Sample records for basaltic achondrite meteorites

  1. Chips off of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Evidence for the Parent Body of Basaltic Achondrite Meteorites.

    PubMed

    Binzel, R P; Xu, S

    1993-04-09

    For more than two decades, asteroid 4 Vesta has been debated as the source for the eucrite, diogenite, and howardite classes of basaltic achondrite meteorites. Its basaltic achondrite spectral properties are unlike those of other large main-belt asteroids. Telescopic measurements have revealed 20 small (diameters meteorites. Twelve have orbits that are similar to Vesta's and were previously predicted to be dynamically associated with Vesta. Eight bridge the orbital space between Vesta and the 3:1 resonance, a proposed source region for meteorites. These asteroids are most probably multikilometer-sized fragments excavated from Vesta through one or more impacts. The sizes, ejection velocities of 500 meters per second, and proximity of these fragments to the 3:1 resonance establish Vesta as a dynamically viable source for eucrite, diogenite, and howardite meteorites.

  2. An Achondritic Micrometeorite from Antarctica: Expanding the Solar System Inventory of Basaltic Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounelle, M.; Engrand, C.; Chaussidon, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Maurette, M.

    2005-01-01

    Micrometeorites with sizes below 1 mm are collected in a diversity of environments such as deep-sea sediments and polar caps. Chemical, mineralogical and isotopic studies indicate that micrometeorites are closely related to primitive carbonaceous chondrites that amount to only approximately 2% of meteorite falls. While thousands of micrometeorites have been studied in detail, no micrometeorite has been found so far with an unambiguous achondritic composition and texture. One melted cosmic spherule has a low Fe/Mn ratio similar to that of eucrites, the most common basaltic meteorite group. Here we report on the texture, mineralogy, Rare Earth Elements (REEs) abundance and oxygen isotopic composition of the unmelted Antarctic micrometeorite 99-21-40 that has an unambiguous basaltic origin.

  3. Brachinite-Like Clast in the Kaidun Meteorite: First Report of Primitive Achondrite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higashi, K.; Hasegawa, H.; Mikouchi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Kaidun is a brecciated meteorite containing many different types of meteorites. It is composed of carbonaceous, enstatite, ordinary and R chondrites with smaller amounts of basaltic achondrites, impact melt products and unknown [1, 2]. Because of the multiple components and high abundance of carbonaceous chondrites, the Kaidun parent body was probably a large C-type asteroid in order to have accumulated clasts of many unrelated asteroids, and thus Kaidun contains previously unknown materials[1]. It has been suggested that the Kaidun parent body trawled through different regions of the solar system [3], but the formation of Kaidun meteorite is still uncertain. In this abstract, we report the first discovery of a brachinite-like clast in Kaidun.

  4. Aioun el Atrouss - Evidence for thermal recrystallization of a eurite breccia. [meteoritic mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    The Aioun el Atrouss meteorite is a breccia consisting largely of angular fragments of green orthopyroxene and containing scattered clasts of basaltic composition (mostly pigeonite and calcic plagioclase). It appears to be a physical mixture of two meteorite types - diogenite (hypersthene achondrite) and eucrite (basaltic achondrite). The results of a mineral analysis are tabulated, and typical pyroxene compositions in orthopyroxene (diogenite), subophitic and granoblastic portions of the meteorite are presented.

  5. Serra Pelada: the first Amazonian Meteorite fall is a Eucrite (basalt) from Asteroid 4-Vesta.

    PubMed

    Zucolotto, Maria Elizabeth; Tosi, Amanda A; Villaça, Caio V N; Moutinho, André L R; Andrade, Diana P P; Faulstich, Fabiano; Gomes, Angelo M S; Rios, Debora C; Rocha, Marcilio C

    2018-01-01

    Serra Pelada is the newest Brazilian eucrite and the first recovered fall from Amazonia (State of Pará, Brazil, June 29th 2017). In this paper, we report on its petrography, chemistry, mineralogy and its magnetic properties. Study of four thin sections reveals that the meteorite is brecciated, containing basaltic and gabbroic clasts, as well of recrystallized impact melt, embedded into a fine-medium grained matrix. Chemical analyses suggest that Serra Pelada is a monomict basaltic eucritic breccia, and that the meteorite is a normal member of the HED suite. Our results provide additional geological and compositional information on the lithological diversity of its parent body. The mineralogy of Serra Pelada consists basically of low-Ca pyroxene and high-Ca plagioclase with accessory minerals such as quartz, sulphide (troilite), chromite - ulvöspinel and ilmenite. These data are consistent with the meteorite being an eucrite, a basaltic achondrite and a member of the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) clan of meteorites which most likely are from the crust asteroid 4 Vesta.

  6. Compositions of Normal and Anomalous Eucrite-Type Mafic Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common asteroidal igneous meteorites are eucrite-type mafic achondrites - basalts and gabbros composed of ferroan pigeonite, ferroan augite, calcic plagioclase, silica, ilmenite, troilite, Ca-phosphate, chromite and Fe-metal. These rocks are thought to have formed on a single asteroid along with howardites and diogenites. However, high precision O-isotopic analyses have shown that some mafic achondrites have small, well-resolved, non-mass-dependent differences that have been interpreted as indicating derivation from different asteroids. Some of these O-anomalous mafic achondrites also have anomalous petrologic characteristics, strengthening the case that they hail from distinct parent asteroids. We present the results of bulk compositional studies of a suite of normal and anomalous eucrite-type basalts and cumulate gabbros.

  7. Relationships among basaltic lunar meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1991-01-01

    During the past two years four meteorites of dominantly mare basalt composition were identified in the Japanese and US Antarctic collections. Basalts represent a much higher proportion of the lunar meteorites than is expected from photogeologic mapping of mare and highland regions. Also, the basaltic lunar meteorites are all described as VLT mare basalt, which is a relatively uncommon type among returned lunar samples. The significance of the basaltic meteorites to the understanding of the lunar crust depends on the evaluation of possible relationships among the individual meteorites. None of the specimens are paired meteorites. They differ from each other in petrography and composition. It is important to determine whether they might be paired ejecta which were ejected from the same mare region by the same impact. The question of paired ejecta must be addressed using a combination of exposure histories and petrographic/compositional characteristics. It is possible that the basaltic lunar meteorites are paired ejecta from the same region of the Moon. However, the relationships among them are more complicated than the basaltic breccias being simply brecciated mare gabbros.

  8. Relationships Between HED's, Mesosiderites, and Ungrouped Achondrites: Trace Element Analyses of Mesosiderite RKPA 79015 and Ungrouped Achondrite QUE 93148

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, M.; Lapen, T.; Righter, K.

    2008-01-01

    Achondritic meteorites are a diverse group of meteorites that formed by igneous activity in asteroids. These meteorites can provide important information about early differentiation processes on asteroidal bodies. The howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) meteorites, the largest group of achondrites, are the only group of meteorites for which a potential parent body has been identified (4 Vesta) [e.g., 1]. Mesosiderites are stony-iron meteorites composed of roughly equal amounts of metal and silicates and silicates are broadly similar to HED meteorites [2]. They may have been formed by impact-mixing of crustal and core materials of differentiated meteorite parent bodies. Chemical and oxygen isotopic compositional data suggest that the HED meteorites and silicate portions of mesosiderites originated on the same or closely related parent bodies. Pallasites and IIIAB irons also have similar oxygen isotope compositions and have been thought to be related to the HEDs [3,4]. However, recent high resolution analyses have shown that pallasites and HED's have different oxygen isotopic values, but mesosiderites and HED s have the same isotope compositions implying a close connection [5]. QUE 93148 is a small (1.1g) olivine-rich (mg 86) achondrite that contains variable amounts of orthopyroxenene (mg 87) and kamacite (6.7 wt% Ni), with minor augite [6]. This meteorite was originally classified as a lodranite [7], but it s oxygen isotopic composition precludes a genetic relationship to the acapulcoites and lodranites. And also this meteorite has a lower Mn/Mg ratio than any major group of primitive or evolved achondrites and suggested that QUE 93148 may be a piece of the deep mantle of the HED parent body [6]. To better understand the relationship between HED s, mesosiderites and related achondrites, we have measured trace elements in the individual metallic and silicate phases. In this study, abundances of a suite of elements were measured for the unusual mesosiderite RKPA 79015

  9. A Classification Table for Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chennaoui-Aoudjehane, H.; Larouci, N.; Jambon, A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Classifying chondrites is relatively easy and the criteria are well documented. It is based on mineral compositions, textural characteristics and more recently, magnetic susceptibility. It can be more difficult to classify achondrites, especially those that are very similar to terrestrial igneous rocks, because mineralogical, textural and compositional properties can be quite variable. Achondrites contain essentially olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclases, oxides, sulphides and accessory minerals. Their origin is attributed to differentiated parents bodies: large asteroids (Vesta); planets (Mars); a satellite (the Moon); and numerous asteroids of unknown size. In most cases, achondrites are not eye witnessed falls and some do not have fusion crust. Because of the mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility similarity with terrestrial igneous rocks for some achondrites, it can be difficult for classifiers to confirm their extra-terrestrial origin. We -as classifiers of meteorites- are confronted with this problem with every suspected achondrite we receive for identification. We are developing a "grid" of classification to provide an easier approach for initial classification. We use simple but reproducible criteria based on mineralogical, petrological and geochemical studies. We presented the classes: acapulcoites, lodranites, winonaites and Martian meteorites (shergottite, chassignites, nakhlites). In this work we are completing the classification table by including the groups: angrites, aubrites, brachinites, ureilites, HED (howardites, eucrites, and diogenites), lunar meteorites, pallasites and mesosiderites. Iron meteorites are not presented in this abstract.

