale barium titanate powders at 950 °C. The phase and morphology were determined, along with investigation of the synthetic pathway, with the reaction proceeding via BaCl2 and TiO2 intermediates. The powders were also used to create sintered ceramics, which exhibit a permittivity maximum corresponding to a tetragonal-cubic transition at 112 °C, as opposed to the more conventional temperature of ∼120 °C. The lower-than-expected value for the ferro- to para-electric phase transition is likely due to undetectable levels of contaminants.

  19. Prospects for the ORNL/TAMU Barium Fluoride Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Austin; McIntosh, Alan; Youngs, Mike; Mosby, Shea; Varner, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state is essential to understanding properties such as the structure of a neutron star or its gravitational collapse, leading to supernovae. It has been suggested that to better constrain the symmetry energy one can use the bremmstrahlung gamma rays emitted from the hot, dense nuclear matter in the early stages of heavy ion collisions. These gamma rays have the potential to provide a cleaner probe than the more traditional hadronic probes. To measure these bremmstrahlung photons, barium fluoride scintillation crystals were chosen for their ability to detect photons across a large energy range and for their inherent pulse shape discrimination properties. This summer, the detectors of the TAMU/ORNL barium fluoride array were tested in preparation for such an experiment. Signals from each detector were recorded individually for cosmic rays and radioactive source events. The full waveforms were digitized with flash ADCs. A selected set of detectors was assembled and tested with beam from the K500 cyclotron. With this in-beam data, waveform integration parameters may be optimized. Results from the testing of these detectors with flash digitizers will be presented. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Cyclotron Institute.

  20. Biodegradable Polyester/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    compatible with the polymer [5-9]. In this paper we report the synthesis and properties of both PLA and PHB nanocomposites with different nanoclays...hydroxy polyester, polylactide (PLA) and fl-hydroxy polyester, polyhydroxybutyrate ( PHB ) with layered silicates have been successfully prepared by melt...extrusion of PLA and PHB with organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) and fluoromica. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are improved

  1. Polymorphism in silicate-postperovskite reviewed (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, O. D.

    2010-12-01

    Early on in the examination of postperovskite(ppv)-type magnesium metasilicate it had been debated if this potential deep mantle mineral can be subject to further structural transformation as function of composition, pressure, and temperature within the range of conditions in the lower mantle. MgSiO3-perovskite accommodates minor elements through local lattice distortions by tilt of the corner-sharing octahedral framework. The CaIrO3-type ppv structure does not seem to possess a similar mechanism of local relaxation of lattice strain. Instead minor elements may rather be accommodated by periodic kinks in this layered structure (1). This kinking-mechanism allows for generating a plethora of polymorphs similar in structure and free energy (1,2). However, the elastic properties of ppv may be strongly affected by this type of structural modification. While structural analogues of silicate-ppv exhibit this type of polymorphism (3,4) previous attempts to examine polymorphism in silicate-ppv remained suggestive (2,5). This is mostly owed to the severe constraints imposed on powder diffraction studies conducted under the extreme conditions of stability of MgSiO3-ppv. Here I present new results on silicate-ppv based on different experimental strategies which shed more light on this complex yet important issue of structural modifications in minor-element bearing silicate-ppv. (1) Oganov et al. Nature 438, 1142 (2005);(2) Tschauner et al. Am. Min. 93, 533 (2008); (3) Shirako et al. Phys. Chem. Min. 36, 455 (2009); Yakovlev et al. J. Sol. Stat. Chem. 182, 1545 (2009) Work supported through NNSA Cooperative Agreement DOE-FC88-01NV14049

  2. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  3. SILICATE EVOLUTION IN BROWN DWARF DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, B.

    2009-08-10

    We present a compositional analysis of the 10 {mu}m silicate spectra for brown dwarf disks in the Taurus and Upper Scorpius (UppSco) star-forming regions, using archival Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph observations. A variety in the silicate features is observed, ranging from a narrow profile with a peak at 9.8 {mu}m, to nearly flat, low-contrast features. For most objects, we find nearly equal fractions for the large-grain and crystalline mass fractions, indicating both processes to be active in these disks. The median crystalline mass fraction for the Taurus brown dwarfs is found to be 20%, a factor of {approx}2 higher than the median reported for the higher mass stars in Taurus. The large-grain mass fractions are found to increase with an increasing strength in the X-ray emission, while the opposite trend is observed for the crystalline mass fractions. A small 5% of the Taurus brown dwarfs are still found to be dominated by pristine interstellar medium-like dust, with an amorphous submicron grain mass fraction of {approx}87%. For 15% of the objects, we find a negligible large-grain mass fraction, but a >60% small amorphous silicate fraction. These may be the cases where substantial grain growth and dust sedimentation have occurred in the disks, resulting in a high fraction of amorphous submicron grains in the disk surface. Among the UppSco brown dwarfs, only usd161939 has a signal-to-noise ratio high enough to properly model its silicate spectrum. We find a 74% small amorphous grain and a {approx}26% crystalline mass fraction for this object.

  4. Neutron Diffraction Study of Silicate Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H. K.; van Orman, J.; Fei, Y.; Hemley, R. J.; Loveday, J.; Nelmes, R.; Smith, R. I.

    2002-12-01

    The oxygen deficiency and cation-site distribution of silicate perovskite control its physical and chemical properties, including density, bulk modulus, defect mobility, ionic transport, flow behavior, oxidation states, hydration, and minor-element solubility. These properties of perovskite, in turn control the geophysical and geochemical processes of the Earth. The possibility of oxygen deficiency was first recognized in perovskite with minor amounts of Al replacing Mg and Si [1, 2], and its significance is compared to the analogous defect perovskite in ceramics [3]. Basic crystallographic characteristics of the silicate perovskite, including the lattice parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell, the Pbmn space group, and atomic positions, were previously determined by x-ray diffraction [4]. The defect crystallography of silicate perovskite, however, cannot be measured by x-rays because the relevant ions (Mg2+, Al3+, Si4+ and O2-) are isoelectronic. These ions have very different neutron cross-section and can be readily resolved by neutron diffraction. Using multianvil apparatus, we synthesized perovskite samples at 1700°C and 25-28 GPa. We perform multiple runs to accumulate 3 mm3 sample each for the MgSiO3 end member and MgSiO3 plus 5 weight %\\ Al2O3 in perovskite structure. Excellent powder diffraction data were collected at the POLARIS Beamline of ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Lab, and were subjected to Rietveld analysis. Neutron derived information sheds light on the unusual effects found for Al3+ substitution on the compressibility of the silicate perovskite [1]. 1. J. Zhang and D. J. Weidner, Science 284, 782 (1999). 2. J. P. Brodholt, Nature 407, 620 (2000). 3. A. Navrotsky, Science 284, 1788 (1999). 4. N. L. Ross and R. M. Hazen, Phys. Chem. Minerals 17, 228 (1990).

  5. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  6. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    PubMed

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation.

  7. Water and the density of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richet, Pascal; Whittington, Alan; Holtz, François; Behrens, Harald; Ohlhorst, Susanne; Wilke, Max

    A review of published and newly measured densities for 40 hydrous silicate glasses indicates that the room-temperature partial molar volume of water is 12.0+/-0.5cm3/mol. This value holds for simple or mineral compositions as well as for complex natural glasses, from rhyolite to tephrite compositions, prepared up to 10-20kbar pressures and containing up to 7wt% H2O. This volume does not vary either with the molar volume of the water-free silicate phase, with its degree of polymerization or with water speciation. Over a wide range of compositions, this constant value implies that the volume change for the reaction between hydroxyl ions and molecular water is zero and that, at least in glasses, speciation does not depend on pressure. Consistent with data from Ochs and Lange (1997, 1999), systematics in volume expansion for SiO2-M2O systems (M=H, Li, Na, K) suggests that the partial molar thermal expansion coefficient of H2O is about 4× 10-5 K-1 in silicate glasses.

  8. Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and amount of calcium sulfate (added to control the setting time) were screened using a statistical model. In the second part of the study, the liquid-to-powder ratio was optimized for cements containing three different amounts of radiopacifier. Finally, the effect of using glycerol rather than water was evaluated in terms of radiopacity. The setting time was found to increase with the amount of radiopacifier when the liquid-to-powder ratio was fixed. This was likely due to the higher density of the radiopacifier in comparison to the calcium silicate, which gave a higher liquid-to-powder ratio in terms of volume. Using glycerol rather than water to mix the cements led to a decrease in radiopacity of the cement. In conclusion, we were able to produce premixed calcium silicate cements with acceptable properties for use in endodontic applications. PMID:23507729

  9. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  10. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pengfei; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  11. Phosphorus partitioning among mantle silicate phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xirouchakis, D.; Draper, D. S.

    2002-05-01

    In the absence of a phosphate phase, phosphorus may be considered to behave as an incompatible element during partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages and/or crystallization of residual basaltic liquids. Thus, phosphorus can give valuable constraints on the extent of partial melting and/or magma crystallization, providing that crystal-liquid partition coefficients for P2O5 are known with confidence. In phosphate-normative rocks most of P2O5 is likely contained in phosphate minerals, however, in rocks containing only trace amounts of this oxide, as is often the case of mantle peridotites, silicate minerals can apparently host a large proportion of the bulk P2O5 content. Considering the small differences in the ionic radii of tetrahedrally coordinated P5+ (0.31 Å), Si4+ (0.26 Å), and Al3+ (0.39 Å) the potential for phosphorus incorporation into crystalline silicates is perhaps unsurprising. Although silicate and phosphate phases can be isostructural (e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4 or SiO2 vs. AlPO4), this does not warranty mutual solubility (Bradley et al 1966; Brunet et al. 2000). Neglecting the rare reports of significant (2-4 wt%) but also poorly understood P2O5 enrichment in olivine and pyroxene grains in a few extraterrestrial and terrestrial samples (Buseck and Clark, 1984; Goodrich 1984), the overlap in the P2O5 content (wt%) in olivine, pyroxene(s), garnet, and plagioclase, regardless of differences in analytical techniques and compositions, suggests that incorporation of trace quantities of phosphorus in these minerals appears plausible. Parenthetically, there is also considerable overlap in the few published (Henderson 1968; Anderson & Greenland 1969; Thompson 1975; Libourel et al. 1994) or unpublished (Xirouchakis and Draper unpubl. data) partition coefficients for these minerals and mafic silicate liquids. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter the silicate minerals of interest remain unclear or poorly understood, and certainly need to be

  12. Silicate release from glass for pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Denise; Bortoluzzi, Fabiana; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Ramirez, Adrian Gustavo

    2008-05-01

    Glass is made of polymeric silica and other minor components, which are necessary for turning the silica into a material more easily moldable and resistant to temperature changes. Glass containers for pharmaceutical usage are classified according to their resistance to a chemical attack, a test carried out in the presence of water and heat. The test is designed to show the released alkalinity, a variable dependent on the amount of sodium oxide, one of the minor components added to the glass mass. In this work, the release of silica from glass by action of constituents from pharmaceutical formulations was investigated. The study included products used in large volumes and usually stored in glass containers. Solutions of amino acids, electrolytes, glucose, oligoelements and others such as heparin and sodium bicarbonate were individually stored in glass containers and heated at 121 degrees C for 30min, as in the water attack test. The test was also carried out only with water, where the pH varied from 2 to 12. The released silicate was measured either by photometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, depending on the nature of the sample. The results showed that silicate is released during the heating cycle even if the contact is with pure water only. The pH exerts a considerable influence on the release, being that the higher the pH, the higher the silica dissolved. An elevated pH, however, is not the only factor responsible for silica dissolution. While in the solutions of NaCl, KCl, Mg Cl2 and ZnSO4 and in most of the amino acids, the concentration of silicate was as high as in pure water (0.1-1.0mg Si/L). In the solutions of sodium acetate, bicarbonate and gluconate, its concentration was much higher, over 30mg Si/L. These results were confirmed by the analysis of commercial products, where in solutions of amino acids the level of silicate ranged from 0.14 to 0.19mg Si/L. On the other hand, calcium gluconate, sodium bicarbonate and potassium phosphate presented

  13. Barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate ceramics via sol-gel process: novel high-energy-density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas Puli, Venkata; Kumar, Ashok; Chrisey, Douglas B.; Tomozawa, M.; Scott, J. F.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2011-10-01

    Lead-free barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate, [(BaZr0.2Ti0.80)O3]1-x-[(Ba0.70Ca0.30)TiO3]x (x = 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) (BZT-BCT) ceramics with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss and moderate electric breakdown field were prepared by the sol-gel synthesis technique. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed tetragonal crystal structure and this was further confirmed by Raman spectra. Well-behaved ferroelectric hysteresis loops and moderate polarizations (spontaneous polarization, Ps ~ 3-6 µC cm-2) were obtained in these BZT-BCT ceramics. Frequency-dependent dielectric spectra confirmed that ferroelectric diffuse phase transition (DPT) exists near room temperature. Scanning electron microscope images revealed monolithic grain growth in samples sintered at 1280 °C. 1000/ɛ versus (T) plots revealed ferroelectric DPT behaviour with estimated γ values of ~1.52, 1.51 and 1.88, respectively, for the studied BZT-BCT compositions. All three compositions showed packing-limited breakdown fields of ~47-73 kV cm-1 with an energy density of 0.05-0.6 J cm-3 for thick ceramics (>1 mm). Therefore these compositions might be useful in Y5V-type capacitor applications.

