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Sample records for barrier infrared detector

  1. Barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2014-06-01

    In 1959, Lawson and co-workers publication triggered development of variable band gap Hg1-xCdxTe (HgCdTe) alloys providing an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Over the five decades, this material system has successfully fought off major challenges from different material systems, but despite that it has more competitors today than ever before. It is interesting however, that none of these competitors can compete in terms of fundamental properties. They may promise to be more manufacturable, but never to provide higher performance or, with the exception of thermal detectors, to operate at higher temperatures. In the last two decades a several new concepts of photodetectors to improve their performance have been proposed including trapping detectors, barrier detectors, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage detectors. This paper describes the present status of infrared barrier detectors. It is especially addressed to the group of III-V compounds including type-II superlattice materials, although HgCdTe barrier detectors are also included. It seems to be clear that certain of these solutions have merged as a real competitions of HgCdTe photodetectors.

  2. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  3. Barrier infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  4. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  5. Antimonide superlattice barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Soibel, Alexander; Nguyen, Jean; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Lee, Michael C.; Yang, Baohau; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-08-01

    Unipolar barriers can block one carrier type but allow the un-impeded flow of the other. They can be used to implement the barrier infra-red detector (BIRD) design for increasing the collection efficiency of photo-generated carriers, and reducing dark current generation without impeding photocurrent flow. In particular, the InAs/GaSb/AlSb material system, which can be epitaxially grown on GaSb or InAs substrates, is well suited for implementing BIRD structures, as there is considerable flexibility in forming a variety of alloys and superlattices, and tailoring band offsets. We describe our efforts to achieve high-performance long wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared photodetectors based on the BIRD architecture. Specifically, we report a 10 μm cutoff device based on a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. The detector, without anti-reflection coating, exhibits a responsivity of 1.5 A/W and a dark current density of 1×10-5 A/cm2 at 77K under 0.2 V bias. It reaches 300 K background limited infrared photodetection (BLIP) operation at 101 K, with a black-body BLIP D* value of 2.6×1010 cm-Hz1/2/W for 2π field of view under 0.2 V bias.

  6. Antimonide superlattice complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Nguyen, Jean; Keo, Sam A.; Rafol, B., , Sir; Yang, Baohua; Lee, Mike C.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Höglund, Linda; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-05-01

    The nearly lattice-matched InAs/GaSb/AlSb (antimonide) material system offers tremendous flexibility in realizing high-performance infrared detectors. Antimonide-based superlattice infrared absorbers can be customized to have cutoff wavelengths ranging from the short-wave infrared (SWIR) to the very long-wave infrared (VLWIR). They can be used in constructing sophisticated heterostructures to enable advanced infrared photodetector designs. In particular, they facilitate the construction of unipolar barriers, which can block one carrier type but allow the un-impeded flow of the other. Unipolar barriers are used to implement the barrier infrared detector (BIRD) design for increasing the collection efficiency of photo-generated carriers, and reducing dark current generation without impeding photocurrent flow. We report our recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in antimonide superlattice based long-wavelength infrared photodetectors using a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design.

  7. Antimonide-based barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Soibel, Alexander; Nguyen, Jean; Keo, Sam A.; Lee, Michael C.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2010-04-01

    The nearly lattice-matched InAs/GaSb/AlSb (antimonide) material system offers tremendous flexibility in realizing high-performance infrared detectors. Antimonide-based alloy and superlattice infrared absorbers can be customized to have cutoff wavelengths ranging from the short wave infrared (SWIR) to the very long wave infrared (VLWIR). They can be used in constructing sophisticated heterostructures to enable advanced infrared photodetector designs. In particular, they facilitate the construction of unipolar barriers, which can block one carrier type but allow the unimpeded flow of the other. Unipolar barriers are used to implement the barrier infra-red detector (BIRD) design for increasing the collection efficiency of photo-generated carriers, and reducing dark current generation without impeding photocurrent flow. We report our recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in antimonide alloy and superlattice based infrared photodetectors using the BIRD architecture. Specifically, we report a 10 μm cutoff superlattice device based on a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. The detector, without antireflection coating or passivation, exhibits a responsivity of 1.5 A/W and a dark current density of 1×10-5 A/cm2 at 77K under 0.2 V bias. It reaches 300 K background limited infrared photodetection (BLIP) operation at 87 K, with a blackbody BLIP D* value of 1.1×1011 cm-Hz1/2/W for f/2 optics under 0.2 V bias.

  8. HgCdTe barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, new strategies to achieve high-operating temperature (HOT) detectors have been proposed, including barrier structures such as nBn devices, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage (cascade) infrared detectors. The ability to tune the positions of the conduction and valence band edges independently in a broken-gap type-II superlattices is especially helpful in the design of unipolar barriers. This idea has been also implemented in HgCdTe ternary material system. However, the implementation of this detector structure in HgCdTe material system is not straightforward due to the existence of a valence band discontinuity (barrier) at the absorber-barrier interface. In this paper we present status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with emphasis on technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown HgCdTe barrier detectors achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. Their performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. From the perspective of device fabrication their important technological advantage results from less stringent surface passivation requirements and tolerance to threading dislocations.

  9. Barrier infrared detector research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Keo, Sam A.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Soibel, Alexander; Nguyen, Jean; Höglund, Linda; Rafol, B., , Sir; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-10-01

    The barrier infrared detector device architecture offers the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. The versatility of the antimonide material system, with the availability of three different types of band offsets for flexibility in device design, provides the ideal setting for implementing barrier infrared detectors. We describe the progress made at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in recent years in Barrier infrared detector research that resulted in high-performance quantum structure infrared detectors, including the type-II superlattice complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD), and the high operating quantum dot barrier infrared detector (HOT QD-BIRD).

  10. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  11. Si/IrSi3 Schottky-Barrier Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Si/IrSi or Si/IrSi3 Schottky-barrier detector fabricated by stoichiometric codeposition of Ir and Si on p Si substrate. Includes p+ substrate contact, silicide electrode, and n Si guard ring, which suppresses leakage around periphery of silicide electrode. Part of continuing effort to develop imaging arrays of Schottky-barrier detectors operating at far-infrared wavelengths.

  12. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) with double tunnel junction contact and quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Höglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, B., , Sir; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-07-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from ˜4.2 μm to 6 μm, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  13. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  14. High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector with Tailorable Cutoff Wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Seibel, Alexander (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith Y. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A barrier infrared detector with absorber materials having selectable cutoff wavelengths and its method of manufacture is described. A GaInAsSb absorber layer may be grown on a GaSb substrate layer formed by mixing GaSb and InAsSb by an absorber mixing ratio. A GaAlAsSb barrier layer may then be grown on the barrier layer formed by mixing GaSb and AlSbAs by a barrier mixing ratio. The absorber mixing ratio may be selected to adjust a band gap of the absorber layer and thereby determine a cutoff wavelength for the barrier infrared detector. The absorber mixing ratio may vary along an absorber layer growth direction. Various contact layer architectures may be used. In addition, a top contact layer may be isolated into an array of elements electrically isolated as individual functional detectors that may be used in a detector array, imaging array, or focal plane array.

  15. Superlattice barrier infrared detector development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, B., , Sir; Nguyen, Jean; Höglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-06-01

    We report recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in type-II superlattice based infrared photodetectors using the barrier infrared detector architecture. We used photoluminescence measurements for evaluating detector material and studied the influence of the material quality on the intensity of the photoluminescence. We performed direct noise measurements of the superlattice detectors and demonstrated that while intrinsic 1/f noise is absent in superlattice heterodiode, side-wall leakage current can become a source of strong frequency-dependent noise. We developed an effective dry etching process for these complex antimonide-based superlattices that enabled us to fabricate single pixel devices as well as large format focal plane arrays. We describe the demonstration of a 1024×1024 pixel long-wavelength infrared focal plane array based the complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. An 11.5 μm cutoff focal plane without anti-reflection coating has yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 53 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. Imaging results from a recent 10 μm cutoff focal plane array are also presented.

  16. Superlattice Barrier Infrared Detector Development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, Sir B.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in type-II superlattice based infrared photodetectors using the barrier infrared detector architecture. We used photoluminescence measurements for evaluating detector material and studied the influence of the material quality on the intensity of the photoluminescence. We performed direct noise measurements of the superlattice detectors and demonstrated that while intrinsic 1/f noise is absent in superlattice heterodiode, side-wall leakage current can become a source of strong frequency-dependent noise. We developed an effective dry etching process for these complex antimonide-based superlattices that enabled us to fabricate single pixel devices as well as large format focal plane arrays. We describe the demonstration of a 1024x1024 pixel long-wavelength infrared focal plane array based the complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. An 11.5 micron cutoff focal plane without anti-reflection coating has yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 53 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. Imaging results from a recent 10 ?m cutoff focal plane array are also presented.

  17. Surface Leakage Mechanisms in III-V Infrared Barrier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidor, D. E.; Savich, G. R.; Wicks, G. W.

    2016-09-01

    Infrared detector epitaxial structures employing unipolar barriers exhibit greatly reduced dark currents compared to simple pn-based structures. When correctly positioned within the structure, unipolar barriers are highly effective at blocking bulk dark current mechanisms. Unipolar barriers are also effective at suppressing surface leakage current in infrared detector structures employing absorbing layers that possess the same conductivity type in their bulk and at their surface. When an absorbing layer possesses opposite conductivity types in its bulk and at its surface, unipolar barriers are not solutions to surface leakage. This work reviews empirically determined surface band alignments of III-V semiconductor compounds and modeled surface band alignments of both gallium-free and gallium-containing type-II strained layer superlattice material systems. Surface band alignments are used to predict surface conductivity types in several detector structures, and the relationship between surface and bulk conductivity types in the absorbing layers of these structures is used as the basis for explaining observed surface leakage characteristics.

  18. High operating temperature midwave quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-06-01

    The nBn or XBn barrier infrared detector has the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. High performance detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InAsSb absorber lattice matched to GaSb substrate, with a matching AlAsSb unipolar electron barrier, have been demonstrated. The band gap of lattice-matched InAsSb yields a detector cutoff wavelength of approximately 4.2 μm when operating at ~150K. We report results on extending the cutoff wavelength of midwave barrier infrared detectors by incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the active area of the detector. Using this approach, we were able to extend the detector cutoff wavelength to ~6 μm, allowing the coverage of the full midwave infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD) shows infrared response at temperatures up to 225 K.

  19. High Operating Temperature Midwave Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The nBn or XBn barrier infrared detector has the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. High performance detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InAsSb absorber lattice matched to GaSb substrate, with a matching AlAsSb unipolar electron barrier, have been demonstrated. The band gap of lattice-matched InAsSb yields a detector cutoff wavelength of approximately 4.2 ??m when operating at 150K. We report results on extending the cutoff wavelength of midwave barrier infrared detectors by incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the active area of the detector. Using this approach, we were able to extend the detector cutoff wavelength to 6 ?m, allowing the coverage of the full midwave infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD) shows infrared response at temperatures up to 225 K.

  20. Ir/IrSi3/Si Schottky-Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Quantum efficiency increased. Proposed Schottky-barrier infrared detector has double metallic layer of Ir and IrSi3 instead of single metallic layer of Ir, IrSi, or IrSi3. Offers advantages of both relatively high infrared absorption in thin film of Ir and stability and reproducibility of layer of IrSi3 in contact with Si. Also serves as barrier to chemical reactions between Ir overlayer and Si substrate. Detectors used to form focal-plane array integrated with charge-coupled-device-addressing and image-processing circuitry.

  1. Improved cell design for Schottky barrier infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Freeman D.; Mooney, Jonathan M.; Tzannes, Alexis P.; Murguia, James E.

    1995-09-01

    The responsivity of large scale platinum silicide arrays, having small pixels, is low compared to the responsivity of large area test diodes fabricated on the same wafer. Often, the responsivity loss is described by assigning a lower Fowler emission coefficient to the detectors. We find the reduced responsivity to be the direct result of a reduction in the effective active area of the detector. This reduction in effective active area becomes more pronounced as the detector cell size is reduced. We provide a simple model for the area reduction in terms of modulation of detector Schottky potential by the underlying depletion region of the detector guard ring. We also suggest changes in the detector array unit cell design, which will maximize responsivity.

  2. High-Operating-Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector with Tailorable Cutoff Wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory, J.; Soibel, Alexander; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    A mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) barrier photodetector is capable of operating at higher temperature than the prevailing MWIR detectors based on InSb. The standard high-operating-temperature barrier infrared detector (HOT-BIRD) is made with an InAsSb infrared absorber that is lattice-matched to a GaSb substrate, and has a cutoff wavelength of approximately 4 microns. To increase the versatility and utility of the HOT-BIRD, it is implemented with IR absorber materials with customizable cutoff wavelengths. The HOT-BIRD can be built with the quaternary alloy GaInAsSb as the absorber, GaAlSbAs as the barrier, on a lattice-matching GaSb substrate. The cutoff wavelength of the GaInAsSb can be tailored by adjusting the alloy composition. To build a HOT-BIRD requires a matching pair of absorber and barrier materials with the following properties: (1) their valence band edges must be approximately the same to allow unimpeded hole flow, while their conduction band edges should have a large difference to form an electron barrier; and (2) the absorber and the barrier must be respectively lattice-matched and closely lattice-matched to the substrate to ensure high material quality and low defect density. To make a HOT-BIRD with cutoff wavelength shorter than 4 microns, a GaInAsSb quaternary alloy was used as the absorber, and a matching GaAlSbAs quaternary alloy as the barrier. By changing the alloy composition, the band gap of the quaternary alloy absorber can be continuously adjusted with cutoff wavelength ranging from 4 microns down to the short wavelength infrared (SWIR). By carefully choosing the alloy composition of the barrier, a HOT-BIRD structure can be formed. With this method, a HOT-BIRD can be made with continuously tailorable cutoff wavelengths from 4 microns down to the SWIR. The HOT-BIRD detector technology is suitable for making very-large-format MWIR/SWIR focal plane arrays that can be operated by passive cooling from low Earth orbit. High-operating temperature

  3. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  4. Proton radiation effect on performance of InAs/GaSb complementary barrier infrared detector

    SciTech Connect

    Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, Sir B.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Fisher, Anita M.; Keo, Sam. A.; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-12-28

    In this work, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation on the performance of long wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb photodiodes (λ{sub c} = 10.2 μm), based on the complementary barrier infrared detector design. We found that irradiation with 68 MeV protons causes a significant increase of the dark current from j{sub d} = 5 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} to j{sub d} = 6 × 10{sup −3} A/cm{sup 2}, at V{sub b} = 0.1 V, T = 80 K and fluence 19.2 × 10{sup 11 }H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Analysis of the dark current as a function of temperature and bias showed that the dominant contributor to the dark current in these devices changes from diffusion current to tunneling current after proton irradiation. This change in the dark current mechanism can be attributed to the onset of surface leakage current, generated by trap-assisted tunneling processes in proton displacement damage areas located near the device sidewalls.

  5. Status of HgCdTe Barrier Infrared Detectors Grown by MOCVD in Military University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Jóźwikowski, K.; Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Madejczyk, P.; Kowalewski, A.; Markowska, O.; Rogalski, A.; Rutkowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present the status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with an emphasis on technological progress in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool for HgCdTe barrier architecture growth with a wide range of composition, donor /acceptor doping, and without post-grown annealing. The device concept of a specific barrier bandgap architecture integrated with Auger-suppression is as a good solution for high-operating temperature infrared detectors. Analyzed devices show a high performance comparable with the state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07" and detectivities of non-immersed detectors are close to the value marked for HgCdTe photodiodes. Experimental data of long-wavelength infrared detector structures were confirmed by numerical simulations obtained by a commercially available software APSYS platform. A detailed analysis applied to explain dark current plots was made, taking into account Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and tunneling currents.

  6. Theoretical Modeling of HOT HgCdTe Barrier Detectors for the Mid-Wave Infrared Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Rogalski, A.

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports on theoretical modeling of medium-wavelength infrared HgCdTe barrier infrared detector (BIRD) photoelectrical performance. BIRD HgCdTe detectors were simulated with the commercially available software APSYS. Detailed analysis of the detector performance such as dark current, photocurrent, resistance-area product, detectivity versus applied bias, operating temperature, and structural parameters (absorber doping, barrier composition) was performed to determine the optimal operating conditions. It is shown that higher operation temperature conditions achievable with commonly used thermoelectric coolers allow detectivities of D = 9.5 × 1010 cmHz1/2/W and D * = 1.5 × 1011 cmHz1/2/W at T = 200 K to be obtained for the correct absorber doping for nBnnn+ and nBnpn+, respectively. R 0 A for the nBnnn+ detector was found to range from 200 Ω cm2 to 0.6 Ω cm2 at T = 200 K to 300 K, respectively.

  7. History of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  8. Tunable quantum well infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A novel infrared detector (20, 20', 20), is provided, which is characterized by photon-assisted resonant tunneling between adjacent quantum wells (22a, 22b) separated by barrier layers (28) in an intrinsic semiconductor layer (24) formed on an n.sup.+ substrate (26), wherein the resonance is electrically tunable over a wide band of wavelengths in the near to long infrared region. An n.sup.+ contacting layer (34) is formed over the intrinsic layer and the substrate is n.sup.+ doped to provide contact to the quantum wells. The detector permits fabrication of arrays (30) (one-dimensional and two-dimensional) for use in imaging and spectroscopy applications.

  9. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  10. Active Pyroelectric Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Mina, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noncontact pyroelectric infrared detector is described. A pyroelectric film that also has piezoelectric properties is held in place so that it is free to vibrate. It is electrically stimulated to vibrate at a resonance frequency. The vibrating film forms part of a balanced bridge circuit. As thermal radiation impinges on the film the pyroelectric effect causes the resonance frequency to change, thereby unbalancing the bridge circuit. A differential amplifier tracks the change in voltage across the bridge. The resulting voltage signal is further processed by a bandpass filter and a precision rectifier. The device allows for DC or static temperature measurements without the use of a mechanical chopping device.

  11. Test bench for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    The Bench for Infrared Detectors (BIRD 210) has been designed for testing IRFPA detectors up to 1024 x 1024 pixels. It is also suitable for single element detectors. The detectors are required to be equipped with their coolers (Stirling or thermo electrics) and cooler electronics.

  12. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardimona, D. A.; Huang, D. H.; Cowan, V.; Morath, C.

    2011-05-01

    Two of the main requirements for space situational awareness are to locate and identify dim and/or distant objects. At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate, we are investigating how nanostructured metal surfaces can produce plasmon-enhanced fields to address the first function. We are also investigating quantum interference effects in semiconductor quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities to address the amplification of weak signals. To address the second function of identification of space objects, we are investigating a wavelength-tunable detector scheme that involves a coupled double quantum well structure with a thin middle barrier between the two wells. The photocurrent from this structure will be swept out with a lateral bias. In order to eliminate the diffraction loss of incident photons by a surface grating structure for the z-polarization required in normal quantum well infrared photodetector structures, we will grow an array of self-organized quantum dots buried in one of the quantum wells of a symmetric double quantum well structure. In this paper, we will first describe the requirements for detectors in space, then we will describe our work in the above topics, and finally we will briefly mention our forays into other areas of quantum-structured detectors for use in space.

  13. Detector Arrays For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Paper describes status of program for developing integrated infrared detectors for astronomy. Program covers variety of detectors, including extrinsic silicon, extrinsic germanium, and indium antimonide devices with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Paper notes for arrays to reach background noise limit in cryogenic telescope, continued reductions in readout noise and dark current needed.

  14. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  15. Near infrared detectors for SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23

    Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

  16. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fick, Wolfgang; Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Haiml, Markus; Hanna, Stefan; Hübner, Dominique; Höhnemann, Holger; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Thöt, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The motivation and intended benefits for the use of infrared (IR) detectors for space applications are highlighted. The actual status of state-of-the-art IR detectors for space applications is presented based on some of AIM's currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength IR (SWIR) to the long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and very long-wavelength IR (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP and the IR detectors for the Sentinel 3 SLSTR will be elaborated. Additionally, dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC, will be addressed.

  17. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  18. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  19. Growing Crystals for Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Unidirectional solidification yields bulk crystals with compositional homogeneity. Unidirectionaly crystal-growth furnace assembly travels vertically so crystal grows upward from bottom tapered end of ampoule. Separately controlled furnaces used for hot (upper) and cold (lower) zones. New process produces ingots with radial compositional homogeneity suitable for fabricating infrared detectors.

  20. Development of dual-band barrier detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plis, Elena; Myers, Stephen A.; Ramirez, David A.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of dual-band InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattices (T2SL) detectors with barrier designs at SK Infrared. Over the past five years, we demonstrated mid-wave/long-wave (MW/LWIR, cut-off wavelengths are 5 μm and 10.0 μm), and LW/LWIR (cut-off wavelengths are 9 μm and 11.0 μm) detectors with nBn and pBp designs. Recent results include a high performance bias-selectable long/long-wavelength infrared photodetector based on T2SL with a pBp barrier architecture. The two channels 50% cut-off wavelengths were ~ 9.2 μm and ~ 12 μm at 77 K. The "blue" and "red" LWIR absorbers demonstrated saturated QE values of 34 % and 28 %, respectively, measured in a backside illuminated configuration with a ~ 35 μm thick layer of residual GaSb substrate. Bulk-limited dark current levels were ~ 2.6 x 10-7 A/cm2 at + 100 mV and ~ 8.3 x 10-4 A/cm2 at - 200 mV for the "blue" and "red" channels, respectively.

  1. Pixel isolation of low dark-current large-format InAs/GaSb superlattice complementary barrier infrared detector focal plane arrays with high fill factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Hill, Cory J.; Rafol, Don; Keo, Sam; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Mumolo, Jason; Liu, John; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    Low dark current and high fill factor are two crucial characteristics for the realization of the InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) technology as third generation focal plane arrays (FPAs). Recent development proved high performance results for the complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design, and a high-quality etch technique is required to minimize surface leakage currents. We report on a n-CBIRD with 10.3 μm cutoff, exhibiting a responsivity of 1.7 A/W and dark current density of 1×10-5 A/cm2 at 77K under 0.2 V bias, without AR coating and without passivation. Results from four different mesa isolation techniques are compared on single element diodes: chemical wet etch using C4H6O6:H3PO4:H2O2:H2O, BCl3/Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP), CH4/H2/Ar ICP, and CH4/H2/BCl3/Cl2/Ar ICP. The CH4/H2/BCl3/Cl2/Ar etched structures yielded more than 2.5 times improvement in dark current density and nearvertical sidewalls. Using this etching technique, we then implement a 1k x 1k p-CBIRD array with 11.5 μm cutoff and peak responsivity of 3 A/W. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded a 81% fill factor with 98% operability and performance results of 21% quantum efficiency, 53 mK NE▵T, and NEI of 6.9×1013 photons/sec-cm2.

  2. Two-color infrared detector

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F; Kim, Jin K

    2014-05-13

    A two-color detector includes a first absorber layer. The first absorber layer exhibits a first valence band energy characterized by a first valence band energy function. A barrier layer adjoins the first absorber layer at a first interface. The barrier layer exhibits a second valence band energy characterized by a second valence band energy function. The barrier layer also adjoins a second absorber layer at a second interface. The second absorber layer exhibits a third valence band energy characterized by a third valence band energy function. The first and second valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the first interface and the second and third valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the second interface.

  3. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  4. nBn and pBp infrared detectors with graded barrier layer, graded absorption layer, or chirped strained layer super lattice absorption layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An nBn detector is described where for some embodiments the barrier layer has a concentration gradient, for some embodiments the absorption layer has a concentration gradient, and for some embodiments the absorption layer is a chirped strained layer super lattice. The use of a graded barrier or absorption layer, or the use of a chirped strained layer super lattice for the absorption layer, allows for design of the energy bands so that the valence band may be aligned across the device. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. Ultrasensitive graphene far-infrared power detectors.

    PubMed

    McKitterick, C B; Prober, D E; Vora, H; Du, X

    2015-04-29

    We describe the properties of ultrasensitive graphene photon detectors for use in the far-infrared/terahertz spectral region and present theoretical predictions for their power detection sensitivity. These predictions are based on two graphene contacting schemes with superconducting contacts: contacts with a thin insulating barrier, and direct superconducting contacts. To quantitatively assess these predictions, we perform thermal measurements of graphene at low temperatures and analyse them to extract information on electron-phonon cooling in graphene. These new results for the electron-phonon cooling channel allow reliable prediction of the noise equivalent power (NEP) that can be expected from an optimized graphene detector, using measurement of the Johnson noise emission as the thermometry method. We find that an NEP of 2 × 10(-19) W Hz(-1/2) should be achievable under certain biasing conditions with an ideal device. PMID:25835056

  6. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  7. Stacked silicide/silicon mid- to long-wavelength infrared detector

    DOEpatents

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1990-03-13

    The use of stacked Schottky barriers (16) with epitaxially grown thin silicides (10) combined with selective doping (22) of the barriers provides high quantum efficiency infrared detectors (30) at longer wavelengths that is compatible with existing silicon VLSI technology.

  8. Stray light in infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Dafu; He, Xiangrong; Wang, Xiaokun; Zhang, Kefeng; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao

    2009-07-01

    Infrared optical system which has severe requirements on stray light levels often need cold shield around the detector. Some basic design principles and goals for baffles are presented. The location of vanes for cold shield are shown based on universal design criteria of baffle vane. Three different categories of vane designs for cold shield and their advantages for stray light control are discussed: one vane, two vanes and three vanes. The design of vane structure on cold shield surfaces is analyzed using the LIGHTTOOLS stray light software. The PST curves of cold shield without vane and with different vanes are given.

  9. High-performance long wavelength superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Hill, Cory J.; Lee, Mike; Nguyen, Jean; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    The nearly lattice-matched InAs/GaSb/AlSb (antimonide) material system offers tremendous flexibility in realizing high-performance infrared detectors. Antimonide-based superlattice (SL) detectors can be tailor-made to have cutoff wavelengths ranging from the short wave infrared (SWIR) to the very long wave infrared (VLWIR). SL detectors are predicted to have suppressed Auger recombination rates and low interband tunneling, resulting in the suppressed dark currents. Moreover, the nearly lattice-matched antimonide material system, consisting of InAs, GaSb, AlSb and their alloys, allows for the construction of superlattice heterostructures. In particular, unipolar barriers, which blocks one carrier type without impeding the flow of the other, have been implemented in the design of SL photodetectors to realize complex heterodiodes with improved performance. Here, we report our recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in antimonide superlattice based infrared photodetectors.

  10. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossington, Carolyn Sally

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the Star Wars nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  11. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  12. Proceedings of the Second Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The workshop focused on infrared detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers are organized into the following categories: discrete infrared detectors and readout electronics; advanced bolometers; intrinsic integrated infrared arrays; and extrinsic integrated infrared arrays. Status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) programs are also included.

  13. New infrared detectors and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.

    1979-01-01

    The inventions and published papers related to the project are listed. The research with thin films of LaF3 deposited on GaAs substrates is reported along with improvements in photocapacitative MIS infrared detectors.

  14. SAPHIRA detector for infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Ives, Derek; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2014-08-01

    The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking is the amplification of the photoelectron signal inside the infrared pixel by means of the avalanche gain. In 2007 ESO started a program at Selex to develop near infrared electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD) for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. In a first step the cutoff wavelength was reduced from 4.5 micron to 2.5 micron in order to verify that the dark current scales with the bandgap and can be reduced to less than one electron/ms, the value required for wavefront sensing. The growth technology was liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) with annular diodes based on the loophole interconnect technology. The arrays required deep cooling to 40K to achieve acceptable cosmetic performance at high APD gain. The second step was to develop a multiplexer tailored to the specific application of the GRAVITY instrument wavefront sensors and the fringe tracker. The pixel format is 320x256 pixels. The array has 32 parallel video outputs which are arranged in such a way that the full multiplex advantage is available also for small subwindows. Nondestructive readout schemes with subpixel sampling are possible. This reduces the readout noise at high APD gain well below the subelectron level at frame rates of 1 KHz. The third step was the change of the growth technology from liquid phase epitaxy to metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). This growth technology allows the band structure and doping to be controlled on a 0.1μm scale and provides more flexibility for the design of diode structures. The bandgap can be varied for different layers of Hg(1-x)CdxTe. It is possible to make heterojunctions and apply solid state engineering techniques. The change to MOVPE resulted in a dramatic improvement in the cosmetic quality with 99.97 % operable pixels at an operating temperature of 85K. Currently this sensor is deployed in the 4 wavefront sensors and in the

  15. Infrared array detectors. [for astronomical observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Arrays of detectors sensitive to infrared radiation will enable astronomical observations to be made with shorter observing times than with discrete detectors and with good relative spatial accuracy. Systems using such arrays are being developed for astronomy in several regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. An example of an infrared system is given here consisting of a 32x32 element bismuth doped silicon charge injection device array that has been used in an astronomical camera.

  16. Anomalous Polarization May Improve Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chan-Lon; Pan, Dee-Son

    1990-01-01

    New configurations proposed for quantum-well devices. Simplifies alignment, increases sensitivity, and opens up more possibilities in design of quantum-well detectors of infrared radiation. In detector made according to proposed concept, light incident broadside on front surface absorbed. No special waveguide structures required.

  17. Advances in pyroelectric infrared detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerman, H. P.; Schwarz, F.; Weiner, S.

    1972-01-01

    Recent improvements in the pyroelectric detector have been due to the development of locked-in polarization, further reduction of the FET leakage current, and reduction of short circuit noise. The pyroelectric detector has been successfully employed in these typical applications: (1) thermograph using a single detector and X-Y scanner, (2) focal plane reticle scanner, (3) linear array thermal imaging system, (4) pyroelectric image tube, (5) radiometers (vertical temperature profile radiometer, carbon dioxide sensor), (6) high speed spectrometer, and (7) laser detector.

  18. Infrared receiver having a cooled radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Van Antwerpen, H. C.

    1985-04-09

    An infrared receiver having an infrared radiation detector cooled by means of a cold-gas engine, the thermal contact between a cooling surface of the cold-gas engine and the radiation detector being obtained by an elastic thermally conducting bridge. The cylindrical bridge is comprised of a plurality of turns of a metal strip. Due to the presence of the bridge, a good thermal conduction and further a compensation for differences in thermal expansion coefficients of the materials used are obtained. The infrared receiver is particularly suitable for night vision apparatus.

  19. MWIR InAsSb barrier detector data and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Ionescu, A. C.; Okerlund, D.; De Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Sharifi, H.; Dhar, N. K.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Grein, C.

    2013-06-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) InAsSb alloy barrier detectors grown on GaAs substrates were characterized as a function of temperature to evaluate their performance. Detector arrays were fabricated in a 1024 × 1024 format on an 18 μm pitch. A fanout was utilized to directly acquire data from a set of selected detectors without an intervening read out integrating circuit (ROIC). The detectors have a cutoff wavelength equal to ~ 4.9 μm at 150 K. The peak internal quantum efficiency (QE) required a reverse bias voltage of 1 V. The detectors were diffusion-limited at the bias required to attain peak QE. Multiple 18 μm × 18 μm detectors were tied together in parallel by connecting the indium bump of each detector to a single large metal pad on the fanout. The dark current density at -1 V bias for a set of 64 × 64 and 6 × 6 array of detectors, each of which were tied together in parallel was ~ 10-3 A/cm2 at 200 K and 5 × 10-6 A/cm2 at 150 K. The 4096 (64 × 64) and 36 (6 × 6) detectors, both have similar Jdark vs Vd characteristics, demonstrating high operability and uniformity of the detectors in the array. The external QE measured using a narrow band filter centered at ~ 4 μm had values in the 65 - 70 % range. Since the detectors were illuminated through a GaAs substrate which has a reflectance of 29%, the internal QE is greater than 90 %. A 1024 × 1024 ROIC on an 18 μm pitch was also designed and fabricated to interface with the barrier detectors. QE at 150 K for a 1024 × 1024 detector array hybridized to a ROIC matched the QE measured on detectors that were measured directly through a fanout chip. Median D* at 150 K under a flux of 1.07 × 1015 ph/(cm2/s was 1.0 x 1011 cm Hz1/2 /W.

  20. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology—HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)—have been investigated.

  1. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Lashley, Jason Charles; Opeil, Cyril P.; Smith, James Lawrence

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  2. Infrared diagnosis using liquid crystal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.; Vollrath, K.

    1986-01-01

    The possible uses of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers for analysis of plasmas and flows need appropriate infrared image converters. Emphasis was placed on liquid crystal detectors and their operational modes. Performance characterstics and selection criteria, such as high sensitivity, short reaction time, and high spatial resolution are discussed.

  3. Infrared Detector System with Controlled Thermal Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal infrared detector system includes a heat sink, a support member, a connection support member connecting the support member to the heat sink and including a heater unit is reviewed. An infrared detector element is mounted on the support member and a temperature signal representative of the infrared energy contacting the support member can then be derived by comparing the temperature of the support member and the heat sink. The temperature signal from a support member and a temperature signal from the connection support member can then be used to drive a heater unit mounted on the connection support member to thereby control the thermal conductance of the support member. Thus, the thermal conductance can be controlled so that it can be actively increased or decreased as desired.

  4. Monolithic short wave infrared (SWIR) detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A monolithic self-scanned linear detector array was developed for remote sensing in the 1.1- 2.4-micron spectral region. A high-density IRCCD test chip was fabricated to verify new design approaches required for the detector array. The driving factors in the Schottky barrier IRCCD (Pdsub2Si) process development are the attainment of detector yield, uniformity, adequate quantum efficiency, and lowest possible dark current consistent with radiometric accuracy. A dual-band module was designed that consists of two linear detector arrays. The sensor architecture places the floating diffusion output structure in the middle of the chip, away from the butt edges. A focal plane package was conceptualized and includes a polycrystalline silicon substrate carrying a two-layer, thick-film interconnecting conductor pattern and five epoxy-mounted modules. A polycrystalline silicon cover encloses the modules and bond wires, and serves as a radiation and EMI shield, thermal conductor, and contamination seal.

  5. Infrared detectors: Advances, challenges and new technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Amir; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2013-12-01

    Human knowledge of infrared (IR) radiation is about 200 years old. However it was in the late 20th century that we developed a wide range of smart technologies for detection and started to take advantage for our benefit. Today IR detector technology is in its 3rd generation and comes with challenging demands. Based on the propagation of IR radiation through free space it is divided into different transmission windows. The most interesting for thermal imaging are the mid-wave IR (MWIR) and the long-wave IR (LW IR). Infrared detectors for thermal imaging have a number of applications in industry, security, search & rescue, surveillance, medicine, research, meteorology, climatology and astronomy. Currently high-performance IR imaging technology is mainly based on epitaxially grown structures of the small-bandgap bulk alloy mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT), indium antimonide (InSb) and GaAs based quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), depending on the application and wavelength range. However, they operate at low temperatures requiring costly and bulky cryogenic systems. In addition there is always a need for better performance, which generates possibilities for developing new technologies. Some emerging technologies are quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs), type-II strained layer super-lattice, and QDIPs with type-II band alignment. In this report a brief review of the current and new technologies for high performance IR detectors, will be presented.

  6. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tarle, G.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, Anne; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; Miguel, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will measure precisely the cosmological expansion history over both the acceleration and deceleration epochs and thereby constrain the nature of the dark energy that dominates our universe today. The SNAP focal plane contains equal areas of optical CCDs and NIR sensors and an integral field spectrograph. Having over 150 million pixels and a field-of-view of 0.34 square degrees, the SNAP NIR system will be the largest yet constructed. With sensitivity in the range 0.9-1.7 {micro}m, it will detect Type Ia supernovae between z = 1 and 1.7 and will provide follow-up precision photometry for all supernovae. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-off tuned to 1.7 {micro}m, will permit passive cooling at 140 K while maintaining noise below zodiacal levels. By dithering to remove the effects of intrapixel variations and by careful attention to other instrumental effects, we expect to control relative photometric accuracy below a few hundredths of a magnitude. Because SNAP continuously revisits the same fields we will be able to achieve outstanding statistical precision on the photometry of reference stars in these fields, allowing precise monitoring of our detectors. The capabilities of the NIR system for broadening the science reach of SNAP are discussed.

  7. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-28

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current–voltage (I–V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} = 10⁵) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I–V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance–voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35–2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0–1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  8. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (ION/IOFF = 105) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I-V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance-voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35-2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0-1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  9. Advances in Detector Technology for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCreight, Craig; Cheng, P. L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Progress in semiconductor materials and processing technology has allowed the development of infrared detector arrays with unprecedented sensitivity, for imaging and spectroscopic applications in astronomy. The earlier discrete-detector approach has been replaced by large-element (up to 1024 x 1024 pixel), multiplexed devices. Progress has been made against a number of key limiting factors, such as quantum efficiency, noise, spectral response, linearity, and dark current. Future developments will focus on the need for even larger arrays, which operate at higher temperatures.

  10. Astronomical imaging with infrared array detectors.

    PubMed

    Gatley, I; Depoy, D L; Fowler, A M

    1988-12-01

    History shows that progress in astronomy often stems directly from technological innovation and that each portion of the electromagnetic spectrum offers unique insights into the nature of the universe. Most recently, the widespread availability of infrared-sensitive two-dimensional array detectors has led to dramatic improvements in the capabilities of conventional ground-based observatories. The impact of this new technology on our understanding of a wide variety of phenomena is illustrated here by infrared pictures of star-forming regions, of nebulae produced by the late stages of stellar evolution, of the nucleus of our own galaxy(the Milky Way), and of activity in other galaxies. PMID:17817072

  11. Adiabatic Demagnetization Cooler For Far Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akio; Yazawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Junya

    1988-11-01

    An small adiabatic demagnetization cooler for an astronomical far infrared detector has been built. Single crystals of manganese ammonium sulphate and chromium potassium alum, were prepared as magnetic substances. The superconducting magnet was indirectly cooled and operated by small current up to 13.3 A, the maximum field being 3.5 T. As a preliminary step, adiabatic demagnetization to zero field was implemented. The lowest temperature obtained was 0.5 K, for 5.0 K initial temperature.

  12. [Study on photographing experiment of infrared detector].

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Jiang; Zhang, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Infrared detectors are widely used in multi spectral remote sensing systems, and in order to verify photographing principles of infrared time delay integration (TDI) detector, and make preparations for future research, a verification system for infrared TDI camera is proposed in the present paper. Experimental methods are explained thoroughly and two major factors which affect image quality are analyzed. First, the causes of image motion and their effects on the quality of image are studied, and a novel architecture using high precision DC-speed machine is presented, then the relationship between velocity of precision turntable and detectors line transfer frequency is determined by Kalman algorithm. Second, four focusing means are analyzed and compared, and video signal amplitude method is selected according to practical application. Finally, a genuine demo system is established in national supervision and test center for optics mechanics quality. 5.3, 6.4 and 9.2 mm drones are chosen for testing. Experimental results indicate that the obtained drone is vivid, and camera's resolution achieves 11.3 lines per mm, which satisfies preliminary aims.

  13. Multilayered (Hg,Cd)Te infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rae, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Multilayered mercury-cadmium telluride photoconductive detectors were developed which are capable of providing individual coverage of three separate spectral wavelength bands without the use of beam splitters. The multilayered "three-color" detector on a single dewar takes the place of three separate detector/filter/dewar units and enables simpler and more reliable mechanical and optical designs for multispectral scanners and radiometers. Wavelength channel design goals (in micrometers) were: 10.1 to 11.0, 11.0 to 12.0, and 13.0. Detectivity for all channels was 1 x 10 to the 10th power cm-Hz 1/2/Watt. A problem occurred in finding an epoxy layer which had good infrared transmission properties and which also was chemically and mechanically compatible with HgCdTe processing techniques. Data on 6 candidate bonding materials are surveyed and discussed.

  14. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  15. Infrared SWAP detectors: pushing the limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Taalat, R.; Brunner, A.; Rubaldo, L.; Augey, T.; Kerlain, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Manissadjian, A.; Gravrand, O.; Castelein, P.; Destéfanis, G.

    2015-06-01

    The growing demand for compact and low consumption infrared cooled detectors is driven by different products segments. Hand Held Thermal Imagers, UAV, small gimbals are some of them. End users are requiring devices easy to use with fast cool down time, excellent portability, low acoustic noise with no trade-offs in reliability and performance. These requirements are pushing the technology developments toward constant innovations on detectors, coolers, read out circuits and proximity electronic boards. In this paper we are discussing the different figures of merit and highlighting the challenges for the different components. An update on the developments of HOT technology for most advanced pixel pitch will be presented. Very compact products are driving the developments for innovative coolers and cryogenic solutions. A low power compact architecture is a must for electronic boards to optimize the overall system power consumption. Finally a look to the future requirements for further shrink will be addressed.

  16. Automatic Testing Of Infrared Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David A.

    1982-12-01

    Large scale infrared (IR) detector array production requires highly automated and accurate test equipment with data logging features. At Texas Instruments (TI), five different types of automatic test systems have been developed with a central computer data logging system. Two of these system types test the completed array in various stages of integration into the final assembly. These tests include responsivity, detectivity, and other characteristics. Since direct calibration for responsivity and detectivity is not available, close attention to the applicable formulas, an error budget, and calibration procedures is required. This paper first summarizes the many types of tests and test equipment that are used at TI in constructing a finished "Common Module" detector from raw mercury cadium telluride (MCT), then describes in more detail the test sets for automated testing of the array itself, and the factors affecting array test accuracy and calibration.

  17. Far-infrared kinetic-inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, E.N.; McDonald, D.G.; Sauvageau, J.E. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on extremely sensitive far-infrared detectors suitable for both direct detection and heterodyn applications based upon {mu}m-sized thin films with thickness less than a superconducting penetration depth. The penetration depth of such a film, and therefore its inductance, varies with temperature and with quasiparticle population (described by an effective temperature T*), resulting in both bolometric and non-equilibrium Photoinductive responses. Incident radiation is coupled into the small-area kinetic inductor by a lithographic antenna, and the resulting inductance changes are amplified and converted to a voltage signal by an integrated microstrip DC SQUID.

  18. Gerard Kuiper and the Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek

    2013-10-01

    The life and contributions of Gerard Kuiper have been documented by Dale Cruikshank in his National Academy of Sciences biography. I will argue that particularly important in this eventful life was Kuiper's war time experiences. Kuiper's wartime role evolved as the war unfolded, but towards the end he was charged by the US military with reporting German progress with war-related technologies and the activities of scientists under Nazi control. He interviewed a great many scientists, including his own PhD mentor (Ejnar Hertzsprung), and when Kuiper was the only person available, he interviewed concentration-camp victims. He carried briefing sheets that identified the technologies being sought by the allies and the major fraction of these involved infrared equipment. He sent back to the USA boxes of documents, and large amounts of equipment, and he stressed to the military his interest in these for his own research. It seems very likely that in this way an effective PbS infrared detector, so critical to Kuiper's career and the future of planetary science, came to the USA and to Robert Cashman's laboratory at Northwestern University. As the war was winding down, Cashman and Kuiper worked together to develop a practical infrared spectrometer for astronomical use. Within months, Kuiper discovered the C02 atmospheres on Mars and Venus.

  19. Resonant infrared detector with substantially unit quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam (Inventor); Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A resonant infrared detector includes an infrared-active layer which has first and second parallel faces and which absorbs radiation of a given wavelength. The detector also includes a first tuned reflective layer, disposed opposite the first face of the infrared-active layer, which reflects a specific portion of the radiation incident thereon and allows a specific portion of the incident radiation at the given wavelength to reach the infrared-active layer. A second reflective layer, disposed opposite the second face of the infrared-active layer, reflects back into the infrared-active layer substantially all of the radiation at the given wavelength which passes through the infrared-active layer. The reflective layers have the effect of increasing the quantum efficiency of the infrared detector relative to the quantum efficiency of the infrared-active layer alone.

  20. Proceedings of the Third Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, Craig R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    This volume consists of 37 papers which summarize results presented at the Third Infrared Detector Technology Workshop, held February 7-9, 1989, at Ames Research Center. The workshop focused on infrared (IR) detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers on discrete IR detectors, cryogenic readouts, extrinsic and intrinsic IR arrays, and recent results from ground-based observations with integrated arrays were given. Recent developments in the second-generation Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared spectrometer and in detectors and arrays for the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) are also included, as are status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) projects.

  1. Fundamental physics of infrared detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinch, Michael A.

    2001-06-01

    The fundamental parameters of IR photon detection are discussed relevant to the meaningful comparison of a wide range of proposed IR detecting materials systems. The thermal generation rate of the IR material is seen to be the key parameter that enables this comparison. The simple materials physics of (1) intrinsic direct bandgap semiconductors, (2) extrinsic semiconductors, (3) quantum well devices, including types I, II, and III superlattices, (4) Si Schottky barriers, are examined with regard to the potential performance of these materials as IR detectors, utilizing the thermal generation rate as a differentiator. The possibility of room temperature photon detection over the whole IR spectral range is discussed, and comparison made with uncooled thermal detection.

  2. Fundamental physics of infrared detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinch, Michael A.

    2000-06-01

    The fundamental parameters of IR photon detection are discussed relevant to the meaningful comparison of a wide range of proposed IR detecting materials systems. The thermal generation rate of the IR material is seen to be the key parameter that enables this comparison. The simple materials physics of 1) intrinsic direct bandgap semiconductors; 2) extrinsic semiconductors; 3) quantum well devices, including types I, II, and III superlattices; 4) Si Schottky barriers; and 5) high temperature superconductors, will be examined with regard to the potential performance of these materials as IR detectors, utilizing the thermal generation rate as a differentiator. The possibility of room temperature photon detection over the whole IR spectral range is discussed, and comparisons made with uncooled thermal detection.

  3. Innovative Long Wavelength Infrared Detector Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on innovative long wavelength (lambda less than 17 microns) infrared (LWIR) detectors with the potential of meeting future NASA and DoD long-duration space application needs. Requirements are for focal plane arrays which operate near 65K using active refrigeration with mission lifetimes of five to ten years. The workshop addressed innovative concepts, new material systems, novel device physics, and current progress in relation to benchmark technology. It also provided a forum for discussion of performance characterization, producibility, reliability, and fundamental limitations of device physics. It covered the status of the incumbent HgCdTe technology, which shows encouraging progress towards LWIR arrays, and provided a snapshot of research and development in several new contender technologies.

  4. Multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiwavelength focal plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y<1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  5. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  6. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Solobodan; Datskou, Irene C.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  7. nBn Infrared Detector Containing Graded Absorption Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Bandara, Sumith V.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed to modify the basic structure of an nBn infrared photodetector so that a plain electron-donor- type (n-type) semiconductor contact layer would be replaced by a graded n-type III V alloy semiconductor layer (i.e., ternary or quarternary) with appropriate doping gradient. The abbreviation nBn refers to one aspect of the unmodified basic device structure: There is an electron-barrier ("B" ) layer between two n-type ("n" ) layers, as shown in the upper part of the figure. One of the n-type layers is the aforementioned photon-absorption layer; the other n-type layer, denoted the contact layer, collects the photocurrent. The basic unmodified device structure utilizes minority-charge-carrier conduction, such that, for reasons too complex to explain within the space available for this article, the dark current at a given temperature can be orders of magnitude lower (and, consequently, signal-to-noise ratios can be greater) than in infrared detectors of other types. Thus, to obtain a given level of performance, less cooling (and, consequently, less cooling equipment and less cooling power) is needed. [In principle, one could obtain the same advantages by means of a structure that would be called pBp because it would include a barrier layer between two electron-acceptor- type (p-type) layers.] The proposed modifications could make it practical to utilize nBn photodetectors in conjunction with readily available, compact thermoelectric coolers in diverse infrared- imaging applications that could include planetary exploration, industrial quality control, monitoring pollution, firefighting, law enforcement, and medical diagnosis.

  8. Using quantum filters as edge detectors in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaños Marín, Daniela

    2014-06-01

    Some new filters inspired in quantum models are used as edge detectors in infrared images. In this case, Bessel, Hermite and Morse filters will be applied to detect edges and fibrillar structures in infrared images. The edge detectors will be built by the Laplacian of the mentioned quantum filters. Furthermore, using curvature operators, curvature detectors and amplifiers of contrast will be constructed to analyze infrared images. The quantum filter prototyping will be done using computer algebra software, specifically Maple and its package, ImageTools. The quantum filters will be applied to infrared images using the technique of convolutions and blurred derivatives. It is expected that designed quantum filters will be useful for analysis and processing of infrared images. As future investigations, we propose to design plugins with the quantum filters that can be incorporated into the program ImageJ, which will facilitate the use of the quantum filters for the infrared image processing.