  10. Trace element distributions in primitive achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Andrew M.; Prinz, Martin; Weisberg, Michael K.

    1993-01-01

    The primitive achondrites have approximately chondritic bulk chemical composition but achondritic textures. Clayton et al. show that nine of these meteorites, the acapulcoites and the lodranites, have similar oxygen isotopic compositions. The acapulcoites appear to be highly metamorphosed, but undifferentiated meteorites of chondritic composition; whereas, the lodranites appear to have lost a feldspathic partial melt. In order to learn more about metamorphic processes and partial melt removal, we have measured the trace element compositions of constituent phases of a number of primitive achondrites by ion microprobe. We have analyzed two acapulcoites, Acapulco and ALH81261 (paired with ALH77081), and three londranites, Lodran, LEW88280, and MAC88177. In addition, we analyzed LEW88663, which has the bulk composition, mineral chemistry, and oxygen isotopic composition of L-chondrites, but is metal-free and has an achondrite texture; and Divnoe, a plagioclase-poor, olivine-rich primitive achondrite with an oxygen isotopic composition similar to that of the group IAB iron meteorites. These meteorites show a variety of REE patterns in their constituent phases, and there are consistent differences between acapulcoites and lodranites that are consistent with removal of a LREE- and Eu-enriched melt that is apparently responsible for the low plagioclase content of lodranites.

  11. Studies of Brazilian meteorites. III - Origin and history of the Angra dos Reis achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Hlava, P. F.; Berkley, J. L.; Gomes, C. B.; Curvello, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    The mineral composition of the Angra dos Reis meteorite, which fell in 1869, is described. This achondrite contains phases reported in a meteorite for the first time. Petrofabric analysis shows that fassaite has a preferred orientation and lineation, which is interpreted as being due to cumulus processes, possibly the effect of post-depositional magmatic current flow or laminar flow of a crystalline mush. The mineral chemistry indicates crystallization from a highly silica-undersaturated melt at low pressure. Several aspects of the mineral composition are discussed with reference to the implications of crystallization conditions.

  12. Finding the Parent Body of Anomalous Achondrite NWA 6704 Among V-type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Reddy, Vishnu; Le Corre, Lucille; Cloutis, Edward

    2017-10-01

    North West Africa (NWA) 6704 is an unusual, ungrouped basaltic achondrite meteorite that has a striking greenish-yellow color on the inside, and that is also relatively unaltered and un-shocked. The meteorite is coarse-grained with grain sizes around1.5 millimeters, which is highly suggestive of a slow-cooling geologic environment. The meteorite is mostly composed of orthopyroxene (~70%), with a less abundant olivine fraction (~16%), as well as feldspar (~13%). We obtained laboratory spectra of NWA 6704 as chips and <150-micron samples for analysis with XRD and Ramen spectroscopy. Asteroid (4) Vesta has been proposed to be the parent body of the largest basaltic achondrite clan, the HED meteorites. However, NWA 6704 has an 0.625 micrometer absorption band feature attributed to Ni3+ in olivine that has not been detected on Vesta. We plotted the Band I center and Band Area Ratio (BAR) for this meteorite and it plots in the region between S(V) and S(VI) subtype. The S(V) subtype shows strong variations in olivine-feldspar ratios, and becomes difficult to distinguish with large amounts of metal phases. The S(VI) type describes mineralogy that is consistent with olivine-metal assemblage, with a minor pyroxene component. Both of these subtypes are indicative with bodies that have experienced some component of partial differentiation. NWA 6704 could be one of the oldest rocks in the solar system, as multiple distinguished thermal events are revealed through U-Pb dating as well as Ar-Ar dating at ~4.52 Ga and at ~2.67 Ga. We also compared the spectral band parameters of NWA 6704 with V-type asteroids from the literature. Based on this comparison, the best match is an outer main belt V-type asteroid that suffered a catastrophic collision very early on in the Solar System history.

  13. A model composition for Mars derived from the oxygen isotopic ratios of martian/SNC meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaney, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen is the most abundant element in most meteorites, yet the ratios of its isotopes are seldom used to constrain the compositional history of achondrites. The two major achondrite groups have O isotope signatures that differ from any plausible chondritic precursors and lie between the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite domains. If the assumption is made that the present global sampling of chondritic meteorites reflects the variability of O reservoirs at the time of planetessimal/planet aggregation in the early nebula, then the O in these groups must reflect mixing between known chondritic reservoirs. This approach, in combination with constraints based on Fe-Mn-Mg systematics, has been used previously to model the composition of the basaltic achondrite parent body (BAP) and provides a model precursor composition that is generally consistent with previous eucrite parent body (EPB) estimates. The same approach is applied to Mars exploiting the assumption that the SNC and related meteorites sample the martian lithosphere. Model planet and planetesimal compositions can be derived by mixing of known chondritic components using O isotope ratios as the fundamental compositional constraint. The major- and minor-element composition for Mars derived here and that derived previously for the basaltic achondrite parent body are, in many respects, compatible with model compositions generated using completely independent constraints. The role of volatile elements and alkalis in particular remains a major difficulty in applying such models.

  14. Vestas Pinaria Region: Original Basaltic Achondrite Material Derived from Mixing Upper and Lower Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, L. A.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Ammannito, Eleonora; Frigeri, Alessandro; Stephan, Katrin; Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; Krohn, Katrin; hide

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Dawn mission shows that the Pinaria region of Vesta spanning a portion of the rim of the Rheasilvia basin is bright and anhydrous. Reflectance spectra, absorption band centers, and their variations, cover the range of pyroxenes from diogenite-rich to howardite and eucrite compositions, with no evidence of olivine in this region. By examining band centers and depths of the floor, walls and rims of six major craters in the region, we find a lane of diogenite-rich material next to howardite-eucrite material that does not follow the local topography. The source of this material is not clear and is probably ejecta from post-Rheasilvia impacts. Material of a howardite-eucrite composition originating from beyond the Rheasilvia basin is evident on the western edge of the region. Overall, the Pinaria region exposes the complete range of basaltic achondrite parent body material, with little evidence of contamination of non-basaltic achondrite material. With both high reflectance and low abundance of hydrated material, this region of Vesta may be considered the "Pinaria desert".

  15. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Audrey; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grossman, Jeffrey; Metzler, Knut

    2017-11-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin 105 contains 2666 meteorites including 12 falls (Aouinet Legraa, Banma, Buritizal, Ejby, Kamargaon, Moshampa, Mount Blanco, Murrili, Osceola, Sariçiçek, Sidi Ali Ou Azza, Stubenberg), with 2244 ordinary chondrites, 142 HED achondrites, 116 carbonaceous chondrites, 37 Lunar meteorites, 20 enstatite chondrites, 20 iron meteorites, 20 ureilites, 19 Martian meteorites, 12 Rumuruti chondrites, 10 primitive achondrites, 9 mesosiderites, 5 angrites, 4 pallasites, 4 ungrouped achondrites, 2 ungrouped chondrites, 1 enstatite achondrite, and 1 relict meteorite, and with 1545 from Antarctica, 686 from Africa, 245 from Asia, 147 from South America, 22 from North America, 14 from Europe, 5 from Oceania, 1 from unknown origin. Note: 5 meteorites from Russia were counted as European. It also includes a list of approved new Dense Collection Areas and a nomenclature of the Aletai (IIIE-an) iron meteorites from Xinjiang, China.

  16. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Grossman, Jeffrey; Bouvier, Audrey; Agee, Carl B.

    2017-05-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin 103 contains 2582 meteorites including 10 falls (Ardón, Demsa, Jinju, Križevci, Kuresoi, Novato, Tinajdad, Tirhert, Vicência, Wolcott), with 2174 ordinary chondrites, 130 HED achondrites, 113 carbonaceous chondrites, 41 ureilites, 27 lunar meteorites, 24 enstatite chondrites, 21 iron meteorites, 15 primitive achondrites, 11 mesosiderites, 10 Martian meteorites, 6 Rumuruti chondrites, 5 ungrouped achondrites, 2 enstatite achondrites, 1 relict meteorite, 1 pallasite, and 1 angrite, and with 1511 from Antarctica, 588 from Africa, 361 from Asia, 86 from South America, 28 from North America, and 6 from Europe. Note: 1 meteorite from Russia was counted as European. The complete contents of this bulletin (244 pages) are available on line. Information about approved meteorites can be obtained from the Meteoritical Bulletin Database (MBD) available on line at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/.

  17. AR-39Ar-40 dating of basalts and rock breccias from Apollo 17 and the malvern achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsten, T.; Horn, P.