  14. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  15. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  16. Intoxication by large amounts of barium nitrate overcome by early massive K supplementation and oral administration of magnesium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Payen, Christine; Dellinger, Arnaud; Pulce, Corine; Cirimele, Vincent; Carbonnel, Vincent; Kintz, Pascal; Descotes, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Suicide by ingestion of barium is exceptionally rare. Adverse health effects depend on the solubility of the barium compound. Severe hypokalemia, which generally occurs within 2 hours after ingestion, is the predominating feature of acute barium toxicity, subsequently leading to adverse effects on muscular activity and cardiac automaticity. We report one case of acute poisoning with barium nitrate, a soluble barium compound. A 75-year-old woman was hospitalized after suicidal ingestion of a burrow mole fumigant containing 12.375 g of barium nitrate. About 1 hour post-ingestion, she was only complaining of abdominal pain. The ECG recording demonstrated polymorphic ventricular premature complexes (VPCs). Laboratory data revealed profound hypokalemia (2.1 mmol/L). She made a complete and uneventful recovery after early and massive potassium supplementation combined with oral magnesium sulphate to prevent barium nitrate absorption.

  17. The Evolving Mixture of Barium Isotopes in Milky Way Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals in stars form through one of two types of neutron capture processes: the rapid r-process or slower s-process. The fraction of odd and even barium isotopes in stars can indicate which process predominantly contributed to a star’s heavy metals, since odd barium isotopes predominantly form through the r-process and even barium isotopes through the s-process. The “stellar model” predicts that older stars contain comparable amounts of odd and even barium isotopes, while the “classical model” states that they almost exclusively contain odd isotopes. This study investigated these competing models by analyzing high-resolution spectra of twelve Milky Way stars. These spectra were analyzed for the first time in this study. To quantify r- and s-process enrichment, we measured the odd barium isotope fraction in the stars by fitting models to the stars’ spectra. Generating models involved measuring the stars’ Doppler shift, resolution, and barium abundance. To reduce error margins we optimized resolution and barium abundance measurements by enhancing existing techniques through several rounds of revisions. Our results support the stellar model of heavy metal enrichment, and our proposed optimizations will enable future researchers to obtain a deeper understanding of chemical enrichment in the Universe. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program at the University of California Santa Cruz, Lick Observatory, and the National Science Foundation.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  19. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic properties of Ni substituted Y-type barium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Mi Hee; Kim, Chul Sung

    2014-05-07

    Y-type barium hexaferrite is attractive material for various applications, such as high frequency antennas and RF devices, because of its interesting magnetic properties. Especially, Ni substituted Y- type hexaferrites have higher magnetic ordering temperature than other Y-type. We have investigated macroscopic and microscopic properties of Y-type barium hexaferrite. Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 2−x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) samples are prepared by solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as a network analyzer for high frequency characteristics. The XRD pattern is analyzed by Rietveld refinement method and confirms the hexagonal structure with R-3m. The hysteresis curve shows ferrimagnetic behavior. Saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases with Ni contents. Ni{sup 2+}, which preferentially occupies the octahedral site with up-spin sub-lattice, has smaller spin value S of 1 than Co{sup 2+} having S = 3/2. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) measurement of Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 1.5}Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} shows that Curie and spin transition temperatures are found to be 718 K and 209 K, respectively. The Curie temperature T{sub C} is increased with Ni contents, while T{sub S} is decreased with Ni. The Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures and fitted by using a least-squares method with six sextet of six Lorentzian lines for Fe sites, corresponding to the 3b{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}*, 6c{sub VI}, 18h{sub VI}, 6c{sub IV}, and 3a{sub IV} sites at below T{sub C}. From Mössbauer measurements, we confirmed the spin state of Fe ion to be Fe{sup 3+} and obtained the isomer shift (δ), magnetic hyperfine field (H{sub hf}), and the occupancy ratio of Fe ions at six sub-lattices. The complex permeability and permittivity are measured between 100 MHz and 4 GHz, suggesting that Y-type barium hexaferrite is promising for antenna

  1. Magnetic properties of Ni substituted Y-type barium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Mi Hee; Kim, Chul Sung

    2014-05-01

    Y-type barium hexaferrite is attractive material for various applications, such as high frequency antennas and RF devices, because of its interesting magnetic properties. Especially, Ni substituted Y- type hexaferrites have higher magnetic ordering temperature than other Y-type. We have investigated macroscopic and microscopic properties of Y-type barium hexaferrite. Ba2Co2-xNixFe12O22 (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) samples are prepared by solid-state reaction method and studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, as well as a network analyzer for high frequency characteristics. The XRD pattern is analyzed by Rietveld refinement method and confirms the hexagonal structure with R-3m. The hysteresis curve shows ferrimagnetic behavior. Saturation magnetization (Ms) decreases with Ni contents. Ni2+, which preferentially occupies the octahedral site with up-spin sub-lattice, has smaller spin value S of 1 than Co2+ having S = 3/2. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) measurement of Ba2Co1.5Ni0.5Fe12O22 shows that Curie and spin transition temperatures are found to be 718 K and 209 K, respectively. The Curie temperature TC is increased with Ni contents, while TS is decreased with Ni. The Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures and fitted by using a least-squares method with six sextet of six Lorentzian lines for Fe sites, corresponding to the 3bVI, 6cIV*, 6cVI, 18hVI, 6cIV, and 3aIV sites at below TC. From Mössbauer measurements, we confirmed the spin state of Fe ion to be Fe3+ and obtained the isomer shift (δ), magnetic hyperfine field (Hhf), and the occupancy ratio of Fe ions at six sub-lattices. The complex permeability and permittivity are measured between 100 MHz and 4 GHz, suggesting that Y-type barium hexaferrite is promising for antenna applications in UHF band.

  2. Barium and Neodymium Isotope Heterogeneities in Early Solar System Materials: Applications to Planetary Reservoir Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranen, M. C.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2005-12-01

    Heavy element isotopic heterogeneities in early Solar System materials may exist as a result of both incomplete mixing of pre-solar nucleosynthetic components in the Solar Nebula leading to different ratios of p-, r- and s-process isotopes in bulk planetary materials as well as heterogeneities caused by the decay of now extinct nuclides. Boyet and Carlson (2005) reported a difference in 142Nd/144Nd between Earths mantle and chondrites of about 20-30 ppm. Assuming that this difference was due to decay of 146Sm and that the Earth and chondrites formed with identical 146Sm/144Sm they inferred the formation of a deep enriched silicate layer (D'' ?) in the Earth that formed within the first 30 Myr of Solar System history. We have obtained a similar difference in 142Nd/144Nd between Earth and chondrites. However, we are now testing their interpretation with Ba isotope measurements of various chondrites. Barium is an ideal element for testing the origin of small isotopic anomalies because it has two isotopes (134 and 136) derived only from the s-process as well as three isotopes (135,137 and 138) derived from both the r- and s-process with 135Ba possibly having a contribution from the decay of now extinct 135Cs. Six chondrites: Allende (CV3), Peace River (L6), Murchison (CM2), Grady (H3.7), Guarena (H6), and Bruderheim (L6) were measured for Ba isotopic composition with a new generation TIMS instrument (a GV ISOPROBE-T). A terrestrial andesite, AGV-1, was also processed for use as our reference standard. Preliminary results indicate widespread heterogeneity in the fractionation corrected 137Ba/136Ba ratio between different meteorites and our terrestrial standard, as high as 25 ppm. Smaller anomalies are also seen in 134Ba/136Ba. These anomalies are likely caused by slight differences in the mixing proportions of r- and s-process Ba in Earth and chondrites. This calls into question whether or not the differences seen in 142Nd/144Nd are truly caused by early differentiation

  3. Adsorption of β-carotene on modified magnesium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Guo, Ning; Fu, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Modified flocculation magnesium silicate is prepared by a hydrothermal process at 120°C for 18 h after adding Al2(SO4)3 into the magnesium silicate gel. Compared with standard magnesium silicate with 328.116 m2 g-1 surface area, this modified magnesium silicate has a bigger BET surface area of 536.803 m2 g-1 and a lower interlayer water content. Modified magnesium silicate exhibits high β-carotene adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity of 364.96 mg g-1. It is shown that when suspended in organic solvent, this material can be used effectively for carotenoid separation. Furthermore, our results suggest that modified magnesium silicate may be a promising candidate as an absorbent in the decoloring of oil.

  4. On the nature of striae in strontium barium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Monchamp, R.R.; Mihalik, G.B.; Franks, L.A.

    1993-12-31

    Strontium barium niobate crystals were grown by the Czochralski technique. These crystals were 15--20 mm in diameter and 25 to 75 mm long. Two types stride, designated as coarse and fine, were characterized. The coarse stride are optically dense and are spaced by 100 to 500 {mu}m apart; the fine striae are optically less dense and spaced 5--50 {mu}m apart. The origins of the stride are attributed to thermal fluctuations in the melt related to the control system and to rotation of the growing crystal in non-isothermal radial gradients. Analysis of the crystals would indicated that the coarse striae may contain increased concentrations of sodium.

  5. Nonlinear optical properties of calcium barium niobate epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Vigne, Sébastien; Hossain, Nadir; Chaker, Mohammed; Légaré, François

    2016-07-25

    We investigate the potential of epitaxial calcium barium niobate (CBN) thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition for optical frequency conversion. Using second harmonic generation (SHG), we analyze the polarization response of the generated signal to determine the ratios d15 / d32 and d33 / d32 of the three independent components of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor in CBN thin film. In addition, a detailed comparison to the signal intensity obtained in a y-cut quartz allows us to measure the absolute value of these components in CBN thin film: d15 = 5 ± 2 pm / V, d32 = 3.1 ± 0.6 pm / V and d33 = 9 ± 2 pm / V.

  6. Impact of vanadium ions in barium borate glass.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; Hammad, Ahmed H

    2015-02-25

    Combined optical and infrared spectral measurements of prepared barium borate glasses containing different concentrations of V2O5 were carried out. Vanadium containing glasses exhibit extended UV-visible (UV/Vis.) bands when compared with base binary borate glass. UV/Vis. spectrum shows the presence of an unsymmetrical strong UV broad band centered at 214 nm attributed to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for the preparation of such glass. The calculated direct and indirect optical band gaps are found to decrease with increasing the vanadium content (2.9:137 for indirect and 3.99:2.01 for direct transition). This change was discussed in terms of structural changes in the glass network. Infrared absorption spectra of the glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular and tetrahedral borate units. Electron spin resonance analyses indicate the presence of unpaired species in sufficient quantity to be identified and to confirm the spectral data.

  7. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  8. Microwave dielectric properties of graded barium strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. W.; Weiss, C. V.; Ngo, E.; Hirsch, S.; Coryell, L. A.; Alpay, S. P.

    2008-05-01

    Compositionally graded barium strontium titanate (BaxSr1-xTiO3 or BST) multilayers (5mol% MgO doped and undoped) were prepared via metallo-organic solution deposition on Pt-Si substrates and characterized electrically at 0.5, 5, and 10GHz. For the undoped BST multilayers, the small-signal dielectric response, tunability, and the loss tangent at 10GHz were 261, 25% at 1778kV/cm, and 0.078, respectively. On the other hand, the Mg-doped BST multilayers displayed a significant improvement in the loss characteristics at 10GHz (0.039) but the dielectric response and its tunability were lower (189 and 15%, respectively, at 1778kV/cm).

  9. Dynamics of the CRRES barium releases in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Mende, S. B.; Geller, S. P.; Miller, M.; Hoffman, R. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Pongratz, M.; Meredith, N. P.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) G-2, G-3, and G-4 ionized and neutral barium cloud positions are triangulated from ground-based optical data. From the time history of the ionized cloud motion perpendicular to the magnetic field, the late time coupling of the ionized cloud with the collisionless ambient plasma in the magnetosphere is investigated for each of the releases. The coupling of the ionized clouds with the ambient medium is quantitatively consistent with predictions from theory in that the coupling time increases with increasing distance from the Earth. Quantitative comparison with simple theory for the couping time also yields reasonable agreement. Other effects not predicted by the theory are discussed in the context of the observations.

  10. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  11. Impact of vanadium ions in barium borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Hammad, Ahmed H.

    2015-02-01

    Combined optical and infrared spectral measurements of prepared barium borate glasses containing different concentrations of V2O5 were carried out. Vanadium containing glasses exhibit extended UV-visible (UV/Vis.) bands when compared with base binary borate glass. UV/Vis. spectrum shows the presence of an unsymmetrical strong UV broad band centered at 214 nm attributed to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for the preparation of such glass. The calculated direct and indirect optical band gaps are found to decrease with increasing the vanadium content (2.9:137 for indirect and 3.99:2.01 for direct transition). This change was discussed in terms of structural changes in the glass network. Infrared absorption spectra of the glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular and tetrahedral borate units. Electron spin resonance analyses indicate the presence of unpaired species in sufficient quantity to be identified and to confirm the spectral data.