  9. Uncooled infrared detector and imager development at DALI Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Haitao; Chi, Jiguang; Qian, Liangshan; Pan, Feng; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaorong; Ma, Zhigang

    2015-06-01

    Zhejiang Dali Technology Co. Ltd. is one of the major players in the China Infrared industry. The company has been working on infrared imagers using uncooled FPAs for about 15 years. It started the research and development of uncooled microbolometer detectors since 2006, and has brought several uncooled detectors into mass production, including 35um 384x288, 25um 160x120, 384x288, 640x480, and 17um 384x288, 640x480. In this presentation, we will describe the uncooled infrared detector and imager development at DALI Technology.

  10. Infrared Detectors Overview in the Short Wave Infrared to Far Infrared for CLARREO Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Refaat, Tamer F.

    2010-01-01

    There exists a considerable interest in the broadband detectors for CLARREO Mission, which can be used to detect CO2, O3, H2O, CH4, and other gases. Detection of these species is critical for understanding the Earth?s atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry, and systemic force driving climatic changes. Discussions are focused on current and the most recent detectors developed in SWIR-to-Far infrared range for CLARREO space-based instrument to measure the above-mentioned species. These detector components will make instruments designed for these critical detections more efficient while reducing complexity and associated electronics and weight. We will review the on-going detector technology efforts in the SWIR to Far-IR regions at different organizations in this study.

  11. Effect of space exposure on pyroelectric infrared detectors (A0135)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Clark, I. O.; Crouch, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of long-duration space exposure and launch environment on the performance of pyroelectric detectors which is important for the prediction of performance degradation, setting exposure limits, or determining shielding requirements was investigated. Air pollution monitoring and thermal mapping of the Earth, which includes the remote sensing of aerosols and limb scanning infrared radiometer projects, requires photodetection in the 6- to 20 micro m region of the spectrum. Pyroelectric detectors can detect radiation in the 1- to 100 micro m region while operating at room temperature. This makes tahe pyroelectric detector a prime candidate to fill the thermal infrared detector requirements.

  12. Far-Infrared Blocked Impurity Band Detector Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, H. H.; Guptill, M. T.; Monson, J. C.; Stewart, J. W.; Huffman, J. E.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Abedin, M. N.

    2007-01-01

    DRS Sensors & Targeting Systems, supported by detector materials supplier Lawrence Semiconductor Research Laboratory, is developing far-infrared detectors jointly with NASA Langley under the Far-IR Detector Technology Advancement Partnership (FIDTAP). The detectors are intended for spectral characterization of the Earth's energy budget from space. During the first year of this effort we have designed, fabricated, and evaluated pilot Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors in both silicon and germanium, utilizing pre-existing customized detector materials and photolithographic masks. A second-year effort has prepared improved silicon materials, fabricated custom photolithographic masks for detector process, and begun detector processing. We report the characterization results from the pilot detectors and other progress.

  13. Predictive modeling of infrared detectors and material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin

    Detectors sensitive to thermal and reflected infrared radiation are widely used for night-vision, communications, thermography, and object tracking among other military, industrial, and commercial applications. System requirements for the next generation of ultra-high-performance infrared detectors call for increased functionality such as large formats (> 4K HD) with wide field-of-view, multispectral sensitivity, and on-chip processing. Due to the low yield of infrared material processing, the development of these next-generation technologies has become prohibitively costly and time consuming. In this work, it will be shown that physics-based numerical models can be applied to predictively simulate infrared detector arrays of current technological interest. The models can be used to a priori estimate detector characteristics, intelligently design detector architectures, and assist in the analysis and interpretation of existing systems. This dissertation develops a multi-scale simulation model which evaluates the physics of infrared systems from the atomic (material properties and electronic structure) to systems level (modulation transfer function, dense array effects). The framework is used to determine the electronic structure of several infrared materials, optimize the design of a two-color back-to-back HgCdTe photodiode, investigate a predicted failure mechanism for next-generation arrays, and predict the systems-level measurables of a number of detector architectures.

  14. Electron-beam studies of Schottky-barrier detector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckerar, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the surface anomalies occurring in Schottky-barrier particle detectors identifiable by means of an electron beam technique employed by Czaja (1965) for analyzing defects in diode structures. The technique is shown to make possible the detection and identification of the following anomalies: (1) chemical contamination of the detector surface; (2) mechanical damage of the wafer substrates; (3) damage introduced in semiconductor surface preparation; (4) radiation damage; and (5) defective surface metallization.

  15. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratary test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  16. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratory test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  17. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  18. Heterojunction and superlattice detectors for infrared to ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2016-07-01

    The interest in Infrared and Ultraviolet detectors has increased immensely due to the emergence of important applications over a wide range of activities. Detectors based on free carrier absorption known as Hetero-junction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HEIWIP) detectors and variations of these heterojunction structures to be used as intervalence band detectors for a wide wavelength region are presented. Although this internal photoemission concept is valid for all semiconductor materials systems, using a well-studied III-V system of GaAs/AlxGa1-x As to cover a wide wavelength range from UV to far-infrared (THz) is an important development in detector technology. Using the intervalence band (heavy hole, light hole and split off) transitions for high operating temperature detection of mid Infrared radiation is also discussed. A promising new way to extend the detection wavelength threshold beyond the standard threshold connected with the energy gap in a GaAs/AlxGa1-x As system is also presented. Superlattice detector technology, which is another promising detector architecture, can be optimized using both Type I and Type II heterostructures. Here the focus will be on Type II Strained Layer (T2SL) Superlattice detectors. T2SL Superlattices based on InAs/(In,GA)Sb have made significant improvements demonstrating focal plane arrays operating around 80 K and with multiple band detection capability. A novel spectroscopic method to evaluate the band offsets of both heterojunction and superlattice detectors is also discussed.

  19. Development of double-cantilever infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shusen

    Detection and imaging of infrared (IR) radiation are of great importance to a variety of military and civilian applications. Recent advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of uncooled cantilever IR focal plane arrays (FPAs), which function based on the bending of bimaterial cantilevers upon the absorption of IR energy. In this dissertation, capacitive-based double-cantilever IR FPAs, which have a potential of reaching a noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) approaching the theoretical limit, i.e., <10 mK, are developed. Each pixel in the proposed double-cantilever IR FPAs consists of two facing bimaterial cantilevers: one bends upward and the other downward upon IR radiation, resulting in an extremely high sensitivity of the device. It is predicted that the NETD of the double-cantilever IR FPAs is about 60% of the current single-cantilever IR FPAs, which is a significant improvement of device performance. A surface micromachining module with polyimide as a sacrificial material is developed for the fabrication of both simplified single- and double-cantilever FPAs. It is found the as-fabricated FPAs are curved because of the imbalanced residual stresses (strains) in thin films developed in the fabrication processes. In this dissertation, therefore, the general relationship between the residual strain and the resultant elastic bending deformation is modeled. A thorough investigation of residual stresses in cantilever IR materials and structures is then conducted using the theory developed in this dissertation. Furthermore, thermal-cycling experiments reveal that the residual stresses in IR materials, i.e., plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiNx and electron beam (Ebeam) AI, can be significantly modified by thermal annealing. Therefore, an engineering approach to flattening IR FPAs is developed by using rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Finally, this dissertation demonstrates the thermal detection of cantilever

  20. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  1. Multi-element double ring infrared detector based on InSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo; Lv, Hui; Guo, Li; Liu, Zhu

    2015-10-01

    A multi-element double ring infrared detector based on InSb p-n photodiodes is presented. The presented detector includes an outer ring detector and an inner ring detector. Each ring consist 10 detector elements, five mid-wave infrared detector elements and five short wave infrared detector elements. Two wavebands of 3.5-5 μm and 1.5-3 μm in mid-wave infrared and short wave infrared are adopted. The mid-wave infrared and short wave infrared detector elements are arranged alternately and close to each other to form detection pair. Between the adjacent detector elements, there is an interval to avoid cross talk. Dual band filter thin films are directly coated on the photodiode surface to form a dual band infrared detector. The double ring detector which can perform dual band IR counter-countermeasures can track target effectively under infrared countermeasure conditions.

  2. Infrared focal plane detector modules for space applications at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Dominique; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard; Gassmann, Kai-Uwe; Haiml, Markus; Weber, Andreas; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Ziegler, Johann; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Fick, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of this paper, AIM presents the actual status of some of its currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments for space applications covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) to the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP will be elaborated. Additionally dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC will be addressed.

  3. Development of infrared detector with slot antenna-coupled microbolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kosol; Kislov, Nikolai; Wang, Jing

    2010-04-01

    The current state-of-the-art infrared detection technology requires either exotic materials or cryogenic conditions to perform its duty. Implementing infrared detection by coupling infrared tuned antenna with a micro-bolometer offers a promising technological platform for mass production of un-cooled infrared detectors and imaging arrays. The design, fabrication, and characterization of a planar slotted antenna have been demonstrated on a thin silicon dioxide (SiO2) membrane for infrared detection. The planar slotted antenna was chosen due to its ease of fabrication and greater fabrication tolerance, higher gain and greater bandwidth coveted for the infrared applications. The employment of the SiO2 membrane technology mitigates the losses due to surface waves generated as the radiation coupling into the substrates. In addition, by retaining the membrane thickness to be less than a wavelength, the amount of interference is greatly reduced. A strategically designed planar slotted dipole antenna is implemented along with an integrated direct current (DC) block enabled by co-fabricated on-chip capacitors between the two DC patches to separate DC and high frequency signals without the need for sub-micron DC separation line. As a result of this revision, standard UV photolithography instead of e-beam lithography can be used to fabricate the infrared detectors for mass production. This research is considered as an important step toward our main goal, which is developing ultrafast infrared detector by coupling a planar slotted antenna with a metal insulator metal (MIM) tunneling diode.

  4. Plasmonic lens enhanced mid-infrared quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, Andreas Schwarz, Benedikt; Gansch, Roman; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2014-10-27

    We demonstrate monolithic integrated quantum cascade detectors enhanced by plasmonic lenses. Surface normal incident mid-infrared radiation is coupled to surface plasmon polaritons guided to and detected by the active region of the detector. The lens extends the optical effective active area of the device up to a 5 times larger area than for standard mesa detectors or pixel devices while the electrical active region stays the same. The extended optical area increases the absorption efficiency of the presented device as well as the room temperature performance while it offers a flexible platform for various detector geometries. A photocurrent response increase at room temperature up to a factor of 6 was observed.

  5. Theoretical Study of Midwave Infrared HgCdTe nBn Detectors Operating at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Nima Dehdashti; Jolley, Gregory; Umana-Membreno, Gilberto A.; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    We report a theoretical study of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) unipolar n-type/barrier/ n-type (nBn) detectors for midwave infrared (MWIR) applications at elevated temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the composition, doping, and thickness of the barrier layer in MWIR HgCdTe nBn detectors can be optimized to yield performance levels comparable with those of ideal HgCdTe p- n photodiodes. It is also shown that introduction of an additional barrier at the back contact layer of the detector structure (nBnn+) leads to substantial suppression of the Auger generation-recombination (GR) mechanism; this results in an order-of-magnitude reduction in the dark current level compared with conventional nBn or p- n junction-based detectors, thus enabling background-limited detector operation above 200 K.

  6. Detector requirements for space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements for background-limited (BLIP) detectors are discussed in terms of number of photons falling on each pixel, dark current, high detective quantum efficiencies, large numbers of pixels, and array size.

  7. British Aerospace Cryogenic Coolers For Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Harry W.

    1988-10-01

    The British Aerospace Dynamics Division has been active in the infrared field since the early 1950's. Originally infrared sensors were, and in many cases still are, cooled with Joule-Thomson coolers associated with rechargeable gas-bottles. Today, there is also a need for zero maintenance systems. To meet this need British Aerospace has productionised a range of viable Stirling Cycle cryogenic coolers. This paper summarises the intensive development programme which has taken place over the last seven years on such applications as the British Aerospace infrared linescan system for the Tornado and their suitability for further applications; both infrared and other sensors where signal-to-noise improvements at low temperatures are beneficial.

  8. Infrared imaging using carbon nanotube-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongzhi; Xi, Ning; Song, Bo; Chen, Liangliang; Lai, King W. C.; Lou, Jianyong

    2011-06-01

    Using carbon nanotubes (CNT), high performance infrared detectors have been developed. Since the CNTs have extraordinary optoelectronics properties due to its unique one dimensional geometry and structure, the CNT based infrared detectors have extremely low dark current, low noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), short response time, and high dynamic range. Most importantly, it can detect 3-5 um middle-wave infrared (MWIR) at room temperature. This unique feature can significantly reduce the size and weight of a MWIR imaging system by eliminating a cryogenic cooling system. However, there are two major difficulties that impede the application of CNT based IR detectors for imaging systems. First, the small diameter of the CNTs results in low fill factor. Secondly, it is difficult to fabricate large scale of detector array for high resolution focal plane due to the limitations on the efficiency and cost of the manufacturing. In this paper, a new CNT based IR imaging system will be presented. Integrating the CNT detectors with photonic crystal resonant cavity, the fill factor of the CNT based IR sensor can reach as high as 0.91. Furthermore, using the compressive sensing technology, a high resolution imaging can be achieved by CNT based IR detectors. The experimental testing results show that the new imaging system can achieve the superb performance enabled by CNT based IR detectors, and, at the same time, overcame its difficulties to achieve high resolution and efficient imaging.

  9. Development of an ultrahigh-performance infrared detector platform for advanced spectroscopic sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manish; Wicks, Gary; Marshall, Andrew; Craig, Adam; Golding, Terry; Hossain, Khalid; McEwan, Ken; Howle, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Laser-based stand-off sensing of threat agents (e.g. explosives, toxic industrial chemicals or chemical warfare agents), by detection of distinct infrared spectral absorption signature of these materials, has made significant advances recently. This is due in part to the availability of infrared and terahertz laser sources with significantly improved power and tunability. However, there is a pressing need for a versatile, high performance infrared sensor that can complement and enhance the recent advances achieved in laser technology. This work presents new, high performance infrared detectors based on III-V barrier diodes. Unipolar barrier diodes, such as the nBn, have been very successful in the MWIR using InAs(Sb)-based materials, and in the MWIR and LWIR using type-II InAsSb/InAs superlattice-based materials. This work addresses the extension of the barrier diode architecture into the SWIR region, using GaSb-based and InAs-based materials. The program has resulted in detectors with unmatched performance in the 2-3 μm spectral range. Temperature dependent characterization has shown dark currents to be diffusion limited and equal to, or within a factor of 5, of the Rule 07 expression for Auger-limited HgCdTe detectors. Furthermore, D* values are superior to those of existing detectors in the 2-3 μm band. Of particular significance to spectroscopic sensing systems is the ability to have near-background limited performance at operation temperatures compatible with robust and reliable solid state thermoelectric coolers.

  10. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  11. Mid/far-infrared photo-detectors based on graphene asymmetric quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Salem, E.; Chaabani, R.; Jaziri, S.

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a theoretical study on the electronic properties of a single-layer graphene asymmetric quantum well. Quantification of energy levels is limited by electron–hole conversion at the barrier interfaces and free-electron continuum. Electron–hole conversion at the barrier interfaces can be controlled by introducing an asymmetry between barriers and taking into account the effect of the interactions of the graphene sheet with the substrate. The interaction with the substrate induces an effective mass to carriers, allowing observation of Fabry–Pérot resonances under normal incidence and extinction of Klein tunneling. The asymmetry, between barriers creates a transmission gap between confined states and free-electron continuum, allowing the large graphene asymmetric quantum well to be exploited as a photo-detector operating at mid- and far-infrared frequency regimes.

  12. Mid/far-infrared photo-detectors based on graphene asymmetric quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Salem, E.; Chaabani, R.; Jaziri, S.

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a theoretical study on the electronic properties of a single-layer graphene asymmetric quantum well. Quantification of energy levels is limited by electron-hole conversion at the barrier interfaces and free-electron continuum. Electron-hole conversion at the barrier interfaces can be controlled by introducing an asymmetry between barriers and taking into account the effect of the interactions of the graphene sheet with the substrate. The interaction with the substrate induces an effective mass to carriers, allowing observation of Fabry-Pérot resonances under normal incidence and extinction of Klein tunneling. The asymmetry, between barriers creates a transmission gap between confined states and free-electron continuum, allowing the large graphene asymmetric quantum well to be exploited as a photo-detector operating at mid- and far-infrared frequency regimes.

  13. Materials processing threshold report. 1: Semiconductor crystals for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, E. V.; Thompson, T. R.; Nagler, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive search was performed of the open literature pertaining to infrared detectors to determine what constitutes a good detector and in what way performance is limited by specific material properties. Interviews were conducted with a number of experts in the field to assess their perceptions of the state of the art and of the utility of zero-gravity processing. Based on this information base and on a review of NASA programs in crystal growth and infrared sensors, NASA program goals were reassessed and suggestions are presented as to possible joint and divergent efforts between NASA and DOD.

  14. SDIO long wavelength infrared detector requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duston, Dwight

    1990-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has a significant requirement for infrared sensors for surveillance, tracking and discrimination of objects in space. Projected SDIO needs cover the range from short wavelengths out to 30 microns. Large arrays are required, and producibility and cost are major factors. The SDIO is pursuing several approaches including innovative concepts based on semiconductors and superconductors.

  15. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  16. Practical design of infrared detector circuits.

    PubMed

    Berger, T; Brookner, E

    1967-07-01

    The practical design of the receiver circuitry for an ir surveillance system is considered. A design procedure for obtaining high signal detectability is presented and illustrated with an explicit example. Filtering circuitry is designed which takes into account the nonwhite noise of the detector cell and the first stage of amplification. The tradeoffs between signal detectability, accuracy, resolution, and background suppression are also discussed. PMID:20062160

  17. Development of Kinetic Inductance Detectors for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlis, Alyssa; Aguirre, James E.; Stevenson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An instrument with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at far-infrared wavelengths could contribute significantly to several currently unanswered questions in astrophysics. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a spectroscopic experiment at far-infrared wavelengths using kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). KIDs have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. Specifically, the approach we take uses lumped-element KIDs, which consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements combined to form a microresonator. The inductive element serves as a direct radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels, along with results from a prototype detector array.

  18. High photoresponse in hybrid graphene-carbon nanotube infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongtao; Christianson, Caleb; Weintrub, Ben; Wu, Judy Z

    2013-11-27

    Efficient exciton dissociation is crucial to obtaining high photonic response in photodetectors. This work explores implementation of a novel exciton dissociation mechanism through heterojunctions self-assembled at the graphene/MWCNT (multiwall carbon nanotube) interfaces in graphene/MWCNT nanohybrids. Significantly enhanced near-infrared photoresponsivity by nearly an order of magnitude has been achieved on the graphene/MWCNT nanohybrids as compared to the best achieved so far on carbon nanotube (CNT) only infrared (IR) detectors. This leads to a high detectivity up to 1.5 × 10(7) cm·Hz(1/2)·W(-1) in the graphene/MWCNT nanohybrid, which represents a 500% improvement over the best D* achieved on MWCNT film IR detectors and may be further improved with optimization on the interfacial heterojunctions. This approach of the self-assembly of graphene/CNT nanohybrids provides a pathway toward high-performance and low-cost carbon nanostructure IR detectors.

  19. Schottky Barrier CdTe(Cl) Detectors for Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Yosef; Floyd, Samuel

    2002-10-01

    Schottky barrier cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation detectors of dimensions 2mm × 2mm × 1mm and segmented monolithic 3cm × 3 cm × 1mm are under study at GSFC for future NASA planetary instruments. These instruments will perform x-ray fluorescence spectrometry of the surface and monitor the solar x-ray flux spectrum, the excitation source for the characteristic x-rays emitted from the planetary body. The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the most recent example of such a remote sensing technique. Its x-ray fluorescence detectors were gas proportional counters with a back up Si PIN solar monitor. Analysis of NEAR data has shown the necessity to develop a solar x-ray detector with efficiency extending to 30keV. Proportional counters and Si diodes have low sensitivity above 9keV. Our 2mm × 2mm × 1mm CdTe operating at -30°C possesses an energy resolution of 250eV FWHM for 55Fe with unit efficiency to up to 30keV. This is an excellent candidate for a solar monitor. Another ramification of the NEAR data is a need to develop a large area detector system, 20-30 cm2, with cosmic ray charged particle rejection, for measuring the characteristic radiation. A 3cm × 3cm × 1mm Schottky CdTe segmented monolithic detector is under investigation for this purpose. A tiling of 2-3 such detectors will result in the desired area. The favorable characteristics of Schottky CdTe detectors, the system design complexities when using CdTe and its adaptation to future missions will be discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector... evaluate suspected brain hematomas. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special...

  3. Construction of prototypes of a new class of infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.

    1976-01-01

    A class of infrared detectors is proposed and experimental results are presented for a prototype device. The material used is LaF3, an ionic conductor with a capacitance that varies exponentially with temperature. The detectivity of a prototype detector is estimated from measured signal voltages and incident power, and a Johnson noise voltage calculated from the measured resistance. For the parameters characterizing this device the estimated detectivity is consistent with a theoretical prediction. The theory further predicts an optimum detectivity for much thinner devices than the prototypes.

  4. Low-background detector arrays for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Estrada, J. A.; Goebel, J. H.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Weber, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    The status of a program which develops and characterizes integrated infrared (IR) detector array technology for space astronomical applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, coupled to silicon readout electronics. Low-background laboratory test results include measurements of responsivity, noise, dark current, temporal response, and the effects of gamma-radiation. In addition, successful astronomical imagery has been obtained on some arrays from this program. These two aspects of the development combine to demonstrate the strong potential for integrated array technology for IR space astronomy.

  5. JWST Near-Infrared Detectors: Latest Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Chiao, Meng; Clemons, Brian L.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lavaque, Dodolfo J.; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2013, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 x 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the NIRSpec flight arrays as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

  6. Kinetic inductance detectors for far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlis, A.; Aguirre, J.; Stevenson, T.

    2016-07-01

    The star formation mechanisms at work in the early universe remain one of the major unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. Many of the luminous galaxies present during the period of peak star formation (at redshift of about 2.5) were heavily enshrouded in dust, which makes observing their properties difficult at optical wavelengths. However, many spectral lines exist at far-infrared wavelengths that serve as tracers of star formation. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a balloon-borne spectroscopic intensity mapping experiment at far-infrared wavelengths. The system uses lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs), which have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. KIDs consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements, and use the inductive element as the radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels.

  7. Space applications of superconductivity - Microwave and infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth of a seven part series on the potential applications of superconductivity in space. The potential of superconducting microwave and infrared detectors for space applications is reviewed. The devices considered include bolometers, super-Schottky diodes and Josephson junctions operating as oscillators, mixers, and parametric amplifiers. In each case the description includes the physical mechanism, theoretical limits and the current state of the art for the superconducting device as well as its nonsuperconducting competitors.

  8. Cooled and uncooled infrared detectors for missile seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, Rami; Haski, Jacob; Mizrahi, Udi; Shkedy, Lior; Shtrichman, Itay; Pinsky, Ephi

    2014-06-01

    Electro-optical missile seekers pose exceptional requirements for infrared (IR) detectors. These requirements include: very short mission readiness (time-to-image), one-time and relatively short mission duration, extreme ambient conditions, high sensitivity, fast frame rate, and in some cases small size and cost. SCD is engaged in the development and production of IR detectors for missile seeker applications for many years. 0D, 1D and 2D InSb focal plane arrays (FPAs) are packaged in specially designed fast cool-down Dewars and integrated with Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers. These cooled MWIR detectors were integrated in numerous seekers of various missile types, for short and long range applications, and are combat proven. New technologies for the MWIR, such as epi-InSb and XBn-InAsSb, enable faster cool-down time and higher sensitivity for the next generation seekers. The uncooled micro-bolometer technology for IR detectors has advanced significantly over the last decade, and high resolution - high sensitivity FPAs are now available for different applications. Their much smaller size and cost with regard to the cooled detectors makes these uncooled LWIR detectors natural candidates for short and mid-range missile seekers. In this work we will present SCD's cooled and uncooled solutions for advanced electro-optical missile seekers.

  9. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  10. Photoacoustic-based detector for infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, L.; Palzer, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present an alternative detector technology for use in direct absorption spectroscopy setups. Instead of a semiconductor based detector, we use the photoacoustic effect to gauge the light intensity. To this end, the target gas species is hermetically sealed under excess pressure inside a miniature cell along with a MEMS microphone. Optical access to the cell is provided by a quartz window. The approach is particularly suitable for tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the mid-infrared range, where numerous molecules exhibit large absorption cross sections. Moreover, a frequency standard is integrated into the method since the number density and pressure inside the cell are constant. We demonstrate that the information extracted by our method is at least equivalent to that achieved using a semiconductor-based photon detector. As exemplary and highly relevant target gas, we have performed direct spectroscopy of methane at the R3-line of the 2v3 band at 6046.95 cm-1 using both detector technologies in parallel. The results may be transferred to other infrared-active transitions without loss of generality.

  11. Characterization of barrier effects in superlattice LWIR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhiger, David R.; Kvaas, Robert E.; Harris, Sean F.; Kolasa, Borys P.; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.

    2010-04-01

    Improved LWIR sensors are needed for defense applications. We report an advance in sensor technology based on diodes in type-II strained layer superlattice structures built in the InAs/GaSb/AlSb materials system. A key feature of the devices is a pair of complementary barriers, namely, an electron barrier and a hole barrier formed at different depths in the growth sequence. The structure is known as CBIRD. This work is a collaborative effort between Raytheon Vision Systems and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with design and growth being performed at JPL, and processing and testing at RVS. We have analyzed the current-voltage characteristics as functions of temperature and junction area, and have measured the spectral response and quantum efficiency as functions of bias voltage. From the temperature dependence of the dark current in a typical case, we infer that the effective barrier height is 0.175 eV. This indicates that dark current is limited by the barriers rather than diffusion or GR mechanisms occurring within the absorber region where the bandgap is 0.13 eV. The barriers prove to be very effective in suppressing the dark current. In the case of a detector having a cutoff wavelength of 9.24 μm, we find R0A > 105 ohm cm2 at 78 K, as compared with about 100 ohm cm2 for an InAs/GaSb homojunction of the same cutoff. For good photo response, the device must be biased to typically -200 or -250 mV. In this condition we find the internal quantum efficiency to be greater than 50%, while the RA remains above 104 ohm cm2. Thus, the device shows both high RA and good quantum efficiency at the same operating bias. We have also measured the capacitance of the CBIRD device as functions of bias and frequency to help characterize the behavior of the barriers. A 256×256 focal plane array was fabricated with this structure which showed at 78K a responsivity operability of more than 99%.

  12. An aeronomical application of a germanium near infrared (NIR) detector

    SciTech Connect

    Noto, J.; Kerr, R.B.; Rudy, R.J.; Williams, R.; Hecht, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    A collaboration between Boston University and the Aerospace corporation has resulted in a germanium based detector used in conjunction with an infrared optimized Fabry-Perot spectrometer. Gold plated mirrors were installed and the appropriate transmissive optics are used in the Fabry-Perot to optimize the NIR transmission. The detector is a germanium PIN diode coated with a layer of silicon-nitride. Current produced by the detector is measured by using a Capacitive Trans-Impedance Amplifier (CITA). An A/D converter samples the amplified capacitor voltage and outputs a 12 bit word that is then passed on to the controlling computer system. The detector, amplifier, and associated electronics are mounted inside a standard IR dewar and operated at 77 K. The authors have operated this detector and spectrometer system at Millstone Hill for about 6 months. Acceptable noise characteristics, a NEP of 10{sup {minus}17} watts, and a QE of 90% at 1.2 {micro}m, have been achieved with an amplifier gain of 200. The system is currently configured for observations of thermospheric helium, and has made the first measurement of the He 10,830 {angstrom} nightglow emission isolated from OH contamination. In an effort to both increase the sensitivity of the Fabry-Perot in the visible and to adapt it for planetary astronomy the authors have entered into a collaboration with CIDTEC. A Charge Injection Detector or CID has some unique capabilities that distinguish it from a CCD and the authors are evaluating it as a detector for the Hadinger fringe pattern produced by a Fabry-Perot. The CID allows non-destructive readout and random access of individual pixels with in the entire frame, this allows for both ``electronic masking`` of bright objects and allows each fringe to be observed without having to readout a large number of dark pixels.

  13. SAT's infrared equipment using second-generation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siriex, Michel B.

    1995-09-01

    In 1982 SAT proposed for the first time a second generation detector in the design of FLIRs for the TRIGAT program, since then different types of IR equipment have been developed on the basis of this technology: (1) An infra-red seeker for the MICA missile. (2) Three types of IRST: VAMPIR MB for naval applications, SIRENE for the Army and OSF for the Rafale aircraft. (3) Three thermal imagers: Condor 1 for the mast mounted sight equipping the long range anti tank system, Tiger installed on the sight of the medium range antitank system, and Condor 2 for the pilot sight of the TRIGAT French-German helicopter. Infra-red detectors are MCT IR-CCD focal plane arrays developed by SOFRADIR with the objective of the best standardization possible in spite of different configurations and specifications for each program. In this paper, we intend to present the main features of this technology for these programs and the advantages obtained by comparison with the first generation in terms of performance. Industrialization of these products is starting now, and a specific effort has been made to standardize the components, especially the driving and read out electronics. A set of ASICs has been developed to make compact detection modules including a detector in his dewar, a cooling machine, and a proximity electronic.

  14. Optical motion detector detecting visible and near infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobart R., Jr.

    1990-02-01

    An optical motion detector detects changes in scene lighting indicative of motion and is also capable of detecting surveillance by active night vision devices using near-infrared light. The detector includes two photodetectors which each provide data to a signal processing network. One photodetector is sensitive to visible light; the other to near-infrared light. Both signal processing networks are identical and include a sample-and-hold, a comparator network, and a pulse stretcher. The output of a photodetector is provided to the sample-and-hold and comparator network. The comparator network compares a voltage corresponding to the instantaneously detected ambient lighting scene with a voltage corresponding to a reference lighting scene. The pulse stretcher receives the output of the comparator network and in turn provides an output to a logical processor. The logical processor compares the outputs of both signal processing networks and provides an output indicating surveillance with near-infrared light. The logical processor also indicates any perturbations in intensities of incandescent and fluorescent light.

  15. The development of infrared detectors and mechanisms for use in future infrared space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The environment above earth's atmosphere offers significant advantages in sensitivity and wavelength coverage in infrared astronomy over ground-based observatories. In support of future infrared space missions, technology development efforts were undertaken to develop detectors sensitive to radiation between 2.5 micron and 200 micron. Additionally, work was undertaken to develop mechanisms supporting the imaging and spectroscopy requirements of infrared space missions. Arsenic-doped-Silicon and Antimony-doped-Silicon Blocked Impurity Band detectors, responsive to radiation between 4 micron and 45 micron, were produced in 128x128 picture element arrays with the low noise, high sensitivity performance needed for space environments. Technology development continued on Gallium-doped-Germanium detectors (for use between 80 micron and 200 micron), but were hampered by contamination during manufacture. Antimony-doped-Indium detectors (for use between 2.5 micron and 5 micron) were developed in a 256x256 pixel format with high responsive quantum efficiency and low dark current. Work began on adapting an existing cryogenic mechanism design for space-based missions; then was redirected towards an all-fixed optical design to improve reliability and lower projected mission costs.

  16. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  17. InGaAs Detectors for Miniature Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, T. N.; Staller, C.; Dejewski, S.; Cunningham, T.; Herring, M.; Fossum, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    In the past year, there has been substantial impetus for NASA to consider missions that are of relatively low cost as a trade off for a higher new mission launch rate. To maintain low mission cost, these missions will be of short duration and will use smaller launch vehicles (e.g. Pegasus). Consequently, very low volume, very low mass instrument (a.k.a. miniature instrument) payloads will be required. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the number of instruments flown on a particular mission will also be highly constrained; consequently increased instrument capability will also be desired. In the case of infrared instruments, focal planes typically require cooling to ensure high performance of the detectors, especially in the case of spectrometers where high D* is necessary. In this paper, we discuss the InGaAs detector technology and its potential.

  18. Fundamental limits of MWIR HgCdTe barrier detectors operating under non-equilibrium mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Jóźwikowski, K.; Rogalski, A.

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents numerical considerations of temperature-dependent performance of different mid-wave infrared HgCdTe detectors (with p- and n-type active layer) for non-equilibrium operation. Current-voltage characteristics of double heterostructure PpN photodiode, pBppN barrier photodiode, nBnn and nBnnN barrier detectors are compared to find an optimal architecture for high-operating temperature conditions. Using our model, the calculated characteristics of the devices are fitted to the experimental results for HgCdTe photodiode grown on GaAs substrate by metal organic chemical vapour deposition. The performance of photodiodes with p-type absorber are limited by the generation current associated with the Shockley-Read-Hall process, while nBnn type devices (with the n-type absorber) indicate a diffusion limited dark currents associated with Auger processes. At high values of the reverse bias (over 1 V), the trap states located at dislocations lead to strong band-to-band and trap-assisted tunnelling due to high electric field within the depletion layer.

  19. Can graphene make better HgCdTe infrared detectors?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We develop a simple and low-cost technique based on chemical vapor deposition from which large-size graphene films with 5-10 graphene layers can be produced reliably and the graphene films can be transferred easily onto HgCdTe (MCT) thin wafers at room temperature. The proposed technique does not cause any thermal and mechanical damages to the MCT wafers. It is found that the averaged light transmittance of the graphene film on MCT thin wafer is about 80% in the mid-infrared bandwidth at room temperature and 77 K. Moreover, we find that the electrical conductance of the graphene film on the MCT substrate is about 25 times larger than that of the MCT substrate at room temperature and 77 K. These experimental findings suggest that, from a physics point of view, graphene can be utilized as transparent electrodes as a replacement for metal electrodes while producing better and cheaper MCT infrared detectors. PMID:21711816

  20. Reflow flip-chip bonding technology for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yue; Lin, Chun; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Ding, Rui-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Based on the self-alignment principle, a new reflow flip-chip bonding technology for infrared detectors is proposed. By optimizing the dimensions between the under bump metallization (UBM) and the indium bump, 10 µm tall spherical indium balls are achieved firstly. Then the technical parameters of heating temperature and surface pre-treatment are discussed. Thereafter, a new reflow flip-chip bonding technology is applied to the infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) and it results in a 6.7% of the total bad pixel percentage which is dramatically decreased compared with the thermo-compression one of 41.9%. The deduced fatigue life of the IRFPA bonded by the new reflow flip-chip bonding technology is four times longer than that of the thermo-compression one.

  1. InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Masur, Michael; Schmitz, Johannes; Daumer, Volker; Niemasz, Jasmin; Vandervelde, Thomas; DeMeo, Dante; Luppold, Wolfgang; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann; Walther, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Future heterojunction InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) detector devices in the long-wavelength infrared regime (LWIR, 8-12 μm) require an accurate bandstructure model and a successful surface passivation. In this study, we have validated the superlattice empirical pseudopotential method developed by Dente and Tilton over a wide range of bandgap energies. Furthermore, dark current data for a novel dielectric surface passivation for LWIR devices is presented. Next, we present a technique for high-resolution, full-wafer mapping of etch pit densities on commercial (1 0 0) GaSb substrates, which allows to study the local correlation between threading dislocations in the substrate and the electro-optical pixel performance. Finally, recent performance data for 384 × 288 dual-color InAs/GaSb superlattice imagers for the mid-wavelength infrared (MWR, 3-5 μm) is given.

  2. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  3. Progress in MOCVD growth of HgCdTe epilayers for HOT infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebłowski, A.; Gawron, W.; Martyniuk, P.; Stepień, D.; Kolwas, K.; Piotrowski, J.; Madejczyk, P.; Kopytko, M.; Piotrowski, A.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present progress in MOCVD growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology and Vigo System S.A. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool in fabrication of different HgCdTe detector structures with a wide range of composition, donor/acceptor doping and without post grown annealing. Particular progress has been achieved in the growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers for long wavelength infrared photoconductors operated in HOT conditions. The (100) HgCdTe photoconductor optimized for 13-μm attain detectivity equal to 6.5x109 Jones and therefore outperform its (111) counterpart. The paper also presents technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown (111) HgCdTe barrier detectors. The barrier device performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. The detectivity of HgCdTe detectors is close to the value marked HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07".

  4. An improved far-infrared microscope with quantum Hall detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikushima, Kenji; Sakuma, Hisato; Komiyama, Susumu

    2003-05-01

    A highly-sensitive scanning far-infrared (FIR) microscope is developed. The microscope consists of a silicon solid immersion lens that probes FIR and a condenser lens that focuses the FIR onto a small and highly-sensitive quantum Hall detector. The solid immersion lens is in contact with a sample, which is moved with a mechanical stage. The microscope is successfully applied to image extremely weak cyclotron emission from quantum Hall devices with a spatial resolution about 50 μm and a signal-to-noise ratio improved by a factor 18 compared to a previous system.

  5. Crosstalk study of near infrared InGaAs detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Fan, Cui; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Jianwei; Wei, Jun; Gong, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Crosstalk characteristics of high density FPA detectors attract widespread attention in the application of electro-optical systems. Crosstalk characteristics of near-infrared (NIR) InGaAs photodiodes and focal plane arrays (FPAs) were studied in this paper. The mesa type detector was investigated by using laser beam induced current technique (LBIC) to measure the absorption outside the designed photosensitive area, and the results show that the excess absorption enlarges the crosstalk of the adjacent pixels. The structure optimization using the effective absorption layer between the pixels can effectively reduce the crosstalk to 2.5%. The major crosstalk components of the optimization photodiode come from the electronic signal caused by carrier lateral diffusion. For the planar type detectors, test structures were used to compare the crosstalk of different structures, and the guard ring structure shows good suppression of the crosstalk. Then the back-illuminated 32x32 InGaAs photodiodes with 30μm pitch were designed, and LBIC was used to measure its lateral diffusion of the effective carriers and fill factor of photosensitive area. The results indicate that the fill factor of detectors can reach up to 98% when the diffusion region is optimized, and the minimum response exists between two neighborhood pixels. Based on these crosstalk measurement results and optimizing structure designs, the linear InGaAs photodiodes were designed and thus the InGaAs FPA assembly was fabricated. The assembly shows higher electro-optical performance and good improvement on crosstalk. The assembly was applied in infrared imaging system and modulation transfer function (MTF) of FPA assembly was calculated to be above 0.50. The clear image based on FPA assembly was obtained.

  6. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  7. Type-II superlattice infrared detector technology at Fraunhofer IAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Daumer, Volker; Hugger, Tsvetelina; Kohn, Norbert; Luppold, Wolfgang; Müller, Raphael; Niemasz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Stadelmann, Tim; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    For more than two decades, Antimony-based type-II superlattice photodetectors for the infrared spectral range between 3-15 μm are under development at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF). Today, Fraunhofer IAF is Germany's only national foundry for InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice detectors and we cover a wide range of aspects from basic materials research to small series production in this field. We develop single-element photodetectors for sensing systems as well as two-dimensional detector arrays for high-performance imaging and threat warning systems in the mid-wavelength and long-wavelength region of the thermal infrared. We continuously enhance our production capabilities by extending our in-line process control facilities. As a recent example, we present a semiautomatic wafer probe station that has developed into an important tool for electrooptical characterization. A large amount of the basic materials research focuses on the reduction of the dark current by the development of bandgap engineered device designs on the basis of heterojunction concepts. Recently, we have successfully demonstrated Europe's first LWIR InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice imager with 640x512 pixels with 15 μm pitch. The demonstrator camera already delivers a good image quality and achieves a thermal resolution better than 30 mK.

  8. Infrared light field imaging using single carbon nanotube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Chen, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanxin; Yang, Ruiguo; Song, Bo; Sun, Zhiyong

    2014-06-01

    The conventional photographs only record the sum total of light rays of each point on image plane so that they tell little about the amount of light traveling along individual rays. The focus and lens aberration problems have challenged photographers since the very beginning therefore light field photography was proposed to solve these problems. Lens array and multiple camera systems are used to capture 4D light rays, by reordering the different views of scene from multiple directions. The coded aperture is another method to encode the angular information in frequency domain. However, infrared light field sensing is still widely opening to research. In the paper, we will propose micro plane mirror optics together with compressive sensing algorithm to record light field in infrared spectrum. The micro mirror reflects objects irradiation and forms a virtual image behind the plane in which the mirror lies. The Digital Micromirror (DMD) consists of millions microscale mirrors which work as CCD array in the camera and it is controlled separately so as to project linear combination of object image onto lens. Coded aperture could be utilized to control angular resolution of infrared light rays. The carbon nanotube based infrared detector, which has ultra high signal to noise ratio and ultra fast responsibility, will sum up all image information on it without image distortion. Based on a number of measurements, compressive sensing algorithm was used to recover images from distinct angles, which could compute different views of scene to reconstruct infrared light field scence. Two innovative applications of full image recovery using nano scale photodetector and DMD based synthetic aperture photography will also be discussed in this paper.

  9. Noise spectrum measurements of a midwave, interband cascade infrared photodetector with 33 nm wide electron barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treider, Laura A.; Cowan, Vincent M.; Morath, Christian P.; Tian, Zhaobing; Krishna, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) potentially offer mid-wave infrared detection at very high operating temperatures due to their nearly ideal photovoltaic operation. An ICIP typically makes use of several cascade stages grown in series, each of which consists of an active absorption region with a mid-wave cutoff wavelength, an intra-band relaxation region for electron transport and an inter-band tunneling region to enable electron transport to the next stage. The latter two also effectively act as a hole-barrier (hB) and an electron-barrier (eB), respectively, forming a preferential path for each carrier. Here, an ICIP with a relatively large eB was investigated. One of the key parameters to measure for detector performance is the noise spectrum, particularly to observe the behavior at low frequencies where the noise is often much larger than estimates based on the ideal shot noise expression would predict. This paper presents the results of noise spectrum measurements of differently sized ICIP devices, taken using an external trans-impedance amplifier with a cooled, internal impedance converter and a cooled feedback resistor. Measurements were taken at different operating temperatures and voltage biases in order to determine the noise-dependence on each.

  10. Infrared dual-band detectors for next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Chabuel, Fabien; Vaz, Cedric; Billon-Lanfrey, David; Baylet, Jacques; Gravrand, Olivier; Ballet, Philippe; Destefanis, Gérard

    2011-06-01

    The development of DB (Dual-Band) infrared detectors has been the core of research and technological improvements for the last ten years at CEA-LETI and Sofradir: the semi planar structure uses a proven standard process with robust reproducibility, leading to low-risk and a facilitated ramp-up to production. This makes it the natural choice for the third generation detectors proposed by Sofradir. The fabrication of DB MCT detectors is reaching maturity: ALTAIR with 24μm-pixel pitch arrays in TV format are available, showing median NETD around 18mK with operability over 99.5%. A second structure, based on two back to back diodes, with a single contact per pixel translates the DB pixel into smaller cell therefore being more efficient in terms of pitch reduction. These new technologies widen perspectives and open new horizons of applications such as large DB FPA, dual mode capability providing both SAL (Semi Active Laser) and IR operations for more robust target engagement or compact dual color detection with wide-angle integrated optics for missile warning system.

  11. Compact dewar and electronics for large-format infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manissadjian, A.; Magli, S.; Mallet, E.; Cassaigne, P.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared systems cameras trend is to require higher performance (thanks to higher resolution) and in parallel higher compactness for easier integration in systems. The latest developments at SOFRADIR / France on HgCdTe (Mercury Cadmium Telluride / MCT) cooled IR staring detectors do show constant improvements regarding detector performances and compactness, by reducing the pixel pitch and optimizing their encapsulation. Among the latest introduced detectors, the 15μm pixel pitch JUPITER HD-TV format (1280×1024) has to deal with challenging specifications regarding dewar compactness, low power consumption and reliability. Initially introduced four years ago in a large dewar with a more than 2kg split Stirling cooler compressor, it is now available in a new versatile compact dewar that is vacuum-maintenance-free over typical 18 years mission profiles, and that can be integrated with the different available Stirling coolers: K548 microcooler for light solution (less than 0.7 kg), K549 or LSF9548 for split cooler and/or higher reliability solution. The IDDCAs are also required with simplified electrical interface enabling to shorten the system development time and to standardize the electronic boards definition with smaller volumes. Sofradir is therefore introducing MEGALINK, the new compact Command & Control Electronics compatible with most of the Sofradir IDDCAs. MEGALINK provides all necessary input biases and clocks to the FPAs, and digitizes and multiplexes the video outputs to provide a 14 bit output signal through a cameralink interface, in a surface smaller than a business card.

  12. SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission long-wavelength infrared detectors fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon; Ksendzov, A.; Dejewski, Suzan M.; Jones, Eric W.; Fathauer, Robert W.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    A new SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detector has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The detection mechanism of the SiGe/Si HIP detector is infrared absorption in the degenerately doped p+-SiGe layer followed by internal photoemission of photoexcited holes over a heterojunction barrier. By adjusting the Ge concentration in the SiGe layer, and, consequently, the valence band offset between SiGe and Si, the cutoff wavelength of SiGe HIP detectors can be extended into the LWIR (8-17-micron) regime. Detectors were fabricated by growing p+-SiGe layers using MBE on patterned p-type Si substrates. The SiGe layers were boron-doped, with concentrations ranging from 10 to the 19th/cu cm to 4 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm. Infrared absorption of 5-25 percent in a 30-nm-thick p+-SiGe layer was measured in the 3-20-micron range using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Quantum efficiencies of 3-5 percent have been obtained from test devices in the 8-12-micron range.

  13. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  14. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  15. Visible and infrared linear detector arrays for the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Gary C.

    1987-01-01

    The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument uses four separate focal plane assemblies consisting of line array detectors that are multiplexed to a common J-FET preamp using a FET switch multiplexing (MUX) technique. A 32-element silicon line array covers the spectral range from 0.41 to 0.70 microns. Three additional 64-element indium antimonide (InSb) line arrays cover the spectral range from 0.68 to 2.45 microns. The spectral sampling interval per detector element is nominally 9.8 nm, giving a total of 224 spectral channels. All focal planes operate at liquid nitrogen temperature and are housed in separate dewars. Electrical performance characteristics include a read noise of less than 1000 e(-) in all channels, response and dark nonuniformity of 5 percent peak to peak, and quantum efficiency of greater than 60 percent.

  16. Detection mechanisms in microstrip dipole antenna-coupled infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codreanu, Iulian; Gonzalez, Francisco J.; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2003-06-01

    We compare the detection mechanisms employed in microstrip dipole antenna-coupled infrared detectors. The electrical currents induced along the antenna arms are detected by a rectangular niobium (Nb) microsensor placed at the center of the antenna. The ohmic nature of the Au-Nb contact determines the detection mechanism. Devices with linear contacts between the Au antenna arms and the Nb microsensor exhibit bolometric response. A nonlinear Au-insulator-Nb junction rectifies the induced antenna currents. Devices with nonlinear contacts also exhibit a bolometric response. The devices with nonlinear contacts are 1/ f noise limited while the devices with linear contacts are Johnson noise limited. The rectification mechanism is 5.3 times faster than the thermal detection. The current-voltage ( I- V) characteristic of the devices exhibiting bolometric response is linear, while that of the rectifying devices is cubic. For devices with nonlinear contacts excellent agreement is obtained between the measured detector response and the ratio between the second and the first derivative of the I- V characteristic.

  17. Method of fabricating multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiwavelength local plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y.ltoreq.1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  18. Infra-red detector and method of making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Craig, Richard A.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2007-02-20

    A low-cost infra-red detector is disclosed including a method of making and using the same. The detector employs a substrate, a filtering layer, a converting layer, and a diverter to be responsive to wavelengths up to about 1600 nm. The detector is useful for a variety of applications including spectroscopy, imaging, and defect detection.

  19. Design philosophy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory infrared detector test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R.; Blessinger, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    To support the development of advanced infrared remote sensing instrumentation using line and area arrays, a test facility has been developed to characterize the detectors. The necessary performance characteristics of the facility were defined by considering current and projected requirements for detector testing. The completed facility provides the desired level of detector testing capability as well as providing ease of human interaction.

  20. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z.; Dvoretskii, S.

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  1. On-orbit performance of the Compact Infrared Camera (CIRC) with uncooled infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Haruyoshi; Sakai, Michito; Kato, Eri.; Nakajima, Yasuhoiro; Nakau, Koji.; Kimura, Toshiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    We have developed the Compact Infrared Camera (CIRC) with an uncooled infrared array detector (microbolometer) for space application. Microbolometers have an advantage of not requiring cooling system such as a mechanical cooler, and is suitable for resource-limited sensor system. Another characteristic of the CIRC is its use of athermal optics. The athermal optics system compensates for defocus owing to temperature changes. We also employ a shutter-less system which is a method to correct non-uniformity of the detector without a mechanical shutter. The CIRC achieves a small size (approximately 200 mm), light mass (approximately 3 kg), and low electrical power consumption (<20 W) by employing athermal optics and a shutterless system. The CIRC is launched in May 2014 as a technology-demonstration payload of Advanced Land Observation Satellite-2 (ALOS-2). Since the initial functional verification phase (July 4-14, 2014), the CIRC was demonstrated a function according to its intended design. We also confirmed the temperature accuracy of the CIRC observation data is within +/-4K in the calibration validation phase after the initial functional verification phase. The CIRC also detected wildfires in various areas and observed the volcano activities in the operational phase. In this paper, we present the on-orbit performance of the CIRC onboard ALOS-2.