    1977-01-01

    The principles and the potential of the Ar-39/Ar-40 dating technique are illustrated by means of results obtained for 12 Apollo 17 rocks. Emphasis is given to methodical problems and the geological interpretation of lunar rock ages. Often it is ambigious to associate a given lunar breccia with a certain formation, or a formation with a basin. In addition, large-scale events on the Moon have not necessarily reset radiometric clocks completely. One rock fragment has a well-defined plateau age of 4.28 b.y., but the ages of two Apollo 17 breccias define an upper limit for the formation age of the Serenitatis basin at 4.05 b.y. Ages derived from five mare basalts indicate cessation of mare volcanism at Taurus-Littrow approximately 3.78 b.y. ago. Ca/Ar-37 exposure ages show that Camelot Crater was formed by an impact approximately 95 m.y. ago. After a short summary of the lunar timetable as it stands at the end of the Apollo program, we report about Ar-39/Ar-40 and rare gas studies on the Malvern meteorite. This achondrite resembles lunar highland breccias in texture as well as in rare-gas patterns. It was strongly annealed at some time between 3.4 and 3.8 b.y. ago. The results indicate that very similar processes have occurred on the Moon and on achondritic parent bodies at comparable times, leading to impact breccias with strikingly similar features, including the retention of rare-gas isotopes from various sources.

  18. Workshop on Oxygen in Asteroids and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Constraints on the detection of solar nebula's oxidation state through asteroid observation. Oxidation/Reduction Processes in Primitive Achondrites. Low-Temperature Chemical Processing on Asteroids. On the Formation Location of Asteroids and Meteorites. The Spectral Properties of Angritic Basalts. Correlation Between Chemical and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions in Chondrites. Effect of In-Situ Aqueous Alteration on Thermal Model Heat Budgets. Oxidation-Reduction in Meteorites: The Case of High-Ni Irons. Ureilite Atmospherics: Coming up for Air on a Parent Body. High Temperature Effects Including Oxygen Fugacity, in Pre-Planetary and Planetary Meteorites and Asteroids. Oxygen Isotopic Variation of Asteroidal Materials. High-Temperature Chemical Processing on Asteroids: An Oxygen Isotope Perspective. Oxygen Isotopes and Origin of Opaque Assemblages from the Ningqiang Carbonaceous Chondrite. Water Distribution in the Asteroid Belt. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: V Systematics in Planetary Pyroxenes and fo 2 Estimates for Basalts from Vesta.

  19. Asteroidal Differentiation - The Record in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Early in solar system history, an intense energy source modified the small rocky bodies that had accreted from nebular condensates. The consensus view is that this energy source was the decay of short-lived 26Al, perhaps with a contribution from short-lived 60Fe. Differentiated meteorites and primitive achondrites preserve records of the states of asteroids as differentiation was ending. Reading these records provides clues to the nature of the energy source and the mechanisms of differentiation. I will examine the records from the acapulcoite-lordanite clan, ureilites, main-group pallasites, magmatic iron meteorite groups, brachinites and howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) clan meteorites. The acapulcoite-lodranite clan and the ureilites contain evidence that their parent asteroids reached temperatures where basaltic melts were produced. The mineralogies of lodranites and ureilites are dominantly olivine and low-Ca pyroxene, and these meteorites are highly depleted in incompatible lithophile elements. The acapulcoite-lodranite and ureilite parent bodies were heated to the point where on the order of 20-30% melting had taken place, but there is no evidence for more extensive melting. Assuming a 26Al energy source, the implication is that transport of the Al-rich basalt out of the mantle outpaced radiogenic heating, and thus shut down further differentiation. Main-group pallasites, magmatic iron meteorites and HED clan meteorites, on the other hand, provide evidence for total or near total melting of asteroids. The silicate phase of pallasites is magnesian olivine; their minor and trace element contents suggest that they are refractory melting residues. The degree of melting was high, perhaps on the order of 80%. The compositions of the most Ir-rich magmatic irons suggest near total melting of the metallic phase, and thus high degrees of melting on their parent asteroids. The compositions of basaltic eucrites are most consistent with them being residues from the

  20. Thermoluminescence characteristics of a chondrite (Holbrook) and an aubrite achondrite (Norton County) meteorites.

    PubMed

    Bossin, Lily; Kazakis, Nikolaos A; Kitis, George; Tsirliganis, Nestor C

    2017-09-01

    The present study constitutes the first part of a meteorite project, currently in progress, towards the full and thorough dosimetric study (TL and OSL) of two different meteorites of recent fall, Norton County and Holbrook. Both meteorites exhibit strong TL sensitivity, linear dose response and no saturation for doses up to 2kGy. However, the two meteorites exhibited a very dissimilar TL glow curve and behaviour regarding sensitization and fading. Notably, the Norton County aubrite achondrite was found to exhibit a strong fading of the high-temperature peak (~300°C), attributed to anomalous fading, whereas Holbrook did not seem to show signs of anomalous fading. Since quantitative conclusions regarding the thermal and irradiation history of meteorites, require knowledge of the detailed peak structure of the glow curve and deeper understanding of the trapping mechanism, the glow curves, after irradiation in the range 10-2000Gy, were deconvoluted using general order kinetics. The fitting parameters extracted point towards complex non-strictly first order mechanisms with a multitude of traps acting very differently. All the above, combined with future OSL measurements, currently in progress, are expected to shed light on the nature of the involved traps in both phenomena (energy depth, light-resistance etc), which would allow to extract more concrete conclusions about their history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 100, 2014 June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Grossman, Jeffrey N.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin 100 contains 1943 meteorites including 8 falls (Boumdeid [2011], Huaxi, Košice, Silistra, Sołtmany, Sutter's Mill, Thika, Tissint), with 1575 ordinary chondrites, 139 carbonaceous chondrites, 96 HED achondrites, 25 ureilites, 18 primitive achondrites, 17 iron meteorites, 15 enstatite chondrites, 11 lunar meteorites, 10 mesosiderites, 10 ungrouped achondrites, 8 pallasites, 8 Martian meteorites, 6 Rumuruti chondrites, 3 enstatite achondrites, and 2 angrites, and with 937 from Antarctica, 592 from Africa, 230 from Asia, 95 from South America, 44 from North America, 36 from Oceania, 6 from Europe, and 1 from an unknown location. This will be the last Bulletin published in the current format. Information about approved meteorites can be obtained from the Meteoritical Bulletin Database (MBD) available online at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/

  2. Lunar basalt meteorite EET 87521: Petrology of the clast population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenova, A. S.; Nazarov, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Elephant Moraine meteorite EET 87521 was classified as a lunar mare basalt breccia which is composed mainly of VLT basalt clasts. Here we report on our petrological study of lithic clasts and monomineralic fragments in the thin sections EET 87521,54 and EET 87521,47,1, which were prepared from the meteorite. The results of the study show that EET 87521 consists mainly of Al-rich ferrobasalt clasts and olivine pyroxenite clasts. The bulk composition of the meteorite can be well modelled by the mixing of these lithic components which appear to be differentiates of the Luna 25 basalt melt. KREEP and Mg-rich gabbro components are minor constituents of EET 87521.

  3. Bunburra Rockhole: Exploring the Geology of a New Differentiated Basaltic Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedix, G.K.; Bland, P. A.; Friedrich, J. M.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Sanborn, M. E.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Greenwood, R. C; Franchi, L. A.; Bevan, A. W. R.; Towner, M. C.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Bunburra Rockhole (BR) is the first recovered meteorite of the Desert Fireball Network. It was initially classified as a basaltic eucrite, based on texture, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry but subsequent O isotopic analyses showed that BR's composition lies significantly far away from the HED group of meteorites. This suggested that BR was not a piece of the HED parent body (4 Vesta), but other explanations could also account for the observed oxygen signatures. Possible scenarios include contamination by components from other bodies (chondrites or other achondrites) or that 4 Vesta may not be as equilibrated as hypothesized. After examining multiple pieces with different instruments (CT scans and x-ray maps), no obvious evidence of contamination was found. If BR is not from Vesta, a conundrum exists as no unusual features were found in mineral and bulk trace element chemistry as exist for other anomalous basaltic achondrites such as Ibitira or Asuka 881394. These meteorites have distinct petrological and geochemical characteristics, in addition to their anomalous O isotope compositions, that set them apart from eucrites. Thus, early results provided a somewhat ambiguous picture of BR's petrogenesis and parentage. To clarify the nature of the relationship, if any, between BR and eucrites, we have performed a correlated stable isotope and bulk chemical study of several lithologic fragments.