  12. Coralline barium records temporal variability in equatorial Pacific upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, David W.; Shen, Glen T.; Boyle, Edward A.

    1989-08-01

    LATTICE-BOUND cadmium in scleractinian corals has been shown to be a sensitive tracer of historical changes in the nutrient content of surface waters1,2. Barium also substitutes into the lattice of aragonite reef-building corals because there is solid solution between orthorhombic BaCO3 (witherite) and CaCO3(aragonite)3. It is expected that the substitution should be proportional to the Ba content of sea water, which increases from low values in warm surface waters to higher values in cold deep waters. Here we present a high-resolution coralline Ba record from the Galapagos Islands spanning the period 1965-1978. Coralline Ba/Ca tracks historical sea surface temperatures, reflecting the vertical displacement of warm nutrient-poor surface waters by cold, nutrient-rich source waters. Differences between coralline Ba and Cd records may be due to preferential uptake of Cd by phytoplankton during times of lower surface nutrients.

  13. A buffer gas cooled beam of barium monohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Geoffrey; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    Significant advances in direct laser cooling of diatomic molecules have opened up a wide array of molecular species to precision studies spanning many-body physics, quantum collisions and ultracold dissociation. We present a cryogenic beam source of barium monohydride (BaH), and study laser ablation of solid precursor targets as well as helium buffer gas cooling dynamics. Additionally, we cover progress towards a molecular magneto-optical trap, with spectroscopic studies of relevant cooling transitions in the B2 Σ <--X2 Σ manifold in laser ablated molecules, including resolution of hyperfine structure and precision measurements of the vibrational Frank-Condon factors. Finally, we examine the feasibility of photo dissociation of trapped BaH molecules to yield optically accessible samples of ultracold hydrogen.

  14. Strontium and barium iodide high light yield scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Hull, Giulia; Drobshoff, Alexander D.; Payne, Stephen A.; van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody M.; Shah, Kanai S.; Roy, Utpal N.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2008-02-01

    Europium-doped strontium and barium iodide are found to be readily growable by the Bridgman method and to produce high scintillation light yields. SrI2(Eu ) emits into the Eu2+ band, centered at 435nm, with a decay time of 1.2μs and a light yield of ˜90000photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 4% full width at half maximum at 662keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. BaI2(Eu ) produces >30000photons/MeV into the Eu2+ band at 420nm (<1μs decay). An additional broad impurity-mediated recombination band is present at 550nm (>3μs decay), unless high-purity feedstock is used.

  15. Spectroscopic study of Er:Sm doped barium fluorotellurite glass.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, A; Dwivedi, Y; Rai, S B

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we report the physical and spectroscopic properties of Er(3+), Sm(3+) and Er(3+):Sm(3+) ions codoped barium fluorotellurite (BFT) glasses. Different Stokes and anti-Stokes emissions were observed under 532 nm and 976 nm laser excitations. Energy transfer from Er(3+) ion to Sm(3+) ion was confirmed on the basis of luminescence intensity variation and decay curve analysis in both the cases. Under green (532 nm) excitation emission intensity of Sm(3+) ion bands improves whereas on NIR (976 nm) excitation new emission bands of Sm(3+) ions were observed in Er:Sm codoped samples. Ion interactions and the different energy transfer parameters were also calculated. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis, microstructure and dielectric properties of zirconium doped barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rohtash; Asokan, K.; Patnaik, S.; Birajdar, Balaji

    2016-05-23

    We report on synthesis, microstructural and relaxor ferroelectric properties of Zirconium(Zr) doped Barium Titanate (BT) samples with general formula Ba(Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x})O{sub 3} (x=0.20, 0.35). These lead-free ceramics were prepared by solid state reaction route. The phase transition behavior and temperature dependent dielectric properties and composition dependent ferroelectric properties were investigated. XRD analysis at room temperature confirms phase purity of the samples. SEM observations revealed retarded grain growth with increasing Zr mole fraction. Dielectric properties of BZT ceramics is influenced significantly by small addition of Zr mole fraction. With increasing Zr mole fraction, dielectric constant decreases while FWHM and frequency dispersion increases. Polarization vs electric field hysteresis measurements reveal ferroelectric relaxor phase at room temperature. The advantages of such substitution maneuvering towards optimizing ferroelectric properties of BaTiO{sub 3} are discussed.

  17. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-24

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1−xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba{sup 2+} ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba{sup 2+} ion in SBT lattice.

  18. Niobium and rubidium in the barium star Zeta Capricorni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, V. V.; Lambert, D. L.

    1984-03-01

    An abundance analysis of the elements Rb to Nb (relative to the G-giant standard ɛ Vir) has been carried out for the barium star ζ Cap using low-noise, high-resolution Digicon and Reticon spectra. Tech's (1971) low abundance of Nb in ζ Cap suggests that the s-process ceased less than about a million years ago. The authors' improved analysis finds a higher Nb abundance consistent with the complete decay of 93Zr to 93Nb; i.e., more than 3×106 years have elapsed since the principal phase of s-processing. The abundance of Rb suggests a neutron density of N(n) ≡ 107cm-3 for the s-process site at the close of s-processing.

  19. Barium titanate nanocomposite capacitor FY09 year end report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Tyler E.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William; Fellows, Benjamin D.

    2009-11-01

    This late start RTBF project started the development of barium titanate (BTO)/glass nanocomposite capacitors for future and emerging energy storage applications. The long term goal of this work is to decrease the size, weight, and cost of ceramic capacitors while increasing their reliability. Ceramic-based nanocomposites have the potential to yield materials with enhanced permittivity, breakdown strength (BDS), and reduced strain, which can increase the energy density of capacitors and increase their shot life. Composites of BTO in glass will limit grain growth during device fabrication (preserving nanoparticle grain size and enhanced properties), resulting in devices with improved density, permittivity, BDS, and shot life. BTO will eliminate the issues associated with Pb toxicity and volatility as well as the variation in energy storage vs. temperature of PZT based devices. During the last six months of FY09 this work focused on developing syntheses for BTO nanoparticles and firing profiles for sintering BTO/glass composite capacitors.

  20. Influence of Barium Hexaferrite on Magnetic Properties of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Jarupoom, P; Jaita, P

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) powders was derived from natural bovine bone by sequence of thermal processes. The barium hexaferrite (BF) find magnetic powders were added into HA powders in ratio of 1-3 vol.%. The HA-BF ceramics were prepared by a solid state reaction method and sintered at 1250 degrees C for 2 h. Effects of BF additive on structural, physical and magnetic properties of HA ceramics were investigated. X-ray diffraction revealed that all HA-BF samples showed a main phase of high purity hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] with calcium and phosphate molar ratio of 1.67. The addition of BF into HA inhibited grain growth and caused an improvement of mechanical properties. The M-H hysteresis loops also showed an improvement in magnetic behavior for higher content of BF. Moreover, in vitro bioactivity test indicated that the 2-3 vol.% sample may be suitable for biological applications.

  1. Small polarons and point defects in barium cerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Michael; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2015-12-01

    Barium cerate (BaCeO3) is a well-known ionic conductor of both hydrogen and oxygen. In applications, it is frequently doped (for instance with Y) to increase stability and promote diffusion. However, the effects of doping and native defects are not fully understood. Computational studies have been stymied by the nature of the conduction band, which is made up of cerium 4 f states. These states present a challenge to ab initio techniques based on density functional theory within the standard approximations for exchange and correlation. Using a hybrid functional, we investigate the effects of hydrogen impurities and native defects on the electrical and optical properties of BaCeO3. We discuss the tendency of excess electrons or holes to localize in the form of small polarons. We also explore the interactions of polarons with hydrogen impurities and oxygen vacancies, and their impact on luminescence properties.

  2. A new type of microphone using flexoelectric barium strontium titnate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seol ryung; Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Shujun; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-03-01

    A flexoelectric bridge-structured microphone using bulk barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 or BST) ceramic was investigated in this study. The flexoelectric microphone was installed in an anechoic box and exposed to the sound pressure emitted from a loud speaker. Charge sensitivity of the flexoelectric microphone was measured and calibrated using a reference microphone. The 1.5 mm×768 μm×50 μm micro-machined bridge-structured flexoelectric microphone has a sensitivity of 0.92 pC/Pa, while its resonance frequency was calculated to be 98.67 kHz. The analytical and experimental results show that the flexoelectric microphone has both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, indicating that flexoelectric microphones are potential candidates for many applications.

  3. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeet, Suninder; Sharma, Manoj; Pandey, O. P.

    2015-05-01

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl10O17(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl2O4(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f6 5d → 4f7 transition of Eu2+ which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  4. Preparation and magnetic properties of barium hexaferrite nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Mu Guohong Pan Xifeng; Chen Na; Gan Keke; Gu Mingyuan

    2008-06-03

    The barium hexaferrite nanorods were successfully prepared by sol-gel technique combined with polymethylmethacrylate as template. The crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} with different shape were investigated with X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results show that diameters and lengths of magnetic nanorods are about 60 nm and 300 nm, respectively. The coercivity of rod-shaped BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} is increased to 5350 Oe, in comparison with 4800 Oe with plate-shape. The formation mechanism of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanorods and reasons resulting in high coercivity are discussed.

  5. Dissociation behavior of protons incorporated in yttrium doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Develos-Bagarinao, K.; Yamaji, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Fujishiro, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The dissociation behavior of protons incorporated in yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY20) was investigated via combination of in-situ diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and evolved gas analysis. The vicinities of dopant or host ions were considered as sites of proton dissolution. The temperature dependence of the dissociation of protons from each site was evaluated. Protons which were considered to have dissolved in the vicinity of dopant ions were easily removed and dissociated as water. On the other hand, those which dissolved in the vicinity of host ions were dissociated as hydrogen at high temperatures. Such dissociation behavior was also detected after using D2O saturated gas for pre-treatment. These results suggest that some protons which dissolved in the perovskite oxide could dissociate as hydrogen without forming oxygen vacancies. (131words)

  6. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  7. Modeling Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R -1 2 -3 0 Multiscale Modeling of the Structure of Material Modeling Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium - Silicate -Hydrate...Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium - Silicate -Hydrate Mei Qiang Chandler and John F. Peters Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer...DEM) was used to model the nanomechanical behavior of Calcium - Silicate -Hydrate (C-S-H). The inter- particle forces consist of the traditional friction

  8. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chuanjian E-mail: ksun@uestc.edu.cn; Yu, Zhong; Sun, Ke E-mail: ksun@uestc.edu.cn; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen; Yang, Yan

    2015-09-14

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 12−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f{sub 1}, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub bf2}, ω{sub kf1}, ω{sub af1}, ω{sub kf2}, and ω{sub bk} of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f{sub 1}, 4f{sub 2}, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub bf2} and ω{sub af1} decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ω{sub kf1}, ω{sub kf2}, and ω{sub bk} show a slight change.

  9. BD-21 3873: another yellow-symbiotic barium star.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, V. V.; Cunha, K.; Jorissen, A.; Boffin, H. M. J.

    1997-08-01

    An abundance analysis of the yellow symbiotic system BD-21 3873 reveals it to be a metal-poor K-giant ([Fe/H]=-1.3) which is enriched in the heavy s-process elements. In that respect, this star appears to be a twin of AG Dra, another yellow symbiotic system analyzed in a previous paper (Smith et al., 1996A&A...315..179S). The heavy-element abundance distributions of AG Dra and BD-21 3873 are almost identical, and are best reproduced by a s-process with a neutron exposure parameter of 1.2-1.3mb^-1^ and a neutron density logN_n_=8.3 (as derived from the Rb/Zr ratio). These two systems thus link the symbiotic stars to the binary barium and CH stars which are also s-process enriched. These binary systems, which exhibit overabundances of the heavy elements, owe their abundance peculiarities to mass transfer from thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars, which have since evolved to become white-dwarf companions of the cool stars we now view as the chemically-peculiar primaries. The spectroscopic orbits of BD-21 3873 (derived from CORAVEL measurements) and AG Dra are similar to those of barium and CH stars. With an orbital period of 281.6d, BD-21 3873 is one of the closest systems in these families, and its light curve indeed suggests that variations due to reflection and ellipticity effects are present. The amplitude of the ellipsoidal variations indicates that the giant must be close to filling its Roche lobe. However, no acceptable solution simultaneously satisfies the constraints from the light curve, the orbital elements and the evolutionary tracks in the framework of the standard Roche lobe geometry. We suggest that this discrepancy may be resolved by taking into account the deformation of the Roche lobe caused by the force driving the large mass loss of the giant.