  2. Infrared Detectors Containing Stacked Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jin S.; Lin, True-Lon; Jones, Eric; Del Castillo, Hector; Gunapala, Sarath

    1996-01-01

    Long-wavelength-infrared detectors containing multiple layers of high-quality crystalline p(+) Si(1-x)Ge(x) alternating with layers of Si undergoing development. Each detector comprises stack of Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) photodetectors. In comparison with older HIP detectors containing single Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunctions, developmental detectors feature greater quantum efficiencies and stronger photoresponses.

  3. The improved pyroelectric detectors for far-infrared laser interferometer measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Gao

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, the application of the pyroelectric detectors for Far-Infrared laser diagnostics on TOKAMAK plasma is described. We discovered experimentally that the Fabry-Perot interference could affect the performance of the pyroelectric detectors (PED). The improved pyroelectric detector (IPD) was developed for FIR laser coheront measuring. Some designing considerations about the pyroelectric detectors used in high temperature plasma conditions are mentioned.

  4. MEMS-based infrared detector for body thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kum-Pyo; Kim, Yun-Ho; Min, Nam-Ki

    2005-12-01

    Infrared detectors have many application fields. One of those, MEMS based thermopile is attractive for many low-cost commercial and industrial applications, mainly because it does not require cooling for operation and the process technologies are relatively simple. The MEMS thermopile fabricated on a silicon nitride microbridge structure was proposed. Using microbridge rather conventional membrane makes it possible to fabricate much smaller micro thermopile and to reduce heat loss because of small contact area at silicon rim. The bridge material is only composed of Si3N4. The thermocouple was used a poly-Si and an aluminum. The characteristic of electromotive force (EMF) generation was evaluated for various patterns at hot junction. Aluminum thermocouple shape on bridge structure was designed two patterns. One was a square shape and the other shape was a hollow square. The output voltage of hollow square-type electrode was increased in compared with square-type electrode from 3.03uV/°C to 4.609uV/°C at body temperature (37°C). With the same membrane dimensions and the same overall thickness of the chip a thermopile on microbridge is almost 53% smaller a conventional thermopile chip.

  5. Defects and noise in Type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Wörl, Andreas; Daumer, Volker; Rehm, Robert; Kirste, Lutz; Rutz, Frank; Schmitz, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    To examine defects in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices we investigated GaSb substrates and epitaxial InAs/GaSb layers by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography to characterize the distribution of threading dislocations. Those measurements are compared with wet chemical etch pit density measurements on GaSb substrates and InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices epitaxial layer structures. The technique uses a wet chemical etch process to decorate threading dislocations and an automated optical analyzing system for mapping the defect distribution. Dark current and noise measurements on processed InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice single element photo diodes reveal a generation-recombination limited dark current behavior without contributions by surface leakage currents for midwavelength infrared detectors. In the white noise part of the noise spectrum, the extracted diode noise closely matches the theoretically expected shot noise behavior. For diodes with an increased dark current in comparison to the dark current of generation-recombination limited material, the standard shot-noise model fails to describe the noise experimentally observed in the white part of the spectrum. Instead, we find that McIntyre's noise model for avalanche multiplication processes fits the data quite well. We suggest that within high electric field domains localized around crystallographic defects, electrons initiate avalanche multiplication processes leading to increased dark current and excess noise.

  6. InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Lemke, Florian; Masur, Michael; Schmitz, Johannes; Stadelmann, Tim; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas; Walther, Martin

    2015-05-01

    We report on the development of high-performance InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) infrared (IR) detectors for the mid-wavelength (MWIR, 3-5 μm) and long-wavelength (LWIR, 8-12 μm) transmission window of the atmosphere. With a refined process technology, we are now able to fabricate dual-color focal plane arrays for the MWIR that excel at a very low number of noisy pixels. In an effort to correlate dark current and noise data of a larger number of devices, we found that for the description of the behavior in the white noise part of the spectrum, both, in InAs/GaSb SL photodiodes for the MWIR and the LWIR McIntyre's well-known model for excess noise of avalanche photodiodes is, in general, much more suited than the commonly used shot noise model. The analysis of dark current contributions is a convenient method to identify limiting mechanisms and extract material parameters such as the minority carrier lifetime. We show that even in large area devices the contribution of the sidewall leakage path should not be ignored for this kind of investigation. Finally, we present our Al-free heterojunction device concept for reduced dark current.

  7. Hetero-engineering infrared detectors with type-II superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z.-B.; DeCuir, E. A.; Gautam, N.; Krishna, S.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Pattison, J. W.; Dhar, N.; Welser, R. E.; Sood, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2-SLs) are of great interest as they provide a lot of band engineering flexibility. A wide variety of unipolar barrier structures have been investigated with this material system. In this report, we will present our recent work on the development of low noise long-wave infrared (LWIR) InAs/GaSb T2-SLs photodetectors. By adopting a so-called pBiBn design, the dark current of LWIR photodetectors is greatly suppressed. The LWIR pBiBn device has demonstrated a dark current density as low as 1.42×10-5 A/cm2 at -60 mV, and R0A of 5365 Ωcm2 at 76 K. A peak detectivity at 7.8 μm of 7.7×1011 cmHz1/2W-1 is obtained at 76 K. Further effort to reduce the operating bias is also reported. By refining the energy-band alignment, a 2-μm-thick LWIR pBiBn device has demonstrated a single pass (no AR coating) quantum efficiency of 20% at 10 μm under zero-bias at 77 K. We have recently extended our efforts to further reduce the dark current by using an interband cascade (IC) photodetector structure. Some further details about the device operation and results will be discussed.

  8. Flexible infrared detectors based on p-n junctions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenlong; Gao, Min; Yan, Zhuocheng; Pan, Taisong; Liao, Feiyi; Lin, Yuan

    2016-05-14

    Different types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, are used to fabricate infrared (IR) detectors on flexible substrates based on CNT p-n junctions. It is found that this kind of detector is sensitive to infrared signals with a power density as low as 90 μW mm(-2) even at room temperature. Besides, unlike other devices, the detector with this unique structure can be bent for 100 cycles without any damage and its functionality does not degenerate once it recovers to the initial state. The results give a good reference for developing efficient, low-cost, and flexible IR detectors. PMID:27101973

  9. Dark current in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Vaidya

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear whether the tunneling current in QWIPs depends just on the energy corresponding to motion perpendicular to the plane of the quantum well or on the total energy. In order to get a quantitative assessment of the contribution of energy corresponding to motion in the plane of the quantum well to the dark current we use the following approach. We calculate the dark current in GaAs/AlxGa1-x s quantum well infrared detectors for both tunneling dependent only on Ez, and tunneling dependent on the total energy, and compare the results to experimental data. Comparison of theoretical results with experimental data at 40K shows that motion in the plane of the quantum well plays a significant role in determining the tunneling dark current. Corrections are made to Levine's original formula. Variation of the dark current with barrier width and doping density is systematically studied. It is shown that increasing the barrier width and/or decreasing the doping density in the well do not always reduce the dark current.

  10. New and Better Near-Infrared Detectors for JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Mott, D. Brent; Wen, Yiting; Linder, Don; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hill, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    ESA and NASA recently selected two 5 m cutoff Teledyne H2RG sensor chip assemblies (SCA) for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). These HgCdTe SCAs incorporate Teledynes improved barrier layer design that eliminates the degradation that affected earlier JWST H2RGs(Rauscher et al. 2012a). The better indium barrier, together with other design changes, has improved the performance and reliability of JWSTs SCAs. In this article, we describe the measured performance characteristics that most directly affect scientific observations including read noise, total noise, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), and image persistence. As part of measuring QE, we measured the quantum yield as a function of photon energy,, and found that it exceeds unity for photon energies E (2.65.2) Eg, where Eg is the HgCdTe bandgap energy. This corresponds to. 2 m for NIRSpecs 5 m cutoff HgCdTe. Our measurements agree well with a previous measurement by McCullough et al. (2008) for. 1.3. For 1.3, we find a slower increase in with photon energy than McCullough et al. did. However, and as McCullough et al. note, their two state model of the yield process is not valid for large 1.

  11. Heterojunction Internal Photoemission SiO.7GeO.3/Si Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True Lon

    1994-01-01

    Silicon-compatible detectors are amoung the most promising infrared sensors for large focal plane array applications due to their advantages of uniformity, reliability, and easy integration with low-noise Si readout circuitry.

  12. Progress, challenges, and opportunities for HgCdTe infrared materials and detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wen; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a review on the current status, challenges, and potential future development opportunities for HgCdTe infrared materials and detector technology. A brief history of HgCdTe infrared technology is firstly summarized and discussed, leading to the conclusion that HgCdTe-based infrared detectors will continue to be a core infrared technology with expanded capabilities in the future due to a unique combination of its favourable properties. Recent progress and the current status of HgCdTe infrared technology are reviewed, including material growth, device architecture, device processing, surface passivation, and focal plane array applications. The further development of infrared applications requires that future infrared detectors have the features of lower cost, smaller pixel size, larger array format size, higher operating temperature, and multi-band detection, which presents a number of serious challenges to current HgCdTe-based infrared technology. The primary challenges include well controlled p-type doping, lower cost, larger array format size, higher operating temperature, multi-band detection, and advanced plasma dry etching. Various new concepts and technologies are proposed and discussed that have the potential to overcome the existing primary challenges that are inhibiting the development of next generation HgCdTe infrared detector technology.

  13. Measuring Io's Lava Eruption Temperatures with a Novel Infrared Detector and Digital Readout Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley; Gunapala, Sarath; Rafol, B., Sir; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.

    2016-10-01

    ] Ting et al., 2012, Barrier infrared detector, U.S. Pat. No. 8217480. [5] Schultz et al., 2014, LL Journal, 20, 2, 36-51. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory–California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA.

  14. Type-II indium arsenide/gallium antimonide superlattices for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Hooman

    In this work, the unique properties of type-II InAs/GaSb heterojunctions were utilized for the realization of novel infrared photodetectors with higher operating temperature, detectivity and uniformity than the commonly available infrared detectors. This effort was concentrated on two major devices: uncooled infrared detectors in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range, and cooled devices in the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) range. Uncooled infrared (IR) detectors are required for low-cost, lightweight sensor systems that have many industrial and medical applications. Commercially available uncooled IR sensors use ferroelectric or microbolometer detectors. These sensors are inherently slow and cannot detect rapid signal changes needed for high-speed infrared systems. Some of the applications which require a fast detector (tau < 30 msec) are: freespace communication, active infrared countermeasure, non-invasive medical monitoring, and LIDARs. Although photon detectors have frequency responses in the megahertz range, their high temperature detectivity is severely degraded due to high Auger recombination rates. Bandgap engineering was used in order to suppress Auger recombination at room temperature in type-II superlattices. Our experimental results demonstrated nearly one order of magnitude lower Auger recombination rate at room temperature in these type-II superlattices compared to typical intrinsic detectors, such as HgCdTe, with similar bandgap. Uncooled detectors based on the engineered superlattices showed a detectivity of 1.3 x 108g cmHz 1/2/W at 11 Et m, which is comparable to microbolometers. However, the measured response time of the detectors was more than five orders of magnitude faster than microbolometers. In parallel, devices for operation in the VLWIR were developed. High-performance infrared detectors with cutoff wavelength above 14 mum are highly needed for many space-based applications. Commonly used detectors are extrinsic silicon and Hg

  15. Flexible infrared detectors based on p-n junctions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenlong; Gao, Min; Yan, Zhuocheng; Pan, Taisong; Liao, Feiyi; Lin, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Different types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, are used to fabricate infrared (IR) detectors on flexible substrates based on CNT p-n junctions. It is found that this kind of detector is sensitive to infrared signals with a power density as low as 90 μW mm-2 even at room temperature. Besides, unlike other devices, the detector with this unique structure can be bent for 100 cycles without any damage and its functionality does not degenerate once it recovers to the initial state. The results give a good reference for developing efficient, low-cost, and flexible IR detectors.Different types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, are used to fabricate infrared (IR) detectors on flexible substrates based on CNT p-n junctions. It is found that this kind of detector is sensitive to infrared signals with a power density as low as 90 μW mm-2 even at room temperature. Besides, unlike other devices, the detector with this unique structure can be bent for 100 cycles without any damage and its functionality does not degenerate once it recovers to the initial state. The results give a good reference for developing efficient, low-cost, and flexible IR detectors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08791k

  16. 2D Array of Far-infrared Thermal Detectors: Noise Measurements and Processing Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, B.; Aslam, S.; Stevenson, T.

    2008-01-01

    A magnesium diboride (MgB2) detector 2D array for use in future space-based spectrometers is being developed at GSFC. Expected pixel sensitivities and comparison to current state-of-the-art infrared (IR) detectors will be discussed.

  17. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  18. Correlation between the performance of double-barrier quantum-well infrared photodetectors and their microstructure: On the origin of the photovoltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, E.; Trampert, A.; Guzmán, A.; Calleja, E.

    2005-08-01

    In this work we show clear evidences that silicon segregation out of quantum wells (QWs) is the mechanism responsible for the unexpected photovoltaic (PV) effect exhibited by AlGaAs /AlAs/GaAs double-barrier quantum-well infrared photodetectors. Our results are based on the combined analysis of the detectors' microstructure [obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)] and their electro-optical characteristics (dark current and responsivity versus bias). A TEM image intensity analysis yields the result of an unintentional asymmetry between the two AlAs barriers adjacent to the QW attributed to the presence of segregated Si at the interface. Moreover, we find that the higher this compositional asymmetry, the higher the asymmetries in the electro-optical response of the detector. Additionally we show here direct evidences of how the growth-induced nonequivalence of the AlAs tunnel barriers can be ruled out as the origin of the PV effect.

  19. Laboratory characterization of direct readout Si:Sb and Si:Ga infrared detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, Mark E.; Moss, Nicolas N.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Estrada, John A.; Goebel, John H.; Mccreight, Craig R.; Savage, Maureen L.; Junga, Frank; Whittemore, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of recent results obtained at Ames Research Center in performance evaluations of infrared detector arrays are presented. Antimony- and gallium-doped silicon direct readout 58x62 element hybrid devices from Ames' ongoing detector technology development program are described. The observed characteristics meet most of the performance goals specified by the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) instrument teams and compare favorably with the best performance reported for discrete non-integrating extrinsic silicon detectors. Initial results of radiation environment testing are reported, and non-ideal behavior demonstrated by these test devices is discussed.

  20. Extraordinary photocurrent harvesting at type-II heterojunction interfaces: toward high detectivity carbon nanotube infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongtao; Christianson, Caleb; Kirkeminde, Alec; Ren, Shenqiang; Wu, Judy

    2012-12-12

    Despite the potentials and the efforts put in the development of uncooled carbon nanotube infrared detectors during the past two decades, their figure-of-merit detectivity remains orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional semiconductor counterparts due to the lack of efficient exciton dissociation schemes. In this paper, we report an extraordinary photocurrent harvesting configuration at a semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (s-SWCNT)/polymer type-II heterojunction interface, which provides highly efficient exciton dissociation through the intrinsic energy offset by designing the s-SWCNT/polymer interface band alignment. This results in significantly enhanced near-infrared detectivity of 2.3 × 10(8) cm·Hz(1/2)/W, comparable to that of the many conventional uncooled infrared detectors. With further optimization, the s-SWCNT/polymer nanohybrid uncooled infrared detectors could be highly competitive for practical applications.

  1. Overview of DRS uncooled VOx infrared detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Han, C. J.; Skidmore, George

    2011-06-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past decade on uncooled focal plane array technologies and production capabilities. The detector pixel dimensions have continually decreased with an increase in pixel performance making large format, high-density array products affordable. In turn, this has resulted in the proliferation of uncooled IR detectors in commercial and military markets. Presently, uncooled detectors are widely used in firefighting, surveillance, industrial process monitoring, machine vision, and medical applications. Within the military arena, uncooled detectors are ubiquitous in Army soldier systems such as weapon sights, driver's viewers, and helmet-mounted sights. Uncooled detectors are also employed in airborne and ground surveillance sensors including unmanned aerial vehicles and robot vehicles.

  2. Polycrystalline lead selenide: the resurgence of an old infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, G.; Montojo, M. T.; Torquemada, M. C.; Rodrigo, M. T.; Sánchez, F. J.; Gómez, L. J.; Almazán, R. M.; Verdú, M.; Rodríguez, P.; Villamayor, V.; Álvarez, M.; Diezhandino, J.; Plaza, J.; Catalán, I.

    2007-06-01

    The existing technology for uncooled MWIR photon detectors based on polycrystalline lead salts is stigmatized for being a 50-year-old technology. It has been traditionally relegated to single-element detectors and relatively small linear arrays due to the limitations imposed by its standard manufacture process based on a chemical bath deposition technique (CBD) developed more than 40 years ago. Recently, an innovative method for processing detectors, based on a vapour phase deposition (VPD) technique, has allowed manufacturing the first 2D array of polycrystalline PbSe with good electro optical characteristics. The new method of processing PbSe is an all silicon technology and it is compatible with standard CMOS circuitry. In addition to its affordability, VPD PbSe constitutes a perfect candidate to fill the existing gap in the photonic and uncooled IR imaging detectors sensitive to the MWIR photons. The perspectives opened are numerous and very important, converting the old PbSe detector in a serious alternative to others uncooled technologies in the low cost IR detection market. The number of potential applications is huge, some of them with high commercial impact such as personal IR imagers, enhanced vision systems for automotive applications and other not less important in the security/defence domain such as sensors for active protection systems (APS) or low cost seekers. Despite the fact, unanimously accepted, that uncooled will dominate the majority of the future IR detection applications, today, thermal detectors are the unique plausible alternative. There is plenty of room for photonic uncooled and complementary alternatives are needed. This work allocates polycrystalline PbSe in the current panorama of the uncooled IR detectors, underlining its potentiality in two areas of interest, i.e., very low cost imaging IR detectors and MWIR fast uncooled detectors for security and defence applications. The new method of processing again converts PbSe into an

  3. Visible and infrared detector developments supported by the European Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, N.; Minoglou, K.; Voland, C.; Levillain, Y.; Meynart, R.; Bezy, J.-L.; Duvet, L.; Zahir, M.; Leone, B.; Ciapponi, A.; Crouzet, P.-E.

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing is a priority activity for the European Space Agency and detector performance is a crucial factor in determining how well this role is performed. Consequently, the Agency has a strong interest in continuous improvement of both detector capabilities and availability within Europe. To this end, ESA maintains a number of strategic detector development plans combining both technology-push and technology-pull. The visible and infrared wavebands are of particular interest for remote sensing activities and this paper sets out the requirements for current and future missions and presents details of the Agency's current and planned detector developments.

  4. Evaluation of a pyroelectric detector with a carbon multiwalled nanotube black coating in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, E.; Deshpande, R.; Dillon, A. C.; Lehman, J.

    2006-02-01

    The performance of a pyroelectric detector with a carbon multiwalled nanotube coating was evaluated in the 0.9-14 µm wavelength range. The relative spectral responsivity of this detector was shown to be flat over most of the wavelength range examined, and the spectral flatness was shown to be comparable to the best infrared black coatings currently available. This finding is promising because black coatings with spectrally flat absorbance profiles are usually associated with the highest absorbance values. The performance of the detector (in terms of noise equivalent power and specific detectivity) was limited by the very thick (250 µm thick) LiNbO3 pyroelectric crystal onto which the coating was deposited. The responsivity of this detector was shown to be linear in the 0.06-2.8 mW radiant power range, and its spatial uniformity was comparable to that of other pyroelectric detectors that use different types of black coating. The carbon nanotube coatings were reported to be much more durable than other infrared black coatings, such as metal blacks, that are commonly used to coat thermal detectors in the infrared. This, in combination with their excellent spectral flatness, suggests that carbon nanotube coatings appear extremely promising for thermal detection applications in the infrared.

  5. Heated Surface Temperatures Measured by Infrared Detector in a Cascade Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigators have used infrared devices to accurately measure heated surface temperatures. Several of these applications have been for turbine heat transfer studies involving film cooling and surface roughness, typically, these measurements use an infrared camera positioned externally to the test section. In cascade studies, where several blades are used to ensure periodic flow, adjacent blades block the externally positioned camera's views of the test blade. To obtain a more complete mapping of the surface temperatures, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center fabricated a probe with an infrared detector to sense the blade temperatures. The probe size was kept small to minimize the flow disturbance. By traversing and rotating the probe, using the same approach as for total pressure surveys, one can find the blade surface temperatures. Probe mounted infrared detectors are appropriate for measuring surface temperatures where an externally positioned infrared camera is unable to completely view the test object. This probe consists of a 8-mm gallium arsenide (GaAs) lens mounted in front of a mercury-cadmium-zinc-tellurium (HgCdZnTe) detector. This type of photovoltaic detector was chosen because of its high sensitivity to temperature when the detector is uncooled. The particular application is for relatively low surface temperatures, typically ambient to 100 C. This requires a detector sensitive at long wavelengths. The detector is a commercial product enclosed in a 9-mm-diameter package. The GaAs lens material was chosen because of its glass-like hardness and its good long-wavelength transmission characteristics. When assembled, the 6.4-mm probe stem is held in the traversing actuator. Since the entire probe is above the measurement plane, the flow field disturbance in the measurement plane is minimized. This particular probe body is somewhat wider than necessary, because it was designed to have replaceable detectors and lenses. The signal for the detector is

  6. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Dědič, V. Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  7. Stress induced long wavelength photoconductivity in doped silicon infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The long wavelength cutoff of a Si:P detector was extended to 34 microns by the application of a uniaxial stress. An unstressed Si:P photoconductive detector responds to photons of up to 28 microns wavelength. By applying a uniaxial stress to a detector along the /100/ crystal axis, the response was extended to approximately 34 microns. The /100/ axis was chosen as the stress direction because theoretical calculations predicted that such a stress extends the wavelength response more than one along the /110/ axis. These theoretical calculations were based upon fits to experimental data obtained at stresses of up to approximately kbar, and indicated that the extension in wavelength response continues to increase at much larger stresses.

  8. DRS uncooled VOx infrared detector development and production status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Han, C. J.; Skidmore, George D.; Hess, Cory

    2010-04-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past decade on uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) technology development and production capacity at DRS as well as other domestic and overseas suppliers. This resulted in the proliferation of uncooled IR detectors in commercial and military markets. The uncooled detectors are widely used in firefighting, surveillance, industrial process monitoring, machine vision, and medical applications. In the military arena, uncooled detectors are fielded among diverse systems such as weapon sights, driver enhancement viewers, helmet-mounted sights, airborne and ground surveillance sensors including UAVs and robot vehicles. Pixel dimensions have continually decreased with an increase in pixel performance. This paper presents an overview of the DRS 25- and 17-micron pixel pitch uncooled VOx detector technology development and production status. The DRS uncooled FPA products include 320x240 and 640x480 arrays while the larger 1024x768 17-micron pitch array is at engineering prototype quantities. Current production of the 25-micron pitch 320x240 and 640x480 arrays exceeds 5,000 units per month, supporting U.S. military systems such as Army thermal weapon sights (TWS) and driver vision enhancers (DVE). Next generation systems are moving towards the 17-micron pixel pitch detectors. Advancement in small pixel technology has enabled the 17-micron pitch detectors performance to surpass their 25-micron pitch counterparts. To meet future production demand of the 17-micron pitch UFPAs, DRS has made significant investment in production infrastructure to upgrade its tools. These investments include a new DUV stepper, coater, and plasma etcher plus improvements in its manufacturing techniques to enhance yield. These advanced tools reduce the minimum line width in production below 0.35μm and are now being used to manufacture the 17-micron 320x240 and 640x480 arrays. To further technology development, DRS continues to engage in R&D activities

  9. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors and application to radon sampling in dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, M. E. M.; Sujo, L. C.; Villalba, L.; Peinado, J. S.; Jimenez, A. C.; Baca, A. M.; Gandara, S. D.; Villalobos, M. R.; Miranda, A. L.; Peraza, E. F. H.

    2003-10-01

    Some calibration conditions of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A series of functional expressions and graphs were developed to describe relationship between radon concentration in air and the activity adsorbed in DBCC, when placed in small chambers. A semi-empirical expression for the DBCC calibration was obtained, based on the detector integration time and the adsorption coefficient of radon on activated charcoal. Both, the integration time for 10% of DBCC of the same batch, and the adsorption coefficient of radon for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were experimentally determined. Using these values as the calibration parameters, a semi-empirical calibration function was used for the interpretation of the radon activities in the detectors used for sampling more than 200 dwellings in the major cities of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico.

  10. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Georgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.

    2004-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope's primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted lambda (sub co) approximately 5 micrometer Rockwell HAWAII- 2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  11. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Giorgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.; Brambora, Clifford; Connelly, Joe; Derro, Rebecca; DiPirro, Michael J.; Doria-Warner, Christina; Ericsson, Aprille; Glazer, Stuart D.; Greene, Charles; Hall, Donald N.; Jacobson, Shane; Jakobsen, Peter; Johnson, Eric; Johnson, Scott D.; Krebs, Carolyn; Krebs, Danny J.; Lambros, Scott D.; Likins, Blake; Manthripragada, Sridhar; Martineau, Robert J.; Morse, Ernie C.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Mott, D. Brent; Muench, Theo; Park, Hongwoo; Parker, Susan; Polidan, Elizabeth J.; Rashford, Robert; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin; Sharma, Rajeev; Strada, Paolo; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wong, Selmer; Yagelowich, John; Zuray, Monica

    2004-10-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope"s primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted λco ~ 5 μm Rockwell HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  12. Infrared electro-optical detector to rescue humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysi-Zarco, Paulo; Castro Ramos, Jorge; Gordiano-Alvarado, Gabriel

    2004-10-01

    We designed and built an electro-optical sensor to detect human bodies. The aim of this paper is to describe a device to make easier the localization of lost people in natural disasters or in dangerous environments. The detection is realized in base of the infrared radiation emitted by the human body. We employ point commercial pyloric quantum sensors, the electronic assembly integrates the captured infrared energy by using low noise chip. The optical device include a Cassegrain antenna, a diffraction grating which besides to choose in automatic way the correct wavelength emitted by the human body, it is useful as optical filter.

  13. Magnetotransport in very long wave infrared quantum cascade detectors: Analyzing the current with and without illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Jasnot, François-Régis; Maëro, Simon; Vaulchier, Louis-Anne de; Guldner, Yves; Carosella, Francesca; Ferreira, Robson; Delga, Alexandre; Doyennette, Laetitia; Berger, Vincent; Carras, Mathieu

    2013-12-04

    Current measurements of current have been performed on a very long wave infrared quantum cascade detector under magnetic field under both dark and light conditions. The analysis of dark current as a function of temperature highlights three regimes of transport. Under illumination, the model developed is in agreement with the oscillatory component of the experimental magnetophotocurrent. It allows to identify the key points controlling the electronic transport: crucial role of extraction, location of ionized impurities and scattering mechanisms involved in the structure. This work is valuable for the future conception of high-performance quantum cascade detectors in the infrared range.

  14. The suppression of charged-particle-induced noise in infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A d.c.-coupled transimpedance amplifier/pulse suppression circuit designed to remove charged-particle-induced noise from infrared detectors is described. Noise spikes produced by single particle events are large and have short rise times, and can degrade the performance of an infrared detector in moderate radiation environments. The use of the suppression circuit improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 1.6:1, which corresponds to a reduction in required observing time by a factor of about 2.6.

  15. Miniature Uncooled Infrared Sensitive Detectors for in Vivo Biomedical Imaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P. G.; Demos, S. G.; Rajic, S.

    1998-06-01

    Broadband infrared (OR) radiation detectors have been developed using miniature, inexpensive, mass produced microcantilevers capable of detecting temperature differences as small as lea(-6) K. Microcantilevers made out of semiconductor materials can be used either as uncurled photon or thermal detectors. Mounted on a probe mm in diameter a number of microcantilevers can be accommodated in the working channel of existing endoscopes for in vivo proximity focus measurements inside the human body.

  16. Assessment study of infrared detector arrays for low-background astronomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ando, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art of infrared detector arrays employing charge coupled devices (CCD) or charge injection devices (CID) readout are assessed. The applicability, limitations and potentials of such arrays under the low-background astronomical observing conditions of interest for SIRFT (Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility) are determined. The following are reviewed: (1) monolithic extrinsic arrays; (2) monolithic intrinsic arrays; (3) charge injection devices; and (4) hybrid arrays.

  17. Detector Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Ceryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna; Xia-Serafino, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) incorporates two 5 micron cutoff (lambda(sub co) = 5 microns) 2048x2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. These detector arrays, and the two Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuits that control them, are operated in space at T approx. 37 K. In this article, we provide a brief introduction to NIRSpec, its detector subsystem (DS), detector readout in the space radiation environment, and present a snapshot of the developmental status of the NIRSpec DS as integration and testing of the engineering test unit begins.

  18. Infrared detectors: State of art; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makky, Wagih H.

    1992-12-01

    The present conference discusses innovative IR detection devices and technologies, HgCdTe-based IR detectors, and quantum-well (QW) devices. Attention is given to uncooled thermal imaging, intersubband transitions and IR hot-electron transistors, the consideration of a novel two-color IR detector on the basis of the 'two-peak' effect, recent developments in MOCVD of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te photodiode arrays, and the growth of HgCdTe by MBE on CdZnTe substrates. Also discussed are Si-based QW intersubband detectors, increased responsivity and detectivity in asymmetric QW IR detectors, IR internal emission detectors, an InSb monolithic focal-plane cell, and surface plasmons on PtSi for visible and Si Schottky-barrier-enhanced detection. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  19. JWST Near-Infrared Detector Degradation: Finding the Problem, Fixing the Problem, and Moving Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Bob; Greenhouse, Matt; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, Chad; Hall, Don; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Bob; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Ray; Polis, Don; Pontius, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 micron cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article we present the two public DD-FRB "Executiye Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  20. Arrays of SiO(2) Substrate-Free Micromechanical Uncooled THz and Infrared Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Grbovic, Dragoslav; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of arrays of uncooled infrared and terahertz micromechanical detectors that utilize SiO2 as a main structural material. Materials with highly dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion, namely, Al and SiO2, were used to form folded bimaterial regions. This approach improved the detector sensitivity by 12 times compared to SiNx-based detectors of similar shape and size. Two types of structural SiO2 layers were investigated: thermally grown and plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited SiO2. Fabrication of the detector arrays relied on a straightforward process flow that involved three photolithography steps and no wet etching. The noise equivalent temperature difference intrinsic to the detectors fabricated during this work can reach 3.8 mK when excluding any contribution from the optical readout used to interrogate the arrays.

  1. Multi-element double ring detector for dual band infrared counter-countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Xubo

    2014-06-10

    A multi-element double ring detector which can track a target effectively under infrared (IR) countermeasure conditions is presented. Dual band IR counter-countermeasures can be performed by the detector to distinguish the target from target-flare mixed signals. Middle and short IR wavelengths are used for target and IR countermeasure detection, respectively. With a special design, unique dual band signals will be outputted by the detector when a target spot is located on the center of the detector. By comparison, the typical single element ring detector has a "dead spot" in this case, which is undesirable for target identification. Relatively high tracking accuracy and low cost indicate that the presented method has a potential application. PMID:24921141

  2. The Case for Moderately-Cooled, Far-Infrared Thermal Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, John C.; Lakew, Brook

    2004-01-01

    There are moderately-cooled (around 77K) infrared detectors, for instance InSb (around 5 microns wavelength) and HgCdTe (around 15 to 20 microns wavelength). However for longer wavelengths there are either uncooled thermal-type detectors or highly cooled (about 4K and lower) quantum and thermal detectors, with the notable exception of high Tc superconductor detectors. We will describe certain long-wavelength applications in space where only moderate cooling is feasible, and where better sensitivity is required than possible with uncooled detectors. These requirements could be met with high Tc bolometers, but it may also be prudent to develop other technologies. Additionally, over the past 16 years a marketplace has not developed for the commercial production of high Tc bolometers, indicating their production may be a natural endeavor for government laboratories.

  3. Counter-countermeasure identification based on multi-element dual band infrared detector.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Sun, Weiguo; Chen, Hongxu; Si, Junjie

    2013-07-20

    An infrared (IR) dual band multi-element detector with the abilities of dual band IR counter-countermeasure (IRCCM) and spatial filtering is presented for effective target detection in a complex tactical environment. The detection elements of the detector are specially arranged like a conventional reticle pattern. With special design, the ratio of radiation intensity from two IR bands can be calculated to distinguish the target from the IR target-flare mixed signal and the two detection bands use a common aperture in the seeker. Without a reticle in the optical system of the IR seeker, the dual band detector can still perform spatial filtering to eliminate background noise effectively. The design details of the detector are presented. The performance of the detector's dual band IRCCM and spatial filtering are analyzed. Simulation results are presented verifying validity of the presented method. PMID:23872767

  4. Multi-element double ring detector for dual band infrared counter-countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Xubo

    2014-06-10

    A multi-element double ring detector which can track a target effectively under infrared (IR) countermeasure conditions is presented. Dual band IR counter-countermeasures can be performed by the detector to distinguish the target from target-flare mixed signals. Middle and short IR wavelengths are used for target and IR countermeasure detection, respectively. With a special design, unique dual band signals will be outputted by the detector when a target spot is located on the center of the detector. By comparison, the typical single element ring detector has a "dead spot" in this case, which is undesirable for target identification. Relatively high tracking accuracy and low cost indicate that the presented method has a potential application.

  5. Infrared receivers for low background astronomy: Incoherent detectors and coherent devices from one micrometer to one millimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, N. W.; Greenberg, L. T.; Hauser, M. G.; Houck, J. R.; Low, F. J.; Mccreight, C. R.; Rank, D. M.; Richards, P. L.; Weiss, R.

    1979-01-01

    The status of incoherent detectors and coherent receivers over the infrared wavelength range from one micrometer to one millimeter is described. General principles of infrared receivers are included, and photon detectors, bolometers, coherent receivers, and important supporting technologies are discussed, with emphasis on their suitability for low background astronomical applications. Broad recommendations are presented and specific opportunities are identified for development of improved devices.

  6. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, M. S. Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Kumor, D.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  7. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  8. Polymer-Ceramic Composite Materials for Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D; Currie, J. R.; Penn, B. G.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Ferroelectrics:Polymer composites can be considered an established substitute for conventional electroceramics and ferroelectric polymers. The composites have a unique blend of polymeric properties such as mechanical flexibility, high strength, formability, and low cost, with the high electro-active properties of ceramic materials. They have attracted considerable interest because of their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detecting devices and piezoelectric transducers. These flexible sensors and transducers may eventually be useful for their health monitoring applications for NASA crew launch vehicles and crew exploration vehicles being developed. In the light of many technologically important applications in this field, it is worthwhile to present an overview of the pyroelectric infrared detector theory, models to predict dielectric behavior and pyroelectric coefficient, and the concept of connectivity and fabrication techniques of biphasic composites. An elaborate review of Pyroelectric-Polymer composite materials investigated to date for their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detectors is presented.

  9. Thermophysics modeling of an infrared detector cryochamber for transient operational scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Mayank; Singhal, Gaurav; Verma, Avinash C.; Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Manmohan

    2016-05-01

    An infrared detector (IR) is essentially a transducer capable of converting radiant energy in the infrared regime into a measurable form. The benefit of infrared radiation is that it facilitates viewing objects in dark or through obscured conditions by detecting the infrared energy emitted by them. One of the most significant applications of IR detector systems is for target acquisition and tracking of projectile systems. IR detectors also find widespread applications in the industry and commercial market. The performance of infrared detector is sensitive to temperatures and performs best when cooled to cryogenic temperatures in the range of nearly 120 K. However, the necessity to operate in such cryogenic regimes increases the complexity in the application of IR detectors. This entails a need for detailed thermophysics analysis to be able to determine the actual cooling load specific to the application and also due to its interaction with the environment. This will enable design of most appropriate cooling methodologies suitable for specific scenarios. The focus of the present work is to develop a robust thermo-physical numerical methodology for predicting IR cryochamber behavior under transient conditions, which is the most critical scenario, taking into account all relevant heat loads including radiation in its original form. The advantage of the developed code against existing commercial software (COMSOL, ANSYS, etc.), is that it is capable of handling gas conduction together with radiation terms effectively, employing a ubiquitous software such as MATLAB. Also, it requires much smaller computational resources and is significantly less time intensive. It provides physically correct results enabling thermal characterization of cryochamber geometry in conjunction with appropriate cooling methodology. The code has been subsequently validated experimentally as the observed cooling characteristics are found to be in close agreement with the results predicted using

  10. Thermal cycling reliability of indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; He, Kai; Wang, Jian-xin; Zhang, Qin-yao

    2013-09-01

    Thermal cycling reliability is one of the most important issues whether the HgCdTe infrared focal plane array detectors can be applied to both military and civil fields. In this paper, a 3D finite element model for indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors is established. The thermal stress distribution and thermally induced warpage of the detector assembly as a function of the distance between the detector chip and Si-ROIC, the thickness and the materials properties of electrical lead board in cryogenic temperature are analyzed. The results show that all these parameters have influences on the thermal stress distribution and warpage of the detector assembly, especially the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE) of electrical lead board. The thermal stress and warpage in the assembly can be avoided or minimized by choosing the appropriate electrical lead board. Additionally, the warpage of some indirect hybrid detectors assembly samples is measured in experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which verifies that the results are calculated by finite element method are reasonable.

  11. Adaptive non-uniformity correction method based on temperature for infrared detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijie; Yue, Song; Hong, Pu; Jia, Guowei; Lei, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The existence of non-uniformities in the responsitivity of the element array is a severe problem typical to common infrared detector. These non-uniformities result in a "curtain'' like fixed pattern noises (FPN) that appear in the image. Some random noise can be restrained by the method kind of equalization method. But the fixed pattern noise can only be removed by .non uniformity correction method. The produce of non uniformities of detector array is the combined action of infrared detector array, readout circuit, semiconductor device performance, the amplifier circuit and optical system. Conventional linear correction techniques require costly recalibration due to the drift of the detector or changes in temperature. Therefore, an adaptive non-uniformity method is needed to solve this problem. A lot factors including detectors and environment conditions variety are considered to analyze and conduct the cause of detector drift. Several experiments are designed to verify the guess. Based on the experiments, an adaptive non-uniformity correction method is put forward in this paper. The strength of this method lies in its simplicity and low computational complexity. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the disadvantage of traditional non-uniformity correct method is conquered by the proposed scheme.

  12. An Infrared Laser Testing Facility for the Characterization of the CLAS12 Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    During the 12 GeV upgrade to the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, a new spectrometer, CLAS12, will be built in Hall B. The Nuclear Physics Group at the University of New Hampshire is part of the collaboration working to design and build this new detector system. Among the new detector systems being developed for CLAS12 is a silicon vertex tracker that will be placed close to the target, providing excellent position resolution for vertex determination. It is essential to have the ability to perform quality assurance tests and to evaluate the performance of the individual silicon strip detectors before their installation in the full detector system. The UNH Nuclear Physics Group is designing and building a laser testing facility at UNH to perform this task. The design for the testing facility consists of a 1064 nm infrared laser system and a precision positioning mechanism to scan the laser light on the detector by a computer controlled system designed to efficiently test the large number of detectors prior to installation. The detector signals are read out by a computer data acquisition system for analysis. The facility also includes a cleanroom area to house the test stand, and a dry storage containment system for the storage of the detectors.

  13. Human and Nonhuman Recognition Using Pyroelectric Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Weiguo; Wen, Ke; He, Lifang; Cheng, Lihua; Li, Yong

    2012-11-01

    The auto regressive (AR) model of time series is utilized in this paper to recognize a human and nonhuman from pyroelectric infrared (PIR) signals. Through the wavelet transform, the signals are reconstructed by removing the noise from the original signals. The coefficients of the AR model are selected as the features for human and nonhuman recognition and calculated by the Burg algorithm. The classification experiments of a human and nonhuman are performed with a support vector machine. The recognition results for different PIR signals using the proposed AR-based features show high performance with an optimal recognition rate, which is up to 94.6 % and higher than that of the traditional time domain feature and transform domain method, such as the wavelet entropy and wavelet entropy of the double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform.

  14. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  15. Dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometer: universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-01

    It was found that carbon atomic emission can be excited in low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and an atmospheric pressure, low power consumption, and compact microplasma carbon atomic emission spectrometer (AES) was constructed and used as a universal and sensitive gas chromatographic (GC) detector for detection of volatile carbon-containing compounds. A concentric DBD device was housed in a heating box to increase the plasma operation temperature to 300 °C to intensify carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. Carbon-containing compounds directly injected or eluted from GC can be decomposed, atomized, and excited in this heated DBD for carbon atomic emission. The performance of this new optical detector was first evaluated by determination of a series of volatile carbon-containing compounds including formaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol, and absolute limits of detection (LODs) were found at a range of 0.12-0.28 ng under the optimized conditions. Preliminary experimental results showed that it provided slightly higher LODs than those obtained by GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). Furthermore, it is a new universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds that even includes those compounds which are difficult to detect by FID, such as HCHO, CO, and CO2. Meanwhile, hydrogen gas used in conventional techniques was eliminated; and molecular optical emission detection can also be performed with this GC detector for multichannel analysis to improve resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks of complex mixtures. PMID:24328147

  16. Characterization of liquid phase epitaxial GaAs forblocked-impurity-band far-infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, B.L.; Reichertz, L.A.; Beeman, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2004-04-07

    GaAs Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) photoconductor detectors have the potential to become the most sensitive, low noise detectors in the far-infrared below 45.5 cm{sup -1} (220 {micro}m). We have studied the characteristics of liquid phase epitaxial GaAs films relevant to BIB production, including impurity band formation and the infrared absorption of the active section of the device. Knowledge of the far-infrared absorption spectrum as a function of donor concentration combined with variable temperature Hall effect and resistivity studies leads us to conclude that the optimal concentration for the absorbing layer of a GaAs BIB detector lies between 1 x 10{sup 15} and 6.7 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. At these concentrations there is significant wavefunction overlap which in turn leads to absorption beyond the 1s ground to 2p bound excited state transition of 35.5 cm{sup -1} (282 {micro}m). There still remains a gap between the upper edge of the donor band and the bottom of the conduction band, a necessity for proper BIB detector operation.

  17. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  18. The mechanism of laser disturbing infrared detector and its intelligent protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan; Feng, Yun-song; Ling, Yong-shun; Qiao, Ya

    2013-09-01

    Interference mechanism of laser disturbing infrared detector is analyzed. The disturbing grade was separated into four levels according to interference effect. The levels are saturation, melting, vaporization and plasma. The responsivity of a detector will drop and it can't work effectively when it was saturated. Its performance wills recovery when the interference disappeared. Melting, Vaporization and plasma will lead to permanent damage. The main damage to detector is thermal damage for induced laser. The reason is that the detector will melt or evaporate when it absorbed the energy of induced laser. For HgCdTe detector, the damage appeared as Hg precipitation. It appeared as In exfoliated from welding outlet line of HgCdTe crystal or HgCdTe melting when the temperature of detector is higher. Since Vanadium Oxide has reversible transformation characteristic between semi-conductor, metal and insulator, it can be used to protect detector from laser damage. Vanadium Oxide can be made as thin film coatings on optical system to protect the detector. the phase transformation point temperature of VO2 is 68°C,a few doping method can decrease the transformation temperature. These mean that less energy can make VO2 film's temperature increase to transformation point. VO2 film protecting HgCdTe detector was used as an example to estimate the protection effect. For an HgCdTe detector, its responsivity will drop two orders of magnitude when its temperature raises 70K. This case be regard as that the detector was disturbed. When a CO2 pulsed laser beam with 0.1μ s˜10μs pulse width was incidence an HgCdTe detector, its heat conduction depth is 0.32˜3.2μm and its thermal diffusion can be ignored. The damage energy density threshold value is Ein=1.55J/cm2. When CO2 pulsed laser beam incidence the detector through certain thickness VO2 film, the VO2 film will has transformed from semiconductor state to metallic state before the laser beam damage the detector. The energy of

  19. Stability of the spectral responsivity of cryogenically cooled InSb infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, Evangelos

    2005-10-10

    The spectral responsivity of two cryogenically cooled InSb detectors was observed to drift slowly with time. The origin of these drifts was investigated and was shown to occur due to a water-ice thin film that was deposited onto the active areas of the cold detectors. The presence of the ice film (which is itself a dielectric film) modifies the transmission characteristics of the antireflection coatings deposited on the active areas of the detectors, thus giving rise to the observed drifts. The magnitude of the drifts was drastically reduced by evacuating the detector dewars while baking them at 50 degrees C for approximately 48 h. All InSb detectors have antireflection coatings to reduce the Fresnel reflections and therefore enhance their spectral responsivity. This work demonstrates that InSb infrared detectors should be evacuated and baked at least annually and in some cases (depending on the quality of the dewar and the measurement uncertainty required) more frequently. These observations are particularly relevant to InSb detectors mounted in dewars that use rubber O rings since the ingress of moisture was found to be particularly serious in this type of dewar. PMID:16237922

  20. Stability of the spectral responsivity of cryogenically cooled InSb infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharous, Evangelos

    2005-10-10

    The spectral responsivity of two cryogenically cooled InSb detectors was observed to drift slowly with time. The origin of these drifts was investigated and was shown to occur due to a water-ice thin film that was deposited onto the active areas of the cold detectors. The presence of the ice film (which is itself a dielectric film) modifies the transmission characteristics of the antireflection coatings deposited on the active areas of the detectors, thus giving rise to the observed drifts. The magnitude of the drifts was drastically reduced by evacuating the detector dewars while baking them at 50 deg. C for approximately 48 h. All InSb detectors have antireflection coatings to reduce the Fresnel reflections and therefore enhance their spectral responsivity. This work demonstrates that InSb infrared detectors should be evacuated and baked at least annually and in some cases (depending on the quality of the dewar and the measurement uncertainty required) more frequently. These observations are particularly relevant to InSb detectors mounted in dewars that use rubber O rings since the ingress of moisture was found to be particularly serious in this type of dewar.

  1. A new generation of small pixel pitch/SWaP cooled infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espuno, L.; Pacaud, O.; Reibel, Y.; Rubaldo, L.; Kerlain, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Dariel, A.; Roumegoux, J.; Brunner, A.; Kessler, A.; Gravrand, O.; Castelein, P.

    2015-10-01

    Following clear technological trends, the cooled IR detectors market is now in demand for smaller, more efficient and higher performance products. This demand pushes products developments towards constant innovations on detectors, read-out circuits, proximity electronics boards, and coolers. Sofradir was first to show a 10μm focal plane array (FPA) at DSS 2012, and announced the DAPHNIS 10μm product line back in 2014. This pixel pitch is a key enabler for infrared detectors with increased resolution. Sofradir recently achieved outstanding products demonstrations at this pixel pitch, which clearly demonstrate the benefits of adopting 10μm pixel pitch focal plane array-based detectors. Both HD and XGA Daphnis 10μm products also benefit from a global video datapath efficiency improvement by transitioning to digital video interfaces. Moreover, innovative smart pixels functionalities drastically increase product versatility. In addition to this strong push towards a higher pixels density, Sofradir acknowledges the need for smaller and lower power cooled infrared detector. Together with straightforward system interfaces and better overall performances, latest technological advances on SWAP-C (Size, Weight, Power and Cost) Sofradir products enable the advent of a new generation of high performance portable and agile systems (handheld thermal imagers, unmanned aerial vehicles, light gimbals etc...). This paper focuses on those features and performances that can make an actual difference in the field.

  2. A Hot-Electron Far-Infrared Direct Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to improve the sensitivity of direct-detection bolometers at millimeter, submillimeter and far-infrared wavelengths. The idea is to adjust a speed of the thermal relaxation of hot-electrons in a nanometer size normal metal or super-conductive transition edge bolometer by controlling the elastic electron mean free path. If the bolometer contacts are made of a superconductor with high critical temperature (Nb, Pb etc.) then the thermal diffusion into the contacts is absent because of the Andreev's reflection and the electron-phonon relaxation is the only mechanism for heat removal. The relaxation rate should behave as T(sup 4)l at subkelvin temperatures (l is the electron elastic mean free path) and can be reduced by factor of 10-100 by decreasing l. Then an antenna- or waveguide-coupled bolometer with a time constant about 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) s at T approximately equals 0.1-0.3 K will exhibit photon-noise limited performance in millimeter and submillimeter range. The choice of the bolometer material is a tradeoff between a low electron heat capacity and fabrication. A state-of-the-art bolometer currently offers NEP = 10(exp -17) W(Square root of (Hz)) at 100 mK along with a approximately equals 2 msec time constant. The bolometer we propose will have a figure-of-merit, NEP(square root (r)), which is 10(exp 3) times smaller. This will allow for a tremendous increase in speed which will have a significant impact for observational mapping applications. Alternatively, the bolometer could operate at higher temperature with still superior sensitivity. This device can significantly increase a science return and reduce the cost for future observational missions. This research was performed by the Center for Space Microelectronics Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was sponsored by NASA, Office of Space Science.

