Science.gov

Sample records for barrier energy difference

  1. Fusion of Si28+Si28,30: Different trends at sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnoli, G.; Stefanini, A. M.; Esbensen, H.; Jiang, C. L.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Fioretto, E.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Jia, H. M.; Mazzocco, M.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Montanari, D.; Parascandolo, C.; Scarlassara, F.; Strano, E.; Szilner, S.; Torresi, D.

    2014-10-01

    Background: The fusion excitation function of the system Si28+Si28 at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier is known only down to ≃15 mb. This precludes any information on both coupling effects on sub-barrier cross sections and the possible appearance of hindrance. For Si28+Si30 even if the fusion cross section is measured down to ≃50 μb, the evidence of hindrance is marginal. Both systems have positive fusion Q values. While Si28 has a deformed oblate shape, Si30 is spherical. Purpose: We investigate 1. the possible influence of the different structure of the two Si isotopes on the fusion excitation functions in the deep sub-barrier region and 2. whether hindrance exists in the Si+Si systems and whether it is strong enough to generate an S-factor maximum, thus allowing a comparison with lighter heavy-ion systems of astrophysical interest. Methods: Si28 beams from the XTU Tandem accelerator of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro were used. The setup was based on an electrostatic beam separator, and fusion evaporation residues (ER) were detected at very forward angles. Angular distributions of ER were measured. Results: Fusion cross sections of Si28+Si28 have been obtained down to ≃600 nb. The slope of the excitation function has a clear irregularity below the barrier, but no indication of a S-factor maximum is found. For Si28+Si30 the previous data have been confirmed and two smaller cross sections have been measured down to ≃4 μb. The trend of the S-factor reinforces the previous weak evidence of hindrance. Conclusions: The sub-barrier cross sections for Si28+Si28 are overestimated by coupled-channels calculations based on a standard Woods-Saxon potential, except for the lowest energies. Calculations using the M3Y+repulsion potential are adjusted to fit the Si28+Si28 and the existing Si30+Si30 data. An additional weak imaginary potential (probably simulating the effect of the oblate Si28 deformation) is required to fit the low-energy trend of

  2. Specific Barriers and Drivers in Different Stages of Decision-Making about Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Private Homes

    PubMed Central

    Klöckner, Christian A.; Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades of privately owned homes like adding to the insulation layers in the walls, roof or floor, or replacing windows with more efficiently insulated versions can contribute significantly to reducing the energy impact of the building sector and thus also the CO2 footprint of a household. However, even in countries like Norway that have a rather high rate of renovation, energy upgrades are not always integrated into such a refurbishment project. This study tests which structural and internal psychological barriers hinder and which drivers foster decision-making to implement such measures, once a renovation project is planned. With a theoretical background in stage-based models of decision-making 24 barriers and drivers were tested for their specific effect in the stages of decision-making. The four stages of decision-making assumed in this study were (1) “not being in a decision mode,” (2) “deciding what to do,” (3) “deciding how to do it,” and (4) “planning implementation.” Based on an online survey of 3787 Norwegian households, it was found that the most important barriers toward deciding to implement energy efficiency upgrades were not owning the dwelling and feeling the right time had not come yet. The most important drivers of starting to decide were higher expected comfort levels, better expected living conditions, and an expected reduction of energy costs. For the transition from deciding what to do to how to do it, not managing to make a decision and feeling the right point in time has not come yet were the strongest barriers, easily accessible information and an expected reduction of energy costs were the most important drivers. The final transition from deciding how to do the upgrades to planning implementation was driven by expecting a payoff within a reasonable time frame and higher expected comfort levels; the most important barriers were time demands for supervising contractors and—again—a feeling that the right

  3. Specific Barriers and Drivers in Different Stages of Decision-Making about Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Private Homes.

    PubMed

    Klöckner, Christian A; Nayum, Alim

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades of privately owned homes like adding to the insulation layers in the walls, roof or floor, or replacing windows with more efficiently insulated versions can contribute significantly to reducing the energy impact of the building sector and thus also the CO2 footprint of a household. However, even in countries like Norway that have a rather high rate of renovation, energy upgrades are not always integrated into such a refurbishment project. This study tests which structural and internal psychological barriers hinder and which drivers foster decision-making to implement such measures, once a renovation project is planned. With a theoretical background in stage-based models of decision-making 24 barriers and drivers were tested for their specific effect in the stages of decision-making. The four stages of decision-making assumed in this study were (1) "not being in a decision mode," (2) "deciding what to do," (3) "deciding how to do it," and (4) "planning implementation." Based on an online survey of 3787 Norwegian households, it was found that the most important barriers toward deciding to implement energy efficiency upgrades were not owning the dwelling and feeling the right time had not come yet. The most important drivers of starting to decide were higher expected comfort levels, better expected living conditions, and an expected reduction of energy costs. For the transition from deciding what to do to how to do it, not managing to make a decision and feeling the right point in time has not come yet were the strongest barriers, easily accessible information and an expected reduction of energy costs were the most important drivers. The final transition from deciding how to do the upgrades to planning implementation was driven by expecting a payoff within a reasonable time frame and higher expected comfort levels; the most important barriers were time demands for supervising contractors and-again-a feeling that the right point in time has

  4. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the ``barriers`` literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  5. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the barriers'' literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  6. Energy barriers, entropy barriers, and non-Arrhenius behavior in a minimal glassy model.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Weeks, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    We study glassy dynamics using a simulation of three soft Brownian particles confined to a two-dimensional circular region. If the circular region is large, the disks freely rearrange, but rearrangements are rarer for smaller system sizes. We directly measure a one-dimensional free-energy landscape characterizing the dynamics. This landscape has two local minima corresponding to the two distinct disk configurations, separated by a free-energy barrier that governs the rearrangement rate. We study several different interaction potentials and demonstrate that the free-energy barrier is composed of a potential-energy barrier and an entropic barrier. The heights of both of these barriers depend on temperature and system size, demonstrating how non-Arrhenius behavior can arise close to the glass transition.

  7. Barriers to electric energy efficiency in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berko, Joseph Kofi, Jr.

    Development advocates argue that sustainable development strategies are the best means to permanently improve living standards in developing countries. Advocates' arguments are based on the technical, financial, and environmental advantages of sustainable development. However, they have not addressed the organizational and administrative decision-making issues which are key to successful implementation of sustainable development in developing countries. Using the Ghanaian electricity industry as a case study, this dissertation identifies and analyzes organizational structures, administrative mechanisms, and decision-maker viewpoints that critically affect the success of adoption and implementation of energy efficiency within a sustainable development framework. Utilizing semi-structured interviews in field research, decision-makers' perceptions of the pattern of the industry's development, causes of the electricity supply shortfall, and barriers to electricity-use efficiency were identified. Based on the initial findings, the study formulated a set of policy initiatives to establish support for energy use efficiency. In a second set of interviews, these policy suggestions were presented to some of the top decision-makers to elicit their reactions. According to the decision-makers, the electricity supply shortfall is due to rapid urbanization and increased industrial consumption as a result of the structural adjustment program, rural electrification, and the sudden release of suppressed loads. The study found a lack of initiative and collaboration among industry decision-makers, and a related divergence in decision-makers' concerns and viewpoints. Also, lacking are institutional support systems and knowledge of proven energy efficiency strategies and technologies. As a result, planning, and even the range of perceived solutions to choose from are supply-side oriented. The final chapter of the study presents implications of its findings and proposes that any

  8. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  9. Only Above Barrier Energy Components Contribute to Barrier Traversal Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galapon, Eric A.

    2012-04-01

    A time of arrival operator across a square potential barrier is constructed. The expectation value of the barrier time of arrival operator for a sufficiently localized incident wave packet is compared with the expectation value of the free particle time of arrival operator for the same wave packet. The comparison yields an expression for the expected traversal time across the barrier. It is shown that only the above barrier components of the momentum distribution of the incident wave packet contribute to the barrier traversal time, implying that below the barrier components are transmitted without delay. This is consistent with the recent experiment in attosecond ionization in helium indicating that there is no real tunneling delay time [P. Eckle , Science 322, 1525 (2008)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1163439].

  10. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions.

  11. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Recently, important progresses have been made towards the development of high capacity rockfall barriers (100 kJ - 8000 kJ). The interest of researchers and practitioners is now turning to the development of fences of minor capacity, whose use becomes essential in areas where rockfall events generally have low intensity and the use of high capacity barriers would be accompanied by excessive costs and high environmental impact. Low energy barriers can also provide a cost-effective solution even in areas where high energies events are expected. Results of full-scale tests are vital to any investigation on the behaviour of these structures. An experimental set-up has been developed at The University of Newcastle (AUS), to investigate the response of low energy rockfall barrier prototypes to low energy impacts. The Australian territory, and in particular New South Wales, is in fact characterised by rockfall events of low-to-medium intensity (50 kJ - 500 kJ) and the need of protection structures working within such energy range, is particularly felt [1]. The experiments involved the impact of a test block onto three spans, low energy barrier prototypes, made of steel structural posts, fully fixed at the base, side cables and a steel meshwork constituted by a double twist hexagonal wire net [2]. Test data enabled the development, calibration and assessment of FE models [3], on which non-linear and dynamic analyses have been performed addressing the effect of the block size. Results have shown that the response of the structure is strongly governed by the net. Data from tests conducted on the sole net and on the entire barrier showed in fact a similar trend, different to what typically observed for high capacity barriers, whose behaviour is also led by the presence of uphill cables and brakes. In particular, the numerical analyses have demonstrated a dependence of the net performance on the block size. In particular, a loss of capacity in the order of 50% occurred as the

  12. Free energy barriers to evaporation of water in hydrophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-11-08

    We use umbrella sampling Monte Carlo and forward and reverse forward flux sampling (FFS) simulation techniques to compute the free energy barriers to evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of the gap width, at 1 bar and 298 K. The evaporation mechanism for small (1 × 1 nm(2)) surfaces is found to be fundamentally different from that for large (3 × 3 nm(2)) surfaces. In the latter case, the evaporation proceeds via the formation of a gap-spanning tubular cavity. The 1 × 1 nm(2) surfaces, in contrast, are too small to accommodate a stable vapor cavity. Accordingly, the associated free energy barriers correspond to the formation of a critical-sized cavity for sufficiently large confining surfaces, and to complete emptying of the gap region for small confining surfaces. The free energy barriers to evaporation were found to be of O(20kT) for 14 Å gaps, and to increase by approximately ~5kT with every 1 Å increase in the gap width. The entropy contribution to the free energy of evaporation was found to be independent of the gap width.

  13. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This study also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  14. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Report to Congress, June 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these barriers. Three groups of energy efficiency technologies and measures were examined: industrial end-use energy efficiency, industrial demand response, and industrial combined heat and power. This report also includes the estimated economic benefits from hypothetical Federal energy efficiency matching grants, as directed by the Act.

  15. Nontechnical Barriers to Solar Energy Use: Review of Recent Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.; Zuboy, J.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews the nontechnical barriers to solar energy use, drawing on recent literature to help identify key barriers that must be addressed as part of the Technology Acceptance efforts under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar America Initiative. A broad literature search yielded more than 400 references, which were narrowed to 19 recent documents on nontechnical barriers to the use of solar energy and other energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) technologies. Some of the most frequently identified barriers included lack of government policy supporting EE/RE, lack of information dissemination and consumer awareness about energy and EE/RE, high cost of solar and other EE/RE technologies compared with conventional energy, and inadequate financing options for EE/RE projects.

  16. Parametric modeling of energy filtering by energy barriers in thermoelectric nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zianni, Xanthippi E-mail: xzianni@gmail.com; Narducci, Dario

    2015-01-21

    We present a parametric modeling of the thermoelectric transport coefficients based on a model previously used to interpret experimental measurements on the conductivity, σ, and Seebeck coefficient, S, in highly Boron-doped polycrystalline Si, where a very significant thermoelectric power factor (TPF) enhancement was observed. We have derived analytical formalism for the transport coefficients in the presence of an energy barrier assuming thermionic emission over the barrier for (i) non-degenerate and (ii) degenerate one-band semiconductor. Simple generic parametric equations are found that are in agreement with the exact Boltzmann transport formalism in a wide range of parameters. Moreover, we explore the effect of energy barriers in 1-d composite semiconductors in the presence of two phases: (a) the bulk-like phase and (b) the barrier phase. It is pointed out that significant TPF enhancement can be achieved in the composite structure of two phases with different thermal conductivities. The TPF enhancement is estimated as a function of temperature, the Fermi energy position, the type of scattering, and the barrier height. The derived modeling provides guidance for experiments and device design.

  17. Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max

    2008-01-10

    The objectives for this workshop were to bring together those with different viewpoints on the implementation of energy efficient ventilation in homes to share their perspectives. The primary benefit of the workshop is to allow the participants to get a broader understanding of the issues involved and thereby make themselves more able to achieve their own goals in this area. In order to achieve this objective each participant was asked to address four objectives from their point of view: (1) Drivers for energy efficient residential ventilation: Why is this an important issue? Who cares about it? Where is the demand: occupants, utilities, regulation, programs, etc? What does sustainability mean in this context? (2) Markets & Technologies: What products, services and systems are out there? What kinds of things are in the pipeline? What is being installed now? Are there regional or other trends? What are the technology interactions with other equipment and the envelope? (3) Barriers to Implementation: What is stopping decision makers from implementing energy-efficient residential ventilation systems? What kind of barriers are there: technological, cost, informational, structural, etc. What is the critical path? (4) Solutions: What can be done to overcome the barriers and how can/should we do it? What is the role of public vs. private institutions? Where can investments be made to save energy while improving the indoor environment? Ten participants prepared presentations for the workshop. Those presentations are included in sections at the end of this workshop report. These presentations provided the principal context for the discussions that happened during the workshop. Critical path issues were raised and potential solutions discussed during the workshop. As a secondary objective they have listed key issues and some potential consensus items which resulted from the discussions.

  18. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  19. Energy barriers and cell migration in confluent tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes such as embryogensis, tumorigenesis and wound healing require cells to move within a tissue. While the migration of single cells has been extensively studied, it has remained unclear how single cell properties control migration through a confluent tissue. We develop numerical and theoretical models to calculate energy barriers to cell rearrangements, which govern cell motility. In contrast to sheared foams where energy barriers are power-law distributed, energy barriers in tissues are exponentially distributed and depend systematically on the cell's number of neighbors. Using simple extensions of `trap' and `Soft Glassy Rheology' models, we demonstrate that these energy barrier distributions give rise to glassy behavior and use the models to make testable predictions for two-time correlation functions and caging times. We incorporate these ideas into a continuum model that combines glassy rheology with active polarization to better understand collective migration in epithelial sheets.

  20. Cooling energy measurements of houses with attics containing radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.; Knight, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively.

  1. Radiant Barriers Save Energy in Buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Langley Research Center needed to coat the Echo 1 satellite with a fine mist of vaporized metal, and collaborated with industry to create "radiant barrier technology." In 2010, Ryan Garrett learned about a new version of the technology resistant to oxidation and founded RadiaSource in Ogden, Utah, to provide the NASA-derived technology for applications in homes, warehouses, gymnasiums, and agricultural settings.

  2. Blood-brain barrier and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2006-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a critical role in the transduction of signals between the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. It does so through several mechanisms, including the direct transport of peptides and regulatory proteins such as insulin and leptin. Another mechanism that may be important is the secretion by brain endothelial cells of substances that affect feeding, such as proinflammatory cytokines and NO. We have recently shown that the BBB is capable of receiving an input from one side and secreting a substance into the other. Additionally, BBB secretions can be modulated by substances that affect feeding, such as adiponectin and lipopolysaccharide.

  3. Deep inelastic scattering at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Rehm, K.E.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    A large yield for a process that appears to have many of the features of deep inelastic scattering has been observed at energies, near the Coulomb barrier in the systems {sup 112,124}Sn + {sup 58}Ni by Wolfs et al. In order to better understand the mechanisms by which energy dissipation takes place close to the barrier, we have extended the measurements of Wolfs to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni. The use of inverse kinematics in the present measurements resulted in better mass and energy resolution due to reduced target effects and in more complete angular coverage. We have obtained angular distributions, mass distributions, and total cross sections for deep inelastic scattering at two energies near the barrier. The results on the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 136}Xe complement those from the closed proton shell Sn nuclei.

  4. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  5. Radiant barriers in houses: Energy, comfort, and moisture considerations in a northern climate

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the conditions under which radiant barrier utilization in attics is appropriate technology in building construction for a northern climate in Utah. A sample of 12 appropriate houses with radiant barriers were selected using predetermined criteria. Another 12 houses without radiant barriers were selected as a control sample and paired with the first 12 houses using predetermined criteria. The research involved three different types of data and analyses. First, a questionnaire survey was completed by the occupants of the 12 sample houses, with radiant barriers. The survey included such factors as: (1) comfort, (2) energy, and (3) potential increased moisture content as perceived by the occupants. Second, a t-test was used to calculate the statistical comparison of utility usage between the 12 sample houses with radiant barriers and the 12 control houses without radiant barriers. Third, the moisture content of the wood framing above and below the radiant barriers was measured over a three month period during the winter months. Data analysis indicated: (1) occupants did perceive that more comfort resulted from the installation of radiant barriers, (2) occupants did not observe additional moisture artifacts after the installation of radiant barriers, (3) occupants did perceive cost savings from utility benefits resulting from the use of radiant barriers, especially in cooling the houses in summer, (4) there was no significant difference between utility usage of houses with radiant barriers and houses without radiant barriers, (5) the moisture content in the ceiling joists of all 24 houses, except one, had a moisture content measurement less than eight percent, and (6) houses with radiant barriers have higher humidity levels within the living space than houses without radiant barrier installation.

  6. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  7. Magnetic Field Dependence of Spin Glass Free Energy Barriers.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Samaresh; Orbach, Raymond L

    2017-04-14

    We measure the field dependence of spin glass free energy barriers in a thin amorphous Ge:Mn film through the time dependence of the magnetization. After the correlation length ξ(t,T) has reached the film thickness L=155  Å so that the dynamics are activated, we change the initial magnetic field by δH. In agreement with the scaling behavior exhibited in a companion Letter [M. Baity-Jesi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 157202 (2017)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.118.157202], we find that the activation energy is increased when δH<0. The change is proportional to (δH)^{2} with the addition of a small (δH)^{4} term. The magnitude of the change of the spin glass free energy barriers is in near quantitative agreement with the prediction of a barrier model.

  8. Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

  9. Analysis of annual energy savings due to radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiant barriers are receiving increasing attention as an energy conservation measure for residential buildings, especially for warmer climates. They are being actively promoted for use in residential attics, sometimes with exaggerated claims about savings in utility bills that will results from their installation. In order to provide consumers with factual information that would assist them in deciding upon an investment in a radiant barrier, the Department of Energy, along with an industry advisory panel, has developed a Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet. A major part of this fact sheet is estimates of energy savings that might be expected from radiant barriers in various climates. This paper presents the details of the methodology underlying the energy savings estimates, and gives a summary of values listed in the Fact Sheet. The energy savings estimates were obtained from calculations using a detailed attic thermal model coupled with DOE-2.1C. A life cycle cost analysis was performed to estimate the present value savings on utility fuel costs. The results show that the fuel cost savings vary significantly with the level of conventional insulation already in the attic and from one climate to another.

  10. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  11. A classical determination of vibrationally adiabatic barriers and wells of a collinear potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli

    1981-05-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a classical vibrationally adiabatic barrier or well in collinear systems is the existence of periodic orbit dividing surfaces. Knowledge of all pods immediately provides all adiabatic barriers and wells. Furthermore, the classical equation connecting the barriers and wells to the masses and potential energy surface of the system is shown, under mild conditions, to be identical in form to the corresponding quantal equation. The only difference is in the determination of the vibrational state which is obtained by WKB quantization classically. The classical barriers and wells can therefore be used to analyze quantal computations. Such analysis is provided for the hydrogen exchange reaction and the F+HH system. A novel result is the existence of vibrationally adiabatic barriers even where no saddle point exists on the static potential energy surface. These barriers are an outcome of competition between the increase of potential energy and decrease of vibrational force constant along the reaction coordinate. Their existence is therefore of general nature — not limited to the specific structure of a given potential energy surface. The experimental significance of these barriers is discussed. The implications on the use of forward or reverse quasiclassical computations is analyzed. A definite conclusion is that one should not average over initial vibrational action in such calculations.

  12. Influence of different cosmetic formulations on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, K; Heinrich, U; Tronnier, H

    2014-01-01

    The human skin barrier is an important part of the skin's intactness and its functionality is a precondition for healthy skin. Ingredients in cosmetic formulations, especially penetration enhancers, can influence this barrier function as they transport active agents into deeper skin layers. In this study different cosmetic formulations were tested by 60 healthy female volunteers over a period of 4 weeks. The skin hydration and barrier function before and during the application were measured. Significant changes in both parameters were determined. A negative influence on the barrier function by penetration enhancers could be observed, but it was also found that lamellar lipid structures (DermaMembranSysteme®, DMS®) are able to enhance the skin barrier. Both penetration enhancers as well as DMS can increase skin hydration. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Implementing District Energy Systems: Municipal Approaches To Overcoming Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Kevin George

    Climate change and energy security are issues facing municipalities throughout the world. Efficient, resilient, sustainable, community-based energy systems, such as district energy systems (DES), fuelled mostly by renewables, are an important tool for addressing both climate change and energy security at the municipal level. In spite of their benefits, DES are not widely adopted in Canada (CDEA, 2011). This is due to the complex nature of the barriers which project proponents face. This thesis examines the experience of the City of Prince George in adopting and implementing the Downtown DES. Using a case study methodology, data was collected through a review of relevant municipal documents and a series of semi-structured, open-ended interviews. A thematic analysis revealed unexpected barriers related to lack of adequate public consultation and negative perceptions regarding biomass as a fuel for the DES. These `lessons learned' were then developed into recommendations for other municipalities considering DES.

  14. Energy management action plan: Developing a strategy for overcoming institutional barriers to municipal energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Energy offices working to improve efficiency of local government facilities face not only technical tasks, but institutional barriers, such as budget structures that do not reward efficiency, a low awareness of energy issues, and purchasing procedures based only on minimizing initial cost. The bureau, in working to remove such barriers in San Francisco, has identified 37 institutional barriers in areas such as operations & maintenance, purchasing, and facility design; these barriers were then reorganized into three groupings-- policy & attitudes, budget & incentives, and awareness & information-- and mapped. This map shows that the barriers mutually reinforce each other, and that a holistic approach is required for permanent change. The city`s recreation & parks department was used as a model department, and information about facility energy use was compiled into a departmental energy review. Staff interviews showed how barriers affect conservation. The bureau then generated ideas for projects to remove specific barriers and rated them according to potential impact and the resources required to implement them. Four of the six projects selected focused on maintenance staff: a cost- sharing lighting retrofit program, a boiler efficiency program, a departmental energy tracking system, and a budgetary incentive program for conservation. The other two projects are city-wide: promotion of a new term contract supplying energy-efficient light materials, and publication/distribution of ENERGY NEWS newsletter. A general methodology, the EMAP Strategy Guide, has been created to assist other energy offices in developing EMAPs.

  15. Market and policy barriers to deployment of energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sioshansi, Ramteen; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    There has recently been resurgent interest in energy storage, due to a number of developments in the electricity industry. Despite this interest, very little storage, beyond some small demonstration projects, has been deployed recently. While technical issues, such as cost, device efficiency, and other technical characteristics are often listed as barriers to storage, there are a number of non-technical and policy-related issues. This paper surveys some of these main barriers and proposes some potential research and policy steps that can help address them. Furthermore, while the discussion is focused on the United States, a number of the findings and observations may be more broadly applicable.

  16. Market and Policy Barriers to Deployment of Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.; Jenkin, T.

    2012-03-01

    There has recently been resurgent interest in energy storage, due to a number of developments in the electricity industry. Despite this interest, very little storage, beyond some small demonstration projects, has been deployed recently. While technical issues, such as cost, device efficiency, and other technical characteristics are often listed as barriers to storage, there are a number of non-technical and policy-related issues. This paper surveys some of these main barriers and proposes some potential research and policy steps that can help address them. While the discussion is focused on the United States, a number of the findings and observations may be more broadly applicable.

  17. Overcoming of energy barrier for irreversible magnetization in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhu-bai; Zhang, Ying; Shen, Bao-gen; Zhang, Ming; Hu, Feng-xia; Sun, Ji-rong

    2017-01-01

    The irreversible magnetization occurs mainly in hard grains in nanocomposite magnets, and the domain wall involves a little part of defect region in irreversible magnetization due to the self-interaction. The investigation on thermal activation shows that the defect region involved in domain wall becomes narrower due to the TiNb addition in Pr2Fe14B/α-Fe magnets. The defect region augments the energy density in the negative direction of domain wall to overcome the energy barrier of perfect hard region. The soft phase, exchange-coupled with defect region at hard grain outer-layer, promotes magnetization reversal in defect region by exchange coupling. While the defect region plays a role as a ladder to overcome the energy barrier, resulting in the decrease of coecivity more or less depending upon the width and anisotropy of defect region.

  18. Energy Dissipating Devices in Falling Rock Protection Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanon-Jano, L.; Blanco-Fernandez, E.; Castro-Fresno, D.; Ballester-Muñoz, F.

    2017-03-01

    Rockfall is a phenomenon which, when uncontrolled, may cause extensive material damage and personal injury. One of the structures used to avoid accidents caused by debris flows or rockfalls is flexible barriers. The energy dissipating devices which absorb the energy generated by rock impact and reduce the mechanical stresses in the rest of the elements of the structure are an essential part of these kinds of structures. This document proposes an overview of the performance of energy dissipating devices, as well as of the role that they fulfil in the barrier. Furthermore, a compilation and a description of the dissipating elements found in the literature are proposed. Additionally, an analysis has been performed of the aspects taken into account in the design, such as experimental (quasi-static and dynamic) tests observing the variation of the behaviour curve depending on the test speed and numerical simulations by means of several finite element software packages.

  19. Mesoscale geomorphic change on low energy barrier islands in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decadal (mesoscale) geomorphic change on sandy barrier islands in the fetch-limited environment of Chesapeake Bay. Low energy barrier islands exist in two settings: on the fringe of marshes and in open water and this analysis shows the various types of barrier island to be genetically related. Barrier islands that face the dominant wind and wave direction (E or W) retreat via barrier translation, preserving the barrier island volume. Those that exist in re-entrants are dominated by longshore transport processes, are strongly affected by sediment supply and are subject to disintegration. Marsh fringe barrier islands are perched on or draped over the surface of the underlying marsh. They migrate landwards via barrier translation during periodic high water events accompanied by large waves (hurricanes and northeasters). The underlying marsh surface erodes under all water levels and the rate of retreat of the barrier island and underlying marsh may take place at different rates, leading to various configurations from perched barrier islands several metres landward of the marsh edge, to barrier islands that have a sandy shoreface extending into the subtidal zone. The coastal configuration during landward retreat of marsh fringe barrier islands is subject to strong local control exerted by the underyling marsh topography. As erosion of marsh promontories occurs and marsh creeks are intersected and bypassed, the configuration is subject to rapid change. Periodic sediment influxes cause spits to develop at re-entrants in the marsh. The spits are initiated as extensions of adjacent marsh fringe barrier islands, but as the sediment volume is finite, the initial drift-aligned spits become sediment-starved and begin to develop a series of swash-aligned cells as they strive for morphodynamic equilibrium. The individual cells are stretched until breaches form in the barrier islands, creating inlets with tidal deltas. At this stage the low

  20. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  1. Sign preference in ion-induced nucleation: contributions to the free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Keasler, Samuel J; Kim, Hyunmi; Chen, Bin

    2012-11-07

    We have performed a series of computer simulations using the AVUS-HR approach to better understand the origin of the sign preference in ion-induced nucleation. In particular, we emphasize the importance of distinguishing between the total formation free energy of a cluster, and the nucleation free energy, which involves only those steps contributing to the free energy barrier. We have separately considered how the ion-water potential energy, the water-water potential energy, and the entropy contribute to both the cluster formation free energy, and the nucleation free energy. These simulations have shown that while the ion-water potential energies make the largest contribution to the formation free energy difference between positive and negative ions, the entropy is the contribution leading to lower nucleation free energy barriers for negative ions. The primary reason for this is the larger stable (but precritical) clusters formed around negative ions. We have further shown that the distinction between formation and nucleation free energies is of particular importance when comparing small cations with larger anions where the formation free energies can be much lower for the cationic clusters, even though the nucleation barriers are lower for the anionic clusters.

  2. The effects of radiant barriers on ceiling heat flux and energy usage

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, K.T.; Beasley, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    In this study a gable ventilation system was installed in an experimental facility to determine the effects of ventilation type on radiant barrier performance. The radiant barriers were installed horizontally above the ceiling insulation. The measured performance was then compared to documented results for a ridge and soffit ventilation system. This study experimentally determined the effects of radiant barriers on ceiling heat loss in cathedral ceiling homes during the winter heating season. A normalization procedure was used to allow short term, clear sky measurements from different days of similar weather to be used to determine radiant barrier performance. The procedure normalized for weather variations of ambient temperature and solar insolation under clear sky conditions to isolate the effects of radiant barriers. In these studies radiant barriers were examined for energy conservation, load shifting and demand reduction characteristics. A thermal model to predict shingle temperature in cathedral ceiling homes was also developed. The experimental results show that radiant barriers are not as effective in homes with a gable ventilation system as compared to homes with a ridge and soffit system. This result is primarily due to increased air flow rates with a ridge and soffit ventilation system. For the gable ventilation system the radiant barriers reduced the peak heat flux by 20% and provided an energy conservation of 4.1%. However, it was found that better load shifting characteristics were present. Radiant barriers conserved energy in a winter study of cathedral ceilings by actually reducing the total heat loss from the ceiling by 40% for peak heating days. The shingle temperature model was validated by comparing ceiling heat flux predictions using actual measured temperatures and modeled temperatures.

  3. Observation of macroscopic quantum tunneling through the Coulomb energy barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerligs, L. J.; Averin, D. V.; Mooij, J. E.

    1990-12-01

    The conductance of linear arrays of two and three normal-metal small tunnel junctions is studied for bias voltages V below the Coloumb-blockade threshold. At low temperature, we find evidence for macroscopic quantum tunneling of the electric charge (q-MQT) through the Coulomb energy barrier. For double junctions the tunneling rate scales as V3, and approximately as the product of the junction conductances, as predicted by the theory of inelastic q-MQT.

  4. Ab initio study of the rotational energy barrier in carbonylylide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Y.; Volatron, F.

    1981-10-01

    The rotational energy barrier in carbonylylide CH 2OCH 2 is studied using RHF CI calculations. Depending on the size of the CI and the basis set (STO-3G and 4-31G), values in the range 13-17 kcal/mol are found. At this level of calculation, the mid-point of the isomerization process can be mainly described by the diradical rather than the zwitterion.

  5. Scattering of Halo Nuclei at Energies below and around the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge, M. J. G.; Cubero, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Moro, A. M.; Pesudo, V.; Acosta, L.; Alcorta, M.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Bender, P.; Buchmann, L.; Diget, C. A.; Di Pietro, A.; Escrig, D.; Falou, H. A.; Figuera, P. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Garnsworthy, A.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Hackman, G.; Kanungo, R.; Lay, J. A.; Madurga, M.; Martel, I.; Mukha, I.; Nilsson, T.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Rajabali, M.; Sarazin, F.; Shotter, A.; Tengblad, O.; Unsworth, C.; Walden, P.

    The loosely bound structure of halo nuclei is predicted to affect the collisions with heavy targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier. We report here on the results on a series of experiments done at different facilities to study the behaviour of the scattering of the archetype of the halo nuclei: 6He, 11Li, and 11Be on heavy targets at energies below and around the Coulomb barrier. The results are interpreted in the framework of Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channel calculations (CDCC). The departure from Rutherford scattering is larger than expected. In first approximation the effect certainly scales with the loosely bound character of the projectile.

  6. Market and policy barriers to deployment of energy storage

    DOE PAGES

    Sioshansi, Ramteen; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    There has recently been resurgent interest in energy storage, due to a number of developments in the electricity industry. Despite this interest, very little storage, beyond some small demonstration projects, has been deployed recently. While technical issues, such as cost, device efficiency, and other technical characteristics are often listed as barriers to storage, there are a number of non-technical and policy-related issues. This paper surveys some of these main barriers and proposes some potential research and policy steps that can help address them. Furthermore, while the discussion is focused on the United States, a number of the findings and observationsmore » may be more broadly applicable.« less

  7. Wetting transition on patterned surfaces: transition states and energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weiqing

    2014-03-18

    We study the wetting transition on microstructured hydrophobic surfaces. We use the string method [J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 164103; J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 134105] to accurately compute the transition states, the energy barriers, and the minimum energy paths for the wetting transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the Wenzel state. Numerical results are obtained for the wetting of a hydrophobic surface textured with a square lattice of pillars. It is found that the wetting of the solid substrate occurs via infiltration of the liquid in a single groove, followed by lateral propagation of the liquid front. The propagation of the liquid front proceeds in a stepwise manner, and a zipping mechanism is observed during the infiltration of each layer. The minimum energy path for the wetting transition goes through a sequence of intermediate metastable states, whose wetted areas reflect the microstructure of the patterned surface. We also study the dependence of the energy barrier on the drop size and the gap between the pillars.

  8. Market barriers to energy efficiency: A critical reappraisal of the rationale for public policies to promote energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Golove, W.H.; Eto, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    This report reviews current perspectives on market barriers to energy efficiency. Ratepayer-funded utility energy-efficiency programs are likely to change in scope, size, and nature as the deregulation process proceeds; the authors research focuses on understanding to what extent some form of future intervention may be warranted and how they might judge the success of particular interventions, especially those funded by ratepayers. They find that challenges to the existence of market barriers have, for the most part, failed to provide a testable alternative explanation for evidence suggesting that there is a substantial ``efficiency gap`` between a consumer`s actual investments in energy efficiency and those that appear to be in the consumer`s own interest. They then suggest that differences of opinion about the appropriateness of public policies stem not from disputes about whether market barriers exist, but from different perceptions of the magnitude of the barriers, and the efficacy and (possibly unintended) consequences of policies designed to overcome them. They conclude that there are compelling justifications for future energy-efficiency policies. Nevertheless, in order to succeed, they must be based on a sound understanding of the market problems they seek to correct and a realistic assessment of their likely efficacy. This understanding can only emerge from detailed investigations of the current operation of individual markets.

  9. Universal Pinning Energy Barrier for Driven Domain Walls in Thin Ferromagnetic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeudy, V.; Mougin, A.; Bustingorry, S.; Savero Torres, W.; Gorchon, J.; Kolton, A. B.; Lemaître, A.; Jamet, J.-P.

    2016-07-01

    We report a comparative study of magnetic field driven domain wall motion in thin films made of different magnetic materials for a wide range of field and temperature. The full thermally activated creep motion, observed below the depinning threshold, is shown to be described by a unique universal energy barrier function. Our findings should be relevant for other systems whose dynamics can be modeled by elastic interfaces moving on disordered energy landscapes.

  10. Universal Pinning Energy Barrier for Driven Domain Walls in Thin Ferromagnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, V; Mougin, A; Bustingorry, S; Savero Torres, W; Gorchon, J; Kolton, A B; Lemaître, A; Jamet, J-P

    2016-07-29

    We report a comparative study of magnetic field driven domain wall motion in thin films made of different magnetic materials for a wide range of field and temperature. The full thermally activated creep motion, observed below the depinning threshold, is shown to be described by a unique universal energy barrier function. Our findings should be relevant for other systems whose dynamics can be modeled by elastic interfaces moving on disordered energy landscapes.

  11. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J.

    1989-01-01

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism.

  12. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Swahlan, D.J.

    1989-04-18

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism. 6 figs.

  13. Multi-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-01-20

    The optimum conditions for multi-neutron transfer have been studied in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 124}Sn at bombarding energies at and below the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed in inverse kinematics with a {sup 124}Sn beam bombarding a {sup 58}Ni target. The particles were identified with respect to mass and Z in the split-pole spectrograph with a hybrid focal plane detector with mass and Z-resolutions of A/{Delta}A = 150 and Z/{Delta}Z = 70. At all energies the transfer of up to 6 neutrons was observed. The yields for these transfer reactions are found to decrease by about a factor of four for each transferred neutron.

  14. Transition model for ricin-aptamer interactions with multiple pathways and energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-02-01

    We develop a transition model to interpret single-molecule ricin-aptamer interactions with multiple unbinding pathways and energy barriers measured by atomic force microscopy dynamic force spectroscopy. Molecular simulations establish the relationship between binding conformations and the corresponding unbinding pathways. Each unbinding pathway follows a Bell-Evans multiple-barrier model. Markov-type transition matrices are developed to analyze the redistribution of unbinding events among the pathways under different loading rates. Our study provides detailed information about complex behaviors in ricin-aptamer unbinding events.

  15. Breaking the Diffraction Barrier Using Fluorescence Emission Difference Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Cuifang; Li, Shuai; Liu, Wei; Hao, Xiang; Gu, Zhaotai; Wang, Yifan; Ge, Jianhong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel physical mechanism for breaking the diffraction barrier in the far field. Termed fluorescence emission difference microscopy (FED), our approach is based on the intensity difference between two differently acquired images. When fluorescence saturation is applied, the resolving ability of FED can be further enhanced. A detailed theoretical analysis and a series of simulation tests are performed. The validity of FED in practical use is demonstrated by experiments on fluorescent nanoparticles and biological cells in which a spatial resolution of <λ/4 is achieved. Featuring the potential to realize a high imaging speed, this approach may be widely applied in nanoscale investigations. PMID:23486546

  16. Energy from low temperature differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, B. K.

    1985-05-01

    A number of energy conservation and alternative energy approaches utilize a low temperature heat source. Applications in this category include: solar ponds, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), low temperature solar thermal, geothermal, and waste heat recovery and bottoming cycles. Low temperature power extraction techniques are presented and the differences between closed and open Rankine power cycles are discussed. Specific applications and technical areas of current research in OTEC along with a breakdown of plant operating conditions and a rough cost estimate illustrate how the use of low temperature power conversion technology can be cost effective.

  17. Free energy barrier for dissociation of the guanosine monophosphate anion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornetta, Lucas M.; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio; Varella, Márcio T. do N.

    2016-08-01

    We report free energy barriers for the ground-state dissociation of the guanosine nucleotide anion in solution, employing implicit and explicit solvation models. The latter was based on the Free Energy Perturbation technique and Monte Carlo simulations. For the lowest-energy structure, both solvation models indicate a solvent-induced transition from a dipole-bound state in the gas phase to a π∗ valence state in solution. The free barrier estimates obtained from explicit and implicit solvation are in fair agreement with each other, although significantly overestimated in comparison to a previously reported explicit solvation model based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Accounting for corrections related to the different DFT functionals used in the present and previous studies significantly improves the agreement. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  18. Lowering energy barriers in surface reactions through concerted reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sakong, Sung; Mosch, Christian; Lozano, Ariel; Busnengo, H Fabio; Gross, Axel

    2012-10-22

    Any technologically important chemical reaction typically involves a number of different elementary reaction steps consisting of bond-breaking and bond-making processes. Usually, one assumes that such complex chemical reactions occur in a step-wise fashion where one single bond is made or broken at a time. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory we show that the barriers of rate-limiting steps for technologically relevant surface reactions are significantly reduced if concerted reaction mechanisms are taken into account.

  19. Low energy barriers of H-atom abstraction from phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, Oksana; Kryachko, Eugene S.; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2002-09-01

    The energy barriers governing the hydrogen atom transfer between phenols related to Vitamin E and methylperoxyl radical are determined using the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. For phenol, o, o-dimethylphenol, and o, o, m-trimethylphenol, they are equal to 6.0, 4.2, and 3.5 kcal/mol, respectively. While in both reactants and products the H-bond is nearly coplanar with the aromatic ring, it becomes essentially twisted out of the ring in the transition state structures. This implies that the transition states in such reactions are likely located at the avoided crossing of the lower-lying electronic states of the H-bonded complex, correlating with the ground π and first excited σ states of the incipient phenoxyl radical.

  20. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Probing the fusion of 7Li with 64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Pradhan, M. K.; Basu, P.; Nanal, V.; Pal, S.; Shrivastava, A.; Saha, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    Background: The stable isotopes of Li, 6Li6 and 7Li, have two-body cluster structures of α +d and α +t with α -separation energies or breakup thresholds at 1.47 and 2.47 MeV, respectively. The weak binding of these projectiles introduces several new reaction channels not usually observed in the case of strongly bound projectiles. The impact of these breakup or breakup-like reaction channels on fusion, the dominant reaction process at near-barrier energies, with different target masses is of current interest. Purpose: Our purpose is to explore the fusion, at above and below the Coulmb barrier, of 7Li with 64Ni target in order to understand the effect of breakup or breakup-like processes with medium-mass target in comparison with 6Li, which has a lower breakup threshold. Measurement: The total fusion (TF) excitation of the weakly bound projectile 7Li with the medium-mass target 64Ni has been measured at the near-barrier energies (0.8 to 2 VB). The measurement was performed using the online characteristic γ -ray detection method. The complete fusion (CF) excitation function for the system was obtained using the x n -evaporation channels with the help of statistical model predictions. Results: At the above barrier energies CF cross sections exhibit an average suppression of about 6.5% compared to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) predictions, while the model describes the measured TF cross section well. But below the barrier, both TF and CF show enhancements compared to 1DBPM predictions. Unlike 6Li, enhancement of CF for 7Li could not be explained by inelastic coupling alone. Conclusion: Whereas the σTF cross sections are almost the same for both the systems in the above barrier region, the suppression of σCF at above the barrier is less for the 7Li+64Ni system than for the 6+64Ni system. Also direct cluster transfer has been identified as the probable source for producing large enhancement in TF cross sections.

  2. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Klein, Michael L.; Shinoda, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle-vesicle, vesicle-planar, and planar-planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  3. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Shinoda, Wataru; Klein, Michael L.

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle–vesicle, vesicle–planar, and planar–planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  4. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Klein, Michael L; Shinoda, Wataru

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle-vesicle, vesicle-planar, and planar-planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  5. Transition path time distribution and the transition path free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-10-19

    The recent experimental measurement of the transition path time distributions of proteins presents several challenges to theory. Firstly, why do the fits of the experimental data to a theoretical expression lead to barrier heights which are much lower than the free energies of activation of the observed transitions? Secondly, there is the theoretical question of determining the transition path time distribution, without invoking the Smoluchowski limit. In this paper, we derive an exact expression for a transition path time distribution which is valid for arbitrary memory friction using the normal mode transformation which underlies Kramers' rate theory. We then recall that for low barriers, there is a noticeable difference between the transition path time distribution obtained with absorbing boundary conditions and free boundary conditions. For the former, the transition times are shorter, since recrossings of the boundaries are disallowed. As a result, if one uses the distribution based on absorbing boundary conditions to fit the experimental data, one will find that the transition path barrier will be larger than the values found based on a theory with free boundary conditions. We then introduce the paradigm of a transition path barrier height, and show that one should always expect it to be much smaller than the activation energy.

  6. The effects of a high-energy diet on hippocampal-dependent discrimination performance and blood-brain barrier integrity differ for diet-induced obese and diet-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Terry L; Monnot, Andrew; Neal, Adelai U; Martin, Ashley A; Horton, J Josiah; Zheng, Wei

    2012-08-20

    Rats that consume high-energy (HE) diets (i.e., diets high in saturated fats and sugar) show impaired hippocampal-dependent learning and memory (e.g., Kanoski and Davidson (2011) [1]). To further investigate this effect, we trained rats given restricted access to low-fat lab chow on hippocampal-dependent serial feature-negative (FN) and hippocampal-independent simple discrimination problems. When training was completed, Group Chow received ad libitum lab chow. The remaining rats received ad libitum HE diet. Performance on both discrimination problems was tested following 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of HE diet exposure. FN, but not simple discrimination, was abolished initially for all rats, and then re-emerged for Group Chow. For rats fed HE diet, those that weighed the least and had the lowest amount of body fat (HE-diet resistant (HE-DR) rats), performed like Group Chow on both discrimination problems. However, HE diet-induced obese (HE-DIO) rats (i.e., rats that weighed the most weight and had the most body fat) performed like Group Chow on the simple discrimination problem, but were impaired throughout testing on the FN problem. Subsequent assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability revealed that concentrations of an exogenously administered dye were elevated in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum or prefrontal cortex for HE-DIO rats relative to the HE-DR and Chow groups. The results indicate that the adverse consequences of HE diet on hippocampal-dependent cognitive functioning are associated with detrimental effects on the BBB and that both of these outcomes vary with sensitivity to HE diet-induced increases in weight and adiposity.

  7. Permeation of low-Z atoms through carbon sheets: Density functional theory study on energy barriers and deformation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stefan E. E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael E-mail: Michael.probst@uibk.ac.at

    2013-12-15

    Energetic and geometric aspects of the permeation of the atoms hydrogen to neon neutral atoms through graphene sheets are investigated by investigating the associated energy barriers and sheet deformations. Density functional theory calculations on cluster models, where graphene is modeled by planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), provide the energies and geometries. Particularities of our systems, such as convergence of both energy barriers and deformation curves with increasing size of the PAHs, are discussed. Three different interaction regimes, adiabatic, planar and vertical, are investigated by enforcing different geometrical constraints. The adiabatic energy barriers range from 5 eV for hydrogen to 20 eV for neon. We find that the permeation of oxygen and carbon into graphene is facilitated by temporary chemical bonding while for other, in principle reactive atoms, it is not. We discuss implications of our results for modeling chemical sputtering of graphite.

  8. Perceived Career Barriers and Coping among Youth in Israel: Ethnic and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipshits-Braziler, Yuliya; Tatar, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated gender and ethnic differences in the perception of different types of career barriers among young adults in relation to their views of themselves as individuals (Personal Career Barriers) and their views of their gender and ethnic group (Group Career Barriers). This study also explored gender and ethnic differences in the…

  9. Fusion of the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm System at Near Barrier Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, B.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Nunes, V.; Canto, L. F.

    2010-08-04

    We analyze the data for complete fusion of the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm system at near barrier energies by performing coupled channel calculations using a double-folding potential as the bare potential. We use a recently proposed new method of analysis by the introduction of dimensionless fusion functions. We observe enhancement of the fusion cross section at energies below the Coulomb barrier and suppression above the barrier.

  10. Technical Barriers, Gaps,and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Marcus V.A.

    2011-11-01

    This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program.

  11. Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

  12. Key Barriers to the Implementation of Solar Energy in Nigeria: A Critical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, D.; Suresh, S.; Renukappa, S.; Oloke, D.

    2017-08-01

    Nigeria, potentially, has abundant sunshine throughout the year, making it full thirst for solar energy generation. Even though, the country’s solar energy projects have not realised a fair result over the years, due to many barriers associated with initiatives implementation. Therefore, the entire power sector remains incapacitated to generate, transmit and distribute a clean, affordable and sustainable energy to assist economic growth. The research integrated five African counterpart’s solar energy initiatives, barriers, policies and strategies adopted as a lesson learned to Nigeria. Inadequate solar initiative’s research, lack of technological know-how, short-term policies, lack of awareness and political instability are the major barriers that made the implementation of solar initiatives almost impossible in Nigeria. The shock of the barriers therefore, constitutes a major negative contribution to the crippling of the power sector in the state. Future research will concentrate on initiatives for mitigating solar and other renewable energy barriers.

  13. Gate-controlled energy barrier at a graphene/molecular semiconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, S.; Pietrobon, L.; Ciudad, D.; Velez, S.; Sun, X.; Stoliar, P.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    The formation of an energy barrier at a metal/molecular semiconductor junction is both a ubiquitous phenomenon as well as the subject of intense research in order to improve the performance of molecular semiconductor-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. For these devices, a junction with a large energy barrier provides rectification, leading to a diode behavior, whereas a relatively small energy barrier provides nearly-ohmic behavior, resulting in efficient carrier injection (extraction) into the molecular semiconductor. Typically, a specific metal/molecular semiconductor combination leads to a fixed energy barrier; therefore, the possibility of a gate-controlled energy barrier is very appealing for advanced applications. Here, we present a graphene/C60 junction-based vertical field-effect transistor in which we demonstrate control of the interfacial energy-barrier such that the junction switches from a highly rectifying diode at negative gate voltages to a nearly-ohmic behavior at positive gate voltages and at room temperature. We extract an energy-barrier modulation of up to 660 meV, a transconductance of up to five orders of magnitude and a gate-modulated photocurrent.

  14. Heavy-ion reactions at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The title covers a very broad area of both experimental and theoretical studies. The common characteristic of heavy-ion collisions at these energies, compared to what is usually seen at higher energies, is the important interplay between different reaction channels or internal degrees of freedom. The couplings between the various channels can result in important multistep contributions to a given channel. These often have to be treated explicitly, for example by solving the appropriate set of coupled equations. In contrast, at higher energies the effects of these couplings frequently can be represented in a simple, average way, as is done when one introduces an imaginary part to the optical potential for elastic scattering. At first, it might be thought that the possible importance of multistep transitions would be a strong disadvantage of working at these energies. However, although the analysis of the data becomes more complicate, the study of these terms and their interferences can be a rich source of information. In particular, it can tell us, indirectly, something about transitions between two excited states. Overviews of some of these phenomena have been presented elsewhere; here I have selected two topics as representative. Even then I cannot go into much detail, so perhaps this paper is best regarded as providing some references as the stating point for a literature search

  15. On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called ``market barriers`` to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland`s attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

  16. On the economic analysis of problems in energy efficiency: Market barriers, market failures, and policy implications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanstad, A.H.; Koomey, J.G.; Levine, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    In his recent paper in The Energy Journal, Ronald Sutherland argues that several so-called market barriers'' to energy efficiency frequently cited in the literature are not market failures in the conventional sense and are thus irrelevant for energy policy. We argue that Sutherland has inadequately analyzed the idea of market barrier and misrepresented the policy implications of microeconomics. We find that economic theory, correctly interpreted, does not provide for the categorical dismissal of market barriers. We explore important methodological issues underlying the debate over market barriers, and discuss the importance of reconciling the findings of non-economic social sciences with the economic analysis of energy demand and consumer decision-making. We also scrutinize Sutherland's attempt to apply finance theory to rationalize high implicit discount rates observed in energy-related choices, and find this use of finance theory to be inappropriate.

  17. Barriers to Energy Efficiency and the Uptake of Green Revolving Funds in Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, John; Savan, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the barriers to the implementation of energy efficiency projects in Canadian universities, including access to capital, bounded rationality, hidden costs, imperfect information, risk and split incentives. Methods to address these barriers are investigated, including evaluating the efficacy of…

  18. Barriers to Energy Efficiency and the Uptake of Green Revolving Funds in Canadian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, John; Savan, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the barriers to the implementation of energy efficiency projects in Canadian universities, including access to capital, bounded rationality, hidden costs, imperfect information, risk and split incentives. Methods to address these barriers are investigated, including evaluating the efficacy of…

  19. Between-species variation in the kinetic stability of TIM proteins linked to solvation-barrier free energies.

    PubMed

    Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Larrea, David; De Maria, Leonardo; Borchert, Torben V; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2009-01-23

    Theoretical, computational, and experimental studies have suggested the existence of solvation barriers in protein unfolding and denaturation processes. These barriers are related to the finite size of water molecules and can be envisioned as arising from the asynchrony between water penetration and breakup of internal interactions. Solvation barriers have been proposed to play roles in protein cooperativity and kinetic stability; therefore, they may be expected to be subject to natural selection. We study the thermal denaturation, in the presence and in the absence of chemical denaturants, of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) from three different species: Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania mexicana. In all cases, denaturation was irreversible and kinetically controlled. Surprisingly, however, we found large differences between the kinetic denaturation parameters, with T. cruzi TIM showing a much larger activation energy value (and, consequently, much lower room-temperature, extrapolated denaturation rates). This disparity cannot be accounted for by variations in the degree of exposure to solvent in transition states (as measured by kinetic urea m values) and is, therefore, to be attributed mainly to differences in solvation-barrier contributions. This was supported by structure-energetics analyses of the transition states and by application of a novel procedure to estimate from experimental data the solvation-barrier impact at the entropy and free-energy levels. These analyses were actually performed with an extended protein set (including six small proteins plus seven variants of lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus and spanning a wide range of activation parameters), allowing us to delineate the general trends of the solvation-barrier contributions. Overall, this work supports that proteins sharing the same structure and function but belonging to different organisms may show widely different solvation barriers, possibly as a result of different

  20. Influence of rotational energy barriers to the conformational search of protein loops in molecular dynamics and ranking the conformations.

    PubMed

    Tappura, K

    2001-08-15

    An adjustable-barrier dihedral angle potential was added as an extension to a novel, previously presented soft-core potential to study its contribution to the efficacy of the search of the conformational space in molecular dynamics. As opposed to the conventional soft-core potential functions, the leading principle in the design of the new soft-core potential, as well as of its extension, the soft-core and adjustable-barrier dihedral angle (SCADA) potential (referred as the SCADA potential), was to maintain the main equilibrium properties of the original force field. This qualifies the methods for a variety of a priori modeling problems without need for additional restraints typically required with the conventional soft-core potentials. In the present study, the different potential energy functions are applied to the problem of predicting loop conformations in proteins. Comparison of the performance of the soft-core and SCADA potential showed that the main hurdles for the efficient sampling of the conformational space of (loops in) proteins are related to the high-energy barriers caused by the Lennard-Jones and Coulombic energy terms, and not to the rotational barriers, although the conformational search can be further enhanced by lowering the rotational barriers of the dihedral angles. Finally, different evaluation methods were studied and a few promising criteria found to distinguish the near-native loop conformations from the wrong ones.

  1. Experimental study on temperature characteristics and energy conversion in packed bed reactor with dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sen; Tang, Zuchen; Gu, Fan

    2010-10-01

    The temperature characteristics and energy conversion in packed bed reactor combined with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was investigated experimentally. The pellet temperatures of two types packed bed reactor, cylindrical reactor and parallel-plate reactor, was measured in conditions of various inlet voltage of DBD plasma. The relationship between pellet temperature of the packed bed and applied voltage of DBD plasma was discovered. The experimental result indicates a tendency that the pellet temperature of packed bed increases as the applied voltage of inlet plasma increases. When the voltage of inlet plasma is high enough, the pellet temperature increment decreases. Simultaneously,the packed bed temperature is sensitive to the inlet plasma energy and there is a potential application to heat exchanger. Moreover the proportion of energy consumption of plasma inputting into packed bed reactor was analyzed and calculated. The mechanisms that electrical energy of inlet plasma is transformed into heat energy in the two phases, gaseous and pellets of the packed bed reactor are different. The energy consumption in pellet phase is dielectric polarization loss and depends on packed bed geometry and DBD plasma etc. The energy consumption in gaseous phase is plasma sheath procedure. The important factors effecting on gas discharge are gaseous component and voltage, frequency of power.