  4. An anomalous basaltic meteorite from the innermost main belt.

    PubMed

    Bland, Philip A; Spurny, Pavel; Towner, Martin C; Bevan, Alex W R; Singleton, Andrew T; Bottke, William F; Greenwood, Richard C; Chesley, Steven R; Shrbeny, Lukas; Borovicka, Jiri; Ceplecha, Zdenek; McClafferty, Terence P; Vaughan, David; Benedix, Gretchen K; Deacon, Geoff; Howard, Kieren T; Franchi, Ian A; Hough, Robert M

    2009-09-18

    Triangulated observations of fireballs allow us to determine orbits and fall positions for meteorites. The great majority of basaltic meteorites are derived from the asteroid 4 Vesta. We report on a recent fall that has orbital properties and an oxygen isotope composition that suggest a distinct parent body. Although its orbit was almost entirely contained within Earth's orbit, modeling indicates that it originated from the innermost main belt. Because the meteorite parent body would likely be classified as a V-type asteroid, V-type precursors for basaltic meteorites unrelated to Vesta may reside in the inner main belt. This starting location is in agreement with predictions of a planetesimal evolution model that postulates the formation of differentiated asteroids in the terrestrial planet region, with surviving fragments concentrated in the innermost main belt.

  5. Mineralogy, Petrology and Oxygen Fugacity of the LaPaz Icefield Lunar Basaltic Meteorites and the Origin of Evolved Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. J.; Righter, K.; Brandon, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    LAP 02205 is a 1.2 kg lunar mare basalt meteorite found in the Lap Paz ice field of Antarctica in 2002 [1]. Four similar meteorites were also found within the same region [1] and all five have a combined mass of 1.9 kg (LAP 02224, LAP 02226, LAP 02436 and LAP 03632, hereafter called the LAP meteorites). The LAP meteorites all contain a similar texture, mineral assemblage, and composition. A lunar origin for these samples comes from O isotopic data for LAP 02205 [1], Fe/Mn ratios of pyroxenes [1-5], and the presence of distinct lunar mineralogy such as Fe metal and baddeleyite. The LAP meteorites may represent an area of the Moon, which has never been sampled by Apollo missions, or by other lunar meteorites. The data from this study will be used to compare the LAP meteorites to Apollo mare basalts and lunar basaltic meteorites, and will ultimately help to constrain their origin.

  6. Dynamic crystallization of a eucrite basalt. [achondrite textural features produced by superheating and differing cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Powell, M. A.; Hays, J. F.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The textural features produced in Stannern, a non-porpyritic representative of the eucrite basaltic achondrite class of meteorite, at differing cooling rates and various degrees of initial superheating were studied. Textures produced from mildly superheated melts were found to be fasciculate rather than porphyritic as the result of the cosaturated bulk chemistry of Stannern. The qualitative type of texture apparently depends mainly on the degree of initial superheating, whereas cooling rate exerts a strong influence on the coarseness of texture. Increasing the degree of superheating produces textures from intergranular/subophitic to fasciculate/porphyritic. With initial superheating to 1200 deg C the transition to quasi-porphyritic is controlled by cooling rate, but the development of phenocrysts is merely an overprint on the fasciculate background texture of the groundmass. The suppression of fasciculate texture is completed by a decrease of the degree of initial superheating below the plagioclast entry and suppression of quasi-porphyritic texture is completed by decrease of the degree of initial superheating below pyroxene entry; these qualitative changes do not seem to be produced by changes of cooling rate. A grain size/cooling rate dependence has been used to deduce the cooling rate of fasciculate-textured Stannern clasts (10.1 to 100 deg C/hr).

  7. K/TH in Achondrites and Interpretation of Grand Data for the Dawn Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    The Dawn mission will explore 4 Vesta [1], a highly differentiated asteroid believed to be the parent body of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorite suite [e.g. 2]. The Dawn spacecraft is equipped with a gamma-ray and neutron detector (GRaND), which will enable measurement and mapping of elemental abundances on Vesta s surface [3]. Drawing on HED geochemistry, Usui and McSween [4] proposed a linear mixing model for interpretation of GRaND data. However, the HED suite is not the only achondrite suite representing asteroidal basaltic crusts; others include the mesosiderites, angrites, NWA 011, and possibly Ibitira, each of which is thought to have a distinct parental asteroid [5]. Here we critically examine the variability of GRaND-analyzed elements, K and Th, in HED meteorites, and propose a method based on the K-Th systematics to distinguish between HED and the other differentiated achondrites. Maps of these elements might also recognize incompatible element enriched areas such as mapped locally on the Moon (KREEP) [6], and variations in K/Th ratios might indicate impact volatilization of K. We also propose a new mixing model using elements that will be most reliably measured by GRaND, including K.

  8. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk for Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foxworth, Suzanne; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Allen, J.; Kascak, A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has the unique responsibility to curate NASA's extraterrestrial samples from past and future missions. Curation includes documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach. Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kilograms of lunar rocks, core and regolith samples, from the lunar surface. JSC also curates meteorites collected from a US cooperative effort among NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Smithsonian Institution that funds expeditions to Antarctica. The meteorites that are collected include rocks from Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta. The sample disks for educational use include these different samples. Active relevant learning has always been important to teachers and the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program provides this active style of learning for students and the general public. The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks permit students to conduct investigations comparable to actual scientists. The Lunar Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Basalt, Breccia, Highland Regolith, Anorthosite, Mare Regolith and Orange Soil. The Meteorite Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Chondrite L3, Chondrite H5, Carbonaceous Chondrite, Basaltic Achondrite, Iron and Stony-Iron. Teachers are given different activities that adhere to their standards with the disks. During a Sample Disk Certification Workshop, teachers participate in the activities as students gain insight into the history, formation and geologic processes of the moon, asteroids and meteorites.

  9. Pigeonholing planetary meteorites: The lessons of misclassification of EET87521 and ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    The last few years have provided two noteworthy examples of misclassifications of achondritic meteorites because the samples were new kinds of meteorites from planetary rather than asteroidal parent bodies. Basaltic lunar meteorite EET87521 was misclassified as a eucrite and SNC (martian) orthopyroxenite ALH84001 was misclassified as a diogenite. In classifying meteorites we find what we expect: we pigeonhole meteorites into known categories most of which were derived from the more common asteroidal meteorites. But the examples of EET8752 and ALH84001 remind us that planets are more complex than asteroids and exhibit a wider variety of rock types. We should expect variety in planetary meteorites and we need to know how to recognize them when we have them. Our intent here is to show that our asteroidal perspective is inappropriate for planetary meteorites.

  10. Comparison of lunar rocks and meteorites: Implications to histories of the moon and parent meteorite bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Fodor, R. V.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    There are many similarities between lunar samples and stone meteorites. Lunar samples, especially from the highlands, indicate that they have been affected by complex and repeated impact processes. Similar complex and repeated impact processes have also been operative on the achondritic and chondritic meteorites. Similarities between lunar and meteoritic rocks are discussed as follows: (1) Monomict and polymict breccias occur in lunar rocks, as well as in achondritic and chondritic meteorites, having resulted from complex and repeated impact processes; (2) Chondrules are present in lunar meteorites, as well as in a few achondritic and most chondritic meteorites. They apparently crystallized spontaneously from molten highly supercooled droplets which may have formed from impact melts or, perhaps, volcanic processes (as well as from the solar nebula, in the case of meteoritic chondrites); (3) Lithic fragments vary from little modified (relative to the apparent original texture) to partly or completely melted and recrystallized lithic fragments. Their detailed study allows conclusions to be drawn about their parent rock types and their origin, thereby gaining insight into preimpact histories of lunar and meteoritic breccias. There is evidence that cumulate rocks were involved in the early history of both moon and parent meteorite bodies.

  11. In Situ Determination of Siderophile Trace Elements in Metals and Sulfides in Enstatite Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanAcken, D.; Humayun, M.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A.

    2010-01-01

    Enstatite meteorites are identified by their extremely reduced mineralogy (1) and similar oxygen isotope composition (2). The enstatite meteorite clan incorporates both EH and EL chondrites, as well as a wide variety of enstatite achondrites, such as aubrites or anomalous enstatite meteorites (e.g. Mt. Egerton, Shallowater, Zaklodzie, NWA 2526). The role of nebular versus planetary processes in the formation of enstatite meteorites is still under debate (e.g. 3-5). Past studies showed a significant influence of metal segregation in the formation of enstatite achondrites. Casanova et al. (6) suggested incomplete metal-silicate segregation during core formation and attributed the unfractionated siderophile element patterns in aubrites metals to a lack of fractional crystallization in a planetary core. Recent studies suggest a significant role of impact melting in the formation of primitive enstatite chondrites (7) and identified NWA 2526 as a partial melt residue of an enstatite chondrite (8). To understand the nature of siderophile element-bearing phases in enstatite achondrites, establish links between enstatite achondrites and enstatite chondrites (9), and constrain planetary differentiation on their respective parent bodies and their petrogenetic histories, we present laser ablation ICP-MS measurements of metal and sulfide phases in Shallowater, Mt. Egerton, and the aubrites Aubres, Cumberland Falls, and Mayo Belwa.

  12. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Sara S.; Zipfel, Jutta; Grossman, Jeffrey N.; Grady, Monica M.