  10. Barium tagging in solid xenon for the EXO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are searching for rare decay modes never before observed to uncover the absolute mass of the neutrino, as well as to discover if it is a Majorana fermion. Detection of the daughter nucleus can help provide positive identification of this event over most radioactive backgrounds. The goal of the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is to measure the rate of 0nubetabeta decay in 136Xe, incorporating 136Ba daughter identification by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Here, we investigate a technique in which the 136Ba daughter is grabbed with a cryogenic probe by freezing it in solid xenon ice, and detected directly in the solid xenon. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of barium in solid xenon were observed for the first time in this work. Identification of the 6s 2 1S0 → 6s6p 1P 1 transition in both absorption (558 nm) and emission spectra (594 nm) were made. Additional blue absorption and emission lines were observed, but their transitions were not identified. Saturation of the 6s2 1S0 → 6s6p 1P1 transition was not observed with increased excitation rates using resonance excitation at 558˜nm. From this a limit on the metastable decay rate was deduced to be greater than 104 s-1. Finally a fluorescence spectrum was obtained from a sample with only 20,000 atoms in the laser beam. With potential improvements of 107 in detection efficiency, single barium atom detection seems possible in solid xenon. A fiber probe detector based on a bare single mode fiber was also constructed and tested with fluorescing dye molecules. Successful detection of a few dye molecules in solution at the probe tip was demonstrated.

  11. Experiments of water formation on warm silicates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-10

    When dust grains have a higher temperature than they would have in dense clouds, and when H, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} have a negligible residence time on grains, the formation of water should still be possible via the hydrogenation of OH and Eley-Rideal-type reactions. We determined that the OH desorption energy from an amorphous silicate surface is at least 143 meV (1656 K). This is 400 K higher than the value previously used in chemical models of the interstellar medium and is possibly as high as 410 meV (4760 K). This extends the temperature range for the efficient formation of water on grains from about 30 K to at least 50 K, and possibly over 100 K. We do not find evidence that water molecules leave the surface upon formation. Instead, through a thermal programmed desorption experiment, we find that water formed on the surface of an amorphous silicate desorbs at around 160 K. We also measured the cross-sections for the reaction of H and D with an O{sub 3} layer on an amorphous silicate surface at 50 K. The values of the cross-sections, σ{sub H} = 1.6 ± 0.27 Å{sup 2} and σ{sub D} = 0.94 ± 0.09 Å{sup 2}, respectively, are smaller than the size of an O{sub 3} molecule, suggesting the reaction mechanism is more likely Eley-Rideal than hot-atom. Information obtained through these experiments should help theorists evaluate the relative contribution of water formation on warm grains versus in the gas phase.

  12. Dentinal Tubule Penetration of Tricalcium Silicate Sealers.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Greer E; Primus, Carolyn M; Opperman, Lynne A

    2016-04-01

    The treatments for which mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based materials can be used in dentistry are expanding. Smaller particle size and easier handling properties have allowed the advent of tricalcium silicate sealers including EndoSequence BC Sealer (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), QuickSet2 (Avalon Biomed, Bradenton, FL), NeoMTA Plus (Avalon Biomed), and MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). The objective of this study was to measure the tubule penetration with these sealers using continuous wave (CW) and single-cone (SC) obturation techniques. Eighty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups of 10 and obturated with 1 of the previously mentioned sealers mixed with trace amounts of rhodamine using either the CW or SC technique. Teeth were sectioned at 1 mm and 5 mm from the apex and examined under a confocal laser microscope. The percentage of sealer penetration and the maximum sealer penetration were measured. The tricalcium silicate sealers penetrated tubules as deep as 2000 μm (2 mm). The percentage of sealer penetration was much higher 5 mm from the apex, with many specimens having 100% penetration for both SC and warm vertical techniques. MTA Fillapex, a resin-based sealer with less than 20% MTA particles, had significantly greater tubule penetration with a warm vertical technique versus the SC technique at the 1-mm level. Within the limitations of this study, the CW and SC techniques produced similar tubule penetration at both the 1-mm and the 5-mm level with the tricalcium silicate sealers BC Sealer, QuickSet2, and NeoMTA Plus. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF BARIUM ENEMA FINDINGS IN HIRSCHSPRUNG'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Peyvasteh, Mehran; Askarpour, Shahnam; Ostadian, Nasrollah; Moghimi, Mohammad-Reza; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease is the most common cause of pediatric intestinal obstruction. Contrast enema is used for evaluation of the patients with its diagnosis. To evaluate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiologic findings for diagnosis of Hirschsprung in patients underwent barium enema. This cross sectional study was carried out in Imam Khomeini Hospital for one year starting from 2012, April. Sixty patients were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: neonates with failure to pass meconium, abdominal distention, and refractory constipation who failed to respond with medical treatment. Transitional zone, delay in barium evacuation after 24 h, rectosigmoid index (maximum with of the rectum divided by maximum with of the sigmoid; abnormal if <1), and irregularity of mucosa (jejunization) were evaluated in barium enema. Biopsy was obtained at three locations apart above dentate line. PPV, NPV, specificity , and sensitivity was calculated for each finding. Mean age of the cases with Hirschsprung's disease and without was 17.90±18.29 months and 17.8±18.34 months respectively (p=0.983). It was confirmed in 30 (M=20, F=10) of cases. Failure to pass meconium was found in 21(70%) cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 90%, 80%, 81.8% and 88.8% respectively for transitional zone in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 76.7%, 83.3%, 78.1% and 82.1% respectively for rectosigmoid index .Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 46.7%, 100%, 100% and 65.2% respectively for irregular contraction detected in barium enema. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 23.3%, 100%, 100% and 56.6% respectively for mucosal irregularity in barium enema. The most sensitive finding was transitional zone. The most specific findings were irregular contraction, mucosal irregularity, and followed by cobblestone appearance. A doença de Hirschsprung é a causa mais comum de obstrução intestinal pedi

  14. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  15. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  16. Lithium metaborate flux in silicate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingamells, C.O.

    1970-01-01

    Lithium metaborate is an effective flux for silicates and other rock-forming minerals. The glass resulting from fusion is mechanically strong, reasonably nonhygroscopic, and is readily soluble in dilute acids. These characteristics lead to its use in X-ray spectrography and in methods which require whole-rock solutions, such as atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Difficulties have been encountered in the use of such techniques : a high-quality reagent has been difficult to obtain ; fusion conditions must be rather closely controlled; graphite crucibles used in the fusions need special treatment. Methods for overcoming these difficulties are outlined. Selected procedures for various instrumental methods of analysis are described. ?? 1970.

  17. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  18. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  19. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, D.

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  20. Group II tris(glycolato)silicates as precursors to silicate glasses and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, P.; Laine, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    Group II tris(glycolato)silicates, MSi(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3} (where M = Ba, Ca, Mg), can be synthesized directly by reaction of silica with ethylene glycol and alkaline-earth (group II) oxides at 200 C. These hexa-alkoxy silicates serve as precursors to silicate glass and ceramic powders. They are readily modified by exchange with longer-chain diols into proper precursors. These rheologically useful precursors may provide access to silicate or aluminosilicate powders, thin films, fibers, and coatings. Thus, the authors have examined the utility of hexacoordinate glycolatosilicates as model precursors. Pyrolysis of the compounds, MSi(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2})O{sub 3}, in air transforms them to their anticipated ceramic products, MO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}. The phase transformation and chemical changes that occur during pyrolysis were characterized using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hexacoordinate glycolatosilicates oxidatively decompose at {approx}300 C to form amorphous materials. Moderate to significant quantities of the group II carbonates, MCO{sub 3} (15--50 wt%), form coincidentally as the amorphous intermediates trap CO{sub 2} generated by ligand oxidation. At {approx}900 C, the amorphous materials crystallize into the expected, phase-pure, MO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}.

  1. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  2. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  3. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  4. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new...

  5. Comparison of flow-controlled calcium and barium carbonate precipitation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuszter, G.; De Wit, A.

    2016-12-01

    Various precipitation patterns can be obtained in flow conditions when injecting a solution of sodium carbonate in a confined geometry initially filled with a solution of either barium or calcium chloride. We compare here the barium and calcium carbonate precipitate structures as a function of initial concentrations and injection flow rate. We show that, in some part of the parameter space, the patterns are similar and feature comparable properties indicating that barium and calcium behave similarly in the related flow-controlled precipitation conditions. For other values of parameters though, the precipitate structures are different indicating that the cohesive and microscopic properties of barium versus calcium carbonate are then important in shaping the pattern in flow conditions.

  6. Numberical simulation of the effects of radially injected barium plasma in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The morphology of the ion cloud in the radial shaped charge barium injection was studied. The shape of the ion cloud that remains after the explosive products and neutral barium clears away was examined. The ion cloud which has the configuration of a rimless wagon wheel is shown. The major features are the 2.5 km radius black hole in the center of the cloud, the surrounding ring of barium ion and the spokes of barium ionization radiating away from the center. The cloud shows no evolution after it emerges from the neutral debris and it is concluded that it is formed within 5 seconds of the event. A numerical model is used to calculate the motion of ions and electrons subject to the electrostatic and lorenz forces.

  7. Severe acute cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Ya-Guang; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Su, Zhong-Xue; Xu, Jian; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong

    2012-10-21

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is considered as a possible etiological factor for severe cholangitis. We herein report a case of severe cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination. An adult male patient presented with epigastric pain was diagnosed as having choledocholithiasis by ultrasonography. EST was performed and the stone was completely cleaned. Barium examination was done 3 d after EST and severe cholangitis appeared 4 h later. The patient was recovered after treated with tienam for 4 d. Barium examination may induce severe cholangitis in patients after EST, although rare, barium examination should be chosen cautiously. Cautions should be also used when EST is performed in patients younger than 50 years to avoid the damage to the sphincter of Oddi.

  8. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished liver... use in enemas. Tannic acid for rectal use to enhance X-ray visualization is regarded as a new drug...

  9. The value of the preoperative barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gedgaudas, R.K.; Kelvin, F.M.; Thompson, W.M.; Rice, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    The value of the barium-enema examination in the assessment of pelvic masses was studied in 44 patients. Findings from those barium-enema examinations and from pathological specimens from 37 patients who had malignant tumors and seven patients who had endometriosis were retrospectively analyzed to determine if the barium-enema examination is useful in differentiating extrinsic lesions with and without invasion of the colon. None of the 12 patients who had extrinsic lesions had any of the criteria that indicated bowel-wall invasion. These criteria included fixation and serrations of the bowel wall in all patients with invasion, and ulceration and fistulizaton in those patients who had complete transmural invasion. In patients with pelvic masses, the preoperative barium-enema examination may be useful to the surgeon in planning surgery and in preparing the patient for the possibility of partial colectomy or colostomy.

  10. Sponge-associated bacteria mineralize arsenic and barium on intracellular vesicles

    DOE PAGES

    Keren, Ray; Mayzel, Boaz; Lavy, Adi; ...

    2017-02-24

    Arsenic and barium are ubiquitous environmental toxins that accumulate in higher trophic-level organisms. Whereas metazoans have detoxifying organs to cope with toxic metals, sponges lack organs but harbour a symbiotic microbiome performing various functions. Here we examine the potential roles of microorganisms in arsenic and barium cycles in the sponge Theonella swinhoei, known to accumulate high levels of these metals. We show that a single sponge symbiotic bacterium, Entotheonella sp., constitutes the arsenic- and barium-accumulating entity within the host. These bacteria mineralize both arsenic and barium on intracellular vesicles. Our results indicate that Entotheonella sp. may act as a detoxifyingmore » organ for its host.« less

  11. 75 FR 36629 - Barium Chloride From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset Review of Antidumping Duty Order, 74 FR 55814 (October 29... the order is barium chloride, a chemical compound having the formulas BaCl 2 or BaCl 2 - 2H 2...

  12. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  14. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales. PMID:26364882

  15. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  16. Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma.

    PubMed

    Tuffen, Hugh; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter R

    2008-05-22

    It has long been assumed that seismogenic faulting is confined to cool, brittle rocks, with a temperature upper limit of approximately 600 degrees C (ref. 1). This thinking underpins our understanding of volcanic earthquakes, which are assumed to occur in cold rocks surrounding moving magma. However, the recent discovery of abundant brittle-ductile fault textures in silicic lavas has led to the counter-intuitive hypothesis that seismic events may be triggered by fracture and faulting within the erupting magma itself. This hypothesis is supported by recent observations of growing lava domes, where microearthquake swarms have coincided with the emplacement of gouge-covered lava spines, leading to models of seismogenic stick-slip along shallow shear zones in the magma. But can fracturing or faulting in high-temperature, eruptible magma really generate measurable seismic events? Here we deform high-temperature silica-rich magmas under simulated volcanic conditions in order to test the hypothesis that high-temperature magma fracture is seismogenic. The acoustic emissions recorded during experiments show that seismogenic rupture may occur in both crystal-rich and crystal-free silicic magmas at eruptive temperatures, extending the range of known conditions for seismogenic faulting.

  17. Silicate mineralogy at the surface of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed geochemical diversity across Mercury's volcanic crust. Near-infrared to ultraviolet spectra and images have provided evidence for the Fe2+-poor nature of silicate minerals, magnesium sulfide minerals in hollows and a darkening component attributed to graphite, but existing spectral data is insufficient to build a mineralogical map for the planet. Here we investigate the mineralogical variability of silicates in Mercury's crust using crystallization experiments on magmas with compositions and under reducing conditions expected for Mercury. We find a common crystallization sequence consisting of olivine, plagioclase, pyroxenes and tridymite for all magmas tested. Depending on the cooling rate, we suggest that lavas on Mercury are either fully crystallized or made of a glassy matrix with phenocrysts. Combining the experimental results with geochemical mapping, we can identify several mineralogical provinces: the Northern Volcanic Plains and Smooth Plains, dominated by plagioclase, the High-Mg province, strongly dominated by forsterite, and the Intermediate Plains, comprised of forsterite, plagioclase and enstatite. This implies a temporal evolution of the mineralogy from the oldest lavas, dominated by mafic minerals, to the youngest lavas, dominated by plagioclase, consistent with progressive shallowing and decreasing degree of mantle melting over time.