  2. Polymeric nanoparticles of different sizes overcome the cell membrane barrier.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Simone; Dass, Martin; Musyanovych, Anna; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker

    2013-06-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have tremendous potential either as carriers or markers in treatment for diseases or as diagnostics in biomedical applications. Finding the optimal conditions for effective intracellular delivery of the payload to the location of interest is still a big challenge. The particles have to overcome the barrier of the cell membrane. Here, we investigated the uptake in HeLa cells of fluorescent polystyrene particles with different size and surface charge. Particles stabilized with the nonionic surfactant Lutensol AT50® (132 nm, 180 nm, 242 nm, 816 nm, 846 nm diameter) were synthesized via dispersion polymerization. Cationic particles (120 nm, 208 nm, 267 nm, 603 nm diameter) were obtained by a combination of miniemulsion and seed dispersion polymerization using cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA-Cl). The particle uptake into HeLa cells was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. Nonionic particles were - independent of their size - taken up by cells only at a barely detectable level, thus aggravating a quantitative comparison. The uptake of positively charged particles was substantially higher and therefore enabling further investigation keeping constant one of these parameters: either material amount or particles number or total interaction surface area. It was found that the uptake rather depends on the total amount of polymeric material present in the media than on the number of particles. The total particle's surface area does not correlate linearly with the uptake, thus indicating that there is no direct dependency between the total surface area and the cellular endocytotic process to overcome the biobarrier "cell membrane." A potentially novel uptake mechanism is found which can be described as an excavator shovel like mechanism. It is a kind of macropinocytosis dependent on actin filaments as well as dynamin, but is clathrin-independent.

  3. [Study on energy transfer in argon/air in dielectric barrier discharge by optical emission spectra].

    PubMed

    Dong, Li-Fang; Qi, Yu-Yan; Zhao, Zeng-Chao; Li, Yong-Hui; Li, Xue-Chen

    2008-11-01

    The energy transfer in dielectric barrier discharge in argon/air mixture in a device with water electrodes was investigated by comparing the optical emission spectra in pure argon, argon/air mixture and air. It was observed that the intensities of argon spectral lines in argon/air discharge are all lower than that in argon discharge, which indicates that the nitrogen in air has a quenching effect on the argon excited states. It was found that the decreasing rate of intensity of spectral lines with increasing the air concentration is different. The intensity of ArI 763. 51 nm decreases fastest, the ArI 772.42 nm and ArI 696.54 nm take second place, while the ArI 750.39 nm decreases slowest. Comparing the excitation energy of argon excited state with the excitation energy of nitrogen molecule, the authors found that the smaller the difference between the excitation energy of argon excited state and the excitation energy of nitrogen molecule, the faster the spectral line decreases, implying the stronger the energy transfer. In addition, the additional argon in air makes the emission intensities of nitrogen band of second positive system and band of first negative system increase, which indicates that the excitation of nitrogen is enhanced by the energy transfer from argon through Penning excitation involving argon metastable states. In other words, the component and ratio of gas in the gas mixture influence the optical characteristic and energy transfer peculiarity in the mixed gas discharge. The optical emission spectra measurement as a useful plasma diagnostic tool has been successfully used in the study of energy transfer in the mixed gas discharge, and the results provide a reasonable reference for the underlying industrial applications of different species discharge.

  4. Cooling energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combination with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

    1987-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory continued the testing of radiant barriers in three unoccupied houses near Knoxville, Tennessee, under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The prime goal of the work was to determine the effect of the interaction of radiant barriers with different levels of attic insulation on house cooling loads. Both horizontal and truss installations of radiant barriers were used along with R-11 and R-30 fiberglass-batt attic insulation. Previous work had been done at Karns using both types of barriers with R-19. The results of the testing showed that horizontal barriers are more effective than truss barriers. A horizontal radiant barrier in combination with R-11 attic insulation saved 16% compared with R-11 and no barrier. The cooling load reductions with R-30 and a barrier were minimal (2%) compared with R-30 and no barrier. The best performing system was a combination of a horizontal barrier and R-19, which was estimated to reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% when compared with R-11 and no barrier. Differing climates, house styles, configurations and occupancy effects are capable of altering these results.

  5. Energy barriers for dipole moment flipping in PVDF-related ferroelectric polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ying-Ju; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Energy barriers for flipping the transverse dipole moments in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and related copolymers and terpolymers are predicted using the nudged elastic band method. The dipole moments flip individually along the chain, with an order and energy barrier magnitudes (0.1-1.2 eV) that depend on the chain composition and environment. Trifluoroethylene (TrFE) and chlorofluoroethylene (CFE) monomers have larger energy barriers than VDF monomers, while a chain in an amorphous environment has a similar transition pathway as that of an isolated molecule. In a crystalline environment, TrFE and CFE monomers expand the lattice and lower the energy barriers for flipping VDF monomers. This finding is consistent with experimental observations of a large electrocaloric effect in P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) terpolymers.

  6. Barriers and opportunities: A review of selected successful energy-efficiency programs

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

    2001-03-20

    In industry, barriers may exist at various points in the decision making process, and in the implementation and management of measures to improve energy efficiency. Barriers may take many forms, and are determined by the business environment and include decision-making processes, energy prices, lack of information, a lack of confidence in the information, or high transaction costs for obtaining reliable information, as well as limited capital availability. Other barriers are the ''invisibility'' of energy efficiency measures and the difficulty of quantifying the impacts, and slow diffusion of innovative technology into markets while firms typically under-invest in R and D, despite the high pay-backs. Various programs try to reduce the barriers to improve the uptake of innovative technologies. A wide array of policies has been used and tested in the industrial sector in industrialized countries, with varying success rates. We review some new approaches to industrial energy efficiency improvement in industrialized countries, focusing on voluntary agreements.

  7. Reaction Pathway and Free Energy Barrier for Urea Elimination in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Min; Chen, Xi; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    To accurately predict the free energy barrier for urea elimination in aqueous solution, we examined the reaction coordinates for the direct and water-assisted elimination pathways, and evaluated the corresponding free energy barriers by using the surface and volume polarization for electrostatics (SVPE) model-based first-principles electronic-structure calculations. Based on the computational results, the water-assisted elimination pathway is dominant for urea elimination in aqueous solution, and the corresponding free energy barrier is 25.3 kcal/mol. The free energy barrier of 25.3 kcal/mol predicted for the dominant reaction pathway of urea elimination in aqueous solution is in good agreement with available experimental kinetic data. PMID:25821238

  8. Energy barriers for dipole moment flipping in PVDF-related ferroelectric polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying-Ju; McGaughey, Alan J H

    2016-01-07

    Energy barriers for flipping the transverse dipole moments in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and related copolymers and terpolymers are predicted using the nudged elastic band method. The dipole moments flip individually along the chain, with an order and energy barrier magnitudes (0.1-1.2 eV) that depend on the chain composition and environment. Trifluoroethylene (TrFE) and chlorofluoroethylene (CFE) monomers have larger energy barriers than VDF monomers, while a chain in an amorphous environment has a similar transition pathway as that of an isolated molecule. In a crystalline environment, TrFE and CFE monomers expand the lattice and lower the energy barriers for flipping VDF monomers. This finding is consistent with experimental observations of a large electrocaloric effect in P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) terpolymers.

  9. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research supporting Thermal Bypass Air Barrier requirements. Since these were adopted in the 2009 IECC, close to one million homes have been mandated to include this vitally important energy efficiency measure.

  10. A Local Order Parameter-Based Method for Simulation of Free Energy Barriers in Crystal Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Hossein; Khanjari, Neda; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2017-03-14

    While global order parameters have been widely used as reaction coordinates in nucleation and crystallization studies, their use in nucleation studies is claimed to have a serious drawback. In this work, a local order parameter is introduced as a local reaction coordinate to drive the simulation from the liquid phase to the solid phase and vice versa. This local order parameter holds information regarding the order in the first- and second-shell neighbors of a particle and has different well-defined values for local crystallites and disordered neighborhoods but is insensitive to the type of the crystal structure. The order parameter is employed in metadynamics simulations to calculate the solid-liquid phase equilibria and free energy barrier to nucleation. Our results for repulsive soft spheres and the Lennard-Jones potential, LJ(12-6), reveal better-resolved solid and liquid basins compared with the case in which a global order parameter is used. It is also shown that the configuration space is sampled more efficiently in the present method, allowing a more accurate calculation of the free energy barrier and the solid-liquid interfacial free energy. Another feature of the present local order parameter-based method is that it is possible to apply the bias potential to regions of interest in the order parameter space, for example, on the largest nucleus in the case of nucleation studies. In the present scheme for metadynamics simulation of the nucleation in supercooled LJ(12-6) particles, unlike the cases in which global order parameters are employed, there is no need to have an estimate of the size of the critical nucleus and to refine the results with the results of umbrella sampling simulations. The barrier heights and the nucleation pathway obtained from this method agree very well with the results of former umbrella sampling simulations.

  11. Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

  12. Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

  13. Precise energy and temperature measurements in dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault-Caron, Mylène; Gagnon, Hervé; Nisol, Bernard; Piyakis, Konstantinos; Wertheimer, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    A specially designed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) cell and associated equipment has been used to carry out precise measurements of electrical energy, {{E}\\text{g}} , dissipated per discharge cycle of the applied ac voltage, Va over the frequency range 5  ⩽  f   ⩽  50 kHz. Twin pairs of several different dielectric materials (2.54 cm diameter discs, thicknesses = 2.0 or ca. 0.1 mm) with relative permittivities between 2.1  ⩽  K{{'}{}}   ⩽  9.5 were used as dielectric barriers in DBDs of four different gases: He, Ne, Ar and N2. Much of the work relates to the study of atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasma in flowing He gas; five separate thermometers (including fiber-optic probes immune to high voltage and high-frequency electromagnetic fields) have enabled us to perform a detailed calorimetric (heat balance) investigation in He APGD, believed to be the first of its kind. Fair agreement in the overall energy balance, which includes vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light emission, lends strong support to the validity of both measurements and methodology. The latter includes refined algorithms that permit rapid data acquisition and processing. The present results are compared with literature, allowing several important conclusions/recommendations to emerge.

  14. Alterations of gut barrier and gut microbiota in food restriction, food deprivation and protein-energy wasting.

    PubMed

    Genton, L; Cani, P D; Schrenzel, J

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence shows that gut microbiota composition is related to changes of gut barrier function including gut permeability and immune function. Gut microbiota is different in obese compared to lean subjects, suggesting that gut microbes are also involved in energy metabolism and subsequent nutritional state. While research on gut microbiota and gut barrier has presently mostly focused on intestinal inflammatory bowel diseases and more recently on obesity and type 2 diabetes, this review aims at summarizing the present knowledge regarding the impact, in vivo, of depleted nutritional states on structure and function of the gut epithelium, the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the gut microbiota and the enteric nervous system. It highlights the complex interactions between the components of gut barrier in depleted states due to food deprivation, food restriction and protein energy wasting and shows that these interactions are multidirectional, implying the existence of feedbacks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  15. Barrier distributions and signatures of transfer channels in the Ca40+Ni58,64 fusion reactions at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgin, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Stefanini, A. M.; Montagnoli, G.; Goasduff, A.; Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Huiming, J.; Scarlassara, F.; Rowley, N.; Szilner, S.; Mijatović, T.

    2014-10-01

    Background: The nuclear structure of colliding nuclei is known to influence the fusion process. Couplings of the relative motion to nuclear shape deformations and vibrations lead to an enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross section in comparison with the predictions of one-dimensional barrier penetration models. This enhancement is explained by coupled-channels calculations including these couplings. The sub-barrier fusion cross section is also affected by nucleon transfer channels between the colliding nuclei. Purpose: The aim of the present experiment is to investigate the influence of the projectile and target nuclear structures on the fusion cross sections in the Ca40+Ni58 and Ca40+Ni64 systems. Methods: The experimental and theoretical fusion excitation functions as well as the barrier distributions were compared for these two systems. Coupled-channels calculations were performed using the ccfull code. Results: Good agreement was found between the measured and calculated fusion cross sections for the Ca40+Ni58 system. The situation is different for the Ca40+Ni64 system where the coupled-channels calculations with no nucleon transfer clearly underestimate the fusion cross sections below the Coulomb barrier. The fusion excitation function was, however, well reproduced at low and high energies by including the coupling to the neutron pair-transfer channel in the calculations. Conclusions: The nuclear structure of the colliding nuclei influences the fusion cross sections below the Coulomb barrier for both Ca40+Ni58,64 systems. Moreover, we highlighted the effect of the neutron pair-transfer channel on the fusion cross sections in Ca40+Ni64.

  16. Fusion excitation function measurement for 6Li+64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastav, A.

    2015-01-01

    Total fusion excitation function has been measured for the reaction of weakly bound 6Li projectile on medium mass 64Ni target at energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. Online characteristic γ-ray detection method has been used to identify and determine the cross sections of the residues. No suppression of total fusion cross section (σTF) is observed at above barrier energies. But enhancement of measured cross section with respect to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1-DBPM) calculation is observed at below barrier energies. The enhancement can not be explained by coupled channels calculation with dominant projectile and target excitations as well as one-neutron stripping reaction.

  17. The effect of applied voltage frequency on surface dielectric barrier discharge energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazukin, A. V.; Gundareva, S. V.; Krivov, S. A.; Nikitin, A. M.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Fedorovich, S. D.

    2016-11-01

    Results of the experimental investigation of surface dielectric barrier discharge's energy dependence on frequency of applied sinusoidal voltage varying from 0.6 to 40 kHz at atmospheric pressure are presented in the paper for disk electrodes of 20, 50 and 150 μm thick. It is shown that surface dielectric barrier discharge's energy dependence on applied voltage frequency represents an U-shaped curve with a distinct minimum. The value and position of energy minimum are related with thickness of the generating plasma electrode, the barrier material and supply voltage. Increase of plasma heat dissipation owing to selection of the dielectric barrier material changes significantly a trend of the U-shaped curve.

  18. A novel method for calculating the energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tchitchekova, Deyana S.; Morthomas, Julien; Perez, Michel; Ribeiro, Fabienne; Ducher, Roland

    2014-07-21

    A novel method for accurate and efficient evaluation of the change in energy barriers for carbon diffusion in ferrite under heterogeneous stress is introduced. This method, called Linear Combination of Stress States, is based on the knowledge of the effects of simple stresses (uniaxial or shear) on these diffusion barriers. Then, it is assumed that the change in energy barriers under a complex stress can be expressed as a linear combination of these already known simple stress effects. The modifications of energy barriers by either uniaxial traction/compression and shear stress are determined by means of atomistic simulations with the Climbing Image-Nudge Elastic Band method and are stored as a set of functions. The results of this method are compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. It is shown that, linear anisotropic elasticity fails to predict the correct energy barrier variation with stress (especially with shear stress) whereas the proposed method provides correct energy barrier variation for stresses up to ∼3 GPa. This study provides a basis for the development of multiscale models of diffusion under non-uniform stress.

  19. Dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers: Cooling season energy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. ); Hall, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. Testing showed that increasing the attic ventilation area ratio from the minimum recommended of 1/300 to 1/150 had little if any effect on the house cooling load with either truss or horizontal barriers present in the attics. Radiant barriers, however, still reduced the house cooling load. There was essentially no difference in house cooling load reduction between either ridge/soffit or gable/soffit vent type with a truss radiant barrier, as both reduced cooling loads by about 8% when compared to no radiant barrier conditions. The attic-ventilation-type testing was done with a ventilation area ratio of 1/150.

  20. Quantum chemical ab initio prediction of proton exchange barriers between CH{sub 4} and different H-zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Tuma, Christian; Sauer, Joachim

    2015-09-14

    A hybrid MP2:DFT (second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory–density functional theory) method that combines MP2 calculations for cluster models with DFT calculations for the full periodic structure is used to localize minima and transition structures for proton jumps at different Brønsted sites in different frameworks (chabazite, faujasite, ferrierite, and ZSM-5) and at different crystallographic positions of a given framework. The MP2 limit for the periodic structures is obtained by extrapolating the results of a series of cluster models of increasing size. A coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) correction to MP2 energies is calculated for cluster models consisting of three tetrahedra. For the adsorption energies, this difference is small, between 0.1 and 0.9 kJ/mol, but for the intrinsic proton exchange barriers, this difference makes a significant (10.85 ± 0.25 kJ/mol) and almost constant contribution across different systems. The total values of the adsorption energies vary between 22 and 34 kJ/mol, whereas the total proton exchange energy barriers fall in the narrow range of 152–156 kJ/mol. After adding nuclear motion contributions (harmonic approximation, 298 K), intrinsic enthalpy barriers between 134 and 141 kJ/mol and apparent energy barriers between 105 and 118 kJ/mol are predicted for the different sites examined for the different frameworks. These predictions are consistent with experimental results available for faujasite, ferrierite, and ZSM-5.

  1. Energy measurements of attic radiant barriers installed in single-family houses

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    Testing was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the energy savings attributable to radiant barriers installed in attics of unoccupied single-family houses. Three levels of fiberglass attic insulation (R-11 ,R-19, and R-30) were tested with two types of barrier installation (horizontal and truss). The results showed that horizontally installed radiant barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing heating and cooling loads. Measured cooling load reductions ranged form 0 to 22% (compared to same attic insulation insulation R-value with no radiant barrier) and heating load changes from /plus/4% to /minus/10% were measured (compared to same attic insulation R-value with no radiant barrier). Radiant barriers appeared to decrease the heating and cooling loads more when lesser amounts of insulation (R-11 and R-19) were present in an attic. Minimal changes were measured when R-30 was present in an attic. Long-term effects of dust on the performance of radiant barriers as well as the effects of moisture condensing on the surface of a radiant barrier during cold winter temperatures remain unanswered.

  2. Language differences as a barrier to quality and safety in health care: the Joint Commission perspective.

    PubMed

    Schyve, Paul M

    2007-11-01

    Effective communication with patients is critical to the safety and quality of care. Barriers to this communication include differences in language, cultural differences, and low health literacy. Evidence-based practices that reduce these barriers must be integrated into, rather than just added to, health care work processes.

  3. Ion channel gates: comparative analysis of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kaihsu; Haider, Shozeb; Grottesi, Alessandro; Sansom, Mark S P

    2009-04-01

    The energetic profile of an ion translated along the axis of an ion channel should reveal whether the structure corresponds to a functionally open or closed state of the channel. In this study, we explore the combined use of Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and evaluation of van der Waals interactions between ion and pore to provide an initial appraisal of the gating state of a channel. This approach is exemplified by its application to the bacterial inward rectifier potassium channel KirBac3.1, where it reveals the closed gate to be formed by a ring of leucine (L124) side chains. We have extended this analysis to a comparative survey of gating profiles, including model hydrophobic nanopores, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and a number of potassium channel structures and models. This enables us to identify three gating regimes, and to show the limitation of this computationally inexpensive method. For a (closed) gate radius of 0.4 nm < R < 0.8 nm, a hydrophobic gate may be present. For a gate radius of 0.2 nm < R < 0.4 nm, both electrostatic and van der Waals interactions will contribute to the barrier height. Below R = 0.2 nm, repulsive van der Waals interactions are likely to dominate, resulting in a sterically occluded gate. In general, the method is more useful when the channel is wider; for narrower channels, the flexibility of the protein may allow otherwise-unsurmountable energetic barriers to be overcome.

  4. Electric current effect on the energy barrier of magnetic domain wall depinning: origin of the quadratic contribution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Ryu, Jisu; Gim, Gi-Hong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Choe, Sug-Bong

    2011-11-18

    The energy barrier of a magnetic domain wall trapped at a defect is measured experimentally. When the domain wall is pushed by an electric current and/or a magnetic field, the depinning time from the barrier exhibits perfect exponential distribution, indicating that a single energy barrier governs the depinning. The electric current is found to generate linear and quadratic contributions to the energy barrier, which are attributed to the nonadiabatic and adiabatic spin-transfer torques, respectively. The adiabatic spin-transfer torque reduces the energy barrier and, consequently, causes depinning at lower current densities, promising a way toward low-power current-controlled magnetic applications.

  5. Free energy and hidden barriers of the β-sheet structure of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Paz, S Alexis; Abrams, Cameron F

    2015-10-13

    On-the-fly free-energy parametrization is a new collective variable biasing approach akin to metadynamics with one important distinction: rather than acquiring an accelerated distribution via a history-dependent bias potential, sampling on this distribution is achieved from the beginning of the simulation using temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics. In the present work, we compare the performance of both approaches to compute the free-energy profile along a scalar collective variable measuring the H-bond registry of the β-sheet structure of the mouse Prion protein. Both methods agree on the location of the free-energy minimum, but free-energy profiles from well-tempered metadynamics are subject to a much higher degree of statistical noise due to hidden barriers. The sensitivity of metadynamics to hidden barriers is shown to be a consequence of the history dependence of the bias potential, and we detail the nature of these barriers for the prion β-sheet. In contrast, on-the-fly parametrization is much less sensitive to these barriers and thus displays improved convergence behavior relative to that of metadynamics. While hidden barriers are a frequent and central issue in free-energy methods, on-the-fly free-energy parametrization appears to be a robust and preferable method to confront this issue.

  6. Do stigma and other perceived barriers to mental health care differ across Armed Forces?

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Matthew; Adler, Amy; Zamorski, Mark; Castro, Carl; Hanily, Natalie; Steele, Nicole; Kearney, Steve; Greenberg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives Military organizations are keen to address barriers to mental health care yet stigma and barriers to care remain little understood, especially potential cultural differences between Armed Forces. The aim of this study was to compare data collected by the US, UK, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian militaries using Hoge et al.'s perceived stigma and barriers to care measure (Combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, mental health problems and barriers to care. New Engl J Med 2004;351:13–22). Design Each member country identified data sources that had enquired about Hoge et al.'s perceived stigma and perceived barriers to care items in the re-deployment or immediate post-deployment period. Five relevant statements were included in the study. Setting US, UK Australian, New Zealand and Canadian Armed Forces. Results Concerns about stigma and barriers to care tended to be more prominent among personnel who met criteria for a mental health problem. The pattern of reported stigma and barriers to care was similar across the Armed Forces of all five nations. Conclusions Barriers to care continue to be a major issue for service personnel within Western military forces. Although there are policy, procedural and cultural differences between Armed Forces, the nations studied appear to share some similarities in terms of perceived stigma and barriers to psychological care. Further research to understand patterns of reporting and subgroup differences is required. PMID:20382906

  7. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  8. Financing Projects That Use Clean-Energy Technologies. An Overview of Barriers and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D. P.; McKenna, J. J.; Murphy, L. M.

    2005-10-01

    This technical paper describes the importance of project financing for clean-energy technology deployment. It describes the key challenges in financing clean-energy technology projects, including technical risks, credit worthiness risk, revenue security risk, market competition, scale and related cost, as well as first-steps to overcome those barriers.

  9. On the role of energy barriers in determining contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Chen, P

    2006-11-30

    The thermodynamic model of contact angles on rough, heterogeneous surfaces developed by Long et al. [J. Long, M.N. Hyder, R.Y.M. Huang and P. Chen, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 118 (2005) 173] was employed to study the role of energy barriers in determining contact angle hysteresis. Major energy barriers corresponding to metastable states and minor energy barriers corresponding to secondary metastable states were defined. Distributions of major and/or minor energy barriers as a function of apparent contact angle for various surfaces were obtained. The reproducibility of contact angle measurement, the effect of vibrational energy on contact angle hysteresis and the "stick-slip" phenomenon were discussed. Quantitative relations between contact angles and vibrational energy were obtained. It was found that receding contact angles are normally poorly reproducible for hydrophilic surfaces, but for extremely hydrophobic surfaces, advancing contact angles may have a poor reproducibility. When the vibrational energy available to a system increases, the measured advancing contact angle will decrease while the receding angle will increase until both reach a common value: the system equilibrium angle. This finding not only agrees well with the experimental observations in system equilibrium contact angle measurements, but also lays a theoretical foundation for such measurements. A small vibrational energy may result in a "stick-slip" phenomenon.

  10. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  11. Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Energy Efficient Heat Engines Program

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine Faber

    2004-10-31

    This program aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of the microstructural, mechanical, and chemical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based coatings for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (AS800) substrates and optimize such coatings for environmental barriers. The program consisted of three tasks: processing of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings, phase and microstructural development, and life-limiting phenomena. Northwestern University formed a cross-functional team with Lehigh University, Honeywell Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major accomplishments are: (1) Conditions for the plasma spray of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and its alloys were optimized to provide maximum density and thickness. (2) Adherent small particle plasma spray coatings of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be routinely prepared. (3) Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be stabilized against its disruptive phase transformation to 1400 C by the addition of one or more oxides of Al, La, and/or Nb. (4) Residual stresses in the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were measured using X-rays and changed with thermal exposure. (5) Properly doped coatings are more resistant against thermal cycling than undoped coatings, and can be cycled many thousand times without spallation. (6) Water vapor testing in the ORNL Keiser Rig of adherent coatings showed that undoped Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is not an effective barrier at preventing chemical changes to the AS800. (7) Limited water vapor testing of doped and adherent coatings, which had successfully survived many thermal cycles, showed that in the water vapor environment, de-cohesion may occur.

  12. Investigation of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge actuators with powered electrodes of different exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuangyan; Cai, Jinsheng; Lian, Yongsheng

    2017-09-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge actuators with powered electrodes of different exposures were investigated numerically by using a newly proposed plasma kinetic model. The governing equations include the coupled continuity plasma discharge equation, drift-diffusion equation, electron energy equation, Poisson’s equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations. Powered electrodes of three different exposures were simulated to understand the effect of surface exposure on plasma discharge and surrounding flow field. Our study showed that the fully exposed powered electrode resulted in earlier reduced electric field breakdown and more intensive discharge characteristics than partially exposed and rounded-exposed ones. Our study also showed that the reduced electric field and heat release concentrated near the right upper tip of the powered electrode. The fully exposed electrode also led to stronger shock wave, higher heating temperature, and larger heated area.

  13. Free-energy barrier for electric-field-driven polymer entry into nanoscale channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, Narges; Fazli, Hossein

    2011-05-01

    Free-energy barrier for entry of a charged polymer into a nanoscale channel by a driving electric field is studied theoretically and using molecular dynamics simulations. Dependence of the barrier height on the polymer length, the driving field strength, and the channel entrance geometry is investigated. Squeezing effect of the electric field on the polymer before its entry to the channel is taken into account. It is shown that lateral confinement of the polymer prior to its entry changes the polymer length dependence of the barrier height noticeably. Our theory and simulation results are in good agreement and reasonably describe related experimental data.

  14. Free Energy Barrier for Molecular Motions in Bistable [2]Rotaxane Molecular Electronic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-10

    cyclophane cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) with the π-electron-rich tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene ( DNP ) stations provides...simulations to calculate the free energy barrier for the shuttling of the CBPQT4+ ring between the TTF and the DNP . The approach used here was to...oxidization). The return barrier from the DNP to the TTF leads to a predicted lifetime of 2.1 s, which is compatible with experiments. 1. Introduction The

  15. Removing the barrier to the calculation of activation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mesele, Oluwaseun O.; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-10-06

    Approaches for directly calculating the activation energy for a chemical reaction from a simulation at a single temperature are explored with applications to both classical and quantum systems. The activation energy is obtained from a time correlation function that can be evaluated from the same molecular dynamics trajectories or quantum dynamics used to evaluate the rate constant itself and thus requires essentially no extra computational work.

  16. Removing the barrier to the calculation of activation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mesele, Oluwaseun O.; Thompson, Ward H.

    2016-10-06

    Approaches for directly calculating the activation energy for a chemical reaction from a simulation at a single temperature are explored with applications to both classical and quantum systems. The activation energy is obtained from a time correlation function that can be evaluated from the same molecular dynamics trajectories or quantum dynamics used to evaluate the rate constant itself and thus requires essentially no extra computational work.

  17. Field-dependent energy barriers in Co/CoO core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, P.; Kechrakos, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2016-02-01

    We perform atomistic modeling of Co/CoO nanoparticles with a diameter of a few nanometers and realistic values of the exchange and anisotropy parameters in order to study the field-dependent energy barriers under forward and backward reversal of the magnetization. The barriers are extracted from the constrained energy minimization using the integration of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations and the Lagrange multiplier method. We show that the applied field and the interface exchange strength have opposite effects on the values of the energy barriers. In particular, while the backward (forward) energy barrier increases (decreases) linearly with the strength of the interface exchange coupling, it decreases (increases) almost quadratically with the applied magnetic field. Our results are in good agreement with the well-known Meiklejohn-Bean model of exchange bias, and allow us to analyze the limits of applicability of the macrospin approach to the study of energy barriers in core-shell Co/CoO nanoparticles.

  18. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  19. Gender and Ethnic Differences in the Perception of Barriers to Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzzo, Darrell Anthony

    The present study examined: (1) the relationship between the number and types of occupational barriers perceived by college students and their current levels of career development; and (2) gender and ethnic differences in the types of barriers perceived. Participants (129 women and 59 men) responded to open-ended questions about perceived barriers…

  20. The Clean Air Act and Renewable Energy: Opportunities, Barriers, and Options

    SciTech Connect

    Wooley, D.R.; Morss, E.M.; Fang, J.M.

    2001-03-01

    This paper examines the opportunities, obstacles, and potential options to promote renewable energy under the CAA and related programs. It deals, in sequence, with the regulation of SO2, NOx, regional haze/particulate matter, and CO2. For each pollutant, the paper discusses the opportunities, barriers, and options for boosting renewables under the CAA. It concludes by comparing the options discussed. The paper is based on a project on environmental regulation and renewable energy in electricity generation conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Office of Power Technologies, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy.

  1. Overcoming barriers to residential conservation: do energy audits help

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A study on the effects of energy audits on the pace and choice of household investment in energy-saving improvements in the home is reported. An evaluation based on the household's assessment of the usefulness of the audit which was provided for their home was performed. The number and types of recent conservation actions among audited and unaudited samples of households are compared. The audit's effect on household knowledge about the economically attractive options for their home and on the choice of recent improvements is assessed. Possible reasons are suggested for the weak effect of audits in stimulating activity and reorienting investment choices. (LEW)

  2. Calculation of free energy barriers to the fusion of small vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Schick, M

    2008-03-01

    The fusion of small vesicles, either with a planar bilayer or with one another, is studied using a microscopic model in which the bilayers are composed of hexagonal- and lamellar-forming amphiphiles. The free energy of the system is obtained within the self-consistent field approximation. We find that the free energy barrier to form the initial stalk is hardly affected by the radius of the vesicle, but that the barrier to expand the hemifusion diaphragm and form a fusion pore decreases rapidly as the radius decreases. As a consequence, once the initial barrier to stalk formation is overcome, one which we estimate at 13 k(B)T for biological membranes, fusion involving small vesicles should proceed with little or no further input of energy.

  3. Numerical determination of the interfacial energy and nucleation barrier of curved solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, Julia; Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal

    2016-07-01

    The phase-field crystal (PFC) technique is a widely used approach for modeling crystal growth phenomena with atomistic resolution on mesoscopic time scales. We use a two-dimensional PFC model for a binary system based on the work of Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study the effect of the curved, diffuse solid-liquid interface on the interfacial energy as well as the nucleation barrier. The calculation of the interfacial energy and the nucleation barrier certainly depends on the proper definition of the solid-liquid dividing surface and the corresponding nucleus size. We define the position of the sharp interface at which the interfacial energy is to be evaluated by using the concept of equimolar dividing surface (re) and the minimization of the interfacial energy (rs). The comparison of the results based on both radii shows that the difference re-rs is always positive and has a limit for large cluster sizes which is comparable to the Tolman length. Furthermore, we found the real nucleation barrier for small cluster sizes, which is defined as a function of the radius rs, and compared it with the classical nucleation theory. The simulation results also show that the extracted interfacial energy as function of both radii is independent of system size, and this dependence can be reasonably described by the nonclassical Tolman formula with a positive Tolman length.

  4. Numerical determination of the interfacial energy and nucleation barrier of curved solid-liquid interfaces in binary systems.

    PubMed

    Kundin, Julia; Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal

    2016-07-01

    The phase-field crystal (PFC) technique is a widely used approach for modeling crystal growth phenomena with atomistic resolution on mesoscopic time scales. We use a two-dimensional PFC model for a binary system based on the work of Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007)PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study the effect of the curved, diffuse solid-liquid interface on the interfacial energy as well as the nucleation barrier. The calculation of the interfacial energy and the nucleation barrier certainly depends on the proper definition of the solid-liquid dividing surface and the corresponding nucleus size. We define the position of the sharp interface at which the interfacial energy is to be evaluated by using the concept of equimolar dividing surface (r^{e}) and the minimization of the interfacial energy (r^{s}). The comparison of the results based on both radii shows that the difference r^{e}-r^{s} is always positive and has a limit for large cluster sizes which is comparable to the Tolman length. Furthermore, we found the real nucleation barrier for small cluster sizes, which is defined as a function of the radius r^{s}, and compared it with the classical nucleation theory. The simulation results also show that the extracted interfacial energy as function of both radii is independent of system size, and this dependence can be reasonably described by the nonclassical Tolman formula with a positive Tolman length.

  5. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  6. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO{sub 2} junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein-Babaei, F. E-mail: fhbabaei@yahoo.com; Lajvardi, Mehdi M. Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2015-02-23

    Nobel metal/TiO{sub 2} structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO{sub 2}-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO{sub 2} layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO{sub 2} behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 10{sup 6} times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO{sub 2} contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  7. Technical Barriers, Gaps, and Opportunities Related to Home Energy Upgrade Market Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, M. V. A.

    2011-11-01

    This report outlines the technical barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. The objective of this report is to outline the technical1 barriers, gaps, and opportunities that arise in executing home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, as identified through research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program. This information will be used to provide guidance for new research necessary to enable the success of the approaches. Investigation for this report was conducted via publications related to home energy upgrade market delivery approaches, and a series of interviews with subject matter experts (contractors, consultants, program managers, manufacturers, trade organization representatives, and real estate agents). These experts specified technical barriers and gaps, and offered suggestions for how the technical community might address them. The potential benefits of home energy upgrades are many and varied: reduced energy use and costs; improved comfort, durability, and safety; increased property value; and job creation. Nevertheless, home energy upgrades do not comprise a large part of the overall home improvement market. Residential energy efficiency is the most complex climate intervention option to deliver because the market failures are many and transaction costs are high (Climate Change Capital 2009). The key reasons that energy efficiency investment is not being delivered are: (1) The opportunity is highly fragmented; and (2) The energy efficiency assets are nonstatus, low-visibility investments that are not properly valued. There are significant barriers to mobilizing the investment in home energy upgrades, including the 'hassle factor' (the time and effort required to identify and secure improvement works), access to financing, and the opportunity cost of

  8. Energy Savings Certificate Markets: Opportunities and Implementation Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, B.; Bird, L.; Barbose, G.

    2009-07-01

    Early experiences with energy savings certificates (ESCs) have revealed their merits and the challenges associated with them. While in the United States ESC markets have yet to gain significant traction, lessons can be drawn from early experiences in the states of Connecticut and New York, as well as from established markets in Italy, France, and elsewhere. The staying power of European examples demonstrates that ESCs can help initiate more efficiency projects. This article compares ESCs with renewable energy certificates (RECs), looks at the unique opportunities and challenges they present, and reviews solutions and best practices demonstrated by early ESC markets. Three major potential ESC market types are also reviewed: compliance, voluntary, and carbon. Additionally, factors that will benefit ESC markets in the United States are examined: new state EEPS policies, public interest in tools to mitigate climate change, and the growing interest in a voluntary market for ESCs.

  9. Fusion enhancement at near and sub-barrier energies in 19O + 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Vadas, J.; Steinbach, T. K.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; deSouza, R. T.; Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, C. J.; Baby, L. T.; Kuvin, S. A.; Tripathi, Vandana; Wiedenhöver, I.; Umar, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Measuring the fusion excitation function for an isotopic chain of projectile nuclei provides a stringent test of a microscopic description of fusion. We report the first measurement of the fusion excitation function at near-barrier energies for the 19O + 12C system. The measured excitation function is compared with the fusion excitation function of 18O + 12C. A significant enhancement in the fusion probability of 19O ions with a 12C target as compared to 18O ions is observed. The experimental cross-sections observed at near-barrier energies are compared with a state-of-the-art microscopic model.

  10. Elastic scattering of {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cubero, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.; Buchmann, L.; Shotter, A.; Walden, P.; Diget, D. G.; Fulton, B.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Mukha, I.

    2011-10-28

    We have studied the dynamical effects of the halo structure of {sup 11}Li on the scattering on heavy targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier. This experiment was performed at ISAC-II at TRIUMF with a world record in production of the post-accelerated {sup 11}Li beam. As part of this study we report here on the first measurement of the elastic cross section of the core nucleus, i.e. {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb, at energies around the Coulomb barrier. A preliminary optical model analysis has been performed in order to extract a global optical potential to describe the measured angular distributions.

  11. Fusion enhancement at near and sub-barrier energies in 19O + 12C

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Varinderjit; Vadas, J.; Steinbach, T. K.; ...

    2016-12-12

    Measuring the fusion excitation function for an isotopic chain of projectile nuclei provides a stringent test of a microscopic description of fusion. We report the first measurement of the fusion excitation function at near-barrier energies for the 19O+12C system. The measured excitation function is compared with the fusion excitation function of 18O+12C. A significant enhancement in the fusion probability of 19O ions with a 12C target as compared to 18O ions is observed. As a result, the experimental cross-sections observed at near-barrier energies are compared with a state-of-the-art microscopic model.

  12. Analysis of the barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas Elisha

    Native American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.

  13. Elastic scattering of {sup 6}Li on {sup 64}Zn at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zadro, M.; Figuera, P.; Pietro, A. Di; Fisichella, M.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Amorini, F.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Rizzo, F.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Goryunov, O.; Ostashko, V.; Papa, M.

    2009-12-15

    Elastic-scattering angular distributions for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 64}Zn system were measured at eight beam energies from below to above the Coulomb barrier, 12.0{<=}E{sub lab}{<=}22.0 MeV. The experimental data were analyzed within the optical model to study the energy dependence of the interaction potential and to obtain total reaction cross sections. The results obtained using several optical model potentials show similar behavior. The energy dependence of the strengths of the real and imaginary potentials suggests the presence of the breakup threshold anomaly. It is shown that the extracted energy dependence of the interaction potential at sub-barrier energies is very sensitive to possible experimental errors.

  14. Analyzing Barriers to Energy Conservation in Residences and Offices: The Rewire Program at the University of Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Leah C.; Mildenberger, Matto; Savan, Beth; Kolenda, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Conducting a barriers analysis is an important first step when designing proenvironmental behavior change interventions. Yet, detailed information on common barriers to energy conservation campaigns remains unavailable. Using a pair of original surveys, we leverage the theory of planned behavior to report on the most important barriers for…

  15. Analyzing Barriers to Energy Conservation in Residences and Offices: The Rewire Program at the University of Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Leah C.; Mildenberger, Matto; Savan, Beth; Kolenda, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Conducting a barriers analysis is an important first step when designing proenvironmental behavior change interventions. Yet, detailed information on common barriers to energy conservation campaigns remains unavailable. Using a pair of original surveys, we leverage the theory of planned behavior to report on the most important barriers for…

  16. Temperature-dependent hydration at micellar surface: activation energy barrier crossing model revisited.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Rajib Kumar; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2007-07-05

    In recent years, the validity of the activation energy barrier crossing model at the micellar surface brings notable controversy (Sen, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Halder, A.; Bhattacharyya, K. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2004, 385, 357-361. Kumbhakar, M.; Goel, T.; Mukherjee, T.; Pal, H. J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108, 19246-19254.) in the literature. In order to check the validity of the model by time-resolved solvation of a probe fluorophore, a wider range of temperature must be considered. At the same time, spatial heterogeneity (solubilization) of the probe and structural perturbation of the host micelle should carefully be avoided, which was not strictly maintained in the earlier studies. We report here the solvation dynamics of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6(p-dimethylamino-styryl) 4H-pyran (DCM) in the SDS micelle at 298, 323, and 348 K. The probe DCM is completely insoluble in bulk water in this wide range of temperature. The size of the micelle at different temperatures using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique is found to have insignificant change. The hydration number of the micelle, determined by sound velocity measurements, decreases with increasing temperature. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy reveals the retention of the probe in the micellar interface within the temperature range. The average solvation time decreases with increasing temperature. The result of the solvation study has been analyzed in the light of energetics of bound to free water conversion at a constant size and decreasing hydration number at the micellar surface. The solvation process at the micellar surface has been found to be the activation energy barrier crossing type, in which interfacially bound type water molecules get converted into free type molecules. We have calculated Ea to be 3.5 kcal mol-1, which is in good agreement with that obtained by molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  17. Lack of an energy policy remains a major barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports that the war with Iraq provided a new dimension to the ongoing oil industry struggle to cope with oppressive government action and regulation. Coming as it did just before the administration was to announce guidelines for a long-awaited National Energy Strategy (NES), the war created a renewed and dramatic focus on the national energy security question. Now, numerous congressmen, senators and administration leaders are taking a fresh look at how the U.S. can extricate itself from excessive dependence on Middle East oil imports. For example, the planned free-trade agreement with Mexico could figure prominently in an alliance that would bring much more Mexican oil to the U.S. Meanwhile, the wild card is proposals to open up U.S. drilling offshore and in the Arctic National Wildlife Region (ANWR). Prior to hostilities, Middle East tensions brought on significant increases in the price of oil, and with it a large gain in oil company profits for fourth-quarter 1990. Result: talk in Congress of a new windfall profits tax.

  18. SCC-DFTB Energy Barriers for Single and Double Proton Transfer Processes in the Model Molecular Systems Malonaldehyde and Porphycene

    SciTech Connect

    Walewski, L.; Krachtus, D; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C; Bala, P.; Lesyng, B.

    2005-09-01

    Self-consistent charge-density functional tight-binding SCC-DFTB is a computationally efficient method applicable to large (bio)molecular systems in which (bio)chemical reactions may occur. Among these reactions are proton transfer processes. This method, along with more advanced ab initio techniques, is applied in this study to compute intramolecular barriers for single and double proton transfer processes in the model systems, malonaldehyde and porphycene, respectively. SCC-DFTB is compared with experimental data and higher-level ab initio calculations. For malonaldehyde, the SCC-DFTB barrier height is 3.1 kcal/mol in vacuo and 4.2 kcal/mol in water solution. In the case of porphycene, the minimum energy pathways for double intramolecular proton transfer were determined using the conjugate peak refinement (CPR) method. Six isomers of porphycene were ordered according to energy. The only energetically allowed pathway was found to connect two symmetrical trans states via an unstable cis-A isomer. The SCC-DFTB barrier heights are 11.1 kcal/mol for the trans-cis-A process, and 7.4 kcal/mol for the reverse cis-A-trans one with the energy difference of 3.7 kcal/mol between the trans- and cis-A states. The method provides satisfactory energy results when compared with reference ab initio and experimental data.

  19. 6Li breakup from 208Pb target at Coulomb barrier energies: doorway to reaction mechanism induced by loosely bound/halo nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Scopel, P.; Signorini, C.; Fortunato, L.; Soramel, F.; Thompson, I. J.; Vitturi, A.; Barbui, M.; Brondi, A.; Cinausero, M.; Fabris, D.; Fioretto, E.; La Rana, G.; Lunardon, M.; Moro, R.; Ordine, A.; Prete, G. F.; Rizzi, V.; Stroe, L.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Viesti, G.

    2004-12-01

    The breakup cross section of the system 6Li + 208Pb has been measured at four beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier and the excitation energy distributions of the α + d/ 6Li * system have been deduced. Comparison of the experimental data with two different theoretical approaches strongly supports the direct breakup process description.

  20. State Successes: Using Outreach and Eduction to Transcend Barriers to Wind Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.; Flowers, L.

    2010-05-01

    Many states projected to contribute significantly to the United States' 20% wind energy by 2030 goal have not yet achieved a first wind farm, and many more have not yet hit the 100-MW mark. These states are struggling with basic barriers of the need for understanding of the wind resource; wind energy benefits and impacts; economic development, water, and carbon impacts; issues such as transmission, utility integration, siting, and wildlife; involvement of key constituents such as the electrical sector, the ag sector, and county commissioners; effective policy; and an educated public and an educated workforce. Other states have partially transcended these barriers and are encountering organized pushback; NIMBYism; siting problems such as zoning, permitting, and environmental issues; and interstate barriers such as transmission.

  1. Interdependence of different symmetry energy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, C.; Agrawal, B. K.; De, J. N.; Samaddar, S. K.; Centelles, M.; Viñas, X.

    2017-08-01

    Relations between the nuclear symmetry energy coefficient and its density derivatives are derived. The relations hold for a class of interactions with quadratic momentum dependence and a power-law density dependence. The structural connection between the different symmetry energy elements as obtained seems to be followed by almost all reasonable nuclear energy density functionals, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, suggesting a universality in the correlation structure. This, coupled with known values of some well-accepted constants related to nuclear matter, helps in constraining values of different density derivatives of the nuclear symmetry energy, shedding light on the isovector part of the nuclear interaction.

  2. Investigation of the hole resonant energies in GaAs-AlGaAs double-barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkal, N.; Zitouni, K.; Kadri, A.

    1994-12-01

    A rigorous calculation of the resonant energies corresponding to valence sub-band hold transmission maxima is presented for GaAs/AlGaAs double-barrier heterostructures, employing the k.p method, the envelope-function approximation, and transfer matrix techniques. Incident waves associated with both the two light-hole and two heavy-hole bands are treated explicitly.

  3. Facile Control of Interfacial Energy-Barrier Scattering in Antimony Telluride Electrodeposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiwon; Jung, Hyunsung; Lim, Jae-Hong; Myung, Nosang V.

    2017-04-01

    The augmented thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) films is investigated by introducing interfacial energy-barrier scattering (i.e., barrier heights), which occurs at both the grain boundaries and the interfaces with embedded second phases. It is postulated that the barriers created at both the interfaces and boundaries filter the low-energy carriers, thus favoring a high Seebeck coefficient. A facile, but high-precision composition-controlled electrodeposition technique is employed to synthesize single-phase nanocrystalline Sb2Te3 and nanocomposite Te/Sb2Te3. Both the initial composition of the Sb-Te solid solution and the post-annealing profiles are varied to control the grain size, as well as the formation of second-phase Te. The electrical and thermoelectric properties are measured and correlated with the physical properties, where an enhanced Seebeck coefficient at a fixed carrier concentration is interpreted as indicating that the energy-dependent carrier filtering effect is in force. On a promising note, modification of the Sb2Te3 film physical properties and formation of the second phase affect the interfacial energy-barrier scattering and yields an enhanced power factor. Thus, Sb2Te3 film is a promising p-type thermoelectric material for a room-temperature-operational micro-thermoelectric power generator.

  4. Addressing Barriers to Wind Energy by Creating Consensus through Information Dissemination and Outreach: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Perchlik

    2003-02-28

    OAK B188 The sixteen month project to address barriers to the development of VT wind energy was successful. The project built consensus on wind energy siting issues through four stakeholder workshops and engaged Vermonters on wind energy issues with a wind energy information dissemination and outreach campaign. There is still a great need for more outreach and accurate wind energy information dissemination on the local level where informed discussion on the cost and benefits of wind energy projects needs to be held. The stakeholder workshop framework and outreach tools that were created by this project will be helpful tools as state agencies, wind developers, non-profit organizations and concerned citizens (in Vermont and around the country) continue to discuss wind energy projects and the role of wind energy in comprehensive energy plans. Given the success of this project it is recommended that other states replicate this project as a way to help overcome the barriers to win d energy development. This report provides: an overview of the project accomplishments, detailed quarter by quarter descriptions of the project activities, activities spawned by the project, conclusions, and copies of all the documents created during the project as attachments (No.1-8).

  5. Difference in flowering time as an isolating barrier.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka; Yasumoto, Akiko A; Nitta, Kozue; Yahara, Tetsukazu; Tachida, Hidenori

    2013-01-21

    Although many theoretical studies have reported strong effects of different flowering times on reproductive isolation, such studies have all focused on the different flowering time within a season, and the subsequently developed models are difficult to apply to the cases of diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering species pairs. The different flowering times within a day differ from those within a season because of the simultaneous opening and closing of the flowers for each species and the carry-over of the pollen from early to later times. In this study, we consider pollinator-mediated, diurnal- and nocturnal-flowering plants and build a new model to study the effects of the different flowering times within a day on reproductive isolation. We assume two loci, each with two alleles, which determine the opening and closing times of flowers, respectively. We numerically calculate the changes in the frequencies of the gametes in a model incorporating the reductions in hybrid viability, flowering costs, recombination rate and degree of dominance at each locus. We found that the early-opening flowers had a much higher fitness than the late-opening flowers and that the maintenance of the two species was difficult even if their flowering times were not overlapping. Therefore, some other mechanisms, such as pollinator preference, may be required to explain the coexistence of closely related diurnal and nocturnal flowers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Origin of the Energy Barrier to Chemical Reactions of O2 on Al(111): Evidence for Charge Transfer, Not Spin Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    change of O2 spin, at the barrier [Fig. 3]; i.e., the corresponding diabatic surfaces cross. Far from the Al surface, the triplet state is...previous theoretical models, in particular nonadiabatic [17] or diabatic [16] approaches, which also find an energy barrier consistent with experiment...crossings of different diabatic O2 spin configuration sur- faces are accommodated by small spin fluctuations within the metal surface. For parallel

  7. Fusion cross sections in systems leading to [sup 170]Hf at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, S.; Hasenbalg, F.; Testoni, J.E.; Abriola, D.; Berisso, M.C.; di Tada, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Pacheco, A.J. ); Charlop, A.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Vandenbosch, R. )

    1995-03-01

    In an effort to study the effect of the entrance channel mass asymmetry on the fusion process at near-barrier energies, we have measured the fusion cross section and its distribution according to the different evaporation residues for the [sup 28]Si+[sup 142]Ce, [sup 32]S+[sup 138]Ba, and [sup 48]Ti+[sup 122]Sn systems. All these systems lead to the same compound nucleus [sup 170]Hf. The measurements were performed using a delayed x-ray technique. For the last two systems we have also measured the fission cross sections in the same bombarding energy range. This experimental information can be used to restrict the free parameters of the statistical model used to account for the relative yield. A constrained and realistic statistical decay model is useful in reducing the uncertainties in the determination of the spin distribution from measurements of gamma multiplicities for these systems. The excitation function for the fusion cross section can be described using a schematic coupled channels calculation with realistic coupling strengths. Our results show no umambiguous effect that can be associated with the entrance channel mass asymmetry.

  8. Understanding {sup 6}He induced reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Escrig, D.; Tengblad, O.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.

    2009-06-03

    Recent developments aimed to understand the observed features arising in the scattering of the Borromean nucleus {sup 6}He on heavy targets are discussed and compared with recent data for {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb measured at the RIB facility at Louvain-la-Neuve at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The analysis of the elastic scattering data in terms of the optical model, reveals the presence of a long range absorption mechanism, that manifests in the form of a large value of the imaginary diffuseness parameter. The elastic data have been also compared with three--body CDCC calculations, based on a di-neutron model of {sup 6}He, and four--body CDCC calculations, based on a more realistic three-body model of this nucleus. Finally, the angular and energy distribution of {alpha} particles emitted at backward angles are discussed and compared with different theoretical approaches. We find that these {alpha} particles are produced mainly by a two-neutron transfer mechanism to very excited states in the residual nucleus.

  9. Ethnic differences in cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in England

    PubMed Central

    Niksic, Maja; Rachet, Bernard; Warburton, Fiona G; Forbes, Lindsay J L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ethnic differences in cancer symptom awareness and barriers to seeking medical help in the English population are not fully understood. We aimed to quantify these differences, to help develop more effective health campaigns, tailored to the needs of different ethnic groups. Methods: Using a large national data set (n=38 492) of cross-sectional surveys that used the Cancer Research UK Cancer Awareness Measure, we examined how cancer symptom awareness and barriers varied by ethnicity, controlling for socio-economic position, age and gender. Data were analysed using multivariable logistic regression. Results: Awareness of cancer symptoms was lower in minority ethnic groups than White participants, with the lowest awareness observed among Bangladeshis and Black Africans. Ethnic minorities were more likely than White British to report barriers to help-seeking. South Asians reported the highest emotional barriers, such as lack of confidence to talk to the doctor, and practical barriers, such as worry about many other things. The Irish were more likely than the White British to report practical barriers, such as being too busy to visit a doctor. White British participants were more likely than any other ethnic group to report that they would feel worried about wasting the doctor's time. Overall, Black Africans had the lowest barriers. All differences were statistically significant (P<0.01 level), after controlling for confounders. Conclusions: Our findings suggest the need for culturally sensitive and targeted health campaigns, focused on improving recognition of cancer symptoms among ethnic minorities. Campaigns should tackle the specific barriers prevalent in each ethnic group. PMID:27280638

  10. Free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of binary hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Ganagalla, Srinivasa Rao; Punnathanam, Sudeep N

    2013-05-07

    In this study, the free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a system that exhibits a eutectic point are computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The system studied is a binary hard sphere mixture with a diameter ratio of 0.85 between the smaller and larger hard spheres. The simulations of crystal nucleation are performed for the entire range of fluid compositions. The free energy barrier is found to be the highest near the eutectic point and is nearly five times that for the pure fluid, which slows down the nucleation rate by a factor of 10(-31). These free energy barriers are some of highest ever computed using simulations. For most of the conditions studied, the composition of the critical nucleus corresponds to either one of the two thermodynamically stable solid phases. However, near the eutectic point, the nucleation barrier is lowest for the formation of the metastable random hexagonal closed packed (rhcp) solid phase with composition lying in the two-phase region of the phase diagram. The fluid to solid phase transition is hypothesized to proceed via formation of a metastable rhcp phase followed by a phase separation into respective stable fcc solid phases.

  11. Investigation of Li6+Ni64 fusion at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Md. Moin; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastava, A.

    2014-08-01

    The total fusion (TF) excitation function for a Li6 projectile with a Ni64 target has been measured using the online characteristic γ ray detection method at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The complete fusion (CF) excitation function for the system is subsequently estimated from the dominating neutron evaporation channels with the help of statistical model predictions. The CF cross sections exhibit a suppression of about 13% compared to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1DBPM) at above-barrier energies, but no suppression is observed for TF cross sections. The observation does corroborate the estimated suppression for Li6 on Co59 target, but does not corroborate the recently proposed universal suppression factor for the Li6 projectile. The result supports the conjecture of reduced suppression of CF cross sections with decreasing target mass. At energies below the barrier, both the TF and the CF cross sections are enhanced. The observed enhancement of the CF process can be explained by channel coupling (CC), but the enhancement in TF cross sections is significantly higher than the CC predictions.

  12. Direct measurement of energy barriers on rough and heterogeneous solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, T.B.; LaGow, J.; Connelly, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will deal with the phenomenon of energy barriers to the spread of liquids on solids. These barriers often manifest themselves as a {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} of a sessile drop as liquid is added to it. That is, the volume of the drop increases, but the diameter does not. Thus the advancing contact angle ({theta}{sub a}) increases to a maximum. At the point where the hydrostatic pressure in the drop overcomes the {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} force the diameter suddenly increases and the drop relaxes to a metastable configuration which has a lower {theta}{sub a}. Energy barriers should be considered in many applications such as the spreading of liquid adhesives where thorough wetting is the goal. The interfacial forces involved are both long-range Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces and short-range acid-base (AB) forces. The authors will describe how they measure the energy barriers on real surfaces directly and resolve them into their LW and AB components.