    2002-07-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin No. 86 lists information for 11 54 newly classified meteorites, comprising 661 from Antarctica, 218 from Africa, 207 from Asia (203 of which are from Oman), 62 from North America, 3 from South America, and 3 from Europe. Information is provided for 5 falls (El Idrissia, Undulung, Dashoguz, El Tigre, and Yafa). Noteworthy specimens include 7 martian meteorites (Dhofar 378, Grove Mountains 99027, Northwest Africa 856, 1068, and 1110, and Sayh al Uhaymir 060 and 090); 4 lunar meteorites (Dhofar 301, 302, 303, and 489); 9 new iron meteorites; a mesosiderite (Northwest Africa 1242); an ungrouped stony-iron meteorite (Dar al Gani 962); and a wide variety of other interesting stony meteorites, including CH, CK, CM, CR, CV, R, enstatite, unequilibrated ordinary, and ungrouped chondrites, primitive achondrites, howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) achondrites, and ureilites.

  13. Consortium reports on lunar meteorites Yamato 793169 and Asuka 881757, a new type of mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, Keizo; Takeda, Hiroshi; Lindstrom, M. M.; Tatsumoto, M.; Torigoe, N.; Misawa, K.; Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.; Koeberl, C.; Kojima, H.

    1993-01-01

    Consortium studies on lunar meteorites Yamato 793169 and Asuka 881757 (formerly Asuka-31) were performed to characterize these new samples from unknown locations in the lunar mare. Both meteorites are coarse-grained mare rocks having low Mg/Fe ratios (bulk mg'=30-35) and low TiO2 (1.5-2.5 percent in homogenized bulk samples). They are intermediate between VLT and low-Ti mare basalts. Although these meteorites are not identical to each other, their mineral and bulk compositions, isotopic systematics, and crystallization ages are remarkably similar and distinct from those of all other mare basalts. They appear to represent a new type of low-Ti mare basalt that crystallized at about 3.9Ga. These meteorites are inconsistent with the canonical correlation between the TiO2 contents and ages of mare basalts and suggest that our knowledge of lunar volcanism is far from complete.

  14. Paleomagnetism of a primitive achondrite parent body: The acapulcoite-lodranites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; Weiss, B. P.; Andrade Lima, E.; Fu, R. R.; Uehara, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Wang, H.; Suavet, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Primitive achondrites are a recently recognized meteorite grouping with textures and compositions intermediate between unmelted meteorites (chondrites) and igneous meteorites (achondrites). Their existence demonstrates prima facie that some planetesimals only experienced partial rather than complete melting. We present the first paleomagnetic measurements of acapulcoite-lodranite meteorites to determine the existence and intensity of ancient magnetic fields on their parent body. Our paleomagnetic study tests the hypothesis that their parent body had an advecting metallic core, with the goal of providing one of the first geophysical constraints on its large-scale structure and the extent of interior differentiation. In particular, by analyzing samples whose petrologic textures require an origin on a partially differentiated body, we will be able to critically test a recent proposal that some achondrites and chondrite groups could have originated on a single body (Weiss and Elkins-Tanton 2013). We analyzed samples of the meteorites Acapulco and Lodran. Like other acapulcoites and lodranites, these meteorites are granular rocks containing large (~0.1-0.3 mm) kamacite and taenite grains along with similarly sized silicate crystals. Many silicate grains contain numerous fine (1-10 μm) FeNi metal inclusions. Our compositional measurements and rock magnetic data suggest that tetrataenite is rare or absent. Bulk paleomagnetic measurements were done on four mutually oriented bulk samples of Acapulco and one bulk sample of Lodran. Alternating field (AF) demagnetization revealed that the magnetization of the bulk samples is highly unstable, likely due to the large (~0.1-0.3 mm) interstitial kamacite grains throughout the samples. To overcome this challenge, we are analyzing individual ~0.2 mm mutually oriented silicate grains extracted using a wire saw micromill. Preliminary SQUID microscopy measurements of a Lodran silicate grain suggest magnetization stable to AF levels of

  15. Samples from Differentiated Asteroids; Regolithic Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin J. S.; Ross, A. J.; Cartwright, J. A.; Ross, D. K.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Jenniskens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiated and partially differentiated asteroids preserve a glimpse of planet formation frozen in time from the early solar system and thus are attractive targets for future exploration. Samples of such asteroids arrive to Earth in the form of achondrite meteorites. Many achondrites, particularly those thought to be most representative of asteroidal regolith, contain a diverse assortment of materials both indigenous and exogenous to the original igneous parent body intermixed at microscopic scales. Remote sensing spacecraft and landers would have difficulty deciphering individual components at these spatial scales, potentially leading to confusing results. Sample return would thus be much more informative than a robotic probe. In this and a companion abstract [1] we consider two regolithic achondrite types, howardites and (polymict) ureilites, in order to evaluate what materials might occur in samples returned from surfaces of differentiated asteroids and what sampling strategies might be prudent.

  16. The geologic classification of the meteorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elston, Donald Parker

    1968-01-01

    The meteorite classes of Prior and Mason are assigned to three proposed genetic groups on the basis of a combination of compositional, mineralogical, and elemental characteristics: l) the calcium-poor, volatile-rich carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites; 2) the calcium-poor, volatile-poor chondrites (enstatite, bronzite, hypersthene, and pigeonite), achondrites (enstatite, hypersthene, and pigeonite), stonyirons (pallasites, siderophyre), and irons; and, 3) the calcium-rich (basaltic) achondrites. Chondrites are correlated with calcium-poor achondrites and the silicate phase of the pallasitic meteorites on Fe contents of olivine and pyroxene; and with metal of the stony-irons and irons on the basis of trace elements (Ga and Ge). Transitions in structure and texture between the chondrites and achondrites are recognized. The Van Schmus-Wood chemical-petrologic classification of the chondrites has been modified and expanded to a mineralogic-petrologic classification of the chondrites and calcium-poor achondrites. Chondrites apparently are the first rocks of the solar system. Paragenetic and textural relations in the Murray carbonaceous chondrite shed new light on the manner of accretion, and on the character of dispersed solid materials ('dust', and chondrules and metal) that existed in the solar system before accretion. Two pre-accretionary mineral assemblages (components) are recognized in the carbonaceous chondrites and in the unequilibrated volatile-poor chondrites. They are: 1) a 'low temperature' water-, rare gas-, and carbon-bearing component; and, 2) a high temperature anhydrous silicate and metal component. Paragenetic relations indicate that component 2 materials predate chondrite formation. An accretionary assemblage (component 3) also is recognized in the carbonaceous chondrites and in the unequilibrated volatile-poor chondrites. Component 3 consists of very fine grains of olivine and pyroxene, which occur as pervasive disseminations, as small irregular

  17. The spatial and temporal distribution of lunar mare basalts as deduced from analysis of data for lunar meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Neukum, G.; Nyquist, L.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we analyze data for lunar meteorites with emphasis on the spatial and temporal distribution of lunar mare basalts. The data are mostly from the Lunar Meteorite Compendium ( http://www-curator.jsc.nasa.gov/antmet/lmc/contents.cfm cited hereafter as Compendium) compiled by Kevin Righter, NASA Johnson Space Center, and from the associated literature. Analysis of the data showed that (i) a significant part of the lunar meteorite source craters are not larger than hundreds of meters in diameter; (ii) cryptomaria seem to be rather abundant in lunar highlands; (iii) the ratios of lunar meteorites belonging to three broad petrologic groups (mare basalt/gabbro, feldspatic highland breccias, and mingled breccias which are a mixture of mare and highland components) seem to be roughly proportional to the areal distribution of these rocks on the lunar surface; and (iv) the meteorite mare basalt ages show a range from ˜2.5 to 4.3 Ga and fill the gaps in the Apollo/Luna basalt age distribution. The ages of mare basalt clasts from mingled breccias seem to be systematically higher than those of "normal" mare basalts, which supports the suggestion that mingled breccias originated mostly from cryptomaria.

  18. Asteroidal Differentiation Processes Deduced from Ultramafic Achondrite Ureilite Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Hilary; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Hudson, Pierre; Romanek, Christopher S.; Franchi, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Ureilites are the second largest achondrite group. They are ultramafic achondrites that have experienced igneous processing whilst retaining some degree of nebula-derived chemical heterogeneity. They differ from other achondrites in that they contain abundant carbon and their oxygen isotope compositions are very heterogeneous and similar to those of the carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mineral line. Their carbonaceous nature and some compositional characteristics indicative of nebular origin suggest that they are primitive materials that form a link between nebular processes and early periods of planetesimal accretion. However, despite numerous studies, the exact origin of ureilites remains unclear. Current opinion is that they represent the residual mantle of an asteroid that underwent silicate and Fe-Ni-S partial melting and melt removal. Recent studies of short-lived chronometers indicate that the parent asteroid of the ureilites differentiated very early in the history of the Solar System. Therefore, they contain important information about processes that formed small rocky planetesimals in the early Solar System. In effect, they form a bridge between nebula processes and differentiation in small planetesimals prior to accretion into larger planets and so a correct interpretation of ureilite petrogenesis is essential for understanding this critical step.