  3. INAS hole-immobilized doping superlattice long-wave-infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An approach to long-wave-infrared (LWIR) technology is discussed. The approach is based on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of hole immobilized doping superlattices in narrow band gap 3-5 semiconductors, specifically, InAs and InSb. Such superlattices are incorporated into detector structures suitable for focal plane arrays. An LWIR detector that has high detectivity performance to wavelengths of about 16 microns at operating temperatures of 65K, where long-duration space refrigeration is plausible, is presented.

  4. Commentary: JWST near-infrared detector degradation— finding the problem, fixing the problem, and moving forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Robert J.; Greenhouse, Matthew; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, C. W.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy A.; Kohn, Stanley; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Robert E.; Misselt, Karl; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Raymond; Pipher, Judith L.; Piquette, Eric; Polis, Dan; Pontius, Jim; Rieke, Marcia; Smith, Roger; Tennant, W. E.; Wang, Liqin; Wen, Yiting; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Zandian, Majid

    2012-06-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared-optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 μm cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article, we present the two public DD-FRB "Executive Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, some recent measurements showing that the performance of the improved design meets JWST requirements, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  5. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    The present conference discusses Schottky-barrier IR image sensors, SWIR and MWIR Schottky-barrier imagers, a 640 x 640 PtSi, models of nonlinearities in focal plane arrays, retinal function relative to IRT focal plane arrays, a solid-state pyroelectric imager, and electrolyte electroreflectance spectroscopies for the ion-implanted HgCdTe with thermal annealing. Also discussed are HgCdTe hybrid focal plane arrays for thermoelectrically cooled applications, a novel IR detector plasma-edge detector, and IR detector circuits using monolithic CMOS amps with InSb detectors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  6. Evaluation of nano-slot antenna for mid-infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Junsei; Kawakami, Akira; Hyodo, Masaharu; Tanaka, Shukichi; Takeda, Masanori; Shimakage, Hisashi

    2014-11-01

    To improve the response performance of superconducting infrared detectors, we propose using a photonic antenna with a micro-detector in conjunction with a nano-structure. In this paper, we report evaluation results that show the basic characteristics of a photonic antenna in the mid-infrared region. The antenna consists of a nano-slot antenna and a thin-film load resistance placed in the center of the antenna. The antennas were designed for operation at approximately several tens of THz by using an electromagnetic simulator. Through measurements of the spectral reflectance characteristics, clear absorptions caused by the antenna properties were observed at approximately 50 THz, and high polarization dependencies were also observed. The results of the simulation qualitatively agreed with the results of the experiment. The effective area of the antenna was also evaluated and was found to be approximately 3.5 μm2 at 54 THz.

  7. Development of sensitive long-wave infrared detector arrays for passively cooled space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Craig; Lee, Donald; Beletic, James; Chen, Chi-Yi A.; Demers, Richard T.; Dorn, Meghan; Edwall, Dennis; Fazar, Candice Bacon; Forrest, William J.; Liu, Fengchuan; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Pipher, Judith L.; Yulius, Aristo

    2013-09-01

    The near-earth object camera (NEOCam) is a proposed infrared space mission designed to discover and characterize most of the potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 140 m in diameter that orbit near the Earth. NASA has funded technology development for NEOCam, including the development of long wavelength infrared detector arrays that will have excellent zodiacal background emission-limited performance at passively cooled focal plane temperatures. Teledyne Imaging Sensors has developed and delivered for test at the University of Rochester the first set of approximately 10 μm cutoff, 1024×1024 pixel HgCdTe detector arrays. Measurements of these arrays show the development to be extremely promising: noise, dark current, quantum efficiency, and well depth goals have been met by this technology at focal plane temperatures of 35 to 40 K, readily attainable with passive cooling. The next set of arrays to be developed will address changes suggested by the first set of deliverables.

  8. Modeling effects of common molecular contaminants on the Euclid infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W.; McKenney, C.; Barbier, R.; Cho, H.; Cillis, A.; Clemens, J.-C.; Dawson, O.; Delo, G.; Ealet, A.; Feizi, A.; Ferraro, N.; Foltz, R.; Goodsall, T.; Hickey, M.; Hwang, T.; Israelsson, U.; Jhabvala, M.; Kahle, D.; Kan, Em.; Kan, Er.; Lotkin, G.; Maciaszek, T.; McClure, S.; Miko, L.; Nguyen, L.; Pravdo, S.; Prieto, E.; Powers, T.; Seiffert, M.; Strada, P.; Tucker, C.; Turck, K.; Waczynski, A.; Wang, F.; Weber, C.; Williams, J.

    2016-07-01

    Cleanliness specifications for infrared detector arrays are usually so stringent that effects are neglibile. However, the specifications determine only the level of particulates and areal density of molecular layer on the surface, but the chemical composition of these contaminants are not specified. Here, we use a model to assess the impact on system quantum efficiency from possible contaminants that could accidentally transfer or cryopump to the detector during instrument or spacecraft testing and on orbit operation. Contaminant layers thin enough to meet typical specifications, < 0.5μgram/cm2, have a negligible effect on the net quantum efficiency of the detector, provided that the contaminant does not react with the detector surface, Performance impacts from these contaminant plating onto the surface become important for thicknesses 5 - 50μgram/cm2. Importantly, detectable change in the "ripple" of the anti reflection coating occurs at these coverages and can enhance the system quantum efficiency. This is a factor 10 less coverage for which loss from molecular absorption lines is important. Thus, should contamination be suspected during instrument test or flight, detailed modelling of the layer on the detector and response to very well known calibrations sources would be useful to determine the impact on detector performance.

  9. Numerical Device Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization of Extended-SWIR HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, J.; DeWames, R. E.; DeCuir, E. A.; Bellotti, E.; Dhar, N.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging in the extended short-wavelength infrared (eSWIR) spectral band (1.7-3.0 μm) for astronomy applications is an area of significant interest. However, these applications require infrared detectors with extremely low dark current (less than 0.01 electrons per pixel per second for certain applications). In these detectors, sources of dark current that may limit the overall system performance are fundamental and/or defect-related mechanisms. Non-optimized growth/device processing may present material point defects within the HgCdTe bandgap leading to Shockley-Read-Hall dominated dark current. While realizing contributions to the dark current from only fundamental mechanisms should be the goal for attaining optimal device performance, it may not be readily feasible with current technology and/or resources. In this regard, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory performed physics-based, two- and three-dimensional numerical modeling of HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detectors designed for operation in the eSWIR spectral band. The underlying impetus for this capability and study originates with a desire to reach fundamental performance limits via intelligent device design.

  10. Spectral filtering using active metasurfaces compatible with narrow bandgap III-V infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Kim, Jin; Brener, Igal

    2016-09-19

    Narrow-bandgap semiconductors such as alloys of InAsAlSb and their heterostructures are considered promising candidates for next generation infrared photodetectors and devices. The prospect of actively tuning the spectral responsivity of these detectors at the pixel level is very appealing. In principle, this could be achieved with a tunable metasurface fabricated monolithically on the detector pixel. Here, we present first steps towards that goal using a complementary metasurface strongly coupled to an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode operating in the long-wave region of the infrared spectrum. We fabricate such a coupled system using the same epitaxial layers used for infrared pixels in a focal plane array and demonstrate the existence of ENZ modes in high mobility layers of InAsSb. We confirm that the coupling strength between the ENZ mode and the metasurface depends on the ENZ layer thickness and demonstrate a transmission modulation on the order of 25%. We further show numerically the expected tunable spectral behavior of such coupled system under reverse and forward bias, which could be used in future electrically tunable detectors. PMID:27661890

  11. Spectral filtering using active metasurfaces compatible with narrow bandgap III-V infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Kim, Jin; Brener, Igal

    2016-09-19

    Narrow-bandgap semiconductors such as alloys of InAsAlSb and their heterostructures are considered promising candidates for next generation infrared photodetectors and devices. The prospect of actively tuning the spectral responsivity of these detectors at the pixel level is very appealing. In principle, this could be achieved with a tunable metasurface fabricated monolithically on the detector pixel. Here, we present first steps towards that goal using a complementary metasurface strongly coupled to an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode operating in the long-wave region of the infrared spectrum. We fabricate such a coupled system using the same epitaxial layers used for infrared pixels in a focal plane array and demonstrate the existence of ENZ modes in high mobility layers of InAsSb. We confirm that the coupling strength between the ENZ mode and the metasurface depends on the ENZ layer thickness and demonstrate a transmission modulation on the order of 25%. We further show numerically the expected tunable spectral behavior of such coupled system under reverse and forward bias, which could be used in future electrically tunable detectors.

  12. Bowtie nanoantenna integrated with indium gallium arsenide antimonide for uncooled infrared detector with enhanced sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangjo; Sarabandi, Kamal

    2013-12-10

    A novel high-impedance nanoantenna with an embedded matching network is implemented to realize a highly sensitive infrared detector. A bowtie antenna is operated at its antiparallel resonance and loaded with a small low-bandgap (E(g)=0.52  eV) indium gallium arsenide antimonide (InGaAsSb) p-n junction. The structure is optimized for maximum power transfer and significant field enhancement at its terminals for a desired frequency band where the maximum quantum efficiency of InGaAsSb is observed. The sensitivity improvement of the proposed detector is evaluated against the traditional bulk detector and it is shown that the detectivity is improved by the field enhancement factor, which is approximately 20 for the case considered here.

  13. Thermal imager fixed pattern noise prediction using a characterization of the infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Paolo; Zatti, Stefano; Giunti, Claudio; Sozzi, Barbara; Guadagnoli, Emanuele; Porta, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Cooled infrared detectors are typically characterized by well-known electro-optical parameters: responsivity, noise equivalent temperature difference, shot noise, 1/f noise, and so on. Particularly important for staring arrays is also the residual fixed pattern noise (FPN) that can be obtained after the application of the nonuniformity correction (NUC) algorithm. A direct measure of this parameter is usually hard to define because the residual FPN strongly depends, other than on the detector, on the choice of the NUC algorithm and the operative scenario. We introduce three measurable parameters: instability, nonlinearity, and a residual after a polynomial fitting of the detector response curve, and we demonstrate how they are related to the residual FPN after the application of an NUC (the relationship with three common correction algorithms is discussed). A comparison with experimental data is also presented and discussed.

  14. A highly sensitive scanning far-infrared microscope with quantum Hall detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikushima, Kenji; Sakuma, Hisato; Komiyama, Susumu

    2003-09-01

    We develop a highly sensitive scanning far-infrared (FIR) microscope, which consists of a silicon solid immersion lens that probes FIR and a condenser lens that focuses the FIR onto a small quantum Hall detector (400 μm×400 μm). The solid immersion lens is in contact with the backside of a Hall bar sample, which is moved with a mechanical XY stage. The quantum Hall detector, which function as a narrow band FIR detector (bandwidth of about 2%), is a Hall bar with a large length-to-width ratio in integer quantum Hall effect regimes. The microscope is successfully applied to image extremely weak cyclotron emissions from quantum Hall devices with a spatial resolution of about 50 μm and a signal-to-noise ratio improved by a factor 18 compared to a previous system.

  15. Free-space-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors for infrared optical communications.

    PubMed

    Bellei, Francesco; Cartwright, Alyssa P; McCaughan, Adam N; Dane, Andrew E; Najafi, Faraz; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-02-22

    This paper describes the construction of a cryostat and an optical system with a free-space coupling efficiency of 56.5% ± 3.4% to a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) for infrared quantum communication and spectrum analysis. A 1K pot decreases the base temperature to T = 1.7 K from the 2.9 K reached by the cold head cooled by a pulse-tube cryocooler. The minimum spot size coupled to the detector chip was 6.6 ± 0.11 µm starting from a fiber source at wavelength, λ = 1.55 µm. We demonstrated photon counting on a detector with an 8 × 7.3 µm2 area. We measured a dark count rate of 95 ± 3.35 kcps and a system detection efficiency of 1.64% ± 0.13%. We explain the key steps that are required to improve further the coupling efficiency.

  16. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation.

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, G; Endres, C P; Lewen, F; Oosterbeek, J W

    2008-10-01

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30 dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating.

  17. Towards Background-Limited Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a Cryogenic Far-Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyhrie, A.; Glenn, J.; Wheeler, J.; Day, P.; Eom, B. H.; Leduc, H.; Skrutskie, M.

    2016-08-01

    Arrays of tens of thousands of sensitive far-infrared detectors coupled to a cryogenic 4-6 m class orbital telescope are needed to trace the assembly of galaxies over cosmic time. The sensitivity of a 4 Kelvin telescope observing in the far-infrared (30-300 \\upmu m) would be limited by zodiacal light and Galactic interstellar dust emission, and require broadband detector noise equivalent powers (NEPs) in the range of 3× 10^{-19} W/√{Hz}. We are fabricating and testing 96 element arrays of lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) designed to reach NEPs near this level in a low-background laboratory environment. The LEKIDs are fabricated with aluminum: the low normal-state resistivity of Al permits the use of very thin wire-grid absorber lines (150 nm) for efficient absorption of radiation, while the small volumes enable high sensitivities because quasiparticle densities are high. Such narrow absorption lines present a fabrication challenge, but we deposit TiN atop the Al to increase the robustness of the detectors and achieve a 95 % yield. We present the design of these Al/TiN bilayer LEKIDs and preliminary sensitivity measurements at 350 \\upmu m optically loaded by cold blackbody radiation.

  18. Ageing effects in cryogenically cooled InSb infrared filtered detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, E.; Fox, N. P.

    2005-02-01

    The spectral responsivity of two commercially available InSb detectors with low-pass cold filters attached on their cold shields for optimum operation in the 1.6-2.6 µm wavelength range was observed to drift slowly with time. The origin of these drifts was investigated. The drifts were shown to arise due to a thin film of water-ice deposition on the cold low-pass filters mounted on the cold shields of the two detectors. The presence of the ice film (which is itself a dielectric film) modifies the transmission characteristics of the filter, thus giving rise to the observed drifts. The drifts were completely eliminated by evacuating the detector dewars while baking them at 50 °C for 72 h. This work confirms that infrared detectors employing cold multi-layer dielectric filters should be evacuated and baked at least annually and in some cases (depending on the quality of the dewar and the measurement uncertainty required) more frequently. These observations are particularly relevant to space instruments which use cryogenically cooled infrared filter radiometers for earth observation. The deposition of a thin film of ice on the cold band-pass filters can account for the oscillatory drifts observed in the response of some of the channels of the ATSR-2, and Landsat-3 and Landsat-5 space missions.

  19. Early detection of combustible gas leaks using open path infrared (IR) gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward; Baliga, Shankar

    2012-06-01

    Open path IR gas detectors are a mainstay in the oil and gas industry. They are used in a variety of instances to identify gas accumulations or monitor gas cloud migrations. In offshore installations, open path optical gas detectors are used to monitor drilling and production operations, crude oil separation, compression, and exhaust and ventilation systems. Because they can monitor a perimeter or fence line, they are ideally suited for detecting gas in open facilities, where point gas detectors would be difficult or expensive to deploy. Despite their widespread use, open path optical gas detectors are rarely employed to detect low level concentrations of combustible gases. Standard models are typically set to alarm at 50% LEL-m (50% LEL extended over one meter), providing sufficiently early warning when gas accumulations occur. Nevertheless, in cases in which a combustible gas is diluted quickly, such as ventilation exhaust ducting, it may be necessary to set the detector to alarm at the lowest predictable level. Further, interest in low level infrared gas detection has been growing as gases such as CH4 and CO2 are greenhouse gases. The present paper describes a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) open path system designed to detect combustible and carbon dioxide gas leaks in the parts-per-million-meter (ppm-m or mg/cm2). The detector has been installed in offshore platforms and large onshore facilities to detect a variety of flammable gases and vapors. Advantages and limitations of the system are presented. False alarm immunity and resilience to atmospheric interferences are also discussed.

  20. An instrumentation amplifier based readout circuit for a dual element microbolometer infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waal, D. J.; Schoeman, J.

    2014-06-01

    The infrared band is widely used in many applications to solve problems stretching over very diverse fields, ranging from medical applications like inflammation detection to military, security and safety applications employing thermal imaging in low light conditions. At the heart of these optoelectrical systems lies a sensor used to detect incident infrared radiation, and in the case of this work our focus is on uncooled microbolometers as thermal detectors. Microbolometer based thermal detectors are limited in sensitivity by various parameters, including the detector layout and design, operating temperature, air pressure and biasing that causes self heating. Traditional microbolometers use the entire membrane surface for a single detector material. This work presents the design of a readout circuit amplifier where a dual detector element microbolometer is used, rather than the traditional single element. The concept to be investigated is based on the principle that both elements will be stimulated with a similar incoming IR signal and experience the same resistive change, thus creating a common mode signal. However, such a common mode signal will be rejected by a differential amplifier, thus one element is placed within a negative resistance converter to create a differential mode signal that is twice the magnitude of the comparable single mode signal of traditional detector designs. An instrumentation amplifier is used for the final stage of the readout amplifier circuit, as it allows for very high common mode rejection with proper trimming of the Wheatstone bridge to compensate for manufacturing tolerance. It was found that by implementing the above, improved sensitivity can be achieved.

  1. A Failure Mode in Dense Infrared Detector Arrays Resulting in Increased Dark Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a failure mode that arises in dense infrared focal plane detector arrays as a consequence of the interactions of neighboring pixels through the minority carrier profiles in the common absorber layer. We consider the situation in which one pixel in a hexagonal array becomes de-biased relative to its neighbors and show that the dark current in the six neighboring pixels increases exponentially as a function of the difference between the nominal and anomalous biases. Moreover, we show that the current increase in the six nearest-neighbor pixels is in total larger than that by which the current in the affected pixel decreases, causing a net increase in the dark current. The physical origins of this effect are explained as being due to increased lateral diffusion currents that arise as a consequence of breaking the symmetry of the minority carrier profiles. We then perform a parametric study to quantify the magnitude of this effect for a number of detector geometric parameters, operating temperatures, and spectral bands. Particularly, numerical simulations are carried out for short-, mid-, and long-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detectors operating between 77 K and 210 K. We show that this effect is most prevalent in architectures for which the lateral diffusion current is the largest component of the total dark current—high operating temperature devices with narrow epitaxial absorber thicknesses and pitches small compared to the diffusion length of minority carriers. These results could prove significant particularly for short- and mid-wave infrared detectors, which are typically designed to fit these conditions.

  2. Characterization results of the TROPOMI Short Wave InfraRed detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeveen, R. W. M.; Voors, R.; Robbins, M. S.; Tol, P. J. J.; Ivanov, T. I.

    2013-10-01

    The TROPOMI Earth-observing instrument is the single payload on board ESA's Sentinel-5 Precursor mission. It is the successor of the Sciamachy instrument (ESA ENVISAT) and the OMI instrument (NASA EOS/Aura), and combines and improves the best of both instruments. TROPOMI copies the push broom observation geometry of OMI allowing for daily global coverage due to its instantaneous field of view of 108 degrees, or 2600 km swath on ground. From Sciamachy the 2305 - 2385 nm Short-Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) observational band is copied with which methane and carbon monoxide are observed. This paper reports on the development of the SWIR detector module and the detailed characterization of the 1000x256 SWIR Saturn detector array produced by Sofradir (F) as measured with the SRON-developed Front-End Electronics. The detailed characterization comprises not only the regular properties such as dark current, noise and photo-response, but also more complex characteristics including non-linearity and memory. Characterization of the detection module was performed for all operational parameters: detector temperature (135 - 145 K), bias voltage and integration time. Thanks to the detector-characterization program, the operational clocking of the detector could be optimized, resulting in significantly improved performance.

  3. Design and analysis of a multi-element dual band infrared detector for counter-countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiguo; Li, Mo; Chen, Hongxu

    2014-01-01

    A dual band multi-element infrared (IR) detector which enables effective target tracking in a complex tactical environment is presented. The photosensitive elements are designed like the stripes of the Lovell optical reticle and arranged close to each other. The thin films of the dual band filter are precisely coated onto an IR transparent substrate, which is then bonded directly onto the surface of photosensitive area with an IR transparent adhesive. The optical system of the detector adopts a spin-scan mode. The filter-detector combination rotates with a mechanical rotor during scanning. The dual band filters temporally encode target location into the incoming radiation signals, and the photosensitive elements then convert the modulated radiation into an electrical signal. The ratio of radiation intensity from two bands can be calculated to distinguish target from IR target-flare mixed signals. Because the pattern of the detector is similar to the Lovell reticle, the detector can also perform spatial filtering to eliminate background noise. In addition, relatively high stability, together with simplicity of the hardware and low cost, indicates that the presented method has a potential application at the field in which precision is not strictly requested.

  4. Characterization of Dual-Band Infrared Detectors for Application to Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Refaat, Tamer F.; Xiao, Yegao; Bhat, Ishwara

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), in partnership with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), developed photovoltaic infrared (IR) detectors suitable at two different wavelengths using Sb-based material systems. Using lattice-matched InGaAsSb grown on GaSb substrates, dual wavelength detectors operating at 1.7 and 2.5 micron wavelengths can be realized. P-N junction diodes are fabricated on both GaSb and InGaAsSb materials. The photodiode on GaSb detects wavelengths at 1.7 micron and the InGaAsSb detector detects wavelengths at 2.2 micron or longer depending on the composition. The films for these devices are grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The cross section of the independently accessed back-to-back photodiode dual band detector consists of a p-type substrate on which n-on-p GaInAsSb junction is grown, followed by a p-on-n GaSb junction. There are three ohmic contacts in this structure, one to the p-GaSb top layer, one to the n-GaSb/n-GaInAsSb layer and one to the p-type GaSb substrate. The common terminal is the contact to the n-GaSb/n-GaInAsSb layer. The contact to the n-GaSb/p-GaInAsSb region of the photodiode in the dual band is electrically connected and is accessed at the edge of the photodiode. NASA LaRC acquired the fabricated dual band detector from RPI and characterized the detector at its Detector Characterization Laboratory. Characterization results, such as responsivity, noise, quantum efficiency, and detectivity will be presented.

  5. Examination of cotton fibers and common contaminants using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemical imaging of cotton fibers and common contaminants in fibers is presented. Chemical imaging was performed with an infrared microscope equipped with a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In a...

  6. Novel processing and properties of high efficiency superconducting infrared bolometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxey, Donovan E.

    1998-12-01

    The work in this dissertation involves the design, fabrication, and analysis of superconducting infrared bolometric detectors. These bolometers have been made from superconducting YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} (YBCO) deposited on silicon (100) substrates utilizing a buffer layer of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Thin films of undoped and silver(Ag) doped YBCO, as well as stacked layers of undoped/Ag-doped YBCO have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The microstructure and materials properties of these films have been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrical and transport properties of these films have been investigated using four-point resistance versus temperature measurements. The results of the investigations of the materials and electrical properties of these films show that they are of high quality, and exhibit superconducting characteristics that are conducive for bolometer device applications. For the first time superconducting bolometric detectors have been fabricated using a novel photolithographic and anti-reflective coating (ARC) process. This fabrication process can be used to fabricate any type of device structure that utilizes superconducting YBCO. The use of an anti-reflective coating simplifies the overall device fabrication process and allows this process to be easily integrated with conventional silicon device processing steps. The anti-reflective coating serves as a barrier to moisture and other contaminants that react with YBCO, as well as act as an absorption medium that improves the optical collection efficiency of the device. Optical analysis of these three bolometer device structures has been carried out using a helium neon (HeNe; lambda = 632.8nm) laser. At a bias of 1mA, and chopping frequency of 100Hz; we have measured photoresponse as a function of device temperature, calculated responsivity, and

  7. Anodic fluoride passivation of InAs/GaSb type II superlattice infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lixue; Cao, Xiancun; Yao, Guansheng; Zhang, Liang; Si, Junjie; Sun, Weiguo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major challenges of InAs/GaSb superlattice devices arises owing to the large number of surface states generated during fabrication processes. Surface passivation and subsequent capping of the surfaces are essential for any practical applicability of this material system. In this paper, we passivated InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors proposed anodic fluoride passivation method. Short and mid wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared materials were grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on GaSb (100) substrates. A GaSb buffer layer was grown for optimized superlattice growth condition, which can decrease the occurrence of defects with similar pyramidal structure. The result of auger electron spectroscopy (AES) surface scans after anodic fluoride passivation confirms that anodic fluoride passivation treatment did affect. The leakage current as a function of bias voltage (I-V) for InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors has been examined at 77K. Compared with the unpassivated approach, this passivation methods decrease the dark current by approximately five orders of magnitude.

  8. Fast infrared array spectrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled 160-element PbSe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jun; Gore, Jay P.; Sivathanu, Yudaya R.; Lim, Jongmook

    2004-02-01

    A fast infrared array spectrometer (FIAS) with a thermoelectrically cooled 160-element PbSe detector was demonstrated using measurements of instantaneous infrared radiation intensities simultaneously over the 1.8-4.9 μm wavelength range at a sampling rate of 390 Hz. A three-point second-degree Lagrange interpolation polynomial was constructed to calibrate the FIAS because of the nonlinear response of the infrared array detector to the incident radiation beam. This calibration method gave excellent measurements of blackbody radiation spectra except for a narrow band at wavelength of 4.3 μm due to absorption by room carbon dioxide, which is one of the two major gas radiation peaks (2.7 and 4.3 μm) from the lean premixed hydrocarbon/air combustion products in the midinfrared spectrum. Therefore, the absorption coefficient of room carbon dioxide was conveniently measured on site with the blackbody reference source, and was used in the calibration of the FIAS and also in the calculations of the radiation spectra. Blackbody tests showed that this procedure was effective in correcting for the room carbon dioxide absorption in the radiation spectra measured by the FIAS. For an example of its application, the calibrated FIAS was used to measure spectral radiation intensities from three lean premixed laminar flames and a premixed turbulent jet flame for which reference data with a grating spectrometer were available for comparison. The agreement between the FIAS measurements and the reference data was excellent.

  9. Development of Passively Cooled Long Wave Infrared Detector Arrays for NEOCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Craig W.; Lee, D.; Beletic, J.; Chen, C.; Demers, R.; Dorn, M.; Edwall, D.; Bacon Fazar, C.; Forrest, W. J.; Liu, F.; Mainzer, A. K.; Pipher, J.; Yulius, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Near Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) is a proposed space mission designed to discover and characterize most of the potentially hazardous asteroids that orbit near the Earth. NEOCam consists of an infrared telescope and a passively cooled wide-field camera operating at thermal infrared wavelengths. NASA has funded technology development for NEOCam, including the development of long wavelength infrared detector arrays that will have excellent performance at NEOCam’s zodiacal emission-limited background. Teledyne Imaging Sensors has developed and delivered for test at the University of Rochester the first set of approximately 10 micron cutoff, 1024 x 1024 HgCdTe detector arrays in accord with NEOCam requirements. The first measurements of these arrays show the development to be extremely promising: noise, dark current, quantum efficiency and well depth goals have been met by this technology at focal plane temperatures of 40K, readily attainable with passive cooling. The next set of arrays to be developed will address changes suggested by the first set of deliverables.

  10. Limiting dark current mechanisms in antimony-based superlattice infrared detectors for the long-wavelength infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Lemke, Florian; Schmitz, Johannes; Wauro, Matthias; Walther, Martin

    2015-06-01

    A detailed understanding of limiting dark current mechanisms in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared detectors is key to improve the electrooptical performance of these devices. We present a six-component dark current analysis which, for the first time, takes account of sidewall-related dark current contributions in mesa-etched T2SL photodiodes. In a wide temperature range from 30K to 130K, the paper compares limiting mechanisms in two homojunction T2SL photodiode wafers for the long-wavelength infrared regime. While the two epi wafers were fabricated with nominally the same frontside process they were grown on different molecular beam epitaxy systems. In the available literature a limitation by Shockley-Read-Hall processes in the space charge region giving rise to generation-recombination (GR) dark current is the prevailing verdict on the bulk dark current mechanism in T2SL homojunction photodiodes around 77K. In contrast, we find that investigated photodiode wafers are instead limited by the diffusion mechanism and the ohmic shunt component, respectively. Furthermore, our in-depth analysis of the various dark current components has led to an interesting observation on the temperature dependence of the shunt resistance in T2SL homojunction photodiodes. Our results indicate that the GR and the shunt mechanism share the same dependence on bandgap and temperature, i.e., a proportionality to exp(-Eg/2kT).

  11. Infrared Radiative Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeff I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Street, Ken W.; Markham, Jim R.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared (IR) transmittance and reflectance of translucent thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have important implications for both the performance of these coatings as radiation barriers and emitters as well as affecting measurements of TBC thermal conductivity, especially as TBCs are being pushed to higher temperatures. In this paper, the infrared spectral directional-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) TBCs are reported. These measurements are compared to those for single crystal YSZ specimens to show the effects of the plasma-sprayed coating microstructure. It is shown that the coatings exhibit negligible absorption at wavelengths up to about 5 micrometers, and that internal scattering rather than surface reflections dominates the hemispherical reflectance. The translucent nature of the 8YSZ TBCs results in the absorptance/emittance and reflectance of TBC-coated substrates depending on the TBC thickness, microstructure, as well as the radiative properties of the underlying substrate. The effects of these properties on TBC measurements and performance are discussed.

  12. Non-local means-based nonuniformity correction for infrared focal-plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Chen, Fu-sheng; Wang, Chen-sheng

    2014-11-01

    The infrared imaging systems are normally based on the infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA) which can be considered as an array of independent detectors aligned at the focal plane of the imaging system. Unfortunately, every detector on the IRFPA may have a different response to the same input infrared signal which is known as the nonuniformity problem. Then we can observe the fixed pattern noise (FPN) from the resulting images. Standard nonuniformity correction (NUC) methods need to be recalibrated after a short period of time due the temporal drift of the FPN. Scene-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques eliminate the need for calibration by correction coefficients based on the scene being viewed. However, in the scene-based NUC method the problem of ghosting artifacts widely seriously decreases the image quality, which can degrade the performance of many applications such as target detection and track. This paper proposed an improved scene-based method based on the retina-like neural network approach. The method incorporates the use of non-local means (NLM) method into the estimation of the gain and the offset of each detector. This method can not only estimates the accurate correction coefficient but also restrict the ghosting artifacts efficiently. The proposed method relies on the use of NLM method which is a very successful image denoising method. And then the NLM used here can preserve the image edges efficiently and obtain a reliable spatial estimation. We tested the proposed NUC method by applying it to an IR sequence of frames. The performance of the proposed method was compared the other well-established adaptive NUC techniques.

  13. Modified lead titanate thin films for pyroelectric infrared detectors on gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Moinuddin; Butler, Donald P.

    2015-07-01

    Pyroelectric infrared detectors provide the advantage of both a wide spectral response and dynamic range, which also has enabled systems to be developed with reduced size, weight and power consumption. This paper demonstrates the deposition of lead zirconium titanate (PZT) and lead calcium titanate (PCT) thin films for uncooled pyroelectric detectors with the utilization of gold electrodes. The modified lead titanate thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on gold electrodes. The PZT and PCT thins films deposited and annealed at temperatures of 650 °C and 550 °C respectively demonstrated the best pyroelectric performance in this work. The thin films displayed a pyroelectric effect that increased with temperature. Poling of the thin films was carried out for a fixed time periods and fixed dc bias voltages at elevated temperature in order to increase the pyroelectric coefficient by establishing a spontaneous polarization of the thin films. Poling caused the pyroelectric current to increase one order of magnitude.

  14. Modeling of high-precision wavefront sensing with new generation of CMT avalanche photodiode infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Gousset, Silvère; Petit, Cyril; Michau, Vincent; Fusco, Thierry; Robert, Clelia

    2015-12-01

    Near-infrared wavefront sensing allows for the enhancement of sky coverage with adaptive optics. The recently developed HgCdTe avalanche photodiode arrays are promising due to their very low detector noise, but still present an imperfect cosmetic that may directly impact real-time wavefront measurements for adaptive optics and thus degrade performance in astronomical applications. We propose here a model of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurement in the presence of residual fixed pattern noise and defective pixels. To adjust our models, a fine characterization of such an HgCdTe array, the RAPID sensor, is proposed. The impact of the cosmetic defects on the Shack-Hartmann measurement is assessed through numerical simulations. This study provides both a new insight on the applicability of cadmium mercury telluride (CMT) avalanche photodiodes detectors for astronomical applications and criteria to specify the cosmetic qualities of future arrays. PMID:26836674

  15. The growth and Raman scattering studies of TGSP crystal as the IR room temperature infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekfar, R.; Abbasi, B.

    2005-09-01

    The partial substitution of sulphate (SO42-) by phosphate (PO43-) in triglycine sulfate (TGS) single crystal can improve the properties of the TGS family crystal as room temperature infrared (IR) detector. Phosphoric acid (H3PO4)-doped triglycine sulfate (TGSP) single crystal has strong pyroelectric properties due to its high pyroelectric coefficient and reasonably low dielectric constant. This family of single crystals can grow easily and rapidly and are reasonably good uniform detectors in the electromagnetic region from UV to IR at room temperature and without using cryogenic cooling. TGSP single crystals were grown by saturated solution method. In order to investigate the detection sensitivity of the TGSP crystal, single crystals with different dopant concentration of phosphate (PO43-) ion were grown. A rather complete back-scattering Raman scattering spectra and hysteresis loops of the grown crystals were recorded and compared with each other. The Raman spectra and their assignments only will be reported here.

  16. Room temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb nBn detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Hoglund, Linda; Rosenberg, Robert; Kowalczyk, Robert; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Fisher, Anita; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigate the high temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb-AlAsSb nBn detectors with cut-off wavelengths near 4.5 μm. The quantum efficiency of these devices is 35% without antireflection coatings and does not change with temperature in the 77-325 K temperature range, indicating potential for room temperature operation. The device dark current stays diffusion limited in the 150-325 K temperature range and becomes dominated by generation-recombination processes at lower temperatures. Detector detectivities of D*(λ) = 1 × 109 (cm Hz0.5/W) at T = 300 K and D*(λ) = 5 × 109 (cm Hz0.5/W) at T = 250 K, which is easily achievable with a one stage TE cooler.

  17. Room temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb nBn detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Hoglund, Linda; Rosenberg, Robert; Kowalczyk, Robert; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Fisher, Anita; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2014-07-14

    In this work, we investigate the high temperature performance of mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb-AlAsSb nBn detectors with cut-off wavelengths near 4.5 μm. The quantum efficiency of these devices is 35% without antireflection coatings and does not change with temperature in the 77–325 K temperature range, indicating potential for room temperature operation. The current generation of nBn detectors shows an increase of operational bias with temperature, which is attributed to a shift in the Fermi energy level in the absorber. Analysis of the device performance shows that operational bias and quantum efficiency of these detectors can be further improved. The device dark current stays diffusion limited in the 150 K–325 K temperature range and becomes dominated by generation-recombination processes at lower temperatures. Detector detectivities are D*(λ) = 1 × 10{sup 9} (cm Hz{sup 0.5}/W) at T = 300 K and D*(λ) = 5 × 10{sup 9} (cm Hz{sup 0.5}/W) at T = 250 K, which is easily achievable with a one stage TE cooler.

  18. GaAs Blocked-Impurity-Band Detectors for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, Benjamin Lewin

    2004-01-01

    High-purity and doped GaAs films have been grown by Liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) for development of a blocked impurity band (BIB) detector for far-infrared radiation. The film growth process developed has resulted in the capability to grow GaAs with a net active impurity concentration below 1 x 1013 cm-3, ideal for the blocking layer of the BIB detector. The growth of n-type LPE GaAs films with donor concentrations below the metal-insulator transition, as required for the absorbing layer of a BIB detector, has been achieved. The control of the donor concentration, however, was found to be insufficient for detector production. The growth by LPE of a high-purity film onto a commercially grown vapor-phase epitaxial (VPE) n-type GaAs doped absorbing layer resulted in a BIB device that showed a significant reduction in the low-temperature dark current compared to the absorbing layer only. Extended optical response was not detected, most likely due to the high compensation of the commercially grown GaAs absorbing layer, which restricts the depletion width of the device.

  19. Fundamental Limits on the Imaging and Polarisation Properties of Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher N.; Withington, Stafford; Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, S. Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Far-infrared bolometric detectors are used extensively in ground-based and space-borne astronomy, and thus it is important to understand their optical behaviour precisely. We have studied the intensity and polarisation response of free-space bolometers, and shown that when the size of the absorber is reduced below a wavelength, the response changes from being that of a classical optical detector to that of a few-mode antenna. We have calculated the modal content of the reception patterns, and found that for any volumetric detector having a side length of less than a wavelength, three magnetic and three electric dipoles characterize the behaviour. The size of the absorber merely determines the relative strengths of the contributions. The same formalism can be applied to thin-film absorbers, where the induced current is forced to flow in a plane. In this case, one magnetic and two electric dipoles characterize the behaviour. The ability to model easily the intensity, polarisation, and straylight characteristics of electrically-small detectors will be of great value when designing high-performance polarimetric imaging arrays.

  20. Infrared detectors and arrays; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 6, 7, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Dereniak, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume provide an overview of recent advances in theoretical and experimental research related to IR detector materials and arrays. The major subject areas covered include IR Schottky barrier silicide arrays, HdCdTe developments, SPRITE technology, superlattice or bandgap-engineered devices, extrinsic silicon technology, indium antimonide technology, and pyroelectric arrays. Papers are presented on time division multiplexed time delay integration, spatial noise in staring IR focal plane arrays, pyroelectrics in a harsh environment, and testing of focal plane arrays.

  1. Long-wavelength PTSI infrared detectors and method of fabrication thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon (Inventor); Park, Jin S. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor); Del Castillo, Hector M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Extended cutoff wavelengths of PtSi Schottky infrared detectors in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) regime have been demonstrated for the first time. This result was achieved by incorporating a 1-nm-thick p+ doping spike at the PtSi/Si interface. The extended cutoff wavelengths resulted from the combined effects of an increased electric field near the silicide/Si interface due to the p+ doping spike and the Schottky image force. The p+ doping spikes were grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 450 degrees Celsius using elemental boron as the dopant source, with doping concentrations ranging from 1.times.10.sup.19 to 1.times.10.sup.21 cm.sup.-3. The cutoff wavelengths were shown to increase with increasing doping concentrations of the p+ spikes.

  2. Growth and study of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals in low-G for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wilcox, W. R.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments on growth of TGS crystals using (010) and (001) oriented disc shape seeds in the low gravity environment aboard Spacelab-3 are presented. The holographic interferograms reconstructed on the ground demonstrated diffusion limited growth. The morphology of the crystals grown was similar to that of crystals grown on earth, except the faces were not fully developed and planar. The device quality of these crytals is considered to be comparable with the best crystals grown on earth. Better infrared detector characteristics were obtained by doping TGS with Cs and L-alanine simultaneously on the ground. Crystals grown on (010) poled seeds show improved morphology and pyroelectric properties.

  3. Innovative design of a calibration mechanism for the space infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, De-wei; Li, Bo; Liu, Jian-feng; Ruan, Ning-juan

    2013-09-01

    A new style calibration mechanism is designed for the infrared camera working in space. This calibration mechanism adds a locking device, which will produce magnetic force to fix the moving parts on the stage of launch. It has not been taken into account in past calibration mechanism of space infrared camera. In order to simplify structure and control system, an alnico is adopted in locking device as the source of magnetic field, which interacts with magnetic material and produces locking force. In addition, there is also a special structural design, which makes magnetic circuit closeitself to control magnetic leakage interfering with other equipment. Besides, another important component of calibration mechanism is a permanent magnet torquer. It can provide driving force for the blackbody to complete two state conversions of calibration and Non-calibration. High magnetic induction intensity and coercivity alnico is used as the stator, which will lighten the weight of torquer. On-off control strategy is selected in order to simplify the control system. Because calibration is only a temporary state, temperature rise has little influence on torquer. This setup is favorable to increase its reliability. There are guard plates on the axial direction shielding electromagnetism, also reducing magnetic leakage. Experimental investigations have been carried out to verify the feasibility and reliability of design. Result indicates the calibration mechanism can primely complete the calibration task of the space infrared detector. It has an important application value on the field of infrared detection.

  4. Electron-phonon interaction in three-barrier nanosystems as active elements of quantum cascade detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.; Grynyshyn, Yu. B.

    2015-04-15

    The theory of electron tunneling through an open nanostructure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector is developed, which takes into account the interaction of electrons with confined and interface phonons. Using the method of finite-temperature Green’s functions and the electron-phonon Hamiltonian in the representation of second quantization over all system variables, the temperature shifts and electron-level widths are calculated and the contributions of different electron-phonon-interaction mechanisms to renormalization of the spectral parameters are analyzed depending on the geometrical configuration of the nanosystem. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As-based resonant tunneling nanostructure, the temperature shift and rf field absorption peak width are not very sensitive to the electron-phonon interaction and result from a decrease in potential barrier heights caused by a difference in the temperature dependences of the well and barrier band gaps.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Novel Single-Photon Detectors in the Long-Wavelength Infrared Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takeji; An, Zhenghua; Komiyama, Susumu

    2011-05-01

    Novel single-photon detectors, called Charge-sensitive Infrared Phototransistor (CSIP), have been developed in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range. The devices are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) structure, and do not require ultralow temperatures ( T < 1 K) for operation. Figures of merit are determined in a T-range of 4.2 K˜30 K by using a homemade all-cryogenic spectrometer. We found that the photo-signal persists up to around 30 K. Excellent specific detectivity D * = 9.6 × 1014 cm Hz1/2/W and noise equivalent power NEP = 8.3 × 10-19 W/Hz1/2 are derived up to T = 23 K. The dynamic range of detection exceeds 106, roughly ranging from attowatt to picowatt levels. These values are by a few orders of magnitude higher than that of the state-of-the-art values of other detectors. Simple planar structure of CSIPs is feasible for array fabrication and will make it possible to monolithically integrate with reading circuit. CSIPs are, therefore, not only extremely sensitive but also suitable for practical use in wide ranging applications.

  6. Development and application of InAsP/InP quantum well infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetanjali, Porwal, S.; Kumar, R.; Dixit, V. K.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    InAsxP1-x/InP quantum wells grown using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy are investigated for infrared detector applications. The structural parameters of the QWs are evaluated from high resolution x-ray diffraction. The electronic transition energies measured from surface photo voltage and photoconductivity confirms that these QWs can be used for fabricating IR detectors in the wide wavelength range, i.e. 0.9-1.46 µm by inter-band transitions and 7-18 µm by inter-sub-band transitions. Subsequently the functionality of one such fabricated InAsxP1-x/InPQW detector is verified by measuring the photoluminescence of suitable semiconductor quantum well structure. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 24 June 2016. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing contained an error in the Figures 1 and 2 where the right side of the images were cutoff. The error has been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  7. Midwave infrared type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors with mixed interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plis, E.; Annamalai, S.; Posani, K. T.; Krishna, S.; Rupani, R. A.; Ghosh, S.

    2006-07-01

    We report the growth and fabrication of midwave infrared InAs/GaSb strain layer superlattice (SLS) detectors. Growth of alternate interfaces leads to a reduced strain between the GaSb buffer and SLS ({delta}a{sub parallel}/a=-5x10{sup -4}), enabling the growth of active regions up to 3 {mu}m (625 periods). The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the active region were characterized using x-ray crystallography and photoluminescence, respectively. p-i-n detectors were grown using 625 periods of 8 ML (monolayer) InAs/8 ML GaSb as the active region. The {lambda}{sub cutoff} for the detectors was 4.6 {mu}m with a conversion efficiency of 32% at V{sub b}=-0.2 V. Detectivity was obtained using noise power spectral density measurements under 300 K 2{pi} field of view illumination and was equal to 5.2x10{sup 10} and 3x10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W (V{sub b}=-0.02 V, T=80 K) in the white noise and 1/f noise limit (at 50 Hz)

  8. High spectral response of self-driven GaN-based detectors by controlling the contact barrier height

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Dabing; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren; Miao, Guoqing; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    High spectral response of self-driven GaN-based ultraviolet detectors with interdigitated finger geometries were realized using interdigitated Schottky and near-ohmic contacts. Ni/GaN/Cr, Ni/GaN/Ag, and Ni/GaN/Ti/Al detectors were designed with zero bias responsivities proportional to the Schottky barrier difference between the interdigitated contacts of 0.037 A/W, 0.083 A/W, and 0.104 A/W, respectively. Voltage-dependent photocurrent was studied, showing high gain under forward bias. Differences between the electron and hole mobility model and the hole trapping model were considered to be the main photocurrent gain mechanism. These detectors operate in photoconductive mode with large photocurrent gain and depletion mode with high speed, and can extend GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal detector applications.

  9. Low-Power Miniaturized Helium Dielectric Barrier Discharge Photoionization Detectors for Highly Sensitive Vapor Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Zhou, Menglian; Lee, Jiwon; Nidetz, Robert; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microhelium dielectric barrier discharge photoionization detector (μHDBD-PID) on chip with dimensions of only ∼15 mm × ∼10 mm × ∼0.7 mm and weight of only ∼0.25 g. It offers low power consumption (<400 mW), low helium consumption (5.8 mL/min), rapid response (up to ∼60 ms at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min), quick warm-up time (∼5 min), an excellent detection limit (a few picograms), a large linear dynamic range (>4 orders of magnitude), and maintenance-free operation. Furthermore, the μHDBD-PID can be driven with a miniaturized (∼5 cm × ∼2.5 cm × ∼2.5 cm), light (22 g), and low cost (∼$2) power supply with only 1.5 VDC input. The dependence of the μHDBD-PID performance on bias voltage, auxiliary helium flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, and temperature was also systematically investigated. Finally, the μHDBD-PID was employed to detect permanent gases and a sublist of the EPA 8260 standard reagents that include 51 analytes. The μHDBD-PID developed here can have a broad range of applications in portable and microgas chromatography systems for in situ, real-time, and sensitive gas analysis. PMID:27559931

  10. CdS/PbSe heterojunction for high temperature mid-infrared photovoltaic detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Binbin E-mail: shi@ou.edu; Qiu, Jijun; Zhao, Lihua; Chang, Caleb; Shi, Zhisheng E-mail: shi@ou.edu

    2014-03-24

    n-CdS/p-PbSe heterojunction is investigated. A thin CdS film is deposited by chemical bath deposition on top of epitaxial PbSe film by molecular beam epitaxy on Silicon. Current-voltage measurements demonstrate very good junction characteristics with rectifying ratio of ∼178 and ideality factor of 1.79 at 300 K. Detectors made with such structure exhibit mid-infrared spectral photoresponse at room temperature. The peak responsivity R{sub λ} and specific detectivity D{sup *} are 0.055 A/W and 5.482 × 10{sup 8} cm·Hz{sup 1/2}/W at λ = 4.7 μm under zero-bias photovoltaic mode. Temperature-dependent photoresponse measurements show abnormal intensity variation below ∼200 K. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are also discussed.

  11. Slot Antenna Coupled Thin-Film Warm Carrier Far-Infrared Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Yoshizumi; Suzuki, Kenji

    Slot antenna coupled thin-film warm carrier devices were fabricated, and the detection properties were investigated at 94 and 700 GHz. Two-dimensional 8 × 3 slot antenna arrays fed by a coplanar waveguide were used as the antennas. The thin-film antennas were fabricated with a photolithographic method, and the warm carrier detectors, which have the contact area of 8 × 10-10 cm2, were fabricated with an electron beam lithographic method. The experimental results indicate that the fabricated devices receive the far-infrared radiation with antenna and rectified it with non-linear I-V characteristic. By changing the antenna from the single slot antenna to the two-dimensional 8 × 3 slot antenna array, the detected sensitivity improved by 11 dB.

  12. Performance of charge-injection-device infrared detector arrays at low and moderate backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, M. E.; Mccreight, C. R.; Goebel, J. H.; Reeves, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Three 2 x 64 element charge injection device infrared detector arrays were tested at low and moderate background to evaluate their usefulness for space based astronomical observations. Testing was conducted both in the laboratory and in ground based telescope observations. The devices showed an average readout noise level below 200 equivalent electrons, a peak responsivity of 4 A/W, and a noise equivalent power of 3x10 sq root of W/Hz. Array well capacity was measured to be significantly smaller than predicted. The measured sensitivity, which compares well with that of nonintegrating discrete extrinsic silicon photoconductors, shows these arrays to be useful for certain astronomical observations. However, the measured readout efficiency and frequency response represent serious limitations in low background applications.