  13. Overcoming Codes and Standards Barriers to Innovations in Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Pamala C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2015-02-15

    In this journal article, the authors discuss approaches to overcoming building code barriers to energy-efficiency innovations in home construction. Building codes have been a highly motivational force for increasing the energy efficiency of new homes in the United States in recent years. But as quickly as the codes seem to be changing, new products are coming to the market at an even more rapid pace, sometimes offering approaches and construction techniques unthought of when the current code was first proposed, which might have been several years before its adoption by various jurisdictions. Due to this delay, the codes themselves can become barriers to innovations that might otherwise be helping to further increase the efficiency, comfort, health or durability of new homes. . The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America, a program dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of America’s housing stock through research and education, is working with the U.S. housing industry through its research teams to help builders identify and remove code barriers to innovation in the home construction industry. The article addresses several approaches that builders use to achieve approval for innovative building techniques when code barriers appear to exist.

  14. Opportunities and barriers for a crop-based energy sector in Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupfel, Ellen Joanne

    This study investigates the existing opportunities and barriers for expanding the crop-based energy sector in Ontario. The investigation takes place at a time when growing concerns about sustainability---environmental, social, and economic---are encouraging the exploration of alternatives to energy systems based on fossil fuels, and concerns around the future viability of rural communities are making agriculturally-based and rural-based energy production systems attractive to many. To explore opportunities and barriers for the crop-based energy sector, this thesis addresses the question: What is the political-economic context within which the crop-based energy sector operates in Ontario? Taking an institutional approach, the study involved 26 interviews with individuals whose organizations influence Ontario's crop-based energy sector (that includes the biofuels ethanol and biodiesel), developed a model outlining relationships between the crop-based energy sector and other sectors of the economy, as well as the state, and implemented a survey of Ontario Members of Provincial Parliament's perspectives on biofuels. This research examines the balance of power of knowledge, production, security, finance, and technology for Ontario's crop-based energy sector. The overall balance of power currently rests with the petroleum sector. Through force field analysis, the study also identifies the key opportunities and barriers for the growth and development of the biofuels sector. These opportunities include climate change and rural development agendas, and the barriers include the petroleum sector, cost of production, and some sectors of the state. A few overarching conclusions emerge from this research: (1) Change in Ontario's crop-based energy sector is driven foremost by political and economic forces; (2) Climate change is the most significant driving force for the development and expansion of Ontario's crop-based energy sector; (3) Production cost and resistance from the

  15. Effects of intrinsic degrees of freedom in enhancement of sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy-dependent one-dimensional barrier penetration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have analyzed the role of barrier modification effects (barrier height, barrier position, barrier curvature) introduced due to the energy-dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) and the coupled channel model on the sub-barrier fusion dynamics of {}_{16}^{32,36} {{S}} + {}_{40}^{90,96} {{Zr}} reactions. The influence of inelastic surface excitations of colliding pairs and multi-neutron transfer channels is found to be a dominant mode of couplings. The coupling of relative motion of colliding nuclei to these dominant intrinsic degrees of freedom leads to a substantially large fusion enhancement at below-barrier energies over the expectations of one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The coupled channel calculations based upon static Woods-Saxon potential must include the internal nuclear structure degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei for complete description of experimental data. On the other hand, theoretical calculations based upon the EDWSP model along with Wong formula provide a complete description of sub-barrier fusion enhancement of various heavy-ion fusion reactions. In EDWSP model calculations, significantly larger values of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.98 fm to a = 0.85 fm are required to address the observed sub-barrier fusion enhancement of {}_{16}^{32,36} {{S}} + {}_{40}^{90,96} {{Zr}} reactions. Furthermore, within the context of EDWSP model, it is possible to achieve an agreement with the experimental fusion cross-sectional data within 10 %. For four heavy-ion fusion reactions, only at 4 fusion data points out of 90 fusion data points deviates exceeding 5 %, while 86 fusion data points lie within 5 % and hence the EDWSP model is able to account the above-barrier portion of the fusion cross-sectional data within 5 % with a probability greater than 90 %.

  16. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-01

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(-Ee f f/kBT ) . Here, the effective energy barrier Eeff scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  17. The Analytical Parametrization of Fusion Barrier by Using the Skyrme Energy-Density Function Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, V.; Mirzaei, M.; N., Wang

    2015-08-01

    Using the skyrme energy density formalism, a pocket formula is introduced for barrier heights and positions of 95 fusion reactions (48 ≤ ZP ZT ≤ 1520) with respect to the charge and mass numbers of the interacting nuclei. It is shown that the parameterized values of RB and VB are able to reproduce the corresponding experimental data with good accuracy. Moreover, the absolute errors of our formulas are less than those obtained using the analytical parametrization forms of the fusion barrier based on the proximity versions. The ability of the parameterized forms of the barrier heights and its positions to reproduce the experimental data of the fusion cross section have been analyzed using the Wong model.

  18. Calculating Transition Energy Barriers and Characterizing Activation States for Steps of Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ryham, Rolf J; Klotz, Thomas S; Yao, Lihan; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-03-08

    We use continuum mechanics to calculate an entire least energy pathway of membrane fusion, from stalk formation, to pore creation, and through fusion pore enlargement. The model assumes that each structure in the pathway is axially symmetric. The static continuum stalk structure agrees quantitatively with experimental stalk architecture. Calculations show that in a stalk, the distal monolayer is stretched and the stored stretching energy is significantly less than the tilt energy of an unstretched distal monolayer. The string method is used to determine the energy of the transition barriers that separate intermediate states and the dynamics of two bilayers as they pass through them. Hemifusion requires a small amount of energy independently of lipid composition, while direct transition from a stalk to a fusion pore without a hemifusion intermediate is highly improbable. Hemifusion diaphragm expansion is spontaneous for distal monolayers containing at least two lipid components, given sufficiently negative diaphragm spontaneous curvature. Conversely, diaphragms formed from single-component distal monolayers do not expand without the continual injection of energy. We identify a diaphragm radius, below which central pore expansion is spontaneous. For larger diaphragms, prior studies have shown that pore expansion is not axisymmetric, and here our calculations supply an upper bound for the energy of the barrier against pore formation. The major energy-requiring deformations in the steps of fusion are: widening of a hydrophobic fissure in bilayers for stalk formation, splay within the expanding hemifusion diaphragm, and fissure widening initiating pore formation in a hemifusion diaphragm.

  19. Calculating Transition Energy Barriers and Characterizing Activation States for Steps of Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ryham, Rolf J.; Klotz, Thomas S.; Yao, Lihan; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2016-01-01

    We use continuum mechanics to calculate an entire least energy pathway of membrane fusion, from stalk formation, to pore creation, and through fusion pore enlargement. The model assumes that each structure in the pathway is axially symmetric. The static continuum stalk structure agrees quantitatively with experimental stalk architecture. Calculations show that in a stalk, the distal monolayer is stretched and the stored stretching energy is significantly less than the tilt energy of an unstretched distal monolayer. The string method is used to determine the energy of the transition barriers that separate intermediate states and the dynamics of two bilayers as they pass through them. Hemifusion requires a small amount of energy independently of lipid composition, while direct transition from a stalk to a fusion pore without a hemifusion intermediate is highly improbable. Hemifusion diaphragm expansion is spontaneous for distal monolayers containing at least two lipid components, given sufficiently negative diaphragm spontaneous curvature. Conversely, diaphragms formed from single-component distal monolayers do not expand without the continual injection of energy. We identify a diaphragm radius, below which central pore expansion is spontaneous. For larger diaphragms, prior studies have shown that pore expansion is not axisymmetric, and here our calculations supply an upper bound for the energy of the barrier against pore formation. The major energy-requiring deformations in the steps of fusion are: widening of a hydrophobic fissure in bilayers for stalk formation, splay within the expanding hemifusion diaphragm, and fissure widening initiating pore formation in a hemifusion diaphragm. PMID:26958888

  20. Binding Energy and Dissociation Barrier: Experimental Determination of the Key Parameters of the Potential Energy Curve of Diethyl Ether on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus; Dürr, Michael; Höfer, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The key parameters of the potential energy curve of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces, binding energy of the intermediate state and dissociation barrier, were experimentally investigated for the model system of diethyl ether (Et2O) on Si(001). Et2O adsorbs via a datively bonded intermediate from which it converts via ether cleavage into a covalently attached final state. This thermally activated conversion into the final state was followed in real-time by means of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) at different temperatures and the associated energy barrier ϵa = 0.38 ± 0.05 eV and pre-exponential factor νa = 10(4±1) s(-1) were determined. From molecular beam experiments on the initial sticking probability, the difference between the desorption energy ϵd and ϵa was extracted and thus the binding energy of the intermediate state was determined (0.62 ± 0.08 eV). The results are discussed in terms of general chemical trends as well as with respect to a wider applicability on adsorbate reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

  1. Thermodynamics of downhill folding: multi-probe analysis of PDD, a protein that folds over a marginal free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Muñoz, Victor

    2014-07-31

    Downhill folding proteins fold in microseconds by crossing a very low or no free energy barrier (<3 RT), and exhibit a complex unfolding behavior in equilibrium. Such unfolding complexity is due to the weak thermodynamic coupling that exists between the various structural segments of these proteins, and it is manifested in unfolding curves that differ depending on the structural probe employed to monitor the process. Probe-dependent unfolding has important practical implications because it permits one to investigate the folding energy landscape in detail using multiprobe thermodynamic experiments. This type of thermodynamic behavior has been investigated in depth on the protein BBL, an example of extreme (one-state) downhill folding in which there is no free energy barrier at any condition, including the denaturation midpoint. However, an open question is, to what extent is such thermodynamic behavior observed on less extreme downhill folders? Here we perform a multiprobe spectroscopic characterization of the microsecond folder PDD, a structural and functional homologue of BBL that folds within the downhill regime, but is not an example of one-state downhill folding; rather at the denaturation midpoint PDD folds by crossing an incipient free energy barrier. Model-free analysis of the unfolding curves from four different spectroscopic probes together with differential scanning calorimetry reveals a dispersion of ∼9 K in the apparent melting temperature and also marked differences in unfolding broadness (from ∼50 to ∼130 kJ mol(-1) when analyzed with a two-state model), confirming that such properties are also observed on less extreme downhill folders. We subsequently perform a global quantitative analysis of the unfolding data of PDD using the same ME statistical mechanical model that was used before for the BBL domain. The analysis shows that this simple model captures all of the features observed on the unfolding of PDD (i.e., the intensity and temperature

  2. Elastic scattering of 17O ions from 58Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Parascandolo, L.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Toniolo, N.; Grebosz, J.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Stroe, L.; Miyatake, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Zerva, K.

    2014-03-01

    Elastic scattering has been studied for the collisions induced by 17O on 58Ni target at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier. The elastic scattering angular distributions were measured for several energies and were analyzed within the framework of the optical model to obtain total reaction cross sections. The reaction cross-sections of the tightly bound 17O were compared with those of weakly bound 17F on the same targets in order to investigate the effects of the low binding energy in the reaction dynamics.

  3. Differences in psychiatric symptoms and barriers to mental health care between volunteer and career firefighters.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Boffa, Joseph W; Hom, Melanie A; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    Firefighters are at increased risk for mental health problems. However, little is known about differences in psychiatric symptoms between volunteer and career firefighters. This study aimed to (1) describe differences in psychiatric symptoms and barriers to mental health care between U.S. firefighters in volunteer-only and career-only departments; and (2) determine if greater self-reported structural barriers to mental health care (e.g., cost, availability of resources) explain the differences in psychiatric symptom levels. Overall, 525 current U.S. firefighters participated. Analyses of covariance and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate group differences between volunteer (n=204) and career (n=321) firefighters, adjusting for demographic and occupational characteristics. Volunteer firefighters reported significantly elevated levels of depression, posttraumatic stress, and suicidal symptoms compared to career firefighters. Career firefighters reported relatively elevated levels of problematic alcohol use. Volunteer firefighters additionally reported greater structural barriers to mental health care (e.g., cost, availability of resources), and these barriers accounted for the differences in mental health variables between volunteer and career firefighters. Findings suggest that volunteer firefighters report elevated psychiatric symptoms compared to career firefighters and greater structural barriers to mental health treatment may explain this link. Increased efforts are needed to develop firefighter-specific interventions and bolster mental health service utilization.

  4. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T.

    2016-04-01

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc* = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc* controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  5. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T

    2016-04-28

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc (*) = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc (*) controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  6. Surface barrier height for different Al compositions and barrier layer thicknesses in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Nitin Fjeldly, Tor A.; Iniguez, Benjamin

    2013-12-04

    In this paper, we present a physics based analytical model for the calculation of surface barrier height for given values of barrier layer thicknesses and Al mole fractions. An explicit expression for the two dimensional electron gas density is also developed incorporating the change in polarization charges for different Al mole fractions.

  7. Numerical Modelling of a Low-Energy Rockfall Barrier: New Insight into the Bullet Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentani, A.; Giacomini, A.; Buzzi, O.; Govoni, L.; Gottardi, G.; Fityus, S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic response of low energy, semi-rigid rockfall barriers. The study is based on a FE model that reproduces the geometry, components and connections of the existing systems that were previously tested at The University of Newcastle. The mechanical behaviour of the relevant barrier components was calibrated from simple mechanical tests and the response of the assembled system, i.e. 2 m high, 15 m long rockfall barrier, was validated against of full-scale tests results. Following a satisfactory validation of the model, further dynamic non-linear analyses were conducted to investigate the dependence of the full system performance to the size of impacting blocks. Interestingly, the total failure energy was found to evolve non-monotonically with block size because of dynamic effects that seem to prevail for impact speeds in the range of 15-20 m/s. The study also highlights the complex effects of adding intermediate longitudinal cables to the system. An improvement of the barrier performance is observed for the large blocks but the bullet effect is exacerbated for small blocks.

  8. Barriers to oral health care amongst different social classes in India.

    PubMed

    Garcha, V; Shetiya, S H; Kakodkar, P

    2010-09-01

    To investigate and compare the influence of social and cultural factors as access barriers to oral health care amongst people from various social classes. A cross sectional survey in Pimpri, was conducted using a pilot tested 15 item-structured, close-ended and self-administered questionnaire. Two hundred and fifty people aged 35-45 years (50 participants each in five social classes as per British Registrar's General classification of occupation) were selected. The chi-square test was applied to check statistical differences between social classes at 5% level of significance. Overall, it was observed that irrespective of the social class difference 88% participants wished to seek only expert/professional advice for the dental treatment. Unavailability of services on Sunday (63%), going to dentist only when in pain (57%), trying self care or home remedy (54%), inadequate government policies (50%), budgetary constraints (40%) were among the major access barriers. Statistically significant difference in the access barriers among the social classes were found related to: Inadequate government policies, budgetary constraints, appointment schedules, far-off located clinics, myths and fear about dental treatment. Social and cultural factors act as access barriers to oral health care and social class differences have a significant influence on the access barriers.

  9. Gender differences in combat medic mental health services utilization, barriers, and stigma.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Chapman, Paula L; Thurman, Ryan M; Pitts, Barbara L; Figley, Charles; Unwin, Brian

    2013-07-01

    Military health care providers experience considerable stressors related to their exposure to death and traumatic injuries in others. This study used survey data from 799 active duty U.S. Army Combat Medics deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Military experiences, combat exposures, and mental health care seeking of active duty Combat Medics were explored and compared across both genders. Barriers to care were also assessed. Male and female Combat Medics reported surprisingly similar experiences, exposures, and health issues. Overall, results indicate no striking differences in barriers for females compared to their male counterparts, suggesting the barriers to utilization of mental health services may be consistent across gender. Although medics endorsed barriers and stigma related to mental health counseling services, they still sought these health services. Female and male medics who endorsed barriers were more likely to report seeking services than those who did not endorse barriers. This study provides an initial description of utilization of mental health counseling services for U.S. Army Combat Medics, the majority of whom were involved in combat operations in Afghanistan or Iraq. Our findings indicate that comprehensive assessment of the military experiences and combat exposures is needed to appreciate their potential influence on military health care providers. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. Barriers to effective communication in skilled nursing facilities: differences in perception between nurses and physicians.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, M P; Franzi, C; Osterweil, D; Hill, T

    1999-01-01

    Effective communication between nurses and physicians is central to the clinical care of nursing home residents. Anecdotal evidence suggests that communication between the groups is unsatisfactory, but no empirical data exist with which to validate assumptions. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare perceptions of potential communication barriers among nurses and physicians in four California nursing homes. Registered nurses (n = 59), and physicians (n = 47) involved in the direct clinical care of nursing home residents completed a 12-item questionnaire designed to elicit perceptions about potential communication barriers. Five specific categories of barriers were identified. These included nurse competence, time burden of calls, necessity of calls, professional respect, and language comprehension. Responses were compared using t test analysis. Significant differences in perceived communication barriers were identified. Physicians, but not nurses, perceive nursing competence to be a significant barrier. Nurses perceive physicians to be unpleasant. Both physicians and nurses perceive that physicians do not value nurses' opinions. Neither group perceived language expression, language comprehension, or time burden of phone calls to be barriers to communication. Issues related to the perceived competency of nurses by physicians is consistent with existing data from other clinical settings. Differences in awareness about scope of practice and regulatory requirements between the groups may offer a partial explanation for the discordant perceptions. Perceptions by nurses (but not physicians) of unpleasantness and/or disrespect during telephone encounters may reflect the broader ongoing differences in professional culture, social status, and gender inequality between the two groups. Further clarification of the causes of barriers to effective communication is essential in order to plan appropriate interventions.

  11. Perceived Barriers to Employment Success: Are There Differences between European American and African American VR Consumers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanskas, Stephen A.; Lustig, Daniel C.; Ishitani, Terry T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to investigate whether there were differences between European and African American vocational rehabilitation consumers' perceptions of the barriers they experience towards obtaining employment. A secondary purpose was to determine whether there were differences in these perceptions based upon gender…

  12. Barriers to Incorporating Climate Change Science into High School and Community College Energy Course Offerings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, C.

    2013-05-01

    In reviewing studies evaluating trends in greenhouse gasses, weather, climate and/or ecosystems, it becomes apparent that climate change is a reality. It has also become evident that the energy sector accounts for most of the greenhouse gas emissions with worldwide emissions of carbon dioxide increasing by 31 percent from 1990 to 2005, higher than in the previous thousands of years. While energy courses and topics are presented in high school and community college classes the topic of Climate Change Science is not always a part of the conversation. During the summer of 2011 and 2012, research undergraduates conducted interviews with a total of 39 national community college and 8 high school instructors who participated in a two week Sustainable Energy Education Training (SEET) workshop. Interview questions addressed the barriers and opportunities to the incorporation of climate change as a dimension of an energy/renewable energy curriculum. Barriers found included: there is not enough instruction time to include it; some school administrators including community members do not recognize climate change issues; quality information about climate change geared to students is difficult to find; and, most climate change information is too scientific for most audiences. A Solution to some barriers included dialogue on sustainability as a common ground in recognizing environmental changes/concerns among educators, administrators and community members. Sustainability discussions are already supported in school business courses as well as in technical education. In conclusion, we cannot expect climate change to dissipate without humans making more informed energy and environmental choices. With global population growth producing greater emissions resulting in increased climate change, we must include the topic of climate change to students in high school and community college classrooms, preparing our next generation of leaders and workforce to be equipped to find solutions

  13. Formation of hyperdeformed states in capture reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, A. S.; Antonenko, N. V.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Scheid, W.

    2010-09-15

    The high-spin hyperdeformed nuclear states treated as dinuclear or quasimolecular configurations are suggested to be directly populated in heavy ion collisions at sub-barrier energies. Tunneling through the Coulomb barrier is considered using the quantum diffusion approach based on the formalism of reduced density matrix. The reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 86}Kr,{sup 124}Sn,{sup 136}Xe,{sup 138}Ba,{sup 140}Ce, {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni, and {sup 40,48}Ca+{sup 40,48}Ca, are suggested for populating high-spin hyperdeformed states. The partial production and identification cross sections for the hyperdeformed states are calculated as the functions of bombarding energy.

  14. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J.

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  15. Nucleon exchange mechanism in heavy-ion collisions at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, B.; Ayik, S.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-06-15

    Nucleon drift and diffusion mechanisms in central collisions of asymmetric heavy ions at near-barrier energies are investigated in the framework of a stochastic mean-field approach. Expressions for diffusion and drift coefficients for nucleon transfer deduced from the stochastic mean-field approach in the semiclassical approximation have similar forms familiar from the phenomenological nucleon exchange model. The variance of fragment mass distribution agrees with the empirical formula {sigma}{sub AA}{sup 2}(t)=N{sub exc}(t). The comparison with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations shows that below barrier energies, the drift coefficient in the semiclassical approximation underestimates the mean number of nucleon transfer obtained in the quantal framework. Motion of the window in the dinuclear system has a significant effect on the nucleon transfer in asymmetric collisions.

  16. Fine-tuning terminal solvent ligands to rationally enhance the energy barrier in dinuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Yuan, Chen; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2016-12-20

    In search of simple approaches to rationally enhance the energy barriers in polynuclear dysprosium single-molecule magnets, a new system containing two structurally closely related dinuclear dysprosium complexes, namely [Dy2(L)2(DBM)2(DMF)2] (1) and [Dy2(L)2(DBM)2(DMA)2]·2DMA (2) (HDBM = dibenzoylmethane, H2L = 2-hydroxy-N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide), is introduced and the structure-dependent magnetic properties are investigated. The two complexes display only slight variations in the coordination geometries of the Dy(iii) ion but display remarkably different magnetic behaviors. By replacing the DMF (dimethylformamide) ligand in complex 1 with DMA (dimethylacetamide) in 2 while retaining the same coordination atoms, we were able to create a 3-fold enhancement in the energy barrier, from 24 K for complex 1 to 77 K for complex 2. Complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations revealed that the charge distribution surrounding the Dy(iii) centers in 1 and 2 is the key factor in determining the relaxation properties of the SMMs. The introduction of an electron-donating CH3 group in DMA to replace the hydrogen in DMF resulted in a larger average charge along the magnetic axes of complex 2 compared to complex 1, which resulted in a stronger easy-axis ligand field, thus increasing the energy difference between the ground and the first excited states of complex 2. This work presents a simple method to rationally enhance the energy barrier in polynuclear lanthanide SMMs through fine-tuning of the electrostatic potential of the atoms along the magnetic axis.

  17. Energy-Efficient Phase-Change Memory with Graphene as a Thermal Barrier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-02

    Energy-Efficient Phase-Change Memory with Graphene as a Thermal Barrier Chiyui Ahn,*,† Scott W. Fong,† Yongsung Kim,‡ Seunghyun Lee,† Aditya Sood...Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), Suwon, 443-803, South Korea *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Phase-change memory (PCM) is an important...cycles, and the graphene could further enhance the PCM endurance by limiting atomic migration or material segregation at the bottom electrode interface

  18. Influence of porous media structure in colloid retention in the absence of an energy barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazmino, E. F.; Johnson, W. P.; Ma, H.

    2010-12-01

    Many colloid transport experiments have been conducted in a porous media with narrow size distribution, which allows a single collector size to be used in filtration theory to predict deposition rates. In this work, deposition of colloids (ranging from 0.21 μm to 9.1 μm) in packed columns is examined in the absence of an energy barrier with three different glass bead porous media: uniform mono-dispersed, mono-modal poly-dispersed and bimodal poly-dispersed. The corresponding porosities to these media are 0.378, 0.339 and 0.282. The effect of gravitational settling on deposition is studied by injecting the particles co-current and counter-current with gravity, especially for larger size colloids. Also, direct observations are conducted in a flow cell for selected colloid sizes for a better understanding of the mechanisms of attachment. Experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions to determine characteristic collector sizes that represent poly-dispersed porous media in filtration theory.

  19. The fusion of membranes and vesicles: pathway and energy barriers from dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grafmüller, Andrea; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2009-04-08

    The fusion of lipid bilayers is studied with dissipative particle dynamics simulations. First, to achieve control over membrane properties, the effects of individual simulation parameters are studied and optimized. Then, a large number of fusion events for a vesicle and a planar bilayer are simulated using the optimized parameter set. In the observed fusion pathway, configurations of individual lipids play an important role. Fusion starts with individual lipids assuming a splayed tail configuration with one tail inserted in each membrane. To determine the corresponding energy barrier, we measure the average work for interbilayer flips of a lipid tail, i.e., the average work to displace one lipid tail from one bilayer to the other. This energy barrier is found to depend strongly on a certain dissipative particle dynamics parameter, and, thus, can be adjusted in the simulations. Overall, three subprocesses have been identified in the fusion pathway. Their energy barriers are estimated to lie in the range 8-15 k(B)T. The fusion probability is found to possess a maximum at intermediate tension values. As one decreases the tension, the fusion probability seems to vanish before the tensionless membrane state is attained. This would imply that the tension has to exceed a certain threshold value to induce fusion.

  20. The Fusion of Membranes and Vesicles: Pathway and Energy Barriers from Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Grafmüller, Andrea; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The fusion of lipid bilayers is studied with dissipative particle dynamics simulations. First, to achieve control over membrane properties, the effects of individual simulation parameters are studied and optimized. Then, a large number of fusion events for a vesicle and a planar bilayer are simulated using the optimized parameter set. In the observed fusion pathway, configurations of individual lipids play an important role. Fusion starts with individual lipids assuming a splayed tail configuration with one tail inserted in each membrane. To determine the corresponding energy barrier, we measure the average work for interbilayer flips of a lipid tail, i.e., the average work to displace one lipid tail from one bilayer to the other. This energy barrier is found to depend strongly on a certain dissipative particle dynamics parameter, and, thus, can be adjusted in the simulations. Overall, three subprocesses have been identified in the fusion pathway. Their energy barriers are estimated to lie in the range 8–15 kBT. The fusion probability is found to possess a maximum at intermediate tension values. As one decreases the tension, the fusion probability seems to vanish before the tensionless membrane state is attained. This would imply that the tension has to exceed a certain threshold value to induce fusion. PMID:19348749

  1. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  2. Barriers on the propagation of renewable energy sources and sustainable solid waste management practices in Greece.

    PubMed

    Boemi, Sn; Papadopoulos, Am; Karagiannidis, A; Kontogianni, S

    2010-11-01

    Renewable energy sources (RES), excluding large hydroelectric plants, currently produce 4.21% of total electricity production in Greece. Even when considering the additional production from large hydroelectric plants, which accounts for some 7.8%, the distance to be covered towards the objective of 20% electricity produced from RES by 2010 and respectively towards 20% of total energy production by 2020 is discouraging. The potential, however, does exist; unfortunately so do serious barriers. On the other hand, solid waste management (SWM) is an issue that generates continuously increasing interest due to the extra amounts of solid waste generated; the lack of existing disposal facilities with adequate infrastructure and integrated management plans, also often accompanied by legislative and institutional gaps. However, socio-economic and public awareness problems are still met in the planning and implementation of RES and SWM projects, together with the lack of a complete national cadastre and a spatial development master plan, specifying areas eligible for RES and SWM development. Specific barriers occur for individual RES and the on-going inclusion of waste-derived renewable energy in the examined palette further increases the complexity of the entire issue. The consolidated study of this broad set of barriers was a main task of the present study which was carried out within the frame of a Hellenic-Canadian research project; the main results will be discussed herein.

  3. Is there an energy barrier in the growth of sulfuric acid clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenius, Tinja; Kupiainen, Oona; Ortega, Ismael K.; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    We have used a kinetic model and quantum chemical formation free energy data to study the growth of molecular clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia or sulfuric acid and dimethylamine in atmospherically relevant conditions. All simulations were performed both with and without charged clusters. We show that the cluster growth in the acid-ammonia system involves energy barriers in both electrically neutral and ionic systems, while in the acid-DMA system the growth along the major pathways is barrierless and occurs via electrically neutral clusters also when ions are present.

  4. Tunnel spin polarization versus energy for clean and doped Al2O3 barriers.

    PubMed

    Park, B G; Banerjee, T; Lodder, J C; Jansen, R

    2007-11-23

    The variation of the tunnel spin-polarization (TSP) with energy is determined using a magnetic tunnel transistor, allowing quantification of the energy dependent TSP separately for both ferromagnet/insulator interfaces and direct correlation with the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) measured in the same device. The intrinsic TSP is reduced below the Fermi level, and more strongly so for tunneling into empty states above the Fermi level. For artificially doped barriers, the low bias TMR decreases due to defect-assisted tunneling. Yet, this mechanism becomes ineffective at large bias, where instead inelastic spin scattering causes a strong TMR decay.

  5. Final report. Renewable energy and energy efficiency in Mexico: Barriers and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Ashford, Mike

    2000-09-28

    The report describes the prospects for energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions reductions in Mexico, along with renewable energy potential. A methodology for developing emissions baselines is shown, in order to prepare project emissions reductions calculations. An application to the USIJI program was also prepared through this project, for a portfolio of energy efficiency projects.

  6. Field Study and Energy-Plus Benchmarks for Energy Saver Homes having Different Envelope Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Childs, Kenneth W; Stannard, Eric E

    2012-01-01

    An alliance to maximize energy efficiency and cost-effective residential construction (ZEBRAlliance) built and field tested four homes that are 50 percent more energy efficient than a code compliant home. The homes are unoccupied for the duration of a two-year field study, thereby eliminating the confounding issue of occupancy habits. All homes have about the same consistent and scheduled internal load. Each home showcases a unique envelope strategy: 1) structural insulated panel (SIP), 2) optimal value wall framing (OVF), 3) advanced framing featuring the benefits of insulations mixed with phase change materials (PCM), and 4) an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). All homes have different weather resistive barriers (WRBs) and/or air barriers to limit air and moisture infiltration. Three homes provide space conditioning and water heating via a ground loop heat exchanger, while the fourth home uses a high efficiency air-to-air heat pump and heat pump water heater. Field performance and results of EnergyPlus V7.0 benchmarks were made for roof and attics as compared to cathedral design and for wall heat flows to validate models. The moisture content of the wall sheathing is shown to prove the protecting effectiveness of WRBs. Temperature distributions through insulations in the wall and ceiling with and without PCMs are described to characterize the performance of the PCM building envelopes.

  7. Inequalities in cancer screening participation: examining differences in perceived benefits and barriers

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, L.M.; Raine, R.; Wardle, J.; von Wagner, C.; Robb, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Inequalities exist in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake, with people from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds less likely to participate. Identifying the facilitators and barriers to screening uptake is important to addressing screening disparities. We pooled data from 2 trials to examine educational differences in psychological constructs related to guaiac fecal occult blood testing. Methods Patients (n = 8576) registered at 7 general practices in England, within 15 years of the eligible age range for screening (45‐59.5 years), were invited to complete a questionnaire. Measures included perceived barriers (emotional and practical) and benefits of screening, screening intentions, and participant characteristics including education. Results After data pooling, 2181 responses were included. People with high school education or no formal education reported higher emotional and practical barriers and were less likely to definitely intend to participate in screening, compared with university graduates in analyses controlling for study arm and participant characteristics. The belief that one would worry more about CRC after screening and concerns about tempting fate were strongly negatively associated with education. In a model including education and participant characteristics, respondents with low emotional barriers, low practical barriers, and high perceived benefits were more likely to definitely intend to take part in screening. Conclusions In this analysis of adults approaching the CRC screening age, there was a consistent effect of education on perceived barriers toward guaiac fecal occult blood testing, which could affect screening decision making. Interventions should target specific barriers to reduce educational disparities in screening uptake and avoid exacerbating inequalities in CRC mortality. PMID:27309861

  8. Gender Differences in College Students' Career Maturity and Perceived Barriers in Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzzo, Darrell Anthony

    1995-01-01

    Gender differences in 401 college students' career maturity were investigated with quantitative measures that included attitudes, decision-making skills, and vocational congruence. Analyses revealed that females scored significantly higher than males on each of the measures. Qualitative analyses revealed that the perception of barriers may serve…

  9. Gender Differences in the Perceived Needs and Barriers of Youth Offenders Preparing for Community Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Diane; Abrams, Laura S.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how gender differences may influence the community reentry experiences of incarcerated youth. Structured surveys assessing risk factors for re-offending, perceived reentry needs, and anticipated barriers to meeting these needs were administered to a convenience sample of males (n = 36) and females (n = 35) who were within 60…

  10. Do Perceived Cues, Benefits, and Barriers to Physical Activity Differ between Male and Female Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tergerson, Jennifer L.; King, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed adolescents at single-sex high schools to examine whether perceptions of physical activity differed by gender. The most helpful cue to physical activity for males and females was having a friend to exercise with. Parental encouragement and having a parent who exercised were also helpful. Wanting to do other things was a common barrier to…

  11. Free energy barrier for molecular motions in bistable [2]rotaxane molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungjun; Goddard, William A; Jang, Seung Soon; Dichtel, William R; Heath, James R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2009-03-12

    Donor-acceptor binding of the pi-electron-poor cyclophane cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) with the pi-electron-rich tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) stations provides the basis for electrochemically switchable, bistable [2]rotaxanes, which have been incorporated and operated within solid-state devices to form ultradense memory circuits (ChemPhysChem 2002, 3, 519-525; Nature 2007, 445, 414-417) and nanoelectromechanical systems. The rate of CBPQT(4+) shuttling at each oxidation state of the [2]rotaxane dictates critical write-and-retention time parameters within the devices, which can be tuned through chemical synthesis. To validate how well computational chemistry methods can estimate these rates for use in designing new devices, we used molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the free energy barrier for the shuttling of the CBPQT(4+) ring between the TTF and the DNP. The approach used here was to calculate the potential of mean force along the switching pathway, from which we calculated free energy barriers. These calculations find a turn-on time after the rotaxane is doubly oxidized of approximately 10(-7) s (suggesting that the much longer experimental turn-on time is determined by the time scale of oxidization). The return barrier from the DNP to the TTF leads to a predicted lifetime of 2.1 s, which is compatible with experiments.

  12. Coulomb energy differences in isobaric multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, S. M.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Brandolini, F.; Lunardi, S.; Mason, P.; Menegazzo, R.; Nespolo, M.; Ur, C. A.; Della Vedova, F.; Marginean, N.; Napoli, D. R.; De Angelis, G.; Axiotis, M.; Gadea, A.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Bucurescu, D.; Iordachescu, A.; Bizzeti-Sona, A. M.; Bizzeti, P. G.

    2007-02-12

    By comparing the excitation energies of analogue states in isobaric multiplets, several nuclear structure properties can be studied as a function of the angular momentum up to high spin states. In particular, the mirror nuclei 35Ar and 35Cl show large differences between the excitation energies of analogue negative-parity states at high spin, confirming the important contribution of the relativistic electromagnetic spin-orbit interaction to the Coulomb energy. The single-particle character of the configuration of these states is reproduced with very good accuracy by shell model calculations in the sd and pf shells valence space. In addition, evidence of isospin mixing is deduced from the El transitions linking positive and negative parity states.

  13. Symmetric splitting for the system 32S+238U at energies near and below the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freifelder, R.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Deyoung, P.; Schicker, R.; Sen, S.; Stachel, J.

    1987-06-01

    The total capture cross section for the system 32S+238U has been measured at energies from 0.93 to 1.08 times the s-wave interaction barrier by detecting coincident fission fragments following full momentum transfer reactions. The subbarrier cross section cannot be reproduced by a one-dimensional barrier penetration model. Using a quantum mechanical coupled channels model, good agreement is obtained. The measured angular distributions of fission fragments were compared to the predictions of saddle and scission point transition state theory. Saddle point transition state model calculations fail to reproduce the data, while scission point transition state calculations are in agreement with their qualitative trend. Evidence for nonequilibrium processes is presented.

  14. Effect of bleaching agents on sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Canoglu, Ebru; Gulsahi, Kamran; Sahin, Cem; Altundasar, Emre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on the sealing properties of different intraorifice barriers and root filling materials. Study Design: The root canals of extracted human premolars (n=180) were prepared by using System GT rotary files and filled with either gutta-percha+AH Plus or Resilon+Epiphany sealer. In both groups, the coronal 3mm of root filling was removed and replaced with one of the following materials applied as intraorifice barriers (n=30/group): 1. ProProot-MTA; 2. Conventional Glass ionomer cement; and 3. Hybrid resin composite. In each subgroup, intracoronal bleaching was performed using either sodium perborate with distilled water or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel for 3 weeks. The leakage of specimens was measured using fluid-filtration and dye penetration tests. The data were analyzed statistically with One-way ANOVA, Repeated Measures t-test and Independent Samples t-test (p=0.05). Results: The fluid conductance values of the test groups were not influenced by the type of the bleaching agent, the intraorifice barrier, or the root filling material (all p>0.05). However, the extent of dye leakage was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier material (p<0.05), which showed the following statistical ranking: glass ionomer cement > resin composite > ProRoot-MTA (p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel or sodium perborate/distilled water on the sealing properties of tested intraorifice barriers and root filling materials varied conforming leakage assessment. These properties were not affected by using fluid filtration test, while the glass ionomer barrier showed the greatest amount of dye leakage in both gutta-percha and Resilon root-filled teeth. Key words:Tooth Bleaching, root canal filling materials, glass ionomer cement, mineral trioxide aggregate, micro leakage PMID:22322509

  15. [Study on Spectral Characteristics of Micro Plasma Channels of Different Gas-Gap in Dielectric Barrier Discharge].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ye-nan; Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Ying

    2015-10-01

    By optical emission spectrum, we report on the first investigation on the plasma parameters of micro plasma channels which are generated in two gas-gaps with different thickness in a triple-layer dielectric barrier discharge system. Different from the micro plasma channels formed in traditional two-layer dielectric barrier discharge, micro plasma channels formed in the triple-layer dielectric barrier discharge system reflect a unique discharge characteristic. From the pattern images taken by an ordinary camera, it shows that micro plasma channels generated in two discharge gas-gaps discharge with different sizes and light intensities. The micro plasma channels in wide gas-gap are much bigger than those in narrow gas-gap, and their light intensities are obvious stronger. By collecting the emission spectra of N2 second positive band (C3∏u --> B3∏g ) and calculating the relative intensity ratio method of N2 molecular ion line at 391.4 and the N2 molecular line at 394.1, the molecular vibration temperature and the average electron energy of micro plasma channels in two gas-gaps as functions of Argon concentration and applied voltage are investigated, respectively. It is found that the molecular vibration temperature and the average electron energy of micro plasma channels in wide gas-gap are lower than those in narrow gas-gap, and they both decrease with the increasing of the Argon concentration. As the applied voltage increases, micro plasma channels in wide gas-gap vary in a small range on the above two plasma investigations, while those in narrow gas-gap vary obviously. It indicates that micro plasma channels in narrow gas-gap are more sensitive to the applied voltage and they have a wider variation range of electric field than those in wide gas-gap.

  16. Premating Reproductive Barriers between Hybridising Cricket Species Differing in Their Degree of Polyandry

    PubMed Central

    Veen, Thor; Faulks, Joseph; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Understanding speciation hinges on understanding how reproductive barriers arise between incompletely isolated populations. Despite their crucial role in speciation, prezygotic barriers are relatively poorly understood and hard to predict. We use two closely related cricket species, Gryllus bimaculatus and G. campestris, to experimentally investigate premating barriers during three sequential mate choice steps. Furthermore, we experimentally show a significant difference in polyandry levels between the two species and subsequently test the hypothesis that females of the more polyandrous species, G. bimaculatus, will be less discriminating against heterospecific males and hence hybridise more readily. During close-range mating behaviour experiments, males showed relatively weak species discrimination but females discriminated very strongly. In line with our predictions, this discrimination is asymmetric, with the more polyandrous G. bimaculatus mating heterospecifically and G. campestris females never mating heterospecifically. Our study shows clear differences in the strength of reproductive isolation during the mate choice process depending on sex and species, which may have important consequences for the evolution of reproductive barriers. PMID:21573165

  17. Premating reproductive barriers between hybridising cricket species differing in their degree of polyandry.

    PubMed

    Veen, Thor; Faulks, Joseph; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2011-05-05

    Understanding speciation hinges on understanding how reproductive barriers arise between incompletely isolated populations. Despite their crucial role in speciation, prezygotic barriers are relatively poorly understood and hard to predict. We use two closely related cricket species, Gryllus bimaculatus and G. campestris, to experimentally investigate premating barriers during three sequential mate choice steps. Furthermore, we experimentally show a significant difference in polyandry levels between the two species and subsequently test the hypothesis that females of the more polyandrous species, G. bimaculatus, will be less discriminating against heterospecific males and hence hybridise more readily. During close-range mating behaviour experiments, males showed relatively weak species discrimination but females discriminated very strongly. In line with our predictions, this discrimination is asymmetric, with the more polyandrous G. bimaculatus mating heterospecifically and G. campestris females never mating heterospecifically. Our study shows clear differences in the strength of reproductive isolation during the mate choice process depending on sex and species, which may have important consequences for the evolution of reproductive barriers.

  18. Evolution of fusion hindrance for asymmetric systems at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, A.; Mahata, K.; Pandit, S. K.; Nanal, V.; Ichikawa, T.; Hagino, K.; Navin, A.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Parkar, V. V.; Ramachandran, K.; Rout, P. C.; Kumar, Abhinav; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of fusion cross-sections of 7Li and 12C with 198Pt at deep sub-barrier energies are reported to unravel the role of the entrance channel in the occurrence of fusion hindrance. The onset of fusion hindrance has been clearly observed in 12C +198Pt system but not in 7Li +198Pt system, within the measured energy range. Emergence of the hindrance, moving from lighter (6,7Li) to heavier (12C, 16O) projectiles is explained employing a model that considers a gradual transition from a sudden to adiabatic regime at low energies. The model calculation reveals a weak effect of the damping of coupling to collective motion for the present systems as compared to that obtained for systems with heavier projectiles.

  19. Canonical free-energy barrier of particle and polymer cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Johannes; Schierz, Philipp; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-02-01

    A common approach to study nucleation rates is the estimation of free-energy barriers. This usually requires knowledge about the shape of the forming droplet, a task that becomes notoriously difficult in macromolecular setups starting with a proper definition of the cluster boundary. Here we demonstrate a shape-free determination of the free energy for temperature-driven cluster formation in particle as well as polymer systems. Combined with rigorous results on equilibrium droplet formation, this allows for a well-defined finite-size scaling analysis of the effective interfacial free energy at a fixed density. We first verify the theoretical predictions for the formation of a liquid droplet in a supersaturated particle gas by generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones system. Going one step further, we then generalize this approach to cluster formation in a dilute polymer solution. Our results suggest an analogy with particle condensation, when the macromolecules are interpreted as extended particles.

  20. On the role of dynamical barriers in barrierless reactions at low energies: S(1D) + H2.

    PubMed

    Lara, Manuel; Jambrina, P G; Varandas, A J C; Launay, J-M; Aoiz, F J

    2011-10-07

    Reaction probabilities as a function of total angular momentum (opacity functions) and the resulting reaction cross sections for the collision of open shell S((1)D) atoms with para-hydrogen have been calculated in the kinetic energy range 0.09-10 meV (1-120 K). The quantum mechanical hyperspherical reactive scattering method and quasi-classical trajectory and statistical quasi-classical trajectory approaches were used. Two different ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been considered. The widely used reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) PES by Ho et al. [T.-S. Ho, T. Hollebeek, H. Rabitz, S. D. Chao, R. T. Skodje, A. S. Zyubin, and A. M. Mebel, J. Chem. Phys 116, 4124 (2002)] and the recently published accurate double many-body expansion (DMBE)/complete basis set (CBS) PES by Song and Varandas [Y. Z. Song and A. J. C. Varandas, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 134317 (2009)]. The calculations at low collision energies reveal very different dynamical behaviors on the two PESs. The reactivity on the RKHS PES is found to be considerably larger than that on the DMBE/CBS PES as a result of larger reaction probabilities at low total (here also orbital) angular momentum values and to opacity functions which extend to significantly larger total angular momentum values. The observed differences have their origin in two major distinct topographic features. Although both PESs are essentially barrierless for equilibrium H-H distances, when the H-H bond is compressed the DMBE/CBS PES gives rise to a dynamical barrier which limits the reactivity of the system. This barrier is completely absent in the RHKS PES. In addition, the latter PES exhibits a van der Walls well in the entrance channel which reduces the height of the centrifugal barrier and is able to support resonances. As a result, a significant larger cross section is found on this PES, with marked oscillations attributable to shape resonances and/or to the opening of partial wave contributions. The comparison of the

  1. Measurements of angular distributions for7Li elastically scattered from58Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Valenzuela, P.; Aguilera, E. F.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Lizcano, D.; Morales-Rivera, J. C.

    2017-07-01

    Recently, experimental measurements of elastic scattering angular distributions for the system7Li+58Ni at ten different energies around the Coulomb barrier were made by the Heavy-Ion Group. The measurements were made at the Tandem Van de Graaff Particle Accelerator Laboratory in the National Institute for Nuclear Research (ININ) in Mexico. In this work, preliminary elastic scattering angular distributions for five energies (E lab , = 12.0, 12.5, 13.0, 13.5 and 14.22 MeV) are presented. The preliminary experimental data were analyzed using the São Paulo Optical Model Potential (SPP) which is based on a double-folding potential, reproducing very well these data. A comparison is made with old data reported back in 1973 and in 2012. Further analysis is in progress in order to fully understand this particular system, specially because7Li is known to be a weakly bound nucleus.

  2. 7Be- and 8B-reaction dynamics at Coulomb barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Acosta, L.; Di Meo, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Jeong, S. C.; Jia, H. M.; Keeley, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Kimura, S.; Kubono, S.; Lay, J. A.; Lin, C. J.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Miyatake, H.; Mukai, M.; Nakao, T.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Rusek, K.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sava, T.; Sgouros, O.; Stefanini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Stroe, L.; Teranishi, T.; Toniolo, N.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the reaction dynamics induced by the Radioactive Ion Beams 7Be and 8B on a 208Pb target at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The two measurements are strongly interconnected, being 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) the loosely bound core of the even more exotic 8B (Sp = 0.1375 MeV) nucleus. Here we summarize the present status of the data analysis for the measurement of the elastic scattering process for both reactions and the preliminary results for the optical model analysis of the collected data.

  3. Energy efficient engine, high pressure turbine thermal barrier coating. Support technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duderstadt, E. C.; Agarwal, P.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed on a thermal barrier coating support technology task of the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development Program. A thermal barrier coating (TBC) system consisting of a Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond cost layer and ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic layer was selected from eight candidate coating systems on the basis of laboratory tests. The selection was based on coating microstructure, crystallographic phase composition, tensile bond and bend test results, erosion and impact test results, furnace exposure, thermal cycle, and high velocity dynamic oxidation test results. Procedures were developed for applying the selected TBC to CF6-50, high pressure turbine blades and vanes. Coated HPT components were tested in three kinds of tests. Stage 1 blades were tested in a cascade cyclic test rig, Stage 2 blades were component high cycle fatigue tested to qualify thermal barrier coated blades for engine testing, and Stage 2 blades and Stage 1 and 2 vanes were run in factory engine tests. After completion of the 1000 cycle engine test, the TBC on the blades was in excellent condition over all of the platform and airfoil except at the leading edge above midspan on the suction side of the airfoil. The coating damage appeared to be caused by particle impingement; adjacent blades without TBC also showed evidence of particle impingement.

  4. Driven diffusion against electrostatic or effective energy barrier across α-hemolysin

    SciTech Connect

    Ansalone, Patrizio; Chinappi, Mauro; Rondoni, Lamberto; Cecconi, Fabio

    2015-10-21

    We analyze the translocation of a charged particle across an α-Hemolysin (αHL) pore in the framework of a driven diffusion over an extended energy barrier generated by the electrical charges of the αHL. A one-dimensional electrostatic potential is extracted from the full 3D solution of the Poisson’s equation. We characterize the particle transport under the action of a constant forcing by studying the statistics of the translocation time. We derive an analytical expression of translocation time average that compares well with the results from Brownian dynamic simulations of driven particles over the electrostatic potential. Moreover, we show that the translocation time distributions can be perfectly described by a simple theory which replaces the true barrier by an equivalent structureless square barrier. Remarkably, our approach maintains its accuracy also for low-applied voltage regimes where the usual inverse-Gaussian approximation fails. Finally, we discuss how the comparison between the simulated time distributions and their theoretical prediction results to be greatly simplified when using the notion of the empirical Laplace transform technique.

  5. Driven diffusion against electrostatic or effective energy barrier across α-hemolysin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansalone, Patrizio; Chinappi, Mauro; Rondoni, Lamberto; Cecconi, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the translocation of a charged particle across an α-Hemolysin (αHL) pore in the framework of a driven diffusion over an extended energy barrier generated by the electrical charges of the αHL. A one-dimensional electrostatic potential is extracted from the full 3D solution of the Poisson's equation. We characterize the particle transport under the action of a constant forcing by studying the statistics of the translocation time. We derive an analytical expression of translocation time average that compares well with the results from Brownian dynamic simulations of driven particles over the electrostatic potential. Moreover, we show that the translocation time distributions can be perfectly described by a simple theory which replaces the true barrier by an equivalent structureless square barrier. Remarkably, our approach maintains its accuracy also for low-applied voltage regimes where the usual inverse-Gaussian approximation fails. Finally, we discuss how the comparison between the simulated time distributions and their theoretical prediction results to be greatly simplified when using the notion of the empirical Laplace transform technique.

  6. First-Principles Free-Energy Barriers for Photoelectrochemical Surface Reactions: Proton Abstraction at TiO2(110 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecher, Thomas; Reuter, Karsten; Oberhofer, Harald

    2016-12-01

    We explicitly calculate the free-energy barrier for the initial proton abstraction in the water splitting reaction at rutile TiO2(110 ) through ab initio molecular dynamics. Combining solid-state embedding, an energy based reaction coordinate and state-of-the-art free-energy reconstruction techniques renders the calculation tractable at the hybrid density-functional theory level. The obtained free-energy barrier of approximately 0.2 eV, depending slightly on the orientation of the first acceptor water molecule, suggests a hindered reaction on the pristine rutile surface.

  7. Barriers to Building Energy Efficiency (BEE) promotion: A transaction costs perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian Kun, Queena

    Worldwide, buildings account for a surprisingly high 40% of global energy consumption, and the resulting carbon footprint significantly exceeds that of all forms of transportation combined. Large and attractive opportunities exist to reduce buildings' energy use at lower costs and higher returns than in other sectors. This thesis analyzes the concerns of the market stakeholders, mainly real estate developers and end-users, in terms of transaction costs as they make decisions about investing in Building Energy Efficiency (BEE). It provides a detailed analysis of the current situation and future prospects for BEE adoption by the market's stakeholders. It delineates the market and lays out the economic and institutional barriers to the large-scale deployment of energy-efficient building techniques. The aim of this research is to investigate the barriers raised by transaction costs that hinder market stakeholders from investing in BEES. It explains interactions among stakeholders in general and in the specific case of Hong Kong as they consider transaction costs. It focuses on the influence of transaction costs on the decision-making of the stakeholders during the entire process of real estate development. The objectives are: 1) To establish an analytical framework for understanding the barriers to BEE investment with consideration of transaction costs; 2) To build a theoretical game model of decision making among the BEE market stakeholders; 3) To study the empirical data from questionnaire surveys of building designers and from focused interviews with real estate developers in Hong Kong; 4) To triangulate the study's empirical findings with those of the theoretical model and analytical framework. The study shows that a coherent institutional framework needs to be established to ensure that the design and implementation of BEE policies acknowledge the concerns of market stakeholders by taking transaction costs into consideration. Regulatory and incentive options

  8. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT APPROACHES: CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.

    2009-05-29

    Engineered barriers including cementitious barriers are used at sites disposing or contaminated with low-level radioactive waste to enhance performance of the natural environment with respect to controlling the potential spread of contaminants. Drivers for using cementitious barriers include: high radionuclide inventory, radionuclide characteristics (e.g., long half-live, high mobility due to chemical form/speciation, waste matrix properties, shallow water table, and humid climate that provides water for leaching the waste). This document comprises the first in a series of reports being prepared for the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. The document is divided into two parts which provide a summary of: (1) existing experience in the assessment of performance of cementitious materials used for radioactive waste management and disposal and (2) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approaches that have been applied for assessments. Each chapter is organized into five parts: Introduction, Regulatory Considerations, Specific Examples, Summary of Modeling Approaches and Conclusions and Needs. The objective of the report is to provide perspective on the state of the practice for conducting assessments for facilities involving cementitious barriers and to identify opportunities for improvements to the existing approaches. Examples are provided in two contexts: (1) performance assessments conducted for waste disposal facilities and (2) performance assessment-like analyses (e.g., risk assessments) conducted under other regulatory regimes. The introductory sections of each section provide a perspective on the purpose of performance assessments and different roles of cementitious materials for radioactive waste management. Significant experience with assessments of cementitious materials associated with radioactive waste disposal concepts exists in the US Department of Energy Complex and the commercial nuclear sector. Recently, the desire to close legacy facilities has created

  9. Determination of charge transport activation energy and injection barrier in organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Züfle, S.; Altazin, S.; Hofmann, A.; Jäger, L.; Neukom, M. T.; Brütting, W.; Ruhstaller, B.

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier transport in organic semiconductor devices is thermally activated with characteristic activation energies in the range of 0.2-0.6 eV, leading to strongly temperature-dependent behaviour. For designing efficient organic semiconductor materials and devices, it is therefore indispensable to understand the origin of these activation energies. We propose that in bilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing a polar electron transport layer, as well as in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices, the hole injection barrier Einj and the hole mobility activation energy Eμ can be decoupled from each other if temperature-dependent capacitance-frequency (C-f-T) and MIS-CELIV (charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage) experiments are combined. While the C-f-T signal contains information of both injection and transport, the CELIV current is expected to be insensitive to the electrode injection properties. We employ numerical drift-diffusion simulations to investigate the accuracy of this analytical parameter extraction approach and to develop criteria for its validity. We show that the implicit assumption of constant charge density and field profiles leads to systematic errors in determining the activation energies. Thus, one should be aware of the intrinsic limitations of the analytical Arrhenius fit, and for more accurate parameter determination a full drift-diffusion modelling is advised. Applying the analytical method to a standard bilayer OLED, we find that the total activation energy of 0.5 eV for the hole current can be split into contributions of ≈0.25 eV each for injection barrier and mobility. Finally, we also discuss the broader applicability of this method for other device stacks and material combinations.

  10. Electrostatic energy barriers from dielectric membranes upon approach of translocating DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-02-28

    We probe the electrostatic cost associated with the approach phase of DNA translocation events. Within an analytical theory at the Debye-Hückel level, we calculate the electrostatic energy of a rigid DNA molecule interacting with a dielectric membrane. For carbon or silicon based low permittivity neutral membranes, the DNA molecule experiences a repulsive energy barrier between 10 k(B)T and 100 k(B)T. In the case of engineered membranes with high dielectric permittivities, the membrane surface attracts the DNA with an energy of the same magnitude. Both the repulsive and attractive interactions result from image-charge effects and their magnitude survive even for the thinnest graphene-based membranes of size d ≈ 6 Å. For weakly charged membranes, the electrostatic energy is always attractive at large separation distances but switches to repulsive close to the membrane surface. We also characterise the polymer length dependence of the interaction energy. For specific values of the membrane charge density, low permittivity membranes repel short polymers but attract long polymers. Our results can be used to control the strong electrostatic energy of DNA-membrane interactions prior to translocation events by chemical engineering of the relevant system parameters.

  11. On the HCN – HNC Energy Difference

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Thanh L.; Baraban, Joshua H.; Ruscic, Branko; Stanton, John F.