  18. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A. |; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  19. Barium isotopes in Allende meteorite - Evidence against an extinct superheavy element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.; Shimamura, T.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon and chromite fractions from the Allende meteorite that contain isotopically anomalous xenon-131 to xenon-136 (carbonaceous chondrite fission or CCF xenon) at up to 5 x 10 to the 11th atoms per gram show no detectable isotopic anomalies in barium-130 to barium-138. This rules out the possibility that the CCF xenon was formed by in situ fission of an extinct superheavy element. Apparently the CCF xenon and its carbonaceous carrier are relics from stellar nucleosynthesis.

  20. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  1. Elevated Z line: a new sign of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Marc S; Ahmad, Nuzhat A; Rubesin, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    We describe an elevated Z line as a new radiographic sign of Barrett's esophagus characterized by a transversely oriented, zigzagging, barium-etched line extending completely across the circumference of the midesophagus. An elevated Z line is rarely seen in other patients, so this finding should be highly suggestive of Barrett's esophagus on double-contrast barium esophagograms. If the patient is a potential candidate for surveillance, endoscopy and biopsy should be performed to confirm the presence of Barrett's esophagus.

  2. Comparison of the reflectance characteristics of polytetrafluoroethylene and barium sulfate paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, C. L.; Schutt, J. B.; Shai, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the directional reflectance measurements taken on two tetrafluorethylene (TFE) paints formulated with silicone binders. Both paints are found to be more Lambertian than barium sulfate paint and pressed powder, although the pigment to binder ratios for barium sulfate and TFE paints are about 133 and 3.3 to 1, respectively. The TFE paints exhibit total visible reflectances above 90 percent and offer surfaces that are not significantly affected by water.

  3. Role of Barium Swallow in Diagnosing Clinically Significant Anastomotic Leak following Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Simon; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Keech, John C.; Bashir, Mohammad; Gruber, Peter J.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Barium swallow is performed following esophagectomy to evaluate the anastomosis for detection of leaks and to assess the emptying of the gastric conduit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the barium swallow study in diagnosing anastomotic leaks following esophagectomy. Methods Patients who underwent esophagectomy from January 2000 to December 2013 at our institution were investigated. Barium swallow was routinely done between days 5–7 to detect a leak. These results were compared to clinically determined leaks (defined by neck wound infection requiring jejunal feeds and or parenteral nutrition) during the postoperative period. The sensitivity and specificity of barium swallow in diagnosing clinically significant anastomotic leaks was determined. Results A total of 395 esophagectomies were performed (mean age, 62.2 years). The indications for the esophagectomy were as follows: malignancy (n=320), high-grade dysplasia (n=14), perforation (n=27), benign stricture (n=7), achalasia (n=16), and other (n=11). A variety of techniques were used including transhiatal (n=351), McKeown (n=35), and Ivor Lewis (n=9) esophagectomies. Operative mortality was 2.8% (n=11). Three hundred and sixty-eight patients (93%) underwent barium swallow study after esophagectomy. Clinically significant anastomotic leak was identified in 36 patients (9.8%). Barium swallow was able to detect only 13/36 clinically significant leaks. The sensitivity of the swallow in diagnosing a leak was 36% and specificity was 97%. The positive and negative predictive values of barium swallow study in detecting leaks were 59% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion Barium swallow is an insensitive but specific test for detecting leaks at the cervical anastomotic site after esophagectomy. PMID:27066433

  4. Kubelka-Munk optical properties of a barium sulfate white reflectance standard.

    PubMed

    Patterson, E M; Shelden, C E; Stockton, B H

    1977-03-01

    We have measured the Kubelka-Munk scattering and absorption coefficients for a barium sulfate white reflectance standard. These measurements have been based on measurements of the absolute reflectance for the particular barium sulfate samples whose scattering and absorption coefficients were measured. This method gives results that are different from earlier measurements; the differences are significant for measurements of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  5. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  6. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  7. Technical development: CT colonography without cathartic cleansing and with barium as the sole tagging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefere, Philippe; Gryspeerdt, Stefaan; Baekelandt, Marc; Van Holsbeeck, Bartel

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform CT colonography (CTC) without cathartic colon cleansing. Four groups of 3 patients were prepared the day before CTC with a dedicated low residue diet, a hydration control allowing 2 liters of fluid intake and barium as tagging agent. Four different barium regimens were investigated. Groups 1 and 3 ingested barium over 1 day at different concentrations and groups 2 and 4 over 2 days. The barium volume to drink the day before CTC was 750 ml in groups 1 and 2 and 50 ml in groups 3 and 4. The fluid, density measurements of the fecal residue and tagging efficacy were evaluated. All fecal residue with densities >= 150 H.U. was electronically labeled. Per segment a visual labeling score (0, 25, 50, 75, 100%) was performed. The fluid was evaluated according to its proportion to the maximum anteroposterior diameter of the colonic segment where it was detected. No significant differences in densities of tagged residue were detected. The visual labeling scores varied between 90 and 100% in all segments. There were 6 fluid levels: 5 covering < 10% and one covering 50% of the colonic lumen. The lowest density of the fluid was 360 H.U. In this preliminary study we could conclude that CTC without cathartic cleansing and with barium produced efficient labeling of fecal residue. The barium intake could be reduced to one day and to 50 ml.

  8. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  9. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

  10. Thermal conversions of the yttrium-barium-copper salt of carboxylated cellulose and the synthesis of yttrium barium cuprate from it

    SciTech Connect

    Kaputskii, F.N.; Bashmakov, I.A.; Novikov, V.P.

    1994-09-20

    Thermal solid-phase conversions of the yttrium-barium-copper salt of tricarboxycellulose (TCC) with a 1-2-3 cation stoichiometry, respectively, have been considered. Yttrium barium cuprate is the end product of the thermal treatment of the triple salt. According to the data of X-ray analysis the onset of 1-2-3 phase formation is noticeable at 750-800{degrees}C. The temperature 875{degrees}C (with a duration of heating of 12 h) is sufficient for practically complete conversion of the Y-Ba-Cu salt of TCC into YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}.

  11. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  12. Steps toward interstellar silicate mineralogy. V. Thermal Evolution of Amorphous Magnesium Silicates and Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, D.; Jäger, C.; Henning, Th.; Dorschner, J.; Mutschke, H.

    2000-12-01

    The thermally induced amorphous-to-crystalline transition has been studied for bulk sheets and micrometre-sized particles of magnesium silicate glass (MgSiO3), nanometre-sized amorphous magnesium silicate (MgSiO3 and Mg2SiO4 smokes) and amorphous silica particles (SiO2). Silicate glass was produced by the shock-quenching of melts. Samples of nanometre-sized smoke particles have been obtained by the laser ablation technique. Both the MgSiO3 and the Mg2SiO4 smokes have been found to consist of two particle species; particles of smaller size ranging in diametre from 10 nm to about 100 nm and bigger size ranging from a few 100 nm to almost 3 micrometres in diametre. Nanometre-sized particles have been shown to be depleted in magnesium whereas the micrometre-sized particles were found to be enriched in Mg. Generally, the particles are composed of nonstoichiometric magnesium silicates with compositions varying even inside of the particles. Frequently, the particles contained internal voids that are assumed to have been formed by thermal shrinkage or outgassing of the particles' interior during cooling. Annealing at 1000 K transformed the magnesium silicate smokes into crystalline forsterite (c-Mg2SiO4), tridymite (a crystalline modification of SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) according to the initial Mg/Si-ratio of the smoke. Crystallization took place within a few hours for the Mg2SiO4 smoke and within one day for the MgSiO3 smoke. The MgSiO3 glass evolved more slowly because crystallization started at the sample surface. It has been annealed at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1165 K. In contrast to the smoke samples, MgSiO3 glass crystallized as orthoenstatite (MgSiO3). Only after 50 hours of annealing at 1000 K, weak indications of forsterite and tridymite formation have been found in the X-ray diffraction spectra. At a temperature of 1000 K, amorphous silica nanoparticles showed distinctly lower rates of thermal evolution compared with the magnesium silicates

  13. SILICATES FOR CORROSION CONTROL IN BUILDING POTABLE WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicates have been used to control the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials. Previous work has shown that they are particularly useful in reducing the release of zinc from galvanized materials in hot water systems. Negatively charged silicate species were re...

  14. Grain properties of crystalline silicate in Oort cloud comets II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline silicate is sometimes observed in comets as an 11.3-micron resonant emission feature, and may be used for probing the early solar nebula. Because the formation of the crystalline silicate grains requires high temperature, they are thought to be born from amorphous silicates at the inner region, and then transported toward the outer region where comets were born. This transportation can produce the difference in the fraction of crystalline silicate in the cometary dust between two dynamical types of comets, Oort-cloud comets (OCs) and Ecliptic comets (ECs), due to the different heliocentric distances of their birth places. Recently, it is suggested that infrared spectra and peak wavelengths of silicate (forsterite) features depend on particle shapes. From this point of view, peak wavelengths of crystalline silicate features in comet spectra are important to investigate the conditions of the crystalline silicate formation in the early solar nebula. Fortunately, we can observe the comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) along with C/2012 X1 (LINEAR) in this semester. In particular, the comet C/2012 K1 is a bright and good target for this silicate peak feature study.

  15. 78 FR 14540 - Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl Sodium... the registration review of cyromazine, silica silicates (silica dioxide and silica gel), glufosinate...). Silica silicates, silicon dioxide and silica gel, are insecticides and acaracides used in...

  16. Laboratory Studies on Silicates Relevant for the Physics of TNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, John Robert; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Baratta, Giuseppe; Mennella, Vito; Colangeli, Luigi

    2003-06-01

    Silicates are one of the principal components present in Solar System objects. Silicates evolve in space modifying their physical properties according to the astronomical environments they go through. To characterise the nature of TNOs in the framework of the formation and evolution of the Solar System, experiments on structural transitions of silicates have been performed in the laboratory to simulate some of the processing suffered by the dust. The infrared spectral properties of possible silicate candidates thought to be present in TNOs have been studied. The results of thermal annealing of amorphous silicates and amorphisation of crystalline forsterite (pure-Mg olivine) by ion irradiation are presented. The observable properties of TNOs surfaces are inferred.

  17. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  18. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  19. The identification of crystalline olivine in cometary silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; Ryan, Eileen V.

    1989-01-01

    An intermediate-resolution spectrum of the 8-13 micron region in comet Halley is obtained which shows a prominent silicate emission feature with structure not observed before in other comets or in interstellar silicates. The presence of a strong 11.3 micron peak reported by Bregman and coworkers is confirmed, and evidence is found for additional structure in the band. By comparison with spectra of interplanetary dust particles and laboratory silicates, it is concluded that small crystalline olivine particles are a major component of the silicates in this comet; other silicates (e.g., amorphous or hydrated) must also be present. The identification of crystalline olivine in this part of the spectrum is supported by the observation of four peaks in 20-50 micron airborne spectra of this comet which have also been attributed to olivine.

  20. Immobilisation of fully sulfonated polyaniline on nanostructured calcium silicate.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, Thomas; Dominis, Anton; McFarlane, Andrew J; Johnston, James H; Richardson, Michael J; Kane-Maguire, Leon A P; Wallace, Gordon G

    2007-12-01

    Up to 7.4% (w/w) of the sulfonated polyaniline, poly(2-methoxyaniline-5-sulfonic acid) (PMAS) can be absorbed onto nanostructured calcium silicates. Spectroscopic and leaching studies on the novel PMAS-silicate nanocomposites obtained indicate that attachment of the PMAS occurs via electrostatic binding of PMAS sulfonate groups to Ca2+ sites on the silicates. The surface area and pore volume of the nanocomposites are comparable to those of pure silicate and increase the surface area of the PMAS polymer by several orders of magnitude. The PMAS emeraldine salt in the nanocomposites retains its chemical reactivity, being readily oxidised and reduced to its pernigraniline and leucoemeraldine forms, respectively. The conductivity of the composite is comparable to that of the pure PMAS, several orders of magnitude higher than that of dried nanostructured calcium silicate.

  1. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in iron meteorites display an astonishing chemical and mineralogical variety, ranging from chondritic to highly fractionated, silica- and alkali-rich assemblages. In spite of this, their origin is commonly considered to be a simple one: mixing of silicates, fractionated or unfractionated, with metal. The latter had to be liquid in order to accommodate the former in a pore-free way which all models accomplish by assuming shock melting. II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions, including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. They also pose a formidable conundrum: young silicates are enclosed by very old metal. This and many other incompatibilities between models and reality forced the formulation of an alternative genetic model for irons. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  2. The identification of crystalline olivine in cometary silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; Ryan, Eileen V.