  13. Symmetric Absorber-Coupled Far-Infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Brown, Ari D. (Inventor); Stevenson, Thomas R. (Inventor); Patel, Amil A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a symmetric absorber-coupled far-infrared microwave kinetic inductance detector including: a membrane having an absorber disposed thereon in a symmetric cross bar pattern; and a microstrip including a plurality of conductor microstrip lines disposed along all edges of the membrane, and separated from a ground plane by the membrane. The conducting microstrip lines are made from niobium, and the pattern is made from a superconducting material with a transition temperature below niobium, including one of aluminum, titanium nitride, or molybdenum nitride. The pattern is disposed on both a top and a bottom of the membrane, and creates a parallel-plate coupled transmission line on the membrane that acts as a half-wavelength resonator at readout frequencies. The parallel-plate coupled transmission line and the conductor microstrip lines form a stepped impedance resonator. The pattern provides identical power absorption for both horizontal and vertical polarization signals.

  14. Design of monocrystalline Si/SiGe multi-quantum well microbolometer detector for infrared imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Atia; Durmaz, Emre C.; Cetindogan, Barbaros; Yazici, Melik; Kaynak, Mehmet; Kaynak, Canan B.; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the design, modelling and simulation results of silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) multi-quantum well based bolometer detector for uncooled infrared imaging system. The microbolometer is designed to detect light in the long wave length infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm with pixel size of 25 x 25 μm. The design optimization strategy leads to achieve the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) 4.5%/K with maximum germanium (Ge) concentration of 50%. The design of microbolometer entirely relies on standard CMOS and MEMS processes which makes it suitable candidate for commercial infrared imaging systems.

  15. A carbon nanotubes photoconductive detector for middle and far infrared regions based on porous silicon and a polyamide nylon polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Wasan R.

    2015-06-01

    Sensitive and good response photoconductive detectors working in the middle and far infrared regions were fabricated. These detectors were fabricated based on multi and double walled carbon nanotube films and works at room temperature. The films were deposited on a porous silicon (PSi) nanosurface. The surfaces were functionalized by a thin layer of polyamide nylon polymer to improve the photoresponsivity of the fabricated detectors. The response time of the fabricated MWCNTs-PSi detectors were 30 and 0.22 ms for the middle and far IR region respectively. The functionalisation of the MWCNTs-PSi film surface by the polyamide nylon polymer improved the photoconductive gain, photoresponsivity, and specific conductivity in both MWCNTs-PSi and DWCNTs-PSi detectors. The designed carbon nanotube (CNT) based photodetector has low cost, high sensitivity and reasonable speed for the middle and far IR spectral range without cooling.

  16. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  17. Are 16 bits really needed in CCDs and infrared detectors for astronomy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, Fernando; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Gigante, José V.; López-Arozena, D.

    2004-09-01

    One of the problems found in the design of the electronics for astronomical instruments is the difficulty to find precise digitizers (16 bits) at high speed. In fact, most of the chips which claim to have 16-bit actually have a lower ENOB (Effective Number Of Bits), normally around 14, when considering their noise effects. In this paper, a technique based in auto-adjustable gain amplifiers is proposed as a way to relax the A/D requirements for astronomical CCDs and infrared detectors. The amplifiers will automatically toggle between 2 different gains depending on the pixel value. The technique is based on the fact that, due to the shot (photon) noise of the detectors, the maximum signal to noise ratio achievable in most of these devices is relatively low, allowing the use of A/D converters with an ENOB of only 14 (or even 12) bits when combined with auto-adjustable gain amplifiers. It will be shown that the lower resolution of the A/D converters will not affect the accuracy of the science data, even when many images are averaged out to compensate the effects of the shot noise. Furthermore, given that many real A/D converters do not reach an ENOB of 16, for low level signals the accuracy can be even slightly improved with the technique described in this paper. On the other hand, this relaxing of the A/D requirements can allow the use of off-the-shelf boards for the acquisition systems.

  18. Study of a Vuilleumier cycle cryogenic refrigerator for detector cooling on the limb scanning infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    A program to detect and monitor the presence of trace constituents in the earth's atmosphere by using the Limb Scanning Infrared Radiometer (LSIR) is reported. The LSIR, which makes radiometric measurements of the earth's limb radiance profile from a space platform, contains a detector assembly that must be cooled to a temperature of 65 + or - 2 K. The feasibility of cooling the NASA-type detector package with Vuilleumier (VM) cryogenic refrigerator was investigated to develop a preliminary conceptual design of a VM refrigerator that is compatible with a flight-type LSIR instrument. The scope of the LSIR program consists of analytical and design work to establish the size, weight, power consumption, interface requirements, and other important characteristics of a cryogenic cooler that would meet the requirements of the LSIR. The cryogenic cooling requirements under the conditions that NASA specified were defined. Following this, a parametric performance analysis was performed to define the interrelationships between refrigeration characteristics and mission requirements. This effort led to the selection of an optimum refrigerator design for the LSIR mission.

  19. Design of a low noise and high accuracy readout integrated circuit for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Zhou, Hang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a low noise and high accuracy readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for Infrared detectors is presented. The circuit is made up of capacitor trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) and correlation double sampling (CDS) circuit. First, the accuracy, and injection efficiency of the CTIA structure which is used to convert the photo-current into voltage are fully discussed. The readout accuracy of weak current signal can be obviously improved by the using of CTIA. Then, the CDS structure with offset calibration technique is used to reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of CTIA. Thus, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the designed readout circuit is improved. By utilizing the above two techniques, the influence of noise on this circuit was greatly reduced and the precision of the ROIC was improved. Besides, the design of amplifier in CTIA is discussed in more detail, which will bring about important effect on performance of the whole circuit. Simulation results at Cadence Spectre demonstrated that the readout circuit had reached the requirement of application. The final chip was fabricated with Chartered 0.35um standard CMOS process. Testing results show that the linearity of CTIA is 99%, and that the readout accuracy is 10-bit, while the detecting current varies from 10pA to 10nA. Furthermore, the infrared image is shown in this paper, which means that the ROIC has a good performance at the practical application.

  20. Ruggedizing infrared integrated Dewar-detector assemblies for harsh environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, Alexander; Ashush, Nataniel; Shlomovich, Baruch; Oppenhaim, Yaakov; Gridish, Yaakov; Kahanov, Ezra; Koifman, Alina; Tuito, Avi

    2014-06-01

    Cryogenically cooled infrared electro-optical payloads have to operate and survive frequent exposure to harsh vibrational and shock conditions typical of the modern battlefield. This necessitates the development of special approaches to ruggedizing their sensitive components. The ruggedization requirement holds true specifically for Integrated Dewar-Detector Assemblies (IDDA), where the infrared Focal Plane Array (FPA) is usually supported by a thin-walled cold finger enveloped by an evacuated tubular Dewar. Without sufficient ruggedization, harsh environmental vibration may give rise to structural resonance responses resulting in spoiled image quality and even mechanical fractures due to material fatigue. The authors present their approach for the ruggedization of the IDDA by attaching the FPA to a semi-rigid support extending from the dynamically damped Dewar envelope. A mathematical model relies on an experimentally evaluated set of frequency response functions for a reference system and a lumped model of a wideband dynamic absorber. By adding only 2% to the weight of the IDDA, the authors have managed to attenuate the relative deflection and absolute acceleration of the FPA by a factor of 3. The analytical predictions are in full agreement with experiment.

  1. A long-range, wide field-of-view infrared eyeblink detector.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Steven B; Detweiler, Krystal L; Holland, Kyle H; Hord, Michael A; Bracha, Vlastislav

    2006-04-15

    Classical conditioning of the eyeblink response in the rabbit is one of the most advanced models of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. Successful use of the eyeblink conditioning paradigm requires precise measurements of the eyeblink response. One common technique of eyelid movement detection utilizes measurements of infrared (IR) light reflected from the surface of the eye. The performance of current IR sensors, however, is limited by their sensitivity to ambient infrared noise, by their small field-of-view and by short working distances. To address these limitations, we developed an IR eyeblink detector consisting of a pulsing (62.5 kHz) IR light emitting diode (LED) paired with a silicon IR photodiode and circuit that synchronously demodulates the recorded signal and rejects background IR noise. The working distance of the sensor exceeds 20 mm, and the field-of-view is larger than the area of a rabbit's eye. Due to its superior characteristics, the new sensor is ideally suited for both standard eyeblink conditioning and for studies that utilize IR-containing visual stimuli and/or that are conducted in an environment contaminated with IR noise.

  2. New and Better Detectors for the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Boehm, Nicholas; Cagiano, Steve; Delo, Gregory S.; Foltz, Roger; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hickey, Michael; Hill, Robert J.; Kan, Emily; Lindler, Don; Mott, D. Brent; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting

    2014-08-01

    ESA and NASA recently selected two 5 μm cutoff Teledyne H2RG sensor chip assemblies (SCA) for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). These HgCdTe SCAs incorporate Teledyne's "improved barrier layer" design that eliminates the degradation that affected earlier JWST H2RGs. The better indium barrier, together with other design changes that Teledyne phased in from other programs over the years, has improved the performance and reliability of JWST's SCAs. In this article, we describe the measured performance characteristics that most directly affect scientific observations including read noise, total noise, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), and image persistence. As part of measuring QE, we inferred the quantum yield over the full NIRSpec pass band of λ = 0.6-5 μm and found that it exceeds unity for photon energies Eγ > (2.65 ± .2)Eg, where Eg is the HgCdTe bandgap energy. This corresponds to λ lsim 2 μm for NIRSpec's 5 μm cutoff HgCdTe.

  3. Visible and Infrared Wavefront Sensing detectors review in Europe - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-luc

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the state of the art wavefront sensor detectors developments held in Europe for the last decade. A major breakthrough has been achieved with the development by e2v technologies of the CCD220 between 2004 and 2012. Another major breakthrough is currently achieved with the very successful development of fast low noise infrared arrays called RAPID. The astonishing results of this device will be showed for the first time in an international conference at AO4ELT3.The CCD220, a 240x240 pixels 8 outputs EMCCD (CCD with internal multiplication), offers less than 0.2 e readout noise at a frame rate of 1500 Hz with negligible dark current. The OCAM2 camera is the commercial product that drives this advanced device. This system, commercialized by First Light Imaging, is quickly described in this paper. An upgrade of OCAM2 is currently developed to boost its frame rate to 2 kHz, opening the window of XAO wavefront sensing for the ELT using 4 synchronized cameras and pyramid wavefront sensing. This upgrade and the results obtained are described extensively elsewhere in this conference (Gach et al).Since this major success, new detector developments started in Europe. The NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with ESO involvement. The spot elongation from a LGS Shack Hartman wavefront sensor necessitates an increase of the pixel format. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: advanced CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device for very high QE, full digital outputs with signal digital conversion on chip. This innovative device will be used on the European ELT but also interests potentially all giant telescopes.Additional developments also started in 2009 for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on a new technological breakthrough

  4. Nearly lattice-matched short-wave infrared InGaAsBi detectors on InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Chen, X. Y.; Ma, Y. J.; Xi, S. P.; Du, B.; Li, Hsby.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the demonstration of a short-wave infrared detector nearly lattice matched to InP substrate using quaternary InGaAsBi as the absorption layer. The bismuth content of about 3.2% has red-shifted the 50% cut-off wavelength from about 1.6 μm to 2.1 μm at room temperature, indicating a bandgap reduction of about 180 meV due to bismuth incorporation. The detector shows an encouraging dark current density of 2.4 × 10-4 A/cm2 at bias voltage of -10 mV at 300 K. This work shows the promising potential of InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsBi detectors for short-wave infrared detection.

  5. Near-Infrared Image Reconstruction of Newborns' Brains: Robustness to Perturbations of the Source/Detector Location.

    PubMed

    Ahnen, L; Wolf, M; Hagmann, C; Sanchez, S

    2016-01-01

    The brain of preterm infants is the most vulnerable organ and can be severely injured by cerebral ischemia. We are working on a near-infrared imager to early detect cerebral ischemia. During imaging of the brain, movements of the newborn infants are inevitable and the near-infrared sensor has to be able to function on irregular geometries. Our aim is to determine the robustness of the near-infrared image reconstruction to small variations of the source and detector locations. In analytical and numerical simulations, the error estimations for a homogeneous medium agree well. The worst case estimates of errors in reduced scattering and absorption coefficient for distances of r=40 mm are acceptable for a single source-detector pair. The optical properties of an inhomogeneity representing an ischemia are reconstructed correctly within a homogeneous medium, if the error in placement is random.

  6. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    cooled device without liquid nitrogen in very demanding environmental conditions. A successful test of this device was performed on sky on the PIONIER 4 telescopes beam combiner on the VLTi at ESOParanal in June 2014. First Light Imaging, which will commercialize a camera system using also APD infrared arrays in its proprietary wavefront sensor camera platform. These programs are held with several partners, among them are the French astronomical laboratories (LAM, OHP, IPAG), the detector manufacturers (e2v technologies, Sofradir, CEA/LETI) and other partners (ESO, ONERA, IAC, GTC, First Light Imaging). Funding is: Opticon FP7 from European Commission, ESO, CNRS and Université de Provence, Sofradir, ONERA, CEA/LETI the French FUI (DGCIS), the FOCUS Labex and OSEO.

  7. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  8. Design, fabrication and testing of 17um pitch 640x480 uncooled infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lijun; Liu, Haitao; Chi, Jiguang; Qian, Liangshan; Pan, Feng; Liu, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIRFPA) detectors are widely used in industrial thermography cameras, night vision goggles, thermal weapon sights, as well as automotive night vision systems. To meet the market requirement for smaller pixel pitch and higher resolution, we have developed a 17um pitch 640x480 UIRFPA detector. The detector is based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) microbolometer technology, the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is designed and manufactured with 0.35um standard CMOS technology on 8 inch wafer, the microbolometer is fabricated monolithically on the ROIC using an unique surface micromachining process developed inside the company, the fabricated detector is vacuum packaged with hermetic metal package and tested. In this paper we present the design, fabrication and testing of the 17um 640x480 detector. The design trade-off of the detector ROIC and pixel micro-bridge structure will be discussed, by comparison the calculation and simulation to the testing results. The novel surface micromachining process using silicon sacrificial layer will be presented, which is more compatible with the CMOS process than the traditional process with polyimide sacrificial layer, and resulted in good processing stability and high fabrication yield. The performance of the detector is tested, with temperature equivalent temperature difference (NETD) less than 60mK at F/1 aperture, operability better than 99.5%. The results demonstrate that the detector can meet the requirements of most thermography and night vision applications.

  9. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Jordana

    2001-05-12

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the {l_brace}111{r_brace} toward the {l_brace}100{r_brace}. Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained {approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to {approx} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ({approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ({approx}6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface

  10. On the stability of the spectral responsivity of cryogenically cooled photoconductive HgCdTe infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, E.

    2006-08-01

    The spectral responsivity of cryogenically cooled HgCdTe detectors was observed to drift slowly with time. The magnitude of the drift was shown to be strongly dependent on wavelength. The origin of the drift was investigated and was shown to arise due to a thin film of water ice depositing on the active area of the cold detector. The presence of the ice film (which is a dielectric film) interacts with the detector structure thus altering its absorbance characteristics and gives rise to the observed drifts. The drifts were temporarily eliminated by evacuating the detector dewars while baking them at 50 °C for about 48 h. This work demonstrates that HgCdTe infrared detectors should be evacuated and baked at least annually and in some cases (depending on the quality of the dewar and the measurement uncertainty required) more frequently. These observations are particularly relevant to HgCdTe detectors mounted in dewars which utilise rubber O-rings, as the ingress of moisture was found to be particularly serious in this type of dewar. This paper also identified other sources of drift present in the output of cryogenically cooled photoconductive HgCdTe detectors whose origins are currently not understood.

  11. Non-invasive characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip detectors using pulsed infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations consisting of roughly 1300 double sided silicon micro-strip detectors of 3 different dimensions. For the quality assurance of prototype micro-strip detectors a non-invasive detector charaterization is developed. The test system is using a pulsed infrared laser for charge injection and characterization, called Laser Test System (LTS). The system is aimed to develop a set of characterization procedures which are non-invasive (non-destructive) in nature and could be used for quality assurances of several silicon micro-strip detectors in an efficient, reliable and reproducible way. The procedures developed (as reported here) uses the LTS to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The prototype detector modules which are tested with the LTS so far have 1024 strips with a pitch of 58 μm on each side. They are read-out using a self-triggering prototype read-out electronic ASIC called n-XYTER. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infra-red laser light (spot size ≈ 12 μm, wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with a duration of ≈ 10 ns and power ≈ 5 mW of the laser pulse is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensor produces ≈ 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. The laser scans different prototype sensors and various non-invasive techniques to determine characteristics of the detector modules for the quality assurance is reported.

  12. Simulation and analysis of grating-integrated quantum dot infrared detectors for spectral response control and performance enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Oh Kim, Jun; Ku, Zahyun; Urbas, Augustine E-mail: Augustine.Urbas@wpafb.af.mil; Krishna, Sanjay; Kang, Sang-Woo; Jun Lee, Sang; Chul Jun, Young E-mail: Augustine.Urbas@wpafb.af.mil

    2014-04-28

    We propose and analyze a novel detector structure for pixel-level multispectral infrared imaging. More specifically, we investigate the device performance of a grating-integrated quantum dots-in-a-well photodetector under backside illumination. Our design uses 1-dimensional grating patterns fabricated directly on a semiconductor contact layer and, thus, adds a minimal amount of additional effort to conventional detector fabrication flows. We show that we can gain wide-range control of spectral response as well as large overall detection enhancement by adjusting grating parameters. For small grating periods, the spectral responsivity gradually changes with parameters. We explain this spectral tuning using the Fabry–Perot resonance and effective medium theory. For larger grating periods, the responsivity spectra get complicated due to increased diffraction into the active region, but we find that we can obtain large enhancement of the overall detector performance. In our design, the spectral tuning range can be larger than 1 μm, and, compared to the unpatterned detector, the detection enhancement can be greater than 92% and 148% for parallel and perpendicular polarizations. Our work can pave the way for practical, easy-to-fabricate detectors, which are highly useful for many infrared imaging applications.

  13. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  14. A portable cross-shape near-infrared spectroscopic detector for bone marrow lesions diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting

    2016-02-01

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) is an incidence-increasing disease which seriously hazard to human health and possibly contribute to paralysis. Delayed treatment often occurred to BMLs patients due to its characteristics such as complex and diverse clinical manifestations, non-specific, easy to misdiagnosis and etc. The conventional diagnosis methods of BMLs mainly rely on bone marrow biopsy/aspiration, which are invasive, painful, high health risk, and discontinuous which disabled monitoring and during-surgery guidance. Thus we proposed to develop a noninvasive, real-time, continuous measurement, easy-operated device aimed at detecting bone marrow diseases. This device is based on near-infrared spectroscopy and the probe is designed with a cross-shape to tightly and comfortably attach human spine. Space-resolved source-detector placement and measurement algorithm are employed. Four selected wavelength were utilized here to extract BMLs-related component contents of oxy-, deoxy-hemoglobin, fat, scattering index corresponding to fibrosis. We carried out an ink experiment and one clinical measurement to verify the feasibility of our device. The potential of NIRS in BMLs clinics is revealed.

  15. Uncooled infrared detectors toward smaller pixel pitch with newly proposed pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Endoh, Tsutomu; Sano, Masahiko; Katoh, Kouji; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Imai, Tadashi

    2011-06-01

    Since authors have successfully demonstrated uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with 23.5 um pixel pitch, it has been widely utilized for commercial applications such as thermography, security camera and so on. One of the key issues for uncooled IR detector technology is to shrink the pixel size. The smaller the pixel pitch, the more the IR camera products become compact and the less cost. This paper proposes a new pixel structure with a diaphragm and beams which are placed in different level, to realize an uncooled IRFPA with smaller pixel pitch )<=17 μm). The upper level consists of diaphragm with VOx bolometer and IR absorber layers, while the lower level consists of the two beams, which are designed to place on the adjacent pixels. The test devices of this pixel design with 12 um, 15 um and 17 um pitch have been fabricated on the Si ROIC of QVGA (320 × 240) with 23.5 um pitch. Their performances reveal nearly equal to the IRFPA with 23.5 um pitch. For example, noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 12 μm pixel is 63.1 mK with thermal time constant of 14.5 msec. In addition, this new structure is expected to be more effective for the existing IRFPA with 23.5 um pitch in order to improve the IR responsivity.

  16. Simultaneous real-time visible and infrared video with single-pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, Matthew. P.; Gibson, Graham M.; Bowman, Richard W.; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Mitchell, Kevin J.; Welsh, Stephen S.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional cameras rely upon a pixelated sensor to provide spatial resolution. An alternative approach replaces the sensor with a pixelated transmission mask encoded with a series of binary patterns. Combining knowledge of the series of patterns and the associated filtered intensities, measured by single-pixel detectors, allows an image to be deduced through data inversion. In this work we extend the concept of a ‘single-pixel camera’ to provide continuous real-time video at 10 Hz , simultaneously in the visible and short-wave infrared, using an efficient computer algorithm. We demonstrate our camera for imaging through smoke, through a tinted screen, whilst performing compressive sampling and recovering high-resolution detail by arbitrarily controlling the pixel-binning of the masks. We anticipate real-time single-pixel video cameras to have considerable importance where pixelated sensors are limited, allowing for low-cost, non-visible imaging systems in applications such as night-vision, gas sensing and medical diagnostics.

  17. Simultaneous real-time visible and infrared video with single-pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Matthew P; Gibson, Graham M; Bowman, Richard W; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Mitchell, Kevin J; Welsh, Stephen S; Padgett, Miles J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional cameras rely upon a pixelated sensor to provide spatial resolution. An alternative approach replaces the sensor with a pixelated transmission mask encoded with a series of binary patterns. Combining knowledge of the series of patterns and the associated filtered intensities, measured by single-pixel detectors, allows an image to be deduced through data inversion. In this work we extend the concept of a 'single-pixel camera' to provide continuous real-time video at 10 Hz , simultaneously in the visible and short-wave infrared, using an efficient computer algorithm. We demonstrate our camera for imaging through smoke, through a tinted screen, whilst performing compressive sampling and recovering high-resolution detail by arbitrarily controlling the pixel-binning of the masks. We anticipate real-time single-pixel video cameras to have considerable importance where pixelated sensors are limited, allowing for low-cost, non-visible imaging systems in applications such as night-vision, gas sensing and medical diagnostics. PMID:26001092

  18. Evolution of miniature detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    Sensors that are sensitive in the infrared spectral region have been under continuous development since the WW2 era. A quest for the military advantage of 'seeing in the dark' has pushed thermal imaging technology toward high spatial and temporal resolution for night vision equipment, fire control, search track, and seeker 'homing' guidance sensing devices. Similarly, scientific applications have pushed spectral resolution for chemical analysis, remote sensing of earth resources, and astronomical exploration applications. As a result of these developments, focal plane arrays (FPA) are now available with sufficient sensitivity for both high spatial and narrow bandwidth spectral resolution imaging over large fields of view. Such devices combined with emerging opto-electronic developments in integrated FPA data processing techniques can yield miniature sensors capable of imaging reflected sunlight in the near IR and emitted thermal energy in the Mid-wave (MWIR) and longwave (LWIR) IR spectral regions. Robotic space sensors equipped with advanced versions of these FPA's will provide high resolution 'pictures' of their surroundings, perform remote analysis of solid, liquid, and gas matter, or selectively look for 'signatures' of specific objects. Evolutionary trends and projections of future low power micro detector FPA developments for day/night operation or use in adverse viewing conditions are presented in the following test.

  19. InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors for the long-wavelength infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Masur, Michael; Schmitz, Johannes; Walther, Martin

    2014-06-01

    To enable higher operating temperatures in InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors for the long-wavelength infrared atmospheric window at 8-12 μm, a reduction of the bulk dark current density is indispensable. To reduce the dark current of conventional homojunction pin-diode device designs, bandstructure-engineering of the active region is considered most promising. So far, several successful device concepts have been demonstrated, yet they all rely on the inclusion of Aluminum within the active layers. Driven by manufacturing aspects we propose an Al-free heterojunction device concept that is based on a p+-doped InAs/GaSb superlattice absorber layer combined with an adjacent N--doped high gap region, which again is realized with an InAs/GaSb superlattice. To calculate the superlattice band gap and the position of the conduction band edge at the heterojunction we employ the Superlattice Empirical Pseudopotential Method. With a series of three heterojunction p+N- InAs/GaSb superlattice devices with an absorber band gap of 124 meV (10.0 μm) we give a first proof of the advocated device concept.

  20. Simultaneous real-time visible and infrared video with single-pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Matthew P; Gibson, Graham M; Bowman, Richard W; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Mitchell, Kevin J; Welsh, Stephen S; Padgett, Miles J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional cameras rely upon a pixelated sensor to provide spatial resolution. An alternative approach replaces the sensor with a pixelated transmission mask encoded with a series of binary patterns. Combining knowledge of the series of patterns and the associated filtered intensities, measured by single-pixel detectors, allows an image to be deduced through data inversion. In this work we extend the concept of a 'single-pixel camera' to provide continuous real-time video at 10 Hz , simultaneously in the visible and short-wave infrared, using an efficient computer algorithm. We demonstrate our camera for imaging through smoke, through a tinted screen, whilst performing compressive sampling and recovering high-resolution detail by arbitrarily controlling the pixel-binning of the masks. We anticipate real-time single-pixel video cameras to have considerable importance where pixelated sensors are limited, allowing for low-cost, non-visible imaging systems in applications such as night-vision, gas sensing and medical diagnostics.

  1. Elemental boron-doped p(+)-SiGe layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detectors have been fabricated utilizing molecular beam epitaxy of p(+)-SiGe layers on p(-)-Si substrates. Elemental boron from a high-temperature effusion cell was used as the dopant source during MBE growth, and high doping concentrations have been achieved. Strong infrared absorption, mainly by free-carrier absorption, was observed for the degenerately doped SiGe layers. The use of elemental boron as the dopant source allows a low MBE growth temperature, resulting in improved crystalline quality and smooth surface morphology of the Si(0.7)Ge(0.3) layers. Nearly ideal thermionic emission dark current characteristics have been obtained. Photoresponse of the HIP detectors in the long-wavelength infrared regime has been demonstrated.

  2. Detector Control and Data Acquisition for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) with a Custom ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brian S.; Loose, Markus; Alkire, Greg; Joshi, Atul; Kelly, Daniel; Siskind, Eric; Rossetti, Dino; Mah, Jonathan; Cheng, Edward; Miko, Laddawan; Luppino, Gerard; Culver, Harry; Wollack, Edward; Content, David

    2016-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will have the largest near-IR focal plane ever flown by NASA, a total of 18 4K x 4K devices. The project has adopted a system-level approach to detector control and data acquisition where 1) control and processing intelligence is pushed into components closer to the detector to maximize signal integrity, 2) functions are performed at the highest allowable temperatures, and 3) the electronics are designed to ensure that the intrinsic detector noise is the limiting factor for system performance. For WFIRST, the detector arrays operate at 90 to 100 K, the detector control and data acquisition functions are performed by a custom ASIC at 150 to 180 K, and the main data processing electronics are at the ambient temperature of the spacecraft, notionally approx.300 K. The new ASIC is the main interface between the cryogenic detectors and the warm instrument electronics. Its single-chip design provides basic clocking for most types of hybrid detectors with CMOS ROICs. It includes a flexible but simple-to-program sequencer, with the option of microprocessor control for more elaborate readout schemes that may be data-dependent. All analog biases, digital clocks, and analog-to-digital conversion functions are incorporated and are connected to the nearby detectors with a short cable that can provide thermal isolation. The interface to the warm electronics is simple and robust through multiple LVDS channels. It also includes features that support parallel operation of multiple ASICs to control detectors that may have more capability or requirements than can be supported by a single chip.

  3. Enhanced Contrast of Wavelength-Selective Mid-Infrared Detectors Stable against Incident Angle and Temperature Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuno, Katsuya; Kumagai, Shinya; Tashiro, Kohji; Sasaki, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    A thermal infrared detector with enhanced contrast of its wavelength-selective function has been fabricated. A 2 ×2-mm2-size detector with p++-Si-Pt thermopiles on a Si substrate is the base device. A polymer material is deposited on the hot junctions of the thermopiles, working as a wavelength-selective absorber to integrate spectroscopic function into the thermopile detector. The polymer used is polyacrylonitrile (PAN), with a sharp isolated absorption peak at a wavelength of 4455 nm; the detector shows +35% output increase from the baseline at this wavelength. Very little dependence of the center wavelength (CWL) on the incident angle has been confirmed. Temperature dependencies were measured over the range from 20 to 80 °C. The detector shows a smaller CWL shift, which is ˜1/20 of that of the conventional detector using an optical bandpass filter with a dielectric multilayer on a Si substrate. These features are suitable for miniaturizing the sensor module including the optical setups.

  4. Responsivity enhancement of mid-infrared PbSe detectors using CaF2 nano-structured antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Binbin; Qiu, Jijun; Yuan, Zijian; Larson, Preston R.; Strout, Gregory W.; Shi, Zhisheng

    2014-01-01

    The CaF2 nano-structures grown by thermal vapor deposition are presented. Significant responsivity improvement (>200%) of mid-infrared PbSe detectors incorporating a 200 nm nano-structured CaF2 coating was observed. The detector provides a detectivity of 4.2 × 1010 cm . Hz1/2/W at 3.8 μm, which outperforms all the reported un-cooled PbSe detectors. Structural investigations show that the coating is constructed by tapered-shape nanostructures, which creates a gradient refractive-index profile. Analogy to moth-eye antireflective mechanism, the gradient refractive-index nanostructures play the major roles for this antireflection effect. Some other possible mechanisms that help enhance the device performance are also discussed in the work.

  5. Optical modeling techniques for multimode horn-coupled power detectors for submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher N; Withington, Stafford

    2013-08-01

    An important class of detectors for the submillimeter and far-infrared uses a multimode horn to couple incident radiation into an absorbing film made from a thin conductor. We consider how to model the full, partially coherent, optical behavior of these multimode detectors using extensions of mode-matching techniques. We validate modeling the absorber as a resistive sheet, and demonstrate the equivalence of mode-matching and Green's function methods for calculating the scattering matrix representation of the film. Finally, we show how the scattering matrix of the film can be cascaded with those of the other components, as determined by mode matching, so as to calculate the overall optical response of the detector. Simulations are presented of the optical behavior of a square absorbing film in a circular waveguide.

  6. Mercury cadmium telluride infrared detector development in India: status and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.

    2009-05-01

    In the present paper, we describe the development of Long Wave Infrared (8-12 μm) linear and 2-D IR FPA detectors using HgCdTe for use in thermal imagers and IIR seekers. In this direction, Solid State Physics Laboratory(SSPL) (DRDO) tried to concentrate initially in the bulk growth and characterization of HgCdTe during the early eighties. Some efforts were then made to develop a LWIR photoconductive type MCT array in linear configuration with the IRFPA processed on bulk MCT crystals grown in the laboratory. Non availability of quality epilayers with the required specification followed by the denial of supply of CdTe, CdZnTe and even high purity Te by advanced countries, forced us to shift our efforts during early nineties towards development of 60 element PC IR detectors. High performance linear PC arrays were developed. A novel horizontal casting procedure was evolved for growing high quality bulk material using solid state recrystallization technique. Efforts for ultra purification of Te to 7N purity with the help of a sister concern has made it possible to have this material indigenously. Having succeded in the technology for growing single crystalline CdZnTe with (111) orientation and LPE growth of HgCdTe epilayers on CdZnTe substrates an attempt was made to establish the fabrication of 2D short PV arrays showing significant IR response. Thus a detailed technological knowhow for passivation, metallization, ion implanted junction formation, etc. was generated. Parallel work on the development of a matching CCD Mux readout in silicon by Semiconductor Complex Limited was also completed which was tested first in stand-alone mode followed by integration with IRFPAs through indigenously-developed indium bumps. These devices were integrated into an indigenously fabricated glass dewar cooled by a self-developed JT minicooler. In recent years, the LPE (Liquid Phase Epitaxy) growth from Terich route has been standardized for producing epitaxial layers with high

  7. Narrow bandgap semiconducting silicides: Intrinsic infrared detectors on a silicon chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Work done during the final report period is presented. The main technical objective was to achieve epitaxial growth on silicon of two semiconducting silicides, ReSi2 and CrSi2. ReSi2 thin films were grown on (001) silicon wafers by vacuum evaporation of rhenium onto hot substrates in ultrahigh vacuum. The preferred epitaxial relationship was found to be ReSi2(100)/Si(001) with ReSi2(010) parallel to Si(110). The lattice matching consists of a common unit mesh of 120 A(sup 2) area, and a mismatch of 1.8 percent. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the existence of rotation twins corresponding to two distinct but equivalent azimuthal orientations of the common unit mesh. MeV He(+) backscattering spectrometry revealed a minimum channeling yield of 2 percent for an approximately 1,500 A thick film grown at 650 C. Although the lateral dimension of the twins is on the order of 100 A, there is a very high degree of alignment between the ReSi2(100) and the Si(001) planes. Highly oriented films of CrSi2 were grown on (111) silicon substrates, with the matching crystallographic faces being CrSi2(001)/Si(111). The reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the films consist of sharp streaks, symmetrically arranged. The predominant azimuthal orientation of the films was determined to be CrSi2(210) parallel to Si(110). This highly desirable heteroepitaxial relationship has been obtained previously by others; it may be described with a common unit mesh of 51 A(sup 2) and mismatch of 0.3 percent. RHEED also revealed the presence of limited film regions of a competing azimuthal orientation, CrSi2(110) parallel to Si(110). A channeling effect for MeV He(+) ions was not found for this material. Potential commercial applications of this research may be found in silicon-integrated infrared detector arrays. Optical characterizations showed that semiconducting ReSi2 is a strong absorber of infrared radiation, with the adsorption constant increasing above 2 x

  8. Triangular-barrier quantum rod photodiodes: Their fabrication and detector characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Vitushinskiy, P.; Nakamura, S.; Kojima, T.; Sakaki, H.

    2014-02-24

    We have fabricated a GaAs-based triangular-barrier photodiode, in which self-assembled InGaAs quantum rods (Q-rods) are embedded in its barrier region. Transport study at 100 K has shown that electrons start to flow mainly through Q-rods when a bias is set above a threshold. Upon illumination, photo-generated holes are found to accumulate in the middle portion of Q-rods and efficiently lower the local barrier height, yielding the responsivity as high as 10{sup 5} A/W at the incident light of 1 fW.

  9. Preliminary investigation of KTN as a surface acoustic wave infrared/thermal detector

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary investigations of thin films of KTN (KTa1−xNbxO3) surface acoustic wave (SAW) structures for their suitability as thermal detectors. The goal is to use the technique for infrared (IR) detection and imaging. The thin films (0.6 m) of K(Ta1−xNbx)O3 [x = 0.5] epitaxial films were grown and polished on KTaO3 (0 0 1) substrates approximately 1 mm thick. SAW resonators with a center frequency of approximately 480 MHz were fabricated using these substrates. To form the basis of comparison to commonly used, thermally sensitive SAW substrates, SAW devices using lithium niobate (LiNbO3) as the substrate material were also fabricated. The phase response as a function of temperature for the KTN as well as the LiNbO3 SAW devices was measured with a network analyzer. The largest phase change exhibited by the LiNbO3 was about −4.7 / C, whereas the largest phase change exhibited by the KTN was about twice as much (11 / C). Assuming a worst case network analyzer phase resolution of 0.5 , this corresponds to a temperature resolution of 0.1 C for the LiNbO3 and 0.05 C for the KTN. By comparison, typical sensitivity of (uncooled) microbolometers is of the order of 50 mK. We believe that with improved fabrication and signal processing, the KTN/SAW-based detection approach can achieve a temperature resolution of better than 50 mK.

  10. Development of an ASIC for the readout and control of near-infrared large array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Dirk; Berge, Hans Kristian Otnes; Hasanbegovic, Amir; Altan, Mehmet A.; Najafiuchevler, Bahram; Azman, Suleyman; Talebi, Jahanzad; Olsen, Alf; Øya, Petter; Paahlsson, Philip; Gheorghe, Codin; Maehlum, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    The article describes the near infrared readout and controller ASIC (NIRCA) developed by Integrated Detector Electronics AS (IDEAS). The project aims at future astronomical science and Earth observation missions, where the ASIC will be used with image sensors based on mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe, or MCT). NIRCA is designed to operate from cryogenic temperatures (77 K) to higher than room temperature (328 K) and in a high radiation environment (LET > 60 MeVcm2/mg). The ASIC connects to the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) and delivers fully digitized data via serial digital output. The ASIC contains an analogue front-end (AFE) with 4 analogue-to-digital converters (ADCs) and programmable gain amplifiers with offset adjustment. The ADCs have a differential input swing of +/-2 V, 12-bit resolution, and a maximum sample rate of 3 MSps. The ASIC contains a programmable sequencer (microcontroller) to generate up to 40 digital signals for the ROIC and to control the analogue front-end and DACs on the chip. The ASIC has two power supply voltage regulators that provide the ROIC with 1.8 V and 3.3 V, and programmable 10-bit DACs to generate 16 independent reference and bias voltages from 0.3 V to 3 V. In addition NIRCA allows one to read 8 external digital signals, and monitor external and internal analogue signals including onchip temperature. NIRCA can be programmed and controlled via SPI interface for all internal functions and allows data forwarding from and to the ROIC SPI interface.

  11. Defect density reduction in InAs/GaSb type II superlattice focal plane array infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Rehm, Robert; Schmitz, Johannes; Niemasz, Jasmin; Rutz, Frank; Wörl, Andreas; Kirste, Lutz; Scheibner, Ralf; Wendler, Joachim; Ziegler, Johann

    2011-01-01

    InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices (SL) have proven their large potential for high performance focal plane array infrared detectors. Lots of interest is focused on the development of short-period InAs/GaSb SLs for mono- and bispectral infrared detectors between 3 - 30 μm. InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices can be fabricated with up to 1000 periods in the intrinsic region without revealing diffusion limited behavior. This enables the fabrication of InAs/GaSb SL camera systems with very high responsivity, comparable to state of the art CdHgTe and InSb detectors. The material system is also well suited for the fabrication of dual-color mid-wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb SL camera systems. These systems exhibit high quantum efficiency and offer simultaneous and spatially coincident detection in both spectral channels. An essential point for the performance of two-dimensional focal plane infrared detectors in camera systems is the number of defective pixel on the matrix detector. Sources for pixel outages are manifold and might be caused by the dislocation in the substrate, the epitaxial growth process or by imperfections during the focal plane array fabrication process. The goal is to grow defect-free epitaxial layers on a dislocation free large area GaSb substrate. Permanent improvement of the substrate quality and the development of techniques to monitor the substrate quality are of particular importance. To examine the crystalline quality of 3" and 4" GaSb substrates, synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXRT) was employed. In a comparative defect study of different 3" GaSb and 4" GaSb substrates, a significant reduction of the dislocation density caused by improvements in bulk crystal growth has been obtained. Optical characterization techniques for defect characterization after MBE growth are employed to correlate epitaxially grown defects with the detector performance after hybridization with the read-out integrated circuit.

  12. Fabrication and performance of InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices mid-wavelength infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-peng; Deng, Jun; Shi, Yan-li; Chen, Yong-yuan; Wu, Bo

    2013-09-01

    Infrared photodetectors were widely applied in satellite detection, infrared-guided, infrared early warning and infrared imaging and so on. Currently, InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) photodetectors have been attracted by their unique band-structure and potential applications. In this paper, the InAs/GaSb T2SLs photodetectors in mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) spectral range were fabricated with p-i-n structure, and the process parameters were optimized. The multilayer structure was grown on GaSb substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The active area of this photodetector was 260μm×260μm, and the sidewall of mesa was protected by SiO2 layer. The thickness of adsorption layer was 1060 nm. To reserve more incident area and to avoid the damage caused by welding process, the pad of electrodes were designed under the mesa. A annular electrode was designed to shorten the transmission time of carriers to improve the collection efficiently. The cut-off wavelength λc of the detector was 4.2μm@77K, and the dark current density was measured as 1.07×10-3 A/cm2@Vb=-0.1V. The peak of specific blackbody detectivity (D*) was equal to 1.05×1010 cmHz1/2/W at zero-bias.

  13. Suppression of dark current through barrier engineer for solution-processed colloidal quantum-dots infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenyu E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Liu, Yan; Mo, Chen; Wang, Li; Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Liu, Jie; Kurhade, Kandhar K.; Xu, Jian E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Hu, Wenjia; Zhang, Wenjun; You, Guanjun; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-31

    In an attempt to suppress the dark current, the barrier layer engineer for solution-processed PbSe colloidal quantum-dot (CQD) photodetectors has been investigated in the present study. It was found that the dark current can be significantly suppressed by implementing two types of carrier blocking layers, namely, hole blocking layer and electron blocking layer, sandwiched in between two active PbSe CQD layers. Meanwhile no adverse impact has been observed for the photo current. Our study suggests that this improvement resides on the transport pathway created via carrier recombination at intermediate layer, which provides wide implications for the suppression of dark current for infrared photodetectors.

  14. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, Negin; Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N2, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  15. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, Negin Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N{sub 2}, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  16. Optimization of the configuration of a symmetric three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju. A.

    2011-03-15

    On the basis of a model of rectangular potentials and different electron effective masses in wells and barriers of an open resonant-tunneling structure with identical outer barriers, a theory has been developed and the dynamic conductance caused by the interaction of the electromagnetic field with electrons passing through the structure has been calculated. Using the example of the three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As wells and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barriers, it is shown that, independently of the geometrical sizes of potential wells and barriers, there exist three geometrical configurations (positions of the inner barrier with respect to outer ones) at which the nanosystem, as an active element, provides optimum operating conditions of the quantum cascade detector.

  17. Recent development on the uncooled mid-infrared PbSe detectors with high detectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Binbin; Qiu, Jijun; Zhao, Lihua; Yuan, Zijian; Chang, Caleb; Shi, Zhisheng

    2013-12-01

    Polycrystalline lead salt photoconductive (PC) detectors have been widely used for applications in the 1-5μm spectral range because of their low cost, room temperature operation and high detectivity. However, the physical mechanism of such detectors had not been un-ambiguously understood. In order to improve the performance, we proposed a charge separation junction (CSJ) model to analyze and guide our material synthesis process, which has led to PbSe PC detectors with record high detectivity. On the other hand, the performance of photovoltaic (PV) detectors using Pb-salt epitaxial films on Si substrates has been limited by their high defect density even though the ideal performance of the PbSe PV detector was theoretically proven to be higher than the most popular HgCdTe PV detectors at near room temperature, due to its low Auger recombination property. Inspired by the high material quality of self-assembled lead salt microcrystals, we developed a novel method to produce PV detectors using PbSe micro-crystals based on our studies on the PC detector research that showed promising preliminary results.

  18. The Python pit organ: imaging and immunocytochemical analysis of an extremely sensitive natural infrared detector.

    PubMed

    Grace, M S; Church, D R; Kelly, C T; Lynn, W F; Cooper, T M

    1999-01-01

    The Python infrared-sensitive pit organ is a natural infrared imager that combines high sensitivity, ambient temperature function, microscopic dimensions, and self-repair. We are investigating the spectral sensitivity and signal transduction process in snake infrared-sensitive neurons, neither of which is understood. For example, it is unknown whether infrared receptor neurons function on a thermal or a photic mechanism. We imaged pit organs in living Python molurus and Python regius using infrared-sensitive digital video cameras. Pit organs were significantly more absorptive and/or emissive than surrounding tissues in both 3-5 microns and 8-12 microns wavelength ranges. Pit organs exhibited greater absorption/emissivity in the 8-12 microns range than in the 3-5 microns range. To directly test the relationship between photoreceptors and pit organ infrared-sensitive neurons, we performed immunocytochemistry using antisera directed against retinal photoreceptor opsins. Retinal photoreceptors were labeled with antisera specific for retinal opsins, but these antisera failed to label terminals of infrared-sensitive neurons in the pit organ. Infrared-receptive neurons were also distinguished from retinal photoreceptors on the basis of their calcium-binding protein content. These results indicate that the pit organ absorbs infrared radiation in two major atmospheric transmission windows, one of which (8-12 microns) matches emission of targeted prey, and that infrared receptors are biochemically distinct from retinal photoreceptors. These results also provide the first identification of prospective biochemical components of infrared signal transduction in pit organ receptor neurons.

  19. The Python pit organ: imaging and immunocytochemical analysis of an extremely sensitive natural infrared detector.

    PubMed

    Grace, M S; Church, D R; Kelly, C T; Lynn, W F; Cooper, T M

    1999-01-01

    The Python infrared-sensitive pit organ is a natural infrared imager that combines high sensitivity, ambient temperature function, microscopic dimensions, and self-repair. We are investigating the spectral sensitivity and signal transduction process in snake infrared-sensitive neurons, neither of which is understood. For example, it is unknown whether infrared receptor neurons function on a thermal or a photic mechanism. We imaged pit organs in living Python molurus and Python regius using infrared-sensitive digital video cameras. Pit organs were significantly more absorptive and/or emissive than surrounding tissues in both 3-5 microns and 8-12 microns wavelength ranges. Pit organs exhibited greater absorption/emissivity in the 8-12 microns range than in the 3-5 microns range. To directly test the relationship between photoreceptors and pit organ infrared-sensitive neurons, we performed immunocytochemistry using antisera directed against retinal photoreceptor opsins. Retinal photoreceptors were labeled with antisera specific for retinal opsins, but these antisera failed to label terminals of infrared-sensitive neurons in the pit organ. Infrared-receptive neurons were also distinguished from retinal photoreceptors on the basis of their calcium-binding protein content. These results indicate that the pit organ absorbs infrared radiation in two major atmospheric transmission windows, one of which (8-12 microns) matches emission of targeted prey, and that infrared receptors are biochemically distinct from retinal photoreceptors. These results also provide the first identification of prospective biochemical components of infrared signal transduction in pit organ receptor neurons. PMID:10028649

  20. Development of 256 x 256 Element Impurity Band Conduction Infrared Detector Arrays for Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingo, George

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work performed on a one and a half year advance technology program to develop Impurity Band Conduction (IBC) detectors with very low dark current, high quantum efficiency, and with good repeatable processes. The program fabricated several epitaxial growths of Si:As detecting layers from 15 to 35 microns thick and analyzed the performance versus the thickness and the Arsenic concentration of these epitaxial layers. Some of the epitaxial runs did not yield because of excessive residual impurities. The thicker epitaxial layers and the ones with higher Arsenic concentration resulted in good detectors with low dark currents and good quantum efficiency. The program hybridized six detector die from the best detector wafers to a low noise, 256 x 256 readout array and delivered the hybrids to NASA Ames for a more detailed study of the performance of the detectors.

  1. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector and Readout for Sub-Millimeter and Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays for sub-millimeter and far-infrared astronomy. Each detector array is comprised of lambda/2 stepped impedance resonators, a 1.5 micrometer thick silicon membrane, and 380 micrometer thick silicon walls. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The Al transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and are designed to have a surface impedance and filling fraction so as to match the impedance of free space. Our novel fabrication techniques demonstrate high fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large single crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the microstrip circuit.

  2. The evaluation of a pyroelectric detector with a sprayed carbon multi-wall nanotube black coating in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, Evangelos; Lehman, John

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a pyroelectric detector with a "sprayed" multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coating was evaluated in the 0.9 μm-24 μm wavelength range. The relative spectral responsivity of this detector was shown to vary by 8% over this wavelength range. Its responsivity exhibited a super-linear response, while its spatial uniformity of response was strongly dependent on the modulation frequency, indicating that the thermal properties of the "sprayed" MWCNTs play an important role in the spatial uniformity of response profiles. The "sprayed" MWCNT coating is far easier to fabricate than other black coatings and it is relatively durable. This, in combination with the small variation observed in the spectral absorbance of the "sprayed" MWCNT coating over a very wide wavelength range, suggests that these coatings appear extremely promising for thermal detection applications in the infrared.

  3. Short-wave infrared barriode detectors using InGaAsSb absorption material lattice matched to GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, A. P.; Percy, B.; Marshall, A. R. J.; Jain, M.; Wicks, G.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T.; McEwan, K.; Howle, C.

    2015-05-18

    Short-wave infrared barriode detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. An absorption layer composition of In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As{sub 0.25}Sb{sub 0.75} allowed for lattice matching to GaSb and cut-off wavelengths of 2.9 μm at 250 K and 3.0 μm at room temperature. Arrhenius plots of the dark current density showed diffusion limited dark currents approaching those expected for optimized HgCdTe-based detectors. Specific detectivity figures of around 7×10{sup 10} Jones and 1×10{sup 10} Jones were calculated, for 240 K and room temperature, respectively. Significantly, these devices could support focal plane arrays working at higher operating temperatures.