    2015-11-05

    The value for the HCN → HNC 0 K isomerization energy has been investigated by combining state-of-the-art electronic structure methods with the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach. The directly computed energy difference between HCN and HNC at the HEAT-456QP level of theory is 5236 ± 50 cm–1. This is substantially lower (by ~470 cm–1 or ~1.3 kcal/mol) than the recently proposed high-level multireference configuration interaction value of 5705 ± 20 cm–1 of Barber et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.2014, 437, 1828–1835). The discrepancy was analyzed by the ATcT approach, using several distinct steps, which (a) independently corroborated the current single-reference HEAT-456QP result, (b) independently found that the recent multireference-based value is highly unlikely to be correct within its originally stated uncertainty, and (c) produced a recommended value of 5212 ± 30 cm–1 for the HCN → HNC isomerization energy at 0 K, based on all currently available knowledge. The ATcT standard enthalpies of formation at 0 and 298 K for HCN, HNC, and their cations and anions are also presented.

  12. Energy barrier versus switching field for patterned Co80Pt20 alloy and Co/Pt multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jeroen; Bolhuis, Thijs; Abelmann, Leon

    2013-05-01

    Two Co/Pt multilayer samples have been fabricated with a difference in the number of bilayers, leading to a total magnetic layer thickness of 3 nm and 20 nm. From these films, large arrays of magnetic islands have been patterned using laser interference lithography and ion beam etching. We have investigated the switching field distribution (SFD) of approximately 80 islands and thermal switching field distribution SFDT of individual islands of both samples using the anomalous Hall effect. We compare the results of these measurements with the (SFDT) of a previously investigated alloy with a magnetic layer thickness of 20 nm by comparing the results of over 1000 hysteresis loops of a single weak island and a single strong island. We found that that the energy barrier for the multilayer islands increases with increasing switching field, whereas it was previously found that the energy barrier for the alloy stays constant with varying switching fields. When comparing the two multilayer samples, we observe that the grain size, anisotropy, and switching field distribution are more or less independent on thickness, whereas the switching field at both 0 K and 300 K decreases with film thickness.

  13. Total reaction cross sections for 8Li + 90Zr at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakou, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Aslanoglou, X.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Grebosz, J.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Parascandolo, C.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sgouros, O.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trzcinska, A.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-05-01

    Total reaction cross sections for the radioactive nucleus 8Li on 90Zr are reported at the near-barrier energies of 18.5 and 21.5MeV, derived from quasi-elastic scattering measurements. An analysis of the quasi-elastic scattering results is performed within an optical model framework using the BDM3Y1 interaction and total reaction cross sections are deduced. These quantities, appropriately reduced, are compared with previous data obtained in elastic scattering measurements with well and weakly bound projectiles on various targets and a formula for predicting total reaction cross sections with an uncertainty of % is obtained. Further on, the ratios of direct to total reaction cross sections are estimated for 6,8Li on various targets and are compared with CDCC or CRC calculations. The energy dependence of the optical potential is also discussed.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of low surface energy fluoropolymers as potential barrier coatings in oral care.

    PubMed

    Churchley, David P; Barbu, Eugen; Ewen, Richard J; Shen, Zhihao; Kim, Yongchul; McHugh, Mark A; Zhang, Zhong Yi; Nevell, Thomas G; Rees, Gareth D; Tsibouklis, John

    2008-03-15

    A series of low surface energy fluorinated homopolymers and copolymers has been synthesized and characterized using thermal, optical, spectroscopic, and chromatographic techniques. Their utility as barrier technologies in oral care has been considered, and aqueous nanosuspensions of the materials have been deposited as films on model dental hard surfaces in the presence and absence of a salivary pellicle. Calcium hydroxyapatite has been used as a model for enamel, as has PMMA due to its widespread use in denture fabrication. Surface energy determinations, combined with XPS studies, have provided insights into the molecular-level organization at the surface of the film structures. Studies of solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide have identified the polymers that are suitable for processing in this medium.

  15. The {sup 6}He Optical Potential at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Moro, A. M.

    2010-04-26

    We present an Optical Model (OM) study of {sup 6}He on {sup 208}Pb elastic scattering data, measured at laboratory energies around the Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab} = 14, 16, 18, 22, and 27 MeV)[1]. For the projectile-target bare interaction, we use the microscopic Sao Paulo Potential (SPP). This bare interaction is supplemented with a Coulomb Dipole Polarization (CDP) potential, as well as a diffuse complex Woods-Saxon potential. Four-body Continuum-Discretized-Coupled-Channels (CDCC) calculations have been performed in order to support the optical model analysis. We have also studied the alpha channel, which is the dominant reaction process. In the analysis of this channel, we compare the angular and energy distributions of the alpha particles measured at 22 MeV, with Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculations.

  16. Efficient dynamical correction of the transition state theory rate estimate for a flat energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-09-07

    The recrossing correction to the transition state theory estimate of a thermal rate can be difficult to calculate when the energy barrier is flat. This problem arises, for example, in polymer escape if the polymer is long enough to stretch between the initial and final state energy wells while the polymer beads undergo diffusive motion back and forth over the barrier. We present an efficient method for evaluating the correction factor by constructing a sequence of hyperplanes starting at the transition state and calculating the probability that the system advances from one hyperplane to another towards the product. This is analogous to what is done in forward flux sampling except that there the hyperplane sequence starts at the initial state. The method is applied to the escape of polymers with up to 64 beads from a potential well. For high temperature, the results are compared with direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as forward flux sampling and excellent agreement between the three rate estimates is found. The use of a sequence of hyperplanes in the evaluation of the recrossing correction speeds up the calculation by an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach. As the temperature is lowered, the direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as the forward flux simulations become computationally too demanding, while the harmonic transition state theory estimate corrected for recrossings can be calculated without significant increase in the computational effort.

  17. Electrical Characterization of High Energy Electron Irradiated Ni/4 H-SiC Schottky Barrier Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradzah, A. T.; Omotoso, E.; Legodi, M. J.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.; Diale, M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of high energy electron irradiation on Ni/4 H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes was evaluated by current-voltage ( I- V) and capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements at room temperature. Electron irradiation was achieved by using a radioactive strontium source with peak emission energy of 2.3 MeV. Irradiation was performed in fluence steps of 4.9 × 1013 cm-2 until a total fluence of 5.4 × 1014 cm-2 was reached. The Schottky barrier height determined from I- V measurements was not significantly changed by irradiation while that obtained from C- V measurements increased with irradiation. The ideality factor was obtained before irradiation as 1.05 and this value did not significantly change as a result of irradiation. The series resistance increased from 47 Ω before irradiation to 74 Ω after a total electron fluence of 5.4 × 1014 cm-2. The net donor concentration decreased with increasing irradiation fluence from 4.6 × 1014 cm-3 to 3.0 × 1014 cm-3 from which the carrier removal rate was calculated to be 0.37 cm-1.

  18. Entrance Channel Mass Asymmetry Effects in Sub-Barrier Fusion Dynamics by Using Energy Dependent Woods-Saxon Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjeet Singh, Gautam

    2015-12-01

    The present article highlights the inconsistency of static Woods-Saxon potential and the applicability of energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential to explore the fusion dynamics of {}4822Ti+58,60,6428Ni, {}4622Ti+{}6428Ni,{}5022Ti+{}6028Ni, and {}199F+9341Nb reactions leading to formation of different Sn-isotopes via different entrance channels. Theoretical calculations based upon one-dimensional Wong formula obtained by using static Woods-Saxon potential unable to provide proper explanation for sub-barrier fusion enhancement of these projectile-target combinations. However, the predictions of one-dimensional Wong formula based upon energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) accurately describe the observed fusion dynamics of these systems wherein the significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.97 fm is required to address the experimental data in whole range of energy. Therefore, the energy dependence in nucleus-nucleus potential simulates the influence of the nuclear structure degrees of freedom of the colliding pairs. Supported by Dr. D.S. Kothari Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme sponsored by University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India

  19. A Review of Barriers to and Opportunities for the Integration of Renewable Energy in the Southeast

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Ben W; Hadley, Stanton W; Xu, Yan

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to prepare a summary report that examines the opportunities for and obstacles to the integration of renewable energy resources in the Southeast between now and the year 2030. The report, which is based on a review of existing literature regarding renewable resources in the Southeast, includes the following renewable energy resources: wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, biomass, and tidal. The evaluation was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Energy Foundation and is a subjective review with limited detailed analysis. However, the report offers a best estimate of the magnitude, time frame, and cost of deployment of renewable resources in the Southeast based upon the literature reviewed and reasonable engineering and economic estimates. For the purposes of this report, the Southeast is defined as the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. In addition, some aspects of the report (wind and geothermal) also consider the extended Southeast, which includes Maryland, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. A description of the existing base of renewable electricity installations in the region is given for each technology considered. Where available, the possible barriers and other considerations regarding renewable energy resources are listed in terms of availability, investment and maintenance costs, reliability, installation requirements, policies, and energy market. As stated above, the report is a comprehensive review of renewable energy resources in the southeastern region of United States based on a literature study that included information obtained from the Southern Bio-Power wiki, sources from the Energy Foundation, sources available to ORNL, and sources found during the review. The report consists of an executive summary, this introductory chapter describing report objectives, a chapter on analysis methods and

  20. pH-Regulated Mechanisms Account for Pigment-Type Differences in Epidermal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Gunathilake, Roshan; Schurer, Nanna Y.; Shoo, Brenda A.; Celli, Anna; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Crumrine, Debra; Sirimanna, Ganga; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether pigment type determines differences in epidermal function, we studied stratum corneum (SC) pH, permeability barrier homeostasis, and SC integrity in three geographically disparate populations with pigment type I–II versus IV–V skin (Fitzpatrick I–VI scale). Type IV–V subjects showed: (i) lower surface pH (≈0.5 U); (ii) enhanced SC integrity (transepidermal water loss change with sequential tape strippings); and (iii) more rapid barrier recovery than type I–II subjects. Enhanced barrier function could be ascribed to increased epidermal lipid content, increased lamellar body production, and reduced acidity, leading to enhanced lipid processing. Compromised SC integrity in type I–II subjects could be ascribed to increased serine protease activity, resulting in accelerated desmoglein-1 (DSG-1)/corneodesmosome degradation. In contrast, DSG-1-positive CDs persisted in type IV–V subjects, but due to enhanced cathepsin-D activity, SC thickness did not increase. Adjustment of pH of type I–II SC to type IV–V levels improved epidermal function. Finally, dendrites from type IV–V melanocytes were more acidic than those from type I–II subjects, and they transfer more melanosomes to the SC, suggesting that melanosome secretion could contribute to the more acidic pH of type IV–V skin. These studies show marked pigment-type differences in epidermal structure and function that are pH driven. PMID:19177137

  1. A finite difference analysis of the field present behind an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Andrew M

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of an incident sound wave with an acoustically impenetrable two-layer barrier is considered. Of particular interest is the presence of several acoustic wave components in the shadow region of this barrier. A finite difference model capable of simulating this geometry is validated by comparison to the analytical solution for an idealized, hard-soft barrier. A panel comprising a high air-content closed cell foam backed with an elastic (metal) back plate is then examined. The insertion loss of this panel was found to exceed the dynamic range of the measurement system and was thus acoustically impenetrable. Experimental results from such a panel are shown to contain artifacts not present in the diffraction solution, when acoustic waves are incident upon the soft surface. A finite difference analysis of this experimental configuration replicates the presence of the additional field components. Furthermore, the simulated results allow the additional components to be identified as arising from the S(0) and A(0) Lamb modes traveling in the elastic plate. These Lamb mode artifacts are not found to be present in the shadow region when the acoustic waves are incident upon the elastic surface.

  2. Biological and Sociocultural Differences in Perceived Barriers to Physical Activity among 5th–7th Grade Urban Girls

    PubMed Central

    Vermeesch, Amber L.; Ling, Jiying; Voskuil, Vicki R.; Bakhoya, Marion; Wesolek, Stacey M.; Bourne, Kelly A.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Robbins, Lorraine B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate physical activity (PA) contributes to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity among U.S. adolescent girls. Barriers preventing adolescent girls from meeting PA guidelines have not been thoroughly examined. Objectives The threefold purpose of this study was to: (a) determine pubertal stage, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic status (SES) differences in ratings of interference of barriers to PA; (b) examine relationships between perceived barriers and age, body mass index (BMI), recreational screen time, sedentary activity, and PA; and (c) identify girls’ top-rated perceived barriers to PA. Methods Girls (N = 509) from eight Midwestern U.S. schools participated. Demographic, pubertal stage, perceived barriers, and recreational screen time data were collected via surveys. Height and weight were measured. Accelerometers measured sedentary activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and light plus MVPA. Results Girls of low SES reported greater interference of perceived barriers to PA than those who were not of low SES (1.16 vs. 0.97, p = .01). Girls in early/middle puberty had lower perceived barriers than those in late puberty (1.03 vs. 1.24, p < .001). Girls’ perceived barriers were negatively related to MVPA (r = −.10, p = .03) and light plus MVPA (r = −.11, p = .02). Girls’ top five perceived barriers included lack of skills, hating to sweat, difficulty finding programs, being tired, and having pain. Discussion Innovative interventions, particularly focusing on skill development, are needed to assist girls in overcoming their perceived barriers to PA. PMID:26325276

  3. Role of energy dependent interaction potential in sub-barrier fusion of S2814i +Z9040r system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2015-08-01

    We have analyzed the importance of the inelastic surface vibrations of colliding nuclei in the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of S2814i +Z9040r system by using the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with one dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel formulation using the code CCFULL. The multi-phonon vibrational states of colliding nuclei seem to impart significant contribution. The coupling between relative motion of reactants and these relevant channels in turn produce anomalously large sub-barrier fusion enhancement over the expectations of one dimensional barrier penetration model. Furthermore, the effects of coupling to inelastic surface excitations are imitated due to energy dependence in the Woods-Saxon potential. In EDWSP model calculations, a wide range of diffuseness parameter much larger than the elastic scattering predictions is needed to account the observed fusion enhancement in the close vicinity of Coulomb barrier.

  4. Breakup and Elastic Scattering in the {sup 9}Be + {sup 144}Sm system at near barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, B.; Garcia, V. N.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Padron, I.

    2010-05-21

    Breakup and elastic scattering in the Be + {sup 144}Sm system, at near barrier energies, are investigated. We calculate theoretically the non-capture breakup cross section by performing coupled reaction channel calculations. The energy dependence of the optical potential does not show the usual threshold anomaly found in tightly bound systems.

  5. Investigation of contribution of incomplete fusion in the total fusion process induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the relative contribution of incomplete fusion (ICF) and complete fusion (CF) in total fusion (TF) induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at energies in the vicinity of Coulomb barrier using classical dynamical model and Wong's formula in conjugation with energy dependent Woods-Saxon formula. It is found that at above barrier energies ICF contributes almost 30% in TF while at energies below the barrier qualitatively its contribution is much more than thirty percent.

  6. Enhancing ability of harvesting energy from random vibration by decreasing the potential barrier of bistable harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunbo; Qin, Weiyang

    2017-02-01

    When a bistable energy harvester (BEH) is driven by weak random excitation, its harvesting efficiency will decrease due to the seldom occurrence of interwell motion. To overcome this defect, we developed an improved bistable energy harvester (IBEH) from BEH by adding a small magnet at the middle of two fixed magnets. It is proved that the attractive force originated from the additional magnet can pull down the potential barrier and shallow the potential well, but still keep the middle position of beam unstable. This can make jumping between potential wells easier. Thus IBEH can realize snap-through even at fairly weak excitation. The magnetic potential energy is given and the electromechanical equations are derived. Then the harvesting performance of IBEH under random excitation is studied. Validation experiments are designed and carried out. Comparisons prove that IBEH is preferable to BEH in harvesting random energy and can give out a high output voltage even at weak excitation. The size of additional magnet can be optimized to reach the best performance of IBEH.

  7. Vinculin phosphorylation and barrier failure of coronary endothelial monolayers under energy depletion.

    PubMed

    Muhs, A; Noll, T; Piper, H M

    1997-08-01

    We studied the hypothesis that, in energy-depleted endothelial cells, Ca(2+)-dependent activation of protein kinase C (PKC) causes phosphorylation of vinculin and that this effect is involved in the early loss of endothelial barrier function. Vinculin localization and phosphorylation, PKC activity, and albumin permeability were studied in cultured coronary endothelial monolayers from rats. Ten minutes after the onset of metabolic inhibition by 5 mM potassium cyanide and 5 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose, immunofluorescence of vinculin at cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix contacts faded, whereas total cellular vinculin content remained unchanged. During the same time period, vinculin phosphorylation at tyrosine and serine sites increased by 3.9- and 3.5-fold, respectively. Vinculin phosphorylation was related to activation of PKC and an unidentified tyrosine kinase and was elicited by a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ within energy-depleted endothelial cells. Conditions inhibiting vinculin phosphorylation also reduced monolayer permeability induced by energy depletion. These data indicate that vinculin phosphorylation is involved in the progression of hyperpermeability during energy depletion in coronary endothelial monolayers.

  8. Educational Barriers of Rural Youth: Relation of Individual and Contextual Difference Variables

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Matthew J.; Byun, Soo-yong; Meece, Judith L.; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation of several individual and contextual difference factors to the perceived educational barriers of rural youth. Data were from a broader national investigation of students’ postsecondary aspirations and preparation in rural high schools across the United States. The sample involved more than 7,000 rural youth in 73 high schools across 34 states. Results indicated that some individual (e.g., African American race/ethnicity) and contextual (e.g., parent education) difference factors were predictive while others were not. Extensions to, similarities, and variations with previous research are discussed. Implications, limitations, and suggestions for future research are also discussed. PMID:24474843

  9. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  10. Coronal microleakage of three different dental biomaterials as intra-orifice barrier during nonvital bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Zarenejad, Nafiseh; Asgary, Saeed; Ramazani, Nahid; Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Rafiei, Alireza; Ramazani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to assess the microleakage of glass-ionomer (GI), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement as coronal orifice barrier during walking bleaching. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, endodontic treatment was done for 70 extracted human incisors without canal calcification, caries, restoration, resorption, or cracks. The teeth were then divided into three experimental using “Simple randomization allocation” (n = 20) and two control groups (n = 5). The three cements were applied as 3-mm intra-orifice barrier in test groups, and bleaching process was then conducted using a mixture of sodium perborate powder and distilled water, for 9 days. For leakage evaluation, bovine serum albumin marker was traced in a dual-chamber technique with Bradford indicator. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean ± standard deviation leakage of samples from negative control, positive control, GI, MTA, and CEM cement groups were 0.0, 8.9 ± 0.03, 0.47 ± 0.02, 0.48 ± 0.02, and 0.49 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between three experimental groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that GI, MTA, and CEM cements are considered as suitable intra-orifice barrier to provide coronal seal during walking bleaching. PMID:26759596

  11. Unraveling barrier properties of three different in-house human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; Gooris, Gerrit S; Mulder, Aat; Rietveld, Marion; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2012-01-01

    Human skin equivalents (HSEs) are three-dimensional culture models that are used as a model for native human skin. In this study the barrier properties of two novel HSEs, the fibroblast-derived matrix model (FDM) and the Leiden epidermal model (LEM), were compared with the full-thickness collagen model (FTM) and human skin. Since the main skin barrier is located in the lipid regions of the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), we investigated the epidermal morphology, expression of differentiation markers, SC permeability, lipid composition, and lipid organization of all HSEs and native human skin. Our results demonstrate that the barrier function of the FDM and LEM improved compared with that of the FTM, but all HSEs are more permeable than human skin. Further, the FDM and LEM have a relatively lower free fatty acid content than the FTM and human skin. Several similarities between the FDM, LEM and FTM were observed: (1) the morphology and the expression of the investigated differentiation markers were similar to those observed in native human skin, except for the observed expression of keratin 16 and premature expression of involucrin that were detected in all HSEs, (2) the lipids in the SC of all HSEs were arranged in lipid lamellae, similar to human skin, but show an increase in the number of lipid lamellae in the intercellular regions and (3) the SC lipids of all HSEs show a less densely packed lateral lipid organization compared with human SC. These findings indicate that the HSEs mimic many aspects of native human skin, but differ in their barrier properties.

  12. Single-Chain Magnets Based on Octacyanotungstate with the Highest Energy Barriers for Cyanide Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rong-Min; Cao, Fan; Li, Jing; Yang, Li; Han, Yuan; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Zaichao; Wang, Xin-Yi; Song, You

    2016-01-01

    By introducing large counter cations as the spacer, two isolated 3, 3-ladder compounds, (Ph4P)[CoII(3-Mepy)2.7(H2O)0.3WV(CN)8]·0.6H2O (1) and (Ph4As)[CoII(3-Mepy)3WV(CN)8] (2, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine), were synthesized and characterized. Static and dynamic magnetic characterizations reveal that compounds 1 and 2 both behave as the single-chain magnets (SCMs) with very high energy barriers: 252(9) K for 1 and 224(7) K for 2, respectively. These two compounds display the highest relaxation barriers for cyano-bridged SCMs and are preceded only by two cobalt(II)-radical compounds among all SCMs. Meanwhile, a large coercive field of 26.2 kOe (1) and 22.6 kOe (2) were observed at 1.8 K. PMID:27071451

  13. Effect of 2450-MHz microwave energy on the blood-brain barrier to hydrophilic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave energy at 2450 MHz 120 Hz AM was found ineffective in increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to the hydrophilic tracers HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose. Furthermore, a diminished permeability to HRP and sodium fluorescein was apparent after 180 minutes of exposure to microwaves at an incident power density of 20 mW/cm/sup 2/. Colonic temperature, as well as temperature within the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, cerebellum and medulla, were elevated by less than 1/sup 0/C over those of sham-exposed rats. A significant decrease in the permeability to HRP and (/sup 14/C) sucrose occurred after exposure to an incident power density of 65 mW/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. The reduction in permeability to HRP correlated with a suppressed incorporation of the tracer by pinocytosis in cerebral microvessels. Suppression of blood-brain barrier permeability to hydrophilic tracers was most pronounced at brain temperatures exceeding approx. 40/sup 0/C and is demonstrated to be temperature dependent.

  14. Single-Chain Magnets Based on Octacyanotungstate with the Highest Energy Barriers for Cyanide Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Rong-Min; Cao, Fan; Li, Jing; Yang, Li; Han, Yuan; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Zaichao; Wang, Xin-Yi; Song, You

    2016-04-01

    By introducing large counter cations as the spacer, two isolated 3, 3-ladder compounds, (Ph4P)[CoII(3-Mepy)2.7(H2O)0.3WV(CN)8]·0.6H2O (1) and (Ph4As)[CoII(3-Mepy)3WV(CN)8] (2, 3-Mepy = 3-methylpyridine), were synthesized and characterized. Static and dynamic magnetic characterizations reveal that compounds 1 and 2 both behave as the single-chain magnets (SCMs) with very high energy barriers: 252(9) K for 1 and 224(7) K for 2, respectively. These two compounds display the highest relaxation barriers for cyano-bridged SCMs and are preceded only by two cobalt(II)-radical compounds among all SCMs. Meanwhile, a large coercive field of 26.2 kOe (1) and 22.6 kOe (2) were observed at 1.8 K.

  15. Sensing properties of different classes of gases based on the nanowire-electrode junction barrier modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nandan; Yan, Chaoyi; Lee, Pooi See; Comini, Elisabetta

    2011-04-01

    The role of contact between semiconducting nanowire and metal electrodes in a single nanowire field effect transistor (NW-FET) is investigated for the sensing of different type of gases. Two different types of In2O3nanowire devices, namely; Schottky contact device (SCD) and Ohmic contact device (OCD) are evaluated. SCD has shown a superior response to the reducing gas (CO) compared to oxidizing gas (NO), while OCD has shown high sensitivity towards oxidizing gas (NO) compared to the reducing gas (CO) under similar working conditions. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the contact resistance at the metal-semiconductor junction in SCD and the change in nanowirechannel conductance dominates in OCD. The Schottky barrier height (SBH) was extracted using low temperature current voltage measurement which provided direct evidence for the notion that the barrier height plays a crucial role in the sensing of different types of gases. The sensing mechanism is illustrated in this work for both devices.The role of contact between semiconducting nanowire and metal electrodes in a single nanowire field effect transistor (NW-FET) is investigated for the sensing of different type of gases. Two different types of In2O3nanowire devices, namely; Schottky contact device (SCD) and Ohmic contact device (OCD) are evaluated. SCD has shown a superior response to the reducing gas (CO) compared to oxidizing gas (NO), while OCD has shown high sensitivity towards oxidizing gas (NO) compared to the reducing gas (CO) under similar working conditions. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the contact resistance at the metal-semiconductor junction in SCD and the change in nanowirechannel conductance dominates in OCD. The Schottky barrier height (SBH) was extracted using low temperature current voltage measurement which provided direct evidence for the notion that the barrier height plays a crucial role in the sensing of different types of gases. The sensing mechanism is illustrated in this work

  16. Quantum dynamics study of energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with a negative-energy barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-01-01

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics approach in full dimensional, six degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with an early, negative energy barrier. The calculation shows both the HBr and OH vibrational excitations enhance the reactivity. However, even this reaction has a negative energy barrier, the calculation shows not all forms of energy are equally effective in promoting the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, the vibrational energies of both the HBr and OH are more effective in enhancing the reactivity than the translational energy, whereas the rotational excitations of both the HBr and OH hinder the reactivity. The rate constants were also calculated for the temperature range between 5 to 500 K. The quantal rate constants have a better slope agreement with the experimental data than quasi-classical trajectory results. PMID:28071762

  17. Quantum dynamics study of energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with a negative-energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-01-10

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics approach in full dimensional, six degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with an early, negative energy barrier. The calculation shows both the HBr and OH vibrational excitations enhance the reactivity. However, even this reaction has a negative energy barrier, the calculation shows not all forms of energy are equally effective in promoting the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, the vibrational energies of both the HBr and OH are more effective in enhancing the reactivity than the translational energy, whereas the rotational excitations of both the HBr and OH hinder the reactivity. The rate constants were also calculated for the temperature range between 5 to 500 K. The quantal rate constants have a better slope agreement with the experimental data than quasi-classical trajectory results.

  18. Quantum dynamics study of energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with a negative-energy barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-01-01

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics approach in full dimensional, six degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with an early, negative energy barrier. The calculation shows both the HBr and OH vibrational excitations enhance the reactivity. However, even this reaction has a negative energy barrier, the calculation shows not all forms of energy are equally effective in promoting the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, the vibrational energies of both the HBr and OH are more effective in enhancing the reactivity than the translational energy, whereas the rotational excitations of both the HBr and OH hinder the reactivity. The rate constants were also calculated for the temperature range between 5 to 500 K. The quantal rate constants have a better slope agreement with the experimental data than quasi-classical trajectory results.

  19. A maximum difference scaling survey of barriers to intensive combination treatment strategies with glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyfroidt, Sabrina; Hulscher, Marlies; De Cock, Diederik; Van der Elst, Kristien; Joly, Johan; Westhovens, René; Verschueren, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the relative importance of barriers related to the provision of intensive combination treatment strategies with glucocorticoids (ICTS-GCs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) from the rheumatologists' perspective and to explore the relation between rheumatologists' characteristics and importance scores. A maximum difference scaling (MDS) survey was administered to 66 rheumatologists in Flanders and the Brussels-Capital Region. The survey included 25 barriers, previously being discovered in a qualitative study. The survey included 25 choice sets, each of which contained a different set of four barriers. In each choice situation, respondents were asked to choose the most important barrier. The mean relative importance score (RIS) for each barrier was calculated using hierarchical Bayes modeling. The potential relation between rheumatologists' characteristics and the RIS was examined using Spearman's correlation coefficient, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis H test. The three highest ranked barriers included "contraindicated for some patients (e.g., patients with comorbidities, older patients)," "an increased risk of side effects and related complications," and "patients' resistance" with a mean ± SD RIS of 9.76 ± 0.82, 8.50 ± 1.17, and 7.45 ± 1.22, respectively. Comparing the RISs based on rheumatologists' characteristics, a different ranking was found for three barriers depending on the age, university location, and/or frequency of prescribing ICTS-GCs. The dominant barriers hindering ICTS-GCs prescription from a rheumatologists' perspective are patient-related barriers and barriers related to the complexity of prescribing a combination therapy including GCs. A tailored improvement intervention is needed to overcome these barriers and should focus on the familiarity of rheumatologists with ICTS-GC and patient education.

  20. Activation of metabotropic GABA receptors increases the energy barrier for vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Rost, Benjamin R; Nicholson, Patrick; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Rummel, Andreas; Rosenmund, Christian; Breustedt, Joerg; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2011-09-15

    Neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals is under the tight control of various metabotropic receptors. We report here that in addition to the regulation of Ca(2+) channel activity, metabotropic GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) at murine hippocampal glutamatergic synapses utilize an inhibitory pathway that directly targets the synaptic vesicle release machinery. Acute application of the GABA(B)R agonist baclofen rapidly and reversibly inhibits vesicle fusion, which occurs independently of the SNAP-25 C-terminus. Using applications of hypertonic sucrose solutions, we find that the size of the readily releasable pool remains unchanged by GABA(B)R activation, but the sensitivity of primed vesicles to hypertonic stimuli appears lowered as the response amplitudes at intermediate sucrose concentrations are smaller and release kinetics are slowed. These data show that presynaptic GABA(B)Rs can inhibit neurotransmitter release directly by increasing the energy barrier for vesicle fusion.

  1. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Grudzevich, O. T.; Yavshits, S. G.

    2013-03-15

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  2. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex.

    PubMed

    Vanston, C R; Kearley, G J; Edwards, A J; Darwish, T A; de Souza, N R; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Gardiner, M G

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)2CH2}2Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.

  3. Why Density-Gradient Corrections Improve Atomization Energies and Barrier Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdew, John P.; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Zupan, Ales; Burke, Kieron

    While the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation typically underestimates the strength of the chemical bond, the local spin density (LSD) approximation overestimates it. Thus LSD overbinds atoms in molecules, and underestimates the heights of energy barriers when the transition state is more highly bonded than the initial state. Generalized gradient approximations (GGA's), which incorporate density-gradient corrections to LSD, improve the agreement between calculated and measured energetics. This has been previously understood as a consequence of the fact that gradient corrections favor density inhomogeneity, which increases when a bond is stretched or broken. We show that gradient corrections also favor high density, which increases when a bond is compressed or formed, but that the inhomogeneity effect usually prevails. To quantify the discussion, we present a thermodynamic-like inequality which is satisfied when gradient corrections favor a process.

  4. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)(2)CH2}(2)Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.

  5. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)(2)CH2}(2)Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model formore » the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique.« less

  6. Elastic scattering of 17O+208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Di Meo, P.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Toniolo, N.; Filipescu, D.; Gheorghe, A.; Glodariu, T.; Jeong, S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lay, J. A.; Miyatake, H.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Stroe, L.; Vitturi, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Zerva, K.

    2016-05-01

    Within the frame of the commissioning of a new experimental apparatus EXPADES we undertook the measurement of the elastic scattering angular distribution for the system 17O+208Pb at energy around the Coulomb barrier. The reaction dynamics induced by loosely bound Radioactive Ion Beams is currently being extensively studied [4]. In particular the study of the elastic scattering process allows to obtain direct information on the total reaction cross section of the exotic nuclei. In order to understand the effect of the low binding energy on the reaction mechanism it is important to compare radioactive weakly bound nuclei with stable strongly-bound nuclei. In this framework the study of the 17O+208Pb elastic scattering can be considered to be complementary to a previous measurement of the total reaction cross section for the system 17F+208Pb at energies of 86, 90.4 MeV [5, 6]. The data will be compared with those obtained for the neighboring systems 16,18O+208Pb and others available in literature.

  7. Investigation of 17F+p elastic scattering at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Azab Farid, M.; Ibraheem, Awad A.; Al-Hajjaji, Arwa S.

    2015-10-01

    The 17F +p elastic scattering at two near-barrier energies of 3.5 and 4.3 MeV/nucleon, have been analyzed in the framework of the single folding approach. The folded potentials are constructed by folding the density-dependent (DDM3Y) effective nucleon-nucleon interaction over the nuclear density of the one-proton halo nucleus 17F. Two versions of the density are considered. In addition, two versions of the one-nucleon knock-on exchange potentials are introduced to construct the real microscopic potentials. The derived potentials supplemented by phenomenological Woods-Saxon imaginary and spin-orbit potentials produced excellent description of the differential elastic scattering cross sections at the higher energy without need to introduce any renormalization. At the lower energy, however, in order to successfully reproduce the data, it is necessary to reduce the strength of the constructed real DDM3Y potential by about 25% of its original value. Furthermore, good agreement with data is obtained using the extracted microscopic DDM3Y potentials for both real and imaginary parts. Moreover, the interesting notch test is applied to investigate the sensitivity of the elastic scattering cross section to the radial distribution of the constructed microscopic potentials. The extracted reaction (absorption) cross sections are, also, investigated.

  8. Canonical free-energy barrier of particle and polymer cluster formation

    PubMed Central

    Zierenberg, Johannes; Schierz, Philipp; Janke, Wolfhard

    2017-01-01

    A common approach to study nucleation rates is the estimation of free-energy barriers. This usually requires knowledge about the shape of the forming droplet, a task that becomes notoriously difficult in macromolecular setups starting with a proper definition of the cluster boundary. Here we demonstrate a shape-free determination of the free energy for temperature-driven cluster formation in particle as well as polymer systems. Combined with rigorous results on equilibrium droplet formation, this allows for a well-defined finite-size scaling analysis of the effective interfacial free energy at a fixed density. We first verify the theoretical predictions for the formation of a liquid droplet in a supersaturated particle gas by generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones system. Going one step further, we then generalize this approach to cluster formation in a dilute polymer solution. Our results suggest an analogy with particle condensation, when the macromolecules are interpreted as extended particles. PMID:28240262

  9. Energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Radiant barriers were tested in attics of three unoccupied research houses which are located near Knoxville, Tennessee. The prime purpose of the testing was to determine the interaction, if any, between two types of radiant barriers, horizontal (barrier laid on top of attic insulation) and truss (barrier attached to underside of roof trusses), and three levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation, R-11, R-19, and R-30. Testing of radiant barriers with R-19 fiberglass-batt attic insulation was done at the houses in the summer of 1985 and in the winter of 1985-86. The R-11 and R-30 testing was done in the summer of 1986. These results showed that horizontal barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing house cooling and heating loads. The summer of 1986 testing showed that increasing the attic insulation from R-11 to R-30 reduced the house cooling load (Btu) by approximately 16%. Adding a horizontal barrier to R-11 also reduced the cooling load compared to R-11 with no barrier by about 16%, while a truss barrier reduced it by 11%. A horizontal barrier with R-30 only reduced the cooling load by 2% compared to R-30 with no barrier, while an increase in the cooling load of 0.7% was measured with a truss barrier and R-30. Radiant barriers were not effective in reducing house cooling loads when R-30 attic insulation was present. The results from the summer of 1985 were integrated into the latest work through the use of a modeling effort using the building load simulation program, DOE-2.1B. This showed that R-19 insulation in conjunction with a horizontal barrier was (for Knoxville) the most effective barrier/insulation combination and could reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% compared to R-11 with no barrier.

  10. Racial differences in barriers to blood pressure control in a family practice setting.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathan M; Spees, Colleen K; Taylor, Christopher A; Wexler, Randy

    2010-10-01

    Hypertension prevalence in the African American community is greater than in all other ethnic groups. Cultural perceptions of health and disease introduce barriers to providing effective care. The purpose of this study was to identify racial differences in the perceived causes of hypertension, current behaviors performed to control blood pressure, and perceived barriers to preventing or treating hypertension. A self-administered survey of patients seen for medical care in a primary care network was conducted. The survey was developed to measure perceptions of hypertension etiology and treatments. Data from African American (n = 69) and Caucasian (n = 218) respondents were used to assess racial differences in perceptions of blood pressure control. About half of respondents knew their current blood pressures. African American patients were significantly less likely to believe that hypertension was caused by a lack of exercise and obesity. Significantly more Caucasians were less likely to report cutting down on table salt and taking prescription medications for blood pressure control. Both African Americans and Caucasians believed that sodium reduction was the most easily changed behavior to control their blood pressure, while both groups identified weight loss as being the most difficult. Racial differences exist in the perceived causes and treatments of high blood pressure, indicating a need for further patient education. When treating and counseling patients, physicians and support staff members must be sensitive to racial diversity and strive to offer culturally relevant solutions, especially for behaviors perceived as most difficult to change.

  11. Cooling season energy measurements of dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. ); Hall, J.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. Testing showed that increasing the attic ventilation area ratio from the minimum recommended of 1/300 (1 ft{sup 2} of effective ventilation area per 300 ft{sup 2} of attic area) to 1/150 had little if any effect on the house cooling load with either truss or horizontal barriers present in the attics. Radiant barriers, however, still reduced the house cooling load. 18 refs., 17 figs., 26 tabs.

  12. Making AlN(x) Tunnel Barriers Using a Low-Energy Nitrogen-Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama; Kleinsasser, Alan; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry; Lee, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A technique based on accelerating positive nitrogen ions onto an aluminum layer has been demonstrated to be effective in forming thin (<2 nm thick) layers of aluminum nitride (AlN(x)) for use as tunnel barriers in Nb/Al-AlN(x)/Nb superconductor/insulator/ superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions. AlN(x) is the present material of choice for tunnel barriers because, to a degree greater than that of any other suitable material, it offers the required combination of low leakage current at high current density and greater thermal stability. While ultra-thin AlN films with good thickness and stoichiometry control are easily formed using techniques such as reactive molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, growth temperatures of 900 C are necessary for the dissociative adsorption of nitrogen from either nitrogen (N2) or ammonia (NH3). These growth temperatures are prohibitively high for the formation of tunnel barriers on Nb films because interfacial reactions at temperatures as low as 200 to 300 C degrade device properties. Heretofore, deposition by reactive sputtering and nitridation of thin Al layers with DC and RF nitrogen plasmas have been successfully used to form AlN barriers in SIS junctions. However, precise control over critical current density Jc has proven to be a challenge, as is attaining adequate process reproducibility from system to system. The present ion-beam technique is an alternative to the plasma or reactive sputtering techniques as it provides a highly controlled arrival of reactive species, independent of the electrical conditions of the substrate or vacuum chamber. Independent and accurate control of parameters such as ion energy, flux, species, and direction promises more precise control of film characteristics such as stoichiometry and thickness than is the case with typical plasma processes. In particular, the background pressure during ion-beam nitride growth is 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower, minimizing the formation of

  13. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Keten, Sinan

    2016-07-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect.

  14. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Keten, Sinan

    2016-07-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect.

  15. Influence of hydrodynamic energy on Holocene reef flat accretion, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechnik, Belinda; Webster, Jody M.; Nothdurft, Luke; Webb, Gregory E.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Duce, Stephanie; Braga, Juan C.; Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Puotinen, Marji

    2016-01-01

    The response of platform reefs to sea-level stabilization over the past 6 ka is well established for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), with reefs typically accreting laterally from windward to leeward. However, these observations are based on few cores spread across reef zones and may not accurately reflect a reef's true accretional response to the Holocene stillstand. We present a new record of reef accretion based on 49 U/Th ages from Heron and One Tree reefs in conjunction with re-analyzed data from 14 reefs across the GBR. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic energy is the main driver of accretional direction; exposed reefs accreted primarily lagoon-ward while protected reefs accreted seawards, contrary to the traditional growth model in the GBR. Lateral accretion rates varied from 86.3 m/ka-42.4 m/ka on the exposed One Tree windward reef and 68.35 m/ka-15.7 m/ka on the protected leeward Heron reef, suggesting that wind/wave energy is not a dominant control on lateral accretion rates. This represents the most comprehensive statement of lateral accretion direction and rates from the mid-outer platform reefs of the GBR, confirming great variability in reef flat growth both within and between reef margins over the last 6 ka, and highlighting the need for closely-spaced transects.

  16. Transient effects of drying creep in nanoporous solids: understanding the effects of nanoscale energy barriers

    PubMed Central

    Sinko, Robert; Vandamme, Matthieu; Keten, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    The Pickett effect is the phenomenon of creep enhancement during transient drying. It has been observed for many nanoporous solids, including concrete, wood and Kevlar. While the existing micromechanical models can partially explain this effect, they have yet to consider nanoscale dynamic effects of water in nanopores, which are believed to be of paramount importance. Here, we examine how creep deformations in a slit pore are accelerated by the motion of water due to drying forces using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the drying that drives water flow in the nanopores lowers both the activation energy of pore walls sliding past one another and the apparent viscosity of confined water molecules. This lowering can be captured with an analytical Arrhenius relationship accounting for the role of water flow in overcoming the energy barriers. Notably, we use this model and simulation results to demonstrate that the drying creep strain is not linearly dependent on the applied creep stress at the nanopore level. Our findings establish the scaling relationships that explain how the creep driving force, drying force and fluid properties are related. Thus, we establish the nanoscale origins of the Pickett effect and provide strategies for minimizing the additional displacements arising from this effect. PMID:27493584

  17. Cross-Cultural Differences in Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Online Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesova, Larisa; Yang, Dazhi; Richardson, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this study was to learn about students' perceived barriers and the impact of those barriers on the quality of online discussions between two distinct cultural groups in Eastern and Northern Siberia (Russia). A mixed-methods approach utilizing surveys and interviews was used to investigate (1) the types of barriers the students…

  18. US-China Clean Energy Research Center on Building Energy Efficiency: Materials that Improve the Cost-Effectiveness of Air Barrier Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hun, Diana E.

    2016-12-01

    The US–China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) was launched in 2009 by US Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Chinese Minister of Science and Technology Wan Gang, and Chinese National Energy Agency Administrator Zhang Guobao. This 5-year collaboration emerged from the fact that the United States and China are the world’s largest energy producers, energy consumers, and greenhouse gas emitters, and that their joint effort could have significant positive repercussions worldwide. CERC’s main goal is to develop and deploy clean energy technologies that will help both countries meet energy and climate challenges. Three consortia were established to address the most pressing energy-related research areas: Advanced Coal Technology, Clean Vehicles, and Building Energy Efficiency (BEE). The project discussed in this report was part of the CERC-BEE consortia; its objective was to lower energy use in buildings by developing and evaluating technologies that improve the cost-effectiveness of air barrier systems for building envelopes.

  19. Relative Gibbs energies in solution through continuum models: effect of the loss of translational degrees of freedom in bimolecular reactions on Gibbs energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Diego; López, Ramón; Sordo, Tomás L

    2005-12-15

    We present here a cell model for evaluating Gibbs energy barriers corresponding to bimolecular reactions (or processes of larger molecularity) in which a loss of translational degrees of freedom takes place along the reaction coordinate. With this model, we have studied the Walden inversion processes: Xa- + H3CXb --> XaCH3 + Xb- (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). In these processes, our model yields an increase of about 2.3-3.4 kcal/mol in Gibbs energy in solution corresponding to the loss of the translational degrees of freedom when passing from separate reactants to the TS in good agreement with experimental data. The corresponding value in the gas phase is about 6.7-7.1 kcal/mol. When the difference between these two figures is used to correct the results obtained by the standard UAHF implementation of the continuum model, the theoretical results are brought significantly closer to the experimental ones. This seems to indicate that for these reactions the parametrization used does not adequately introduce the increase in Gibbs energy corresponding to the constriction of the translational motion of the species along the reaction coordinate when passing from the gas phase to solution. Therefore, we believe that continuum models could perform much better if we released the parametrization process from the task of taking into account the constriction in translation motion in solution, which could be more adequately evaluated using the cell model proposed here, thus allowing it to focus on better reproducing all the remaining solvation effects.

  20. Characteristic differences in barrier and hygroscopic properties between normal and cosmetic dry skin. I. Enhanced barrier analysis with sequential tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Lu, N; Chandar, P; Tempesta, D; Vincent, C; Bajor, J; McGuiness, H

    2014-04-01

    Cosmetic dry skin often has a lower hydration level but a similar apparent barrier function, as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL), than that of the normal skin. To investigate the intrinsic difference in barrier property and moisture-holding ability between the cosmetic dry and normal skin, we developed a new clinical and data analysis procedure based on sequential tape-stripping with TEWL measurement, coupled with chemical analysis for protein and natural moisturizing factors (NMF) in the stratum corneum. A clinical study consisting of 64 healthy Caucasian female subjects with normal and cosmetic dry skin was conducted according to our clinical and data collection protocols. After the baseline visual dryness assessment, 20 tape-strips were placed and removed on each test site using D-Squame tapes. TEWL was measured at baseline and after the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th tape-strips. All tapes were analysed for protein mass via chemical extraction and the Pierce BCA protein assay, as well as using an infrared densitometry device SquameScan 850A. The stratum corneum thickness and barrier quality (water transport resistance per thickness of the stratum corneum) were decoupled from the apparent barrier function using the TEWL and protein data. A linear relationship between 1/TEWL and cumulative protein removal was observed for both normal and cosmetic dry skin. However, the slope of the linear relation was significantly steeper for normal skin, and significantly more protein was removed from cosmetic dry skin. The results showed that on average, the barrier quality of the stratum corneum of the normal skin is about 40% higher than that of the dry skin, whereas the stratum corneum of the dry skin is about 30% thicker than that of the normal skin. In addition, the amount of SC removal in sequential tape-stripping is generally non-uniform. Our results demonstrated that there are characteristic differences in the barrier property between normal and cosmetic dry skin

  1. One-neutron stripping from 9Be to 181Ta, 169Tm, 187Re and at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. D.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Ferreira, J. L.; Mendes Junior, D. R.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, M. L.; Zhang, N. T.; Zhang, Y. H.; Li, G. S.; Wang, J. G.; Guo, S.; Qiang, Y. H.; Gao, B. S.; Zheng, Y.; Lei, X. G.; Wang, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    We report the measurement of one-neutron stripping of 9Be to the 181Ta, 187Re and nuclei, in the range from subbarrier to above-barrier energies. The activation technique was used, with the detection of off-line γ rays. The results show that the transfer cross sections for the three systems investigated are very similar and are much larger than the corresponding fusion cross sections at subbarrier energies, whereas fusion predominates at energies above the barrier. Data are in good agreement with our coupled reaction channel calculations. We also investigate the ratio, as a function of energy, between experimental transfer and fusion cross sections. The role of transfer couplings on the fusion excitation functions is also discussed.

  2. Installed Cost Benchmarks and Deployment Barriers for Residential Solar Photovoltaics with Energy Storage: Q1 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Ardani, Kristen; O'Shaughnessy, Eric; Fu, Ran; McClurg, Chris; Huneycutt, Joshua; Margolis, Robert

    2016-12-01

    In this report, we fill a gap in the existing knowledge about PV-plus-storage system costs and value by providing detailed component- and system-level installed cost benchmarks for residential systems. We also examine other barriers to increased deployment of PV-plus-storage systems in the residential sector. The results are meant to help technology manufacturers, installers, and other stakeholders identify cost-reduction opportunities and inform decision makers about regulatory, policy, and market characteristics that impede solar plus storage deployment. In addition, our periodic cost benchmarks will document progress in cost reductions over time. To analyze costs for PV-plus-storage systems deployed in the first quarter of 2016, we adapt the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's component- and system-level cost-modeling methods for standalone PV. In general, we attempt to model best-in-class installation techniques and business operations from an installed-cost perspective. In addition to our original analysis, model development, and review of published literature, we derive inputs for our model and validate our draft results via interviews with industry and subject-matter experts. One challenge to analyzing the costs of PV-plus-storage systems is choosing an appropriate cost metric. Unlike standalone PV, energy storage lacks universally accepted cost metrics, such as dollars per watt of installed capacity and lifetime levelized cost of energy. We explain the difficulty of arriving at a standard approach for reporting storage costs and then provide the rationale for using the total installed costs of a standard PV-plus-storage system as our primary metric, rather than using a system-size-normalized metric.

  3. Pentametallic lanthanide-alkoxide square-based pyramids: high energy barrier for thermal relaxation in a holmium single molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Blagg, Robin J; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J L; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2011-10-14

    Pentametallic Ln complexes of formula [Ln(5)O(O(i)Pr)(13)] have been made, where Ln(III) = Sm, Gd, Tb, Ho and Er; slow magnetisation relaxation to 33 K is observed for the Ho complex with an energy barrier of ca. 400 K.

  4. Imaging the radical channel in acetaldehyde photodissociation: Competing mechanisms at energies close to the triplet exit barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, G. A.; Arregui, A.; Rodriguez, J. D.; Banares, L.; Rubio-Lago, L.

    2010-08-14

    The photodissociation of acetaldehyde in the radical channel has been studied at wavelengths between 315 and 325 nm using the velocity-map imaging technique. Upon one-photon absorption at 315 nm, the molecule is excited to the first singlet excited state S{sub 1}, which, in turn, undergoes intersystem crossing to the first excited triplet state T{sub 1}. On the triplet surface, the molecule dissociates into CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals with large kinetic energy release (KER), in accordance with the well characterized exit barrier on T{sub 1}. However, at longer wavelengths (>320 nm), which correspond to excitation energies just below the triplet barrier, a sudden change in KER is observed. At these photolysis wavelengths, there is not enough energy to surpass the exit barrier on the triplet state, which leaves the possibility of unimolecular dissociation on S{sub 0} after internal conversion from S{sub 1}. We have characterized the fragments' KER at these wavelengths, as well as determined the energy partitioning for the radical fragments. A new accurate estimate of the barrier height on T{sub 1} is presented.

  5. Functional and cytometric examination of different human lung epithelial cell types as drug transport barriers

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Rosania, Gus R.; Kim, Chong-Kook; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-01-01

    To develop inhaled medications, various cell culture models have been used to examine the transcellular transport or cellular uptake properties of small molecules. For the reproducible high throughput screening of the inhaled drug candidates, a further verification of cell architectures as drug transport barriers can contribute to establishing appropriate in vitro cell models. In the present study, side-by-side experiments were performed to compare the structure and transport function of three lung epithelial cells (Calu-3, normal human bronchial primary cells (NHBE), and NL-20). The cells were cultured on the nucleopore membranes in the air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions, with cell culture medium in the basolateral side only, starting from day 1. In transport assays, paracellular transport across all three types of cells appeared to be markedly different with the NHBE or Calu-3 cells, showing low paracellular permeability and high TEER values, while the NL-20 cells showed high paracellular permeability and low TEER. Quantitative image analysis of the confocal microscope sections further confirmed that the Calu-3 cells formed intact cell monolayers in contrast to the NHBE and NL-20 cells with multilayers. Among three lung epithelial cell types, the Calu-3 cell cultures under the ALI condition showed optimal cytometric features for mimicking the biophysical characteristics of in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, the Calu-3 cell monolayers could be used as functional cell barriers for the lung-targeted drug transport studies. PMID:26746641

  6. Hypothalamic control of energy balance: different peptides, different functions.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Sarah F; Wortley, Katherine E

    2004-03-01

    Energy balance is maintained via a homeostatic system involving both the brain and the periphery. A key component of this system is the hypothalamus. Over the past two decades, major advances have been made in identifying an increasing number of peptides within the hypothalamus that contribute to the process of energy homeostasis. Under stable conditions, equilibrium exists between anabolic peptides that stimulate feeding behavior, as well as decrease energy expenditure and lipid utilization in favor of fat storage, and catabolic peptides that attenuate food intake, while stimulating sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity and restricting fat deposition by increasing lipid metabolism. The equilibrium between these neuropeptides is dynamic in nature. It shifts across the day-night cycle and from day to day and also in response to dietary challenges as well as peripheral energy stores. These shifts occur in close relation to circulating levels of the hormones, leptin, insulin, ghrelin and corticosterone, and also the nutrients, glucose and lipids. These circulating factors together with neural processes are primary signals relaying information regarding the availability of fuels needed for current cellular demand, in addition to the level of stored fuels needed for long-term use. Together, these signals have profound impact on the expression and production of neuropeptides that, in turn, initiate the appropriate anabolic or catabolic responses for restoring equilibrium. In this review, we summarize the evidence obtained on nine peptides in the hypothalamus that have emerged as key players in this process. Data from behavioral, physiological, pharmacological and genetic studies are described and consolidated in an attempt to formulate a clear statement on the underlying function of each of these peptides and also on how they work together to create and maintain energy homeostasis.

  7. Cooling season energy measurements of dust and ventilation effects on radiant barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A. ); Hall, J.A. )

    1990-02-01

    Cooling season tests were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, to determine the effects on attic radiant barrier performance incurred by changes in attic ventilation area ratio, attic ventilation type, and the buildup of dust on horizontal radiant barriers. All three houses had R-19 fiberglass batt insulation in their attics. Horizontal radiant barriers were artificially dusted and the dusted barriers showed measurable performance degradations, although the dusted barriers were still superior to no radiant barriers. Dust loadings of 0.34 and 0.74 mg/cm{sup 2} reduced a clean radiant barrier surface emissivity of 0.055 to 0.125 and 0.185, respectively. Total house cooling load increases amounted to 2.3 and 8.4% compared to house loads with clean horizontal barriers, respectively. When compared to R-19 with no horizontal radiant barrier conditions, the dusted horizontal radiant barriers reduced cooling loads by about 7%. 18 refs., 18 figs., 30 tabs.