    1989-01-01

    An intermediate-resolution spectrum of the 8-13 micron region in comet Halley is obtained which shows a prominent silicate emission feature with structure not observed before in other comets or in interstellar silicates. The presence of a strong 11.3 micron peak reported by Bregman and coworkers is confirmed, and evidence is found for additional structure in the band. By comparison with spectra of interplanetary dust particles and laboratory silicates, it is concluded that small crystalline olivine particles are a major component of the silicates in this comet; other silicates (e.g., amorphous or hydrated) must also be present. The identification of crystalline olivine in this part of the spectrum is supported by the observation of four peaks in 20-50 micron airborne spectra of this comet which have also been attributed to olivine.

  3. Defect Chemistry and Microstructure of Complex Perovskite Barium Zinc Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping

    1991-02-01

    This dissertation presents a systematic study of the characterization of the phase transitions, microstructures, defects and transport properties of undoped and doped complex perovskite barium zinc niobate (BZN). Complex perovskite BZN is a paraelectric material while its parent material barium titanate is ferroelectric. With codoping of (Zn + 2Nb) into Ti site, BaTiO_3 shows three distinguished features. First, the Curie temperature is lowered; second, the three phase transitions (cubic-tetragonal-orthorhombic-rhombohedral) coalesce; and lastly, the transition becomes diffuse showing a typical 2nd order phase transition compared with 1st order in undoped BaTiO_3. Complex microchemical ordering is another characteristic of BZN. Stoichiometric BZN shows a mixture of two types of ordering schemes. 1:1, 1:2 ordered microdomains and the disordered matrix co-exist. The 1:1 type ordering involves an internal charge imbalance which inhibits the growth of 1:1 type of ordered microdomains. The 1:2 type ordering is consistent with the chemical composition of BZN. These ordering patterns can be modified by either adjustment of the Zn/Nb ratio or by doping. The defect structure of the stoichiometric BZN is closely related to that of BaTiO_3. Stoichiometric BZN is an insulator with wide band gap (~ 3.70 eV). Undoped BZN has a high oxygen vacancy concentration which comes from three possible sources, such as unavoidable acceptor impurities, due to their natural abundance, Zn/Nb ratio uncertainty due to processing limitations, and high temperature ZnO loss due to sintering process. The oxygen vacancy concentration for undoped BZN lays in the neighborhood of 1500 ppm (atm.). The compensation defects for various dopants have also been identified. Both electrons and holes conduct by a small polaron mechanism. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpies of oxidation and reduction, mass action constants for intrinsic electronic disorder, oxidation and reduction have been

  4. Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Anupriya; Deepa, M K; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-10-01

    A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release

  5. The first barium tin(II) bromide fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dénès, Georges; Merazig, Hocine; Muntasar, Abdualhafeed; Porterfield, Robyn

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to prepare barium tin(II) bromide fluorides for the first time, possibly similar to the chloride fluorides obtained earlier in our laboratory, precipitation reactions were carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of SnF2 and of BaBr2.2H2O. In contrast with the chloride fluoride system, a single powdered phase was obtained throughout the SnF2 - BaBr2 system, with the yield being maximum at X ≈ 0.25, where X is the molar fraction of barium bromide in the reaction mixture. Phase identification with the JCPDS database failed to produce a match, confirming that a new phase had been produced. The exact chemical composition of the new compound has not been obtained yet. Based on the X value for the maximum yield, the Sn/Ba ratio is likely to be 3/1 or 2/1. The Mössbauer spectrum at ambient conditions shows that bonding to tin(II) is covalent, therefore with the tin lone pair being stereoactive. The Mössbauer parameters ( δ = 3.68 mm/s, Δ = 0.99 mm/s) are similar to those of SnBrF and of Sn2BrF5, thereby showing that tin is bonded to both fluorine and bromine. The larger isomer shift and lower quadrupole splitting than in tin(II) fluorides show that the stereoactivity of the tin lone pair is lower than in the fluorides. The Mössbauer parameters fit well the linear correlation of the quadrupole splitting versus the isomer shift" that has been shown to be present in other series of tin(II) compounds. The linear decrease on this correlation shows that the contribution of non-spherical orbitals ( p and d) to the lone pair is a much larger contributor to the quadrupole splitting than lattice distortions. The structure is likely made of Ba2+ cations and tin(II) fluoride bromide polyatomic anions, with covalent bonding withinthe anions.

  6. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  7. Organics Synthesized Using Iron-Grain Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Cody, G. D.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2003-01-01

    We use Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis to produce hydrocarbons by hydrogenating carbon monoxide via catalytic reactions. The products of these reactions have been studied using 'natural' catalysts and calculations of the efficiency of FTT synthesis in the Solar Nebula suggest that these types of reactions could make significant contributions to the composition of material near three AU. We coat Fe-silicate grains with organic material using FTT synthesis to simulate the chemistry in the early Solar Nebula. In our experimental setup, we roughly model a nebular environment where grains are successively transported from hot to cold regions of the nebula. In other words, the starting gases and FTT products are continuously circulated through the grains at high temperature with intervals of cooling. Organics generated in this manner could represent the carbonaceous material incorporated in comets and meteorites. We analyze the resulting organics and present the results.

  8. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  9. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, Mari L.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 Si.sub.4 O.sub.13 pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs.sub.2 O and TiO.sub.2 loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO.sub.2 and Cs.sub.2 that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass.

  10. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, M.L.

    1997-01-07

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 13} pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass. 10 figs.

  11. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  12. Barium from a mini r-process in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.

    1983-01-01

    McCulloch and Wasserburg (1978) have reported nonlinear isotopic anomalies in barium for two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende carbonaceous chondrite, known as EK-1-4-1 and C-1. In an attempt to account for these anomalies, it has been proposed that Ba from an r-process of nucleosynthesis, containing Ba-135 and Ba-137, was injected into the primeval color system but was not totally homogenized. Questions arise in connection with the relations of Xe isotopes in carbonaceous chondrites. This has prompted Heymann and Dziczkaniec (1979, 1980, 1981) to study the formation of r-Xe, r-Kr, and r-Te by the mini r-process which is thought to occur in the O, Ne-rich shells of Type II supernovae. Lee et al. (1979) have studied the formation of r-Ba, r-Nd, and r-Sm by the same process. Certain differences regarding the approaches used by Lee et al. and by Heymann and Dziczkaniec make it necessary to restudy the work of Lee et al. Attention is given to the survival probabilities of nuclear species of interest, taking into accounts the elements Cs, Ba, I, and Xe.

  13. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-19

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} downshifted the Curie temperature (T{sub C}). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, T{sub C} where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Er-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Sm-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Nd-doped BaTiO{sub 3} and Ce-doped BaTiO{sub 3} had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as T{sub C} also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} except for Er-doped BaTiO{sub 3}.

  14. Properties of barium strontium titanate at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Nurul; Free, Charles

    2015-04-24

    The trend towards using higher millimetre-wave frequencies for communication systems has created a need for accurate characterization of materials to be used at these frequencies. Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) is a ferroelectric material whose permittivity is known to change as a function of applied electric field and have found varieties of application in electronic and communication field. In this work, new data on the properties of BST characterize using the free space technique at frequencies between 145 GHz and 155 GHz for both thick film and bulk samples are presented. The measurement data provided useful information on effective permittivity and loss tangent for all the BST samples. Data on the material transmission, reflection properties as well as loss will also be presented. The outcome of the work shows through practical measurement, that BST has a high permittivity with moderate losses and the results also shows that BST has suitable properties to be used as RAM for high frequency application.

  15. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ˜32 MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  16. Communication: Barium ions and helium nanodroplets: Solvation and desolvation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaohang; Drabbels, Marcel

    2012-08-07

    The solvation of Ba{sup +} ions created by the photoionization of barium atoms located on the surface of helium nanodroplets has been investigated. The excitation spectra corresponding to the 6p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} Leftwards-Arrow 6s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} and 6p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} Leftwards-Arrow 6s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} transitions of Ba{sup +} are found to be identical to those recorded in bulk He II [H. J. Reyher, H. Bauer, C. Huber, R. Mayer, A. Schafer, and A. Winnacker, Phys. Lett. A 115, 238 (1986)], indicating that the ions formed at the surface of the helium droplets become fully solvated by the helium. Time-of-flight mass spectra suggest that following the excitation of the solvated Ba{sup +} ions, these are being ejected from the helium droplets either as bare Ba{sup +} ions or as small Ba{sup +}He{sub n} (n < 20) complexes.

  17. Beta Decay Studies of Short Lived Barium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendall, Charles Skipwith

    The half-lives and relative intensities of several short lived neutron rich isotopes, with atomic numbers between 54 and 57, produced in the spontaneous fission of californium-252 were determined. This was accomplished from the study of the time variation of the K X-ray yields of these isotopes. A transport system which allowed us to study isotopes with half-lives less than 10 seconds was developed. Mass assignments were made by comparing the experimental values of the half-lives with known values. A beta K X-ray coincidence technique was used to obtain the barium beta spectrum in coincidence with lanthanum K X -rays. A Kurie plot was performed on the spectrum to determine the beta groups. The probable origin of each beta group was determined through a comparison of the relative intensities of the isotopes and beta groups. Four beta groups probably from the decay of Ba-145 were revealed. The end point energies of these beta groups are 3870 (+OR-) 432 keV, 2772 (+OR-) 112 keV, 1894 (+OR-) 58 keV, and 746 (+OR-) 38 keV. The three lowest energy groups have not been observed before.

  18. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-05-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  19. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-08-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen generation from barium tantalate composites.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Roland; Soldat, Julia; Busser, G Wilma; Wark, Michael

    2013-04-01

    (111)-layered Ba5Ta4O15 photocatalysts were synthesised by a solid state reaction route and a citrate synthesis route, and their structural and electronic properties were investigated. After citrate route preparation, the presence of a second phase, namely Ba3Ta5O15, was determined by X-ray powder diffraction and absorption spectroscopy. The existence of this phase had a profound effect on the photocatalytic activity of this Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composite in comparison to the pure Ba5Ta4O15 materials. The photocatalytic performance of the barium tantalates was evaluated by investigating the capability in ˙OH radical formation and hydrogen generation. Strongly increased hydrogen evolution rates for the Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composite, up to 160% higher than for the pure Ba5Ta4O15, were determined, and only very small amounts of Rh co-catalyst, deposited on the photocatalysts by stepwise reductive photo-deposition, were needed to achieve these results.

  1. Dielectric and Impedance Spectroscopy of Barium Bismuth Vanadate Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutar, B. C.; Choudhary, R. N. P.; Das, Piyush R.

    2014-07-01

    Structural, micro-structural and electrical properties of barium bismuth vanadate Ba(Bi0.5V0.5)O3 ceramics were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the prepared material confirmed the formation of the compound with monoclinic crystal system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the compound exhibits well-defined grains that are uniformly distributed throughout the surface of the sample. Dielectric properties of the compound were studied as a function of temperature at different frequencies. An observation of dielectric anomaly at 295 °C is due to ferroelectric phase transition that was later confirmed by the appearance of hysteresis loop. Detailed studies of complex impedance spectroscopy have provided a better understanding of the relaxation process and correlations between the microstructure-electrical properties of the materials. The nature of frequency dependence of ac conductivity obeys the Debye power law. The dc conductivity, calculated from the ac conductivity spectrum, shows the negative temperature coefficient of resistance behavior similar to that of a semiconductor.

  2. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  3. The chemical composition of the mild barium star HD 202109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, A. V.; Gopka, V. F.; Kim, C.; Liang, Y. C.; Musaev, F. A.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We present chemical abundances of the mild barium star HD 202109 (\\zeta Cyg) determined from the analysis of a spectrum obtained by using the 2-m telescope at the Peak Terskol Observatory and a high-resolution spectrometer with R=80 000, signal to noise ratio >100. We also present the atmospheric parameters of the star determined using various methods including iron-line abundance analysis. For line identifications, we use whole-range synthetic spectra computed from Kurucz's database and the latest lists of spectral lines. Among the determined abundances of 51 elements, those of P, S, K, Cu, Zn, Ge, Rb, Sr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, In, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Hf, Os, Ir, Pt, Tl, and Pb were not investigated previously. Assuming that the overabundance pattern of Ba stars is due to binary accretion, the observed abundance pattern of the neutron-capture process elements in HD 202109 can be explained by combining the AGB star nucleosynthesis and the wind accretion scenario. Based on observations obtained at the 2-m telescope of Peak Terskol observatory near Mt. Elbrus, Northern Caucasus, Russia - International Center for Astronomical, Medical and Ecological Research (ICAMER), Ukraine & Russia.

  4. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  5. Exchange bias in barium ferrite/magnetite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, M. J.; Ataie, A.; Raygan, S.; Picken, S. J.