  4. Characterization of direct readout Si:Sb and Si:Ga infrared detector arrays for space-based astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, Mark E.; Mccreight, Craig R.; Goebel, John H.; Moss, Nicolas N.; Savage, Maureen L.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary test results from the evaluation of Si:Sb and Si:Ga 58 x 62-element infrared detector arrays are presented. These devices are being characterized under background conditions and readout rates representative of operation in orbiting, crogenically-cooled infrared observatories. The arrays are hybridized to silicon direct-readout multiplexers which allow random-access and nondestructive readout. Array performance optimization is being conducted with a flexible microcomputer-based drive and readoaut electronics system. Preliminary Si:Sb measurements indicate a sense node capacitance of 0.06 pF, peak (28-micron) responsivity above 3 A/W at 2V bias, read noise of 130 rms e(-), dark current approximately 10 e(-)/s, and a well capacity greater than 10 to the 5th e(-). The limited test data available on the performance of the Si:Ga array are also discussed.

  5. Long-wavelength PtSi infrared detectors fabricated by incorporating a p(+) doping spike grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Park, J. S.; George, T.; Jones, E. W.; Fathauer, R. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1993-01-01

    By incorporating a 1-nm-thick p(+) doping spike at the PtSi/Si interface, we have successfully demonstrated extended cutoff wavelengths of PtSi Schottky infrared detectors in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) regime for the first time. The extended cutoff wavelengths resulted from the combined effects of an increased electric field near the silicide/Si interface due to the p(+) doping spike and the Schottky image force. The p(+) doping spikes were grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 450 C, using elemental boron as the dopant source, with doping concentrations ranging from 5 x 10 exp 19 to 2 x 10 exp 20/cu cm. Transmission electron microscopy indicated good crystalline quality of the doping spikes. The cutoff wavelengths were shown to increase with increasing doping concentrations of the p(+) spikes. Thermionic emission dark current characteristics were observed and photoresponses in the LWIR regime were demonstrated.

  6. In situ calibration of the foil detector for an infrared imaging video bolometer using a carbon evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, K.; Peterson, B. J.; Takayama, S.; Sano, R.

    2016-11-01

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a useful diagnostic for the multi-dimensional measurement of plasma radiation profiles. For the application of IRVB measurement to the neutron environment in fusion plasma devices such as the Large Helical Device (LHD), in situ calibration of the thermal characteristics of the foil detector is required. Laser irradiation tests of sample foils show that the reproducibility and uniformity of the carbon coating for the foil were improved using a vacuum evaporation method. Also, the principle of the in situ calibration system was justified.

  7. Demonstration of large format mid-wavelength infrared focal plane arrays based on superlattice and BIRD detector structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Cory J.; Soibel, Alexander; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Ting, David Z.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-11-01

    We have demonstrated the use of bulk antimonide based materials and type-II antimonide based superlattices in the development of large area mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs). Barrier infrared photodetectors (BIRDs) and superlattice-based infrared photodetectors are expected to outperform traditional III-V MWIR and LWIR imaging technologies and are expected to offer significant advantages over II-VI material based FPAs. We have used molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technology to grow InAs/GaSb superlattice pin photodiodes and bulk InAsSb structures on GaSb substrates. The coupled quantum well superlattice device offers additional control in wavelength tuning via quantum well sizes and interface composition, while the BIRD structure allows for device fabrication without additional passivation. As a demonstration of the large area imaging capabilities of this technology, we have fabricated mid-wavelength 1024 × 1024 pixels superlattice imaging FPAs and 640 × 512 MWIR arrays based on the BIRD concept. These initial FPA have produced excellent infrared imagery.

  8. High-Speed Incoming Infrared Target Detection by Fusion of Spatial and Temporal Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting high-speed incoming targets by the fusion of spatial and temporal detectors to achieve a high detection rate for an active protection system (APS). The incoming targets have different image velocities according to the target-camera geometry. Therefore, single-target detector-based approaches, such as a 1D temporal filter, 2D spatial filter and 3D matched filter, cannot provide a high detection rate with moderate false alarms. The target speed variation was analyzed according to the incoming angle and target velocity. The speed of the distant target at the firing time is almost stationary and increases slowly. The speed varying targets are detected stably by fusing the spatial and temporal filters. The stationary target detector is activated by an almost zero temporal contrast filter (TCF) and identifies targets using a spatial filter called the modified mean subtraction filter (M-MSF). A small motion (sub-pixel velocity) target detector is activated by a small TCF value and finds targets using the same spatial filter. A large motion (pixel-velocity) target detector works when the TCF value is high. The final target detection is terminated by fusing the three detectors based on the threat priority. The experimental results of the various target sequences show that the proposed fusion-based target detector produces the highest detection rate with an acceptable false alarm rate. PMID:25815448

  9. Infrared detector Dewars - Increased LN2 hold time and vacuum jacket life spans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Boyd, W. J.; Blass, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    IR detector Dewars commonly suffer from shorter than desired LN2 hold times and insulation jacket vacuum corruption over relatively short time periods. In an attempt to solve this problem for a 9144 detector Dewar, small 1 liter/s appendage ion pumps were selected for continuous pumping of the vacuum jackets. This procedure extended LN2 hold times from 20 to 60 h and virtually eliminated vacuum jacket corruption. Thus the detector systems are usable continuously over periods of 6 months or more.

  10. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here.

  11. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use.

    PubMed

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6-20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here. PMID:27370438

  12. Broadband terahertz-wave detector implementing zero-biased InGaAsP Schottky-barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes two types of terahertz-wave detector modules implementing a zero-biased InGaAsP Schottky barrier diode (SBD). A SBD was monolithically integrated with a short-stub resonant matching circuit for increasing the detection sensitivity, and assembled in a compact J-band (WR-3) rectangular-waveguide-input module. The module could detect signals at frequencies from 200 to 500 GHz, and its sensitivity peaked at 1460 V/W around 350 GHz, which is a record value for the InP-based zero-biased SBD. A polarization-sensitive sub-terahertz-wave detector was also developed by integrating a SBD and an extended bowtie antenna. The fabricated quasi-optical module could detect signals at frequencies ranging from 30 GHz to 1 THz at zero bias. The principal-polarization-axis angle for signal detection was stable within +/-1.5° at frequencies from 80 to 600 GHz, while the degree of polarization was more than 95%.

  13. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C S

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm{sup {minus}1} with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  14. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 10(sup 13) cm(exp -3) can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm(exp -1) with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  15. Development of Short Wavelength Infrared Array Detectors for Space Astronomy Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1997-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and its team - the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Rochester (UR), Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC), Ames Research Center (ARC), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) - are carrying out a research program with the goal of developing and optimizing infrared arrays in the 2-27 micron range for space infrared astronomy. This report summarizes research results for the entire grant period 1 January 1992 through 30 June 1996.

  16. Type-II superlattice detector for long-wave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, A.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Kahanov, E.; Klin, O.; Langof, L.; Livneh, Y.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shkedy, L.; Shtrichman, I.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tuito, A.; Vaserman, S.; Weiss, E.

    2015-06-01

    When incorporated into the active layer of a "XBp" detector structure, Type II InAs/GaSb superlattices (T2SLs) offer a high quantum efficiency (QE) and a low diffusion limited dark current, close to MCT Rule 07. Using a simulation tool that was developed to predict the QE as a function of the T2SL period dimensions and active layer stack thickness, we have designed and fabricated a new focal plane array (FPA) T2SL XBp detector. The detector goes by the name of "Pelican-D LW", and has a format of 640 ×512 pixels with a pitch of 15 μm. The FPA has a QE of 50% (one pass), a cut-off of ~9.5 μm, and operates at 77K with a high operability, background limited performance and good stability. It uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit, and the integrated detector cooler assembly (IDCA) closely follows the configuration of SCD's Pelican-D MWIR detector.

  17. Optical properties of nanostructured TiO2 thin films and their application as antireflection coatings on infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, R C; Perera, A G U; Zhu, H; Zhao, Y

    2012-10-15

    Oblique-angle deposited titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanorods have attracted much attention as good antireflection (AR) coating material due to their low n profile. Therefore, it is necessary to better understand the optical properties of these nanorods. TiO(2) nanorods grown on glass and Si substrates were characterized in the visible (0.4-0.8 μm) and infrared (2-12 μm) regions to extract their complex n profiles empirically. Application of these nanorods in multilayer AR coatings on infrared detectors is also discussed. Optimization of graded index profile of these AR coatings in the broad infrared region (2-12 μm) even at oblique angles of incidence is discussed. The effective coupling between the incoming light and multiple nanorod layers for reducing the reflection is obtained by optimizing the effect from Fabry-Perot oscillations. An optimized five-layer AR coating on GaN shows the reflectance less than 3.3% for normal incidence and 10.5% at 60° across the whole 2-8 μm spectral range.

  18. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  19. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  20. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed. PMID:25554314

  1. Angular dependence of source-target-detector in active mode standoff infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaños, Joaquín. A.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-06-01

    Active mode standoff measurement using infrared spectroscopy were carried out in which the angle between target and the source was varied from 0-70° with respect to the surface normal of substrates containing traces of highly energetic materials (explosives). The experiments were made using three infrared sources: a modulated source (Mod-FTIR), an unmodulated source (UnMod-FTIR) and a scanning quantum cascade laser (QCL), part of a dispersive mid infrared (MIR) spectrometer. The targets consisted of PENT 200 μg/cm2 deposited on aluminum plates placed at 1 m from the sources. The evaluation of the three modalities was aimed at verifying the influence of the highly collimated laser beam in the detection in comparison with the other sources. The Mod-FTIR performed better than QCL source in terms of the MIR signal intensity decrease with increasing angle.

  2. Design, development, characterization and qualification of infrared focal plane area array detectors for space-borne imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ankur; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the design, development, characterization and qualification aspects of large format Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPA) required for panchromatic, multi-, hyper- and ultra-spectral imaging applications from a space-borne imager. Detection of feeble radiant flux from the intended target in narrow spectral bands requires a highly sensitive low noise sensor array with high well capacity. For this the photodiode arrays responsive in desired spectral band are grown using different growth techniques and flip-chip bonded with a suitable Si Read-out ICs (ROICs) for signal conditioning. IR detectors require cryogenic cooling to achieve background limited performance. Although passive radiative cooling is always the preferred choice of cooling in space, it is not suitable for cooling IRFPAs due to high thermal loads. To facilitate characterization of IRFPAs and cool them to desired cryogenic temperature, an Integrated Detector Dewar Cooler Assembly (IDDCA) is essential where the detector array sits over the cold tip of an active cooler and the detector cooler assembly is vacuum sealed in a thermally isolated Dewar. A cold shield above the sensor array inside the Dewar restricts its field-of-view and a cold filter fine tunes its spectral response. In this paper, various constituents of an IRFPA like sensor array materials, growth techniques, ROICs, filters, cold shields, cooling techniques etc., their types and selection criteria for different applications are discussed in detail. Design aspects of IRFPA characterization test bench, challenges involved in radiometric and spectral characterization and space qualification of such IDDCA based IRFPAs are also discussed.

  3. Reflectance near-infrared measurements for determining changes in skin barrier function and scattering in relation to moisturizer application.

    PubMed

    Qassem, Meha; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-09-01

    Skin moisture relates to the state of multiple skin constituents and aspects, but unfortunately, a device which could provide comprehensive and in vivo analysis is not available. Nevertheless, several reports have demonstrated accurate estimations of dermal water content using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and the potential of employing this technique in skin analysis. We aim to investigate whether NIRS could detect changes in skin barrier function through evaluation of skin water uptake in relation to moisturizer application. NIR and capacitance data were collected from 20 volunteers at both forearms, prior to and after seven days of regular moisturizer use. Results indicated lower peak intensities at the 1940-nm minima and higher intensities at the 1450-nm equivalent minima with moisturizer abstinence, while the opposite was true with regular moisturizer application. As the light beam would have traveled deeper into the skin at 1450 nm, it has been concluded that long-term, frequent moisturizer use had limited the penetration of extrinsic water. Partial least squares analysis showed that separation of sample’s scores increased with abstinence of moisturizer use. Thus, NIRS can provide valuable information not only on dermal water contents but also on additional parameters such as skin barrier function. PMID:26375481

  4. Reflectance near-infrared measurements for determining changes in skin barrier function and scattering in relation to moisturizer application.

    PubMed

    Qassem, Meha; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-09-01

    Skin moisture relates to the state of multiple skin constituents and aspects, but unfortunately, a device which could provide comprehensive and in vivo analysis is not available. Nevertheless, several reports have demonstrated accurate estimations of dermal water content using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and the potential of employing this technique in skin analysis. We aim to investigate whether NIRS could detect changes in skin barrier function through evaluation of skin water uptake in relation to moisturizer application. NIR and capacitance data were collected from 20 volunteers at both forearms, prior to and after seven days of regular moisturizer use. Results indicated lower peak intensities at the 1940-nm minima and higher intensities at the 1450-nm equivalent minima with moisturizer abstinence, while the opposite was true with regular moisturizer application. As the light beam would have traveled deeper into the skin at 1450 nm, it has been concluded that long-term, frequent moisturizer use had limited the penetration of extrinsic water. Partial least squares analysis showed that separation of sample’s scores increased with abstinence of moisturizer use. Thus, NIRS can provide valuable information not only on dermal water contents but also on additional parameters such as skin barrier function.

  5. On-chip chalcogenide glass waveguide-integrated mid-infrared PbTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Singh, V.; Kita, D.; Monmeyran, C.; Becla, P.; Su, P.; Li, J.; Huang, X.; Kimerling, L. C.; Hu, J.; Richardson, K.; Tan, D. T. H.; Agarwal, A.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an on-chip polycrystalline PbTe photoconductive detector integrated with a chalcogenide glass waveguide. The device is monolithically fabricated on silicon, operates at room-temperature, and exhibits a responsivity of 1.0 A/W at wavelengths between 2.1 and 2.5 μm.

  6. Large-format 17μm high-end VOx μ-bolometer infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, U.; Argaman, N.; Elkind, S.; Giladi, A.; Hirsh, Y.; Labilov, M.; Pivnik, I.; Shiloah, N.; Singer, M.; Tuito, A.; Ben-Ezra, M.; Shtrichman, I.

    2013-06-01

    Long range sights and targeting systems require a combination of high spatial resolution, low temporal NETD, and wide field of view. For practical electro-optical systems it is hard to support these constraints simultaneously. Moreover, achieving these needs with the relatively low-cost Uncooled μ-Bolometer technology is a major challenge in the design and implementation of both the bolometer pixel and the Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC). In this work we present measured results from a new, large format (1024×768) detector array, with 17μm pitch. This detector meets the demands of a typical armored vehicle sight with its high resolution and large format, together with low NETD of better than 35mK (at F/1, 30Hz). We estimate a Recognition Range for a NATO target of better than 4 km at all relevant atmospheric conditions, which is better than standard 2nd generation scanning array cooled detector. A new design of the detector package enables improved stability of the Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) to environmental temperature drifts.

  7. Infrared imaging of cotton fibers using a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrational spectroscopy studies can be used to examine the quality and structure of cotton fibers. An emerging area of research relates to the imaging of cotton fibers. Herein, we report the use of a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscope to image developing cotton fibers. Studies were perfor...

  8. InAs/GaInSb strained layer superlattice as an infrared detector material: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey L.

    2000-04-01

    The investigation of the InAs/Ga1-xInxSb strained layer superlattice (SLS) has been largely motivated by the promise of overcoming limitations of current mature high-performance IR detectors, such as those using HgCdTe and extrinsic silicon. It also offers fundamentally superior performance over other newly emerging III-V bandgap- engineered materials such as QWIPs. The inherent properties of the InAs/GaInSb SLS have identified it as an attractive alternative for niche VLWIR applications requiring high performance under low backgrounds at operating temperatures > 40K. If this material system proves to meet the stringent demands of VLWIR applications, it will most certainly play a significant role as an alternative materials for photovoltaic focal pane arrays operating in the LWIR and MWIR regimes as well. This paper is an overview of SLS technology development, and focuses on critical development needs as seen from the perspective of the IR detector industry.

  9. InAs/GaSb superlattice focal plane array infrared detectors: manufacturing aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, Frank; Rehm, Robert; Schmitz, Johannes; Fleissner, Joachim; Walther, Martin; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann

    2009-05-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II short-period superlattice (SL) photodiodes have been shown to be very promising for 2nd and 3rd generation thermal imaging systems with excellent detector performance. A multi-wafer molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth process on 3"-GaSb substrates, which allows simultaneous growth on five substrates with excellent homogeneity has been developed. A reliable III/V-process technology for badge processing of single-color and dual-color FPAs has been set up to facilitate fabrication of mono- and bi-spectral InAs/GaSb SL detector arrays for the mid-IR spectral range. Mono- and bispectral SL camera systems with different pitch and number of pixels have been fabricated. Those imaging systems show excellent electro-optical performance data with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) around 10 mK.

  10. Use of Near-Infrared Detector to Sense RF Antenna Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, R.A.; Lee, R.L.; Baity, W.F.

    1999-11-01

    The three antennas used for ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments on DIII-D have experienced localized heating of the Faraday shield rods during plasma operations which has resulted in some melting. This melting is of great concern not only because of the damage it does to the rf system's ability to deliver rf to the plasma, but because of its potential to contaminate the plasma during a shot and cast the experimental results from the shot into question. A real-time sensor to detect the temperature of the antennae during plasma operations is described. The sensor uses an avalanche photo diode (APD) with sensitivity from 0.4 to 1.0 {micro}m to monitor the temperature of the antennae. Calculations for the detector sensitivity based on Planck's law are compared with experimental results and detector data taken during plasma operations are presented.

  11. Increasing sensitivity and angle-of-view of mid-wave infrared detectors by integration with dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth W.; Abolmaali, Farzaneh; Duran, Joshua M.; Ariyawansa, Gamini; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2016-06-01

    We observed up to 100 times enhancement of sensitivity of mid-wave infrared photodetectors in the 2-5 μm range by using photonic jets produced by sapphire, polystyrene, and soda-lime glass microspheres with diameters in the 90-300 μm range. By finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling, we gain insight into the role of the microspheres refractive index, size, and alignment with respect to the detector mesa. A combination of enhanced sensitivity with angle-of-view (AOV) up to 20° is demonstrated for individual photodetectors. It is proposed that integration with microspheres can be scaled up for large focal plane arrays, which should provide maximal light collection efficiencies with wide AOVs, a combination of properties highly attractive for imaging applications.

  12. Room temperature detector array technology for the terahertz to far-infrared.

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, Ryan; Shaw, Michael; Zhang, X.; Tao, Hu; Lentine, Anthony L.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Averitt, Richard D.; Kadlec, Emil G; Rakich, Peter T.

    2011-10-01

    Thermal detection has made extensive progress in the last 40 years, however, the speed and detectivity can still be improved. The advancement of silicon photonic microring resonators has made them intriguing for detection devices due to their small size and high quality factors. Implementing silicon photonic microring or microdisk resonators as a means of a thermal detector gives rise to higher speed and detectivity, as well as lower noise compared to conventional devices with electrical readouts. This LDRD effort explored the design and measurements of silicon photonic microdisk resonators used for thermal detection. The characteristic values, consisting of the thermal time constant ({tau} {approx} 2 ms) and noise equivalent power were measured and found to surpass the performance of the best microbolometers. Furthermore the detectivity was found to be D{sub {lambda}} = 2.47 x 10{sup 8} cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W at 10.6 {mu}m which is comparable to commercial detectors. Subsequent design modifications should increase the detectivity by another order of magnitude. Thermal detection in the terahertz (THz) remains underdeveloped, opening a door for new innovative technologies such as metamaterial enhanced detectors. This project also explored the use of metamaterials in conjunction with a cantilever design for detection in the THz region and demonstrated the use of metamaterials as custom thin film absorbers for thermal detection. While much work remains to integrate these technologies into a unified platform, the early stages of research show promising futures for use in thermal detection.

  13. Uncooled InGaSb photovoltaic infrared detectors for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Takashi; Nishimura, Ryosuke; Yamaoka, Keisuke; Camargo, Edson Gomes; Morishita, Tomohiro; Ueno, Koichiro; Tokuo, Seiichi; Goto, Hiromasa; Kuze, Naohiro

    2013-09-01

    We developed a mid-infrared InGaSb-based photovoltaic infrared sensor (InGaSb PVS) for gas sensing, with improved performance at room temperature, when compared with previous InSb-based PVS. To improve the performance at absorbance wavelengths of most important gases, such as CO2, InGaSb was employed in the light absorber layer. High quality InGaSb films were obtained with the introduction of an InSb buffer layer, directly grown on GaAs substrate. As a result, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the InGaSb PVS was 1.3 times higher than the previous InSb PVS at a wavelength of 4.2 μm, were CO2 absorption occurs.

  14. Antenna-coupled thin-film far-infrared radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Yoshizumi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Takashi

    1996-06-01

    The 4 slot array antenna for 700 GHz far-infrared radiation are fabricated on the fused quartz substrates, making use of the dimensions obtained from the model experiments in the microwave region, and the power gain and directivity are obtained experimentally. The properties of fabricated array antenna agree with the theory, and 4 slot array antenna on the substrate of which thickness is odd multiples of a quarter dielectric wavelength improve the power gain by 5 dB compared with the single slot antenna on both sides of air and dielectric. These experimental data indicate that the fabricated antennas show the antenna pattern expected from the theory and work as array antennas for 700 GHz far- infrared laser radiation.

  15. HgCdTe long-wavelength infrared photovoltaic detectors formed by reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tam T.; Dell, John M.; Musca, Charles A.; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2002-12-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) is known to type convert p-type HgCdTe to n-type, thus providing a method for p-n junction formation for photodiode fabrication. Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) n-on-p photodiodes fabricated using RIE induced p-to-n type conversion have already been demonstrated and show excellent performance. This paper will report on the successful application of RIE junction formation technology for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe photodiodes, and compares the device performance of photodiodes fabricated on vacancy and extrinsically doped p-type HgCdTe. The diode current versus bias voltage (I-V) characteristic of these devices have also been measured as a function of temperature in the range 20K to 200K with various junction areas. These results are compared in the light of detailed Hall measurement data obtained from type converted materials.

  16. Passivation of long-wave infrared InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors with epitaxially grown ZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plis, Elena; Kutty, Maya Narayanan; Myers, Stephen; Krishna, Sanjay; Chen, Chihyu; Phillips, Jamie D.

    2014-06-01

    In past decade, T2SL detectors with promising performance have been reported by various institutions thanks to the extensive modeling efforts, improvement of T2SL material quality, and development of advanced low-dark-current architectures with unipolar barriers (Xbn, CBIRD, pBiBn, M-structure, etc). One of the most demanding challenges of present day T2SL technology is the suppression of surface leakage currents associated with the exposed mesa sidewalls, which appear during the definition of device optical area. Typical FPA pixels have large surface/volume ratio and their performance is strongly dependent on surface effects. In order to overcome the limitation imposed by surface leakage currents, a stable surface passivation layer is needed. In this paper we report on InAs/GaSb T2SL detectors operating in the LWIR spectral region (100% cut-off wavelength of ~10 μm at 77K) passivated with epitaxially grown ZnTe. In order to compensate for the high conductivity of ZnTe passivation it was doped with chlorine to 1 × 1018cm-3 concentration. Dark current measurements reveal the significant reduction of noise current after ZnTe passivation.

  17. 3D-Printing of inverted pyramid suspending architecture for pyroelectric infrared detectors with inhibited microphonic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing; Zhao, Xiangyong; Li, Xiaobing; Deng, Hao; Yan, Hong; Yang, Linrong; Di, Wenning; Luo, Haosu; Neumann, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    A sensitive chip with ultralow dielectric loss based on Mn doped PMNT (71/29) has been proposed for high-end pyroelectric devices. The dielectric loss at 1 kHz is 0.005%, one order lower than the minimum value reported so far. The detective figure of merit (Fd) is up to 92.6 × 10-5 Pa-1/2 at 1 kHz and 53.5 × 10-5 Pa-1/2 at 10 Hz, respectively. In addition, an inverted pyramid suspending architecture for supporting the sensitive chip has been designed and manufactured by 3D printing technology. The combination of this sensitive chip and the proposed suspending architecture largely enhances the performance of the pyroelectric detectors. The responsivity and specific detectivity are 669,811 V/W and 3.32 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W at 10 Hz, respectively, 1.9 times and 1.5 times higher than those of the highest values in literature. Furthermore, the microphonic effect can be largely inhibited according to the theoretical and experimental analysis. This architecture will have promising applications in high-end and stable pyroelectric infrared detectors.

  18. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Near-Infrared and Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, Jogender; Wolfe, Doug E.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that TBC delamination can be monitored by incorporating a thin luminescent sublayer that produces greatly increased luminescence intensity from delaminated regions of the TBC. Initial efforts utilized visible-wavelength luminescence from either europium or erbium doped sublayers. This approach exhibited good sensitivity to delamination of electron-beam physical-vapor-deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs, but limited sensitivity to delamination of the more highly scattering plasma-sprayed TBCs due to stronger optical scattering and to interference by luminescence from rare-earth impurities. These difficulties have now been overcome by new strategies employing near-infrared (NIR) and upconversion luminescence imaging. NIR luminescence at 1550 nm was produced in an erbium plus ytterbium co-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent sublayer using 980-nm excitation. Compared to visible-wavelength luminescence, these NIR emission and excitation wavelengths are much more weakly scattered by the TBC and therefore show much improved depth-probing capabilities. In addition, two-photon upconversion luminescence excitation at 980 nm wavelength produces luminescence emission at 562 nm with near-zero fluorescence background and exceptional contrast for delamination indication. The ability to detect TBC delamination produced by Rockwell indentation and by furnace cycling is demonstrated for both EB-PVD and plasma-sprayed TBCs. The relative strengths of the NIR and upconversion luminescence methods for monitoring TBC delamination are discussed.

  19. InAs/Ga(In)Sb type-II superlattices short/middle dual color infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanli; Hu, Rui; Deng, Gongrong; He, Wenjing; Feng, Jiangmin; Fang, Mingguo; Li, Xue; Deng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Short wavelength and middle wavelength dual color infrared detector were designed and prepared with InAs/Ga(In)Sb type-II superlattices materials. The Crosslight software was used to calculate the relation between wavelength and material parameter such as thickness of InAs, GaSb, then energy strucutre of 100 periods 8ML/8ML InAs/GaSb and the absorption wavelength was calculated. After fixing InAs/GaSb thickness parameter, devices with nBn and pin structure were designed and prepared to compare performance of these two structures. Comparison results showed both structure devices were available for high temperature operation which black detectivity under 200K were 7.9×108cmHz1/2/W for nBn and 1.9×109cmHz1/2/W for pin respectively. Considering the simultaneous readout requirement for further FPAs application the NIP/PIN InAs/GaSb dual-color structure was grown by MBE method. Both two mesas and one mesa devices structure were designed and prepared to appreciate the short/middle dual color devices. Cl2-based ICP etching combined with phosphoric acid based chemicals were utilized to form mesas, silicon dioxide was deposited via PECVD as passivation layer. Ti/Au was used as metallization. Once the devices were finished, the electro-optical performance was measured. Measurement results showed that optical spectrum response with peak wavelength of 2.7μm and 4.3μm under 77K temperature was gained, the test results agree well with calculated results. Peak detectivity was measured as 2.08×1011cmHz1/2/W and 6.2×1010cmHz1/2/W for short and middle wavelength infrared detector respectively. Study results disclosed that InAs/Ga(In)Sb type-II SLs is available for both short and middle wavelength infrared detecting with good performance by simply altering the thickness of InAs layer and GaSb layer.

  20. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space-borne cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the reduction of the refrigeration requirements for infrared sensors operating in space through the use of high temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as electronic leads between the cooled sensors and the relatively warmer data acquisition components. Specifically, this initial study was directed towards the design of an experiment to quantify the thermal performance of these materials in the space environment. First, an intensive review of relevant literature was undertaken, and then, design requirements were formulated. From this background information, a preliminary experimental design was developed. Additional studies will involve a thermal analysis of the experiment and further modifications of the experimental design.

  1. Impact of three-dimensional geometry on the performance of isolated electron-injection infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fathipour, Vala; Jang, Sung Jun; Nia, Iman Hassani; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-01-12

    We present a quantitative study of the influence of three-dimensional geometry of the isolated electron–injection detectors on their characteristics. Significant improvements in the device performance are obtained as a result of scaling the injector diameter with respect to the trapping/absorbing layer diameters. Devices with about ten times smaller injector area with respect to the trapping/absorbing layer areas show more than an order of magnitude lower dark current, as well as an order of magnitude higher optical gain compared with devices of same size injector and trapping/absorbing layer areas. Devices with 10 μm injector diameter and 30 μm trapping/absorbing layer diameter show an optical gain of ∼2000 at bias voltage of −3 V with a cutoff wavelength of 1700 nm. Analytical expressions are derived for the electron-injection detector optical gain to qualitatively explain the significance of scaling the injector with respect to the absorber.

  2. Prospective sur les besoins « défense » en détecteurs infrarougeMid-term defence needs for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, Jean-Christophe

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we propose to present the prospects for mid-term needs for infrared detectors. These needs are derived from expected evolutions in imaging techniques as well as from operational requirements. The main trends that shall allow the direct development in infrared detection are as much the pursuit of greater range, a better discrimination of targets, as the efforts to minimize cost, volume, weigh and consumption. These trends will lead to an examination of the specific needs for some kind of 'smart' infrared detector. Among these applications, we will investigate more deeply the technological requirements for flash and 3D imaging, hyperspectral and uncooled imaging. To cite this article: J.-C. Peyrard, C. R. Physique 4 (2003).

  3. IR detectors for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument payload for the METOP-1 ESA polar platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Michel; Lorans, Dominique; Bischoff, Isabelle; Giotta, Dominique; Wolny, Michel

    1994-12-01

    IASI is an Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer devoted to the operational meteorology and to atmospheric studies and is to be installed on board the second ESA Polar Platform called METOP-1, planned to be launched in the year 2000. The main purpose of this high performance instrument is to record temperature and humidity profiles. The required lifetime is 4 years. This paper presents the characteristics of the LW IR detection arrays for the IASI spectrometer which consist of HgCdTe de- tectors. SAT has to develop the Engineering Model, Qualification Model and Fight Models of detectors, each having 4 pixels and AR-coated microlenses in a dedicated space housing equipped with a flexible line and a connector. An array is composed of HgCdTe photoconductive detectors. For this long wavelength the array is sensitive from 8.26 micrometers to 15.5 micrometers . The detectors, with sensitive areas of 900 x 900 micrometers 2, are 100 K operating with passive cooling. High quality HgCdTe material is a key feature for the manufacturing of high performance photoconductive detectors. Therefore epitaxial HgCdTe layers are used in this project. These epilayers are grown at CEA/LETI on lattice matched CdZnTe substrates, by Te-rich liquid phase epitaxy, based on a slider technique. The Cd content in the layer is carefully adjusted to meet the required cut off wavelength on the devices. After growth of the epilayers, the samples are annealed under Hg pressure in order to convert them into N type mate- rials. The electrical transport properties of the liquid phase epitaxied wafers are, at 100 K, mobility (mu) over 150,000 cm2/V.s and electrical concentration N of 1.5 1015 cm-3, the residual doping level being 1014 cm-3 at low temperature. On these materials the feasibility study of long wavelength HgCdTe photoconductors has been achieved with the following results: the responsivity is 330 V/W. The bias voltage is Vp=300 mV for a 4 mW limitation of power for each element. The

  4. Short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays detector: the performance optimization of photosensitive element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-jiang; Tang, Zun-lie; Zhang, Xiu-chuan; Chen, Yang; Jiang, Li-qun; Cheng, Hong-bing

    2009-07-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in technology of the InGaAs focal plane arrays (FPA) detector operating in short wave infrared (SWIR) last two decades. The no cryogenic cooling, low manufacturing cost, low power, high sensitivity and maneuverability features inherent of InGaAs FPA make it as a mainstream SWIR FPA in a variety of critical military, national security, aerospace, telecommunications and industrial applications. These various types of passive image sensing or active illumination image detecting systems included range-gated imaging, 3-Dimensional Ladar, covert surveillance, pulsed laser beam profiling, machine vision, semiconductor inspection, free space optical communications beam tracker, hyperspectroscopy imaging and many others. In this paper the status and perspectives of hybrid InGaAs FPA which is composed of detector array (PDA) and CMOS readout integrate circuit (ROIC) are reviewed briefly. For various low light levels applications such as starlight or night sky illumination, we have made use of the interface circuit of capacitive feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) in which the integration capacitor was adjustable, therefore implements of the physical and electrical characteristics matches between detector arrays and readout intergrate circuit was achieved excellently. Taking into account the influences of InGaAs detector arrays' optoelectronic characteristics on performance of the FPA, we discussed the key parameters of the photodiode in detailed, and the tradeoff between the responsivity, dark current, impedance at zero bias and junction capacitance of photosensitive element has been made to root out the impact factors. As a result of the educed approach of the photodiode's characteristics optimizing which involve with InGaAs PDA design and process, a high performance InGaAs FPA of 30um pixel pitch and 320×256 format has been developed of which the response spectrum range over 0.9um to 1.7um, the mean peak detectivity (λ=1.55

  5. Reducing the Read Noise of the James Webb Space Telescope Near Infrared Spectrograph Detector Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixsen, D. J.; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Wilson, D. V.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a Wiener optimal approach to using the reference output and reference pixels that are built into Teledyne's HAWAII-2RG detector arrays. In this way, we are reducing the total noise per approximately 1000 second 88 frame up-the-ramp dark integration from about 6.5 e- rms to roughly 5 e- rms. Using a principal components analysis formalism, we achieved these noise improvements without altering the hardware in any way. In addition to being lower, the noise is also cleaner with much less visible correlation. For example, the faint horizontal banding that is often seen in HAWAII-2RG images is almost completely removed. Preliminary testing suggests that the relative gains are even higher when using non flight grade components. We believe that these techniques are applicable to most HAWAII-2RG based instruments.

  6. Development of ultra pure germanium epi layers for blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, M.P.

    1991-05-01

    The main goals of this paper are: (1) To develop a low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) process that allows epitaxial growth at lower temperatures. Lower temperatures will allow the achievement of a sharp dopant profile at the substrate/epi-layer interface. Less out-diffusion from the substrate would allow the use of thinner epitaxial layers, which would lead to a larger depletion width in the photoactive region. LPCVD also avoids, to a great extent, gas-phase nucleation, which would cause Ge particulates to fall onto the wafer surface during growth. (2) To reduce high levels of oxygen and copper present at the wafer interface, as observed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In order to achieve high-quality epitaxial layers, it is imperative that the substrate surface be of excellent quality. (3) To make and test detectors, after satisfactory epitaxial layers have been made.

  7. Performance of multiplexed Ge:Ga detector arrays in the far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mccreight, Craig

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multi-element, multiplexed Ge:Ga linear arrays under low-background conditions was investigated. The on-focal switching is accomplished by MOSFET switches, and the integrated charge is made available through MOSFET source followers. The tests were conducted at 106 microns, and the radiation on the detectors was confined to a spectral window 1.25 microns wide using a stack of cold filters. At 4.2 K, the highest responsivity was 584 A/W, the noise equivalent power was 1.0 x 10(exp -16) W/square root of Hz, and the read noise was 6100 electrons/sample. A detailed description of the test setup and procedure is presented.

  8. Infrared (IR) detectors for the OMEGA spectrometer on-board the Mars `94 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Michel; Lorans, Dominique; Flaux, Bruno; Picault, Robert; Hello, Yann; Puget, Pascal

    1994-09-01

    The MARS 94 spacecraft is devoted to a mission to the planet Mars. Planned to be launched in October 1994, it shall reach the planet in September 1995. The lifetime is one Mars year. A second spacecraft will follow two years later. This paper presents the characteristics of the IR detection modules for the IR OMEGA spectrometer which consists of InSb multiplexed detectors. The purpose of this Meudon Observatory instrument is to observe mineralogy, water, ice and atmosphere in the IR spectrum. SAT has developed the Identification Model, Development Model and Fight Models of detectors, each fitted with 2 arrays and IR filters in a dedicated space housing equipped with a cold flex line and a connector. An array is composed of 128 multiplexed InSb photovoltaic detectors surrounded by a specific IR filter. Each filter is divided into 2 zones. For the IR Short Wavelength filter, one zone operates from 1 to 1.8 micrometers and a second one from 1.8 to 2.7 micrometers ; for the IR Long Wavelength filter, the 2 zones are 2.7 to 4.7 and 4.7 to 5.3 micrometers . The housing is designed in collaboration with the Observation de Paris-Meudon. The InSb photodiodes of sensitive areas 90 X 120 micrometers , and pitch of 120 micrometers , operate at 77 K, with the following characteristics: by means of a scanning operation, the sensitive areas are measured at half maximum of height and the diameters are: 120 +/- 1 et 92 +/- 0,7 mum. The signal is illustrated by the I(V) curve: the main parameters are: I(subscript sc) equals 10 - 100 pA and R(subscript 0) equals 10 - 25 G(Omega) . The quantum efficiency is (eta) equals 60% - 65% and the peak responsivity 2,5 - 2.6 A/W. The detectivity of non multiplexed pixels is: D* at (lambda) pic (FOV, 1800 Hz, 1 Hz) equals 2 X 10(superscript 11) cm Hz(superscript 1/2) W(superscript -1). Measurements are made under low flux corresponding to the conditions of the OMEGA experience, the planet Mars being a cold body of about 270 K. The 1/f noise is

  9. Photoresponse enhancement in graphene/silicon infrared detector by controlling photocarrier collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xin; Zhang, Hengkai; Tang, Xiaobing; Lai, King W. C.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene/silicon junction based photodetectors have attracted great interest due to their superior characteristics like large photosensitive area, fast photocarrier collection and low dark current. Currently, the weak optical absorption and short photocarrier lifetime of graphene remain major limitations for detection of infrared light with wavelengths above 1.2 μm. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of photocarrier transport in graphene/silicon junction based photodetector and propose a theoretical model to study the design and effect of finger-electrode structures on the photocurrent in graphene. We demonstrate that the top finger-like electrode in graphene/silicon photodetector can be designed to enhance the photocarrier collection efficiency in graphene by reducing the average transport distance of photocarriers. Therefore, the photoresponsivity of the graphene/silicon junction based photodetector can be increased. Our results have successfully demonstrated that by optimizing the design of finger electrodes, 4 times enhancement of photocurrents in graphene can be obtained at room temperature.

  10. Performance evaluation of integrating detectors for near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-05-01

    Although there has been a plethora of devices advanced for clinical translation, there has been no standards to compare and determine the optical device for fluorescence molecular imaging. In this work, we compare different CCD configurations using a solid phantom developed to mimic pM - fM concentrations of near-infrared fluorescent dyes in tissues. Our results show that intensified CCD systems (ICCDs) offer greater contrast at larger signal-tonoise ratios (SNRs) in comparison to their un-intensified CCD systems operated at clinically reasonable, sub-second acquisition times. Furthermore, we compared our investigational ICCD device to the commercial NOVADAQ SPY system, demonstrating different performance in both SNR and contrast.

  11. Detecting Thermal Barrier Coating Delamination Using Visible and Near-Infrared Luminescence from Erbium-Doped Sublayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bencic, T. J.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive diagnostic tools are needed to monitor early stages of delamination progression in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) because the risk of delamination induced coating failure will compromise engine performance and safety. Previous work has demonstrated that for TBCs composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), luminescence from a buried europium-doped sublayer can be utilized to identify the location of TBC delamination from the substantially higher luminescence intensity observed from the delaminated regions of the TBC. Luminescence measurements from buried europium-doped layers depend on sufficient transmittance of the 532 nm excitation and 606 nm emission wavelengths through the attenuating undoped YSZ overlayer to produce easily detected luminescence. In the present work, improved delamination indication is demonstrated using erbium-doped YSZ sublayers. For visible-wavelength luminescence, the erbium-doped sublayer offers the advantage of a very strong excitation peak at 517 nm that can be conveniently excited a 514 nm Ar ion laser. More importantly, the erbium-doped sublayer also produces near-infrared luminescence at 1550 nm that is effectively excited by a 980 nm laser diode. Both the 980 nm excitation and the 1550 nm emission are transmitted through the TBC with much less attenuation than visible wavelengths and therefore show great promise for delamination monitoring through thicker or more highly scattering TBCs. The application of this approach for both electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma-sprayed TBCs is discussed.

  12. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-01

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm-1 to 68 cm-1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  13. Determination of the HO2 radical in dielectric barrier discharge plasmas using near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Yong; Yang, Xue-Feng; Zhu, Ai-Min; Zhao, Guo-Li; Wang, Wei-Guo

    2008-02-01

    The hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) plays an important role in combustion systems, atmospheric chemistry and the removal of air pollutants by non-thermal plasmas. This work reports the determination of the hydroperoxyl radical in dielectric barrier discharge plasmas via near-infrared continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy. HO2 radicals were observed in discharges of HCHO/O2/H2O/N2 mixtures around 6625.7 cm-1 in the first H-OO stretching overtone, (2, 0, 0)-(0, 0, 0), of its ground electronic state \\tilde{X}\\,^{2}A^{\\prime \\prime} . At certain discharge conditions (ac frequency of 5 kHz, peak-to-peak voltage of 6.5 kV, 1900 ppm HCHO, 20% O2, 3.5% H2O in N2, Ptotal = 30 Torr), HO2 radical concentration was determined to be 1.0 × 1013 molecules cm-3. The temporary evolution of HO2 concentration was obtained using the 'time window' method. The effects of oxygen concentration, water concentration, the discharge voltage and discharge gas pressure on the concentration of HO2 radicals have been investigated. The detection limit of our setup for the HO2 radical is ~1 × 1011 molecules cm-3.

  14. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-25

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm{sup -1} to 68 cm{sup -1} to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100 Degree-Sign C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  15. Design issues of a low cost lock-in amplifier readout circuit for an infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheepers, L.; Schoeman, J.

    2014-06-01

    In the past, high resolution thermal sensors required expensive cooling techniques making the early thermal imagers expensive to operate and cumbersome to transport, limiting them mainly to military applications. However, the introduction of uncooled microbolometers has overcome many of earlier problems and now shows great potential for commercial optoelectric applications. The structure of uncooled microbolometer sensors, especially their smaller size, makes them attractive in low cost commercial applications requiring high production numbers with relatively low performance requirements. However, the biasing requirements of these microbolometers cause these sensors to generate a substantial amount of noise on the output measurements due to self-heating. Different techniques to reduce this noise component have been attempted, such as pulsed biasing currents and the use of blind bolometers as common mode reference. These techniques proved to either limit the performance of the microbolometer or increase the cost of their implementation. The development of a low cost lock-in amplifier provides a readout technique to potentially overcome these challenges. High performance commercial lock-in amplifiers are very expensive. Using this as a readout circuit for a microbolometer will take away from the low manufacturing cost of the detector array. Thus, the purpose of this work was to develop a low cost readout circuit using the technique of phase sensitive detection and customizing this as a readout circuit for microbolometers. The hardware and software of the readout circuit was designed and tested for improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the microbolometer signal. An optical modulation system was also developed in order to effectively identify the desired signal from the noise with the use of the readout circuit. A data acquisition and graphical user interface sub system was added in order to display the signal recovered by the readout circuit. The readout

  16. HAWC+: A Detector, Polarimetry, and Narrow-Band Imaging Upgrade to SOFIA's Far-Infrared Facility Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, C. D.; Staguhn, J.; Harper, D. A.; Ames, T. J.; Benford, D. J.; Berthoud, M.; Chapman, N. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Dotson, J. L.; Irwin, K. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Kovacs, A.; Looney, L.; Novak, G.; Stacey, G. J.; Vaillancourt, J. E.; HAWC+ Science Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    HAWC, the High-resolution Airborne Widebandwidth Camera, is the facility far-infrared camera for SOFIA, providing continuum imaging from 50 to 250 microns wavelength. As a result of NASA selection as a SOFIA Second Generation Instruments upgrade investigation, HAWC will be upgraded with enhanced capability for addressing current problems in star formation and interstellar medium physics prior to commissioning in early 2015. We describe the capabilities of the upgraded HAWC+, as well as our initial science program. The mapping speed of HAWC is increased by a factor of 9, accomplished by using NASA/Goddard's Backshort-Under-Grid bolometer detectors in a 64x40 format. Two arrays are used in a dual-beam polarimeter format, and the full complement of 5120 transition-edge detectors is read using NIST SQUID multiplexers and U.B.C. Multi-Channel Electronics. A multi-band polarimeter is added to the HAWC opto-mechanical system, at the cryogenic pupil image, employing rotating quartz half-wave plates. Six new filters are added to HAWC+, bringing the full set to 53, 63, 89, 155, and 216 microns at R = 5 resolution and 52, 63, 88, 158, and 205 microns at R = 300 resolution. The latter filters are fixed-tuned to key fine-structure emission lines from [OIII], [OI], [CII], and [NII]. Polarimetry can be performed in any of the filter bands. The first-light science program with HAWC+ emphasizes polarimetry for the purpose of mapping magnetic fields in Galactic clouds. The strength and character of magnetic fields in molecular clouds before, during, and after the star formation phase are largely unknown, despite pioneering efforts on the KAO and ground-based telescopes. SOFIA and HAWC+ provide significant new capability: sensitivity to extended dust emission (to A_V ~ 1) which is unmatched, ~10 arcsec angular resolution combined with wide-field mapping which allows statistical estimates of magnetic field strength, and wavelength coverage spanning the peak of the far-infrared

  17. Modelling of illuminated current–voltage characteristics to evaluate leakage currents in long wavelength infrared mercury cadmium telluride photovoltaic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Vishnu E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Qiu, WeiCheng; Hu, Weida E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn

    2014-11-14

    The current–voltage characteristics of long wavelength mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors have been studied using a recently suggested method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. Diodes fabricated on in-house grown arsenic and vacancy doped epitaxial layers were evaluated for their leakage currents. The thermal diffusion, generation–recombination (g-r), and ohmic currents were found as principal components of diode current besides a component of photocurrent due to illumination. In addition, both types of diodes exhibited an excess current component whose growth with the applied bias voltage did not match the expected growth of trap-assisted-tunnelling current. Instead, it was found to be the best described by an exponential function of the type, I{sub excess} = I{sub r0} + K{sub 1} exp (K{sub 2} V), where I{sub r0}, K{sub 1}, and K{sub 2} are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. A study of the temperature dependence of the diode current components and the excess current provided the useful clues about the source of origin of excess current. It was found that the excess current in diodes fabricated on arsenic doped epitaxial layers has its origin in the source of ohmic shunt currents. Whereas, the source of excess current in diodes fabricated on vacancy doped epitaxial layers appeared to be the avalanche multiplication of photocurrent. The difference in the behaviour of two types of diodes has been attributed to the difference in the quality of epitaxial layers.

  18. High-performance near-infrared spectrally encoded microscopy by using a balanced detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiuling; Gao, Wanrong

    2015-08-01

    Spectrally encoded microscopy (SEM) is a new microscopic imaging technique in which a grating is used to illuminate different positions along a line on the sample with different wavelengths, reducing the size of system and imaging time. In this paper, a SEM device is described which is based on a swept source and a balanced detection. A fixed gain balanced detector (BD) was employed in the system for detecting the low sample light without amplifier. Compared to conventional SEM detection method, our BD-SEM device has two significant advantages, one is its capability of suppressing common-mode noise and thermal noise, resulting in the lateral resolution better than direct detection, the other is that it can amplify the signal intensity which is particularly helpful for tissue reflectance imaging. The lateral resolution was measured by imaging a USAF resolution target. The images of onion cells were obtained. The data showed that both the lateral resolution and signal noise ratio are better than non-BD method. The method presented in this work is helpful for developing miniature endoscopic probe for in vivo tissue visualization with high acquisition speed and high imaging quality.