  8. Physical activity in patients with heart failure: barriers and motivations with special focus on sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Klompstra, Leonie; Jaarsma, Tiny; Strömberg, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to recommendations for physical activity is low in both male and female patients with heart failure (HF). Men are more physically active than women. In order to successfully promote physical activity, it is therefore essential to explore how much and why HF patients are physically active and if this is related to sex. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate physical activity in HF patients, to describe the factors related to physical activity, and to examine potential barriers and motivations to physical activity with special focus on sex differences. Methods The study had a cross-sectional survey design. HF patients living at home received a questionnaire during May–July 2014, with questions on physical activity (from the Short Form-International Physical Activity Questionnaire), and potential barriers and motivations to physical activity. Results A total of 154 HF patients, 27% women, with a mean age of 70±10 were included. In total, 23% of the patients reported a high level of physical activity, 46% a moderate level, and 34% a low level. Higher education, self-efficacy, and motivation were significantly associated with a higher amount of physical activity. Symptoms or severity of the disease were not related to physical activity. All the potential barriers to exercise were reported to be of importance. Psychological motivations were most frequently rated as being the most important motivation (41%) to be physically active. Physical motivations (33%) and social motivations were rated as the least important ones (22%). Women had significantly higher total motivation to be physically active. These differences were found in social, physical, and psychological motivations. Discussion One-third of the HF patients had a low level of physical activity in their daily life. Severity of the disease or symptoms were not related, whereas level of education, exercise self-efficacy, and motivation were important factors to take into account when

  9. The barriers encountered by teachers implementing education for sustainable development: discipline bound differences and teaching traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Carola; Gericke, Niklas; Höglund, Hans-Olof; Bergman, Eva

    2012-07-01

    Background : According to the Swedish curriculum teachers in all subjects have a responsibility to integrate a holistic perspective of sustainable development (SD) and teach according to an education for sustainable development (ESD) approach. However previous research has shown that teachers from different subjects perceive SD differently. Purpose : The study aimed at investigating if and how teachers' subject area influences their ability to implement a holistic perspective of ESD; we investigated both the impact of teaching traditions and the barriers that teachers experienced. Sample : A stratified sample of 224 Swedish upper secondary schools participated. An online questionnaire was sent and answered by a total of 3229 teachers at these schools. In total, there were 669 science teachers, 373 social science teachers, 483 language teachers, 713 vocational and esthetical-practical teachers, and 739 teachers from other disciplines who participated in the survey. Design and methods : The questionnaire consisted of questions requiring Likert-scale responses and multiple-choice questions. The data from the questionnaire were analyzed using Pearson's Chi-square test and one-way ANOVA. The significance level accepted was p < 0.05. Results : Teachers were influenced by their own subject traditions. Science teachers in our study were grounded in the fact-based tradition and lectures were the most common teaching method used. The teaching tradition of the social science teachers seemed to be most in line to an ESD approach. Many language teachers (41%) stated they did not include SD issues in their teaching at all. Among the barriers identified, the most common obstacles were that the teachers lacked inspiring examples of how to include SD in their teaching and that they lacked the necessary expertise about SD. Conclusion : This study highlights the need for the management within schools to create opportunities for teachers to work collaboratively when teaching ESD. It

  10. Adherence and barriers to colorectal cancer screening varies among Arab Americans from different countries of origin.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Arab-Americans (ArA) in Michigan, USA had the lowest colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) in 2008 compared to the state's general population (45.6% vs. 60.8%). The adherence rate and barriers to CRCS have been identified in a previous study; however, these differences have been not examined among ArA from different countries of origin. Community-based study through a survey filled by 130 Arab-Americans aged ⩾50years. Demographic information and information about CRC screening knowledge were obtained. Responses were compared between the two largest population groups (Lebanese and Yemenis). The majority of the participants (80%) were from Lebanon (52.3%) and Yemen (27.7%). Majority of the Yemenis group have never been screened for CRC (72.2% vs. 27.9%, p<0.001). Majority of the unscreened Yemenis were males (100% vs. 63.2%, p=0.002). Both unscreened groups had similar length of residence in U.S., citizenship status, education level, health insurance and access to primary care physicians. Unscreened Lebanese had a higher family history of CRCS (31.6% vs. 0%, p=0.002). The most common reported barrier for both groups was the misconception that CRCS is not necessary (62% for Yemenis & 42% for Lebanese, p=0.197). Unscreened Yemenis were more unaware about CRCS (46% vs. 11%, p=0.002). CRC screening rates vary among Arab-Americans from different countries of origin. Physicians should consider the country of origin when recommending CRC screening to Arab-Americans. Copyright © 2015 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Asymmetric isolating barriers between different microclimatic environments caused by low immigrant survival

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, Thomas P.; Waller, John T.; Svensson, Erik I.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland sites, whereas we detected no differences between immigrant and resident males at coastal sites, suggesting asymmetric local adaptation in a source–sink system. There were no intrinsic differences in longevity between males from the different environments suggesting that the observed differences in male survival are environment-dependent and probably caused by local adaptation. Furthermore, the coastal environment was found to be warmer and drier than the inland environment, further suggesting local adaptation to microclimatic factors has lead to differential survival of resident and immigrant males. Our results suggest that low survival of immigrant males mediates isolation between closely located populations inhabiting different microclimatic environments. PMID:25631994

  12. Changes in Properties of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Jets for Different Gases and for Insulating and Conducting Transfer Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Fellype; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Machida, Munemasa

    2017-03-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jets have been studied extensively in recent years because of its wide range of applications. DBD plasmas can be produced using many different gases and can be applied to a broad variety of surfaces and substrates. This work provides comparisons of DBD plasmas generated using argon (Ar), helium (He), and nitrogen (N2), as well as their mixtures with water vapor in order to know how some plasma properties are affected by the use of different gases. All plasmas were studied in two different conditions: using a transfer plate made of a conductive material and using a transfer plate made of an insulating one. It was observed that the process of Penning ionization of nitrogen molecules by direct collisions with metastable atoms and molecules is evident and significant only in plasmas that use He as the working gas, which means that He atoms in metastable states have greater ability to transfer energy to molecules of nitrogen in the plasma. The collisions of metastable He with N2 molecules determine the vibrational temperature (T vib) values in He plasmas, while in Ar and N2 plasmas, the T vib values are determined mainly by collisions of electrons with N2 molecules. It was noticed that the use of an insulating or a conducting transfer plate as the sample holder affects the results of adhesion between poly(dimethylsiloxane) samples, and it is mainly due to the differences in the plasma power, with a higher plasma power leading to better adhesion.

  13. Changes in Properties of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Jets for Different Gases and for Insulating and Conducting Transfer Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Fellype; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Machida, Munemasa

    2017-06-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jets have been studied extensively in recent years because of its wide range of applications. DBD plasmas can be produced using many different gases and can be applied to a broad variety of surfaces and substrates. This work provides comparisons of DBD plasmas generated using argon (Ar), helium (He), and nitrogen (N2), as well as their mixtures with water vapor in order to know how some plasma properties are affected by the use of different gases. All plasmas were studied in two different conditions: using a transfer plate made of a conductive material and using a transfer plate made of an insulating one. It was observed that the process of Penning ionization of nitrogen molecules by direct collisions with metastable atoms and molecules is evident and significant only in plasmas that use He as the working gas, which means that He atoms in metastable states have greater ability to transfer energy to molecules of nitrogen in the plasma. The collisions of metastable He with N2 molecules determine the vibrational temperature ( T vib) values in He plasmas, while in Ar and N2 plasmas, the T vib values are determined mainly by collisions of electrons with N2 molecules. It was noticed that the use of an insulating or a conducting transfer plate as the sample holder affects the results of adhesion between poly(dimethylsiloxane) samples, and it is mainly due to the differences in the plasma power, with a higher plasma power leading to better adhesion.

  14. Free-Energy Barrier of Filling a Spherical Cavity in the Presence of Line Tension: Implication to the Energy Barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel States on a Superhydrophobic Surface with Spherical Cavities.

    PubMed

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-09-20

    The free-energy barrier of filling a spherical cavity having an inner wall of various wettabilities is studied. The morphology and free energy of a lens-shaped droplet are determined from the minimum of the free energy. The effect of line tension on the free energy is also studied. Then, the equilibrium contact angle of the droplet is determined from the generalized Young's equation. By increasing the droplet volume within the spherical cavity, the droplet morphology changes from spherical with an equilibrium contact angle of 180° to a lens with a convex meniscus, where the morphological complete drying transition occurs. By further increasing the droplet volume, the meniscus changes from convex to concave. Then, the lens-shaped droplet with concave meniscus spreads over the whole inner wall, resulting in an equilibrium contact angle of 0° to leave a spherical bubble, where the morphological complete wetting transition occurs. Finally, the whole cavity is filled with liquid. The free energy shows a barrier from complete drying to complete wetting as a function of droplet volume, which corresponds to the energy barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel states of the superhydrophobic surface with spherical cavities. The free-energy maximum occurs when the meniscus of the droplet becomes flat, and it is given by an analytic formula. The effect of line tension is expressed by the scaled line tension, and this effect is largest at the free-energy maximum. The positive line tension increases the free-energy maximum, which thus increases the stability of the Cassie superhydrophobic state, whereas the negative line tension destabilizes the superhydrophobic state.

  15. Enhancing the effective energy barrier of a Dy(III) SMM using a bridged diamagnetic Zn(II) ion.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Apoorva; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Das, Chinmoy; Mondol, Ranajit; Langley, Stuart K; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Shanmugam, Maheswaran

    2014-08-18

    Field induced single-molecule-magnet behaviour is observed for both a heterodinuclear [ZnDy(L(-))2](3+) complex (1) and a mononuclear [Dy(HL)2](3+) complex (2), with effective energy barriers of 83 cm(-1) and 16 cm(-1), respectively. Insights into the relaxation mechanism(s) and barrier heights are provided via ab initio and DFT calculations. Our findings reveal an interesting observation that the U(eff) of SMMs can be enhanced by incorporating diamagnetic metal ions.

  16. Sucrose Increases the Activation Energy Barrier for Actin-Myosin Strong Binding

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Del R.; Webb, Milad; Stewart, Travis J.; Phillips, Travis; Carter, Michael; Cremo, Christine R.; Baker, Josh E.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the mechanism by which sucrose slows in vitro actin sliding velocities, V, we used stopped flow kinetics and a single molecule binding assay, SiMBA. We observed that in the absence of ATP, sucrose (880 mM) slowed the rate of actin-myosin (A-M) strong binding by 71 ± 8% with a smaller inhibitory effect observed on spontaneous rigor dissociation (21 ± 3%). Similarly, in the presence of ATP, sucrose slowed strong binding associated with Pi release by 85 ± 9% with a smaller inhibitory effect on ATP-induced A-M dissociation, kT (39 ± 2%). Sucrose had no noticeable effect on any other step in the ATPase reaction. In SiMBA, sucrose had a relatively small effect on the diffusion coefficient for actin fragments (25 ± 2%), and with stopped flow we showed that sucrose increased the activation energy barrier for A-M strong binding by 37 ± 3%, indicating that sucrose inhibits the rate of A-M strong binding by slowing bond formation more than diffusional searching. The inhibitory effects of sucrose on the rate of A-M rigor binding (71%) are comparable in magnitude to sucrose’s effects on both V (79 ± 33% decrease) and maximal actin-activated ATPase, kcat, (81 ± 16% decrease), indicating that the rate of A-M strong bond formation significantly influences both kcat and V. PMID:24370736

  17. Protein misfolding occurs by slow diffusion across multiple barriers in a rough energy landscape

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Dee, Derek R.; Liu, Xia; Brigley, Angela M.; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The timescale for the microscopic dynamics of proteins during conformational transitions is set by the intrachain diffusion coefficient, D. Despite the central role of protein misfolding and aggregation in many diseases, it has proven challenging to measure D for these processes because of their heterogeneity. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to overcome these challenges and determine D for misfolding of the prion protein PrP. Observing directly the misfolding of individual dimers into minimal aggregates, we reconstructed the energy landscape governing nonnative structure formation. Remarkably, rather than displaying multiple pathways, as typically expected for aggregation, PrP dimers were funneled into a thermodynamically stable misfolded state along a single pathway containing several intermediates, one of which blocked native folding. Using Kramers’ rate theory, D was found to be 1,000-fold slower for misfolding than for native folding, reflecting local roughening of the misfolding landscape, likely due to increased internal friction. The slow diffusion also led to much longer transit times for barrier crossing, allowing transition paths to be observed directly for the first time to our knowledge. These results open a new window onto the microscopic mechanisms governing protein misfolding. PMID:26109573

  18. Protein misfolding occurs by slow diffusion across multiple barriers in a rough energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Dee, Derek R; Liu, Xia; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2015-07-07

    The timescale for the microscopic dynamics of proteins during conformational transitions is set by the intrachain diffusion coefficient, D. Despite the central role of protein misfolding and aggregation in many diseases, it has proven challenging to measure D for these processes because of their heterogeneity. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to overcome these challenges and determine D for misfolding of the prion protein PrP. Observing directly the misfolding of individual dimers into minimal aggregates, we reconstructed the energy landscape governing nonnative structure formation. Remarkably, rather than displaying multiple pathways, as typically expected for aggregation, PrP dimers were funneled into a thermodynamically stable misfolded state along a single pathway containing several intermediates, one of which blocked native folding. Using Kramers' rate theory, D was found to be 1,000-fold slower for misfolding than for native folding, reflecting local roughening of the misfolding landscape, likely due to increased internal friction. The slow diffusion also led to much longer transit times for barrier crossing, allowing transition paths to be observed directly for the first time to our knowledge. These results open a new window onto the microscopic mechanisms governing protein misfolding.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  20. Molecular origin of high free energy barriers for alkali metal ion transfer through ionic liquid-graphene electrode interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ivaništšev, Vladislav; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Cabeza, Oscar; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2016-01-14

    In this work we study mechanisms of solvent-mediated ion interactions with charged surfaces in ionic liquids by molecular dynamics simulations, in an attempt to reveal the main trends that determine ion-electrode interactions in ionic liquids. We compare the interfacial behaviour of Li(+) and K(+) at a charged graphene sheet in a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, and its mixtures with lithium and potassium tetrafluoroborate salts. Our results show that there are dense interfacial solvation structures in these electrolytes that lead to the formation of high free energy barriers for these alkali metal cations between the bulk and direct contact with the negatively charged surface. We show that the stronger solvation of Li(+) in the ionic liquid leads to the formation of significantly higher interfacial free energy barriers for Li(+) than for K(+). The high free energy barriers observed in our simulations can explain the generally high interfacial resistance in electrochemical storage devices that use ionic liquid-based electrolytes. Overcoming these barriers is the rate-limiting step in the interfacial transport of alkali metal ions and, hence, appears to be a major drawback for a generalised application of ionic liquids in electrochemistry. Some plausible strategies for future theoretical and experimental work for tuning them are suggested.

  1. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  2. Role of tunnelling in complete and incomplete fusion induced by 9Be on 169Tm and 187Re targets at around barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    We have analyzed the complete and incomplete fusion excitation function for 9Be +169Tm, 187Re reactions at around barrier energies using the code PLATYPUS based on classical dynamical model. The quantum mechanical tunnelling correction is incorporated at near and sub barrier energies which significantly improves the matching between the data and prediction.

  3. Determination of the surface energy distributions of different processed lactose.

    PubMed

    Thielmann, Frank; Burnett, Daniel J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2007-11-01

    Particulate interactions between drug and lactose carrier in dry powder inhaler formulations are affected by the heterogenous energy distribution on the surface of the individual compounds. A new method based on Inverse Gas Chromatography at finite concentration is applied to study the energy heterogeneity of untreated, milled, and recrystallized lactose of similar particle size distribution. Energy distributions for the dispersive surface energy and the specific free energy of ethanol are obtained. Milling causes an increase in surface energy due to formation of amorphous regions. Untreated and recrystallized materials have similar surface energies at low surface coverages but show clear differences in energy distribution.

  4. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  5. Quasi-elastic scattering and transfer angular distribution for B,1110+232Th systems at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Shradha; Biswas, D. C.; Mukherjee, S.; Patel, D.; Gupta, Y. K.; Prajapati, G. K.; Joshi, B. N.; Danu, L. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; John, B. V.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Vind, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Quasi-elastic scattering and transfer angular distributions for B,1110+232Th reactions have been measured simultaneously in a wide range of bombarding energies around the Coulomb barrier. The quasi-elastic angular distribution data are analyzed using the optical model code ecis with phenomenological Woods-Saxon potentials. The obtained potential parameters suggest the presence of usual threshold anomaly, confirming tightly bound characteristics for both the projectiles. The reaction cross sections are obtained from the fitting of quasi-elastic angular distribution data. The reduced cross sections at sub-barrier energies compared with Li,76+232Th systems show a systematic dependence on projectile breakup energy. The angular distribution of the transfer products show similar behavior for both the systems.

  6. Fragmentation approach to the point-island model with hindered aggregation: Accessing the barrier energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego Luis; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of hindered aggregation on the island formation process in a one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) point-island model for epitaxial growth with arbitrary critical nucleus size i . In our model, the attachment of monomers to preexisting islands is hindered by an additional attachment barrier, characterized by length la. For la=0 the islands behave as perfect sinks while for la→∞ they behave as reflecting boundaries. For intermediate values of la, the system exhibits a crossover between two different kinds of processes, diffusion-limited aggregation and attachment-limited aggregation. We calculate the growth exponents of the density of islands and monomers for the low coverage and aggregation regimes. The capture-zone (CZ) distributions are also calculated for different values of i and la. In order to obtain a good spatial description of the nucleation process, we propose a fragmentation model, which is based on an approximate description of nucleation inside of the gaps for 1D and the CZs for 2D. In both cases, the nucleation is described by using two different physically rooted probabilities, which are related with the microscopic parameters of the model (i and la). We test our analytical model with extensive numerical simulations and previously established results. The proposed model describes excellently the statistical behavior of the system for arbitrary values of la and i =1 , 2, and 3.

  7. Ergonomic best practices in masonry: regional differences, benefits, barriers, and recommendations for dissemination.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jennifer; Weinstein, Marc; Welch, Laura

    2010-08-01

    Within construction the masonry trade has particularly high rates of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). A NIOSH-sponsored meeting of masonry stakeholders explored current and potential "Best Practices" for reducing MSDs in masonry and identified potential regional differences in use of practices. To verify and better understand the regional effects and other factors associated with differences in practice use, a national telephone survey of masonry contractors was conducted. The United States was divided into four regions for evaluation: Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and West Coast. Nine practices with the potential to reduce MSDs in masonry workers were evaluated. Masonry contractors, owners, and foremen completed 183 surveys. The results verify regional differences in use of best practices in masonry. Half-weight cement bags and autoclave aerated concrete were rarely used anywhere, while lightweight block and mortar silos appear to be diffusing across the country. The Northeast uses significantly fewer best practices than other regions. This article examines reasons for regional differences in masonry best practice, and findings provide insight into use and barriers to adoption that can be used by safety managers, researchers, and other safety advocates to more effectively disseminate ergonomic solutions across the masonry industry.

  8. Effects of Different Waveforms on the Performance of Active Capillary Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dumlao, Morphy C; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Fletcher, John; Donald, William A

    2017-04-01

    Active capillary dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) is emerging as a compact, low-cost, and robust method to form intact ions of small molecules for detection in near real time by portable mass spectrometers. Here, we demonstrate that by using a 10 kHz, ~2.5 kVp-p high-voltage square-wave alternating current plasma, active capillary DBDI can consume less than 1 μW of power. In contrast, the power consumed using a sine and triangle alternating current waveform is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that for the square waveform to obtain a similar voltage for plasma generation. Moreover, the plasma obtained using a square waveform can be significantly more homogenous than that obtained using sine and triangle waveforms. Protonated dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and deprotonated perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) can be detected at about the same or higher abundances using square-wave DBDI mass spectrometry compared with the use of sine and triangle waveforms. By use of benzylammonium thermometer ions, the extent of internal energy deposition using square, sine, or triangle waveform excited plasmas are essentially the same at the optimum voltages for ion detection. Using an H-bridge circuit driving a transformer optimized to reduce losses, square-wave active capillary DBDI can be continuously powered for ~50 h by common 9 V-battery (PP3). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Effects of Different Waveforms on the Performance of Active Capillary Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumlao, Morphy C.; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Fletcher, John; Donald, William A.

    2017-04-01

    Active capillary dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) is emerging as a compact, low-cost, and robust method to form intact ions of small molecules for detection in near real time by portable mass spectrometers. Here, we demonstrate that by using a 10 kHz, 2.5 kVp-p high-voltage square-wave alternating current plasma, active capillary DBDI can consume less than 1 μW of power. In contrast, the power consumed using a sine and triangle alternating current waveform is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that for the square waveform to obtain a similar voltage for plasma generation. Moreover, the plasma obtained using a square waveform can be significantly more homogenous than that obtained using sine and triangle waveforms. Protonated dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and deprotonated perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) can be detected at about the same or higher abundances using square-wave DBDI mass spectrometry compared with the use of sine and triangle waveforms. By use of benzylammonium thermometer ions, the extent of internal energy deposition using square, sine, or triangle waveform excited plasmas are essentially the same at the optimum voltages for ion detection. Using an H-bridge circuit driving a transformer optimized to reduce losses, square-wave active capillary DBDI can be continuously powered for 50 h by common 9 V-battery (PP3).

  10. Regional Differences as Barriers to Body Mass Index Screening Described by Ohio School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalter, Ann M.; Chaudry, Rosemary V.; Polivka, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Body mass index (BMI) screening is advocated by the National Association of School Nurses (NASN). Research identifying barriers to BMI screening in public elementary school settings has been sparse. The purpose of the study was to identify barriers and facilitating factors of BMI screening practices among Ohio school nurses working in…

  11. Measuring the Fusion Cross-Section of 18,19 O + 12 C with Low-Intensity Beams at Energies Near and Below the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy; Vadas, Justin; Schmidt, Jon; Singh, Varinderjit; Hudan, Sylvie; Desouza, Romualdo; Baby, Lagy; Kuvin, Sean; Wiedenhover, Ingo; Umar, Sait; Oberacker, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei has been proposed as a heat source that triggers an X-ray superburst in the crust of an accreting neutron star. To investigate this hypothesis the total fusion cross-section for beams of low-intensity, neutron-rich nuclei (<105 ions/s) on light targets has been measured at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Evaporation residues, resulting from the fusion of oxygen and 12 C nuclei, were identified by their energy and Time-of-flight. Using this technique, the fusion excitation function was measured in the sub-barrier domain down to the 2 mb level. Comparison of the measured fusion excitation function with the predictions of a density constrained TDHF model reveals that the experimental data exhibit a smaller decrease in cross-section with decreasing energy than is theoretically predicted. This difference can be interpreted as a larger tunneling probability for the experimental data as compared to the theoretical predictions. To determine if this difference increases in magnitude with decreasing incident energy improvements have been implemented to enable measurement of the fusion cross-section to an even lower level. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  12. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-01

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  13. Influence of a channel-forming peptide on energy barriers to ion permeation, viewed from a continuum dielectric perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Partenskii, M B; Dorman, V; Jordan, P C

    1994-01-01

    The continuum three-dielectric model for an aqueous ion channel pore-forming peptide-membrane system is extended to account for the finite length of the channel. We focus on the electrostatic influence that a channel-forming peptide may exert on energy barriers to ion permeation. The nonlinear dielectric behavior of channel water caused by dielectric saturation in the presence of an ion is explicitly modeled by assigning channel water a mean dielectric constant much less than that of bulk water. An exact solution of the continuum problem is formulated by approximating the dielectric behavior of bulk water, assigning it a dielectric constant of infinity. The validity of this approximation is verified by comparison with a Poisson-Boltzmann description of the electrolyte. The formal equivalence of high ionic strength and high electrolyte dielectric constant is demonstrated. We estimate limits on the reduction of the electrostatic free energy caused by ionic interaction with the channel-forming peptide. We find that even assigning this region an epsilon of 100, its influence is insufficient to lower permeation free energy barriers to values consistent with observed channel conductances. We provide estimates of the effective dielectric constant of this highly polarizable region, by comparing energy barriers computed using the continuum approach with those found from a semi-microscopic analysis of a simplified model of a gramicidin-like charge distribution. Possible ways of improving both models are discussed. PMID:7529581

  14. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-14

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  15. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  16. Impact of compliance with different guidelines on physical activity during pregnancy and perceived barriers to leisure physical activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paula Clara; Abreu, Sandra; Moreira, Carla; Lopes, Diana; Santos, Rute; Alves, Odete; Silva, Pedro; Montenegro, Nuno; Mota, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the this prospective study were to analyse physical activity (PA) engagement during the first and second trimesters, considering the different guidelines published on PA, to document the individual characteristics associated with the accomplishment of these guidelines and to examine pregnant women's perceived barriers to leisure PA, using a socioecological framework. A sample of 133 pregnant women in two stages--at 10-12 weeks' gestation (T1) and 20-22 weeks' gestation (T2)--were evaluated. PA was assessed by accelerometry during the T1 and T2 evaluation stages. Socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors and barriers to leisure PA were assessed via questionnaire. A large proportion of women (ranging from 32% to 96%) did not reach the levels of PA recommended by the guidelines. There were no significant differences between T1 and T2 with regard to compliance with PA recommendations. A decrease in PA levels from T1 to T2 was noted for all recommendations. No associations were found between participants' characteristics and adherence to the recommendations in T1 and T2. No significant differences were found in barriers to leisure PA between T1 and T2. The most commonly reported barriers to leisure PA were intrapersonal, not health related. Our results indicate that there were no differences between trimesters regarding compliance of PA recommendations, and perceived barriers were similar in both trimesters.

  17. Public versus private food assistance: barriers to participation differ by age and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katie S; Cook, John T; Rogers, Beatrice L; Joseph, Hugh M

    2003-01-01

    To examine participation in the Food Stamp Program, food pantries, and soup kitchens and to identify reasons food-insecure households choose not to participate. Cross-sectional retrospective cohort study. In respondents' homes. 330 randomly selected low-income households (below 185% of poverty). Participation in any of 3 public or private food assistance programs and barriers to participation in each program. Chi-square tests of association between program participation and sociodemographic characteristics. Logistic regression tested for associations between program participation and ethnicity and between food security status and household composition while controlling for potential confounding factors. Controlling for socioeconomic status, Black households are less than half as likely to receive food stamps (odds ratio [OR] = 0.49; P <.02) as Hispanic households. Hispanic households are more likely than non-Hispanic households to say that they feel uncomfortable using food pantries (P <.01). Elderly households are less than half as likely to receive food stamps (OR = 0.44; P =.04) as nonelderly households and are more likely to say that they feel uncomfortable receiving food stamps (P =.05). Low-income households' perceptions of which programs are socially acceptable differ by race and age. Outreach for food stamps and private food assistance should accommodate these differences so that food-insecure households can benefit from all available food assistance.

  18. Characterization of Different Microbubbles in Assisting Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng-Kai; Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-04-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) serve as a critical catalyst to amplify local cavitation in CNS capillary lumen to facilitate focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, limited understanding is available regarding the effect of different microbubbles to induce BBB opening. The aim of this study is to characterize different MBs on their effect in FUS-induced BBB opening. Three MBs, SonoVue, Definity, and USphere, were tested, with 0.4-MHz FUS exposure at 0.62-1.38 of mechanical index (MI) on rats. Evans blue, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and small-animal ultrasound imaging were used as surrogates to allow molecule-penetrated quantification, BBB-opened observation, and MBs circulation/persistence. Cavitation activity was measured via the passive cavitation detection (PCD) setup to correlate with the exposure level and the histological effect. Under given and identical MB concentrations, the three MBs induced similar and equivalent BBB-opening effects and persistence. In addition, a treatment paradigm by adapting exposure time is proposed to compensate MB decay to retain the persistence of BBB-opening efficiency in multiple FUS exposures. The results potentially improve understanding of the equivalence among MBs in focused ultrasound CNS drug delivery, and provide an effective strategy for securing persistence in this treatment modality.

  19. Different Permeability of Potassium Salts across the Blood-Brain Barrier Follows the Hofmeister Series

    PubMed Central

    Breschi, Gian Luca; Cametti, Massimo; Mastropietro, Alfonso; Librizzi, Laura; Baselli, Giuseppe; Resnati, Giuseppe; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The passage of ions across biological membranes is regulated by passive and active mechanisms. Passive ion diffusion into organs depends on the ion-pairing properties of salts present in the serum. Potassium ions could affect brain activity by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and its accumulation in the extracellular cerebral space could precipitate seizures. In the present study, we analyze passive diffusion of a series of potassium salts in the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain preparation. Different potassium counter-anions confer ion-pairing and lipophilicity properties that modulate membrane diffusion of the salt. Extracellular recordings in different cortical areas demonstrated the presence of epileptiform activities that strongly relate to anion identity, following the qualitative order of the Hofmeister series. Indeed, highly lipophilic salts that easily cross the BBB enhanced extracellular potassium concentration measured by ion-selective electrodes and were the most effective pro-epileptic species. This study constitutes a novel contribution for the understanding of the potential epileptogenicity of potassium salts and, more generally, of the role of counter-anions in the passive passage of salts through biological membranes. PMID:24205257

  20. Surface charge measurements on different dielectrics in diffuse and filamentary barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschiersch, R.; Nemschokmichal, S.; Bogaczyk, M.; Meichsner, J.

    2017-03-01

    Previously, we reported on the measurement of surface charges during the operation of barrier discharges (BDs) using the electro-optic Pockels effect of a bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) crystal. With the present work, the next milestone is achieved by making this powerful method accessible to various dielectrics which are typically used in BD configurations. The dynamics and spatial distribution of positive and negative surface charges were determined on optically transparent borosilicate glass, mono-crystalline alumina and magnesia, respectively, covering the BSO crystal. By variation of the nitrogen admixture to helium and the pressure between 500~\\text{mbar} and 1~\\text{bar} , both the diffuse glow-like BD and the self-stabilized discharge filaments were operated inside of a gas gap of 3~\\text{mm} . The characteristics of the discharge and, especially, the influence of the different dielectrics on its development were studied by surface charge diagnostics, electrical measurements and ICCD camera imaging. Regarding the glow-like BD, the breakdown voltage changes significantly by variation of the cathodic dielectric, due to the different effective secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficients. These material-specific SEE yields were estimated using Townsend’s criterion in combination with analytical calculations of the effective ionization coefficient in helium with air impurities. Moreover, the importance of the surface charge memory effect for the self-stabilization of discharge filaments was quantified by the recalculated spatio-temporal behavior of the gap voltage.

  1. Gender Differences in Barriers to Physical Activity among College Students Reporting Varying Levels of Regular Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munford, Shawn N.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have studied the primary determinants of physical activity in an effort to enhance health promotion initiatives nationwide. These physical activity determinants have been observed to differ among various segments of the population, suggesting a further examination of physical activity barriers among differing populations. Little…

  2. Gender Differences in Barriers to Physical Activity among College Students Reporting Varying Levels of Regular Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munford, Shawn N.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have studied the primary determinants of physical activity in an effort to enhance health promotion initiatives nationwide. These physical activity determinants have been observed to differ among various segments of the population, suggesting a further examination of physical activity barriers among differing populations. Little…

  3. Collaborative effects in polymer translocation and the appearance of fictitious free-energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. P.; Piguet, F.

    2014-03-01

    The translocation time of a polymer through a pore under the influence of an external field depends on a number of parameters, the most important of which are the field strength, the interaction with the pore, and the confinement entropy. Experimentally, the translocation is dominated either by the driving force (electrophoretic regime) or by the entropy of confinement or pore interaction (barrier dominated regime). In this Rapid Communication we study a simple model for polymer translocation, loosely based on the asymmetric exclusion process, which shows that it is possible to have what experimentally would be interpreted as barrier dominated, even where there is no barrier to translocation. This effective barrier is interpreted as being due to collaborative effects between the monomers forming the polymer chain.

  4. A four-coordinate cobalt(II) single-ion magnet with coercivity and a very high energy barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rechkemmer, Yvonne; Breitgoff, Frauke D.; van der Meer, Margarethe; Atanasov, Mihail; Hakl, Michael; Orlita, Milan; Neugebauer, Petr; Sarkar, Biprajit; van Slageren, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets display magnetic bistability of molecular origin, which may one day be exploited in magnetic data storage devices. Recently it was realised that increasing the magnetic moment of polynuclear molecules does not automatically lead to a substantial increase in magnetic bistability. Attention has thus increasingly focussed on ions with large magnetic anisotropies, especially lanthanides. In spite of large effective energy barriers towards relaxation of the magnetic moment, this has so far not led to a big increase in magnetic bistability. Here we present a comprehensive study of a mononuclear, tetrahedrally coordinated cobalt(II) single-molecule magnet, which has a very high effective energy barrier and displays pronounced magnetic bistability. The combined experimental-theoretical approach enables an in-depth understanding of the origin of these favourable properties, which are shown to arise from a strong ligand field in combination with axial distortion. Our findings allow formulation of clear design principles for improved materials. PMID:26883902

  5. Similarities and Differences in Barriers and Opportunities Affecting Climate Change Adaptation Action in Four North American Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Whitney R; Kretser, Heidi E; Chetkiewicz, Cheryl-Lesley B; Cross, Molly S

    2017-09-07

    Climate change presents a complex set of challenges for natural resource managers across North America. Despite recognition that climate change poses serious threats to species, ecosystems, and human communities, implementation of adaptation measures is not yet happening on a broad scale. Among different regions, a range of climate change trajectories, varying political contexts, and diverse social and ecological systems generate a myriad of factors that can affect progress on climate change adaptation implementation. In order to understand the general versus site-specific nature of barriers and opportunities influencing implementation, we surveyed and interviewed practitioners, decision-makers, and scientists involved in natural resource management in four different North American regions, northern Ontario (Canada), the Adirondack State Park (US), Arctic Alaska (US), and the Transboundary Rocky Mountains (US and Canada). Common barriers among regions related to a lack of political support and financial resources, as well as challenges related to translating complex and interacting effects of climate change into management actions. Opportunities shared among regions related to collaboration, funding, and the presence of strong leadership. These commonalities indicate the importance of cross-site learning about ways to leverage opportunities and address adaptation barriers; however, regional variations also suggest that adaptation efforts will need to be tailored to fit specific ecological, political, social and economic contexts. Comparative findings on the similarities and differences in barriers and opportunities, as well as rankings of barriers and opportunities by region, offers important contextual insights into how to further refine efforts to advance adaptation actions in those regions.

  6. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate.

    PubMed

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Verhage, Matthijs; Cornelisse, Lennart Niels

    2015-04-14

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane ('activation energy') is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca(2+)-dependent release.

  7. A multilayer ΔE-E R telescope for breakup reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan-Ru; Lin, Cheng-Jian; Wang, Jian-Song; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dong-Xi; Zheng, Lei; Xu, Shi-Wei; Sun, Li-Jie; Jia, Hui-Ming; Ma, Jun-Bing; Ma, Peng; Jin, Shi-Lun; Bai, Zhen; Yang, Yan-Yun; Xu, Xin-Xing; Zhang, Gao-Long; Yang, Feng; He, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Liu, Zu-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The breakup reactions of weakly-bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier and the corresponding coupling effect on the other reaction channels are hot topics nowadays. To overcome the difficulty in identifying both heavier and lighter fragments simultaneously, a new kind of ionization-chamber based detector telescope has been designed and manufactured. It consists of a PCB ionization chamber and three different thickness silicon detectors installed inside the chamber, which form a multilayer ΔE-E R telescope. The working conditions were surveyed by using an α source. An in-beam test experiment shows that the detector has good particle identification for heavy particles like 17F and 16O as well as light particles like protons and alpha particles. The measured quasi-elastic scattering angular distribution and the related discussions for 17F+208Pb are presented. Supported by National Key Basic Research Development Program of China (2013CB834404) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375268, 11475263, U1432127, U1432246).

  8. Colloid Retention in Porous Media in the Presence of Energy Barriers: Hemispheres-in-Cell Model with Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Pazmino, E. F.; Johnson, W. P.

    2010-12-01

    Experimental evidences indicate that surface heterogeneities (charge and/or roughness) play an important role in colloidal retention in porous media under conditions when colloid-surface repulsion exists, at least for colloids of relatively small sizes (e.g. about 2 microns or less). Hence, we have incorporated surface charge heterogeneity into our recently delevoped hemispheres-in-cell model, with an aim to have a better understanding of colloid retention mechanisms in the presence of repulsive energy barriers via numerically simulating the transport and deposition behavior of different size colloids under the coupled effect of heterogeneity, pore structure (e.g. grain to grain contacts), fluid hydrodynamics, etcetera. Here we describe the strategies employed to account for heterogenously charged collector surfaces in the hemispheres-in-cell model so as to correctly compute the colloid-surface internation forces, and then present preliminary results obtained from this model on colloidal retention under various coverage of heterogenous attractive domains over the collector surfaces.

  9. Investigating the dielectric effects of channel pore water on the electrostatic barriers of the permeation ion by the finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Wang, C X; Chen, W Z; Xu, Y W; Shi, Y Y

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann (FDPB) method with four dielectric constants is developed to study the effect of dielectric saturation on the electrostatic barriers of the permeation ion. In this method, the inner shape of the channel pore is explicitly represented, and the fact that the dielectric constant inside the channel pore is different from that of bulk water is taken into account. A model channel system which is a righthanded twist bundle with four alpha-helical segments is provided for this study. From the FDPB calculations, it is found that the difference of the ionic electrostatic solvation energy for wider domains depends strongly on the pore radius in the vicinity of the ion when the pore dielectric constant is changed from 78 to 5. However, the electrostatic solvation energy of the permeation ion can not be significantly affected by the dielectric constant in regions with small pore radii. Our results indicate that the local electrostatic interactions inside the ion channel are of major importance for ion electrostatic solvation energies, and the effect of dielectric saturation on the electrostatic barriers is coupled to the interior channel dimensions.

  10. Assessing Understanding of the Energy Concept in Different Science Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mihwa; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Energy is one of the most central and richly connected ideas across all science disciplines. The purpose of this study was to develop a measurement instrument for assessing students' understanding of the energy concept within and across different science disciplines. To achieve this goal, the Inter-Disciplinary Energy concept Assessment (IDEA) was…

  11. Assessing Understanding of the Energy Concept in Different Science Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mihwa; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Energy is one of the most central and richly connected ideas across all science disciplines. The purpose of this study was to develop a measurement instrument for assessing students' understanding of the energy concept within and across different science disciplines. To achieve this goal, the Inter-Disciplinary Energy concept Assessment (IDEA) was…

  12. Market and behavioral barriers to energy efficiency: A preliminary evaluation of the case for tariff financing in California

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2011-06-23

    Consumers regularly forgo purchases of high efficiency appliances that appear to be cost effective at a reasonable rate of return. While some argue that this is a true revelation of preferences for appliance features, this 'efficiency gap' can be largely explained by a combination of market and behavioral failures that reduce consumers ability to evaluate the relative value of appliances and skew preferences toward initial cost savings, undervaluing future reductions in operating costs. These failures and barriers include externalities of energy use, imperfect competition between manufacturers, asymmetric information, bounded rationality, split incentives, and transaction costs (Golove 1996). Recognizing the social benefit of energy conservation, several major methods are used by policymakers to ensure that efficient appliances are purchased: minimum efficiency standards, Energy Star labeling, and rebates and tax credits. There is no single market for energy services; there are hundreds of uses, thousands of intermediaries, and millions of users, and likewise, no single appropriate government intervention (Golove 1996). Complementary approaches must be implemented, considering policy and institutional limitations. In this paper, I first lay out the rationale for government intervention by addressing the market and behavioral failures and barriers that arise in the context of residential energy efficiency. I then consider the ways in which some of these failures and barriers are addressed through major federal programs and state and utility level programs that leverage them, as well as identifying barriers that are not addressed by currently implemented programs. Heterogeneity of consumers, lack of financing options, and split incentives of landlords and tenants contribute significantly to the under-adoption of efficient appliances. To quantify the size of the market most affected by these barriers, I estimate the number of appliances, and in particular the number

  13. Degradation of organic pollutants and microorganisms from wastewater using different dielectric barrier discharge configurations--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mouele, Emile S Massima; Tijani, Jimoh O; Fatoba, Ojo O; Petrik, Leslie F

    2015-12-01

    The growing global drinking water crisis requires the development of novel advanced, sustainable, and cost-effective water treatment technologies to supplement the existing conventional methods. One such technology is advanced oxidation based on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). DBD such as single and double planar and single and double cylindrical dielectric barrier configurations have been utilized for efficient degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants. The overall performance of the different DBD system varies and depends on several factors. Therefore, this review was compiled to give an overview of different DBD configurations vis-a-viz their applications and the in situ mechanism of generation of free reactive species for water and wastewater treatment. Our survey of the literature indicated that application of double cylindrical dielectric barrier configuration represents an ideal and viable route for achieving greater water and wastewater purification efficiency.

  14. Parameters of antioxidant barrier in different histopathologic types of pediatric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Synakiewicz, Anna; Owczarzak, Anna; Sliwinska, Aleksandra; Lysiak-Szydlowska, Wieslawa; Balcerska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The goal of this study was to evaluate the activities of erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the levels of glutathione (GSH) and ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), as potential markers in different histopathologic types of pediatric neoplasms. No studies on this subject have been reported to date. Material and methods SOD, GSH-Px, GSH, and IMA were measured before oncologic treatment in 129 children with neuroblastoma (NB), soft tissue sarcomas (STS), brain tumors, Hodgkin's disease (HD), and acute leukemias, and in 30 healthy controls. Results The statistical significance of SOD was observed in patients with brain tumors (median 1840.2 U/g Hb, p = 0.0500). The level of GSH was significantly higher in patients with NB (median 6.38 U/g Hb, p = 0.0031) and leukemias (5.16 U/g Hb, p = 0.0200). IMA was statistically significant in cases of STS, NB, and leukemias compared to healthy children (p = 0.0244, p = 0.0069, and p = 0.0000, respectively). The activity of GSH-Px was not statistically significant. Conclusions The antioxidant barrier in all types of pediatric cancers is disturbed. None of the measured parameters was specific enough to represent a reliable marker for any particular histopathologic type of children's neoplasm. PMID:23788871

  15. Effects of different disturbance types on butterflyfish communities of Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emslie, M. J.; Pratchett, M. S.; Cheal, A. J.

    2011-06-01

    The effects of disturbances on coral reef fishes have been extensively documented but most studies have relied on opportunistic sampling following single events. Few studies have the spatial and temporal extent to directly compare the effects of multiple disturbances over a large geographic scale. Here, benthic communities and butterflyfishes on 47 reefs of the Great Barrier Reef were surveyed annually to examine their responses to physical disturbances (cyclones and storms) and/or biological disturbances (bleaching, outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish and white syndrome disease). The effects on benthic and butterflyfish communities varied among reefs depending on the structure and geographical setting of each community, on the size and type of disturbance, and on the disturbance history of that reef. There was considerable variability in the response of butterflyfishes to different disturbances: physical disturbances (occurring with or without biological disturbances) produced substantial declines in abundance, whilst biological disturbances occurring on their own did not. Butterflyfishes with the narrowest feeding preferences, such as obligate corallivores, were always the species most affected. The response of generalist feeders varied with the extent of damage. Wholesale changes to the butterflyfish community were only recorded where structural complexity of reefs was drastically reduced. The observed effects of disturbances on butterflyfishes coupled with predictions of increased frequency and intensity of disturbances sound a dire warning for the future of butterflyfish communities in particular and reef fish communities in general.

  16. Comparison of the surface dielectric barrier discharge characteristics under different electrode gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guoqiang; Dong, Lei; Peng, Kaisheng; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Chunmao; Wu, Guangning

    2017-01-01

    Currently, great interests are paid to the surface dielectric barrier discharge due to the diverse and interesting application. In this paper, the influences of the electrode gap on the discharge characteristics have been studied. Aspects of the electrical parameters, the optical emission, and the discharge induced gas flow were considered. The electrode gap varied from 0 mm to 21 mm, while the applied AC voltage was studied in the range of 17 kV-27 kV. Results indicate that with the increase of the electrode gap, the variation of discharge voltage exhibits an increasing trend, while the other parameters (i.e., the current, power, and induced flow velocity) increase first, and then decrease once the gap exceeded the critical value. Mechanisms of the electrode gap influencing these key parameters were discussed from the point of equivalent circuit. The experimental results reveal that an optimal discharge gap can be obtained, which is closely related to the applied voltage. Visualization of the induced flow with different electrode gaps was realized by the Schlieren diagnostic technique. Finally, the velocities of induced gas flow determined by the pitot tube were compared with the results of intensity-integral method, and good agreements were found.

  17. Effect of four different reflective barriers on black-globe temperatures in calf hutches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, T. H.; Haberman, J. A.; Binion, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene hutches are a popular method of housing dairy calves from 0 to 60 or more days of age, although these hutches get hot when in full sun. This study characterized the relative differences in the ability of four different types of radiant barriers to reduce black-globe temperature within these hutches. Treatments included three different types of covers (two types of laminates (Cadpak P and Cadpak ESD) and an aluminized 3.0-mil white low-density polyethylene (LDPE)) and a reflective paint (LO/MIT-1). The reflective covers were 1.8 × 3 m finished size, and covered the top and sides of the hutch down to 0.15 m above the ground, leaving the front and back exposed. The LO/MIT-1 paint covered the entire sides and roof of the hutch. Two 24-h trials 1 week apart were conducted during relatively hot and clear days in early August. Black-globe temperatures were recorded in duplicate and averaged at 20-min intervals using blackened table tennis balls mounted 0.3 m above the floor in the center of each hutch. Ambient temperature (shade) during the hottest 2-h period for both trials averaged 39.9 °C while the uncovered control averaged 41.1 °C, and LO/MIT-1 averaged 39.9 °C; both of which were significantly higher ( P < 0.01) than the Cadpak P (38.9 °C), Cadpak ESD (38.6 °C), and aluminized LDPE (38.7 °C). During periods of high solar radiation, the hutches with covers had lowest black-globe temperatures followed by hutches painted with reflective paint, while control hutches had the highest temperature.

  18. Effect of four different reflective barriers on black-globe temperatures in calf hutches.

    PubMed

    Friend, T H; Haberman, J A; Binion, W R

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene hutches are a popular method of housing dairy calves from 0 to 60 or more days of age, although these hutches get hot when in full sun. This study characterized the relative differences in the ability of four different types of radiant barriers to reduce black-globe temperature within these hutches. Treatments included three different types of covers (two types of laminates (Cadpak P and Cadpak ESD) and an aluminized 3.0-mil white low-density polyethylene (LDPE)) and a reflective paint (LO/MIT-1). The reflective covers were 1.8 × 3 m finished size, and covered the top and sides of the hutch down to 0.15 m above the ground, leaving the front and back exposed. The LO/MIT-1 paint covered the entire sides and roof of the hutch. Two 24-h trials 1 week apart were conducted during relatively hot and clear days in early August. Black-globe temperatures were recorded in duplicate and averaged at 20-min intervals using blackened table tennis balls mounted 0.3 m above the floor in the center of each hutch. Ambient temperature (shade) during the hottest 2-h period for both trials averaged 39.9 °C while the uncovered control averaged 41.1 °C, and LO/MIT-1 averaged 39.9 °C; both of which were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the Cadpak P (38.9 °C), Cadpak ESD (38.6 °C), and aluminized LDPE (38.7 °C). During periods of high solar radiation, the hutches with covers had lowest black-globe temperatures followed by hutches painted with reflective paint, while control hutches had the highest temperature.

  19. Analysis of Different Methods for Computing Source Energy in the Context of Zero Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Torcellini, Paul A.; Bonnema, Eric; Goldwasser, David; Pless, Shanti

    2016-08-26

    Building energy consumption can only be measured at the site or at the point of utility interconnection with a building. Often, to evaluate the total energy impact, this site-based energy consumption is translated into source energy, that is, the energy at the point of fuel extraction. Consistent with this approach, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) definition of zero energy buildings uses source energy as the metric to account for energy losses from the extraction, transformation, and delivery of energy. Other organizations, as well, use source energy to characterize the energy impacts. Four methods of making the conversion from site energy to source energy were investigated in the context of the DOE definition of zero energy buildings. These methods were evaluated based on three guiding principles--improve energy efficiency, reduce and stabilize power demand, and use power from nonrenewable energy sources as efficiently as possible. This study examines relative trends between strategies as they are implemented on very low-energy buildings to achieve zero energy. A typical office building was modeled and variations to this model performed. The photovoltaic output that was required to create a zero energy building was calculated. Trends were examined with these variations to study the impacts of the calculation method on the building's ability to achieve zero energy status. The paper will highlight the different methods and give conclusions on the advantages and disadvantages of the methods studied.

  20. Multinucleon transfer reactions for the sup 50 Ti+ sup 93 Nb system at sub- and near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Shapira, D.; Stelson, P.H. ); Napoli, D.; Scarlassara, F. . Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro); D'Onofrio, A. ); Wieleczko, J.P. CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette )

    1990-06-01

    A significant yield of multinucleon-transfer products is observed at back angles in quasielastic reactions between {sup 50}Ti and {sup 93}Nb at sub- and near-barrier energies. A variety of nuclidic species that require transfers of up to four nucleons are observed for E{sub c.m.} {ge} 103.9 MeV. The internuclear separation distance where the multinucleon-transfer products first emerge nearly coincides with the closest approach distance of the experimentally established fusion threshold energy, indicating a common origin for the fusion enhancement and multinucleon-transfer reactions.

  1. Nuclear rainbow in the 16O + 27AL system: The role of couplings at energies far above the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Chamon, L. C.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Foti, A.

    2012-04-01

    High precision elastic and inelastic angular distributions have been measured for the 16O + 27Al system at a beam energy of 100 MeV. The data analysis confirms a rainbow formation as already predicted by parameter-free Coupled Channel calculations. It also helps to reveal the crucial role of inelastic couplings in the rainbow formation for heavier systems even at energies far above the Coulomb barrier. This feature, well known in atomic/molecular scattering, is experimentally studied for the first time in Nuclear Physics.

  2. Bracketing subtle conformational energy differences between self-solvated and stretched trifluoropropanol.

    PubMed

    Heger, Matthias; Otto, Katharina E; Mata, Ricardo A; Suhm, Martin A

    2015-04-21

    The intramolecular OH···F hydrogen bond in 3,3,3-trifluoropropanol (TFP) exerts a subtle stabilizing effect that, when compared to the non-fluorinated analog, reorders the five distinguishable conformers and widens the gap between the two most stable structures. Here, we combine findings from Raman spectroscopy in supersonic expansions and high-level quantum-chemical calculations to bracket the energy difference between the two most stable TFP structures at 1.7(5) kJ mol(-1). The torsional potential energy surface suggests consecutive backbone and OH torsional motions for the conformer interconversion, which are discussed in the framework of supersonic jet cooling as a function of nozzle temperature. The picture of a bistable cold molecule with trans or gauche backbone emerges, in which the OH group controls the energy difference and modulates the high barrier separating the heavy atom frames.

  3. Ab initio calculations of stationary points on the benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar potential energy surfaces: barriers to bound orbiting states.

    PubMed

    Moulds, Rebecca J; Buntine, Mark A; Lawrance, Warren D

    2004-09-08

    The potential energy surfaces of the van der Waals complexes benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar have been investigated at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) level of theory with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. Calculations were performed with unconstrained geometry optimization for all stationary points. This study has been performed to elucidate the nature of a conflict between experimental results from dispersed fluorescence and velocity map imaging (VMI). The inconsistency is that spectra for levels of p-difluorobenzene-Ar and -Kr below the dissociation thresholds determined by VMI show bands where free p-difluorobenzene emits, suggesting that dissociation is occurring. We proposed that the bands observed in the dispersed fluorescence spectra are due to emission from states in which the rare gas atom orbits the aromatic chromophore; these states are populated by intramolecular vibrational redistribution from the initially excited level [S. M. Bellm, R. J. Moulds, and W. D. Lawrance, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 10709 (2001)]. To test this proposition, stationary points have been located on both the benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar potential energy surfaces (PESs) to determine the barriers to this orbiting motion. Comparison with previous single point CCSD(T) calculations of the benzene-Ar PES has been used to determine the amount by which the barriers are overestimated at the MP2 level. As there is little difference in the comparable regions of the benzene-Ar and p-difluorobenzene-Ar PESs, the overestimation is expected to be similar for p-difluorobenzene-Ar. Allowing for this overestimation gives the barrier to movement of the Ar atom around the pDFB ring via the valley between the H atoms as < or = 204 cm(-1) in S0 (including zero point energy). From the estimated change upon electronic excitation, the corresponding barrier in S1 is estimated to be < or = 225 cm(-1). This barrier is less than the 240 cm(-1) energy of 30(2), the vibrational level for which the

  4. Gravitational settling effects on unit cell predictions of colloidal retention in porous media in the absence of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huilian; Pazmino, Eddy F; Johnson, William P

    2011-10-01

    Laboratory column experiments for colloidal transport and retention are often carried out with flow direction oriented against gravity (up-flow) to minimize retention of trapped air. However, the models that underlie colloidal filtration theory (e.g., unit cell models such as the Happel sphere-in-cell and hemispheres-in-cell) typically set flow in the same direction as gravity (down-flow). We performed unit model simulations and experimental observations of retention of colloids with different size and density in porous media in the absence of energy barriers under both up-flow and down-flow conditions. Unit cell models predicted very different deposition (e.g., for large or dense colloids with gravity number N(G) > 0.01 at pore water velocity of 4 m/day) under down-flow versus up-flow conditions, which reflect underlying influences of gravity and flow on simulated colloid trajectories that resulted in very different distributions of attached colloids over the model surfaces. The Happel sphere-in-cell model showed greater sensitivity to flow orientation relative to gravity than the hemispheres-in-cell model. In contrast, experimental results were relatively insensitive to orientation of flow with respect to gravity, as a result of the variety of orientations of flow relative to gravity and to the porous media surface that exist in actual porous media. Notably, the down-flow simulations corresponded most closely to the experimental results (for near neutrally buoyant colloids); which justifies the common practice of comparing up-flow experiments to theoretical predictions developed for down-flow conditions.

  5. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    SciTech Connect

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-08-18

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. By and large, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). Finally, as an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  6. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  7. A converged calculation of the energy barrier to internal rotation in the ethylene-sulfur dioxide dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, Stella M.; De Almeida, Wagner B.; van Duijneveldt-van de Rijdt, Jeanne G. C. M.; van Duijneveldt, Frans B.

    2001-08-01

    Geometrical parameters for the equilibrium (MIN) and lowest saddle-point (TS) geometries of the C2H4⋯SO2 dimer, and the corresponding binding energies, were calculated using the Hartree-Fock and correlated levels of ab initio theory, in basis sets ranging from the D95(d,p) double-zeta basis set to the aug-cc-pVQZ correlation consistent basis set. An assessment of the effect of the basis set superposition error (BSSE) on these results was made. The dissociation energy from the lowest vibrational state was estimated to be 705±100 cm-1 at the basis set limit, which is well within the range expected from experiment. The barrier to internal rotation was found to be 53±5 cm-1, slightly higher than the (revised) experimental result of 43 cm-1, probably due to zero-point vibrational effects. Our results clearly show that, in direct contrast with recent ideas, the BSSE correction affects differentially the MIN and TS binding energies and so has to be included in the calculation of small energy barriers such as that in the C2H4⋯SO2 dimer. Previous reports of positive MP2 frozen-core binding energies for this complex in basis D95(d,p) are confirmed. The anomalies are shown to be an artifact arising from an incorrect removal of virtual orbitals by the default frozen-core option in the GAUSSIAN program.

  8. EFFECTS OF NUCLEAR INDUCED BREAKUP ON THE FUSION OF 6Li+12C AND 6He+12C SYSTEMS AROUND BARRIER ENERGIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhan, Sukhvinder S.; Singh, Manjeet; Kharab, Rajesh

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the effects of nuclear induced breakup channel coupling on the fusion cross-section for 6Li+12C and 6He+12C systems in the near barrier energy regime using the dynamic polarization potential (DPP) approach. It has been found that there is enhancement in the fusion cross-section with respect to standard one-dimensional barrier penetration model in the below barrier energy regime while at energies above the barrier there is suppression of fusion cross-section with respect to simple barrier penetration model is observed. The agreement between data and predictions for 6Li+12C system improves significantly as a result of the inclusion of nuclear induced DPP.

  9. Astrophysical S17(0) factor extraction from breakup of B8 on Ni58 at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, T. L.; Aguilera, E. F.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Moro, A. M.; Kolata, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    We have performed continuum-discretized coupled channels (CDCC) calculations of the breakup of B8 on Ni58 and direct proton transfer for the B8+Ni58 system at laboratory energies of 20-28.4 MeV. The influence of the Be7 core-target optical potential (OP) on the breakup cross section was investigated. Elastic scattering angular distributions for the Be7+Ni58 and B8+Ni58 systems at five different energies around the Coulomb barrier were studied, and a reasonable energy-independent OP for each system was obtained. Using these OPs and two different Be7-p relative motion wave functions, and summing breakup and direct proton transfer contributions, we were able to fit the experimental cross section at a B8 laboratory energy of 25.75 MeV. We calculated the excitation function for the Be7 emission in the B8+Ni58 reaction, where Be7 products were measured at the forward angle θlab=45° in the energy interval Elab=20-28.4 MeV. In view of the peripheral character of the B8 breakup reaction at near-barrier energies, we could extract the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the Be7-p system, which was found to be CBe-p,p3/22=0.543±0.027 fm-1. Finally, the astrophysical S17(0) factor was found to be S17(0)=20.8±1.1 eV b.