    2017-06-01

    Exchange bias which accompanies a magnetic hysteresis loop shift along field axis or increase in coercivity, occurs due to exchange interactions between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) or in ferrimagnetic nanoparticles/nanolayers systems. Mixture of barium ferrite (BaFe12O19) and graphite was mechanically milled for different times. Phase analysis, particles morphology, magnetic properties at room temperature and magnetic properties after field cooling at 4 k were measured via XRD, HRTEM, VSM and SQUID, respectively. A nanocomposite of BaFe12O19/Fe3O4 forms after 20 and 40 h of milling. HRTEM images revealed that the nanocomposite consists of crystallites of both phases in intimate contact with crystallite sizes below 20 nm after 20 h milling. Field cooling of the 20- and 40-h milled samples up to 4 k resulted in exchange bias phenomenon. The shift in hysteresis loop for 20- and 40-h milled samples was 204 and 254 Oe, respectively. In spite of the mostly observed exchange coupling systems being ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic systems, in this research the exchange coupling occurred between ferrimagnetic phases. The large difference between coercivity values at 300 and 4 k revealed that superparamagnetic particles constitute a large volume fraction of the milled nanocomposites.

  6. Calcium, Strontium and Barium Homogeneous Catalysts for Fine Chemicals Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Yann; Carpentier, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    The large alkaline earths (Ae), calcium, strontium and barium, have in the past 15 years yielded a brand new generation of heteroleptic molecular catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. However, the integrity of these complexes is often plagued by ligand redistribution equilibria in solution. This personal account retraces the paths followed in our research group towards the design of stable heteroleptic alkalino-earth complexes, including the use of intramolecular noncovalent Ae···H-Si and Ae···F-C interactions. Their implementation as homogenous precatalysts for reactions such as the intramolecular and intermolecular hydroamination and hydrophosphination of activated alkenes, the hydrophosphonylation of ketones, and the dehydrogenative coupling of amines and hydrosilanes that enable the efficient and controlled formations of CP, CN, or SiN σ-bonds, is presented in a synthetic perspective that highlights their overall outstanding catalytic performance. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Thin film barium strontium titanate ferroelectric varactors for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hailing; Spatz, Devin; Wang, Shu; Shin, Eunsung; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-11-01

    Analog phase shifters are investigated with a periodic structure that includes Barium Strontium Titanate ferroelectric thin film varactors in shunt or serial connection to the coplanar waveguide transmission line. The phase shift is achieved by applying a DC bias to the varactors and changing the reactance in the circuit. The goal of this paper is to characterize the shunt capacitive varactors regarding the voltage dependence of the capacitance, loss tangent, and insertion losses at different bias voltages. Quality factor analysis is also conducted taking the parasitic effects into account. Repeated measurements show that the capacitance of a single cell is tuned from 0.8pF to 0.2pF under a DC bias of 0-10V while the loss tangent is kept under 0.01 in the frequency range of 0-40GHz. Insertion loss is tuned from -4dB to less than -0.6dB from 0 to 10V with a Figure of Merit of 14 degrees/dB at 10GHz and the total quality factor of the unit cell is around 6.7 to 10 at 10GHz with matched port impedance. By cascading 10-25 single unit cells, the phase shift is expected to reach 360 degrees with minimum insertion loss.

  8. Abundance analysis of s-process enhanced barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-12-01

    Detailed chemical composition studies of stars with enhanced abundances of neutron-capture elements can provide observational constraints for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis studies and clues for understanding their contribution to the Galactic chemical enrichment. We present abundance results from high-resolution spectral analyses of a sample of four chemically peculiar stars characterized by s-process enhancement. High-resolution spectra (R ˜ 42 000) of these objects spanning a wavelength range from 4000 to 6800 Å are taken from the ELODIE archive. We have estimated the stellar atmospheric parameters, the effective temperature Teff, the surface gravity log g and metallicity [Fe/H] from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres. We report estimates of elemental abundances for several neutron-capture elements, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Dy. While HD 49641 and HD 58368 show [Ba/Fe] ≥ 1.16, the other two objects HD 119650 and HD 191010 are found to be mild barium stars with [Ba/Fe] ˜ 0.4. The derived abundances of the elements are interpreted on the basis of existing theories for understanding their origin and evolution.

  9. High-pressure phase transition observed in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Klug, Dennis D.

    2007-08-01

    The pressure-dependent structural and vibrational properties of barium hydride have been studied up to 22 GPa at room temperature by means of powder x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations. At ambient conditions, BaH2 crystallizes in the cotunnite structure (Pnma). A reversible, first-order structural phase transition is observed at 1.6 GPa. The high-pressure phase can be indexed by a hexagonal unit cell with a proposed Ni2In structure (P63/mmc), with the Ba and H atoms in special positions. The experimental volume compression of the high-pressure phase yields an isothermal bulk modulus B0=24(1) GPa (B0' fixed at 4.13). This compares favorably with the results of the first-principles calculations, which reproduce the first-order nature of the transition. The relevance of these results is discussed in the contexts of metal hydrides in particular and ionic AX2(A =metal) compounds in general.

  10. Facile growth of barium oxide nanorods: structural and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naushad; Wahab, Rizwan; Alam, Manawwer

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports a large-scale synthesis of barium oxide nanorods (BaO-NRs) by simple solution method at a very low-temperature of - 60 degrees C. The as-grown BaO-NRs were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural, compositional, optical and thermal properties. The morphological characterizations of as-synthesized nanorods were done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) which confirmed that the synthesized products are rod shaped and grown in high density. The nanorods exhibits smooth and clean surfaces throughout their lengths. The crystalline property of the material was analyzed with X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The compositional and thermal properties of synthesized nanorods were observed via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis which confirmed that the synthesized nanorods are pure BaO and showed good thermal stability. The nanorods exhibited good optical properties as was confirmed from the room-temperature UV-vis spectroscopy. Finally, a plausible mechanism for the formation of BaO-NRs is also discussed in this paper.

  11. Small Polarons and Point Defects in Barium Cerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Michael; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2015-03-01

    Barium cerate (BaCeO3) is a well-known proton-conducting material. In applications, it is frequently doped (for instance with yttrium) to increase stability and promote hydrogen uptake. However, the microscopic mechanisms of ionic conductivity and the effects of doping and native defects are still not fully understood. Many of the obstacles to the theoretical study of this material stem from the nature of the conduction band, which is made up of cerium 4 f states. These states present a challenge to first-principles techniques based on density functional theory within the standard approximations for exchange and correlation. Using a hybrid functional, we investigate the effects of hydrogen impurities and native defects on the electrical and optical properties of BaCeO3. We discuss the tendency of excess electrons or holes to localize in the form of small polarons. We also explore the interactions of polarons with hydrogen impurities and oxygen vacancies, and their impact on luminescence properties. This work was supported by the DOE and ARO.

  12. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-28

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ~32 MPa. We discuss results in the context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  13. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  14. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z = 0.89 Absorber toward PKS 1830-211: Crystalline Silicates at High Redshift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Welty, Daniel E.; Som, Debopam

    2012-03-01

    We present evidence of a >10σ detection of the 10 μm silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of τ10 = 0.27 ± 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  15. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  16. Evidence for a Late Reducing Event in IAB-Silicate Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seckendorff, V. V.; O'Neill, H. St. C.; Zipfel, J.; Palme, H.

    1992-07-01

    Coexisting orthopyroxene (opx) and olivine (ol) in silicate inclusions of IAB-iron meteorites have different Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios. Ferrosilite (fs) contents of opx are higher than fayalite contents (fa) of ol (e.g., Bunch and Keil 1970). Non-ideal solid solution of fs in opx and/or fa in ol is generally assumed. We reinvestigated the equilibrium Fe-Mg distribution between coexisting ol+opx in the system MgO-FeO-SiO2 (von Seckendorff and O'Neill 1992). Reversal experiments at high- Mg compositions were performed from 900 to 1600 degrees C at 16 and 20 kbar using a barium borosilicate flux. The data could be fitted to a simple thermodynamic model with ol and opx treated as regular solutions and this model was found to describe satisfactorily the literature data extending down to 700 degrees C. For Fe/(Fe+Mg) between 0.05 to 0.15 we find KD^ol-opx close to one from 1600 to 700 degrees C, virtually independent of pressure and temperature. Fig. 1 shows experimental results at the Mg-rich end. Error bars mark 1-sigma standard deviations. Ol is in all cases more Fe-rich than coexisting opx, except for a single run at 1000 degrees C that probably did not reach equilibrium because of slow reaction kinetics. Two calculated distribution curves (1300, 700 degrees C at 16 kbar) lie close together indicating the absence of any significant temperature dependence of the exchange reaction at the Mg- rich end of the system. IAB-silicate inclusions plot outside the range of experimental data (Fig. 1). Although some previous models for Fe-Mg exchange between ol and opx (e.g., Sack 1980) extrapolate to KD<1 at temperatures near 500 degrees C, such models reproduce the experimental data (700 to 1600 degrees C) less well, than our updated model. In addition, temperatures at 500 degrees C are probably too low to allow Fe diffusion in opx. Two pyroxene equilibration temperatures of IAB-silicate inclusions are around 900-1000 degrees C suggesting a similar closure temperature for Fe diffusion

  17. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  18. Characterization of chitin-metal silicates as binding superdisintegrants.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Iyad; Daraghmeh, Nidal; Al-Remawi, Mayyas; Leharne, Stephen A; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Badwan, Adnan

    2009-12-01

    When chitin is used in pharmaceutical formulations, processing of chitin with metal silicates is advantageous, from both an industrial and pharmaceutical perspective, compared to processing using silicon dioxide. Unlike the use of acidic and basic reagents for the industrial preparation of chitin-silica particles, coprecipitation of metal silicates is dependent upon a simple replacement reaction between sodium silicate and metal chlorides. When coprecipitated onto chitin particles, aluminum, magnesium, or calcium silicates result in nonhygroscopic, highly compactable/disintegrable compacts. Disintegration and hardness parameters for coprocessed chitin compacts were investigated and found to be independent of the particle size. Capillary action appears to be the major contributor to both water uptake and the driving force for disintegration of compacts. The good compaction and compression properties shown by the chitin-metal silicates were found to be strongly dependent upon the type of metal silicate coprecipitated onto chitin. In addition, the inherent binding and disintegration abilities of chitin-metal silicates are useful in pharmaceutical applications when poorly compressible and/or highly nonpolar drugs need to be formulated.

  19. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; MacKinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-11-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  20. Reagentless and calibrationless silicate measurement in oceanic waters.

    PubMed

    Giraud, William; Lesven, Ludovic; Jońca, Justyna; Barus, Carole; Gourdal, Margaux; Thouron, Danièle; Garçon, Véronique; Comtat, Maurice

    2012-08-15

    Determination of silicate concentration in seawater without addition of liquid reagents was the key prerequisite for developing an autonomous in situ electrochemical silicate sensor (Lacombe et al., 2007) [11]. The present challenge is to address the issue of calibrationless determination. To achieve such an objective, we chose chronoamperometry performed successively on planar microelectrode (ME) and ultramicroelectrode (UME) among the various possibilities. This analytical method allows estimating simultaneously the diffusion coefficient and the concentration of the studied species. Results obtained with ferrocyanide are in excellent agreement with values of the imposed concentration and diffusion coefficient found in the literature. For the silicate reagentless method, successive chronoamperometric measurements have been performed using a pair of gold disk electrodes for both UME and ME. Our calibrationless method was tested with different concentrations of silicate in artificial seawater from 55 to 140×10(-6) mol L(-1). The average value obtained for the diffusion coefficient of the silicomolybdic complex is 2.2±0.4×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), consistent with diffusion coefficient values of molecules in liquid media. Good results were observed when comparing known concentration of silicate with experimentally derived ones. Further work is underway to explore silicate determination within the lower range of oceanic silicate concentration, down to 0.1×10(-6) mol L(-1).

  1. Magnetic fabric interpretation complicated by inclusions in mafic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagroix, France; Borradaile, Graham J.

    2000-10-01

    The expected relationships between anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and crystal symmetry of mafic silicates are disturbed by the presence of magnetite inclusions. Measurements of AMS, anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence (AARM) and theoretically predicted bulk susceptibilities from chemical composition all favour the exercise of great caution in the interpretation of preferred orientation distributions of silicates from a rock's AMS. These results pertain mainly to the mafic silicates of lower crustal rocks (pyroxene, orthopyroxene, amphibole) and some of their low-grade metamorphic alterations (serpentine, epidote).

  2. Silicate nephrolithiasis after ingestion of supplements containing silica dioxide.

    PubMed

    Flythe, Jennifer E; Rueda, Jose F; Riscoe, Michael K; Watnick, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Silicate calculi are common in some mammals, such as dogs and sheep, but extremely rare in humans. We report a case of silicate calculi in a woman using oral over-the-counter Uncaria tomentosa, Digestive Advantage and FlexProtex supplements. All 3 contained the excipient silica dioxide. Stone analysis showed composition of 100% silicate. The nephrolithiasis promptly abated after discontinuation of the products containing silica, then returned when the patient restarted her supplements. This case emphasizes the importance of stone analysis when obvious causes of nephrolithiasis are unclear and highlights the concerns of using over-the-counter supplements without substantial oversight.

  3. Microstructures of Rare Silicate Stardust from Nova and Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S

    2011-01-01

    Most silicate stardust analyzed in the laboratory and observed around stellar environments derives from O-rich red giant and AGB stars [1,2]. Supernova (SN) silicates and oxides are comparatively rare, and fewer than 10 grains from no-va or binary star systems have been identified to date. Very little is known about dust formation in these stellar environments. Mineralogical studies of only three O-rich SN [3-5] and no nova grains have been performed. Here we report the microstructure and chemical makeup of two SN silicates and one nova grain.