  19. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies of Meteorite Kalahari 009: An Old VLT Mare Basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Bischoff, A.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar meteorite Kalahari 009 is a fragmental basaltic breccia contain ing various very-low-Ti (VLT) mare basalt clasts embedded in a fine-g rained matrix of similar composition. This meteorite and lunar meteorite Kalahari 008, an anorthositic breccia, were suggested to be paired mainly due to the presence of similar fayalitic olivines in fragment s found in both meteorites. Thus, Kalahari 009 probably represents a VLT basalt that came from a locality near a mare-highland boundary r egion of the Moon, as compared to the typical VLT mare basalt samples collected at Mare Crisium during the Luna-24 mission. The concordant Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar ages of such a VLT basalt (24170) suggest that the extrusion of VLT basalts at Mare Crisium occurred 3.30 +/- 0.05 Ga ag o. Previous age results for Kalahari 009 range from approximately 4.2 Ga by its Lu-Hf isochron age to 1.70?0.04 Ga of its Ar-Ar plateau ag e. However, recent in-situ U-Pb dating of phosphates in Kalahari 009 defined an old crystallization age of 4.35+/- 0.15 Ga. The authors su ggested that Kalahari 009 represents a cryptomaria basalt. In this r eport, we present Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic results for Kalahari 009, discuss the relationship of its age and isotopic characteristics to t hose of other L-24 VLT mare basalts and other probable cryptomaria ba salts represented by Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, and discuss it s petrogenesis.

  20. The Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 85, 2001 September

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, J.N.; Zipfel, J.

    2001-01-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin No. 85 lists information for 1376 newly classified meteorites, comprising 658 from Antarctica, 409 from Africa, 265 from Asia (262 of which are from Oman), 31 from North America, 7 from South America, 3 from Australia, and 3 from Europe. Information is provided for 11 falls (Dergaon, Dunbogan, Gujba, Independence, Itqiy, Mora??vka, Oued el Hadjar, Sayama, Sologne, Valera, and Worden). Noteworthy non-Antarctic specimens include 5 martian meteorites (Dar al Gani 876, Northwest Africa 480 and 817, and Sayh al Uhaymir 051 and 094); 6 lunar meteorites (Dhofar 081, 280, and 287, and Northwest Africa 479, 482, and 773); an ungrouped enstatite-rich meteorite (Itqiy); a Bencubbin-like meteorite (Gujba); 9 iron meteorites; and a wide variety of other interesting stony meteorites, including CH, CK, CM, CO, CR, CV, R, enstatite, and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, primitive achondrites, HED achondrites, and ureilites.

  1. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter. Volume 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Satterwhite, Cecilia E.

    1997-01-01

    The availability of 116 new meteorites from the 1994-1996 collections is announced. There are 4 special chondrites, 2 carbonaceous chondrites, and 1 achondrite among the new meteorites. Also included is a redescription of Lodranite GRA95209.

  2. Meteoritic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives were to: explain the abundances of siderophile elements in the SNC meteorite suite, of putative Martian origin; discover the magmatic origins and possibly magma compositions behind the Nakhla meteorite, one of the SNC meteorites; and a re-evaluation of the petrology of Angra dos Reis, a unique meteorite linked to the earliest planetary bodies of the solar nebula. A re-evaluation of its petrography showed that the accepted scenario for its origin, as a cumulate igneous rock, was not consistent with the meteorite's textures (Treiman). More likely is that the meteorite represents a prophyritic igneous rock, originally with magma dominant. Studies of the Nakhla meteorite, of possible Martian origin, although difficult, were successful. It became necessary to reject the basic categorization of Nakhla: that is was a cumulate igneous rock. Detailed studies of the chemical zoning of Nakhlas' minerals, coupled with the failure of experimental studies to yield expected results, forced the conclusion that Nakhla is not a cumulate rock in the usual sense: a rock composed of igneous crystals and intercrystal magma. Study of the siderophile element abundances in the SNC meteorite groups involved trying to find reasonable core formation processes and parameters that would reproduce the observed abundances. Modelling was successful, and delimited a range of models which overlap with those reasonable from geophysical constraints.

  3. Could 433 Eros have a Primitive Achondritic Composition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Nittler, L. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2001-01-01

    One of the goals of the NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) mission to 433 Eros is to determine if it has a meteoritic analog. We are currently investigating if primitive achondrites have bulk compositions and spectral properties similar to Eros. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Opaque-rich lithology in the Divnoe achondrite: Petrology and origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petaev, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    An opaque-rich lithology (ORL) makes up to approximately 9 vol. percent of the Divnoe achondrite. It is characterized by enrichment of troilite and pyroxene, compared to the bulk Divnoe, and by the presence of tiny remnants of olivine in low-CA pyroxene and low minor element concentrations in pyroxene. The ORL was formed by local reaction between gaseous sulfur and olivine in the Divnoe. The Divnoe meteorite is an olivine-rich achondrite with subchondritic chemistry and mineralogy. It has a granoblastic coarse-grained olivine groundmass (CGL: coarse-grained lithology) with relatively large (2-10 mm) poikilitic patches (PP) of pyroxene and, rarely, plagioclase. The groundmass also contains an opaque-rich fine-grained lithology (ORL) which comprises approximately 9 vol. percent of the meteorite, displays reaction boundaries with the groundmass, and differs in mineral chemistry from it. Numerous micron- to mm-thick veins of troilite and, rarely, metal cross all the lithologies found in the meteorite. The Divnoe itself appears to represent a sample of an igneous source region.

  5. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn

    2000-01-01

    This newsletter contains something for everyone! It lists classifications of about 440 meteorites mostly from the 1997 and 1998 ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) seasons. It also gives descriptions of about 45 meteorites of special petrologic type. These include 1 iron, 17 chondrites (7 CC, 1 EC, 9 OC) and 27 achondrites (25 HED, UR). Most notable are an acapoloite (GRA98028) and an olivine diogenite (GRA98108).

  6. The Miller Range 090340 and 090206 meteorites: Identification of new brachinite-like achondrites with implications for the diversity and petrogenesis of the brachinite clan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Cyrena Anne; Kita, Noriko T.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Wirick, Sue; Gross, Juliane

    2017-05-01

    Miller Range (MIL) 090340 and MIL 090206 are olivine-rich achondrites originally classified as ureilites. We investigate their petrography, mineral compositions, olivine Cr valences, equilibration temperatures, and (for MIL 090340) oxygen isotope compositions, and compare them with ureilites and other olivine-rich achondrites. We conclude that they are brachinite-like achondrites that provide new insights into the petrogenesis of brachinite clan meteorites. MIL 090340,6 has a granoblastic texture and consists of 97 modal % by area olivine (Fo = molar Mg/[Mg+Fe] = 71.3 ± 0.6). It also contains minor to trace augite, chromite, chlorapatite, orthopyroxene, metal, troilite, and terrestrial Fe-oxides. Approximately 80% by area of MIL 090206,5 has a granoblastic texture of olivine (Fo 72.3 ± 0.1) plus minor augite and chromite, similar to MIL 090340 but also containing minor plagioclase. The rest of the section consists of a single crystal of orthopyroxene ( 11 × 3 mm), poikilitically enclosing rounded grains of olivine (Fo = 76.1 ± 0.6), augite, chromite, metal, and sulfide. Equilibration temperatures for MIL 090340 and MIL 090206, calculated from olivine-spinel, olivine-augite, and two-pyroxene thermometry range from 800 to 930 °C. In both samples, symplectic intergrowths of Ca-poor orthopyroxene + opaque phases (Fe-oxides, sulfide, metal) occur as rims on and veins/patches within olivine. Before terrestrial weathering, the opaques were probably mostly sulfide, with minor metal. All petrologic properties of MIL 090340 and MIL 090206 are consistent with those of brachinite clan meteorites, and largely distinct from those of ureilites. Oxygen isotope compositions of olivine in MIL 090340 (δ18O = 5.08 ± 0.30‰, δ17O = 2.44 ± 0.21‰, and Δ17O = -0.20 ± 0.12‰) are also within the range of brachinite clan meteorites, and well distinguished from ureilites. Olivine Cr valences in MIL 090340 and the granoblastic area of MIL 090206 are 2.57 ± 0.06 and 2.59 ± 0

  7. The Miller Range 090340 and 090206 meteorites: Identification of new brachinite-like achondrites with implications for the diversity and petrogenesis of the brachinite clan

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Goodrich, Cyrena Anne; Kita, Noriko T.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2017-05-01