  19. Improvement of infrared single-photon detectors absorptance by integrated plasmonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Csete, Mária; Sipos, Áron; Szalai, Anikó; Najafi, Faraz; Szabó, Gábor; Berggren, Karl K.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic structures open novel avenues in photodetector development. Optimized illumination configurations are reported to improve p-polarized light absorptance in superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) comprising short- and long-periodic niobium-nitride (NbN) stripe-patterns. In OC-SNSPDs consisting of ~quarter-wavelength dielectric layer closed by a gold reflector the highest absorptance is attainable at perpendicular incidence onto NbN patterns in P-orientation due to E-field concentration at the bottom of nano-cavities. In NCAI-SNSPDs integrated with nano-cavity-arrays consisting of vertical and horizontal gold segments off-axis illumination in S-orientation results in polar-angle-independent perfect absorptance via collective resonances in short-periodic design, while in long-periodic NCAI-SNSPDs grating-coupled surface waves promote EM-field transportation to the NbN stripes and result in local absorptance maxima. In NCDAI-SNSPDs integrated with nano-cavity-deflector-array consisting of longer vertical gold segments large absorptance maxima appear in 3p-periodic designs due to E-field enhancement via grating-coupled surface waves synchronized with the NbN stripes in S-orientation, which enable to compensate fill-factor-related retrogression. PMID:23934331

  20. Materials Characterization and Integration for Background Limited Far-Infrared Bolometric Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Benford, Dominic J.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross; Kletetschka, Gunther; Mikula, Vilem; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U.-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss materials characterization and integration considerations for large-format, antenna-coupled, low-noise, cryogenic, bolometer arrays for far-infrared space-based observatories. The suitability of Bi as an antenna termination resistor and annealed gold for microstrip and groundplane, in the context of using each to optimize signal and bandwidth of the receiver is addressed. Bismuth is chosen as a candidate termination resistor material because films can be made with the 10-100 Ω/□ needed to impedance-match the antenna in a compact, stable, and reproducible manner. We characterize both the DC electronic transport and the THz optical properties of thermally evaporated (TE) and ion assisted thermally evaporated (IAE) Bi. It is found that the residual resistance ratio of the IAE Bi is an order of magnitude higher than that of TE Bi in the relevant impedance range. Furthermore, we show that we have produced IAE Bi films with linear response across the THz band. We discuss the possibility of employing other, much lower volume, absorber materials including TiAu and PdAu alloys. A comparison of the expected noise in a standard coupling resistor for each material is made. A technique of fabricating 150 nm gold films having a low temperature resistivity equal to 3.5×10-9 Ωm via thermal annealing is also presented. We model the response of these candidate films in an antenna circuit for THz radiation.

  1. Data compressive paradigm for multispectral sensing using tunable DWELL mid-infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Yong; Hayat, Majeed M; Godoy, Sebastián E; Bender, Steven C; Zarkesh-Ha, Payman; Krishna, Sanjay

    2011-09-26

    While quantum dots-in-a-well (DWELL) infrared photodetectors have the feature that their spectral responses can be shifted continuously by varying the applied bias, the width of the spectral response at any applied bias is not sufficiently narrow for use in multispectral sensing without the aid of spectral filters. To achieve higher spectral resolutions without using physical spectral filters, algorithms have been developed for post-processing the DWELL's bias-dependent photocurrents resulting from probing an object of interest repeatedly over a wide range of applied biases. At the heart of these algorithms is the ability to approximate an arbitrary spectral filter, which we desire the DWELL-algorithm combination to mimic, by forming a weighted superposition of the DWELL's non-orthogonal spectral responses over a range of applied biases. However, these algorithms assume availability of abundant DWELL data over a large number of applied biases (>30), leading to large overall acquisition times in proportion with the number of biases. This paper reports a new multispectral sensing algorithm to substantially compress the number of necessary bias values subject to a prescribed performance level across multiple sensing applications. The algorithm identifies a minimal set of biases to be used in sensing only the relevant spectral information for remote-sensing applications of interest. Experimental results on target spectrometry and classification demonstrate a reduction in the number of required biases by a factor of 7 (e.g., from 30 to 4). The tradeoff between performance and bias compression is thoroughly investigated.

  2. Noise processes modeling in HgCdTe infrared photodiode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlakov, Igor D.; Selyakov, Andrew Y.; Ponomarenko, Vladimir P.; Filachev, Anatoly M.

    2010-04-01

    A numerical model of the current noise spectral density in elements of infrared focal plane array based on HgCdTe photodiodes has been developed. Model is based on Langevine method and applied to the photodiode with p+-n-junction and base of finite length d. Dominated dark current diffusion mechanism and random nature of thermal generationrecombination and scattering processes determined the diffusion current fluctuations has been taken into account. The model main peculiar properties are the stochastic boundary conditions on the interface between the depletion and quasineutral regions. Current noise spectral density of the diode with thin base d < Lp, where Lp is the hole diffusion length in n-region, has been calculated. In thin base diodes with blocking contact to substrate, in which recombination velocity S = 0, a noise suppression effect is revealed. At noticeable reverse junction biases |qV| > 3kT the diffusion current noise suppression is to be observed in whole frequency band ωtfl << 1, where tfl is the hole flight time through the depletion region. In this case the diffusion current noise spectral density is less than in diodes with thick base (d >> Lp) by a factor th(d/Lp). At slight biases |qV| < 3kT the diffusion current noise suppression occurs only in limited frequency band ωτ < 1, where τ is the minority carriers lifetime. At high frequencies ωτ >> 1 diffusion current noise comes out of fluctuations caused by scattering processes and is independent on the diode structure. Photocurrent noise spectral density has been calculated too. Model developed is useful for the photodiode elements and arrays optimization.

  3. Uncooled infrared detectors toward smaller pixel pitch with newly proposed pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Endoh, Tsutomu; Sano, Masahiko; Kato, Koji; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Imai, Tadashi

    2013-12-01

    An uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with 23.5 μm pixel pitch has been successfully demonstrated and has found wide commercial applications in the areas of thermography, security cameras, and other applications. One of the key issues for uncooled IRFPA technology is to shrink the pixel pitch because the size of the pixel pitch determines the overall size of the FPA, which, in turn, determines the cost of the IR camera products. This paper proposes an innovative pixel structure with a diaphragm and beams placed in different levels to realize an uncooled IRFPA with smaller pixel pitch (≦17 μm). The upper level consists of a diaphragm with VOx bolometer and IR absorber layers, while the lower level consists of the two beams, which are designed to be placed on the adjacent pixels. The test devices of this pixel design with 12, 15, and 17 μm pitch have been fabricated on the Si read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) of quarter video graphics array (QVGA) (320×240) with 23.5 μm pitch. Their performances are nearly equal to those of the IRFPA with 23.5 μm pitch. For example, a noise equivalent temperature difference of 12 μm pixel is 63.1 mK for F/1 optics with the thermal time constant of 14.5 ms. Then, the proposed structure is shown to be effective for the existing IRFPA with 23.5 μm pitch because of the improvements in IR sensitivity. Furthermore, the advanced pixel structure that has the beams composed of two levels are demonstrated to be realizable.

  4. Design of readout integrated circuit structure for single and dual band infrared detector with variable integration time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Chuan; Shieh, Hsiu-Li; Shiu, Shiuan-Shuo; Liu, Yi-Ting; Tang, Shiang-Feng; Lin, Wen-Jen

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes two kinds of readout integrated circuits for column and row interlaced dual-band infrared detectors. The experiments were simulated using TSMC 0.35μm Mixed Signal 2P4M CMOS process and operated at 3MHz clock rate. The pixel dimensions for two kinds of readout integrated circuits were also 30×30μm. The mid-wave and long-wave sense current was set from 1nA to 2nA and 6nA to 8nA, respectively. We designed a 40x16 array for the columns interlace readout circuit. The output voltage swing was 2.8V. The frame rate was 4.68kFPS. The total power consumption was less than 17.6mW. We also designed a 20x32 array for the row interlace readout circuit. The output voltage swing was 2.8V. The frame rate was 2.67kFPS. The total power consumption was less than 11.4mW. The power consumption increased when the column interlace frame rate reached the row interlace frame rate. The row interlace can decrease the layout area by sharing the column stage circuit, but the frame rate will drop to half of the single band frame rate.

  5. Passivation Effect of Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 Film on HgCdTe Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Sun, Chang-Hong; Chen, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Tian-Ning; Chen, Xin; Lin, Chun; Ding, Ring-Jun; He, Li

    2016-09-01

    The passivation effect of atomic layer deposition of (ALD) Al2O3 film on a HgCdTe infrared detector was investigated in this work. The passivation effect of Al2O3 film was evaluated by measuring the minority carrier lifetime, capacitance versus voltage ( C- V) characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, and resistance versus voltage ( R- V) characteristics of variable-area photodiodes. The minority carrier lifetime, C- V characteristics, and R- V characteristics of HgCdTe devices passivated by ALD Al2O3 film was comparable to those of HgCdTe devices passivated by e-beam evaporation of ZnS/CdTe film. However, the baking stability of devices passivated by Al2O3 film is inferior to that of devices passivated by ZnS/CdTe film. In future work, by optimizing the ALD Al2O3 film growing process and annealing conditions, it may be feasible to achieve both excellent electrical properties and good baking stability.

  6. Integrated infrared and visible image sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor imaging devices integrating an array of visible detectors and another array of infrared detectors into a single module to simultaneously detect both the visible and infrared radiation of an input image. The visible detectors and the infrared detectors may be formed either on two separate substrates or on the same substrate by interleaving visible and infrared detectors.

  7. Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1990-01-01

    Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

  8. Temperature-sensitive junction transformations for mid-wavelength HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays by laser beam induced current microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Weicheng; Hu, Weida Lin, Tie; Yin, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei; Cheng, Xiang'ai Wang, Rui

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we report on the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect and the unusual temperature dependence of junction transformation for mid-wavelength, n-on-p HgCdTe photovoltaic infrared detector arrays. The n-type region is formed by B{sup +} ion implantation on Hg-vacancy-doped p-type HgCdTe. Junction transformations under different temperatures are visually captured by a laser beam induced current microscope. A physical model of temperature dependence on junction transformation is proposed and demonstrated by using numerical simulations. It is shown that Hg-interstitial diffusion and temperature activated defects jointly lead to the p-n junction transformation dependence on temperature, and the weaker mixed conduction compared with long-wavelength HgCdTe photodiode contributes to the disappearance of the photosensitive area extension effect in mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared detector arrays.

  9. Photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot single-photon detector based on resonant tunneling effect with near-infrared response

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; An, Z. H. E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Xiong, D. Y.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhang, B.; Chen, P. P.; Li, T. X.; Lu, W. E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn

    2014-07-21

    We present the photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot (QD) single-photon detector using a reset technique which eliminates the QD's “memory effect.” By applying a proper reset frequency and keeping the detector in linear-response region, the detector's responses to different monochromatic light are resolved which reflects different detection efficiencies. We find the reset photocurrent tails up to 1.3 μm wavelength and near-infrared (∼1100 nm) single-photon sensitivity is demonstrated due to interband transition of electrons in QDs, indicating the device a promising candidate both in quantum information applications and highly sensitive imaging applications operating in relative high temperatures (>80 K).

  10. Improved performance of HgCdTe infrared detector focal plane arrays by modulating light field based on photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jian; Hu, Weida Ye, Zhenhua; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang Lu, Wei; Liao, Lei

    2014-05-14

    An HgCdTe long-wavelength infrared focal plane array photodetector is proposed by modulating light distributions based on the photonic crystal. It is shown that a promising prospect of improving performance is better light harvest and dark current limitation. To optimize the photon field distributions of the HgCdTe-based photonic crystal structure, a numerical method is built by combining the finite-element modeling and the finite-difference time-domain simulation. The optical and electrical characteristics of designed HgCdTe mid-wavelength and long-wavelength photon-trapping infrared detector focal plane arrays are obtained numerically. The results indicate that the photon crystal structure, which is entirely compatible with the large infrared focal plane arrays, can significantly reduce the dark current without degrading the quantum efficiency compared to the regular mesa or planar structure.

  11. InGaAs triangular barrier photodiodes for high-responsivity detection of near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Kazuya; Ohmori, Masato; Noda, Takeshi; Kojima, Tomoya; Kado, Sakunari; Vitushinskiy, Pavel; Iwata, Naotaka; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    InGaAs triangular barrier (TB) structures of various barrier thicknesses have been formed on InP substrates. With them, we have fabricated TB photodiodes that yield a very high responsivity of 2.3 × 104 A/W at 100 K for the 1312 nm light of 320 fW power. By passivating the diode surface with polyimide, the dark current has been markedly reduced. Diodes with thicker barriers show higher sensitivity and responsivity, reflecting the enhancement of the barrier lowering effect by photogenerated holes.

  12. Development of a near-infrared detector and a fiber-optic integral field unit for a space solar observatory SOLAR-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsukawa, Yukio; Kamata, Yukiko; Anan, Tetsu; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Bando, Takamasa; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a high sensitivity and fast readout near-infrared (NIR) detector and an integral field unit (IFU) for making spectro-polarimetric observations of rapidly varying chromospheric spectrum lines, such as He I 1083 nm and Ca II 854 nm, in the next space-based solar mission SOLAR-C. We made tests of a 1.7 μm cutoff H2RG detector with the SIDECAR ASIC for the application in SOLAR-C. It's important to verify its perfor- mance in the temperature condition around -100 °C, which is hotter than the typical temperature environment used for a NIR detector. We built a system for testing the detector between -70 °C and -140 °C. We verified linearity, read-out noise, and dark current in both the slow and fast readout modes. We found the detector has to be cooled down lower than -100 °C because of significant increase of the number of hot pixels in the hotter environment. The compact and polarization maintenance IFU was designed using fiber-optic ribbons consisting of rectangular cores which exhibit good polarization maintenance. A Silicone adhesive DC-SE9187L was used to hold the fragile fiber-optic ribbons in a metal housing. Polarization maintenance property was confirmed though polarization calibration as well as temperature control are required to suppress polarization crosstalk and to achieve the polarization accuracy in SOLAR-C.

  13. Advanced Si IR detectors using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Jones, E. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detectors have been fabricated by MBE. The SiGe/Si HIP detector offers a tailorable spectral response in the long wavelength infrared regime by varying the SiGe/Si heterojunction barrier. Degenerately doped p(+) SiGe layers were grown using elemental boron, as the dopant source allows a low growth temperature. Good crystalline quality was achieved for boron-doped SiGe due to the reduced growth temperature. The dark current density of the boron-doped HIP detectors was found to be thermionic emission limited. HIP detectors with a 0.066 eV were fabricated and characterized using activation energy analysis, corresponding to a 18 micron cutoff wavelength. Photoresponse of the detectors at wavelengths ranging from 2 to 12 microns has been characterized with corresponding quantum efficiencies of 5 - 0.1 percent.

  14. Compact and Sensitive Millimetre Wave Detectors Based on Low Barrier Schottky Diodes on Impedance Matched Planar Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefle, Matthias; Haehnsen, Katharina; Oprea, Ion; Cojocari, Oleg; Penirschke, Andreas; Jakoby, Rolf

    2014-11-01

    Compact and highly responsive millimeter wave planar Schottky detectors are proposed for uni-planar and low-cost fabrication. For optimum power transfer, the zero-bias Schottky diodes are impedance matched by the antenna design itself, with an established meander dipole and a new folded dipole type. In particular, up to 200GHz, the folded dipole exhibits a single responsivity peak, notably beneficial for communications. The realized detectors exhibit an outstanding system RF voltage responsivity of up to 16005mV/mW at 87.8GHz without lenses or pre amplification. In addition, an excellent NEP level is demonstrated by the detectors with 0.39pW/.

  15. Characterization of optoelectronic properties of mercury cadmium telluride and zinc oxide II-VI semiconductors for infrared and ultraviolet detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzami, Kaveh

    Infrared (IR) and Ultraviolet (UV) light detectors have numerous applications including thermal imaging and chemical and biological spectroscopy. In this work, key aspects of HgCdTe and ZnO semiconductor materials are studied in accordance to their importance to state of the art IR and UV detector technologies. The leading material technology for IR detectors today is the lattice matched HgCdTe alloy. The model for optical absorption in this material has not been reexamined after major improvements in HgCdTe material growth technology. Access to an accurate model for absorption coefficient of this material is important for understanding of detector behavior, where the degree of accuracy required continues to grow as detector structures continue to add complexity. In this work, the optical absorption coefficient of HgCdTe is studied in detail using theoretical bandstructure calculations, temperature dependent optical spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. A new model for the optical absorption coefficient of this material as a function of composition and temperature is presented based on a proposed empirical relationship. A significant improvement in the prediction of photovoltaic detector spectral response is observed based on this proposed model. ZnO is emerging as an important material for short wavelength optoelectronic devices, and may have a major impact on high-performance UV detectors. In this work, the steady-state and time-resolved response of ZnO photoconductors are studied. A sharp turn on is observed in the UV for these photodetectors, corresponding to the bandgap energy of 3.4eV for the ZnO material. Photoconductive decay transients show a fast (nanoseconds) and slow (milliseconds) time constant that are attributed to minority carrier relaxation and trapping processes, respectively. Persistent photoconductivity was observed, with time constant on the order of minutes, in response to both visible and UV excitation and is attributed to

  16. Combination of temporal phase unwrapping and long-wave infrared digital holographic interferometry for metrology of mosaic detector under space simulated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Thizy, Cédric; Beaumont, Florent; Garcia, José; Martin, Laurent; Fabron, Christophe; Prieto, Eric; Maciaszek, Thierry; Georges, Marc P.

    2015-08-01

    We present digital holographic interferometry (DHI) in the long-wave infrared for monitoring the deformation under cryogenic conditions of a segmented focal plane array to be used in a space mission. The long wavelength was chosen for its ability to allow measurement of displacements 20 times larger than DHI in the visible and which were foreseen with the test object under such temperature changes. The specimen consists of 4x4 mosaic of detectors assembled on a frame. It was required to assess the global deformation of the ensemble, the deformation of each detector, and piston movements of each of them with respect to their neighbors. For that reason we incorporated the temporal phase unwrapping by capturing a sufficiently high number of holograms between which the phase does not suffer strong variations. At last since the specimen exhibit specular reflectivity at that wavelength, it is illuminated through a reflective diffuser.

  17. Noise properties and signal-dependent interpixel crosstalk of the detectors of the Near-Infrared Spectrograph of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Giovanna; Sirianni, Marco; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Lindler, Don; Böker, Torsten; Ferruit, Pierre; De Marchi, Guido; Stuhlinger, Martin; Jensen, Peter; Strada, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is one of the four science instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope. Its focal plane consists of two HAWAII-2RG sensors operating in the wavelength range of 0.6 to 5.0 μm and, as part of characterizing NIRSpec, the noise properties of these detectors under dark and illuminated conditions were studied. Under dark conditions, and as already known, 1/f noise in the detector system causes somewhat higher noise levels than can be accounted for by a simple model that includes white read noise and shot noise on integrated charge. More surprisingly, for high levels of accumulated charge, significantly lower total noise than expected was observed. This effect is shown to be due to pixel-to-pixel correlations introduced by signal-dependent interpixel crosstalk, with an interpixel coupling factor, α, that ranges from ˜0.01 for zero signal to ˜0.03 close to saturation.

  18. Development of Blocked-Impurity-Band-Type Ge Detectors Fabricated with the Surface-Activated Wafer Bonding Method for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaoka, M.; Kaneda, H.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ukai, S.; Shichi, K.; Wada, T.; Suzuki, T.; Watanabe, K.; Nagase, K.; Baba, S.; Kochi, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report the current status of the development of our new detectors for far-infrared (FIR) astronomy. We develop Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB)-type Ge detectors to realize large-format compact arrays covering a wide FIR wavelength range up to 200 \\upmu m. We fabricated Ge junction devices of different physical parameters with a BIB-type structure, using the room temperature, surface-activated wafer bonding (SAB) method. We measured the absolute responsivity and the spectral response curve of each device at low temperatures, using an internal blackbody source in a cryostat and a Fourier transform spectrometer, respectively. The results show that the SAB Ge junction devices have significantly higher absolute responsivities and longer cut-off wavelengths of the spectral response than the conventional bulk Ge:Ga device. Based upon the results, we discuss the optimum parameters of SAB Ge junction devices for FIR detectors. We conclude that SAB Ge junction devices possess a promising applicability to next-generation FIR detectors covering wavelengths up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m with high responsivity. As a next step, we plan to fabricate a BIB-type Ge array device in combination with a low-power cryogenic readout integrated circuit.

  19. Investigation of quantum efficiency in mid-wave infrared (MWIR) InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattice (T2SL) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Lilian; Klein, Brianna; Tian, Zhao-Bing; Frantz, Eric; Myers, Stephen; Gautam, Nutan; Schuler-Sandy, Ted; Plis, Elena; Krishna, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to optimize the absorption in the active region of InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetectors for the realization of high-performance MWIR devices. Two sets of MWIR (λ100% cut-off ~ 5.5μm at 77K) T2SL detectors were realized; one set with varied detector absorber thickness, the other set with varied T2SL period. The T2SL material quality was evaluated on the basis of room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) and the high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) data. Then the device performance was compared using spectral response, dark current and responsivity measurements. Finally, quantum efficiency was calculated and employed as a metric for the definition of the optimal T2SL period and active region thickness. For the first part of the study, a homojunction pin architecture based on 8 monolayers (MLs) InAs/8MLs GaSb T2SL was used. The thickness of the non-intentionally doped absorber layers were 1.5μm, 2.5μm, and 3.5μm. For the second part of the study, unipolar barrier (pBiBn) devices were grown. The thickness of the absorber region and the T2SL constituent InAs layer thicknesses were kept the same (1.5 μm and 8 MLs, respectively) whereas the T2SL constituent GaSb thickness was varied as 6 MLs, 8 MLs, and 10 MLs. We have found that the pin detector with 2.5 μm thick absorber and the pBiBn detector with 8 ML InAs/ 8 ML GaSb T2SL composition are, within the scope of this study, optimal for the realization of MWIR single-element devices and FPAs with corresponding architectures.

  20. Identification of Defect Candidates and their Effects on Carrier Lifetimes and Dark Currents in InAs/InAsSb Strained-Layer Superlattices for Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    The InAs/GaSb and InAs/InAsSb type-II strain-layer superlattices (T2SLS) are of great importance and show great promise for mid-wave and long-wave infrared (IR) detectors for a variety of civil and military applications. The T2SLS offer several advantages over present day detection technologies including suppressed Auger recombination relative to the bulk MCT material, high quantum efficiencies, and commercial availability of low defect density substrates. While the T2SLS detectors are approaching the empirical Rule-07 benchmark of MCT's performance level, the dark-current density is still significantly higher than that of bulk MCT detectors. One of the major origins of dark current is associated with the Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) process in the depletion region of the detector. I will present results of ab initio electronic structure calculations of the stability of a wide range of point defects [As and In vacancies, In, As and Sb antisites, In interstitials, As interstitials, and Sb interstitials] in various charged states in bulk InAs, InSb, and InAsSb systems and T2SLS. I will also present results of the transition energy levels. The calculations reveal that compared to defects in bulk materials, the formation and defect properties in InAs/InAsSb T2SLS can be affected by various structural features, such as strain, interface, and local chemical environment. I will present examples where the effect of strain or local chemical environment shifts the transition energy levels of certain point defects either above or below the conduction band minimum, thus suppressing their contribution to the SRH recombination.

  1. Detector comparison for sulfur and chlorine detection with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in the near-infrared-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weritz, F.; Schaurich, D.; Wilsch, G.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of the sulfur and chlorine content of building materials. Both, chloride and sulfate ions are major damaging species affecting the stability and lifetime of a structure. Chlorine and sulfur are mostly detected in the VUV and the NIR. In case of building materials the main elements like calcium or iron have many strong spectral lines over the whole spectral range, so that trace elements can only be detected in spectral windows unaffected from these lines. With regard to a preferably simply, robust against dust and vibrations and portable setup only the NIR spectral features are used for civil engineering applications. Most detectors, mainly CCD cameras have rapidly decreasing quantum efficiency in the NIR. Also the quantum efficiency of the photocathode of CCD-Detectors with image intensifier is decreasing in the NIR. Different CCD-detectors were tested with respect to high quantum efficiency and high dynamic range, which is necessary for simultaneous detection of weak spectral lines from trace elements and intense spectral lines from main elements. The measurements are made on reference samples consisting of cement, hydrated cement, cement mortar and concrete with well-defined amounts of the trace elements. Experimental conditions are chosen for an optimum intensity of the trace element spectral lines. The detector systems are compared by limit of detections and the signal to noise ratio.

  2. Low-Timing-Jitter Near-Infrared Single-Photon-Sensitive 16-Channel Intensified-Photodiode Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Lu, Wei; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Sykora, Derek; Jurkovic, Mike; Aebi, Verle; Costello, Ken; Burns, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We developed a 16-channel InGaAsP photocathode intensified-photodiode (IPD) detector with 78 ps (1-sigma) timing-jitter, less than 500 ps FWHM impulse response, greater than 15% quantum efficiency at 1064 nm wavelength with 131 kcps dark counts at 15 C.

  3. Theory of multiple-stage interband photovoltaic devices and ultimate performance limit comparison of multiple-stage and single-stage interband infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkey, Robert T.; Yang, Rui Q.

    2013-09-01

    A theoretical framework for studying signal and noise in multiple-stage interband infrared photovoltaic devices is presented. The theory flows from a general picture of electrons transitioning between thermalized reservoirs. Making the assumption of bulk-like absorbers, we show how the standard semiconductor transport and recombination equations can be extended to the case of multiple-stage devices. The electronic noise arising from thermal fluctuations in the transition rates between reservoirs is derived using the Shockley-Ramo and Wiener-Khinchin theorems. This provides a unified noise treatment accounting for both the Johnson and shot noise. Using a Green's function formalism, we derive consistent analytic expressions for the quantum efficiency and thermal noise in terms of the design parameters and macroscopic material properties of the absorber. The theory is then used to quantify the potential performance improvement from the use of multiple stages. We show that multiple-stage detectors can achieve higher sensitivities for applications requiring a fast temporal response. This is shown by deriving an expression for the optimal number of stages in terms of the absorption coefficient and absorber thicknesses for a multiple-stage detector with short absorbers. The multiple-stage architecture may also be useful for improving the sensitivity of high operating temperature detectors in situations where the quantum efficiency is limited by a short diffusion length. The potential sensitivity improvement offered by a multiple-stage architecture can be judged from the product of the absorption coefficient, α, and diffusion length, Ln, of the absorber material. For detector designs where the absorber lengths in each of the stages are equal, the multiple-stage architecture offers the potential for significant detectivity improvement when αLn ≤ 0.2. We also explore the potential of multiple-stage detectors with photocurrent-matched absorbers. In this architecture, the

  4. Semi-insulating GaAs and Au Schottky barrier photodetectors for near-infrared detection (1280 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusir, A. I.; Makableh, Y. F.; Manasreh, O.

    2015-08-01

    Schottky barriers formed between metal (Au) and semiconductor (GaAs) can be used to detect photons with energy lower than the bandgap of the semiconductor. In this study, photodetectors based on Schottky barriers were fabricated and characterized for the detection of light at wavelength of 1280 nm. The device structure consists of three gold fingers with 1.75 mm long and separated by 0.95 mm, creating an E shape while the middle finger is disconnected from the outer frame. When the device is biased, electric field is stretched between the middle finger and the two outermost electrodes. The device was characterized by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) curve at room temperature. This showed low dark current on the order of 10-10 A, while the photocurrent was higher than the dark current by four orders of magnitude. The detectivity of the device at room temperature was extracted from the I-V curve and estimated to be on the order of 5.3x1010 cm.Hz0.5/W at 5 V. The step response of the device was measured from time-resolved photocurrent curve at 5 V bias with multiple on/off cycles. From which the average recovery time was estimated to be 0.63 second when the photocurrent decreases by four orders of magnitude, and the average rise time was measured to be 0.897 second. Furthermore, the spectral response spectrum of the device exhibits a strong peak close to the optical communication wavelength (~1.3 μm), which is attributed to the internal photoemission of electrons above the Schottky barrier formed between Au and GaAs.

  5. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector and Readout for Sub-Millimeter and Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays for sub-millimeter and farinfrared astronomy. Each detector array is comprised of lambda/2 stepped impedance resonators, a 1.5µm thick silicon membrane, and 380µm thick silicon walls. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The Al transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and are designed to have a surface impedance and filling fraction so as to match the impedance of free space. Our novel fabrication techniques demonstrate high fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large single crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the microstrip circuit.

  6. Investigation of dark current mechanisms on type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice very long wavelength infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochao; Jiang, Dongwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Dongbo; Yu, Qingjiang; Liu, Tong; Ma, Honghu; Zhao, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    An analytical approach to isolating the contribution of surface leakage current from bulk dark current by simulating the current-voltage characteristic of InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors is presented in this paper. It is found that for all the mesa sizes used, the dark current is dominated by the surface component under low reverse bias, and the proportion of surface leakage current to total dark current increases with decreasing mesa size. The limiting dark current mechanisms and main parameters of the InAs/GaSb T2SL detectors were analyzed using a theoretical model including the contribution of surface leakage. We found that surface leakage currents provide a significant contribution, while the ohmic shunt current originating from threading dislocations is not significant.

  7. Mid-wavelength infrared InAsSb/InSb nBn detector with extended cut-off wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Fisher, Anita M.; Hoglund, Linda; Keo, Sam. A.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2016-09-01

    We extended the cut-off wavelength λc of bulk InAsSb nBn detectors to λc = 4.6 μm at T = 200 K by incorporating series of single InSb monolayer into InAsSb absorber. Detectors with 2 μm thick absorber showed a temperature independent quantum efficiency QEm≈ 0.45 for back-side illumination without antireflection coating. The dark current density was jd = 5 × 10-6 A/cm2 at T = 150 K, and increased to jd = 2 × 10-3 A/cm2 at T = 200 K. At temperatures of T = 150 K and below, the demonstrated photodetectors operate in the background limited performance mode, with detectivity D*(λ) = 3-6 × 1011 cm Hz0.5/W for the background temperature of 300 K, and f/2 field of view.

  8. Analysis of the Maillard reaction in human hair using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and a focal-plane array detector.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Keun; Park, Sang-Chul; Bin, Sung-Ah; Roh, Young Sup; Lee, John Hwan; Kim, Boo-Min

    2016-03-01

    The Maillard reaction has been well researched and used in the food industry and the fields of environmental science and organic chemistry. Here, we induced the Maillard reaction inside human hair and analyzed its effects by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with a focal-plane array (FTIR-FPA) detector. We used arginine (A), glycine (G), and D-xylose (X) to generate the Maillard reaction by dissolving them in purified water and heating it to 150 °C. This label-free process generated a complex compound (named AGX after its ingredients) with a monomer structure, which was determined by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and FTIR-FPA. This compound was stable in hair and substantially increased its tensile strength. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the formation of this monomer in human hair, and our study provides insights into a new method that could be used to improve the condition of damaged or aging hair.

  9. A Green's function solution to the image and multiple image interactions for hyperboloidal geometry: Application to metallic pointcontact infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskovsky, N. M.; Cutler, P. H.; Feuchtwang, T. E.; Lucas, A. A.

    1981-07-01

    Using the Mehler-Fock transformation to solve Poisson's equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates, we have obtained an exact Green's function solution for all multiple image corrections to the vacuum tunneling barrier for a hyperboloidal tip-planar-anode model of a point-contact junction consisting of identical or dissimilar metals. These calculations show that the image corrections significantly modify both the form and area of the barrier, producing an enhancement in the rectification and tunneling currents at low bias. I V characteristics have also been obtained for the hyperboloidal tip model using estimates of the emission and collection regions based on field emission experiments for whisker tips of comparable dimensions. These results are compared with earlier calculations which

  10. Heterojunction depth in P+-on-n eSWIR HgCdTe infrared detectors: generation-recombination suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, J.; DeWames, R. E.; DeCuir, E. A.; Bellotti, E.; Dhar, N.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    2015-08-01

    A key design feature of P+-on-n HgCdTe detectors is the depth of the p-type region. Normally, homojunction architectures are utilized where the p-type region extends into the narrow-gap absorber layer. This facilitates the collection of photo-carriers from the absorber layer to the contact; however, this may result in excess generation-recombination (G-R) current if defects are present. Alternatively, properly adopting a heterojunction architecture confines the p-type region (and the majority of the electric field) solely to the wide-gap layer. Junction placement is critical since the detector performance is now dependent on the following sensitivity parameters: p-type region depth, doping, valence band offset, lifetime and detector bias. Understanding the parameter dependence near the hetero-metallurgical interface where the compositional grading occurs and the doping is varied as either a Gaussian or error function is vital to device design. Numerical modeling is now essential to properly engineer the electric field in the device to suppress G-R current while accounting for the aforementioned sensitivity parameters. The simulations reveal that through proper device design the p-type region can be confined to the wide-gap layer, reducing G-R related dark current, without significantly reducing the quantum efficiency at the operating bias V = -0.100V.

  11. A New Large-Well 1024x1024 Si:As Detector for the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainzer, Amanda K.; Hong, John H.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Hogue, Henry; Molyneux, Dale; Ressler, Michael E.; Watkins, Ernie; Reekstin, John; Werner, Mike; Young, Erick

    2005-01-01

    We present a description of a new 1024x1024 Si:As array designed for ground-based use from 5 - 28 microns. With a maximum well depth of 5e6 electrons, this device brings large-format array technology to bear on ground-based mid-infrared programs, allowing entry to the mega-pixel realm previously only accessible to the near-IR. The multiplexer design features switchable gain, a 256x256 windowing mode for extremely bright sources, and it is two-edge buttable. The device is currently in its final design phase at DRS in Cypress, CA. We anticipate completion of the foundry run in October 2005. This new array will enable wide field, high angular resolution ground-based follow up of targets found by space-based missions such as the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).

  12. Test results of Spacelab 2 infrared telescope focal plane. [photoconductive detector fabrication and JFET transimpedance amplifier design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, E. T.; Rieke, G. H.; Gautier, T. N.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Low, F. J.; Poteet, W.; Fazio, G. G.; Koch, D.; Traub, W. A.; Urban, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    The small helium cooled infrared telescope for Spacelab 2 is designed for sensitive mapping of extended, low-surface-brightness celestial sources as well as highly sensitive investigations of the shuttle contamination environment (FPA) for this mission is described as well as the design for a thermally isolated, self-heated J-FET transimpedance amplifier. This amplifier is Johnson noise limited for feedback resistances from less than 10 to the 8th power Omega to greater than 2 x 10 to the 10th power Omega at T = 4.2K. Work on the focal plane array is complete. Performance testing for qualification of the flight hardware is discussed, and results are presented. All infrared data channels are measured to be background limited by the expected level of zodiacal emission.

  13. Very long-wavelength (~20μm) InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detector with double InSb-like interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dongwei; Guo, Fengyun; Xiang, Wei; Hao, Yuehong; Wang, Guowei; Xu, Yingqiang; Yu, Qingjiang; Niu, Zhichuan; Zhao, Liancheng

    2014-11-01

    Optimization of growth parameters for type-II 17MLs InAs/8MLs GaSb strained layer superlattices (SLS) (λcut-off~20 μm at 77K), grown on GaSb substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has been undertaken. Both the GaSb on InAs interface and the InAs on GaSb interface were inserted with InSb interfaces using migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE) method to balance the lattice mismatch. The influence of the effect of the thickness of InSb layer on the properties of the superlattice has been investigated. We demonstrate the structural properties of these SLS structures, using high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Optimized growth parameters were then used to grow SLS detectors with the active region of 2-μm-thick, which demonstrated full-width half-maximum (FWHM) of 22 arcsec for the first SLS satellite peak and nearly zero lattice mismatch between zero-order SLS peak and GaSb substrate. The cut-off wavelength of the detector is 20 μm at 77K measured by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with the quantum efficiency of 10% and the Johnson noise limited detectivity reached 2.8×1010 cm Hz1/2/W at 10.55μm under -75mV bias voltage.

  14. Design of Low Power CMOS Read-Out with TDI Function for Infrared Linear Photodiode Array Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizcaino, Paul; Ramirez-Angulo, Jaime; Patel, Umesh D.

    2007-01-01

    A new low voltage CMOS infrared readout circuit using the buffer-direct injection method is presented. It uses a single supply voltage of 1.8 volts and a bias current of 1uA. The time-delay integration technique is used to increase the signal to noise ratio. A current memory circuit with faulty diode detection is used to remove dark current for background compensation and to disable a photodiode in a cell if detected as faulty. Simulations are shown that verify the circuit that is currently in fabrication in 0.5ym CMOS technology.

  15. Infrared Fluorescence for Vascular Barrier Breach In Vivo – A Novel Method for Quantitation of Albumin Efflux

    PubMed Central

    von Drygalski, Annette; Furla-Freguia, Christian; Mosnier, Laurent O.; Yegneswaran, Subramanian; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Vascular hyperpermeability contributes to morbidity in inflammation. Current methodologies for in vivo assessment of permeability based on extravasation of Evans Blue (EB)-bound albumin are cumbersome and often lack sensitivity. We developed a novel infrared fluorescence (IRF) methodology for measurement of EB-albumin extravasation to quantify vascular permeability in murine models. Vascular permeability induced by endotoxemia was examined for all solid organs, brain, skin and peritoneum by IRF and the traditional absorbance-based measurement of EB in tissue extracts. Organ IRF increased linearly with increasing concentrations of i.v. EB (2.5-25 mg/kg). Tissue IRF was more sensitive for EB accumulation compared to the absorbance-based method. Accordingly, differences in vascular permeability and organ EB accumulation between lipopolysaccharide-treated and saline-treated mice were often significant when analyzed by IRF-based detection but not by absorbance-based detection. EB was detected in all 353 organs analyzed with IRF but only in 67% (239/353) of organs analyzed by absorbance-based methodology, demonstrating improved sensitivity of EB detection in organs with IRF. In contrast, EB in plasma after EB administration was readily measured by both methods with high correlation between the two methods (n=116, r2=0.86). Quantitation of organ-specific EB-IRF differences due to endotoxin was optimal when IRF was compared between mice matched for weight, gender, and age, and with appropriate corrections for organ weight and EB plasma concentrations. Notably, EB-IRF methodology leaves organs intact for subsequent histopathology. In summary, EB-IRF is a novel, highly sensitive, rapid, and convenient method for the relative quantification of EB in intact organs of treatment versus control mice. PMID:23052565

  16. Near-infrared fluorescent imaging of cerebral thrombi and blood-brain barrier disruption in a mouse model of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Eog; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Jaffer, Farouc A; Weissleder, Ralph; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2005-02-01

    An intravital microscopy imaging method was developed to visualize active cerebral thrombus and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption using Near Infrared Fluorescent (NIRF) probes. A circular craniotomy was made in CD-1 mice. Thrombi were formed by applying 10%-FeCl3 to the entire exposed superior sagittal sinus (SSS, 5 mm), or to the posterior 2.5 mm of the SSS for 5 mins. Control animals were pretreated with heparin (50 U/kg) before thrombus induction. Three hours after thrombus formation, a FXIIIa-targeted NIRF imaging probe (A15) was intravenously injected, and the SSS was imaged by intravital microscopy. This was followed by injection of indocyanine green (ICG) to assess BBB permeability. The A15 optical probe bound to thrombus, and the fluorescent signal emitted by the bound agent corresponded well with histologically confirmed thrombus. A15 initially remained intravascular, followed by excretion and subsequent decrease in all tissues except for thrombus, where it was retained. The subsequent ICG was also intravascular immediately after injection, but then began to leak into the cerebral parenchyma at 3 to 5 mins. The sites of leakage were adjacent to thrombosed areas. Heparin pretreatment prevented thrombus formation and reduced ICG leakage significantly. This demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous in vivo monitoring of thrombus and BBB permeability in an animal model of cerebral venous thrombosis.

  17. Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  18. Influence of the Sb dopant distribution on far infrared photoconductivity in Ge:Sb blocked impurity band detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Jordana; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Samperi, Stacy; Haegel, Nancy M.

    2002-02-06

    Extended long wavelength response to {approx}200 {micro}m (50 cm{sup -1}) has been observed in Ge:Sb Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors with N{sub D} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The cut-off wavelength increases from 150 {micro}m (65 cm{sup -1}) to 200 {micro}m (50 cm{sup -1}) with increasing bias. The responsivity at long wavelengths was lower than expected. This can be explained by considering the observed Sb diffusion profile in a transition region between the blocking layer and active layer. BIB modeling is presented which indicates that this Sb concentration profile increases the electric field in the transition region and reduces the field in the blocking layer. The depletion region consists partially of the transition region between the active and blocking layer, which could contribute to the reduced long wavelength response. The field spike at the interface is the likely cause of breakdown at a lower bias than expected.

  19. Numerical study of the intrinsic recombination carriers lifetime in extended short-wavelength infrared detector materials: A comparison between InGaAs and HgCdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic carrier lifetime due to radiative and Auger recombination in HgCdTe and strained InGaAs has been computed in the extended short-wavelength infrared (ESWIR) spectrum from 1.7 μm to 2.7 μm. Using the Green's function theory, both direct and phonon-assisted indirect Auger recombination rates as well as the radiative recombination rates are calculated for different cutoff wavelengths at 300 K with full band structures of the materials. In order to properly model the full band structures of strained InGaAs, an empirical pseudo-potential model for the alloy is fitted using the virtual crystal approximation with spin-orbit coupling included. The results showed that for InxGa1-xAs grown on InP substrate, the compressive strain, which presents in the film when the cutoff wavelength is longer than 1.7 μm, leads to decrease of Auger recombination rate and increase of radiative recombination rate. Since the dominant intrinsic recombination mechanism in this spectral range is radiative recombination, the overall intrinsic carrier lifetime in the strained InGaAs alloys is shorter than that in the relaxed material. When compared to the relaxed HgCdTe, both relaxed and compressively strained InGaAs alloys show shorter intrinsic carrier lifetime at the same cutoff wavelength in room temperature which confirms the potential advantage of HgCdTe as wide-band infrared detector material. While HgCdTe offers superior performance, ultimately the material of choice for ESWIR application will also depend on material quality and cost.

  20. Investigations of quantum efficiency in type-II InAs/GaSb very long wavelength infrared superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochao; Jiang, Dongwei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Wang, Dongbo; Yu, Qingjiang; Zhao, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the quantum efficiency (QE) of InAs/GaSb T2SL very long wavelength Infrared (VLWIR) photodetectors with 50% cutoff of 12.7 μm. Due to the small depletion width and similar absorption coefficient in the T2SL material system, the minority-carrier diffusion length was determined as the key element to improve the QE of VLWIR T2SL photodetectors. The minority-carrier diffusion length was estimated by a comparison of the experimental data with the Hovel model. Our result suggest that the short hole diffusion length (Lh ∼ 520 nm) and the large its ratio to the width of this region (xn/Lh) are considered against the photo-excited carrier collection in the T2SL photodetectors. In addition, the influence of surface recombination velocity (Sh) on the QE of the T2SL photodetectors is also studied. The change of QE with Sh is not so significant due to the relatively low absorption coefficient and short hole diffusion length in our photodetector.

  1. Preliminary validation results of an ASIC for the readout and control of near-infrared large array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pâhlsson, Philip; Meier, Dirk; Otnes Berge, Hans Kristian; Øya, Petter; Steenari, David; Olsen, Alf; Hasanbegovic, Amir; Altan, Mehmet A.; Najafiuchevler, Bahram; Talebi, Jahanzad; Azman, Suleyman; Gheorghe, Codin; Ackermann, Jörg; Mæhlum, Gunnar

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present initial test results of the Near Infrared Readout and Controller ASIC (NIRCA), designed for large area image sensors under contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Norwegian Space Center. The ASIC is designed to read out image sensors based on mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe, or MCT) operating down to 77 K. IDEAS has developed, designed and initiated testing of NIRCA with promising results, showing complete functionality of all ASIC sub-components. The ASIC generates programmable digital signals to clock out the contents of an image array and to amplify, digitize and transfer the resulting pixel charge. The digital signals can be programmed into the ASIC during run-time and allows for windowing and custom readout schemes. The clocked out voltages are amplified by programmable gain amplifiers and digitized by 12-bit, 3-Msps successive approximation register (SAR) analogue-to-digital converters (ADC). Digitized data is encoded using 8-bit to 10-bit encoding and transferred over LVDS to the readout system. The ASIC will give European researchers access to high spectral sensitivity, very low noise and radiation hardened readout electronics for astronomy and Earth observation missions operating at 77 K and room temperature. The versatility of the chip makes the architecture a possible candidate for other research areas, or defense or industrial applications that require analog and digital acquisition, voltage regulation, and digital signal generation.

  2. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Markham, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

  3. MEMS infrared approaches to detector based on nonlinear oscillation and wavelength selective emitter using surface plasmon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2014-03-01

    The suspended MEMS structure is suitable for reducing the energy loss due to the thermal conduction. There is the possibility that IR photon energy can be well-controlled to generate some physical effects. A new method bases on the nonlinear oscillation for the detector. The thin film torsional spring exhibits a large hard spring effect when the deflection occurs in the out-of-plane direction of the film. When IR is absorbed, the resonator bends due to the thermal expansion. The torsional spring becomes harder increasing the resonant frequency. The frequency measurement is suited for the precise sensing. The device response is measured using the laser (wavelength of 650nm). The resonant frequency is 88-94kHz. Q factor is about 1600 in vacuum (1Pa). The sensitivity is -0.144[kHz/(kW/m2)]. As for the emitter, nondispersive IR gas sensor is considered. The molecules have their intrinsic absorptions. CO2 absorbs the wavelength 4.2- 4.3μm. The major incandescent light bulbs have the broad spectrum emitting IR which is not used for gas sensing. The wavelength selectivity at the gas bandwidth will improve the efficiency. A new principle uses the microheater placed facing to the grating. SPP is excited carrying IR energy on the grating surface. IR emission is the reverse process of excitation occurring at the output end. The emission spectra show SPP related peak having the width of 190nm. When the input power increases from 0.3 to 1.9W, the peak at wavelength of 3.5μm becomes clearer.

  4. Theoretical investigation of tensile strained GeSn waveguide with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for mid-infrared detector and modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-03-23

    We theoretically investigate a tensile strained GeSn waveguide integrated with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for the applications in mid-infrared (MIR) detector and modulator. A substantial tensile strain is induced in a 1 × 1 μm² GeSn waveguide by the expansion of 500 nm Si₃N₄ liner stressor and the contour plots of strain are simulated by the finite element simulation. Under the tensile strain, the direct bandgap E(G,Γ) of GeSn is significantly reduced by lowering the Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. Absorption coefficients of tensile strained GeSn waveguides with different Sn compositions are calculated. As the Si₃N₄ liner stressor expands by 1%, the cut-off wavelengths of tensile strained Ge(0.97)Sn(0.03), Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05), and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide photodetectors are extended to 2.32, 2.69, and 4.06 μm, respectively. Tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide electro-absorption modulator based on Franz-Keldysh (FK) effect is demonstrated in theory. External electric field dependence of cut-off wavelength and propagation loss of tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide is observed, due to the FK effect.

  5. Near-infrared spectroscopy system with non-contact source and detector for in vivo multi-distance measurement of deep biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funane, Tsukasa; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Kiguchi, Masashi; Tanikawa, Yukari; Okada, Eiji

    2013-03-01

    A non-contact near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) scanning system with a phosphor cell placed on the skin for in vivo measurement of biological tissue was developed and evaluated. Because the phosphor is excited by the light that propagates in the tissue, and the excitation light is cut by optical filters, the light that propagates in the tissue is selectively detected. The non-contact system was extended to create a scanning system that can flexibly change source positions with a galvano scanner. The optical scanning system was used for non-contact measurement of the human forearm muscle, and the dependence of optical-density change (ΔOD) caused by the upper-arm occlusion and release on source-detector distance was observed. The obtained ΔOD demonstrates the effectiveness of using this system for multi-distance human-forearm measurement. Furthermore, a human forehead was measured with the system. To extract a deep-layer signal, a surface-layer subtraction method with short-distance regression was applied to measured data. On the basis of the correlation with a simultaneously measured laser-Doppler flowmetry signal, it was confirmed that the deep-layer signal was successfully extracted. The extraction result demonstrates that the optical scanning system can be used as a multi-distance NIRS system for measuring the human brain activity at the forehead.

  6. Annealing studies of heteroepitaxial InSbN on GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy for long-wavelength infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Nimai C.; Bharatan, Sudhakar; Li Jia; Iyer, Shanthi

    2012-10-15

    We report the effect of annealing on the structural, vibrational, electrical, and optical properties of heteropepitaxially grown InSbN epilayers on GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy for long-wavelength infrared detector applications. As-grown epilayers exhibited high N incorporation in the both substitutional and interstitial sites, with N induced defects as evidenced from high resolution x-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and room temperature (RT) micro-Raman studies. The as-grown optical band gap was observed at 0.132 eV ({approx}9.4 {mu}m) and the epilayer exhibited high background carrier concentration at {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} range with corresponding mobility of {approx}10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs. Ex situ and in situ annealing at 430 Degree-Sign C though led to the loss of N but improved InSb quality due to effective annihilation of N related defects and other lattice defects attested to enhanced InSb LO phonon modes in the corresponding Raman spectra. Further, annealing resulted in the optical absorption edge red shifting to 0.12 eV ({approx}10.3 {mu}m) and the layers were characterized by reduced background carrier concentration in the {approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range with enhanced mobility in {approx}10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/Vs range.