  10. Applying Risk Science and Stakeholder Engagement to Overcome Environmental Barriers to Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Anderson, Richard M.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-09-20

    The production of electricity from the moving waters of the ocean has the potential to be a viable addition to the portfolio of renewable energy sources worldwide. The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry faces many hurdles, including technology development, challenges of offshore deployments, and financing; however, the barrier most commonly identified by industry, regulators, and stakeholders is the uncertainty surrounding potential environmental effects of devices placed in the water and the permitting processes associated with real or potential impacts. Regulatory processes are not well positioned to judge the severity of harm due to turbines or wave generators. Risks from MHK devices to endangered or protected animals in coastal waters and rivers, as well as the habitats that support them, are poorly understood. This uncertainty raises concerns about catastrophic interactions between spinning turbine blades or slack mooring lines and marine mammals, birds and fish. In order to accelerate the deployment of tidal and wave devices, there is a need to sort through the extensive list of potential interactions that may cause harm to marine organisms and ecosystems, to set priorities for regulatory triggers, and to direct future research. Identifying the risk of MHK technology components on specific marine organisms and ecosystem components can separate perceived from real risk-relevant interactions. Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are developing an Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) to assess environmental effects associated with MHK technologies and projects through a systematic analytical process, with specific input from key stakeholder groups. The array of stakeholders interested in the development of MHK is broad, segmenting into those whose involvement is essential for the success of the MHK project, those that are influential, and those that are interested. PNNL and their partners have engaged these groups, gaining

  11. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Wei, Guodan

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  12. Energy difference space random walk to achieve fast free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Min, Donghong; Yang, Wei

    2008-05-21

    A method is proposed to efficiently obtain free energy differences. In the present algorithm, free energy calculations proceed by the realization of an energy difference space random walk. Thereby, this algorithm can greatly improve the sampling of the regions in phase space where target states overlap.

  13. Female and Male Juvenile Offenders with Disabilities: Differences in the Barriers to Their Transition to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This article examined differences between young women and men who were incarcerated juvenile offenders with disabilities in Oregon in terms of the barriers they faced in their transition from the correctional system back into the community. Data were gathered on 72 females and 276 males, all of whom presented disabilities and who were…

  14. Female and Male Juvenile Offenders with Disabilities: Differences in the Barriers to Their Transition to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Deanne; Bullis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This article examined differences between young women and men who were incarcerated juvenile offenders with disabilities in Oregon in terms of the barriers they faced in their transition from the correctional system back into the community. Data were gathered on 72 females and 276 males, all of whom presented disabilities and who were…

  15. Differences in Perceptions of Barriers to College Enrollment and the Completion of a Degree among Latinos in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becerra, David

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences in perceptions of barriers in education among Latinos in the United States based on the level of linguistic acculturation, generational status, academic achievement, and socioeconomic status of the participants. This study used data from the Pew Hispanic Research Center. Results indicated that later-generation…

  16. Batteries for efficient energy extraction from a water salinity difference.

    PubMed

    La Mantia, Fabio; Pasta, Mauro; Deshazer, Heather D; Logan, Bruce E; Cui, Yi

    2011-04-13

    The salinity difference between seawater and river water is a renewable source of enormous entropic energy, but extracting it efficiently as a form of useful energy remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate a device called "mixing entropy battery", which can extract and store it as useful electrochemical energy. The battery, containing a Na(2-x)Mn(5)O(10) nanorod electrode, was shown to extract energy from real seawater and river water and can be applied to a variety of salt waters. We demonstrated energy extraction efficiencies of up to 74%. Considering the flow rate of river water into oceans as the limiting factor, the renewable energy production could potentially reach 2 TW, or ∼13% of the current world energy consumption. The mixing entropy battery is simple to fabricate and could contribute significantly to renewable energy in the future.

  17. Diabat Interpolation for Polymorph Free-Energy Differences.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Kartik; Peters, Baron

    2017-02-02

    Existing methods to compute free-energy differences between polymorphs use harmonic approximations, advanced non-Boltzmann bias sampling techniques, and/or multistage free-energy perturbations. This work demonstrates how Bennett's diabat interpolation method ( J. Comput. Phys. 1976, 22, 245 ) can be combined with energy gaps from lattice-switch Monte Carlo techniques ( Phys. Rev. E 2000, 61, 906 ) to swiftly estimate polymorph free-energy differences. The new method requires only two unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, one for each polymorph. To illustrate the new method, we compute the free-energy difference between face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic polymorphs for a Gaussian core solid. We discuss the justification for parabolic models of the free-energy diabats and similarities to methods that have been used in studies of electron transfer.

  18. Potential energy barriers for interlayer mass transport in homoepitaxial growth on fcc(111) surfaces: Pt and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinggang; DePristo, Andrew E.

    1994-11-01

    The efficiency of interlayer mass transport determines the growth mode and film quality in molecular beam epitaxy. In this paper we report potential energy barriers (PEB) to interlayer diffusion for Pt and Ag homoepitaxial growth on fcc (111) surfaces, as calculated using the corrected effective medium theory. Various island structures were considered. The island sizes ranged from 3- to about 60-atom islands and to various steps ("infinite" large islands). We found that jumping directly over the island edge has a much higher PEB than does the so-called displacement-exchange mechanism. Exchange at edges with kink sites also had a higher or comparable PEB to those at the straight (perfect) edges, contrary to previous speculations [M. Henzler, T. Schmidt and E.Z. Luo, in: The Structure of Surfaces IV (World Scientific, Signapore, 1994)]. The PEB depended strongly on the local atomic arrangement but was insensitive to the global island size and shape as long as the island edges were at least five atoms long. For the displacement-exchange process, the PEB did not decrease monotonically with decreasing island size over the entire island size range. For very small islands of less than ten atoms the PEB increased abruptly by an order of magnitude. This qualitative behavior was exhibited by both Pt and Ag systems but the two differed quantitatively for island sizes above ten atoms. We discuss the relevance of these results to the experimental observations, i.e., the reentrant growth in Pt [R. Kunkel, B. Poelsema, L.K. Verheij and G. Comsa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65 (1990) 733], layer-by-layer growth in Ag induced by surfactant [H.A. van der Vegt, H.M. van Pinxteren, M. Lohmerier and E. Vlieg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68 (1992) 3335] or by high-density of islands [G. Rosenfeld, R. Servaty, C. Teichert, B. Poelsema and G. Comsa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71 (1993) 895 ], as well as the different growth behaviors found in the two systems.

  19. Hindrance of complete fusion in the {sup 8}Li+{sup 208}Pb system at above-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, E. F.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Rosales, P.; Kolata, J. J.; DeYoung, P. A.; Peaslee, G. F.; Mears, P.; Guess, C.; Becchetti, F. D.; Lupton, J. H.; Chen, Yu

    2009-10-15

    The {sup 211,212}At yields resulting from the interaction of the radioactive projectile {sup 8}Li with a {sup 208}Pb target have been measured at energies between 3 and 8.5 MeV above the Coulomb barrier. They are signatures for fusion of the whole charge but not necessarily the whole mass of the projectile, so they are included in a corresponding operational definition of complete fusion. Within this definition, a fusion suppression factor of 0.70{+-}0.02 (stat.) {+-}0.04 (syst.) is deduced from a comparison to a one-dimensional barrier-penetration-model calculation using parameters extrapolated from values for {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 209}Bi and {sup 9}Be+{sup 208}Pb taken from the literature. Possible incomplete fusion processes are discussed and the results are fitted with a phenomenological model assuming breakup prior to fusion followed by capture of a {sup 7}Li fragment.

  20. Ordering of Self-Diffusion Barrier Energies on Pt(110)-1x2

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, Peter J.

    1999-06-01

    Bond-counting arguments, supported by ab-initio calculations, predict a lower barrier for "leapfrog" diffusion of Pt addimers on Pt(llO)-lx2 than for adatom dif- fusion or addimer dissociation. This conflicts with experiment, possibly signaling contaminant influence.

  1. Survey of the Relationship Between Activity Energy Expenditure Metabolic Equivalents and Barrier Factors of Physical Activity in the Elderly in Kashan

    PubMed Central

    Sadrollahi, Ali; Khalili, Zahra; Pour Nazari, Robab; Mohammadi, Majid; Ahmadi Khatir, Maryam; Mossadegh, Najima

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity in the elderly is influenced by aspects of aging that cause personal, mental, environmental, and social changes. Increases in factors that are barriers to activity cause physical energy expenditure to decrease. Objectives The aim of the present study was to survey the relationship between energy expenditure in metabolic equivalent units (MET) and factors that are barriers to physical activity in elderly people in Kashan, Iran Methods This is a descriptive analysis done in 2014. The study population was 400 people above 60 years old in medical facilities in Kashan. Multistage sampling was used in 10 clinics in 5 areas of Kashan. The sample size was varied according to gender and elderly population. Contributors were given questionnaires concerning energy expenditure levels in physical activity and factors that are barriers to being active. Results The average age among the study population was 67.6 ± 6.8 years median, and the interquartile range (IQR) of barriers to physical activity among Kashan’s elderly was (8.75) ± 33. Average energy expenditure was 326.21 ± 364.84 based on metabolic equivalent units (MET). In fact, 340 persons (85%) were practically without any active energy expenditure. The most common barrier was the lack of an appropriate place for doing physical activity; 298 (74%) of the participants cited this barrier. The results show the Spearman rank-order correlation is significant (P = 0.038, r = 0.104) between barriers to physical activity and activity energy expenditure in Kashan’s elderly. Conclusions Decreasing barriers to physical activity among the elderly causes physical activities to increase; therefore, energy expenditure is increased. Decreasing social and environmental problems for the elderly is effective in increasing physical activity and energy expenditure. PMID:28191341

  2. Measuring Conformational Energy Differences Using Pulsed-Jet Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, Cameron M.; Gaster, Sydney A.; Taylor, Tiffany R.; Brown, Gordon G.

    2017-06-01

    The conformational energy differences of various chemicals have been measured using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy. The hypothesis is that the relative intensities measured in a pulsed-jet instrument are proportional to the conformer populations present before the expansion occurs. Therefore, by measuring the relative intensities in a CP-FTMW spectrum, we aim to determine the relative energy difference between conformers. Experimentally, pulsed-jet CP-FTMW data will be compared to energy differences reported in the literature and to room-temperature CP-FTMW data acquired at Coker College. Results from ab initio calculations will also be used for comparison.

  3. A seven-degree-of-freedom, time-dependent quantum dynamics study on the energy efficiency in surmounting the central energy barrier of the OH + CH{sub 3} → O + CH{sub 4} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pengxiu; Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics calculation with seven degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy efficiency in surmounting the approximate center energy barrier of OH + CH{sub 3}. The calculation shows the OH vibration excitations greatly enhance the reactivity, whereas the vibrational excitations of CH{sub 3} and the rotational excitations hinder the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, although this reaction has a slight early barrier, it is the OH vibrational energy that is the dominate force in promoting the reactivity, not the translational energy. The studies on both the forward O + CH{sub 4} and reverse OH + CH{sub 3} reactions demonstrate, for these central barrier reactions, a small change of the barrier location can significantly change the energy efficacy roles on the reactivity. The calculated rate constants agree with the experimental data.

  4. The Effects of a High-Energy Diet on Hippocampal Function and Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kanoski, Scott E.; Zhang, Yanshu; Zheng, Wei; Davidson, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease are linked with intake of a Western Diet, characterized by high levels of saturated fats and simple carbohydrates. In rats, these dietary components have been shown to disrupt hippocampal-dependent learning and memory processes, particularly those involving spatial memory. Using a rat model, the present research assessed the degree to which consumption of a high-energy (HE) diet, similar to those found in modern Western cultures, produces a selective impairment in hippocampal function as opposed to a more global cognitive disruption. Learning and memory performance was examined following 90-days consumption of an HE-diet in three nonspatial discrimination learning problems that differed with respect to their dependence on the integrity of the hippocampus. The results showed that consumption of the HE-diet impaired performance in a hippocampal-dependent feature negative discrimination problem relative to chow-fed controls, whereas performance was spared on two discrimination problems that do not rely on the hippocampus. To explore the mechanism whereby consuming HE-diets impairs cognitive function, we investigated the effect of HE-diets on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We found that HE-diet consumption produced a decrease in mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, particularly Claudin-5 and -12, in the choroid plexus and the BBB. Consequently, an increased blood-to-brain permeability of sodium fluorescein was observed in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum and prefrontal cortex following HE-diet access. There results indicate that hippocampal function may be particularly vulnerable to disruption by HE-diets, and this disruption may be related to impaired BBB integrity. PMID:20413889

  5. Mononuclear Lanthanide Complexes: Energy-Barrier Enhancement by Ligand Substitution in Field-Induced Dy(III) SIMs.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sourav; Bejoymohandas, Kochan S; Das, Sourav; Kalita, Pankaj; Reddy, Mundalapudi L P; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Colacio, Enrique; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2017-07-17

    The sequential reaction of 2-((6-(hydroxymethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-methyleneamino)phenol (LH2), LnCl3·6H2O, and 1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone (Htfa) in the presence of Et3N afforded [Ln(LH) (tfa)2] [Ln = Dy(3+) (1), Ln = Tb(3+) (2), and Ln = Gd(3+) (3)], while under the same reaction conditions, but in the absence of the coligand, another series of mononuclear complexes, namely, [Ln(LH)2]·Cl·2MeOH] [Ln = Dy(3+) (4) and Tb(3+) (5)] are obtained. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the former set contains a mono-deprotonated [LH](-) and two tfa ligands, while the latter set comprises of two mono-deprotonated [LH](-) ligands that are nearly perpendicular to each other at an angle of 86.9°. Among these complexes, 2 exhibited a ligand-sensitized lanthanide-characteristic emission. Analyses of the alternating current susceptibility measurements reveal the presence of single-molecule magnet behavior for 1 and 4, in the presence of direct-current field, with effective energy barriers of 4.6 and 44.4 K, respectively. The enhancement of the effective energy barrier of the latter can be attributed to the presence of a large energy gap between the ground and first excited Kramers doublets, triggered by the change in coordination environments around the lanthanide centers.

  6. Spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation with range separation: Benchmark on atomization energies and reaction barrier heights

    SciTech Connect

    Mussard, Bastien; Reinhardt, Peter; Toulouse, Julien; Ángyán, János G.

    2015-04-21

    We consider several spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation (RPA) variants for calculating correlation energies, with and without range separation, and test them on datasets of atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. We show that range separation greatly improves the accuracy of all RPA variants for these properties. Moreover, we show that a RPA variant with exchange, hereafter referred to as RPAx-SO2, first proposed by Szabo and Ostlund [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4351 (1977)] in a spin-restricted closed-shell formalism, and extended here to a spin-unrestricted formalism, provides on average the most accurate range-separated RPA variant for atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. Since this range-separated RPAx-SO2 method had already been shown to be among the most accurate range-separated RPA variants for weak intermolecular interactions [J. Toulouse et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084119 (2011)], this works confirms range-separated RPAx-SO2 as a promising method for general chemical applications.

  7. Efficient sampling over rough energy landscapes with high barriers: A combination of metadynamics with integrated tempering sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. Isaac; Zhang, Jun; Che, Xing; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-01

    In order to efficiently overcome high free energy barriers embedded in a complex energy landscape and calculate overall thermodynamics properties using molecular dynamics simulations, we developed and implemented a sampling strategy by combining the metadynamics with (selective) integrated tempering sampling (ITS/SITS) method. The dominant local minima on the potential energy surface (PES) are partially exalted by accumulating history-dependent potentials as in metadynamics, and the sampling over the entire PES is further enhanced by ITS/SITS. With this hybrid method, the simulated system can be rapidly driven across the dominant barrier along selected collective coordinates. Then, ITS/SITS ensures a fast convergence of the sampling over the entire PES and an efficient calculation of the overall thermodynamic properties of the simulation system. To test the accuracy and efficiency of this method, we first benchmarked this method in the calculation of ϕ - ψ distribution of alanine dipeptide in explicit solvent. We further applied it to examine the design of template molecules for aromatic meta-C—H activation in solutions and investigate solution conformations of the nonapeptide Bradykinin involving slow cis-trans isomerizations of three proline residues.

  8. Spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation with range separation: Benchmark on atomization energies and reaction barrier heights.

    PubMed

    Mussard, Bastien; Reinhardt, Peter; Ángyán, János G; Toulouse, Julien

    2015-04-21

    We consider several spin-unrestricted random-phase approximation (RPA) variants for calculating correlation energies, with and without range separation, and test them on datasets of atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. We show that range separation greatly improves the accuracy of all RPA variants for these properties. Moreover, we show that a RPA variant with exchange, hereafter referred to as RPAx-SO2, first proposed by Szabo and Ostlund [J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4351 (1977)] in a spin-restricted closed-shell formalism, and extended here to a spin-unrestricted formalism, provides on average the most accurate range-separated RPA variant for atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. Since this range-separated RPAx-SO2 method had already been shown to be among the most accurate range-separated RPA variants for weak intermolecular interactions [J. Toulouse et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 084119 (2011)], this works confirms range-separated RPAx-SO2 as a promising method for general chemical applications.

  9. Relevance of blood-brain barrier disruption after endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke: dual-energy computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Renú, Arturo; Amaro, Sergio; Laredo, Carlos; Román, Luis San; Llull, Laura; Lopez, Antonio; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Ángel

    2015-03-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) high attenuation (HA) areas after endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke are a common finding indicative of blood-brain barrier disruption. Dual-energy CT allows an accurate differentiation between HA areas related to contrast staining (CS) or to brain hemorrhage (BH). We sought to evaluate the prognostic significance of the presence of CS and BH after endovascular therapy. A prospective cohort of 132 patients treated with endovascular therapy was analyzed. According to dual-energy CT findings, patients were classified into 3 groups: no HA areas (n=53), CS (n=32), and BH (n=47). The rate of new hemorrhagic transformations was recorded at follow-up neuroimaging. Clinical outcome was evaluated at 90 days with the modified Rankin Scale (poor outcome, 3-6). Poor outcome was associated with the presence of CS (odds ratio [OR], 11.3; 95% confidence interval, 3.34-38.95) and BH (OR, 10.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.42-31.68). The rate of poor outcome despite complete recanalization was also significantly higher in CS (OR, 9.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.55-37.18) and BH (OR, 15.1; 95% confidence interval, 3.85-59.35) groups, compared with the no-HA group. Patients with CS disclosed a higher incidence of delayed hemorrhagic transformation at follow-up (OR, 4.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-16.37) compared with no-HA patients. Blood-brain barrier disruption, defined as CS and BH on dual-energy CT, was associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with stroke treated with endovascular therapies. Moreover, isolated CS was associated with delayed hemorrhagic transformation. These results support the clinical relevance of blood-brain barrier disruption in acute stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Barriers to referral for elevated blood pressure in the emergency department and differences between provider-type

    PubMed Central

    Souffront, Kimberly; Chyun, Deborah; Kovner, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sample of ED providers across the United States (n = 450) were surveyed to identify barriers to referral for elevated blood pressure (BP) in the ED and differences between provider-type. RNs reported less knowledge of Stage I HTN (p = .043) and Pre-HTN (p<.01); were less aware of definitions for HTN (p<.001); reported more difficulty caring for patients who are asymptomatic (p = .007); required financial compensation to refer (p = .048); and perceived BP referrals are influenced by the medical director (p<.001). MDs reported more skills to refer (p = .008) and time as a barrier (p = .038); PAs were more likely to report patients are not aware of health benefits (p = .035) and doubted their concern for their BP (p = .023); and felt emotionally uncomfortable when referring (p = .025). Despite these differences, there was no significant difference between provider-type and referral. PMID:25582763

  11. Elastic Scattering Of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 80}Se At Near And Above Barrier Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Barbara, E. de; Testoni, J. E.; Zalazar, L.; Arazi, A.; Cardona, M. A.; Carnelli, P.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    In this work we propose to study the elastic scattering of the weakly bound projectiles {sup 6,7}Li on an intermediate mass target {sup 80}Se. From the experimental results presented here, precise angular distributions at energies below, around and above the nominal Coulomb barriers of the systems were obtained. The final goal of our work is to determine the characteristic parameters of the optical potential and use them to address the question of whether the usual threshold anomaly or the breakup threshold anomaly are present or not in these systems.

  12. Maximum collectible solar energy by different solar tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Helwa, N.H.; Bahgat, A.B.G.; El Shafee, A.M.R.; El Shenawy, E.T.

    2000-01-01

    The output energy from any solar energy system depends on the solar energy input to that system. Using different ways to track the solar energy system to follow the sun can increase solar energy input according to the type of the tracker. A practical study was carried out on difference solar tract systems. The layout of these systems are a fixed system facing south and tilted 40{degree}, a vertical-axis tracker, a 6{degree} tilted-axis tracker, and a two-axis tracker. All the trackers are microprocessor controlled systems, and all systems have photovoltaic arrays for electric energy production. The evaluation of the different systems is based on a complete year of measurements for solar radiation input to the systems and the electric power output from them. The study also includes the effect of some operating parameters on the tracker operation. These studies showed that the collected solar energy as well as the electrical output energy of the tracking solar system are more than that of the stationary system. These gains are higher in the case of the two-axis tracker and decrease gradually from the vertical-axis tracker to the tilted-axis tracker.

  13. Examination of the influence of transfer channels on the barrier height distribution: Scattering of 20Ne on 58Ni,60Ni, and 61Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzcińska, A.; Piasecki, E.; Amar, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Keeley, N.; Kisieliński, M.; Kliczewski, S.; Kowalczyk, M.; Lommel, B.; Mutterer, M.; Siudak, R.; Stolarz, A.; Strojek, I.; Tiourin, G.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It was suggested that the shape of the barrier height distribution can be determined not only by strong reaction channels (collective excitations) but also by weak channels such as transfers and/or noncollective excitations. Purpose: The study of the barrier height distributions for the 20Ne+58,60,61Ni systems requires information on transfer cross sections at near-barrier energies. Methods: A measurement of the cross sections for various transfer channels at a backward angle (142 degrees), at a near-barrier energy was performed. Identification of products was based on time-of-flight and Δ E -E methods. A measurement of the angular distribution of α stripping in the 20Ne+61Ni system was performed using a gas Δ E -E telescope. Results: For all three systems studied: 20Ne+58Ni ,60Ni, and 61Ni total (sum of all transfer channels) cross sections are similar and dominated by α stripping. Conclusions: The results, as well as coupled reaction channel calculations, suggest that transfer is not responsible for smoothing the barrier height distribution in 20Ne+61Ni , supporting the hypothesis that barrier distribution shapes are influenced by noncollective excitations.

  14. SOLPLAN report: An assessment of barriers and incentives to conservation and alternative-energy use in the residential sector in Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulenwider, C. K.; Weiss, L. S.; Pfefferkorn, C.; Wiener, D. E.; Feldmam, S. L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: gathering and analyzing data on energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization; and building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers.

  15. Energy Efficiency of Biogas Produced from Different Biomass Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Shahida; Nazri, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia has different sources of biomass like palm oil waste, agricultural waste, cow dung, sewage waste and landfill sites, which can be used to produce biogas and as a source of energy. Depending on the type of biomass, the biogas produced can have different calorific value. At the same time the energy, being used to produce biogas is dependent on transportation distance, means of transportation, conversion techniques and for handling of raw materials and digested residues. An energy systems analysis approach based on literature is applied to calculate the energy efficiency of biogas produced from biomass. Basically, the methodology is comprised of collecting data, proposing locations and estimating the energy input needed to produce biogas and output obtained from the generated biogas. The study showed that palm oil and municipal solid waste is two potential sources of biomass. The energy efficiency of biogas produced from palm oil residues and municipal solid wastes is 1.70 and 3.33 respectively. Municipal solid wastes have the higher energy efficiency due to less transportation distance and electricity consumption. Despite the inherent uncertainties in the calculations, it can be concluded that the energy potential to use biomass for biogas production is a promising alternative.

  16. Autonomously Folding Protein Fragments Reveal Differences in the Energy Landscapes of Homologous RNases H

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura E.; Marqusee, Susan

    2015-01-01

    An important approach to understanding how a protein sequence encodes its energy landscape is to compare proteins with different sequences that fold to the same general native structure. In this work, we compare E. coli and T. thermophilus homologs of the protein RNase H. Using protein fragments, we create equilibrium mimics of two different potential partially-folded intermediates (Icore and Icore+1) hypothesized to be present on the energy landscapes of these two proteins. We observe that both T. thermophilus RNase H (ttRNH) fragments are folded and have distinct stabilities, indicating that both regions are capable of autonomous folding and that both intermediates are present as local minima on the ttRNH energy landscape. In contrast, the two E. coli RNase H (ecRNH) fragments have very similar stabilities, suggesting that the presence of additional residues in the Icore+1 fragment does not affect the folding or structure as compared to Icore. NMR experiments provide additional evidence that only the Icore intermediate is populated by ecRNH. This is one of the biggest differences that has been observed between the energy landscapes of these two proteins. Additionally, we used a FRET experiment in the background of full-length ttRNH to specifically monitor the formation of the Icore+1 intermediate. We determine that the ttRNH Icore+1 intermediate is likely the intermediate populated prior to the rate-limiting barrier to global folding, in contrast to E. coli RNase H for which Icore is the folding intermediate. This result provides new insight into the nature of the rate-limiting barrier for the folding of RNase H. PMID:25803034

  17. Through-thickness determination of phase composition and residual stresses in thermall barrier coatings using high- energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Weyant, , C. M.; Almer, J. D.; Faber, K. T.; Stony Brook Univ.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy X-rays were used to determine the local phase composition and residual stresses through the thickness of as-sprayed and heat-treated plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat produced with through-thickness segmentation cracks. The as-sprayed residual stresses reflected the combined influence of quenching stresses from the plasma spray process, thermal expansion mismatch between the topcoat, bond coat and substrate, and stress relief from the segmentation cracks. Heat treatments led to the formation of a thermally grown oxide (TGO) which was in compression in the plane, as well as relief of quenching stresses and development of a stress gradient in the YSZ topcoat. The high-energy X-ray technique used in this study revealed the effects that TGO and segmentation cracks have on the in-plane stress state of the entire coating.

  18. A family of enantiopure Fe(III)4 single molecule magnets: fine tuning of energy barrier by remote substituent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Cui, Chang; Qian, Kang; Yin, Ji; Wang, Bing-Wu; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Gao, Song

    2014-08-21

    A new family of enantiopure star-shaped Fe(III)4 single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with the general formula [Fe4(L(K))6] (H2L = (R or S)-2-((2-hydroxy-1-phenylethylimino methyl)phenol); K = H (), Cl (), Br (), I (), and t-Bu ()), were structurally and magnetically characterized. Complex was reported in our previous paper (Chem. Commun., 2011, 47, 8049-8051). Detailed magnetic measurements and a systematic magneto-structural correlation study revealed that the SMM properties of this series of compounds can be finely tuned by the remote substituent of the ligands. Although the change in the coordination environment of the central Fe(3+) ions is very small, the properties of SMM behavior are changed considerably. All five complexes display frequency dependence of the ac susceptibility. However, the χ peaks of complexes and cannot be observed down to 0.5 K. The fitted anisotropy energy barriers (Ueff) of complexes , , and were 5.9, 7.1, and 11.0 K, respectively. Moreover, the hysteresis loops of these three complexes can be also observed around 0.5 K. Magneto-structural correlation analyses revealed that the coordination symmetry of the central Fe(3+) ion and the intermolecular interaction are two key factors affecting the SMM properties. Deviation to a trigonal prism coordination environment and the existence of intermolecular interactions between neighboring clusters may both reduce the anisotropy energy barriers.

  19. SOLPLAN Report: An Assessment of Barriers and Incentives to Conservation and Alternative-Energy Use in the Residential Sector in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Fulenwider, Claire K.; Weiss, Lonnie S.; Pfefferkorn, Carol; Wiener, Don E.; Feldman, Stephen L.

    1981-03-01

    The Alternative Energy Policy Project of the Wisconsin Center for Public Policy focused upon two principle objectives: (1) gathering and analyzing new and previously unavailable data on barriers and incentives to greater energy conservation and alternative energy commercialization in the state of Wisconsin; and (2) building consensus around alternative energy policy to develop guidelines for alternative energy policy for the state. Particular attention was paid to public involvement in the policy process and to assessing barriers and incentives from as many key sectors of the energy field as possible. Thus, data were gathered from the general public, alternative energy users, the heating industry generally, the alternative-energy industry specifically, and key decision makers. The report is divided into four principal sections. The first looks at findings and analyses dealing with barriers to greater conservation and alternative energy use. Incentives for accelerating the extent of residential conservation and alternative energy use are discussed in the second section. The decision-making process itself in energy policy has been little analyzed and seldom documented. The role of consensus-building in the alternative-energy field and analysis of the decision-making process are discussed in Section III. Appendices in Section IV provide survey instruments and descriptions, a compendium of energy-related legislation developed within the project, and various reports. The total report reflects the interactive decision-making model as it was applied in SOLPLAN. (MCW)

  20. Republic of Korea Reduction of Financing Barriers for Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, D. L.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses the findings developed for strengthening the role of performance contracting in improving energy efficiency in the Republic of Korea. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored development of this paper by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), as a part of the Korean-U.S. Climate Technology Partnerships (CTP) program. The results and recommendations outlined in this paper together with other efforts are designed to assist other countries striving to improve their efficient use of energy.

  1. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders; Jónsdottir, Kristjana Y; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-07-01

    Brain energy metabolism is held to reflect energy demanding processes in neuropil related to the density and activity of synapses. There is recent evidence that men have higher density of synapses in temporal cortex than women. One consequence of these differences would be different rates of cortical energy turnover and blood flow in men and women. To test the hypotheses that rates of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) and cerebral blood flow are higher in men than in women in regions of cerebral cortex, and that the differences persist with aging, we used positron emission tomography to determine cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen as functions of age in healthy volunteers of both sexes. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen did not change with age for either sex and there were no differences of mean values of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen between men and women in cerebral cortex. Women had significant decreases of cerebral blood flow as function of age in frontal and parietal lobes. Young women had significantly higher cerebral blood flow than men in frontal and temporal lobes, but these differences had disappeared at age 65. The absent sex difference of cerebral energy turnover suggests that the known differences of synaptic density between the sexes are counteracted by opposite differences of individual synaptic activity.

  2. Barrier-Independent, Fitness-Associated Differences in Sofosbuvir Efficacy against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Isabel; Sheldon, Julie; Moreno, Elena; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M.; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Sofosbuvir displays a high phenotypic barrier to resistance, and it is a component of several combination therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. HCV fitness can be a determinant of decreased sensitivity to direct-acting antiviral agents such as telaprevir or daclatasvir, but fitness-dependent decreased drug sensitivity has not been established for drugs with a high phenotypic barrier to resistance. Low- and high-fitness HCV populations and biological clones derived from them were used to infect Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells. Sofosbuvir efficacy was analyzed by measuring virus progeny production during several passages and by selection of possible sofosbuvir resistance mutations determined by sequencing the NS5B-coding region of the resulting populations. Sofosbuvir exhibited reduced efficacy against high-fitness HCV populations, without the acquisition of sofosbuvir-specific resistance mutations. A reduced sofosbuvir efficacy, similar to that observed with the parental populations, was seen for high-fitness individual biological clones. In independently derived high-fitness HCV populations or clones passaged in the presence of sofosbuvir, M289L was selected as the only substitution in the viral polymerase NS5B. In no case was the sofosbuvir-specific resistance substitution S282T observed. High HCV fitness can lead to decreased sensitivity to sofosbuvir, without the acquisition of specific sofosbuvir resistance mutations. Thus, fitness-dependent drug sensitivity can operate with HCV inhibitors that display a high barrier to resistance. This mechanism may underlie treatment failures not associated with selection of sofosbuvir-specific resistance mutations, linked to in vivo fitness of pretreatment viral populations. PMID:27067341

  3. Case histories portraying different methods of installing liners for verticle barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.K.; Crockford, R.M.; Achhorner, F.N.

    1997-12-31

    The installation of liners for vertical barriers is difficult and has been a learning experience for every contractor making the attempt. Soil stratigraphy and hydrogeologic conditions can vary over short distances, creating a variety of problems. This is particularly so when working near landfills and documentation of the as-built condition is poor. Successful installation requires detailed planning and knowledge of what to expect, as well as alternate plans for potential problems. Several successful methods of panel connection will be presented as well as a variety of installation techniques. Project case histories will be reviewed, highlighting the challenges associated with specific construction techniques.

  4. Mental disorder, service use, and barriers to care among 500 homeless people in 3 different urban settings.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Reinhardt Michael; Clarkson, Adam F; Strehlau, Verena; Torchalla, Iris; Li, Kathy; Schuetz, Christian G

    2013-08-01

    To determine the standardized rates of mental disorder, health service use and barriers to care in a representatively diverse sample of homeless adults in three different sized urban centers in British Columbia, Canada. Five hundred homeless adults from Vancouver, Victoria and Prince George were recruited. The MINI-International Neuropsychiatric Interview PLUS was used to determine current and lifetime rates of mental disorder, mental disorder episodes and suicidality. Health service use and barriers to care were recorded. Overall, 92.8 % of participants met criteria for a current mental disorder: 82.6 % for alcohol or drug dependence, 57.3 % anxiety disorder, 31.5 % mood disorder. Over half (53.4 %) met criteria for a concurrent disorder. Only 14.9 % had seen a psychiatrist and 12.7 % a mental health team in the year prior to the survey. Most common barriers included being poorly connected to the system of care and issues related to homelessness. Mental disorder rates across sites were high, however, differences were found that reflected the composition of the samples. Improving the mental health state of the homeless will require significant capacity for mental health and concurrent disorder programming that is tailored to the community it intends to serve. Demographic features of the population may help in directing assessments of need.

  5. Rural-Urban Differences in Colorectal Cancer Screening Barriers in Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alejandro G; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Schnell, Paulette; Soliman, Amr S

    2015-12-01

    Nebraska ranks 36th nationally in colorectal cancer screening. Despite recent increases in CRC screening rates, rural areas in Nebraska have consistently shown lower rates of CRC screening uptake, compared to urban areas. The objective of this study was to investigate reasons for lower CRC screening rates among Nebraska residents, especially among rural residents. We developed a questionnaire based on Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs to identify factors associated with the use of CRC screening. The questionnaire was mailed in 2014 to adults aged 50-75 years in an urban community in the east and a rural community in the west regions of the state. Multiple logistic regression models were created to assess the effects of HBM constructs, rural residence, and demographic factors on CRC screening use. Of the 1200 surveys mailed, 393 were returned (rural n = 200, urban n = 193). Rural respondents were more likely to perceive screening cost as a barrier. Rural residents were also more likely to report that CRC cannot be prevented and it would change their whole life. In multiple regression models, rural residence, perceived embarrassment, and perceived unpleasantness about screening were significantly associated with reduced odds of receiving colonoscopy. Older age (62 years and older), having a personal doctor, and perceived risk of getting CRC were significantly associated with increased odds of receiving colonoscopy. Interventions to increase uptake of colorectal cancer screening in rural residents should be tailored to acknowledge unique perceptions of screening methods and barriers to screening.

  6. Influence of the intercalated cations on the surface energy of montmorillonites: consequences for the morphology and gas barrier properties of polyethylene/montmorillonites nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Picard, E; Gauthier, H; Gérard, J-F; Espuche, E

    2007-03-15

    Organically modified montmorillonites obtained by cation exchange from the same natural layered silicate were studied. The surface properties of the pristine and a series of organically modified clays were determined by inverse gas chromatography and the water adsorption mechanisms were studied by a gravimetric technique coupled with a microcalorimeter. A significant increase of the specific surface area, a decrease of the water adsorption, and a decrease of the dispersive component of the surface energy were observed when the sodium cations of the natural montmorillonite were exchanged for a quaternary ammonium. Slighter differences in surface properties were observed, on the other hand, between the different types of organically modified montmorillonites. Indeed, similar dispersive components of the surface energy were determined on the organoclays. Nevertheless, the specific surface area increased in the range 48-80 m(2)/g with increasing d-spacing values and the presence of specific groups attached to the quaternary ammonium, such as phenyl rings or hydroxyl groups, led to some specific behaviors, i.e., a more pronounced base character and a higher water adsorption at high activity, respectively. Differences in interlayer cation chain organization, denoted as crystallinity, were also observed as a function of the nature of the chains borne by the quaternary ammonium. In a later step, polyethylene-based nanocomposites were prepared with those organically modified montmorillonites. The clay dispersion and the barrier properties of the nanocomposites were discussed as a function of the montmorillonite characteristics and of the matrix/montmorillonite interactions expected from surface energy characterization.

  7. Extracting renewable energy from a salinity difference using a capacitor.

    PubMed

    Brogioli, Doriano

    2009-07-31

    Completely renewable energy can be produced by using water solutions of different salinity, like river water and sea water. Many different methods are already known, but development is still at prototype stage. Here I report a novel method, based on electric double-layer capacitor technology. Two porous electrodes, immersed in the salt solution, constitute a capacitor. It is first charged, then the salt solution is brought into contact with fresh water. The electrostatic energy increases as the salt concentration of the solution is reduced due to diffusion. This device can be used to turn sources of salinity difference into completely renewable sources of energy. An experimental demonstration is given, and performances and possible improvements are discussed.

  8. Energy dependence of the optical potentials for the 9Be +208Pb and 9Be +209Bi systems at near-Coulomb-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.; Yu, N.; Zhang, H. Q.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Jia, H. M.; Lubian, J.; Lin, C. J.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the energy dependence of the interacting optical potential, at near barrier energies, for two systems involving the weakly bound projectile 9Be and the heavy 208Pb and 209Bi targets, by the simultaneous fit of elastic scattering angular distributions and fusion excitation functions. The approach used consists of dividing the optical potential into two parts. A short-range potential VF+i WF that is responsible for fusion, and a superficial potential VDR+i WDR for direct reactions. It is found, for both systems studied, that the fusion imaginary potential WF presents the usual threshold anomaly (TA) observed in tightly bound systems, whereas the direct reaction imaginary potential WDR shows a breakup threshold anomaly (BTA) behavior. Both potentials satisfy the dispersion relation. The direct reaction polarization potential predominates over the fusion potential and so a net overall behavior is found to follow the BTA phenomenon.

  9. Comparing the health and environmental hazards of different energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Energy and environment can pose difficult challenges for policy makers and scientists. Assessing health impacts of different energy sources requires synthesis of research results from many different disciplines into a rational framework. Information is often scanty; qualitatively different risks, or energy systems with quite different end uses, must be put on a common footing. Risk-assessment methods reviewed include examples drawn from work of the Biomedical and Environmental Assessment Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere. Coal and nuclear fuel cycles are compared in respect to morbidity and mortality. Other cycles (oil, gas and renewables) are also examined. In broadening comparisons to include new technologies, one must include the impact of manufacturing the energy-producing devices as part of an expanded fuel cycle, via input-output methods. Input-output analysis allows comparisons of direct and system-wide impacts. Throughout the analysis, uncertainties must be explicitly recognized in the results, including uncertainty in validity of data and uncertainty in choice of appropriate models. No single method of comparative risk assessment is fully satisfactory; each has its limitations. By use of several methods progress has been made in understanding the relative impact of energy technologies.

  10. Molecular transport through surfactant-covered oil-water interfaces: role of physical properties of solutes and surfactants in creating energy barriers for transport.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong Nam; Gupta, Ashish; Chauhan, Anuj; Kopelevich, Dmitry I

    2011-03-15

    Mechanisms of molecular transport across oil-water interfaces covered by nonionic surfactants are investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Resistance of the surfactant monolayer to the solute transport is shown to be controlled by dense regions in the monolayer. The dense regions are formed on both sides of the dividing surface and the barrier to the solute transport is created by those of them experiencing unfavorable interactions with the solute. Resistance to the transport of a hydrophobic (hydrophilic) solute increases with the excess density of the head (tail) group region of the monolayer, which in turn increases with the length of the surfactant head (tail) group. Barriers for solute transport through surfactant monolayers are also influenced by the solute size. However, the extent of this influence is determined by the monolayer thickness and the solute structure and composition. For example, it is shown that resistance offered by thin monolayers to transport of linear oligomers is relatively insensitive to the solute length. The barrier sensitivity to the length of these solutes increases with the monolayer thickness. In addition to the static barriers, the solute transport is shown to be affected by dynamic barriers due to a nonadiabatic coupling of the monolayer surface with the solute position and configuration. This coupling leads to deviations of the system dynamics from the minimum energy path. The deviations are most significant in the neighborhood of the static energy barrier, which effectively leads to an increase of the barrier for the solute transport.

  11. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    PubMed Central

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane (‘activation energy’) is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05531.001 PMID:25871846

  12. The difference between energy consumption and energy cost: Modelling energy tariff structures for water resource recovery facilities.

    PubMed

    Aymerich, I; Rieger, L; Sobhani, R; Rosso, D; Corominas, Ll

    2015-09-15

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of incorporating more realistic energy cost models (based on current energy tariff structures) into existing water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) process models when evaluating technologies and cost-saving control strategies. In this paper, we first introduce a systematic framework to model energy usage at WRRFs and a generalized structure to describe energy tariffs including the most common billing terms. Secondly, this paper introduces a detailed energy cost model based on a Spanish energy tariff structure coupled with a WRRF process model to evaluate several control strategies and provide insights into the selection of the contracted power structure. The results for a 1-year evaluation on a 115,000 population-equivalent WRRF showed monthly cost differences ranging from 7 to 30% when comparing the detailed energy cost model to an average energy price. The evaluation of different aeration control strategies also showed that using average energy prices and neglecting energy tariff structures may lead to biased conclusions when selecting operating strategies or comparing technologies or equipment. The proposed framework demonstrated that for cost minimization, control strategies should be paired with a specific optimal contracted power. Hence, the design of operational and control strategies must take into account the local energy tariff. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    DOE PAGES

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-08-18

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. By and large, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide verymore » good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). Finally, as an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.« less

  14. Barriers to Point-of-Care Testing in India: Results from Qualitative Research across Different Settings, Users and Major Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Nora; Ganesh, Gayatri; Patil, Mamata; Yellappa, Vijayashree; Pant Pai, Nitika; Vadnais, Caroline; Pai, Madhukar

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful point-of-care testing, namely ensuring the completion of the test and treat cycle in the same encounter, has immense potential to reduce diagnostic and treatment delays, and impact patient outcomes. However, having rapid tests is not enough, as many barriers may prevent their successful implementation in point-of-care testing programs. Qualitative research on diagnostic practices may help identify such barriers across different points of care in health systems. Methods In this exploratory qualitative study, we conducted 78 semi-structured interviews and 13 focus group discussions in an urban and rural area of Karnataka, India, with healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, specialists, traditional healers, and informal providers), patients, community health workers, test manufacturers, laboratory technicians, program managers and policy-makers. Participants were purposively sampled to represent settings of hospitals, peripheral labs, clinics, communities and homes, in both the public and private sectors. Results In the Indian context, the onus is on the patient to ensure successful point-of-care testing across homes, clinics, labs and hospitals, amidst uncoordinated providers with divergent and often competing practices, in settings lacking material, money and human resources. We identified three overarching themes affecting point-of-care testing: the main theme is ‘relationships’ among providers and between providers and patients, influenced by the cross-cutting theme of ‘infrastructure’. Challenges with both result in ‘modified practices’ often favouring empirical (symptomatic) treatment over treatment guided by testing. Conclusions Even if tests can be conducted on the spot and infrastructure challenges have been resolved, relationships among providers and between patients and providers are crucial for successful point-of-care testing. Furthermore, these barriers do not act in isolation, but are interlinked and need to be examined

  15. Two Series of Homodinuclear Lanthanide Complexes: Greatly Enhancing the Energy Barriers through Tuning the Terminal Solvent Ligands in Dy2 Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Li, Yahong; Qin, Yaru; Zhang, Haifeng; Sun, Hao; Pan, Yangdan; Ge, Yu; Zhang, Yiquan

    2017-08-24

    The utilization of 2-ethoxy-6-(((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzyl)imino)methyl)phenol (H2L) as a chelating ligand, in combination with the employment of alcohols (EtOH and MeOH) as auxiliary ligands, in the 4f-metal chemistry afforded two series of dinuclear lanthanide complexes of compositions [Ln2L2(NO3)2 (EtOH)2] (Ln = Sm (1), Eu (2), Gd (3), Tb (4), Dy (5), Ho (6), Er (7)) and [Ln2L2(NO3)2(MeOH)2] (Ln = Sm (8), Eu (9), Gd (10), Tb (11), Dy (12), Ho (13), Er (14)). Complexes 1-7 are isomorphous. The two LnIII ions in 1-7 are doubly bridged by two deprotonated aminophenoxide oxygen atoms of two μ2: η0:η1:η2:η1:η1:η0 L2- ligands. One nitrogen atom, two oxygen atoms of NO3- anion, two methoxide oxygen atoms of two ligand sets, and one oxygen atom of the terminal-coordinated EtOH molecule complete the distorted dodecahedron geometry of each LnIII ion. Compounds 8-14 are isomophous and their structures are similar to those of 1-7. The slight difference between 1-7 and 8-14 stems from purposefully replacing the EtOH ligands in 1-7 with MeOH in 8-14. Dc magnetic susceptibility studies in the 2-300 K range reveal probably weak antiferromagnetic interactions for 3, 4, 7, 10, 11, and 14, and ferromagnetic interactions at low temperature for 5, 6, 12, and 13. Complexes 5 and 12 exhibit SMM behavior with energy barriers of 131.3 K for 5 and 198.8 K for 12, respectively. Namely, the energy barrier is significantly enhanced by dexterously regulating the terminal ligands. To rationalize the observed difference in the magnetic behavior, complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations were performed on two Dy2 complexes. Subtle variation in the angle θ between the magnetic axes and the vector connecting two DyIII ions results in the weaker influence on the tunneling gap of individual DyIII ions by the dipolar field in 12. This work proposes an efficient strategy for synthesizing Dy2 SMMs with high energy barriers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  16. Negligible suppression of the complete fusion of Li,76 on light targets, at energies above the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, M. F.; Zhang, G. L.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Ferioli, E.

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by a recent work performed at Australian National University by S. Kalkal et al. [Phys. Rev. C 93, 044605 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.044605] on breakup and its time scale, where it was shown that the prompt (or near-target) breakup of Li,76 is almost negligible and consequently the near-barrier complete fusion cross section induced by these weakly bound Li isotopes on light targets should not be suppressed by the breakup, as it is for heavier targets, we estimated the contributions of complete and incomplete fusion in the measured total fusions for several light systems available in the literature. The chosen systems were those for which the fusion cross sections had been measured using the γ -ray spectroscopy method and all evaporation channel cross sections were reported. For the estimation, we used, apart from the data, the predictions of the evaporation code cascade. The results show that, indeed, the complete fusion suppression is negligible for such systems at energies slightly above the barrier, in agreement with the above-mentioned recent measurements of breakup time scales.

  17. Simulation study of free-energy barriers in the wetting transition of an oily fluid on a rough surface with reentrant geometry.

    PubMed

    Savoy, Elizabeth S; Escobedo, Fernando A

    2012-11-20

    When in contact with a rough solid surface, fluids with low surface tension, such as oils and alkanes, have their lowest free energy in the fully wetted state. For applications where nonwetting by these phillic fluids is desired, some barrier must be introduced to maintain the nonwetted composite state. One way to create this free-energy barrier is to fabricate roughness with reentrant geometry, but the question remains as to whether the free-energy barrier is sufficiently high to prevent wetting. Our goal is to quantify the free-energy landscape for the wetting transition of an oily fluid on a surface of nails and identify significant surface features and conditions that maximize the wetting free-energy barrier (ΔGfwd*). This is a departure from most work on wetting, which focuses on the equilibrium composite and wetted states. We use boxed molecular dynamics (BXD) (Glowacki, D. R.; Paci, E.; Shalashilin, D. V. J. Phys. Chem. B2009, 113, 16603-16611) with a modified control scheme to evaluate both the thermodynamics and kinetics of the transition over a range of surface affinities (chemistry). We find that the reentrant geometry of the nails does create a free-energy barrier to transition for phillic chemistry whereas a corresponding system on straight posts wets spontaneously and, that doubling the nail height more than doubles ΔGfwd*. For neutral to phillic chemistry, the dewetting free-energy barrier is at least an order of magnitude higher than that for wetting, indicating an essentially irreversible wetting transition. Transition rates from BXD simulations and the associated trends agree well with those in our previous study that used forward flux sampling to compute transition rates for similar systems.

  18. High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

    2012-06-01

    Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

  19. Elastic scattering and transfer reactions for the system 7Be + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Glodariu, T.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Lay, J. A.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Parascandolo, C.; Parkar, V. V.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Rusek, K.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the reaction induced by the Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be on the closed proton shell nucleus 58Ni at 22.0 MeV bombarding energy. The 7Be beam was produced by means of the in-flight technique with the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL (Italy). Charged reaction products were mass and charge identified in a rather wide angular range and their energy distributions were analyzed to infer some information on the production mechanism. The relevance of direct processes, especially 3He- and 4He-stripping, as well as compound nucleus reactions is critically reviewed.

  20. Elastic scattering for the system {sup 6}Li+p at near barrier energies with MAGNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Soukeras, V.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bondi, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Acosta, L.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Alamanos, N.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Elastic scattering measurements have been performed for the {sup 6}Li+p system in inverse kinematics at the energies of 16, 20, 25 and 29 MeV. The heavy ejectile was detected by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, in the angular range between ∼2{sup 0} and 12{sup 0} in the laboratory system, giving us the possibility to span almost a full angular range in the center of mass system. Results will be presented and discussed for one of the energies.

  1. Revealing highly unbalanced energy barriers in the extension and contraction of the muscle-like motion of a [c2]daisy chain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Minot, Christian; Hermann, Klaus; Van Hove, Michel A

    2015-07-28

    Nanoscale muscle-like materials have aroused great interest as they may provide controllable mechanical operations by artificial actuations. Molecular designs to achieve the desired motion at the macroscopic scale in experiments require atomic level understanding. By systematic quantum chemical and molecular dynamics calculations we reveal that the length change is not only due to the linear telescoping from the dibenzo[24]crown-8 recognition at two docking stations but also the folding/unfolding of two bulky stoppers. The extension and contraction processes of a [c2]daisy chain under acidic vs. basic conditions are exothermic but need to cross very different energy barriers, being at least double the height under acidic compared to basic conditions, hindering balanced cyclic motions at moderate excitation. Our result suggests that to realize the desired muscle-like motion one should adopt sufficiently high external excitation, using for example reasonably high temperature and further optimizing the solution used.

  2. Nucleon-nucleon correlations in heavy ion transfer reactions: Recent investigations at energies far below the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    Excitation functions of one- and two-neutron transfer channels have been measured for the 96Zr+40Ca and 116Sn+60Ni systems at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ˜25% below. Target-like recoils have been identified in A, Z and velocity with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental transfer probabilities have been compared, in absolute values and in slope, with semiclassical microscopic calculations which incorporate nucleon-nucleon pairing correlations. For the first time in a heavy ion collision, one was able to provide a consistent description of one and two neutron transfer reactions by incorporating, in the reaction mechanism, all known structure information of entrance and exit channels nuclei. In particular, there is no need to introduce any enhancement factor for the description of two neutron transfer, of course very important are the correlations induced by the pairing interaction.

  3. Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A. Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2013-06-15

    Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the {sup 16}O + {sup 112}Cd, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 184}W; {sup 19}F +{sup 175}Lu; {sup 28}Si +{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm; {sup 40}Ca +{sup 96}Zr; {sup 48}Ca+ {sup 90}Zr; and {sup 64}Ni +{sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 92,96}Zr, and {sup 100}Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  4. Elastic scattering, inelastic excitation, and neutron transfer for 7Li+120Sn at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Lubian, J.; Gasques, L. R.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Chamon, L. C.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Alcántara-Núñez, J. A.; Medina, N. H.; Scarduelli, V.; Freitas, A.; Padron, I.; Rossi, E. S.; Shorto, J. M. B.

    2017-06-01

    Experimental angular distributions for the 7Li+120Sn elastic and inelastic (projectile and target excitations) scattering, and for the neutron stripping reaction, have been obtained at ELAB= 20 , 22, 24, and 26 MeV, covering an energy range around the Coulomb barrier (VB(LAB )≈21.4 MeV). Coupled channel and coupled reaction channel calculations were performed and both describe satisfactorily the experimental data sets. The 1/2- state 7Li inelastic excitation (using a rotational model), as well as the projectile coupling to the continuum (α plus a tritium particle) play a fundamental role on the proper description of elastic, inelastic, and transfer channels. Couplings to the one-neutron stripping channel do not significantly affect the theoretical elastic scattering angular distributions. The spectroscopic amplitudes of the transfer channel were obtained through a shell model calculation. The theoretical angular distributions for the one-neutron stripping reaction agreed with the experimental data.

  5. An Ising iron(ii) chain exhibits a large finite-size energy barrier and "hard" magnetic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi-Fei; Han, Tian; Xue, Wei; Hayashi, Naoaki; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2017-01-31

    One-dimensional spin chains featuring strong axial anisotropic magnetism are promising candidates for isolatable and miniatured information storage materials, the so-called single-chain magnets (SCMs). Here we show a mixed azido/carboxylato bridged metamagnetic iron(ii) chain [Fe(N3)2(4-mpc)]n (4-mpc = N-methylpyridinium-4-carboxylate) with a large energy barrier of 150 K, a large remnant magnetization (1.55Nβ) and coercivity (1.7 T at 2 K) for homo-spin SCMs. Heat capacity and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies corroborate the intrinsic nature of SCM behavior regardless of weak interchain magnetic interactions, which lead to the coexistence of metamagnetism but not long-range magnetic ordering. Moreover, detailed magnetic investigations indicate that the system is not only within the "Ising limit" but also in the "finite-size" regime.

  6. Transesterification thio effects of phosphate diesters: free energy barriers and kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects from density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Gregersen, Brent A; Hengge, Alvan; York, Darrin M

    2006-08-22

    Primary and secondary kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects are calculated with density-functional methods for the in-line dianionic methanolysis of the native (unsubstituted) and thio-substituted cyclic phosphates. These reactions represent reverse reaction models for RNA transesterification under alkaline conditions. The effect of solvent is treated with explicit (single and double) water molecules and self-consistently with an implicit (continuum) solvation model. Singly substituted reactions at the nonbridging O(P1) position and bridging O(2)('), O(3)('), and O(5)(') positions and a doubly substituted reaction at the O(P1) and O(P2) positions were considered. Aqueous free energy barriers are calculated, and the structures and bond orders of the rate-controlling transition states are characterized. The results are consistent with available experimental data and provide useful information for the interpretation of measured isotope and thio effects used to probe mechanism in phosphoryl transfer reactions catalyzed by enzymes and ribozymes.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and interfacial free energy barriers of mixtures of ionic liquids and divalent salts near a graphene wall.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Víctor; Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Cabeza, Oscar; Ivaništšev, Vladislav B; Fedorov, Maxim V; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2016-12-21

    A molecular dynamics study of mixtures of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4]) with magnesium tetrafluoroborate (Mg[BF4]2) confined between two parallel graphene walls is reported. The structure of the system is analyzed by means of ionic density profiles, lateral structure of the first layer close to the graphene surface and angular orientations of imidazolium cations. Free energy profiles for divalent magnesium cations are calculated using two different methods in order to evaluate the height of the potential barriers near the walls, and the results are compared with those of mixtures of the same ionic liquid and a lithium salt (Li[BF4]). Preferential adsorption of magnesium cations is analyzed using a simple model and compared to that of lithium cations, and vibrational densities of states are calculated for the cations close to the walls analyzing the influence of the graphene surface charge. Our results indicate that magnesium cations next to the graphene wall have a roughly similar environment to that in the bulk. Moreover, they face higher potential barriers and are less adsorbed on the charged graphene walls than lithium cations. In other words, magnesium cations have a more stable solvation shell than lithium ones.