    Miller Range (MIL) 090340 and MIL 090206 are olivine-rich achondrites originally classified as ureilites. We investigate their petrography, mineral compositions, olivine Cr valences, equilibration temperatures, and (for MIL 090340) oxygen isotope compositions, and compare them with ureilites and other olivine-rich achondrites. We conclude that they are brachinite-like achondrites that provide new insights into the petrogenesis of brachinite clan meteorites. MIL 090340,6 has a granoblastic texture and consists of ~97 modal % by area olivine (Fo = molar Mg/[Mg+Fe] = 71.3 ± 0.6). It also contains minor to trace augite, chromite, chlorapatite, orthopyroxene, metal, troilite, and terrestrial Fe-oxides. Approximately 80% bymore » area of MIL 090206,5 has a granoblastic texture of olivine (Fo 72.3 ± 0.1) plus minor augite and chromite, similar to MIL 090340 but also containing minor plagioclase. The rest of the section consists of a single crystal of orthopyroxene (~11 × 3 mm), poikilitically enclosing rounded grains of olivine (Fo = 76.1 ± 0.6), augite, chromite, metal, and sulfide. Equilibration temperatures for MIL 090340 and MIL 090206, calculated from olivine-spinel, olivine-augite, and two-pyroxene thermometry range from ~800 to 930 °C. In both samples, symplectic intergrowths of Ca-poor orthopyroxene + opaque phases (Fe-oxides, sulfide, metal) occur as rims on and veins/patches within olivine. Before terrestrial weathering, the opaques were probably mostly sulfide, with minor metal. All petrologic properties of MIL 090340 and MIL 090206 are consistent with those of brachinite clan meteorites, and largely distinct from those of ureilites. Oxygen isotope compositions of olivine in MIL 090340 (δ18O = 5.08 ± 0.30‰, δ17O = 2.44 ± 0.21%, and Δ17O = -0.20 ± 0.12‰) are also within the range of brachinite clan meteorites, and well distinguished from ureilites. Olivine Cr valences in MIL 090340 and the granoblastic area of MIL 090206 are 2.57 ± 0.06 and 2

  8. Origin of felsic achondrites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129, and ultramafic brachinites and brachinite-like achondrites by partial melting of volatile-rich primitive parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James M. D.; Walker, Richard J.; Ash, Richard D.; Liu, Yang; Rumble, Douglas; Irving, Anthony J.; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Tait, Kimberly; McDonough, William F.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2012-03-01

    New major- and trace-element abundances, highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) abundances, and oxygen and rhenium-osmium isotope data are reported for oligoclase-rich meteorites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129 (GRA 06128/9), six brachinites (Brachina; Elephant Morraine 99402/7; Northwest Africa (NWA) 1500; NWA 3151; NWA 4872; NWA 4882) and three olivine-rich achondrites, which are referred to here as brachinite-like achondrites (NWA 5400; NWA 6077; Zag (b)). GRA 06128/9 represent examples of felsic and highly-sodic melt products from an asteroid that may provide a differentiation complement to brachinites and/or brachinite-like achondrites. The new data, together with our petrological observations, are consistent with derivation of GRA 06128/9, brachinites and the three brachinite-like achondrites from nominally volatile-rich and oxidised 'chondritic' precursor sources within their respective parent bodies. Furthermore, the range of Δ17O values (˜0‰ to -0.3‰) among the meteorites indicates generation from isotopically heterogeneous sources that never completely melted, or isotopically homogenised. It is possible to generate major- and trace-element compositions similar to brachinites and the three studied brachinite-like achondrites as residues of moderate degrees (13-30%) of partial melting of primitive chondritic sources. This process was coupled with inefficient removal of silica-saturated, high Fe/Mg felsic melts with compositions similar to GRA 06128/9. Melting of the parent bodies of GRA 06128/9, brachinites and brachinite-like achondrites halted well before extensive differentiation, possibly due to the exhaustion of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al by felsic melt segregation. This mechanism provides a potential explanation for the cessation of run-away melting in asteroids to preserve achondrites such as GRA 06128/9, brachinites, brachinite-like achondrites, acapulcoite-lodranites, ureilites and aubrites. Moderate degrees of

  9. Assessing the Formation of Ungrouped Achondrite Northwest Africa 8186: Residue, Crystallization Product, or Recrystallized Chondrite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of primitive achondrites, metachondrites, and type 7 chondrites challenge the long held idea that all chondrites and achondrites form on separate parent bodies. These meteorites have experienced metamorphic temperatures above petrologic type 6 and have partially melted to various degrees. However, because of their isotopic and compositional similarities to both undifferentiated and differentiated groups, the provenance of these 'type 6+' meteorites remains largely unknown. CK and CV chondrites have recently been linked to a few achondrites due to their strong compositional, mineralogical, and isotopic similarities], suggesting a common origin between these meteorites. Although CVs have generally undergone low degrees of alteration near petrologic type 3, CKs have experienced a wide range of thermal alteration from petrologic type 3 to 6. Thermal evolution models on early accreting bodies predict that an early forming body can partially differentiate due to radiogenic heating, and, as a result, form radial layers of material increasing in thermal grade (types 3 to 6+) from the unmelted chondritic surface towards the differentiated core.Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is an ungrouped achondrite that provides compelling evidence for higher degrees of thermal processing and/or melting and differentiation on some CK/CV parent bodies. NWA 8186 plots on the CCAM line on a 3-oxygen isotope diagram directly with CK and CV chondrites and also plots with the CKs in regards to Cr isotopes. This meteorite is dominated by Nickel(II)Oxygen-rich olivine (less than 80%), lacks iron metal, and contains four oxide phases, indicating a high fOxygen (above FMQ) similar to the CKs. Additionally, NWA 8186 does not contain chondrules. We have further investigated the origins of NWA 8186 by examining and comparing the bulk composition of this CK-like achondrite with CK and CV chondrites, allowing us to assess the various scenarios in which NWA 8186 may have formed from

  10. What Were the Major Factors That Controlled Mineralogical Similarities and Differences of Basaltic, Lherzolitic and Clinopyroxentic Martian Meteorites Within Each Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; McKay, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    Twelve martian meteorites that have been re- covered so far are classified into five groups (basalt, lherzolite, clinopyroxenite, dunite, and orthopyroxenite) mainly from petrology and chemistry. Among them, the dunite and orthopyroxenite groups consist of only one meteorite each (dunite: Chassigny, orthopyroxenite: ALH 84001). The basalt group is the largest group and consists of four meteorites (Shergotty, Zagani, EETA 79001, and QUE 94201). The lherzolitic and clinopyroxenitic groups include three meteorites each (Lherzolite: ALH 77005, LEW 88516, and Y793605, clinopyroxenite: Nakhla, Governador Valadares, and Lafayette). These meteorites within each group are generally similar to the others, but none of them is paired with the others. In this abstract, we discuss the major factors that controlled mineralogical similarities and differences of basaltic, lherzolitic, and clinopyroxenitic meteorites within each group. This may help in understanding their petrogenesis and original locations on Mars in general.

  11. Planetary basalts - Chemistry and petrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Bence, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Recent literature (1975-1978) on planetary basalts is reviewed. Terrestrial basalts are considered in relation to Nd and Sm isotopic studies, magma mixing, chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities in basalt source regions, and partial melting controls on basalt chemistry. Attention is also given to features of mare basalts, eucrites, and comparisons of basalts for the earth, the moon, and the parent body of basaltic achondrites.

  12. Antarctic Martian Meteorites at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, R. C.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, K.; Harrington, R.

    2018-01-01

    This past year marked the 40th anniversary of the first Martian meteorite found in Antarctica by the ANSMET Antarctic Search for Meteorites) program, ALH 77005. Since then, an additional 14 Martian meteorites have been found by the ANSMET program making for a total of 15 Martian meteorites in the U. S. Antarctic meteorite collection at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Of the 15 meteorites, some have been paired so the 15 meteorites actually represent a total of approximately 9 separate samples. The first Martian meteorite found by ANSMET was ALH 77005 (482.500 g), a lherzolitic shergottite. When collected, this meteorite was split as a part of the joint expedition with the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) Japan. Originally classified as an "achondrite-unique", it was re-classified as a Martian lherzolitic shergottite in 1982. This meteorite has been allocated to 137 scientists for research and there are 180.934 g remaining at JSC. Two years later, one of the most significant Martian meteorites of the collection at JSC was found at Elephant Moraine, EET 79001 (7942.000 g), a shergottite. This meteorite is the largest in the Martian collection at JSC and was the largest stony meteorite sample collected during the 1979 season. In addition to its size, this meteorite is of particular interest because it contains a linear contact separating two different igneous lithologies, basaltic and olivine-phyric. EET 79001 has glass inclusions that contain noble gas and nitrogen compositions that are proportionally identical to the Martian atmosphere, as measured by the Viking spacecraft. This discovery helped scientists to identify where the "SNC" meteorite suite had originated, and that we actually possessed Martian samples. This meteorite has been allocated to 205 scientists for research and 5,298.435 g of sample is available.

  13. Uranium and thorium in achondrites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Lovering, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The abundances of U and Th in 19 achondrites and two pallasite olivines have been measured by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Brecciated eucrites are enriched relative to chondrites in both elements by factors between 10 and 20, perhaps as a result of a magmatic differentiation process. Two unbrecciated eucrites are far less enriched, possibly due to their origin as igneous cumulates. The diogenites Johnstown and Shalka contain approximately chondritic levels of U and Th, but Ellemeet is 10 times lower. The abundances in three howardites are in good agreement with those expected from major element data for a mixing model with eucrite and diogenite end members. The high O-18 basaltic achondrites Nakhla, Shergotty and Angra dos Reis have a range of U and Th abundances similar to the brecciated eucrites and howardites, but have systematically higher Th/U ratios.

  14. Comparison of lunar rocks and meteorites: Implications to histories of the moon and parent meteorite bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinz, M.; Fodor, R. V.; Keil, K.