  4. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  5. Sensitized photoluminescence of erbium silicate synthesized on porous silicon framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Xu, Lingbo; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2017-09-01

    Er silicate/porous silicon (PS) composites with effective sensitized erbium emission at 1.53 μm have been synthesized on the PS framework. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction reveal that the PS is coated by Er silicate in composites. Indirect excitation of Er3+ ion luminescence via energy transfer from PS is confirmed. The temperature dependence of Er-related photoluminescence intensity and lifetime is investigated, which concludes a phonon-mediated energy transfer process. The combination of the PS framework and Er silicate provides a possible strategy for practical silicon-based light sources.

  6. Thermally responsive aqueous silicate mixtures and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Vinson, E.F.

    1987-02-03

    A method is described of plugging or sealing a zone in a subterranean formation comprising: (a) contacting the zone with an aqueous silicate composition consisting essentially of (i) an aqueous solution containing an alkali metal silicate; and, (ii) a thermally responsive gelation activator selected from the group consisting of lactose, dextrose, fructose, galactose, mannose, mantose, xylose and mixtures thereof; and (b) activating the gelation activator in response to a thermal change in the composition within the formation whereby the silicate composition is caused to form a gel in the zone.

  7. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  8. High pressure–low temperature phase diagram of barium: Simplicity versus complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Desgreniers, Serge; Tse, John S.; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-11-30

    Barium holds a distinctive position among all elements studied upon densification. Indeed, it was the first example shown to violate the long-standing notion that high compression of simple metals should preserve or yield close-packed structures. From modest pressure conditions at room temperature, barium transforms at higher pressures from its simple structures to the extraordinarily complex atomic arrangements of the incommensurate and self-hosting Ba-IV phases. By a detailed mapping of the pressure/temperature structures of barium, we demonstrate the existence of another crystalline arrangement of barium, Ba-VI, at low temperature and high pressure. The simple structure of Ba-VI is unlike that of complex Ba-IV, the phase encountered in a similar pressure range at room temperature. First-principles calculations predict Ba-VI to be stable at high pressure and superconductive. The results illustrate the complexity of the low temperature-high pressure phase diagram of barium and the significant effect of temperature on structural phase transformations.

  9. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  10. Barium Tagging in Solid Xenon for the nEXO Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Christopher; Craycraft, Adam; Walton, Timothy; Fairbank, William; nEXO Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The proposed nEXO experiment utilizes a tonne-scale liquid xenon time projection chamber to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in xenon-136. Positive observation of this decay would determine the nature of the neutrino to be a MAJORANA particle, as well as measure the absolute neutrino mass scale. A critical concern for any rare decay search is reducing or eliminating backgrounds that cannot be distinguished from signal. A powerful background discrimination technique is positive identification of the daughter atom of the decay, in this case barium. This technique, called ``barium tagging'' may be available for a second phase of nEXO operation, allowing for neutrino mass sensitivity beyond the inverted mass hierarchy. Development is underway on a scheme to capture the barium daughter in solid xenon with a cryogenic probe and detect the barium by laser-induced fluorescence inside the solid xenon sample. This presentation reports results on imaging of single barium atoms frozen in a solid xenon matrix, as well as the progress on the freezing and removal of a solid xenon sample from liquid xenon. Graduated.

  11. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  12. [Comparative analysis chest CT 3D reconstruction and esophagus barium swallow in esophagus foreign body].

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Chu, Hanqi; Huang, Xiaowen; Cui, Yonghua

    2010-06-01

    To compare the diagnosis and therapeutic between chest computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction and esophagus barium swallow in esophagus foreign body. retrospective analyze one hundred and thirty six patients who suffered from esophagus foreign body in our hospital, 97 cases using esophagus barium swallow, 17 cases using chest computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction, 15 cases using both. The patients who showed positive of esophagus foreign body in esophagus barium swallow or chest computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction, 91.8% (89/97) cases or 88.2% (15/17) cases found esophagus foreign bodies finally. All cases successfully took out the esophagus foreign bodies only through one operation which used chest computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction as primary examination, while only 91.0% for those used esophagus barium swallow as primary examination. Both chest computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction and esophagus barium swallow showed high diagnostic efficiency on esophagus foreign body. Chest computed tomography three-dimensional reconstruction had advantages in patients with one of following conditions: (1) esophagus foreign body located in the middle of the esophagus, especially complicated with esophagus perforation; (2) with fever, high white blood count, presence of abscess surrounding the esophagus was suspected; (3) with dyspnea; (4) with a history of esophagus foreign body longer than 5 days; (5) younger than 6 years old.

  13. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  14. Shear-Induced Fragmentation in Silicic Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Manga, M.

    2003-12-01

    Fragmentation of magma, containing abundant gas bubbles, is considered as the defining characteristic of explosive eruptions. When viscous stresses associated with the growth of bubbles and the flow of the ascending magma exceed the strength of the melt, it breaks into disconnected fragments suspended within an expanding gas phase. While repeated effusive and explosive eruptions for individual volcanoes are common, the dynamics governing the transition between explosive and effusive eruptions remain unclear. Magmas for both types of eruptions originate from sources with similar volatile content, yet effusive lavas erupt considerably more degassed than their explosive counterparts. Recent observations suggest that magma fragmentation may not be restricted to explosive eruptions and we find corroborating evidence of magma fragmentation, reannealing and elongation of fragments into flow banding from obsidians from Big Glass Mountain rhyolite dome, California. One mechanism for degassing during magma ascent is the generation of intermittent permeable fracture networks through non-explosive fragmentation near the conduit walls. To gain insight into the mechanics governing fragmentation in silicic volcanoes, we have developed a numerical model for magma ascent in the volcanic conduit. The ascending magma (melt + bubbles) is modelled as steady, isothermal flow of a single-phase liquid at constant mass flux in a cylindrical conduit of constant radius. We specify a pressure, number density of bubbles, and relaxed Newtonian melt viscosity at the base of the conduit and solve the joint problem of bubble growth and magma ascent. Rather than include the transition to fragmentation and flow of fragmented magma, we determine the ascent distance above the conduit entry at which magma fragmentation by viscous shear should first occur. The model is quasi-one-dimensional and for a given depth computes the radially varying vertical component of magma velocity. We show that shear

  15. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  16. Relaxor properties of barium titanate crystals grown by Remeika method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Michel; Tiagunov, Jenia; Dul'kin, Evgeniy; Mojaev, Evgeny

    2017-06-01

    Barium titanate (BaTiO3, BT) crystals have been grown by the Remeika method using both the regular KF and mixed KF-NaF (0.6-0.4) solvents. Typical acute angle ;butterfly wing; BT crystals have been obtained, and they were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy), conventional dielectric and acoustic emission methods. A typical wing has a triangular plate shape which is up to 0.5 mm thick with a 10-15 mm2 area. The plate has a (001) habit and an atomically smooth outer surface. Both K+ and F- solvent ions are incorporated as dopants into the crystal lattice during growth substituting for Ba2+ and O2- ions respectively. The dopants' distribution is found to be inhomogeneous, their content being almost an order of magnitude higher (up to 2 mol%) at out surface of the plate relatively to the bulk. A few μm thick surface layer is formed where a multidomain ferroelectric net is confined between two≤1 μm thick dopant-rich surfaces. The layer as a whole possess relaxor ferroelectric properties, which is apparent from the appearance of additional broad maxima, Tm, in the temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity around the ferroelectric phase transition. Intense acoustic emission responses detected at temperatures corresponding to the Tm values allow to observe the Tm shift to lower temperatures at higher frequencies, or dispersion, typical for relaxor ferroelectrics. The outer surface of the BT wing can thus serve as a relaxor thin film for various electronic application, such as capacitors, or as a substrate for BT-based multiferroic structure. Crystals grown from KF-NaF fluxes contain sodium atoms as an additional impurity, but the crystal yield is much smaller, and while the ferroelectric transition peak is diffuse it does not show any sign of dispersion typical for relaxor behavior.

  17. TWO BARIUM STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 5822

    SciTech Connect

    Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; De Castro, D. B. E-mail: claudio@on.br

    2013-08-01

    Open clusters are very useful examples to explain the constraint of the nucleosynthesis process with the luminosities of stars because the distances of the clusters are better known than those of field stars. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the chemical composition of two red giants in the young open cluster NGC 5822, NGC 5822-2, and NGC 5822-201. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that NGC 5822-2 and -201 have, respectively, a mean overabundance of the elements created by the s-process, ''s'', with the notation [s/Fe] of 0.77 {+-} 0.12 and 0.83 {+-} 0.05. These values are higher than those for field giants of similar metallicity. We also found that NGC 5822-2 and -201 have, respectively, luminosities of 140 L{sub Sun} and 76 L{sub Sun }, which are much lower than the luminosity of an asymptotic giant branch star. We conclude that NGC 5822-2 and NGC 5822-201 are two new barium stars first identified in the open cluster NGC 5822. The mass transfer hypothesis is the best scenario to explain the observed overabundances.

  18. Strontium barium niobate single crystals, growth and ferroelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukasiewicz, T.; Swirkowicz, M. A.; Dec, J.; Hofman, W.; Szyrski, W.

    2008-04-01

    Single crystals of strontium-barium niobate Sr xBa 1-xNb 2O 6 (SBN) undoped and doped with Ce or Cr were grown by the Czochralski method. The inductive heating system was used. In order to improve conditions of growth, a crucible-base cooling was introduced. Single crystals of the following nominal compositions have been obtained: Sr 0.4Ba 0.6Nb 2O 6, Sr 0.5Ba 0.5Nb 2O 6, Sr 0.61Ba 0.39Nb 2O 6 (congruent melting) and Sr 0.75Ba 0.25Nb 2O 6, designated hereafter as SBN40, SBN50, SBN61 and SBN75. They were up to 22 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length with characteristic 24 faces, free from striations and other extended defects. All the crystals were grown in the [0 0 1] direction. The dopants (Ce or Cr) were added to the SBN61 composition. By use of ICP-OES method, the chemical compositions were checked. Etch pit density was also measured. In the case of the undoped single crystals, it was found to be 2.4×10 2-5.6×10 3 cm -2 but in the case of Ce or Cr doping, it increased up to 3.6×10 4-1.8×10 5 cm -2. Investigations of the linear dielectric response measured within 10 0⩽ f⩽10 5 Hz along the polar c-axis of four obtained single-crystalline SBN compounds revealed a gradual crossover from conventional ferroelectric (SBN40) to extreme relaxor (SBN75) behavior.

  19. Electrical properties of niobium doped barium bismuth-titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bobić, J.D.; Vijatović Petrović, M.M.; Banys, J.; Stojanović, B.D.

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Pure and doped BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} were prepared via the solid-state reaction method. ► The grain size was suppressed in Nb-doped samples. ► The diffuseness of the dielectric peak increased with dopant concentration. ► Niobium affected on relaxor behavior of barium bismuth titanate ceramics. ► The conductivity change was noticed in doped samples. -- Abstract: BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4–5/4x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 15} (BBNTx, x = 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.30) ceramics have been prepared by solid state method. XRD data indicate the formation of single-phase-layered perovskites for all compositions. SEM micrographs suggest that the grain size decreases with Nb doping. The effect of niobium doping on the dielectric and relaxor behavior of BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} ceramics was investigated in a wide range of temperatures (20–777 °C) and frequencies (1.21 kHz to 1 MHz). Nb doping influences T{sub c} decrease as well as the decrease of dielectric permittivity at Curie temperature. At room temperature, undoped BaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} exhibits dielectric constant of ∼204 at 100 kHz, that slightly increases with Nb doping. The conductivity of BBNT5 ceramics is found to be lower than that of other investigated compositions. The value of activation energy of σ{sub DC} was found to be 0.89 eV, 1.01 eV, 0.93 eV and 0.71 eV for BBT, BBNT5, BBNT15 and BBNT30, respectively.

  20. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of Barium Zirconate Titanate (BZT) nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Simin; Aghayan, Mahdi; Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Behdani, Mohammad; Asoodeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    So far, the antibacterial activity of some organic and inorganic compounds has been studied. Barium zirconate titanate [Ba(ZrxTi₁-x)O₃] (x = 0.05) nanoparticle is an example of inorganic materials. In vitro studies have provided evidence for the antibacterial activity of this nanoparticle. In the current study, the nano-powder was synthesized by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction showed that the powder was single-phase and had a perovskite structure at the calcination temperature of 1000 °C. Antibacterial activity of the desired nanoparticle was assessed on two gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431 and Micrococcus luteus PTCC1625) and two gram-negative (Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c and clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria according to Radial Diffusion Assay (RDA). The results showed that the antibacterial activity of BZT nano-powder on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was acceptable. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this nano-powder was determined. The results showed that MIC values for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus were about 2.3 μg/mL, 7.3 μg/mL, 3 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was also evaluated and showed that the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus could be decreased at 2.3, 14, 3 and 18 μg/mL of BZT. Average log reduction in viable bacteria count in time-kill assay ranged between 6 Log₁₀ cfu/mL to zero after 24 h of incubation with BZT nanoparticle.