  8. Characterization of the folding energy landscapes of computer generated proteins suggests high folding free energy barriers and cooperativity may be consequences of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Scalley-Kim, Michelle; Baker, David

    2004-04-30

    To determine the extent to which protein folding rates and free energy landscapes have been shaped by natural selection, we have examined the folding kinetics of five proteins generated using computational design methods and, hence, never exposed to natural selection. Four of these proteins are complete computer-generated redesigns of naturally occurring structures and the fifth protein, called Top7, has a computer-generated fold not yet observed in nature. We find that three of the four redesigned proteins fold much faster than their naturally occurring counterparts. While natural selection thus does not appear to operate on protein folding rates, the majority of the designed proteins unfold considerably faster than their naturally occurring counterparts, suggesting possible selection for a high free energy barrier to unfolding. In contrast to almost all naturally occurring proteins of less than 100 residues but consistent with simple computational models, the folding energy landscape for Top7 appears to be quite complex, suggesting the smooth energy landscapes and highly cooperative folding transitions observed for small naturally occurring proteins may also reflect the workings of natural selection.

  9. The role of couplings in nuclear rainbow formation at energies far above the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, D.; Linares, R.; and others

    2012-10-20

    A study of the {sup 16}O+{sup 28}Si elastic and inelastic scattering is presented in the framework of Coupled Channel theory. The Sao Paulo Potential is used in the angular distribution calculations and compared with the existing data at 75 MeV bombarding energy. A nuclear rainbow pattern is predicted and becomes more clear above 100 MeV.

  10. The role of couplings in nuclear rainbow formation at energies far above the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Chamon, L. C.; Faria, P. N.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Bondı, M.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.

    2012-10-01

    A study of the 16O+28Si elastic and inelastic scattering is presented in the framework of Coupled Channel theory. The São Paulo Potential is used in the angular distribution calculations and compared with the existing data at 75 MeV bombarding energy. A nuclear rainbow pattern is predicted and becomes more clear above 100 MeV.

  11. Constraining the Symmetry Energy:. a Journey in the Isospin Physics from Coulomb Barrier to Deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.; Ferini, G.; Rizzo, C.; Rizzo, J.; Baran, V.; Gaitanos, T.; Prassa, V.; Wolter, H. H.; Zielinska-Pfabe, M.

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this work we present a selection of reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the isovector part of the interaction, i.e.to the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). At low energies the behavior of the symmetry energy around saturation influences dissipation and fragment production mechanisms. We will first discuss the recently observed Dynamical Dipole Radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation during the charge equilibration in fusion and deep-inelastic collisions. Important Iso - EOS are stressed. Reactions induced by unstable 132Sn beams appear to be very promising tools to test the sub-saturation Isovector EoS. New Isospin sensitive observables are also presented for deep-inelastic, fragmentation collisions and Isospin equilibration measurements (Imbalance Ratios). The high density symmetry term can be derived from isospin effects on heavy ion reactions at relativistic energies (few AGeV range), that can even allow a "direct" study of the covariant structure of the isovector interaction in the hadron medium. Rather sensitive observables are proposed from collective flows and from pion/kaon production. The possibility of the transition to a mixed hadron-quark phase, at high baryon and isospin density, is finally suggested. Some signatures could come from an expected "neutron trapping" effect. The importance of studying violent collisions with radioactive beams from low to relativistic energies is finally stressed.

  12. The C12(O16,γSi28) radiative capture reaction at sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goasduff, A.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Amandruz, P.-A.; Davis, C.; Hager, U.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G.

    2014-01-01

    The heavy-ion radiative capture C12(O16,γSi28) was measured at the sub-Coulomb barrier bombarding energy Elab=15.7 MeV, which corresponds to the lowest important resonance observed in the C12+ O16 fusion excitation function. Thanks to combination of the bismuth germanate (BGO) γ-ray array and the 0∘ DRAGON electromagnetic spectrometer at TRIUMF, the γ-decay spectrum from the entrance channel down to the ground state of 28Si was measured. Comparisons of the experimental spectrum to γ spectrum extracted from Monte Carlo simulations of the complete setup suggest a Jπ=2+ spin-parity assignment to the entrance channel and yield the radiative capture cross section σRC=0.22±0.04μb. Combining this present spin assignment with previous data on radiative capture, a J (J+1) systematics was constructed, and it indicated a moment of inertia commensurate with the C12+O16 grazing angular momentum. Strong dipole transitions are observed from the entrance channel to T =1 states around 11.5 MeV and are found to result from enhanced M1IV transitions to states exhausting a large part of the M1 sum rule built on the ground state of 28Si. This specific decay was also reported at bombarding energies close to the Coulomb barrier in our previous study of the C12(C12,γ24Mg) heavy-ion radiative capture reaction. Similarities between both systems are investigated.

  13. Quality of sour cream packaged in cups with different light barrier properties measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and sensory analysis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Hanne; Tellefsen, Siri Birgitte Geiner; Dahl, Annette Veberg

    2009-10-01

    In this study, photooxidation of sour cream packaged in cups with different light barrier properties was investigated. The sour cream was light exposed for 36 h with a standard fluorescent light tube, simulating storage conditions in many Norwegian grocery stores. Three different cups were evaluated: a white cup, a cup with medium light barrier (LB), and a cup with high LB. The quality of the sour cream was evaluated by sensory analysis and front face fluorescence spectroscopy. The sour cream stored in white cups became very rancid during the light exposure, with a rancid flavor score of 7.8 on a scale from 1 to 9, where 9 is the highest intensity. Cups with high LB gave best protection against the light. The sensory assessors could not distinguish between sour cream stored in cups with high LB and sour cream stored in the dark. The rancid flavor intensity for the cups with medium LB was significantly different (P < 0.05) from both the white cup and the cup with high LB. The sensory flavor intensities indicated that with 36 h of light exposure, only a cup with high LB will protect the sour cream sufficiently. The fluorescence measurements corresponded well with the sensory analysis as the photosensitizers were somewhat degraded for sour cream stored in cups with medium LB and most degraded in the white cups. For the cups with high LB, the fluorescence peaks that originated from the photosensitizers were all intact. Dairy products such as sour cream will develop off-odor and taste faults ("sunlight taste") in a few hours if exposed to sufficient fluorescent lightning in the grocery stores. A light barrier can be incorporated in the packaging material to protect the dairy products from the light. Our experiment showed that the incorporation of a black pigment into 1 of the 3 plastic layers in the cup for packaging of sour cream protected the sour cream from degradation when exposed to light.

  14. Potential Energy Landscape of the Electronic States of the GFP Chromophore in Different Protonation Forms: Electronic Transition Energies and Conical Intersections.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, I V; Grigorenko, B L; Epifanovsky, E M; Krylov, A I; Nemukhin, A V

    2010-08-10

    We present the results of quantum chemical calculations of the transition energies and conical intersection points for the two lowest singlet electronic states of the green fluorescent protein chromophore, 4'-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone, in the vicinity of its cis conformation in the gas phase. Four protonation states of the chromophore, i.e., anionic, neutral, cationic, and zwitterionic, were considered. Energy differences were computed by the perturbatively corrected complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF)-based approaches at the corresponding potential energy minima optimized by density functional theory and CASSCF (for the ground and excited states, respectively). We also report the EOM-CCSD and SOS-CIS(D) results for the excitation energies. The minimum energy S0/S1 conical intersection points were located using analytic state-specific CASSCF gradients. The results reproduce essential features of previous ab initio calculations of the anionic form of the chromophore and provide an extension for the neutral, cationic, and zwitterionic forms, which are important in the protein environment. The S1 PES of the anion is fairly flat, and the barrier separating the planar bright conformation from the dark twisted one as well as the conical intersection point with the S0 surface is very small (less than 2 kcal/mol). On the cationic surface, the barrier is considerably higher (∼13 kcal/mol). The PES of the S1 state of the zwitterionic form does not have a planar minimum in the Franck-Condon region. The S1 surface of the neutral form possesses a bright planar minimum; the energy barrier of about 9 kcal/mol separates it from the dark twisted conformation as well as from the conical intersection point leading to the cis-trans chromophore isomerization.

  15. Energy radiated by seismic events of different scales and geneses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharyan, G. G.; Ivanchenko, G. N.; Kishkina, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    Extensive data comprising about 1500 seismic events with the moment magnitudes M W from-3.5 to 9.2 have been analyzed for identifying the implications of the event size, the type of faulting in the source, and tectonic situations for the efficiency of the radiation. It is shown that there are several hierarchy levels with different patterns of scaling relationships describing the changes in the parameters of seismic events with the event size. This is due to the specificity of the hierarchy in the macroscopic characteristics of the rock mass. The size and mechanism of the earthquake determine the general trends in the variations of its radiation efficiency. The role of the macroscopic parameter controlling the efficiency of a seismic source is played by the stiffness of a fault or a fracture. The scaling relationship of this parameter determines several hierarchical levels within which the changes in the characteristics of the earthquakes follow the different laws. The huge scatter in the values of the scaled energy (the ratio of the radiated seismic energy to the seismic moment, energy-to-moment ratio) about the average requires additional study. Quite probably, the value of the scaled seismic energy is determined by the mesostructure and physicomechanical characteristics of the fault's core. Small variations in these factors may lead to drastic changes in the stress drop amplitude and in the rupture propagation velocity up to the emergence of different regimes of deformation.

  16. Different sound decay patterns and energy feedback in coupled volumes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Hongjie; Qiu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jiqing

    2011-04-01

    Different non-exponential decays such as the concave and the convex double sloped decays in the coupled rooms provide distinct sound qualities. These are commonly considered to occur in the less reverberant sub-room and the more reverberant sub-room, respectively. However, numerical simulations and experiments in this paper show that the demarcation line is not located along the physical boundaries (e.g., the partition and the coupling aperture), but in the more reverberant sub-room. The sound field with the concave double sloped decay penetrates into the auxiliary sub-room to an extent which is influenced by the difference between the two natural reverberations of the sub-rooms. Furthermore the sound energy flows in different regions are investigated, demonstrating how energy feedback leads to the concave double sloped decay.

  17. New Bond Coat Materials for Thermal Barrier Coating Systems Processed Via Different Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, A.; Csaki, I.; Sohaciu, M.; Oprea, C.; Soare, S.; Costina, I.; Petrescu, M. I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper aims at describing the development of new Ru-based Bond Coats (BC) as part of Thermal Barrier Coatings. The challenge of this research was to obtain an adherent and uniform layer of alumina protective layer after high temperature exposure. We have prepared a RuAl 50/50 at% alloy in an induction furnace which was subsequently subjected to oxidation in an electric furnace, in air, at 1100C, for 10h and 100h. Mechanical alloying of Ru and Al powders was another processing route used in an attempt to obtain a stoichiometric RuAl. The alloy was sintered by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and then oxidized at 1100C for 1 and10h. The alloys obtained as such were analysed before and after oxidation using advanced microscopy techniques (SEM and TEM). The encouraging results in case of RuAl alloys prepared by induction melting reveal that we obtained an adherent and uniform layer of alumina, free of delta-Ru. The results for the samples processed by powder metallurgy were positive but need to be further investigated. We should note here the novelty of this method for this particular type of application - as a BC part of a TBC system.

  18. Relative Efficiency of Surface Energy Budgets Over Different Land Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiachuan

    The partitioning of available solar energy into different fluxes at the Earth's surface is important in determining different physical processes, such as turbulent transport, subsurface hydrology, land-atmospheric interactions, etc. Direct measurements of these turbulent fluxes were carried out using eddy-covariance (EC) towers. However, the distribution of EC towers is sparse due to relatively high cost and practical difficulties in logistics and deployment. As a result, data is temporally and spatially limited and is inadequate to be used for researches at large scales, such as regional and global climate modeling. Besides field measurements, an alternative way is to estimate turbulent fluxes based on the intrinsic relations between surface energy budget components, largely through thermodynamic equilibrium. These relations, referred as relative efficiency, have been included in several models to estimate the magnitude of turbulent fluxes in surface energy budgets such as latent heat and sensible heat. In this study, three theoretical models based on the lumped heat transfer model, the linear stability analysis and the maximum entropy principle respectively, were investigated. Model predictions of relative efficiencies were compared with turbulent flux data over different land covers, viz. lake, grassland and suburban surfaces. Similar results were observed over lake and suburban surface but significant deviation is found over vegetation surface. The relative efficiency of outgoing longwave radiation is found to be orders of magnitude deviated from theoretic predictions. Meanwhile, results show that energy partitioning process is influenced by the surface water availability to a great extent. The study provides insight into what property is determining energy partitioning process over different land covers and gives suggestion for future models.

  19. Gender Differences in Insulin Resistance, Body Composition, and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Geer, Eliza B.; Shen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background Men and women differ substantially in regard to degrees of insulin resistance, body composition, and energy balance. Adipose tissue distribution, in particular the presence of elevated visceral and hepatic adiposity, plays a central role in the development of insulin resistance and obesity-related complications. Objective This review summarizes published data on gender differences in insulin resistance, body composition, and energy balance, to provide insight into novel gender-specific avenues of research as well as gender-tailored treatments of insulin resistance, visceral adiposity, and obesity. Methods English-language articles were identified from searches of the PubMed database through November 2008, and by reviewing the references cited in these reports. Searches included combinations of the following terms: gender, sex, insulin resistance, body composition, energy balance, and hepatic adipose tissue. Results For a given body mass index, men were reported to have more lean mass, women to have higher adiposity. Men were also found to have more visceral and hepatic adipose tissue, whereas women had more peripheral or subcutaneous adipose tissue. These differences, as well as differences in sex hormones and adipokines, may contribute to a more insulin-sensitive environment in women than in men. When normalized to kilograms of lean body mass, men and women had similar resting energy expenditure, but physical energy expenditure was more closely related to percent body fat in men than in women. Conclusion Greater amounts of visceral and hepatic adipose tissue, in conjunction with the lack of a possible protective effect of estrogen, may be related to higher insulin resistance in men compared with women. PMID:19318219

  20. One-dimensional free-energy profiles of complex systems: progress variables that preserve the barriers.

    PubMed

    Krivov, Sergei V; Karplus, Martin

    2006-06-29

    We show that the balanced minimum-cut procedure introduced in PNAS 2004, 101, 14766 can be reinterpreted as a method for solving the constrained optimization problem of finding the minimum cut among the cuts with a particular value of an additive function of the nodes on either side of the cut. Such an additive function (e.g., the partition function of the reactant region) can be used as a progress coordinate to determine a one-dimensional profile (FEP) of the free-energy surface of the protein-folding reaction as well as other complex reactions. The algorithm is based on the network (obtained from an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation) that represents the calculated reaction behavior. The resulting FEP gives the exact values of the free energy as a function of the progress coordinate; i.e., at each value of the progress coordinate, the profile is obtained from the surface with the minimal partition function among the surfaces that divide the full free-energy surface between two chosen end points. In many cases, the balanced minimum-cut procedure gives results for only a limited set of points. An approximate method based on p(fold) is shown to provide the profile for a more complete set of values of the progress coordinate. Applications of the approach to model problems and to realistic systems (beta-hairpin of protein G, LJ38 cluster) are presented.

  1. Heating energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combustion with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the heating energy performance of two levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation (R-11 and R-30) in combination with truss and horizontally installed radiant barriers. The tests, a continuation of work started in the summer of 1985, were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, during the winter of 1986-87. The measured results of the heating tests showed that a horizontal radiant barrier used with R-11 attic insulation reduced the house heating load by 9.3% compared with R-11 with no radiant barrier, while a truss barrier showed essentially no change in the heating load. Horizontal and truss barriers each reduced the heating load by 3.5% when added to R-30 attic insulation. Moisture condensed on the bottom of the horizontal barrier during cold early morning weather but usually dissipated in the warmer afternoon hours at Karns and left no accumulation in the insulation. Depending on the level of attic insulation, an annual heating and cooling HVAC savings ranging from $5 to $65 is estimated to be attainable when a radiant barrier is installed in the attic at Karns. 8 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with (137)Cs and (60)Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics.

  3. Diagnostic group differences in temporomandibular joint energy densities

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, LM; Iwasaki, LR; Gonzalez, YM; Liu, H; Marx, DB; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cartilage fatigue, due to mechanical work, may account for precocious development of degenerative joint disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study compared energy densities (mJ/mm3) in TMJs of three diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population Sixty-eight subjects (44 women, 24 men) gave informed consent. Diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) and imaging were used to group subjects according to presence of jaw muscle or joint pain (+P) and bilateral disc displacement (+DD). Material and Methods Subjects (+P+DD, n=16; −P+DD, n=16; and −P−DD, n=36) provided cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, and jaw tracking data. Numerical modeling was used to determine TMJ loads (Fnormal). Dynamic stereometry was used to characterize individual-specific data of stress-field dynamics during 10 symmetrical jaw closing cycles. These data were used to estimate tractional forces (Ftraction). Energy densities were then calculated as W/Q(W=workdoneormechanicalenergyinput=tractionalforce×distanceofstress-fieldtranslation,Q=volumeofcartilage). ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc analyses tested for intergroup differences. Results Mean ±standard error energy density for the +P+DD group was 12.7±1.5 mJ/mm3 and significantly greater (all adjusted p<0.04) when compared to −P+DD (7.4±1.4 mJ/mm3) and −P−DD (5.8±0.9 mJ/mm3) groups. Energy densities in −P+DD and −P−DD groups were not significantly different. Conclusion Diagnostic group differences in energy densities suggest that mechanical work may be a unique mechanism which contributes to cartilage fatigue in subjects with pain and disc displacement. PMID:25865545

  4. Barriers and Facilitators to Intake of Dairy Products in Adolescent Males and Females With Different Levels of Habitual Intake

    PubMed Central

    Racey, Megan; Bransfield, Jeanette; Capello, Kathryn; Field, David; Kulak, Verena; Machmueller, David; Preyde, Michèle; Newton, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dairy products and alternatives can contribute to overall good health including positive body composition and decreased adiposity; however, these foods are grossly underconsumed by youth, and worldwide, almost 25% of children are overweight or obese. Objective: The study investigated the barriers and facilitators toward dairy consumption by Grade 7 youth. Methods: Thirty 50-minute, audio-recorded focus groups were conducted with 134 students in eight Grade 7 classes across 5 elementary schools. Focus groups were led by trained facilitators in the elementary schools and participants were separated based on dairy consumption and gender. Recorded data were transcribed and thematically analyzed using qualitative analysis software to identify themes related to barriers and facilitators to dairy product intake by each gender. Results: Factors considered important by males and females across different levels of habitual intake include personal knowledge about dairy products and misconceptions regarding dairy foods and their associated health benefits; food characteristics, including taste; personal behaviors such as habits or routines including dairy products; social environments including parental and peer influence; physical environments factors such as availability and skipping meals; and the convenience of dairy products. Interestingly, only males noted sports as a positive influence for dairy product intake. Also, there were differences in the way males and females perceived dining out as affecting their dairy intake. Conclusion: Results suggest several potential factors that nutrition education interventions aiming to increase dairy consumption could target. PMID:28540345

  5. Barriers and Facilitators to Intake of Dairy Products in Adolescent Males and Females With Different Levels of Habitual Intake.

    PubMed

    Racey, Megan; Bransfield, Jeanette; Capello, Kathryn; Field, David; Kulak, Verena; Machmueller, David; Preyde, Michèle; Newton, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dairy products and alternatives can contribute to overall good health including positive body composition and decreased adiposity; however, these foods are grossly underconsumed by youth, and worldwide, almost 25% of children are overweight or obese. Objective: The study investigated the barriers and facilitators toward dairy consumption by Grade 7 youth. Methods: Thirty 50-minute, audio-recorded focus groups were conducted with 134 students in eight Grade 7 classes across 5 elementary schools. Focus groups were led by trained facilitators in the elementary schools and participants were separated based on dairy consumption and gender. Recorded data were transcribed and thematically analyzed using qualitative analysis software to identify themes related to barriers and facilitators to dairy product intake by each gender. Results: Factors considered important by males and females across different levels of habitual intake include personal knowledge about dairy products and misconceptions regarding dairy foods and their associated health benefits; food characteristics, including taste; personal behaviors such as habits or routines including dairy products; social environments including parental and peer influence; physical environments factors such as availability and skipping meals; and the convenience of dairy products. Interestingly, only males noted sports as a positive influence for dairy product intake. Also, there were differences in the way males and females perceived dining out as affecting their dairy intake. Conclusion: Results suggest several potential factors that nutrition education interventions aiming to increase dairy consumption could target.

  6. Experimental evidence for a fusion enhancement in 19O+12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.; Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 x 104p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Evaporation residues were detected with high efficiency by measuring them in the angular range 4.4° <=θlab <= 11.7°. The fusion cross-section has been measured down to 170 mb level. As compared to 18O+12C the fusion cross-section for 19O+12C is enhanced by approximately a factor of 3 times at the lowest energy measured. The measured excitation function will be compared with theoretical calculations. Supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  7. Molecular biology of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers: similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Efficient processing of information by the central nervous system (CNS) represents an important evolutionary advantage. Thus, homeostatic mechanisms have developed that provide appropriate circumstances for neuronal signaling, including a highly controlled and stable microenvironment. To provide such a milieu for neurons, extracellular fluids of the CNS are separated from the changeable environment of blood at three major interfaces: at the brain capillaries by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is localized at the level of the endothelial cells and separates brain interstitial fluid (ISF) from blood; at the epithelial layer of four choroid plexuses, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB), which separates CSF from the CP ISF, and at the arachnoid barrier. The two barriers that represent the largest interface between blood and brain extracellular fluids, the BBB and the BCSFB, prevent the free paracellular diffusion of polar molecules by complex morphological features, including tight junctions (TJs) that interconnect the endothelial and epithelial cells, respectively. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of TJs and adherens junctions in the brain capillary endothelial cells and in the CP epithelial cells. However, normal function of the CNS depends on a constant supply of essential molecules, like glucose and amino acids from the blood, exchange of electrolytes between brain extracellular fluids and blood, as well as on efficient removal of metabolic waste products and excess neurotransmitters from the brain ISF. Therefore, a number of specific transport proteins are expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells and CP epithelial cells that provide transport of nutrients and ions into the CNS and removal of waste products and ions from the CSF. The second part of this review concentrates on the molecular biology of various solute carrier (SLC) transport proteins at those two barriers and underlines differences in their

  8. Molecular biology of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Redzic, Zoran

    2011-01-18

    Efficient processing of information by the central nervous system (CNS) represents an important evolutionary advantage. Thus, homeostatic mechanisms have developed that provide appropriate circumstances for neuronal signaling, including a highly controlled and stable microenvironment. To provide such a milieu for neurons, extracellular fluids of the CNS are separated from the changeable environment of blood at three major interfaces: at the brain capillaries by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is localized at the level of the endothelial cells and separates brain interstitial fluid (ISF) from blood; at the epithelial layer of four choroid plexuses, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB), which separates CSF from the CP ISF, and at the arachnoid barrier. The two barriers that represent the largest interface between blood and brain extracellular fluids, the BBB and the BCSFB, prevent the free paracellular diffusion of polar molecules by complex morphological features, including tight junctions (TJs) that interconnect the endothelial and epithelial cells, respectively. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of TJs and adherens junctions in the brain capillary endothelial cells and in the CP epithelial cells. However, normal function of the CNS depends on a constant supply of essential molecules, like glucose and amino acids from the blood, exchange of electrolytes between brain extracellular fluids and blood, as well as on efficient removal of metabolic waste products and excess neurotransmitters from the brain ISF. Therefore, a number of specific transport proteins are expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells and CP epithelial cells that provide transport of nutrients and ions into the CNS and removal of waste products and ions from the CSF. The second part of this review concentrates on the molecular biology of various solute carrier (SLC) transport proteins at those two barriers and underlines differences in their

  9. A responsive human triple-culture model of the air-blood barrier: incorporation of different macrophage phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria I; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-06-15

    Current pulmonary research underlines the relevance of the alveolar macrophage (AM) integrated in multicellular co-culture-systems of the respiratory tract to unravel, for example, the mechanisms of tissue regeneration. AMs demonstrate a specific functionality, as they inhabit a unique microenvironment with high oxygen levels and exposure to external hazards. Healthy AMs display an anti-inflammatory phenotype, prevent hypersensitivity to normally innocuous contaminants and maintain tissue homeostasis in the alveolus. To mirror the actual physiological function of the AM, we developed three different polarized [classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2wh , wound-healing; M2reg , regulatory)] macrophage models using a mixture of differentiation mediators, as described in the current literature. To test their immunological impact, these distinct macrophage phenotypes were seeded on to the epithelial layer of an established in vitro air-blood barrier co-culture, consisting of alveolar epithelial cells A549 or H441 and microvascular endothelial cells ISO-HAS-1 on the opposite side of a Transwell filter-membrane. IL-8 and sICAM release were measured as functionality parameters after LPS challenge. The M1 model itself already provoked a severe inflammatory-like response of the air-blood barrier co-culture, thus demonstrating its potential as a useful in vitro model for inflammatory lung diseases. The two M2 models represent a 'non-inflammatory' phenotype but still showed the ability to trigger inflammation following LPS challenge. Hence, the latter could be used to establish a quiescent, physiological in vitro air-blood model. Thus, the more complex differentiation protocol developed in the present study provides a responsive in vitro triple-culture model of the air-blood-barrier that mimics AM features as they occur in vivo. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Enhancement of fusion at near-barrier energies for neutron-rich light nuclei: 19O +12 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Vadas, J.; Steinbach, T. K.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Kuvin, S. A.; Tripathi, Vandana; Wiedenhover, I.; Umar, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the fusion excitation function for an isotopic chain of projectile nuclei provides a sensitive test of a microscopic description of fusion. To investigate the theoretically predicted fusion enhancement for neutron-rich light nuclei, an experiment was performed to measure the fusion excitation functions for 19 O +12 C and 18 O +12 C . Using the 18O(d,p) reaction and the RESOLUT mass spectrometer at Florida State University, a beam of 19O was produced with an intensity of 2-4 x 103 p/s. This beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 carbon target. Using an approach optimized for the measurement of fusion with a low-intensity beam, evaporation residues (ERs) resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were measured. The ERs were identified by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. At near-barrier energies, an enhancement of fusion by a factor of three has been observed for 19 O +12 C in comparison to 18 O +12 C . Comparison of the experimental results with the predictions of a density constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) model provide evidence for the importance of pairing in the fusion process. Supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  11. Free energy barrier in the growth of sulfuric acid-ammonia and sulfuric acid-dimethylamine clusters.

    PubMed

    Olenius, T; Kupiainen-Määttä, O; Ortega, I K; Kurtén, T; Vehkamäki, H

    2013-08-28

    The first step in atmospheric new particle formation involves the aggregation of gas phase molecules into small molecular clusters that can grow by colliding with gas molecules and each other. In this work we used first principles quantum chemistry combined with a dynamic model to study the steady-state kinetics of sets of small clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia or sulfuric acid and dimethylamine molecules. Both sets were studied with and without electrically charged clusters. We show the main clustering pathways in the simulated systems together with the quantum chemical Gibbs free energies of formation of the growing clusters. In the sulfuric acid-ammonia system, the major growth pathways exhibit free energy barriers, whereas in the acid-dimethylamine system the growth occurs mainly via barrierless condensation. When ions are present, charged clusters contribute significantly to the growth in the acid-ammonia system. For dimethylamine the role of ions is minor, except at very low acid concentration, and the growing clusters are electrically neutral.

  12. Free energy barrier in the growth of sulfuric acid-ammonia and sulfuric acid-dimethylamine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenius, T.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Ortega, I. K.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-08-01

    The first step in atmospheric new particle formation involves the aggregation of gas phase molecules into small molecular clusters that can grow by colliding with gas molecules and each other. In this work we used first principles quantum chemistry combined with a dynamic model to study the steady-state kinetics of sets of small clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia or sulfuric acid and dimethylamine molecules. Both sets were studied with and without electrically charged clusters. We show the main clustering pathways in the simulated systems together with the quantum chemical Gibbs free energies of formation of the growing clusters. In the sulfuric acid-ammonia system, the major growth pathways exhibit free energy barriers, whereas in the acid-dimethylamine system the growth occurs mainly via barrierless condensation. When ions are present, charged clusters contribute significantly to the growth in the acid-ammonia system. For dimethylamine the role of ions is minor, except at very low acid concentration, and the growing clusters are electrically neutral.

  13. Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Control of Electron Energy Distribution of Dielectric Barrier Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyo Won; Yel Lee, Jung; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2011-10-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure plasmas attract lots of interests for the useful applications such as surface modification and bio-medical treatment. In this study, a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulation was adopted to investigate the discharge characteristics of a planar micro dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a driving frequency from 1 MHz to 50 MHz and with a gap distance from 60 to 500 micrometers. The variation of control parameters such as the gap distance, the driving wave form, and the applied voltage results in the change in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Through the relation between the ionization mean free path and the gap size, a significant change of EEDFs is achievable with the decrease of gap distance. Therefore, it is possible to categorize the operation range of DBDs for its applications by controlling the interactions between plasmas and neutral gas for the generation of preferable radicals. This work was supported by the Human Resources Development of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 20104010100670).

  14. Ion activation energy delivered to wounds by atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharges: sputtering of lipid-like surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Ning, Ning; Graves, David B.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-03-01

    The application of atmospheric pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. These effects are attributed to production of UV photon fluxes, electric fields and beneficial radicals which intersect with biological reaction chains, and to energetic ions bombarding the surface. In this paper we report on results from a computational investigation of the ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) in a dielectric-barrier discharge sustained in air incident directly on cell membranes for small dry and wet wounds in human skin. We found that ion energies in excess of 20-30 eV can be delivered onto cell membranes of dry wounds, and up to 60 eV onto the liquid interface of the wet wound. The details of the IEADs depend on the orientation of the cell membrane and on the relative location of the plasma streamer to the wound. Using results from a molecular dynamics simulation of ion sputter probabilities of typical lipid-like material, we show that prolonged exposure of the cell membrane to such IEADs can produce significant carbon removal.

  15. Universal trend for heavy-ion total reaction cross-sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, O. A. P.; Medeiros, E. L.; Morcelle, V.

    2010-08-01

    Heavy-ion total reaction cross-section measurements for more than 1100 reaction cases covering 61 target nuclei in the range 6Li-238U and 158 projectile nuclei from 2H to 84Kr (mostly exotic ones) have been analyzed in a systematic way by using an empirical, three-parameter formula that is applicable to the cases of projectile kinetic energies above the Coulomb barrier. The analysis has shown that the average total nuclear binding energy per nucleon of the interacting nuclei and their radii are the chief quantities that describe the cross-section patterns. A great amount of cross-section data (87%) has been quite satisfactorily reproduced by the proposed formula; therefore, the total reaction cross-section predictions for new, not yet experimentally investigated reaction cases can be obtained within 25% (or much less) uncertainty. Dedicated to CBPF—Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas in its celebration of the 60th anniversary of its foundation.

  16. A robust numerical method for self-polarization energy of spherical quantum dots with finite confinement barriers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shaozhong

    2010-04-01

    By utilizing a novel three-layer dielectric model for the interface between a spherical quantum dot and the surrounding matrix, a robust numerical method for calculating the self-polarization energy of a spherical quantum dot with a finite confinement barrier is presented in this paper. The proposed numerical method can not only overcome the inherent mathematical divergence in the self-polarization energy which arises for the simplest and most widely used step-like model of the dielectric interface, but also completely eliminate the potential numerical divergence which may occur in the Bolcatto-Proetto's formula [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 319-334 (2001)], an approximation method commonly employed for more realistic three-layer dielectric models such as the linear and the cosine-like models frequently mentioned in the literature. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the convergence of the proposed numerical method as the number of the steps used to discretize the translation layer in a three-layer model goes to infinity, an important property that the Bolcatto-Proetto's formula appears not necessarily to possess.

  17. Theoretical prediction of energy release rate for interface crack initiation by thermal stress in environmental barrier coatings for ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, E.; Umeno, Y.

    2017-05-01

    As weight reduction of turbines for aircraft engines is demanded to improve fuel consumption and curb emission of carbon dioxide, silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) are drawing enormous attention as high-pressure turbine materials. For preventing degradation of SiC/SiC, environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for ceramics are deposited on the composites. The purpose of this study is to establish theoretical guidelines for structural design which ensures the mechanical reliability of EBC. We conducted finite element method (FEM) analysis to calculate energy release rates (ERRs) for interface crack initiation due to thermal stress in EBC consisting of Si-based bond coat, Mullite and Ytterbium (Yb)-silicate layers on a SiC/SiC substrate. In the FEM analysis, the thickness of one EBC layer was changed from 25 μm to 200 μm while the thicknesses of the other layers were fixed at 25 μm, 50 μm and 100 μm. We compared ERRs obtained by the FEM analysis and a simple theory for interface crack in a single-layered structure where ERR is estimated as nominal strain energy in the coating layers multiplied by a constant factor (independent of layer thicknesses). We found that, unlike the case of single-layered structures, the multiplication factor is no longer a constant but is determined by the combination of consisting coating layer thicknesses.

  18. The difference of energies of Si atoms with single-crystalline, amorphous, free and nanoparticle configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Deng, Z. C.; Chu, L. Z.; Fu, G. S.; Peng, Y. C.

    2009-04-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) films were systematically prepared via three ways: a) laser anneal or b) thermal anneal of the amorphous silicon (α-Si) films deposited by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) in base vacuum, c) direct PLA in high-purity Ar gas with pressure of 10 Pa. The anneal-laser fluence, thermal-anneal temperature and ablation-laser fluence thresholds corresponding to the beginning of nanoparticles formation were respectively determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Incorporated with crystallization mechanism, energies compensated for the formation of one Si nanoparticle in the three ways were calculated approximately. The result shows that for different crystallization ways, the potential barriers during the formation of one ~16 nm nanoparticle are on the order of 10-9 mJ.

  19. Energy expenditure and sex differences of golf playing.

    PubMed

    Zunzer, Stefan C; von Duvillard, Serge P; Tschakert, Gerhard; Mangus, Brent; Hofmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the average physical intensity and energy expenditure during a single round of golf on hilly and flat courses in a heterogeneous group of healthy men and women of varying age and golf handicap. Forty-two males and 24 females completed an incremental cycle-ergometer exercise test to determine exercise performance markers. The heart rate (HR), duration, distance, walking speed, ascent and descent were measured via a global positioning system (GPS)/HR monitor during the game and energy expenditure was calculated. Playing 9 or 18-holes of golf, independent of the golf course design, the average HR was not significantly different between sexes or the subgroups. The intensities were light with respect to the percentage of maximal HR and metabolic equivalents of task (METs). Total energy expenditure of all participants was not significantly different for hilly (834 ± 344 kcal) vs. flat courses (833 ± 295 kcal) whereas male players expended significantly greater energy than female players (926 ± 292 vs. 556 ± 180 kcal), but did not have significantly greater relative energy expenditure (2.8 ± 0.8 vs. 2.2 ± 0.7 METs). As a high volume physical activity, playing golf is suggested to yield health benefits. Since the intensity was well below recommended limits, golf may have health related benefits unrelated to the intensity level of the activity.

  20. Inter-arm blood pressure difference in type 2 diabetes: a barrier to effective management?

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher E; Greaves, Colin J; Evans, Philip H; Dickens, Andy; Campbell, John L

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have identified a substantial prevalence of a blood pressure difference between arms in various populations, but not patients with type 2 diabetes. Recognition of such a difference would be important as a potential cause of underestimation of blood pressure. Aim To measure prevalence of an inter-arm blood pressure difference in patients with type 2 diabetes, and to estimate how frequently blood pressure measurements could be erroneously underestimated if an inter-arm difference is unrecognised. Design of study Cross-sectional study. Setting Five surgeries covered by three general practices, Devon, England. Method Patients with type 2 diabetes underwent bilateral simultaneous blood pressure measurements using a validated protocol. Mean blood pressures were calculated for each arm to derive mean systolic and diastolic differences, and to estimate point prevalence of predefined magnitudes of difference. Results A total of 101 participants were recruited. Mean age was 66 years (standard deviation [SD] = 13.9 years); 59% were male, and mean blood pressure was 138/79 mmHg (SD = 15/10 mmHg). Ten participants (10%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4 to 16) had a systolic inter-arm difference ≥10 mmHg; 29 (29%; 95% CI = 20 to 38) had a diastolic difference ≥5 mmHg; and three (3%; 95% CI = 0 to 6) a diastolic difference ≥10 mmHg. No confounding variable was observed to account for the magnitude of an inter-arm difference. Conclusion A systolic inter-arm difference ≥10 mmHg was observed in 10% of patients with diabetes. Failure to recognise this would misclassify half of these as normotensive rather than hypertensive using the lower-reading arm. New patients with type 2 diabetes should be screened for an inter-arm blood pressure difference. PMID:19520026

  1. Edge energy transport barrier and turbulence in the I-mode regime on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dominguez, A.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Reinke, M. L.; Rowan, W. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    We report extended studies of the I-mode regime [Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] obtained in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Marmar et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. This regime, usually accessed with unfavorable ion B × ∇B drift, features an edge thermal transport barrier without a strong particle transport barrier. Steady I-modes have now been obtained with favorable B × ∇B drift, by using specific plasma shapes, as well as with unfavorable drift over a wider range of shapes and plasma parameters. With favorable drift, power thresholds are close to the standard scaling for L-H transitions, while with unfavorable drift they are ˜ 1.5-3 times higher, increasing with Ip. Global energy confinement in both drift configurations is comparable to H-mode scalings, while density profiles and impurity confinement are close to those in L-mode. Transport analysis of the edge region shows a decrease in edge χeff, by typically a factor of 3, between L- and I-mode. The decrease correlates with a drop in mid-frequency fluctuations (f ˜ 50-150 kHz) observed on both density and magnetics diagnostics. Edge fluctuations at higher frequencies often increase above L-mode levels, peaking at f ˜ 250 kHz. This weakly coherent mode is clearest and has narrowest width (Δf/f ˜ 0.45) at low q95 and high Tped, up to 1 keV. The Er well in I-mode is intermediate between L- and H-mode and is dominated by the diamagnetic contribution in the impurity radial force balance, without the Vpol shear typical of H-modes.

  2. Energy-Efficient Phase-Change Memory with Graphene as a Thermal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chiyui; Fong, Scott W; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Seunghyun; Sood, Aditya; Neumann, Christopher M; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E; Pop, Eric; Wong, H-S Philip

    2015-10-14

    Phase-change memory (PCM) is an important class of data storage, yet lowering the programming current of individual devices is known to be a significant challenge. Here we improve the energy-efficiency of PCM by placing a graphene layer at the interface between the phase-change material, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), and the bottom electrode (W) heater. Graphene-PCM (G-PCM) devices have ∼40% lower RESET current compared to control devices without the graphene. This is attributed to the graphene as an added interfacial thermal resistance which helps confine the generated heat inside the active PCM volume. The G-PCM achieves programming up to 10(5) cycles, and the graphene could further enhance the PCM endurance by limiting atomic migration or material segregation at the bottom electrode interface.

  3. Metastability and hysteretic vortex pinning near the order-disorder transition in NbSe2: Interplay between plastic and elastic energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziali Bermúdez, M.; Louden, E. R.; Eskildsen, M. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Bekeris, V.; Pasquini, G.

    2017-03-01

    We studied thermal and dynamic history effects in the vortex lattice (VL) near the order-disorder transition in clean NbSe2 single crystals. Comparing the evolution of the effective vortex pinning and the bulk VL structure, we observed metastable superheated and supercooled VL configurations that coexist with a hysteretic effective pinning response due to thermal cycling of the system. A novel scenario, governed by the interplay between (lower) elastic and (higher) plastic energy barriers, is proposed as an explanation for our observations: Plastic barriers, which prevent the annihilation or creation of topological defects, require dynamic assistance to be overcome and to achieve a stable VL at each temperature. Conversely, thermal hysteresis in the pining response is ascribed to low energy barriers, which inhibit rearrangement within a single VL correlation volume and are easily overcome as the relative strength of competing interactions changes with temperature.

  4. The Barriers Encountered by Teachers Implementing Education for Sustainable Development: Discipline Bound Differences and Teaching Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borg, Carola; Gericke, Niklas; Hoglund, Hans-Olof; Bergman, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to the Swedish curriculum teachers in all subjects have a responsibility to integrate a holistic perspective of sustainable development (SD) and teach according to an education for sustainable development (ESD) approach. However previous research has shown that teachers from different subjects perceive SD differently.…

  5. The Barriers Encountered by Teachers Implementing Education for Sustainable Development: Discipline Bound Differences and Teaching Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borg, Carola; Gericke, Niklas; Hoglund, Hans-Olof; Bergman, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to the Swedish curriculum teachers in all subjects have a responsibility to integrate a holistic perspective of sustainable development (SD) and teach according to an education for sustainable development (ESD) approach. However previous research has shown that teachers from different subjects perceive SD differently.…

  6. Evaluating the efficacy of different types of stem cells in preserving gut barrier function in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    McCulloh, Christopher J; Olson, Jacob K; Wang, Yijie; Vu, Jennifer; Gartner, Sarah; Besner, Gail E

    2017-06-15

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Increased intestinal permeability is central to NEC development. We have shown that stem cells (SCs) can reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. Our current goal was to investigate the efficacy of four different types of SC in preservation of gut barrier function during NEC. We compared (1) amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal SC, (2) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SC, (3) amniotic fluid-derived neural SC, and (4) enteric neural SC. Premature rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection of 2 × 10(6) SC or phosphate-buffered saline only and were then subjected to experimental NEC. Control pups were breastfed and not subjected to NEC. After 48 h, animals received a single enteral dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate -labeled dextran (FD70), were sacrificed 4 h later, and serum FD70 concentrations determined. Compared to breastfed, unstressed pups with intact gut barrier function and normal intestinal permeability (serum FD70 concentration 2.22 ± 0.271 μg/mL), untreated pups exposed to NEC had impaired barrier function with significantly increased permeability (18.6 ± 4.25 μg/mL, P = 0.047). Pups exposed to NEC but treated with SC had significantly reduced intestinal permeability: Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal SC (9.45 ± 1.36 μg/mL, P = 0.017), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SC (6.73 ± 2.74 μg/mL, P = 0.049), amniotic fluid-derived neural SC (8.052 ± 1.31 μg/mL, P = 0.0496), and enteric neural SC (6.60 ± 1.46 μg/mL, P = 0.033). SCs improve gut barrier function in experimental NEC. Although all four types of SC reduce permeability equivalently, SC derived from amniotic fluid may be preferable due to availability at delivery and ease of culture, potentially enhancing clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparision between different metal oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for sensing, energy generation, and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willander, Magnus; Alnoor, Hatim; Elhag, Sami; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Nour, Eiman Satti; Nur, Omer

    2016-02-01

    Highlights from research on different nanocomposites and nanostructures for sensing and other energy related applications will be presented. The synthesized nanostructures and nanocomposites presented here were all obtained using the low temperature (< 100 °C) chemical approach. Nanostructures featured by small foot-print and synthesized by the low temperature aqueous chemical approach allows the utilization of non-conventional solid and soft substrates like e.g. glass, plastic, textile and paper. We here present results from different metal oxide nanostructures employed for chemical sensing and some innovative energy related applications. Efficient sensitive and selective sensing of dopamine, melamine, and glucose are presented as some examples of self-powered sensors utilizing the electrochemical phenomenon i.e. transferring chemical energy into electrical signal. Further the use of nanomaterials for developing selfpowered devices utilizing mechanical ambient energy is presented via piezoelectric and triboelectric effects. Here the self-powered devices and systems were relying on utilizing the electormechanical phenomenon i.e. transferring ambient mechanical energy into useful electrical energy. Finally the visibility of nanomaterials prepared by the low temperature chemical synthesis as possible low cost replacement of Pt electrodes for hydrogen production is briefly presented and discussed.

  8. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  9. Protein-inhibitor flexible docking by a multicanonical sampling: native complex structure with the lowest free energy and a free-energy barrier distinguishing the native complex from the others.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2008-01-01

    Flexible docking between a protein (lysozyme) and an inhibitor (tri-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, tri-NAG) was carried out by an enhanced conformational sampling method, multicanonical molecular dynamics simulation. We used a flexible all-atom model to express lysozyme, tri-NAG, and water molecules surrounding the two bio-molecules. The advantages of this sampling method are as follows: the conformation of system is widely sampled without trapping at energy minima, a thermally equilibrated conformational ensemble at an arbitrary temperature can be reconstructed from the simulation trajectory, and the thermodynamic weight can be assigned to each sampled conformation. During the simulation, exchanges between the binding and free (i.e., unbinding) states of the protein and the inhibitor were repeatedly observed. The conformational ensemble reconstructed at 300 K involved various conformational clusters. The main outcome of the current study is that the most populated conformational cluster (i.e., the cluster of the lowest free energy) was assigned to the native complex structure (i.e., the X-ray complex structure). The simulation also produced non-native complex structures, where the protein and the inhibitor bound with different modes from that of the native complex structure, as well as the unbinding structures. A free-energy barrier (i.e., activation free energy) was clearly detected between the native complex structures and the other structures. The thermal fluctuations of tri-NAG in the lowest free-energy complex correlated well with the X-ray B-factors of tri-NAG in the X-ray complex structure. The existence of the free-energy barrier ensures that the lowest free-energy structure can be discriminated naturally from the other structures. In other words, the multicanonical molecular dynamics simulation can predict the native complex structure without any empirical objective function. The current study also manifested that the flexible all-atom model and the physico

  10. Corneal critical barrier against the penetration of dexamethasone and lomefloxacin hydrochloride: evaluation by the activation energy for drug partition and diffusion in cornea.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Shin-ichi; Higashiyama, Masayo; Yamaguchi, Masazumi; Isowaki, Akiharu; Ohtori, Akira

    2007-08-01

    The cornea is a solid barrier against drug permeation. We searched the critical barrier of corneal drug permeation using a hydrophobic drug, dexamethasone (DM), and a hydrophilic drug, lomefloxacin hydrochloride (LFLX). The activation energies for permeability of DM and LFLX across the intact cornea were 88.0 and 42.1 kJ/mol, respectively. Their activation energies for permeability across the cornea without epithelium decreased to 33.1 and 16.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The results show that epithelium is the critical barrier on the cornea against the permeation of a hydrophobic drug of DM as well as a hydrophilic drug of LFLX. The activation energy of partition for DM (66.8 kJ/mol) was approximately 3-fold larger than that of diffusion (21.2 kJ/mol). The results indicate that the partition for the hydrophobic drug of DM to the corneal epithelium is the primary barrier. Thermodynamic evaluation of activation energy for the drug permeation parameters is a good approach to investigate the mechanism of drug permeability.

  11. Differences in energy capacities between tennis players and runners.

    PubMed

    Novak, Dario; Vucetić, Vlatko; Zugaj, Sanja

    2013-05-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine differences between elite athletes and tennis players in order to provide a clearer picture regarding the energy demands in modern tennis. Forty-eight (48) athletes and 24 tennis players from Croatian national leagues were compared in morphological and physiological parameters of an all-out incremental treadmill test with gas exchange measurements. Tennis players' HRmax (192.96+/-7.75 bpm) shows values that are most different to 400-meters sprinters (200.13+/-6.95 bpm). Maximum running speed of tennis players on the treadmill (vmax) is no different with the speed achieved by sprinters, while there are significant differences among other athletes. Values in running speed at anaerobic threshold (vAnT) show no statistically significant difference with the values for athlete sprinters and 400-m sprinters. Values of RvO2max for tennis players indicate significant similarities with athlete sprinters and 400-m sprinters while the values of RvO2AnT are nearly identical with the values for sprinters and show no statistically significant differences (p<0.05). The results indicate that values achieved by tennis players approximate most different those of the middle and long distance runners. This singles out the possible importance of the anaerobic capacity and the high level of sprint endurance in tennis players. Knowing these characteristics is the basis for planning and implementing training systems that will enable the increase and optimal usage of energy capacities of tennis players in possibly improving sports results.

  12. Distributional implications of reducing interstate energy price differences

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.H.; Gunther, J.W.

    1986-11-01

    A model of state residential energy consumption for electricity, natural gas, and petroleum examines scenarios which reflect the response to a reduction in regional price differences attributable to deregulation. The results indicate that natural gas deregulation will benefit eastern and northwestern consumers at the expense of middle and western consumers. The deregulation of bulk electric power also benefits the east coast, but rising electricity prices would outweigh any benefits for the northwest. In contrast, electricity producers in the west have the most to gain from deregulation of bulk power transmissions because of the opportunities of a national market. A deregulated environment will likely have less dramatic distributional consequences from future energy price shocks, while increased fuel competition will probably limit price movements in any one fuel. 3 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion at energies above the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Mohd; Sharma, Vijay R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, Devendra P.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, excitation functions of several reaction residues in the system 19F+169Tm, populated via the complete and incomplete fusion processes, have been measured using off-line γ-ray spectroscopy. The analysis of excitation functions has been done within the framework of statistical model code pace4. The excitation functions of residues populated via xn and pxn channels are found to be in good agreement with those estimated by the theoretical model code, which confirms the production of these residues solely via complete fusion process. However, a significant enhancement has been observed in the cross-sections of residues involving α-emitting channels as compared to the theoretical predictions. The observed enhancement in the cross-sections has been attributed to the incomplete fusion processes. In order to have a better insight into the onset and strength of incomplete fusion, the incomplete fusion strength function has been deduced. At present, there is no theoretical model available which can satisfactorily explain the incomplete fusion reaction data at energies ≈4–6 MeV/nucleon. In the present work, the influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion in the 19F+169Tm system has also been studied. The measured cross-section data may be important for the development of reactor technology as well. It has been found that the incomplete fusion strength function strongly depends on the α-Q value of the projectile, which is found to be in good agreement with the existing literature data. The analysis strongly supports the projectile-dependent mass-asymmetry systematics. In order to study the influence of Coulomb effect ({Z}{{P}}{Z}{{T}}) on incomplete fusion, the deduced strength function for the present work is compared with the nearby projectile–target combinations. The incomplete fusion strength function is found to increase linearly with {Z}{{P}}{Z}{{T}}, indicating a strong influence of Coulomb effect in the incomplete fusion reactions.

  14. Nonstochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig skin.

    PubMed

    Peel, D M; Hopewell, J W; Wells, J; Charles, M W

    1984-08-01

    Circular areas of pig skin from 1- to 40-mm diameter were irradiated with beta emitters of high, medium, and low energies, 90Sr, 170Tm, and 147Pm, respectively. The study provides information for radiological protection problems of localized skin exposures. During the first 16 weeks after irradiation 90Sr produced a first reaction due to epithelial cell death followed by a second reaction attributable to damage to the dermal blood vessels. 170Tm and 147Pm produced the epithelial reaction only. The epithelial dose response varied as a function of beta energy. The doses required to produce moist desquamation in 50% of 15- to 22.5-mm fields (ED50) were 30-45 Gy from 90Sr, approximately 80 Gy from 170Tm, and approximately 500 Gy from 147Pm. A model involving different methods of epithelial repopulation is proposed to explain this finding. An area effect was observed in the epithelial response to 90Sr irradiation. The ED50 for moist desquamation ranged from approximately 25 Gy for a 40-mm source to approximately 450 Gy for a 1-mm source. The 5-, 9-, and 19-mm 170Tm sources all produced an ED50 of approximately 80 Gy, while the value for the 2-mm source was approximately 250 Gy. It is also suggested that the area effects could be explained by different modes of epithelial repopulation after irradiation. After high energy beta irradiation repopulation would be mainly from the field periphery, while after lower energy irradiation repopulation from hair follicle epithelium would predominate.

  15. Differences in the consumption rates and regulatory barriers to the accessibility of strong opioid analgesics in Israel and St. Petersburg.

    PubMed

    Ponizovsky, Alexander M; Pchelintsev, Michael V; Marom, Eli; Zvartau, Edwin E

    2012-01-01

    To compare trends in opioid consumption in Israel and St. Petersburg/Russia (morphine, oxycodone, pethidine, fentanyl, methadone, buprenorphine, trimeperidine, and papaveretum) over the period 2000-2008, and to describe the regulatory barriers to their accessibility as an exploratory variable for between-country differences. Data were drawn from the databases maintained by the Israel Ministry of Health's Pharmaceutical Administration and the St. Petersburg Central Pharmaceutical Reserve. The data were converted into a defined daily dose (DDD)/1,000 inhabitants/day. Regulation was evaluated according to the WHO guidelines for the assessment of national opioid regulation. The opioid consumption rates in Israel were substantially higher than those in St. Petersburg. The excess in DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day was for fentanyl +0.287 in 2000 and +1.206 in 2008, for morphine +0.245 in 2000 and +0.122 in 2008, and for pethidine/trimeperidine +0.035 in 2000 and +0.007 in 2008. Oxycodone consumption increased in Israel from 0.31 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day in 2000 to 0.46 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day in 2008, whereas this analgesic is not available in St. Petersburg. Methadone and buprenorphine consumption rose in Israel, whereas these drugs are not available in Russia. Conversely, omnopon consumption decreased in St. Petersburg from 0.0206 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day in 2000 to 0.00304 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day in 2008, whereas the compound is not available in Israel. St. Petersburg differs from Israel with less opioid formulary availability and greater regulatory restrictions. The results suggest that strong opioid analgesics consumption rates in St. Petersburg yield those in Israel, and that the between-countries differences in opioid formularies availability and legal and regulatory barriers to opioids accessibility are responsible for the consumption discrepancies.

  16. Testing and evaluation of different energy storage devices for piezoelectric energy harvesting under road conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Pratheek

    The increasing needs in green technology have propelled the rapid development in energy conversion and the advancement of electric energy storage systems. A viable storage technology is needed to store intermittent electrical energy in different electronic applications. In this thesis, recent progress on the chemistry and design of batteries is summarized with their challenges and improvements. Along with that, electrolytic capacitors are also reviewed with their types, advantages and disadvantages of each in short. Super capacitors having higher surface area and thinner dielectrics than conventional capacitors along with hybrid capacitors, are discussed in detail. The potential of a hybrid capacitor, Ni(OH)2/ Active Carbon, compared with Ni-Cd batteries and electrolytic capacitors in the application of energy storage for high way energy harvesting has been explored in this work. Both the battery and the hybrid capacitor has been tested under various experimental conditions and their properties in relation to their chemical compositions are compared. The results obtained from the experiments have been analyzed and the most suitable energy storage devices have been selected with their application potential evaluated before drawing conclusion reported in this thesis.

  17. How well do we understand quasi-elastic reactions at energies close to the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    In collisions between too heavy nuclei a wide spectrum of different reaction modes is observed covering the range from simple processes like elastic scattering to complicated multistep transfers and fusion. On the theoretical side heavy ion reactions are usually analyzed using models that were developed first for light ion induced reactions: the optical model for elastic scattering and the DWBA for more inelastic processes like transfer and inelastic scattering. Some of the assumptions going into these approximations, however, are not valid for heavy ion induced reactions. The region between fusion and quasi-elastic reactions is not well understood theoretically. This region is associated with deep inelastic collisions, which are complex multiparticle reactions involving transfer of several protons and neutrons. In this paper, the author discusses to what extent experiments in the field of quasi-elastic scattering are understood within the framework of various theoretical models and in what areas more work is needed.

  18. Analysis of Elastic Scattering of 8He+208Pb System at around the Coulomb Barrier Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Direkci, M.; Kucuk, Y.; Boztosun, I.