  7. High-Performance LWIR Superlattice Detectors and FPA Based on CBIRD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Liao, Anna; Hoeglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    We report our recent efforts on advancing of antimonide superlattice based infrared photodetectors and demonstration of focal plane arrays based on a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. By optimizing design and growth condition we succeeded to reduce the operational bias of CBIRD single pixel detector without increase of dark current or degradation of quantum efficiency. We demonstrated a 1024x1024 pixel long-wavelength infrared focal plane array utilizing CBIRD design. An 11.5 micrometer cutoff focal plane without anti-reflection coating has yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 53 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. Imaging results from a recent 10 micrometer cutoff focal plane array are also presented. These results advance state-of-the art of superlattice detectors and demonstrated advantages of CBIRD architecture for realization of FPA.

  8. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulrickson, M.A.

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and optical means positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The optical means may be a light pipe array having one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  9. Multi-channel infrared thermometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulrickson, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    A device for measuring the two-dimensional temperature profile of a surface comprises imaging optics for generating an image of the light radiating from the surface; an infrared detector array having a plurality of detectors; and a light pipe array positioned between the imaging optics and the detector array for sampling, transmitting, and distributing the image over the detector surfaces. The light pipe array includes one light pipe for each detector in the detector array.

  10. Uncooled infrared photon detection concepts and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piyankarage, Viraj Vishwakantha Jayaweera

    This work describes infrared (IR) photon detector techniques based on novel semiconductor device concepts and detector designs. The aim of the investigation was to examine alternative IR detection concepts with a view to resolve some of the issues of existing IR detectors such as operating temperature and response range. Systems were fabricated to demonstrate the following IR detection concepts and determine detector parameters: (i) Near-infrared (NIR) detection based on dye-sensitization of nanostructured semiconductors, (ii) Displacement currents in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) embedded dielectric media, (iii) Split-off band transitions in GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction interfacial workfunction internal photoemission (HEIWIP) detectors. A far-infrared detector based on GaSb homojunction interfacial workfunction internal photoemission (HIWIP) structure is also discussed. Device concepts, detector structures, and experimental results discussed in the text are summarized below. Dye-sensitized (DS) detector structures consisting of n-TiO 2/Dye/p-CuSCN heterostructures with several IR-sensitive dyes showed response peaks at 808, 812, 858, 866, 876, and 1056 nm at room temperature. The peak specific-detectivity (D*) was 9.5x1010 cm Hz-1/2 W-1 at 812 nm at room temperature. Radiation induced carrier generation alters the electronic polarizability of QDs provided the quenching of excitation is suppressed by separation of the QDs. A device constructed to illustrate this concept by embedding PbS QDs in paraffin wax showed a peak D* of 3x108 cm Hz 1/2 W-1 at ˜540 nm at ambient temperature. A typical HEIWIP/HIWIP detector structures consist of single (or multiple) period(s) of doped emitter(s) and undoped barrier(s) which are sandwiched between two highly doped contact layers. A p-GaAs/AlGaAs HEIWIP structure showed enhanced absorption in NIR range due to heavy/light-hole band to split-off band transitions and leading to the development of GaAs based uncooled sensors for IR

  11. La détection infrarouge avec les plans focaux non refroidis : état de l'artUncooled focal plane infrared detectors: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, Jean-Luc

    2003-12-01

    The emergence of uncooled detectors has opened new opportunities for IR detection for both military and commercial applications. Development of such devices involves a lot of trade-offs between the different parameters that define the technological stack. These trade-offs explain the number of different architectures that are under worldwide development. The key factor is to find a high sensitivity and low noise thermometer material compatible with silicon technology in order to achieve high thermal isolation in the smallest area as possible. Ferroelectric thermometer based hybrid technology and electrical resistive thermometer based (microbolometer) technology are under development. LETI and ULIS have chosen from the very beginning to develop first a monolithic microbolometer technology fully compatible with commercially available CMOS technology and secondly amorphous silicon based thermometer. This silicon approach has the greatest potential for reducing infrared detector manufacturing cost. After the development of the technology, the transfer to industrial facilities has been performed in a short period of time and the production is now ramping up with ULIS team in new facilities. LETI and ULIS are now working to facilitate the IRFPA integration into equipment in order to address a very large market. Achievement of this goal needs the development of smart sensors with on-chip advanced functions and the decrease of manufacturing cost of IRFPA by decreasing the pixel pitch and simplifying the vacuum package. We present in this paper the technology developed by CEA/LETI and its improvement for being able to designs 384×288 and 160×120 arrays with a pitch of 35 μm. Thermographic application needs high stability infrared detector with a precise determination of the amount of absorbed infrared flux. Hence, infrared detector with internal temperature stabilized shield has been developed and characterized. These results will be presented. To cite this article: J

  12. Infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

  13. Registration of infrared single photons by a two-channel receiver based on fiber-coupled superconducting single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, O.; Chulkova, G.; Milostnaya, I.; Antipov, A.; Smirnov, K.; Morozov, D.; Korneev, A.; Voronov, B.; Gol'tsman, G.; Slysz, W.; Wegrzecki, M.; Bar, J.; Grabiec, P.; Górska, M.; Pearlman, A.; Cross, A.; Kitaygorsky, J.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2008-03-01

    Single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the foundation of all quantum communications (QC) protocols. Among different classes of SPDs currently studied, NbN superconducting SPDs (SSPDs) are established as the best devices for ultrafast counting of single photons in the infrared (IR) wavelength range. The SSPDs are nanostructured, 100 μm2 in total area, superconducting meanders, patterned by electron lithography in ultra-thin NbN films. Their operation has been explained within a phenomenological hot-electron photoresponse model. We present the design and performance of a novel, two-channel SPD receiver, based on two fiber-coupled NbN SSPDs. The receivers have been developed for fiber-based QC systems, operational at 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm telecommunication wavelengths. They operate in the temperature range from 4.2 K to 2 K, in which the NbN SSPDs exhibit their best performance. The receiver unit has been designed as a cryostat insert, placed inside a standard liquid-heliumstorage dewar. The input of the receiver consists of a pair of single-mode optical fibers, equipped with the standard FC connectors and kept at room temperature. Coupling between the SSPD and the fiber is achieved using a specially designed, precise micromechanical holder that places the fiber directly on top of the SSPD nanostructure. Our receivers achieve the quantum efficiency of up to 7% for near-IR photons, with the coupling efficiency of about 30%. The response time was measured to be < 1.5 ns and it was limited by our read-out electronics. The jitter of fiber-coupled SSPDs is < 35 ps and their dark-count rate is below 1s-1. The presented performance parameters show that our single-photon receivers are fully applicable for quantum correlation-type QC systems, including practical quantum cryptography.

  14. Use of reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate the effects of daily moisturizer application on skin optical response and barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qassem, Meha; Kyriacou, Panayiotis

    2014-08-01

    A number of noninvasive techniques and instruments have emerged over the years allowing much progress toward clarifying the structure and function of human skin and studying the effects of various applied substances. All of this research has provided great insight into the interactions between skin and various products through quantitative and qualitative measurements. Such methods include near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a technique which has gained popularity over the years and has often been employed to accurately determine the moisture levels and water content of skin based on its sensitivity to hydrogen bonding. NIRS has also been applied in many studies to report the efficacy of moisturizing products and assess their benefits to the skin. However, many of these studies have reported an increase in skin water content following moisturizer application while some have challenged the benefits of long-term moisturizer use, particularly on normal skin, and even suggested that it can increase the skin's susceptibility to irritants. This paper reports the results of a pilot in vivo study carried out on the skin of 20 healthy volunteers, categorized into groups depending on their skin type and frequency of moisturizer use, in order to investigate the optical response of human skin after direct short-term contact with water followed by application of a moisturizer. The measurements were obtained using a highly advanced spectrophotometer in the region of 900 to 2100 nm equipped with a customized reflectance fiber optic handheld probe. Scatter graphs of group results and second derivative spectra have shown an interesting pattern between frequent users of moisturizers and individuals who do not use moisturizers, suggesting that long-term daily moisturization may have an effect on skin barrier function. The results also raise some questions regarding the optical characteristics of different skin types, as well as the varying response between different water bands in the

  15. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-09-21

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  16. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  17. Infrared detector device inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Soehnel, Grant; Bender, Daniel A.

    2016-08-09

    Methods and apparatuses for identifying carrier lifetimes are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a beam of light is sent to a group of locations on a material for an optical device. Photons emitted from the material are detected at each of the group of locations. A carrier lifetime is identified for each of the group of locations based on the photons detected from each of the group of locations.

  18. Correlation Between Band Structure and Magneto- Transport Properties in HgTe/CdTe Two-Dimensional Far-Infrared Detector Superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braigue, M.; Nafidi, A.; Idbaha, A.; Chaib, H.; Sahsah, H.; Daoud, M.; Marí Soucase, B.; Mollar García, M.; Chander Singh, K.; Hartiti, B.

    2013-06-01

    Theoretical calculations of the electronic properties of n-type HgTe/CdTe superlattices (SLs) have provided an agreement with the experimental data on the magneto-transport behaviour. We have measured the conductivity, Hall mobility, Seebeck and Shubnikov-de Haas effects and angular dependence of the magneto-resistance. Our sample, grown by MBE, had a period d= d 1+ d 2 (124 layers) of d1=8.6 nm (HgTe) /d2=3.2 nm (CdTe). Calculations of the spectras of energy E( d 2), E( k z ) and E( k p ), respectively, in the direction of growth and in plane of the superlattice; were performed in the envelope function formalism. The energy E( d 2, Γ,4.2 K), shown that when d 2 increase the gap E g decrease to zero at the transition semiconductor to semimetal conductivity behaviour and become negative accusing a semimetallic conduction. At 4.2 K, the sample exhibits n type conductivity, confirmed by Hall and Seebeck effects, with a Hall mobility of 2.5 × 105 cm2/ V s. This allowed us to observe the Shubnikov-de Haas effect with n=3.20×1012 cm-2. Using the calculated effective mass (m^{*}_{E1}(EF) = 0.05 m0) of the degenerated electrons gas, the Fermi energy (2D) was E F =88 meV in agreement with 91 meV of thermoelectric power α. In intrinsic regime, α˜ T -3/2 and R H T 3/2 indicates a gap E g = E 1- HH 1=101 meV in agreement with calculated E g ( Γ,300 K)=105 meV. The formalism used here predicts that the system is semiconductor for d 1/ d 2=2.69 and d 2<100 nm. Here, d 2=3.2 nm and E g ( Γ,4.2 K)=48 meV so this sample is a two-dimensional modulated nano-semiconductor and far-infrared detector (12 μm< λ c <28 μm).

  19. Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. F.

    1990-01-01

    There has been a lot of interest in III-V long wavelength detectors in the lambda = 8 to 12 micron spectral range as alternatives to HgCdTe. Recently high performance quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) have been demonstrated. They have a responsivity of R = 1.2 A/W, and a detectivity D(exp asterisk) sub lambda = 2 times 10(exp 10) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W at 68 K for a QWIP with a cutoff wavelength of lambda sub c = 10.7 micron and a R = 1.0 A/W, and D(exp asterisk) sub lambda = 2 times 10(exp 10) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W at T = 77 K for lambda sub c = 8.4 micron. These detectors consist of 50 periods of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown layers doped n = 1 times 10(exp 18)cm(exp -3) having GaAs quantum well widths of 40 A and barrier widths of 500 A of Al sub x Ga sub 1-x As. Due to the well-established GaAs growth and processing techniques, these detectors have the potential for large, highly uniform, low cost, high performance arrays as well as monolithic integration with GaAs electronics, high speed and radiation hardness. Latest results on the transport physics, device performance and arrays are discussed.

  20. Infrared detection with point contact-metal semiconductor diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstein, G.

    1980-03-01

    Point contact Schottky barrier diodes, operating as video detectors and harmonic mixers at infrared frequencies, are studied, and theoretical models are developed and tested. A model extending the frequency response of the nonlinear barrier into the infrared is developed. Conductive and capacitive detection in highly doped semiconductors is considered. A model in which the low frequency spreading resistance is replaced by a complex spreading impedance is developed. The model predicts that optimal operation requires a semiconductor whose plasma frequency is one-third the operation frequency. Physical processes taking place simultaneously in the active region and in general thermal in nature are investigated. A thermo-electric detection model is developed and confirmed experimentally. The manufacturing of bulk point contact diodes is described in detail. Experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions. A method for producing thin crystaline semiconducting films on a metallic substrate is described.

  1. Mid-infrared Photoconductive Response in AlGaN/GaN Step Quantum Wells

    PubMed Central

    Rong, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Chen, G.; Zheng, X. T.; Wang, P.; Xu, F. J.; Qin, Z. X.; Tang, N.; Chen, Y. H.; Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M.; Ge, W. K.; Shen, B.

    2015-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN quantum structure is an excellent candidate for high speed infrared detectors based on intersubband transitions. However, fabrication of AlGaN/GaN quantum well infrared detectors suffers from polarization-induced internal electric field, which greatly limits the carrier vertical transport. In this article, a step quantum well is proposed to attempt solving this problem, in which a novel spacer barrier layer is used to balance the internal electric field. As a result, a nearly flat band potential profile is obtained in the step barrier layers of the AlGaN/GaN step quantum wells and a bound-to-quasi-continuum (B-to-QC) type intersubband prototype device with detectable photocurrent at atmosphere window (3–5 μm) is achieved in such nitride semiconductors. PMID:26395756

  2. Infrared Astronomy with Arrays: The Next Generation; Sunset Village, Los Angeles, CA, Oct. 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, Ian S.

    1994-01-01

    Conference papers on infrared array techniques and methods for infrared astronomy are presented. Topics covered include the following: infrared telescopes; infrared spectrometers; spaceborne astronomy; astronomical observatories; infrared cameras; imaging techniques; sky surveys; infrared photography; infrared photometry; infrared spectroscopy; equipment specifications; data processing and analysis; control systems; cryogenic equipment; adaptive optics; image resolution; infrared detector materials; and focal plane arrays.

  3. Early infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, James

    2009-07-01

    I present a short history of infrared astronomy, from the first scientific approaches of the ‘radiant heat’ in the seventeenth century to the 1970's, the time when space infrared astronomy was developing very rapidly. The beginning of millimeter and submillimeter astronomy is also covered. As the progress of infrared astronomy was strongly dependent on detectors, some details are given on their development.

  4. A polychromator-type near-infrared spectrometer with a high-sensitivity and high-resolution photodiode array detector for pharmaceutical process monitoring on the millisecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kodai; Genkawa, Takuma; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    In the fine chemicals industry, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, advanced sensing technologies have recently begun being incorporated into the process line in order to improve safety and quality in accordance with process analytical technology. For estimating the quality of powders without preparation during drug formulation, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been considered the most promising sensing approach. In this study, we have developed a compact polychromator-type NIR spectrometer equipped with a photodiode (PD) array detector. This detector is consisting of 640 InGaAs-PD elements with 20-μm pitch. Some high-specification spectrometers, which use InGaAs-PD with 512 elements, have a wavelength resolution of about 1.56 nm when covering 900-1700 nm range. On the other hand, the newly developed detector, having the PD with one of the world's highest density, enables wavelength resolution of below 1.25 nm. Moreover, thanks to the combination with a highly integrated charge amplifier array circuit, measurement speed of the detector is higher by two orders than that of existing PD array detectors. The developed spectrometer is small (120 mm × 220 mm × 200 mm) and light (6 kg), and it contains various key devices including the high-density and high-sensitivity PD array detector, NIR technology, and spectroscopy technology for a spectroscopic analyzer that has the required detection mechanism and high sensitivity for powder measurement, as well as a high-speed measuring function for blenders. Moreover, we have evaluated the characteristics of the developed NIR spectrometer, and the measurement of powder samples confirmed that it has high functionality.

  5. High-Performance LWIR Superlattice Detectors and FPA Based on CBIRD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Liao, Anna; Hoeglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    We report our recent efforts on advancing of antimonide superlattice based infrared photodetectors and demonstration of focal plane arrays based on a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. By optimizing design and growth condition we succeeded to reduce the operational bias of CBIRD single pixel detector without increase of dark current or degradation of quantum efficiency. We demonstrated a 1024x1024 pixel long-waveleng thinfrared focal plane array utilizing CBIRD design. An 11.5 micrometer cutoff focal plane without anti-reflection coating has yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 53 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. Imaging results from a recent 10 micrometer cutoff focal plane array are also presented. These results advance state-of-the art of superlattice detectors and demonstrated advantages of CBIRD architecture for realization of FPA.

  6. Growth and Characteristics of Type-II InAs/GaSb Superlattice-Based Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshakhlagh, A.; Soibel, A.; Ting, D. Z.; Hoglund, L.; Nguyen, J.; Keo, S. A.; Liao, A.; Gunapala, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    We report on growth and device performance of infrared photodetectors based on type II InAs/Ga(In)Sb strain layer superlattices (SLs) using the complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. The unipolar barriers on either side of the absorber in the CBIRD design in combination with the type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice material system are expected to outperform traditional III-V LWIR imaging technologies and offer significant advantages over the conventional II-VI material based FPAs. The innovative design of CBIRDS, low defect density material growth, and robust fabrication processes have resulted in the development of high performance long wave infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays at JPL.

  7. Optimization of barrier layer thickness in MgSe/CdSe quantum wells for intersubband devices in the near infrared region

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guopeng; Shen, Aidong; Tamargo, Maria C.

    2015-10-28

    The authors report the optimization of MgSe barrier thickness in CdSe/MgSe multiple quantum well structures and its effect on structural, optical qualities and intersubband (ISB) transition characteristics. Three samples with the MgSe thicknesses of 2 nm, 3 nm, and 4 nm were grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements showed that the thinner the MgSe barrier thickness the better the structural quality. However, ISB absorption was only observed in the sample with a MgSe thickness of 3 nm. Failing to observe ISB absorption in the sample with a thicker MgSe barrier (≥4 nm) is due to the deteriorated material quality while the missing of ISB transition in the sample with thinner barrier (≤2 nm) is due to the tunneling of electrons out of the CdSe wells. The optimized MgSe barrier thickness of around 3 nm is found to be able to suppress the electron tunneling while maintaining a good material quality of the overall structure.

  8. Demonstration of First 9 Micron cutoff 640 x 486 GaAs Based Quantum Well Infrared PhotoDetector (QWIP) Snap-Shot Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Hong, W.; Sundaram, M.; Maker, P. D.; Muller, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the development of this very sensitive long waelength infrared (LWIR) camera based on a GaAs/AlGaAs QWIP focal plane array (FPA) and its performance in quantum efficiency, NEAT, uniformity, and operability.

  9. Electrical properties of n-type GaSb substrates and p-type GaSb buffer layers for InAs/InGaSb superlattice infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, W. C. Haugan, H. J.; Mou, Shin; Brown, G. J.; Elhamri, S.; Berney, R.

    2015-09-15

    Lightly doped n-type GaSb substrates with p-type GaSb buffer layers are the preferred templates for growth of InAs/InGaSb superlattices used in infrared detector applications because of relatively high infrared transmission and a close lattice match to the superlattices. We report here temperature dependent resistivity and Hall effect measurements of bare substrates and substrate-p-type buffer layer structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Multicarrier analysis of the resistivity and Hall coefficient data demonstrate that high temperature transport in the substrates is due to conduction in both the high mobility zone center Γ band and the low mobility off-center L band. High overall mobility values indicate the absence of close compensation and that improved infrared and transport properties were achieved by a reduction in intrinsic acceptor concentration. Standard transport measurements of the undoped buffer layers show p-type conduction up to 300 K indicating electrical isolation of the buffer layer from the lightly n-type GaSb substrate. However, the highest temperature data indicate the early stages of the expected p to n type conversion which leads to apparent anomalously high carrier concentrations and lower than expected mobilities. Data at 77 K indicate very high quality buffer layers.

  10. Waveguide-integrated near-infrared detector with self-assembled metal silicide nanoparticles embedded in a silicon p-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shiyang; Chu, H. S.; Lo, G. Q.; Bai, P.; Kwong, D. L.

    2012-02-01

    An all-silicon photodetector integrated in a silicon-on-insulator waveguide for the telecom regime is proposed. The device is based on internal photoemission from electrically floating metal silicide nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in the space charge region of a Si p-n junction. Numerical simulation indicates that the light absorption could be enhanced if localized surface plasmon resonances are excited on the metal silicide nanoparticles, thus enabling to shrink the detector's footprint to a submicron scale. A proof-of-concept detector fabricated using standard silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology exhibits a peak responsivity of ˜30 mA/W at 5-V reverse bias and a 3-dB bandwidth of ˜6 GHz. It is expected that the overall performance would be significantly improved by optimization of both the detector's configuration and the fabrication parameters.

  11. Infrared retina

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  12. Arrays of Nano Tunnel Junctions as Infrared Image Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong S.; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Infrared image sensors based on high density rectangular planar arrays of nano tunnel junctions have been proposed. These sensors would differ fundamentally from prior infrared sensors based, variously, on bolometry or conventional semiconductor photodetection. Infrared image sensors based on conventional semiconductor photodetection must typically be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to reduce noise to acceptably low levels. Some bolometer-type infrared sensors can be operated at room temperature, but they exhibit low detectivities and long response times, which limit their utility. The proposed infrared image sensors could be operated at room temperature without incurring excessive noise, and would exhibit high detectivities and short response times. Other advantages would include low power demand, high resolution, and tailorability of spectral response. Neither bolometers nor conventional semiconductor photodetectors, the basic detector units as proposed would partly resemble rectennas. Nanometer-scale tunnel junctions would be created by crossing of nanowires with quantum-mechanical-barrier layers in the form of thin layers of electrically insulating material between them (see figure). A microscopic dipole antenna sized and shaped to respond maximally in the infrared wavelength range that one seeks to detect would be formed integrally with the nanowires at each junction. An incident signal in that wavelength range would become coupled into the antenna and, through the antenna, to the junction. At the junction, the flow of electrons between the crossing wires would be dominated by quantum-mechanical tunneling rather than thermionic emission. Relative to thermionic emission, quantum mechanical tunneling is a fast process.

  13. Submillimeter and infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    An overview of the current state of submillimeter and infrared astronomy is given. In order to develop these fields, three areas must be considered. First, a platform immuned to atmospheric effects must be found, and satellites capable of supporting large telescopes must be designed. Current programs are considering specialized instruments such as COBE, a small cosmic background explorer; IRAS, a small cooled infrared survey telescope; and SIRTF, a small cooled infrared telescope. Second, a large area telescope with light gathering power and resolution, comparable to that available in the optical and radio, is essential to the program. Recent NASA studies have indicated the feasibility of constructing a 20 m diameter telescope with a 20 micron wavelength diffraction. Third, detectors are being developed which are near quantum noise limited, radio-style detectors. Questions which can be answered by submillimeter and infrared techniques pertain to star formation, existence of other planetary systems, and missing mass formation.

  14. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  15. A cryogenic testbed for the characterisation of large detector arrays for astronomical and Earth-observing applications in the near to very-long-wavelength infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brien, Thomas L. R.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Haiml, Markus; Hargrave, Peter C.; Höhnemann, Holger; Pascale, Enzo; Sudiwala, Rashmi V.; Van Aken, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we describe a cryogenic testbed designed to offer complete characterisation-via a minimal number of experimental configurations— of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) detector arrays for low-photon background applications, including exoplanet science and solar system exploration. Specifically, the testbed offers a platform to measure the dark current of detector arrays at various temperatures, whilst also characterising their optical response in numerous spectral bands. The average modulation transfer function (MTF) can be found in both dimensions of the array along with the overall quantum efficiency. Working from a liquid-helium bath allows for measurement of arrays from 4.2 K and active-temperature control of the surface to which the array is mounted allows for characterisation of arrays at temperatures up to 80 K, with the temperature of the array holder known to an accuracy of at least 1 mK, with the same level of long-term stability.

  16. Drifts exhibited by cryogenically cooled InSb infrared filtered detectors and their importance to the ATSR-2 and Landsat-5 Earth observation missions.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, Evangelos

    2005-07-10

    The spectral responsivity of commercially available InSb detectors with low-pass cold filters attached to their cold shields for optimum operation in the 1.6-2.6 microm wavelength range is observed to drift slowly with time. These drifts are shown to arise because of a thin film of water-ice deposited on the cold low-pass filters mounted on the cold shields of the detectors. The temporal characteristics of these drifts are shown to strongly depend on wavelength. A model is proposed for the behavior of the water present in the Dewar vacuum, which can explain and predict the temporal characteristics of the observed drifts for all wavelengths. These observations are particularly relevant to space instruments that use cryogenically cooled IR filter radiometers for Earth observation. The temporal profile of drifts observed in missions such as Landsat-5 is identical to that observed in cryogenically cooled filtered InSb detectors during laboratory measurements. This study confirms that the deposition of a thin film of a material such as ice on the cold bandpass filters and windows is therefore the most likely source of the oscillatory drifts observed in the response of some of the channels of the ATSR-2, Landsat-4, and Landsat-5 Earth observation missions.

  17. Growth of InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices for high-resolution mid-wavelength infrared focal plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, M.; Schmitz, J.; Rehm, R.; Kopta, S.; Fuchs, F.; Fleißner, J.; Cabanski, W.; Ziegler, J.

    2005-05-01

    InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices (SLs) with a broken gap type-II band alignment are investigated for the fabrication of photovoltaic pin-photodetectors on GaSb substrates. The structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using valved cracker cells for arsenic and antimony. Effective bandgap and strain in the SL were adjusted by varying the thickness of the InAs and GaSb layers in the SL and the controlled formation of InSb-like or GaAs-like bonds at the interfaces. MBE growth conditions were investigated and optimized in order to achieve good morphological, electrical and optical properties. IR-photodiodes with a cut-off wavelength of 5.4 μm reveal quantum efficiencies around 30% and detectivity values exceeding 10 13 Jones at 77 K. A focal plane array camera with 256×256 detector elements and 40 μm pitch based on InAs/GaSb short-period SLs was fabricated for the first time. The camera system reveals an excellent thermal resolution with a noise equivalent temperature difference below 12 mK for an integration time of 5 ms using f/2 optics. The detector performance, comparable with state of the art mercury-cadmium-telluride IR detectors, makes this material system very interesting for the fabrication of advanced thermal imaging systems.

  18. The theory and experiment of very-long-wavelength 256×1 GaAs/Al x Ga1- x As quantum well infrared detector linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fangmin; Li, Ning; Xiong, Dayuan; Zhen, Honglou; Xu, Xiangyan; Hou, Ying; Ding, Ruijun; Lu, Wei; Huang, Qi; Zhou, Junming

    2008-07-01

    The 256×1 linear array of multiple quantum wells infrared photodetector (QWIP) is designed and fabricated for the peak response wavelength at λ P = 14.6 μm. The response spectral width is bigger than 2.2 μm. The two-dimensional (2D) diffractive coupling grating has been formed on the top QWIP photosensitive pixel for coupling the infrared radiation to the infrared detective layers. The performance of the device at V B = 3 V and T = 45 K has the responsibility 4.28×10-2 (A/W), the blackbody detectivity D b* = 5.14×109 (cm·Hz1/2/W), and the peak detectivity D λ * = 4.24× 1010 (cm·Hz1/2/W). The sensor pixels are connected with CMOS read out circuit (ROC) hybridization by indium bumps. When integral time is 100 μs, the linear array has the effective pixel of QWIP FPA N ef of 99.2%, the average responsibility overline R (V/W) of 3.48×106 (V/W), the average peak detectivity D λ * of 8.29×109 (cm·Hz1/2/W), and the non-uniformity UR of 5.83%. This device is ready for the thermal image application.

  19. On the growth conditions of 3-5 μm well-doped AlGaAs/AlAs/GaAs infrared detectors and its relation to the photovoltaic effect studied by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, E.; Guzmán, A.; Trampert, A.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.; Calleja, E.

    2003-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth conditions (substrate temperature and arsenic flux) on the photovoltaic (PV) behavior and asymmetric characteristics of nominally identical well-doped AlGaAs/AlAs/GaAs double-barrier quantum well infrared photodetectors. This PV effect, already studied and reported in the literature, has been attributed to unintentional asymmetries of the potential profile introduced during the MBE growth process; in particular, due to an inequivalence of the AlAs layer properties or, more plausibly, to local space-charge regions originating from silicon segregation. The different "unintended" asymmetries for the samples considered in this work, validated by both dark-current and responsivity measurements, point at first glance to the existence of structural dissimilarities affecting the PV response. Hence, in order to clarify the influence of the suggested AlAs barriers inequivalence or interface roughness and quality in the origin of the PV signal we have performed a direct layer structural characterization by cross-section high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The analysis yields that regardless of the different growth conditions, the layers properties are similar, suggesting they play a minor role in the origin of the PV effect. Also this characterization tool may provide a further evidence of Si segregation being the main responsible. Concerning its growth conditions dependence, it seems that the As flux, and not only the substrate temperature, may affect Si segregation and hence the PV response.

  20. Growth of room-temperature ``arsenic free'' infrared photovoltaic detectors on GaSb substrate using metamorphic InAlSb digital alloy buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plis, E.; Rotella, P.; Raghavan, S.; Dawson, L. R.; Krishna, S.; Le, D.; Morath, C. P.

    2003-03-01

    We report the growth of a high-quality graded InAlSb digital alloy buffer layer on GaSb substrates. The metamorphic buffer layer relaxes the lattice matching constraint and allows the growth of heterostructures without the use of a second group V element. Cross-sectional transmission electronic microscopy images reveal a very low dislocation density in the buffer layer. Using such a buffer layer, a room-temperature InGaSb photovoltaic detector with λcutoff˜3 μm has been fabricated with an external quantum efficiency >70%.

  1. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [crystallization and phase diagrams of Hg sub 1-x Cd sub x Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczy, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal growth of Hg sub 1-x Cd sub x Te and density measurements of ingot slices are discussed. Radial compositional variations are evaluated from the results of infrared transmission edge mapping. The pseudo-binary HgTe-CdTe phase diagram is examined with reference to differential thermal analysis measurements. The phase equilibria calculations, based on the 'regular association solution' theory (R.A.S.) are explained and, using the obtained R.A.S. parameters, the activities of Hg, Cd, and Te vapors and their partial pressures over the pseudo-binary melt are calculated.

  2. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  3. Multisensor mine detector for peacekeeping: improved landmine detector concept (ILDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Carruthers, Al

    1996-05-01

    The Improved Landmine Detector Concept Project was initiated in Autumn 1994 to develop a prototype vehicle mounted mine detector for low metal content and nonmetallic mines for a peacekeeping role on roads. The system will consist of a teleoperated vehicle carrying a highly sensitive electromagnetic induction (EMI) detector, an infrared imager (IR), ground probing radar (GPR), and a thermal neutron activation (TNA) detector for confirmation. The IR, EMI and TNA detectors have been under test since 1995 and the GPR will be received in June 1996. Results of performance trials of the individual detectors are discussed. Various design configurations and their tradeoffs are discussed. Fusion of data from the detectors to reduce false alarm rate and increase probability of detection, a key element to the success of the system, is discussed. An advanced development model of the system is expected to be complete by Spring 1997.

  4. The pyroelectric properties of TGS for application in infrared detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, R. L.; Reiss, D.

    1981-01-01

    The pyroelectric property of triglycine sulfate and its application in the detection of infrared radiation are described. The detectivities of pyroelectric detectors and other types of infrared detectors are compared. The thermal response of a pyroelectric detector element and the resulting electrical response are derived in terms of the material parameters. The noise sources which limit the sensitivity of pyroelectric detectors are described, and the noise equivalent power for each noise source is given as a function of frequency and detector area.

  5. The utilization of an infrared imaging system as a cooling slot blockage detector in the inspection of a transpiration cooled nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Stephen E.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.; Alderfer, David W.; Whipple, Janet C.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of the 8 foot temperature tunnel's transpiration cooled nozzle was completed using an infrared imaging radiometer to locate regions of cooling flow irregularities caused by obstruction of three or more adjacent cooling slots. Restrictions in the cooling flow were found and cataloged. Blockages found were due primarily to the presence of residual phosphoric acid being discharged from some of the cooling slots. This acid was used during construction of the nozzle components and was to have been purged prior to its delivery to the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In addition, a radial displacement of one selection of discs located in the spool piece was inspected and cataloged for future reference. There did not seem to be a serious restriction of flow in this defect, but evidence from the infrared images indicated reduced slot activity within the gouge. The radiometer survey uncovered regions where closer inspection is recommended but did not cover the entire surface area of the three nozzle subsections due to equipment limitations. A list of areas with suspected problems is included in Appendix A.

  6. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  7. Commercialization of Australian advanced infrared technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redpath, John; Brown, Allen; Woods, William F.

    1995-09-01

    For several decades, the main thrust in infrared technology developments in Australia has been in two main sensor technologies: uncooled silicon chip printed bolometric sensors pioneered by DSTO's Kevin Liddiard, and precision engineered high quality Cadmium Mercury Telluride developed at DSTO under the guidance of Dr. Richard Hartley. In late 1993 a low cost infrared imaging device was developed at DSTO as a sensor for guided missiles. The combination of these three innovations made up a unique package that enabled Australian industry to break through the barriers of commercializing infrared technology. The privately owned company, R.J. Optronics Pty Ltd undertook the process of re-engineering a selection of these DSTO developments to be applicable to a wide range of infrared products. The first project was a novel infrared imager based on a Palmer scan (translated circle) mechanism. This device applies a spinning wedge and a single detector, it uses a video processor to convert the image into a standard rectangular format. Originally developed as an imaging seeker for a stand-off weapon, it is producing such high quality images at such a low cost that it is now also being adapted for a wide variety of other military and commercial applications. A technique for electronically stabilizing it has been developed which uses the inertial signals from co-mounted sensors to compensate for platform motions. This enables it to meet the requirements of aircraft, marine vessels and masthead sight applications without the use of gimbals. After tests on a three-axis motion table, several system configurations have now been successfully operated on a number of lightweight platforms, including a Cessna 172 and the Australian made Seabird Seeker aircraft.

  8. Short-wavelength infrared imaging using low dark current InGaAs detector arrays and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser illuminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Follman, David

    2011-06-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength IR (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7 °C. In addition, we have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640×512 readout integrated integrated circuits to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 μm at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0 °C. Noise due to the readout can be reduced from 95 to 57 electrons by using off-chip correlated double sampling. In addition, Aerius has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, and provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  9. Determination of charge-carrier diffusion length in the photosensing layer of HgCdTe n-on-p photovoltaic infrared focal plane array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnyakov, A. V.; Stuchinsky, V. A. Brunev, D. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2014-03-03

    In the present paper, we propose a method for evaluating the bulk diffusion length of minority charge carriers in the photosensing layer of photovoltaic focal plane array (FPA) photodetectors. The method is based on scanning a strip-shaped illumination spot with one of the detector diodes at a low level of photocurrents j{sub ph} being registered; such scanning provides data for subsequent analysis of measured spot-scan profiles within a simple diffusion model. The asymptotic behavior of the effective (at j{sub ph} ≠ 0) charge-carrier diffusion length l{sub d} {sub eff} as a function of j{sub ph} for j{sub ph} → 0 inferred from our experimental data proved to be consistent with the behavior of l{sub d} {sub eff} vs j{sub ph} as predicted by the model, while the obtained values of the bulk diffusion length of minority carriers (electrons) in the p-HgCdTe film of investigated HgCdTe n-on-p FPA photodetectors were found to be in a good agreement with the previously reported carrier diffusion-length values for HgCdTe.

  10. Transmutation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, J.; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-03-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  11. The CAMCAO infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Antonio; Melo, Antonio; Alves, Joao; Rebordao, Jose; Pinhao, Jose; Bonfait, Gregoire; Lima, Jorge; Barros, Rui; Fernandes, Rui; Catarino, Isabel; Carvalho, Marta; Marques, Rui; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Duarte Santos, Filipe; Finger, Gert; Hubin, Norbert; Huster, Gotthard; Koch, Franz; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Marchetti, Enrico

    2004-09-01

    The CAMCAO instrument is a high resolution near infrared (NIR) camera conceived to operate together with the new ESO Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator (MAD) with the goal of evaluating the feasibility of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics techniques (MCAO) on the sky. It is a high-resolution wide field of view (FoV) camera that is optimized to use the extended correction of the atmospheric turbulence provided by MCAO. While the first purpose of this camera is the sky observation, in the MAD setup, to validate the MCAO technology, in a second phase, the CAMCAO camera is planned to attach directly to the VLT for scientific astrophysical studies. The camera is based on the 2kx2k HAWAII2 infrared detector controlled by an ESO external IRACE system and includes standard IR band filters mounted on a positional filter wheel. The CAMCAO design requires that the optical components and the IR detector should be kept at low temperatures in order to avoid emitting radiation and lower detector noise in the region analysis. The cryogenic system inclues a LN2 tank and a sptially developed pulse tube cryocooler. Field and pupil cold stops are implemented to reduce the infrared background and the stray-light. The CAMCAO optics provide diffraction limited performance down to J Band, but the detector sampling fulfills the Nyquist criterion for the K band (2.2mm).

  12. Laser beam methane detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Instrument uses infrared absorption to determine methane concentration in liquid natural gas vapor. Two sensors measure intensity of 3.39 mm laser beam after it passes through gas; absorption is proportional to concentration of methane. Instrument is used in modeling spread of LNG clouds and as leak detector on LNG carriers and installations. Unit includes wheels for mobility and is both vertically and horizontally operable.

  13. Infrared astronomy after IRAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Thompson, R. I.; Werner, M. W.; Witteborn, F. C.; Becklin, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of infrared astronomy in the wake of IRAS is discussed. Attention is given to an overview of next generation infrared telescope technology, with emphasis on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) which has been built to replace IRAS in the 1990s. Among the instruments to be included on SIRTF are: a wide-field high-resolution camera covering the infrared range 3-30 microns with large arrays of detectors; an imaging photometer operating in the range 3-700 microns; and a spectrograph covering the range 2.5-200 microns with resolutions of 2 and 0.1 percent. Observational missions for the SIRTF are proposed in connection with: planetary formation; star formation; cosmic energy sources; active galactic nuclei; and quasars.

  14. Infrared Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2009-02-01

    A retrospective is given on infrared sky surveys from Thomas Edison’s proposal in the late 1870s to IRAS, the first sensitive mid- to far-infrared all-sky survey, and the mid-1990s experiments that filled in the IRAS deficiencies. The emerging technology for space-based surveys is highlighted, as is the prominent role the US Defense Department, particularly the Air Force, played in developing and applying detector and cryogenic sensor advances to early mid-infrared probe-rocket and satellite-based surveys. This technology was transitioned to the infrared astronomical community in relatively short order and was essential to the success of IRAS, COBE and ISO. Mention is made of several of the little known early observational programs that were superseded by more successful efforts.

  15. Effect of atmospheric turbulence on the bit error probability of a space to ground near infrared laser communications link using binary pulse position modulation and an avalanche photodiode detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safren, H. G.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of atmospheric turbulence on the bit error rate of a space-to-ground near infrared laser communications link is investigated, for a link using binary pulse position modulation and an avalanche photodiode detector. Formulas are presented for the mean and variance of the bit error rate as a function of signal strength. Because these formulas require numerical integration, they are of limited practical use. Approximate formulas are derived which are easy to compute and sufficiently accurate for system feasibility studies, as shown by numerical comparison with the exact formulas. A very simple formula is derived for the bit error rate as a function of signal strength, which requires only the evaluation of an error function. It is shown by numerical calculations that, for realistic values of the system parameters, the increase in the bit error rate due to turbulence does not exceed about thirty percent for signal strengths of four hundred photons per bit or less. The increase in signal strength required to maintain an error rate of one in 10 million is about one or two tenths of a db.

  16. Gamma ray detector modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  17. Infrared tracker for a portable missile launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.

    1993-07-13

    An infrared beam tracker is described for arrangement to a housing that is unitary with a portable missile launcher, comprising: a rotating beam splitter positioned to intercept the infrared beam passing a first portion of the beam through the beam splitter along a first direction and reflecting the remaining portion along a different direction; a first infrared detector for receiving the beam reflected portion from the beam splitter and produce electric signals responsive thereto; a second infrared detector for receiving the beam portion that passes through the beam splitter and providing electric signals responsive thereto; and means interconnected to the first and second infrared detectors and responsive to the electric signals generated by said detectors for determining errors in missile flight direction and communicating course correction information to the missile.

  18. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  19. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  20. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  1. High-Performance LWIR Superlattice Detectors and FPA Based on CBIRD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Nguyen, Jean; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Rafol, Sir B.; Hoeglund, Linda; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John; Liao, Anna; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    We report our recent efforts on advancing of antimonide superlattice based infrared photodetectors and demonstration of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA) based on a complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. By optimizing design and growth condition we succeeded to reduce the operational bias of CBIRD single pixel detector without increase of dark current or degradation of quantum efficiency. We demonstrated a 1024x1024 pixel long-wavelength infrared focal plane array utilizing CBIRD design. An 11.5 ?m cutoff FPA without anti-reflection coating has yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 53 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. In addition, we demonstrated 320x256 format FPA based on the n-CBIRD design. The resulting FPAs yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 26 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. These results advance state-of-the art of superlattice detectors and demonstrated advantages of CBIRD architecture for realization of FPA.

  2. Microbial barriers.

    PubMed

    Gutwein, Luke G; Panigrahi, Mousumee; Schultz, Gregory S; Mast, Bruce A

    2012-07-01

    Barrier wound therapy is commonplace in the health care environment and functions to limit bacterial colonization and infection in both acute wounds and recalcitrant chronic wounds. This article reviews the nature of acute and chronic wounds and their available adjunctive barrier therapies.

  3. Compensated infrared absorption sensor for carbon dioxide and other infrared absorbing gases

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-11-29

    A gas sensor, whose chamber uses filters and choppers in either a semicircular geometry or annular geometry, and incorporates separate infrared radiation filters and optical choppers. This configuration facilitates the use of a single infrared radiation source and a single detector for infrared measurements at two wavelengths, such that measurement errors may be compensated.

  4. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  5. Sensor-trigger device for explosion barrier.

    PubMed

    Liebman, I; Duda, F; Conti, R

    1979-11-01

    A flame sensor-trigger device was developed for use with barriers to suppress coal dust explosions in undergound mines. Principal feature of the device is a dual infrared flame sensor combined with a pressure-arming element. This combination prevents false and premature triggering of the barrier. With minor modifications, the device can also be used with barriers for protection in other facilities against gas explosions and explosions involving dusts other than coal.

  6. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  7. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Esposito, E.; Lisitskyi, M. P.; Nappi, C.; Pagano, S.; Perez de Lara, D.

    2006-03-01

    Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors exploit the early stages of the energy down cascade which occur after the absorption of radiation. They operate on a short temporal scale ranging from few microseconds down to tens of picoseconds. In such a way they provide fast counting capability, high time discrimination and also, for some devices, energy sensitivity. Nonequilibrium superconducting detectors are developed for their use both in basic science and in practical applications for detection of single photons or single ionized macromolecules. In this paper we consider two devices: distributed readout imaging detectors (DROIDs) based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), which are typically used for high-speed energy spectroscopy applications, and hot-electron superconductive detectors (HESDs), which are typically used as fast counters and time discriminators. Implementation of the DROID geometry to use a single superconductor is discussed. Progress in the fabrication technology of NbN nanostructured HESDs is presented. The two detectors share the high sensitivity that makes them able to efficiently detect even single photons down to infrared energy.

  8. Image monitoring of pharmaceutical blending processes and the determination of an end point by using a portable near-infrared imaging device based on a polychromator-type near-infrared spectrometer with a high-speed and high-resolution photo diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kodai; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Genkawa, Takuma; Sugino, Hiroyuki; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-03-03

    In the present study we have developed a new version (ND-NIRs) of a polychromator-type near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with a high-resolution photo diode array detector, which we built before (D-NIRs). The new version has four 5 W halogen lamps compared with the three lamps for the older version. The new version also has a condenser lens with a shorter focal point length. The increase in the number of the lamps and the shortening of the focal point of the condenser lens realize high signal-to-noise ratio and high-speed NIR imaging measurement. By using the ND-NIRs we carried out the in-line monitoring of pharmaceutical blending and determined an end point of the blending process. Moreover, to determinate a more accurate end point, a NIR image of the blending sample was acquired by means of a portable NIR imaging device based on ND-NIRs. The imaging result has demonstrated that the mixing time of 8 min is enough for homogeneous mixing. In this way the present study has demonstrated that ND-NIRs and the imaging system based on a ND-NIRs hold considerable promise for process analysis.

  9. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  10. Ground based infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic instrumentation has been developed for ground-based measurements of astrophysical objects in the intermediate infrared. A conventional Michelson interferometer is limited for astronomical applications in the intermediate infrared by quantum noise fluctuations in the radiation form the source and/or background incident on the detector, and the multiplex advantage is no longer available. One feasible approach to recovering the multiplex advantage is post-dispersion. The infrared signal after passing through telescope and interferometer, is dispersed by a low resolution grating spectrometer onto an array of detectors. The feasibility of the post-dispersion system has been demonstrated with observations of astrophysical objects in the 5 and 10 micrometer atmospheric windows from ground-based telescopes. During FY87/88 the post-disperser was used at the Kitt Peak 4-meter telescope and McMath telescope with facility Fourier transform spectrometers. Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Venus were observed. On Jupiter, the resolution at 12 micrometer was 0.01/cm, considerably higher than had been acheived previously. The spectrum contains Jovian ethane and acetylene emission. Construction was begun on the large cryogenic grating spectrometer.

  11. Large Format Detector Arrays for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    Improvements in detector design and advances in fabrication techniques has resulted in devices which can reach fundamental sensitivity limits in many cases. Many pressing astrophysical questions require large arrays of such sensitive detectors. I will describe the state of far infrared through millimeter detector development at NASA/GSFC, the design and production of large format arrays, and the initial deployment of these powerful new tools.

  12. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Alexander; Tabbert, Bernd

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities - from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  13. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  14. Possibilities for LWIR detectors using MBE-grown Si(/Si(1-x)Ge(x) structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauenstein, Robert J.; Miles, Richard H.; Young, Mary H.

    1990-01-01

    Traditionally, long wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection in Si-based structures has involved either extrinsic Si or Si/metal Schottky barrier devices. Molecular beam epitaxially (MBE) grown Si and Si/Si(1-x)Ge(x) heterostructures offer new possibilities for LWIR detection, including sensors based on intersubband transitions as well as improved conventional devices. The improvement in doping profile control of MBE in comparison with conventional chemical vapor deposited (CVD) Si films has resulted in the successful growth of extrinsic Si:Ga, blocked impurity-band conduction detectors. These structures exhibit a highly abrupt step change in dopant profile between detecting and blocking layers which is extremely difficult or impossible to achieve through conventional epitaxial growth techniques. Through alloying Si with Ge, Schottky barrier infrared detectors are possible, with barrier height values between those involving pure Si or Ge semiconducting materials alone. For both n-type and p-type structures, strain effects can split the band edges, thereby splitting the Schottky threshold and altering the spectral response. Measurements of photoresponse of n-type Au/Si(1-x)Ge(x) Schottky barriers demonstrate this effect. For intersubband multiquntum well (MQW) LWIR detection, Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si detectors grown on Si substrates promise comparable absorption coefficients to that of the Ga(Al)As system while in addition offering the fundamental advantage of response to normally incident light as well as the practical advantage of Si-compatibility. Researchers grew Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si MQW structures aimed at sensitivity to IR in the 8 to 12 micron region and longer, guided by recent theoretical work. Preliminary measurements of n- and p-type Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si MQW structures are given.

  15. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent development at Ulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Trouilleau, C.; Crastes, A.; Fièque, B.; Legras, O.

    2005-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Firefighting, predictive maintenance, process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  16. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent developments at ULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Legras, O.; Trouilleau, C.; Crastes, A.; Fièque, B.

    2005-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Firefighting, predictive maintenance, process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  17. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent developments at Ulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Trouilleau, C.; Fieque, B.; Crastes, A.; Legras, O.

    2005-09-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Fire-fighting, predictive maintenance, process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  18. SUBMM wave superconduction hot-electron direct detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B. S.; Delaet, B.; McGrath, W. R.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we have presented a concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. Such a detector meets the needs of future space far-infrared applications and can be used for background-limited detector arrays on missions like SPIRIT, 10-m filled aperture telescope, SAFIR, and SPECS.

  19. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  20. Voltage tunable two-color infrared detection using semiconductor superlattices.

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Amlan; Choi, Kyung K.; Tsui, Daniel Chee; Reno, John Louis

    2003-08-01

    We demonstrate a voltage tunable two-color quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that consists of multiple periods of two distinct AlGaAs/GaAs superlattices separated by AlGaAs blocking barriers on one side and heavily doped GaAs layers on the other side. The detection peak switches from 9.5 {micro}m under large positive bias to 6 {micro}m under negative bias. The background-limited temperature is 55 K for 9.5 {micro}m detection and 80 K for 6 {micro}m detection. We also demonstrate that the corrugated-QWIP geometry is suitable for coupling normally incident light into the detector.