    2015-04-01

    The elastic scattering angular distribution of 8He+208Pb system is investigated at Elab = 22.0 MeV within the framework of Optical Model by using phenomenological and microscopic potentials. For the phenomenological Optical Model calculations, both real and imaginary parts of the complex nuclear potential have been chosen to have the Wood-Saxon shape. In the microscopic Optical Model calculations, we have used double folding procedure to calculate the real part of optical potential for different kinds of density distributions of 8He. A comparative study of this system has been conducted for the fist time by using phenomenological and microscopic potentials. It is observed that large imaginary radius value due to the existence of long-range absorption mechanism acting at large distances provides a very good agreement between theoretical results and experimental data with small χ2/N values.

  19. Scattering of the Halo Nucleus Be 11 on Au 197 at Energies around the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesudo, V.; Borge, M. J. G.; Moro, A. M.; Lay, J. A.; Nácher, E.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Tengblad, O.; Acosta, L.; Alcorta, M.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Andreoiu, C.; Bender, P. C.; Braid, R.; Cubero, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Fulton, B. R.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Hager, U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Kuhn, K.; Lattuada, M.; Marquínez-Durán, G.; Martel, I.; Miller, D.; Moukaddam, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Perea, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sarazin, F.; Scuderi, V.; Svensson, C. E.; Unsworth, C.; Wang, Z. M.

    2017-04-01

    Angular distributions of the elastic, inelastic, and breakup cross sections of the halo nucleus Be 11 on Au 197 were measured at energies below (Elab=31.9 MeV ) and around (39.6 MeV) the Coulomb barrier. These three channels were unambiguously separated for the first time for reactions of Be 11 on a high-Z target at low energies. The experiment was performed at TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada). The differential cross sections were compared with three different calculations: semiclassical, inert-core continuum-coupled-channels and continuum-coupled-channels ones with including core deformation. These results show conclusively that the elastic and inelastic differential cross sections can only be accounted for if core-excited admixtures are taken into account. The cross sections for these channels strongly depend on the B (E 1 ) distribution in Be 11 , and the reaction mechanism is sensitive to the entanglement of core and halo degrees of freedom in Be 11 .

  20. Experimental Study on Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator with Different Encapsulated Electrode Widths for Airflow Control at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaohua; Yang, Liang; Yan, Huijie; Jin, Ying; Hua, Yue; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator has shown great promise as an aerodynamic flow control device. In this paper, the encapsulated electrode width of a SDBD actuator is changed to study the airflow acceleration behavior. The effects of encapsulated electrode width on the actuator performance are experimentally investigated by measuring the dielectric layer surface potential, time-averaged ionic wind velocity and thrust force. Experimental results show that the airflow velocity and thrust force increase with the encapsulated electrode width. The results can be attributed to the distinct plasma distribution at different encapsulated electrode widths. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175037), National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists of China (No. 11305017) and Special Fund for Theoretical Physics (No. 11247239)

  1. Acetylated rice starches films with different levels of amylose: Mechanical, water vapor barrier, thermal, and biodegradability properties.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Rosana; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Biduski, Bárbara; Prietto, Luciana; Castilhos, Danilo Dufech; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2017-04-15

    Biodegradable films from native or acetylated starches with different amylose levels were prepared. The films were characterized according to the mechanical, water vapor barrier, thermal, and biodegradability properties. The films from acetylated high amylose starches had higher moisture content and water solubility than the native high amylose starch film. However, the acetylation did not affect acid solubility of the films, regardless of the amylose content. Films made from high and medium amylose rice starches were obtained; however low amylose rice starches, whether native or acetylated, did not form films with desirable characteristics. The acetylation decreased the tensile strength and increased the elongation of the films. The acetylated starch-based films had a lower decomposition temperature and higher thermal stability than native starch films. Acetylated starches films exhibited more rapid degradation as compared with the native starches films.

  2. Effects of surface barrier layer in AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Hiroyuki; Kuramoto, Makoto; Nakano, Tomohiro; Kawaharazuka, Atsushi; Makimoto, Toshiki; Horikoshi, Yoshiji

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report the effects of surface barrier layers on the characteristics of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) spectra for AlGaAs barrier samples with different barrier layer AlAs fractions and thickness of the surface barrier layer were measured to increase the solar cell efficiency. The results show that the surface barrier layer is effective to block diffusing photoexcited electrons to the surface while the thicker barrier layer absorbs higher energy photons to generate carriers which recombine at the surface. The optimal surface barrier structure is a 50 nm thick Al0.7Ga0.3As.

  3. Coastal Ohio Wind Project for Reduced Barriers to Deployment of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Carroll, Michael

    2014-04-09

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project was created to establish the viability of wind turbines on the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project’s main goal was to improve operational unit strategies used for environmental impact assessment of offshore turbines on lake wildlife by optimizing and fusing data from the multi-instrument surveillance system and providing an engineering analysis of potential design/operational alternatives for offshore wind turbines. The project also developed a general economic model for offshore WTG deployment to quantify potential revenue losses due to wind turbine shutdown related to ice and avian issues. In a previous phase of this project (Award Number: DE-FG36-06GO86096), we developed a surveillance system that was used to collect different parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directions, and flight altitudes of nocturnal migrating species, movements of birds and bats, and bird calls for assessing patterns and peak passage rates during migration. To derive such parameters we used thermal IR imaging cameras, acoustic recorders, and marine radar Furuno (XANK250), which was coupled with a XIR3000B digitizing card from Russell Technologies and open source radR processing software. The integration yielded a development of different computational techniques and methods, which we further developed and optimized as a combined surveillance system. To accomplish this task we implemented marine radar calibration, optimization of processing parameters, and fusion of the multi-sensor data in order to make inferences about the potential avian targets. The main goal of the data fusion from the multi-sensor environment was aimed at reduction of uncertainties while providing acceptable confidence levels with detailed information about the migration patterns. Another component comprised of an assessment of wind resources in a near lake environment and an investigation of the effectiveness of ice coating materials to

  4. Comprehensive study of reaction mechanisms for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm system at near- and sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.; Anjos, R.M.; Veiga, R.; Crema, E.; Chamon, L.C.; Capurro, O.A.; Niello, J.O. Fernandez; Arazi, A.; Marti, G.V.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Rodriguez, M.D.; Ortega, M.E.; Trotta, M.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Hagino, K.

    2006-06-15

    The delayed x-ray detection technique was used to measure complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm reaction at sub- and near-barrier energies. Elastic and inelastic scattering for this system were also measured. Reaction cross sections were derived and the transfer cross sections of one neutron were calculated. The suppression of complete fusion above the barrier, of the order of 10%, is attributed to {sup 9}Be breakup and is considerably smaller than the value of 30% found for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 208}Pb system.

  5. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  6. Fast and Highly Chemoselective Alkynylation of Thiols with Hypervalent Iodine Reagents Enabled through a Low Energy Barrier Concerted Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among all functional groups, alkynes occupy a privileged position in synthetic and medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, and materials science. Thioalkynes, in particular, are highly useful, as they combine the enhanced reactivity of the triple bond with a sulfur atom frequently encountered in bioactive compounds and materials. Nevertheless, general methods to access these compounds are lacking. In this article, we describe the mechanism and full scope of the alkynylation of thiols using ethynyl benziodoxolone (EBX) hypervalent iodine reagents. Computations led to the discovery of a new, three-atom concerted transition state with a very low energy barrier, which rationalizes the high reaction rate. On the basis of this result, the scope of the reaction was extended to the synthesis of aryl- and alkyl-substituted alkynes containing a broad range of functional groups. New sulfur nucleophiles such as thioglycosides, thioacids, and sodium hydrogen sulfide were also alkynylated successfully to lead to the most general and practical method yet reported for the synthesis of thioalkynes. PMID:25365776

  7. Applicability of colloid filtration theory in size-distributed, reduced porosity, granular media in the absence of energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Eddy F; Ma, Huilian; Johnson, William P

    2011-12-15

    The vast majority of colloid transport experiments use granular porous media with narrow size distribution to facilitate comparison with colloid filtration theory, which represents porous media with a single collector size. In this work we examine retention of colloids ranging in size from 0.21 to 9.1 μm in diameter, in columns packed with uniform and size-distributed borosilicate glass bead porous media with porosity ranging from 0.38 to 0.28. Conditions were favorable to attachment (absent a significant energy barrier). The goal was to determine the applicability of colloid filtration theory to colloid retention in these media. We also directly observed deposition at the pore scale in packed flow cells. The pore domain was characterized via high resolution computerized X-ray micro tomography (HRXMT). The flow field was examined using Lattice-Boltzmann flow simulation methods (LBM). The influence of preferential flow paths on colloid retention in the lowest porosity media was accounted for by correcting the fluid velocity. Straining in pore throats too small to pass was not a significant contributor to colloid retention despite colloid-to-collector size ratios up to 0.05. Mechanistic simulations via the Ma-Pedel-Fife-Johnson correlation equation (MPFJ) for colloid filtration predicted the experimentally observed trends in deposition with porosity when a number-based mean grain size was used.

  8. Measuring the fusion cross-section of 39,47K + 28Si at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Wiggins, Blake; Huston, Jacob; Hudan, Sylvie; Desouza, Romualdo; Chbihi, Abdou; Ackermann, Dieter; Brown, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The outer crust of an accreting neutron star provides an interesting environment for nuclear reactions to occur. In particular, the enhancement of fusion between neutron-rich nuclei relative to their β-stable counterparts has been suggested as a trigger for an X-ray superburst. Recently, nuclei in the mass range of A=20-40 have been proposed as the most likely candidates for this process. To investigate this question, comparing the fusion excitation functions for both neutron-rich and β-stable nuclei at energies near the fusion barrier is necessary. The development of a 47K radioactive beam at NSCL's ReA3 facility makes such a comparison possible for the first time. An approved experiment to measure the fusion excitation functions for 39,47K + 28Si will be described. This experiment utilizes a technique optimized for measuring the total fusion cross-section of reactions involving low-intensity (103 - 106 ions/s) radioactive beams. In addition, protons and α particles emitted by the compound nucleus as it de-excites are measured. Preliminary results will be presented. Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and NSF Grant No. 1342962.

  9. Data-based modeling of drug penetration relates human skin barrier function to the interplay of diffusivity and free-energy profiles

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Robert; Yamamoto, Kenji; Klossek, André; Flesch, Roman; Hönzke, Stefan; Rancan, Fiorenza; Vogt, Annika; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Hedtrich, Sarah; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Rühl, Eckart; Netz, Roland R.

    2017-01-01

    Based on experimental concentration depth profiles of the antiinflammatory drug dexamethasone in human skin, we model the time-dependent drug penetration by the 1D general diffusion equation that accounts for spatial variations in the diffusivity and free energy. For this, we numerically invert the diffusion equation and thereby obtain the diffusivity and the free-energy profiles of the drug as a function of skin depth without further model assumptions. As the only input, drug concentration profiles derived from X-ray microscopy at three consecutive times are used. For dexamethasone, skin barrier function is shown to rely on the combination of a substantially reduced drug diffusivity in the stratum corneum (the outermost epidermal layer), dominant at short times, and a pronounced free-energy barrier at the transition from the epidermis to the dermis underneath, which determines the drug distribution in the long-time limit. Our modeling approach, which is generally applicable to all kinds of barriers and diffusors, allows us to disentangle diffusivity from free-energetic effects. Thereby we can predict short-time drug penetration, where experimental measurements are not feasible, as well as long-time permeation, where ex vivo samples deteriorate, and thus span the entire timescales of biological barrier functioning. PMID:28320932

  10. Interaction energy evaluation of soluble microbial products (SMP) on different membrane surfaces: role of the reconstructed membrane topology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Tian, Yu; Cao, Chu-qing; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhi-neng

    2012-05-15

    Soluble microbial products (SMP), a majority of organic matter in effluents, play a key role in membrane fouling. A series of filtration experiments were conducted, and demonstrated that the flux decrement rate was in order of cellulose acetate membrane (CA, 65.4%), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF, 47.9%) and polyether sulfones (PES, 29.2%). Results showed that the fouling behavior of membrane should be predicted from the combined knowledge of solution chemistry, surface chemical properties and surface morphology. To better understand the interactions between the SMP and different membranes, a technique for reconstructing the membrane surface topology was developed on the basis of statistical parameters obtained from atomic force microscopy. The interaction energy, represented by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) potential, was calculated by surface element integration, allowing exploring the interaction energy profiles for different surfaces and providing considerable insights into the role of such interactions on the macroscopic fouling behavior. The resulting interaction energy differed considerably from the corresponding interaction between perfectly smooth surfaces. The great influence of protrusion on the membrane surface was to reduce the primary energy barrier height, thus rendering rough surface more favorable for deposition. An attractive energy region was immediately surrounded by each positive asperity as demonstrated in the roughness-engendered interaction energy maps. As the SMP approached closer to the membrane, they had a high probability of getting trapped in the attractive energy region, leading to a more rapid loss of flux than smooth membrane.

  11. Comparative studies of Coulomb barrier heights for nuclear models applied to sub-barrier fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Zhang, H. Q.; Wolski, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coulomb barrier heights provided by different nuclear interaction models including the Bass model, the proximity potential model, and the double folding model have been applied for experimental data of fusion in terms of a recently proposed energy scaling approach. The results show that the proximity potential description of the barrier heights seems to be closest to the values required by the systematics. It is suggested that the proximity potential model is the most suitable model to calculate the barrier height. However, the double folding model gives the lowest barrier heights.

  12. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments.

  13. Limitations and barriers for adopting sustainable management practices in different farm types across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Portero, Ángela; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Pedrera, Ana; Jesús Gaitán, Antonio; Ten Berge, Hein

    2014-05-01

    Although apparently the conservation of natural resources such as water and soil does not represent important concerns for our society, the evolution of the world population and the degradation of these resources pose a challenge to improving agricultural food production capacity and conserving, and in some cases restoring, the environmental quality. Unfortunately, the history contains numerous examples of abandonment of these resources (McNeill 1992, Montgomery 2007). Although most of the agronomic conservation practices have been known for millennia, their implementation has often been hindered by non-agricultural motives (Davis et al. 2012). The European project CATCH-C (ten Berge 2011) started last year with the aim of evaluating sustainable soil management practices and exploring the difficulties for their adoption, both at farm and institutional level, to overcome them in the near future. As a first step with that purpose, a selection of best management practices (BMPs) based on interviews with advisors and scientific knowledge were proposed for each of the considered farm typologies: arable crops, permanent crops and pasture. These farm types are representative of the Mediterranean area in terms of agroecological properties, extension, economical importance and soil degradation problems. Semi-structured interviews were carried out by addressing different profiles of farmers to identify in a qualitative way the main limitations for adopting these BMPs on their farms. Different questionnaires were prepared based on the farmers' responses and launched at a larger scale, with the aim of achieving approximately 100 responses per each farm typology. Finally, responses from the questionnaires will be analyzed to explore the causes that hinder or impede the adoption of BMPs in different farm typologies. References: Davis A.S. et al. 2012. Plos ONE 7(10): e4719. doi:10.1371/journalpone.0047149. McNeill, J.R. 1992. The mountains of the Mediterranean world. Cambridge

  14. Safe sex? Misconceptions, gender differences and barriers among injection drug users: a focus group approach.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S H; Weston, C B; Quirinale, J

    1993-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission is one factor involved in the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) within the injection drug use (IDU) population and between IDU and non-IDU individuals. Insufficient information is currently available to reduce this heterosexual transmission. As a basis for designing a questionnaire aimed at the IDU population, we conducted 5 focus groups to collect information on knowledge of and attitudes toward safe sex as held by male and female IDUs in methadone treatment. We identified misconceptions related to HIV infection, condoms, and sexual behavior. We also found gender-based differences in knowledge and learning style. Also, while individuals felt a responsibility to prevent HIV transmission, they lacked sufficient control to do so. The wide range of responses on questions concerning sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), condoms, reproductive decisions, and methods of promoting safe sex provides a basis for developing a questionnaire designed to identify and target specific subgroups for educational intervention.

  15. Stereotyping as a barrier to collaboration: Does interprofessional education make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ateah, Christine A; Snow, Wanda; Wener, Pamela; MacDonald, Laura; Metge, Colleen; Davis, Penny; Fricke, Moni; Ludwig, Sora; Anderson, Judy

    2011-02-01

    This research was part of a Health Canada funded initiative developed to provide evidence about the effectiveness of interprofessional education (IPE) interventions to promote collaborative patient-centred care. Health professional students' ratings of health professions and the effect of IPE on those ratings were examined. Participants were divided into three groups (N=51); control, education, and practice site immersion. Utilizing the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire (SSRQ) which consists of a five point Likert-type scale each group rated health professionals on nine characteristics: academic ability, interpersonal skills, professional competence, leadership, practical skills, independence, confidence, decision-making, and being a team player (Hean, Macleod-Clark, Adams, and Humphris, 2006). Data were collected at four time points; prior to an IPE classroom intervention, following an IPE classroom intervention, following the IPE immersion experience, and four months post IPE immersion experience. Overall, perceptions of other health professions were more positive following the 2.5day interprofessional education session and immersion experience. Student ratings of the seven professions among the nine characteristics will be presented, highlighting similarities and differences across professional groups. Findings support the incorporation of IPE curricula that address the role and functions of other health care professions to facilitate the development collaborative patient-centred care health care teams.

  16. Gender-Based Differences and Barriers in Skin Protection Behaviors in Melanoma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeffrey; Shih, Johnny; Tran, Andrew; Mullane, Aaron; Thomas, Christina; Aydin, Nail; Misra, Subhasis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Skin protection behaviors and environmental exposure play a crucial role in the development and subsequent management of melanoma. This study investigates gender-based differences in skin protection behaviors after melanoma treatment. Methods. Patients diagnosed and surgically treated for cutaneous melanomas over the last six years in a geographically high risk area were surveyed over telephone using a standardized script. Results. Of 150 survey results obtained, there were 82 males and 68 females. Overall, 87% of participants reported skin self-examination for abnormal markings more often and 94% reported wearing skin protective clothing more often, with females being more than males. Females limited outdoor activity more often than males, 79% to 54%, p < 0.05. When outside, females sought shade more often than males, 75% to 56%, p < 0.05. However, males wore a wide brim hat more often than females, 52% to 28%, p < 0.05. Interestingly, 60% of participants reported wearing SPF 30 sunscreen less often, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Larger percentage of females adopted behavioral changes to prevent future melanoma. Those living in high risk areas and with outdoor occupations need particular attention to skin care. Population based screening should be adopted to deal with this rising public health crisis.

  17. Gender-Based Differences and Barriers in Skin Protection Behaviors in Melanoma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Skin protection behaviors and environmental exposure play a crucial role in the development and subsequent management of melanoma. This study investigates gender-based differences in skin protection behaviors after melanoma treatment. Methods. Patients diagnosed and surgically treated for cutaneous melanomas over the last six years in a geographically high risk area were surveyed over telephone using a standardized script. Results. Of 150 survey results obtained, there were 82 males and 68 females. Overall, 87% of participants reported skin self-examination for abnormal markings more often and 94% reported wearing skin protective clothing more often, with females being more than males. Females limited outdoor activity more often than males, 79% to 54%, p < 0.05. When outside, females sought shade more often than males, 75% to 56%, p < 0.05. However, males wore a wide brim hat more often than females, 52% to 28%, p < 0.05. Interestingly, 60% of participants reported wearing SPF 30 sunscreen less often, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Larger percentage of females adopted behavioral changes to prevent future melanoma. Those living in high risk areas and with outdoor occupations need particular attention to skin care. Population based screening should be adopted to deal with this rising public health crisis. PMID:27648306

  18. Potential-barrier model at metal surfaces: Application to analyses of low-energy electron-diffraction fine-structure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mola, E. E.; Paola, C. A.; Vicente, J. L.

    1991-12-01

    We propose a model for the potential barrier for electrons crossing a metal surface, in which (1) we reproduce the effective potential of Lang and Kohn, in fact, better than any approximation in the existing literature and (2) we approach the classical image potential for large separation from the surface. Our potential does not diverge as the electron approaches the surface and goes over smoothly to the electron-electron interaction potential in the bulk. It reproduces the first peak in the effective potential of Lang and Kohn, which is a Friedel oscillation. We achieve better agreement with the Lang-Kohn potential than Jennings, Jones, and Weinert in their barrier model. This makes our model useful in the analysis of low-energy electron-diffraction fine-structure experiments. Our simple barrier model allows analytical solutions of the Schrödinger equation in the density-functional formalism.

  19. The formation of correlated states and the increase in barrier transparency at a low particle energy in nonstationary systems with damping and fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Vysotskii, V. I.; Adamenko, S. V.; Vysotskyy, M. V.

    2012-10-15

    We consider peculiarities in the formation of a coherent correlated state (CCS) of a particle in a periodically modulated harmonic oscillator with damping for various types of stochastic perturbation. It is shown that in the absence of stochastic perturbation, an optimal relation exists between the damping parameter (damping coefficient) and the modulation depth, for which the 'extrinsic' characteristics of the oscillator (amplitudes of 'classical' oscillation and the momentum of a particle) remain unchanged, while the correlation coefficient rapidly increases from |r| = 0 to |r|{sub max} Almost-Equal-To 1; this corresponds to a completely correlated coherent state. Under nonoptimal conditions, the formation of the CCS with a simultaneous increase in is accompanied by damping or excitation of the oscillator. It is shown that for a certain relation between the damping coefficient and the modulation depth, the presence of a stochastic external force acting on the nonstationary oscillator does not prevent the formation of a CCS with |r|{sub max} {yields} 1. A fundamentally different effect is observed under a stochastic influence on the nonstationary frequency of the oscillator; this effect always limits the value of vertical bar r vertical bar at a level |r|{sub max} < 1; a CCR cannot be formed with an unlimited increase in its intensity, and |r|{sub max} {yields} 0. The influence of the CCS formation on the averaged probability Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket D Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket of the tunnel effect (transparency of the potential barrier) is considered for a particle in an oscillator with damping both in the absence and in the presence of a stochastic force. It is shown using a specific example that complete clearing of the potential barrier and the increase in the barrier transparency from the initial value Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket D{sub r=0} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 10{sup -80} to Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket D Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Almost

  20. Indomethacin co-crystals and their parent mixtures: does the intestinal barrier recognize them differently?

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Valeria; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Bertolasi, Valerio; Ferraro, Luca; Beggiato, Sarah; Spizzo, Federico; Spisni, Enzo; Pavan, Barbara

    2015-05-04

    Co-crystals are crystalline complexes of two or more molecules bound together in crystal lattices through noncovalent interactions. The solubility and dissolution properties of co-crystals can allow to increase the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). It is currently believed that the co-crystallization strategy should not induce changes on the pharmacological profile of the APIs, even if it is not yet clear whether a co-crystal would be defined as a physical mixture or as a new chemical entity. In order to clarify these aspects, we chose indomethacin as guest poorly aqueous soluble molecule and compared its properties with those of its co-crystals obtained with 2-hydroxy-4-methylpyridine (co-crystal 1), 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (co-crystal 2), and saccharine (co-crystal 3). In particular, we performed a systematic comparison among indomethacin, its co-crystals, and their parent physical mixtures by evaluating via HPLC analysis the API dissolution profile, its ability to permeate across intestinal cell monolayers (NCM460), and its oral bioavailability in rat. The indomethacin dissolution profile was not altered by the presence of co-crystallizing agents as physical mixtures, whereas significant changes were observed by the dissolution of the co-crystals. Furthermore, there was a qualitative concordance between the API dissolution patterns and the relative oral bioavailabilities in rats. Co-crystal 1 induced a drastic decrease of the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value of NCM460 cell monolayers, whereas its parent mixture did not evidence any effect. The saccharin-indomethacin mixture induced a drastic decrease of the TEER value of monolayers, whereas its parent co-crystal 3 did not induce any effects on their integrity, being anyway able to increase the permeation of indomethacin. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time different effects induced by co-crystals and their parent physical

  1. Culture and language differences as a barrier to provision of quality care by the health workforce in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Khalid M

    2015-04-01

    To identify, synthesize, and summarize issues and challenges related to the culture and language differences of the health workforce in Saudi Arabia. A comprehensive systematic review was conducted in May 2014 to locate published articles. Two independent researchers in consultation with several experts used 4 electronic databases (ISI Web of Knowledge, Science Direct, PubMed, and Cochrane) to scrutinize articles published from January 2000 - March 2014. Each of the studies was given a quality assessment rating of weak, moderate, or strong, and was evaluated for methodological soundness using Russell and Gregory's criteria. The online literature search identified 12 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Lack of knowledge of non-Muslim nurses or culture in Saudi Arabia, difficulties in achieving cultural competence, and culture shock were documented as cultural difference factors. Issues in language difference include the clarity of language use by health care providers in giving information and providing adequate explanation regarding their activities. The available information provided by this review study shows that there is a communication barrier between patients and health care workers such as healthcare workers demonstrate low cultural competency. Despite the fact that the government provides programs for expatriate healthcare workers, there is a need to further improve educational and orientation programs regarding the culture and language in Saudi Arabia.

  2. Culture and language differences as a barrier to provision of quality care by the health workforce in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Khalid M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify, synthesize, and summarize issues and challenges related to the culture and language differences of the health workforce in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A comprehensive systematic review was conducted in May 2014 to locate published articles. Two independent researchers in consultation with several experts used 4 electronic databases (ISI Web of Knowledge, Science Direct, PubMed, and Cochrane) to scrutinize articles published from January 2000 - March 2014. Each of the studies was given a quality assessment rating of weak, moderate, or strong, and was evaluated for methodological soundness using Russell and Gregory’s criteria. Results: The online literature search identified 12 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Lack of knowledge of non-Muslim nurses or culture in Saudi Arabia, difficulties in achieving cultural competence, and culture shock were documented as cultural difference factors. Issues in language difference include the clarity of language use by health care providers in giving information and providing adequate explanation regarding their activities. Conclusion: The available information provided by this review study shows that there is a communication barrier between patients and health care workers such as healthcare workers demonstrate low cultural competency. Despite the fact that the government provides programs for expatriate healthcare workers, there is a need to further improve educational and orientation programs regarding the culture and language in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25828278

  3. Utilisation of health services and geography: deconstructing regional differences in barriers to facility-based delivery in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Andrew; Byrne, Abbey; Morgan, Alison; Jimenez-Soto, Eliana

    2015-03-01

    While established that geographical inaccessibility is a key barrier to the utilisation of health services, it remains unknown whether disparities are driven only by limited access to these services, or are also attributable to health behaviour. Significant disparities exist in health outcomes and the coverage of many critical health services between the mountains region of Nepal and the rest of the country, yet the principal factors driving these regional disparities are not well understood. Using national representative data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey, we examine the extent to which observable factors explain the overall differences in the utilisation of maternal health services. We apply nonlinear Blinder-Oaxaca-type decomposition methods to quantify the effect that differences in measurable characteristics have on the regional coverage gap in facility-based delivery. The mean coverage of facility-based deliveries was 18.6 and 36.3 % in the mountains region and the rest of Nepal, respectively. Between 54.8 and 74.1 % of the regional coverage gap was explained by differences in observed characteristics. Factors influencing health behaviours (proxied by mothers' education, TV viewership and tobacco use, and household wealth) and subjective distance to the health facility were the major factors, contributing between 52.9 and 62.5 % of the disparity. Mothers' birth history was also noteworthy. Policies simultaneously addressing access and health behaviours appear necessary to achieve greater coverage and better health outcomes for women and children in isolated areas.

  4. Similar Students and Different Countries? An Analysis of the Barriers and Drivers for Erasmus Participation in Seven Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerkens, Maarja; Souto-Otero, Manuel; de Wit, Hans; Huisman, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Increasing participation in the Erasmus study abroad program in Europe is a clear policy goal, and student-reported barriers and drivers are regularly monitored. This article uses student survey data from seven countries to examine the extent to which student-level barriers can explain the considerable cross-country variation in Erasmus…

  5. Similar Students and Different Countries? An Analysis of the Barriers and Drivers for Erasmus Participation in Seven Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerkens, Maarja; Souto-Otero, Manuel; de Wit, Hans; Huisman, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Increasing participation in the Erasmus study abroad program in Europe is a clear policy goal, and student-reported barriers and drivers are regularly monitored. This article uses student survey data from seven countries to examine the extent to which student-level barriers can explain the considerable cross-country variation in Erasmus…

  6. Double binding energy differences: Mean-field or pairing effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chong

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter we present a systematic analysis on the average interaction between the last protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei, which can be extracted from the double differences of nuclear binding energies. The empirical average proton-neutron interaction Vpn thus derived from experimental data can be described in a very simple form as the interplay of the nuclear mean field and the pairing interaction. It is found that the smooth behavior as well as the local fluctuations of the Vpn in even-even nuclei with N ≠ Z are dominated by the contribution from the proton-neutron monopole interactions. A strong additional contribution from the isoscalar monopole interaction and isovector proton-neutron pairing interaction is seen in the Vpn for even-even N = Z nuclei and for the adjacent odd-A nuclei with one neutron or proton being subtracted.

  7. Large cross sections for transitions with a small energy difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. H.; Shakov, Kh. Kh.

    2009-05-01

    Cross sections for transitions between states with small differences in energy can be quite large. An example is the 1s-2p transition in atomic hydrogen caused by the impact of a fast charged particle [1] or a photon [3]. In such cases the actual cross section may become much larger than the simple geometric cross section. Such transitions are often difficult to observe in the laboratory. However, they can be evaluated numerically. This effect can be significant in analysis of astrophysical data, as pointed out by T. Nandi [2]. I discuss a few examples of calculations and give a physical explanation for this effect. [4pt] [1] J.H. McGuire, D. J. Land, J. G. Brennan and G. Basbas, Phys. Rev. A19, 2180 (1979).[0pt] [2] Kh.Kh. Shakov and J.H. McGuire, Phys. Rev. A67 033405 (2003). [0pt] [3] T. Nandi, private communication, 2008.

  8. Neutron transfer versus inelastic surface vibrations in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Gautam, Manjeet

    2015-02-01

    This work deeply analyzed the relative importance of the neutron transfer channels and inelastic surface vibrations of colliding nuclei in the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of various heavy ion systems using an energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential (EDWSP) model in conjunction with a one-dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel formulation using the code CCFULL. The multi-phonon vibrational states of colliding nuclei and the nucleon transfer channels are found to be dominant internal degrees of freedom. The coupling between the relative motion of reactants and these relevant channels produces anomalously large sub-barrier fusion enhancement over the expectations of the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. In some cases, the influence of neutron transfer dominates over the couplings to low lying surface vibrational states of collision partners. Furthermore, the effects of coupling to inelastic surface excitations and the impact of neutron transfer channels with positive ground state Q-values are imitated due to energy dependence in the Woods-Saxon potential. In the EDWSP model calculations, a wide range for the diffuseness parameter, which is much larger than the value extracted from the elastic scattering data, is needed to account for the observed fusion enhancement in the close vicinity of the Coulomb barrier.

  9. The influence of the design of two different bioresorbable barriers on the results of guided tissue regeneration therapy. An intra-individual comparative study in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, D; Laurell, L; Gottlow, J; Rylander, H; Mathisen, T; Nyman, S; Rask, M

    1995-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare two bioresorbable barriers to evaluate whether differences in design influence the result of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy. Twenty-four (24) plaque exposed, recession type defects in 4 monkeys were treated. Contralateral defects were randomized for test or control treatment. During a healing period of 6 weeks, gingival recession resulting in device exposure occurred at 3 test and 10 control sites. One control barrier was exfoliated. Histologically, 9 of the 12 test barriers were completely integrated with the surrounding tissues. At 3 test sites, epithelium had migrated apically outside the barrier to a level not exceeding one-third of the height of the device. Seven of the 11 control barriers were enclosed by dentogingival epithelium. The adjacent connective tissue exhibited local inflammatory cell infiltrates (ICT). At the remaining 4 control sites, the epithelial downgrowth as well as the adjacent ICT areas were limited to the coronal 1/3 of the device. New attachment; i.e., new cementum with inserting collagen fibers, averaged 2.2 mm and 0.8 mm at the test and control sites respectively (P < 0.01). Based on the results of the present study, it was concluded that a bioresorbable GTR device, designed to prevent epithelial downgrowth along the barrier surface, has a higher potential to promote new attachment formation than a device which does not have this property.

  10. Ubiquitous human 'master' origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-18

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The 'master' origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs encoded in

  11. Ubiquitous human ‘master’ origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-01

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The ‘master’ origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs

  12. Interstellar Isomers: The Importance of Bonding Energy Differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remijan, Anthony J.; Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Jewell, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    We present strong detections of methyl cyanide (CH3CN), vinyl cyanide (CH2CHCN), ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) and cyanodiacetylene (HC4CN) molecules with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) toward the Sgr B2(N) molecular cloud. Attempts to detect the corresponding isocyanide isomers were only successful in the case of methyl isocyanide (CH3NC) for its J(sub K) = 1(sub 0) - 0(sub 0) transition, which is the first interstellar report of this line. To determine the spatial distribution of CH3NC, we used archival Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array data for the J(sub K) = 1(sub 0) - 0(sub 0) transitions but no emission was detected. From ab initio calculations, the bonding energy difference between the cyanide and isocyanide molecules is greater than 8500 per centimeter (greater than 12,000 K). Thus, cyanides are the more stable isomers and would likely be formed more preferentially over their isocyanide counterparts. That we detect CH3NC emission with a single antenna (Gaussian beamsize(omega(sub B))=1723 arcsec(sup 2)) but not with an interferometer (omega(sub b)=192 arcsec(sup 2)), strongly suggests that CH3NC has a widespread spatial distribution toward the Sgr B2(N) region. Other investigators have shown that CH3CN is present both in the LMH hot core of Sgr B2(N) and in the surrounding medium, while we have shown that CH3NC appears to be deficient in the LMH hot core. Thus, largescale, non-thermal processes in the surrounding medium may account for the conversion of CH3CN to CH3NC while the LMH hot core, which is dominated by thermal processes, does not produce a significant amount of CH3NC. Ice analog experiments by other investigators have shown that radiation bombardment of CH3CN can produce CH3NC, thus supporting our observations. We conclude that isomers separated by such large bonding energy differences are distributed in different interstellar environments, making the evaluation of column density ratios between such isomers irrelevant unless it can

  13. Computing the Free Energy Barriers for Less by Sampling with a Coarse Reference Potential while Retaining Accuracy of the Target Fine Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proposed in this contribution is a protocol for calculating fine-physics (e.g., ab initio QM/MM) free-energy surfaces at a high level of accuracy locally (e.g., only at reactants and at the transition state for computing the activation barrier) from targeted fine-physics sampling and extensive exploratory coarse-physics sampling. The full free-energy surface is still computed but at a lower level of accuracy from coarse-physics sampling. The method is analytically derived in terms of the umbrella sampling and the free-energy perturbation methods which are combined with the thermodynamic cycle and the targeted sampling strategy of the paradynamics approach. The algorithm starts by computing low-accuracy fine-physics free-energy surfaces from the coarse-physics sampling in order to identify the reaction path and to select regions for targeted sampling. Thus, the algorithm does not rely on the coarse-physics minimum free-energy reaction path. Next, segments of high-accuracy free-energy surface are computed locally at selected regions from the targeted fine-physics sampling and are positioned relative to the coarse-physics free-energy shifts. The positioning is done by averaging the free-energy perturbations computed with multistep linear response approximation method. This method is analytically shown to provide results of the thermodynamic integration and the free-energy interpolation methods, while being extremely simple in implementation. Incorporating the metadynamics sampling to the algorithm is also briefly outlined. The application is demonstrated by calculating the B3LYP//6-31G*/MM free-energy barrier for an enzymatic reaction using a semiempirical PM6/MM reference potential. These modifications allow computing the activation free energies at a significantly reduced computational cost but at the same level of accuracy compared to computing full potential of mean force. PMID:25136268

  14. Computing the Free Energy Barriers for Less by Sampling with a Coarse Reference Potential while Retaining Accuracy of the Target Fine Model.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, Nikolay V

    2014-08-12

    Proposed in this contribution is a protocol for calculating fine-physics (e.g., ab initio QM/MM) free-energy surfaces at a high level of accuracy locally (e.g., only at reactants and at the transition state for computing the activation barrier) from targeted fine-physics sampling and extensive exploratory coarse-physics sampling. The full free-energy surface is still computed but at a lower level of accuracy from coarse-physics sampling. The method is analytically derived in terms of the umbrella sampling and the free-energy perturbation methods which are combined with the thermodynamic cycle and the targeted sampling strategy of the paradynamics approach. The algorithm starts by computing low-accuracy fine-physics free-energy surfaces from the coarse-physics sampling in order to identify the reaction path and to select regions for targeted sampling. Thus, the algorithm does not rely on the coarse-physics minimum free-energy reaction path. Next, segments of high-accuracy free-energy surface are computed locally at selected regions from the targeted fine-physics sampling and are positioned relative to the coarse-physics free-energy shifts. The positioning is done by averaging the free-energy perturbations computed with multistep linear response approximation method. This method is analytically shown to provide results of the thermodynamic integration and the free-energy interpolation methods, while being extremely simple in implementation. Incorporating the metadynamics sampling to the algorithm is also briefly outlined. The application is demonstrated by calculating the B3LYP//6-31G*/MM free-energy barrier for an enzymatic reaction using a semiempirical PM6/MM reference potential. These modifications allow computing the activation free energies at a significantly reduced computational cost but at the same level of accuracy compared to computing full potential of mean force.

  15. Blood–brain barrier changes and cell invasion differ between therapeutic immune clearance of neurotrophic virus and CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fabis, Marzena J.; Phares, Timothy W.; Kean, Rhonda B.; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D. Craig

    2008-01-01

    CNS tissues are protected from circulating cells and factors by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), a specialization of the neurovasculature. Outcomes of the loss of BBB integrity and cell infiltration into CNS tissues can differ vastly. For example, elevated BBB permeability is closely associated with the development of neurological disease in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) but not during clearance of the attenuated rabies virus CVS-F3 from the CNS tissues. To probe whether differences in the nature of BBB permeability changes may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute neuroinflammatory disease, we compared the characteristics of BBB permeability changes in mice with EAE and in mice clearing CVS-F3. BBB permeability changes are largely restricted to the cerebellum and spinal cord in both models but differ in the extent of leakage of markers of different size and in the nature of cell accumulation in the CNS tissues. The accumulation in the CNS tissues of CD4 T cells expressing mRNAs specific for IFN-γ and IL-17 is common to both, but iNOS-positive cells invade into the CNS parenchyma only in EAE. Mice that have been immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) and infected exhibit the features of EAE. Treatment with the peroxynitrite-dependent radical scavenger urate inhibits the invasion of iNOS-positive cells into the CNS tissues and the development of clinical signs of EAE without preventing the loss of BBB integrity in immunized/infected animals. These findings indicate that BBB permeability changes can occur in the absence of neuropathology provided that cell invasion is restricted. PMID:18829442

  16. Blood-brain barrier changes and cell invasion differ between therapeutic immune clearance of neurotrophic virus and CNS autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Fabis, Marzena J; Phares, Timothy W; Kean, Rhonda B; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D Craig

    2008-10-07

    CNS tissues are protected from circulating cells and factors by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a specialization of the neurovasculature. Outcomes of the loss of BBB integrity and cell infiltration into CNS tissues can differ vastly. For example, elevated BBB permeability is closely associated with the development of neurological disease in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) but not during clearance of the attenuated rabies virus CVS-F3 from the CNS tissues. To probe whether differences in the nature of BBB permeability changes may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute neuroinflammatory disease, we compared the characteristics of BBB permeability changes in mice with EAE and in mice clearing CVS-F3. BBB permeability changes are largely restricted to the cerebellum and spinal cord in both models but differ in the extent of leakage of markers of different size and in the nature of cell accumulation in the CNS tissues. The accumulation in the CNS tissues of CD4 T cells expressing mRNAs specific for IFN-gamma and IL-17 is common to both, but iNOS-positive cells invade into the CNS parenchyma only in EAE. Mice that have been immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) and infected exhibit the features of EAE. Treatment with the peroxynitrite-dependent radical scavenger urate inhibits the invasion of iNOS-positive cells into the CNS tissues and the development of clinical signs of EAE without preventing the loss of BBB integrity in immunized/infected animals. These findings indicate that BBB permeability changes can occur in the absence of neuropathology provided that cell invasion is restricted.

  17. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  18. Increasing the effective energy barrier promoted by the change of a counteranion in a Zn-Dy-Zn SMM: slow relaxation via the second excited state.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, I; Ruiz, J; Ruiz, E; Aravena, D; Seco, J M; Colacio, E

    2015-08-11

    The trinuclear complex [ZnCl(μ-L)Dy(μ-L)ClZn]PF6 exhibits a single-molecule magnetic behaviour under zero field with a relatively large effective energy barrier of 186 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations reveal that the relaxation of the magnetization is symmetry-driven (the Dy(III) ion possesses a C2 symmetry) and occurs via the second excited state.

  19. The spontaneous fission of 8Be and the fusion at sub-coloumb barrier energies in the time-dependent cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdż, S.; Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1983-08-01

    The time-dependent cluster theory is applied for a description of the spontaneous fission of 8Be and for a calculation of the α-α fusion cross section at sub-Coulomb barrier energies. The calculated spontaneous fission decay width Γ(cal) ≅ 7.5 eV reproduces the experimental value Γ(ex) = 6.8 +/- 1.7 eV.

  20. Activation energy of extracellular enzymes in soils from different biomes.

    PubMed

    Steinweg, J Megan; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Frerichs, Joshua; Mayes, Melanie A

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme dynamics are being incorporated into soil carbon cycling models and accurate representation of enzyme kinetics is an important step in predicting belowground nutrient dynamics. A scarce number of studies have measured activation energy (Ea) in soils and fewer studies have measured Ea in arctic and tropical soils, or in subsurface soils. We determined the Ea for four typical lignocellulose degrading enzymes in the A and B horizons of seven soils covering six different soil orders. We also elucidated which soil properties predicted any measurable differences in Ea. β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase activities were measured at five temperatures, 4, 21, 30, 40, and 60°C. Ea was calculated using the Arrhenius equation. β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase Ea values for both A and B horizons in this study were similar to previously reported values, however we could not make a direct comparison for B horizon soils because of the lack of data. There was no consistent relationship between hydrolase enzyme Ea and the environmental variables we measured. Phenol oxidase was the only enzyme that had a consistent positive relationship between Ea and pH in both horizons. The Ea in the arctic and subarctic zones for peroxidase was lower than the hydrolases and phenol oxidase values, indicating peroxidase may be a rate limited enzyme in environments under warming conditions. By including these six soil types we have increased the number of soil oxidative enzyme Ea values reported in the literature by 50%. This study is a step towards better quantifying enzyme kinetics in different climate zones.

  1. Isomerism of [64Cu-NOTA-Bn]-labeled radiotracers: separation of two complex isomers and determination of their interconversion energy barrier using ion pair chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joern; Rajander, Johan; Ihalainen, Janne A; Ramesh, Dinesh; Eklund, Patrik; Fagerholm, Veronica; Nuutila, Pirjo; Solin, Olof

    2011-05-16

    The model complex [(64)Cu((S)-p-NH(2)-Bn-NOTA)](-) ([(64)Cu]1) was used to study the isomerism of [(64)Cu-NOTA-Bn]-labeled radiotracers. Two complex isomers [(64)Cu]1a and [(64)Cu]1b, which were formed at a ratio of 1:9 during the complexation of [(64)Cu]Cu(2+) with (S)-p-NH(2)-Bn-NOTA, were separated using ion pair chromatography. To study the interconversion, the nonradioactive complex isomers Cu1a and Cu1b were separated and thermally treated at 90 °C in both ammonium acetate solution and deionized water. A faster interconversion rate was observed for both isomers with lower concentrations of ammonium ions. At the end of reaction, the thermodynamic Cu1a to Cu1b equilibrium ratio was 6:94. The particular energy barriers of the interconversion for Cu1a and Cu1b were 130 kJ mol(-1) and 140 kJ mol(-1). Spectrophotometric measurements with Cu1a and Cu1b revealed two isomers adopting different geometrical configurations.

  2. Health and climate benefits of different energy-efficiency and renewable energy choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Luckow, Patrick; Norris, Gregory; Spengler, John D.; Biewald, Bruce; Fisher, Jeremy; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) can benefit public health and the climate by displacing emissions from fossil-fuelled electrical generating units (EGUs). Benefits can vary substantially by EE/RE installation type and location, due to differing electricity generation or savings by location, characteristics of the electrical grid and displaced power plants, along with population patterns. However, previous studies have not formally examined how these dimensions individually and jointly contribute to variability in benefits across locations or EE/RE types. Here, we develop and demonstrate a high-resolution model to simulate and compare the monetized public health and climate benefits of four different illustrative EE/RE installation types in six different locations within the Mid-Atlantic and Lower Great Lakes of the United States. Annual benefits using central estimates for all pathways ranged from US$5.7-US$210 million (US$14-US$170 MWh-1), emphasizing the importance of site-specific information in accurately estimating public health and climate benefits of EE/RE efforts.

  3. Interhabitat differences in energy acquisition and expenditure in a lizard

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Anderson, R.A.

    1984-02-01

    Cnemidophorus hyperythrus, a small (approx. =4-g) teiid lizard, occurs along an elevational thorn scrub-thorn woodland-thorn forest habitat gradient in the cape region of Baja California. The authors compared body size, daily energy expenditure (DEE, measured with double labeled water), relative feeding rate (as reflected by H/sub 2/O influx rate), behavior, and abundance of this species at two sites along the gradient. At the inland thorn woodland site C. hyperythrus were more abundant (approx. =50 lizards/ha.). Mean body mass of woodland site lizards was 13% greater than that of scrub lizards. The DEE of the thorn woodland lizards, 330 site J x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/, and their H/sub 2/O influx, 99 mm/sup 3/ x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/, were also higher than the thorn scrub lizards', 219 J x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/ and 52 mm/sup 3/ x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/. Diets at the two sites were similar. There were no differences between sexes in diet, DEE, or H/sub 2/ influx. Daily maintenance energy costs were calculated based upon laboratory measures of O/sub 2/ consumption of resting lizards at a series of temperatures that represented the daily range of body temperatures experienced by lizards in the field. Activity costs (=DEE minus maintenance) were three times higher in the woodland lizards. Behavioral observations showed that woodland lizards were active most of the day (approx. =9 h/d) whereas scrub lizards were active primarily in the morning (approx. =3.5 h/d). Thus, the higher activity cost, DEE, and feeding rate of woodland lizards can be explained by their longer daily activity period. We suggest causal factors for the difference in daily activity period, and discuss implications of length of daily forging period for adult body size, population density, and various life history parameters of lizards.

  4. Interhabitat differences in energy acquisition and expenditure in a lizard

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Anderson, R.A.

    1984-02-01

    Cnemidophorus hyperythrus, a small (approx. =4-g) teiid lizard, occurs along an elevational thorn scrub - thorn woodland - thorn forest habitat gradient in the cape region of Baja California. Body size, daily energy expenditure (DEE, measured with doubly labeled water), relative feeding rate (as reflected by H/sub 2/O influx rate), behavior, and abundance of this species at two sites along the gradient were compared. At the inland thorn woodland site C. hyperythrus were more abundant (approx. =100 lizards/ha) than at the thorn scrub site near the ocean (approx. =50 lizards/ha). Mean body mass of woodland site lizards was 13% greater than that of scrub lizards. The DEE of the thorn woodland lizards, 330 J x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/,> and their H/sub 2/O influx, 99 mm/sup 3/ x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/, were also higher than the thorn scrub lizards', 219 J x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/ and 52 mm/sup 3/ x g/sup -1/ x d/sup -1/. Diets at the two sites were similar. There were no differences between sexes in diet, DEE, or H/sub 2/O influx. Daily maintenance energy costs were calculated based upon laboratory measures of O/sub 2/ consumption of resting lizards at a series of temperatures that represented the daily range of body temperatures experienced by lizards in the field. Activity costs (=DEE minus maintenance) were three times higher in the woodland lizards. Behavioral observations showed that woodland lizards were active most of the day (approx. =9 h/d) whereas scrub lizards were active primarily in the morning (approx. =3.5 h/d). Thus, the higher activity cost, DEE, and feeding rate of woodland lizards can be explained by their longer daily activity period. Causal factors for the difference in daily activity period are suggested, and implications of length of daily foraging period for adult body, size, population density, and various life history parameters of lizards are discussed.

  5. α and 3He production in the 7Be+28Si reaction at near-barrier energies: Direct versus compound-nucleus mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgouros, O.; Pakou, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Aslanoglou, X.; Betsou, Ch.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Grebosz, J.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Nicolis, N. G.; Parascandolo, C.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stefanini, C.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Strojek, I.; Torresi, D.

    2016-10-01

    The production of α and 3He particles, the cluster constituents of 7Be, in the 7Be+28Si reaction was studied at three near-barrier energies, namely 13, 20, and 22 MeV. Angular distribution measurements were performed at each energy, and the data were analyzed in both statistical model and Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) frameworks in order to disentangle the degree of competition between direct and compound channels. The energy evolution of the ratio of direct to total reaction cross section was mapped in comparison with similar data for 6Li and 7Li projectiles on a 28Si target. The results indicate larger transfer contributions for collisions involving the mirror nuclei 7Be and 7Li than in the 6Li case. Fusion cross sections were deduced, taking into account the α -particle cross sections due to compound-nucleus formation and particle multiplicities deduced from our statistical model framework. It was found that fusion is compatible with systematics and single-barrier penetration cross sections to within an uncertainty band of 10% to 20%. Indications of fusion hindrance for 7Li and 7Be compared to 6Li, starting from the barrier and below it, are given. This hindrance is attributed to the existence of large transfer channels. Furthermore, the experimental results, analyzed in the DWBA framework, suggest 3He and 4He transfer as the dominant direct reaction mechanism.

  6. Different mechanisms influencing permeation of PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kastin, Abba J; Akerstrom, Victoria; Hackler, Laszlo; Pan, Weihong

    2003-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) exerts neurotrophic and neuromodulatory effects on the CNS. To determine the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to PDGF, we examined the blood-to-brain influx of radioactively labeled PDGF isoforms (PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB) by multiple-time regression analysis after intravenous (i.v.) injection and by in-situ perfusion, and also determined the physicochemical characteristics which affect their permeation across the BBB, including lipophilicity (measured by octanol:buffer partition coefficient), hydrogen bonding (measured by differences in octanol : buffer and isooctane : buffer partition coefficients), serum protein binding (measured by capillary electrophoresis), and stability of PDGF in blood 10 min after i.v. injection (measured by HPLC). After i.v. bolus injection, neither 125I-PDGF-AA nor 125I-PDGF-BB crossed the BBB, their influx rates being similar to that of the vascular marker 99mTc-albumin. 125I-PDGF-AA degraded significantly faster in blood than 125I-PDGF-BB. PDGF-BB, however, was completely bound to a large protein in serum whereas PDGF-AA showed no binding. Thus, degradation might explain the poor blood-to-brain influx of PDGF-AA, whereas protein binding could explain the poor influx of circulating PDGF-BB. Despite their lack of permeation in the intact mouse, both 125I-PDGF-AA and 125I-PDGF-BB entered the brain by perfusion in blood-free buffer, and the significantly faster rate of 125I-PDGF-AA than 125I-PDGF-BB may be explained by the lower hydrogen bonding potential of 125I-PDGF-AA. Thus, the lack of significant distribution of PDGF from blood to brain is not because of the intrinsic barrier function of the BBB but probably because of degradation and protein binding. Information from these studies could be useful in the design of analogues for delivery of PDGF as a therapeutic agent.

  7. Fuelling in front of the barrier-are there age based behavioral differences in Garden Warblers Sylvia borin?

    PubMed

    Barboutis, Christos; Henshaw, Ian; Kullberg, Cecilia; Nikolopoulou, Stamatina; Fransson, Thord

    2014-01-01

    Garden Warblers Sylvia borin were studied during autumn stopover in Crete before crossing the barrier of the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Birds followed with transmitters show extensive stopover periods, which were longer in first-year birds, 16 days, compared with adult birds, 14 days. The distribution of body masses from birds trapped in fig trees were used to estimate the departure body mass and the results found indicate that both age categories on average depart with a fuel load close to 100% of lean body mass. The movement of transmitter birds shows differences between first-year and adult birds. Adult birds move further away from the release site and many also left the study area. Several were found settled outside the study area, up to 17 km away, indicating that they regularly make longer stopover movements. It is suggested that this might be a result of that they return to a place where they stayed during an earlier migration. It was shown that stopover site fidelity exists and nine garden warblers were recaptured in the area during a following autumn. The results found highlights the importance of stopover areas close to the Sahara Desert.

  8. Kelvin probe force microscopic imaging of the energy barrier and energetically favorable offset of interfaces in double-junction organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiki, Mahbube K; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Galipeau, David; Qiao, Qiquan

    2013-02-01

    A double-junction polymer solar cell (PSC) has attracted extensive attention as a promising approach to increasing efficiency. Tunneling/recombination interlayers between subcells play a critical role in double-junction PSCs. Interlayers include electron-transport layers (ETLs) such as Nb₂O₅, ZnO, and TiO(x) and hole-transport layers (HTLs) including PEDOT:PSS. These materials have all been used as interlayer materials, but it remains unclear which one is better than the other. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM) was used to identify the energy barrier and energetically favorable energy offset at the interfaces of acceptor-ETL (e.g., PCBM-Nb₂O₅, PCBM-ZnO, and PCBM-TiO(x)) and donor-HTL (e.g., MDMO-PPV/PEDOT:PSS). Here the interface refers to the junction of two materials, formed by drop-casting one on top of other. The interface is buried and is therefore not accessible to the KFM probe. The energy barrier for electron transport from PCBM to ETL was found at ∼0.20, ∼0.12, and ∼0.012 eV at the PCBM-Nb₂O₅, PCBM-ZnO, and PCBM-TiO(x) interfaces, respectively. Hole transport from the donor polymer to PEDOT:PSS was found to be energetically favorable with an energy offset of ∼0.14 eV to facilitate hole transport. The thickness independences of the energy barrier and energetically favorable energy offset at the interfaces of acceptor-ETL and donor-HTL were also observed. This work will provide guidance for researchers to identify and select appropriate materials as interlayers in double-junction PSCs.

  9. An in vitro comparative evaluation of different intraorifice barriers on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots obturated with gutta-percha

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Abhishek; Arora, Vipin; Jha, Padmanabh; Nikhil, Vineeta; Bansal, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare and evaluate the root reinforcement potential of four different intraorifice barriers: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), and nanohybrid composite (NC). Materials and Methods: Seventy-five mandibular premolars were decoronated to a standardized length, and prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. Except for control specimens, the coronal 3-mm gutta-percha was removed and filled with different materials. The specimens (75) were divided into five groups (n = 15) on the basis of the intraorifice barrier material used. Group 1: MTA, Group 2: RMGIC, Group 3: FRC, Group 4: NC, Group 5: no barrier (control). Fracture resistance of the specimens was tested. Results: Fracture resistance of roots was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier used and the following pattern was observed: RMGIC > FRC > NC > MTA. Conclusion: Intraorifice barriers can be regarded as a viable choice to reduce the occurrence of postendodontic root fractures. Among the four tested materials, RMGIC showed the maximum reinforcement. PMID:27099413

  10. Comparative study of different waste biomass for energy application.

    PubMed

    Mo