    1974-01-01

    A number of similarities between lunar and meteoritic rocks are reported and suggest that the comparison is essential for a clear understanding of meteorites as probes of the early history of the solar systems: (1) Monomict and polymict breccias occur in lunar rocks, as well as in achondritic and chondritic meteorites, having resulted from complex and repeated impact processes. (2) Chondrules are present in lunar, as well as in a few achondritic and most chondritic meteorites. It is pointed out that because chondrules may form in several different ways and in different environments, a distinction between the different modes of origin and an estimate of their relative abundance is important if their significance as sources of information on the early history of the solar system is to be clearly understood. (3) Lithic fragments are very useful in attempts to understand the pre- and post-impact history of lunar and meteoritic breccias. They vary from little modified (relative to the apparent original texture), to partly or completely melted and recrystallized lithic fragments.

  15. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, Michael K.; Smith, Caroline; Benedix, Gretchen; Herd, Christopher D. K.; Righter, Kevin; Haack, Henning; Yamaguchi, Akira; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, Hasnaa; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    2010-03-01

    In this edition of The Meteoritical Bulletin, a total of 506 newly approved meteorite names with their relevant data are reported. These include 354 from northwest Africa, 31 from the Americas, 15 from Antarctica (Koreamet), 85 from Asia, 20 from Australia, and 1 from Europe. Among these meteorites are 2 falls, Grimsby (Canada) and Santa Lucia (2008) (Argentina). Also described are a CM with low degree of alteration, new ungrouped chondrites and achondrites, and 4 Martian meteorites.

  16. Natural thermoluminescence of Antarctic meteorites and related studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1998-01-01

    The natural thermoluminescence (TL) laboratory's primary purpose is to provide data on newly recovered Antarctic meteorites that can be included in discovery announcements and to investigate the scientific implications of the data. Natural TL levels of meteorites are indicators of recent thermal history and terrestrial history, and the data can be used to study the orbital/radiation history of groups of meteorites (e.g., H chondrites) or to study the processes leading to the concentration of meteorites at certain sites in Antarctica. An important application of these data is the identification of fragments, or "pairs" of meteorites produced during atmospheric passage or during terrestrial weathering. Thermoluminescence data are particularly useful for pairing within the most common meteorite classes, which typically exhibit very limited petrographic and chemical diversity. Although not originally part of the laboratory's objectives, TL data are also useful in the identification and classification of petrographically or mineralogically unusual meteorites, including unequilibrated ordinary chondrites and some basaltic achondrites. In support of its primary mission, the laboratory also engages in TL studies of modern falls, finds from hot deserts, and terrestrial analogs and conducts detailed studies of the TL properties of certain classes of meteorites. These studies include the measurement of TL profiles in meteorites, the determination of TL levels of finds from the Sahara and the Nullarbor region of Australia, and comparison of TL data to other indicators of irradiation or terrestrial history, such as cosmogenic noble gas and radionuclide abundances. Our current work can be divided into five subcategories, (a) TL survey of Antarctic meteorites, (b) pairing and field relations of Antarctic meteorites, (c) characterization of TL systematics of meteorites, (d) comparison of natural TL and other terrestrial age indicators for Antarctic meteorites, and for meteorites

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Meteorites" included the following reports:Description of a New Stony Meteorite Find from Bulloch County, Georgia; Meteorite Ablation Derived from Cosmic Ray Track Data Dhofar 732: A Mg-rich Orthopyroxenitic Achondrite Halogens, Carbon and Sulfur in the Tagish Lake Meteorite: Implications for Classification and Terrestrial Alteration; Electromagnetic Scrape of Meteorites and Probably Columbia Tiles; Pre-Atmospheric Sizes and Orbits of Several Chondrites; Research of Shock-Thermal History of the Enstatite Chondrites by Track, Thermoluminescence and Neutron-Activation (NAA) Methods; Radiation and Shock-thermal History of the Kaidun CR2 Chondrite Glass Inclusions; On the Problem of Search for Super-Heavy Element Traces in the Meteorites: Probability of Their Discovery by Three-Prong Tracks due to Nuclear Spontaneous Fission Trace Element Abundances in Separated Phases of Pesyanoe, Enstatite Achondrite; Evaluation of Cooling Rate Calculated by Diffusional Modification of Chemical Zoning: Different Initial Profiles for Diffusion Calculation; Mineralogical Features and REE Distribution in Ortho- and Clinopyroxenes of the HaH 317 Enstatite Chondrite Dhofar 311, 730 and 731: New Lunar Meteorites from Oman; The Deuterium Content of Individual Murchison Amino Acids; Clues to the Formation of PV1, an Enigmatic Carbon-rich Chondritic Clast from the Plainview H-Chondrite Regolith Breccia ;Numerical Simulations of the Production of Extinct Radionuclides and ProtoCAIs by Magnetic Flaring.

  18. The Chassigny meteorite - A cumulate dunite with hydrous amphibole-bearing melt inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floran, R. J.; Prinz, M.; Hlava, P. F.; Keil, K.; Nehru, C. E.; Hinthorne, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Chassigny meteorite, an iron-rich dunite (Fo 68), is a moderately shocked olivine achondrite or chassignite with features indicative of a cumulate origin with some subsolidus annealing. The evidence that the meteorite experienced shock pressures of approximately 150-200 kbar is described. Kaersutitic amphibole, found only in melt inclusions, represents the first extraterrestrial occurence of hydrous amphibole and the first meteoritic amphibole type other than fluorichterite. Fractionation data indicate that Chassigny formed under relatively more oxidizing conditions than most other achondrites, which implies that its parental melt could not have been directly derived from a chondritic composition in a simple single-stage process. Similarities and differences with the Brachina meteorite, the only other meteorite of the Chassigny type, are considered.

  19. Studies of Magmatic Inclusions in the Basaltic Martian Meteorites Shergotty, Zagami, EETA 79001 and QUE 94201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Ralph P.; McKay, Gordon A.

    1997-01-01

    Currently there are 12 meteorites thought by planetary scientists to be martian samples, delivered to the Earth after violent impacts on that planet's surface. Of these 12 specimens, 4 are basaltic: Shergotty, Zagami, EETA 79001 and QUE 94201. Basalts are particularly important rocks to planetary geologists- they are the most common rocks found on the surfaces of the terrestrial planets, representing volcanic activity of their parent worlds. In addition, because they are generated by partial melting of the mantle and/or lower crust, they can serve as guide posts to the composition and internal processes of a planet. Consequently these four meteorites can serve as 'ground-truth' representatives of the predominant volcanic surface rocks of Mars, and offer researchers a glimpse of the magmatic history of that planet. Unfortunately, unraveling the parentage of a basaltic rock is not always straightforward. While many basalts are simple, unaltered partial melts of the mantle, others have undergone secondary processes which change the original parental chemistry, such as assimilation of other crustal rocks, mixing with other magmas, accumulation, re-equilibration between mineral species after crystallization, loss of late-stage magmatic fluids and alteration by metamorphic or metasomatic processes. Fortunately, magmatic inclusions can trap the evolving magmatic liquid, isolating it from many of these secondary processes and offering a direct look at the magma during different stages of development. These inclusions form when major or minor phases grow skeletally, surrounding small amounts of the parental magma within pockets in the growing crystal. The inclusion as a whole (usually consisting of glass with enclosed crystals) continues to represent the composition of the parental magma at the time the melt pocket closed, even when the rock as a whole evolves under changing conditions. The four basaltic martian meteorites contain several distinct generations of melt

  20. Origin of igneous meteorites and differentiated asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E.; Goldstein, J.; Asphaug, E.; Bottke, W.; Moskovitz, N.; Keil, K.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Igneously formed meteorites and asteroids provide major challenges to our understanding of the formation and evolution of the asteroid belt. The numbers and types of differentiated meteorites and non-chondritic asteroids appear to be incompatible with an origin by fragmentation of numerous Vesta-like bodies by hypervelocity impacts in the asteroid belt over 4 Gyr. We lack asteroids and achondrites from the olivine-rich mantles of the parent bodies of the 12 groups of iron meteorites and the ˜70 ungrouped irons, the 2 groups of pallasites and the 4--6 ungrouped pallasites. We lack mantle and core samples from the parent asteroids of the basaltic achondrites that do not come from Vesta, viz., angrites and the ungrouped eucrites like NWA 011 and Ibitira. How could core samples have been extracted from numerous differentiated bodies when Vesta's basaltic crust was preserved? Where is the missing Psyche family of differentiated asteroids including the complementary mantle and crustal asteroids [1]? Why are meteorites derived from far more differentiated parent bodies than chondritic parent bodies even though C and S class chondritic asteroids dominate the asteroid belt? New paradigm. Our studies of meteorites, impact modeling, and dynamical studies suggest a new paradigm in which differentiated asteroids accreted at 1--2 au less than 2 Myr after CAI formation [2]. They were rapidly melted by 26Al and disrupted by hit-and-run impacts [3] while still molten or semi-molten when planetary embryos were accreting. Metallic Fe-Ni bodies derived from core material cooled rapidly with little or no silicate insulation less than 4 Myr after CAI formation [4]. Fragments of differentiated planetesimals were subsequently tossed into the asteroid belt. Meteorite evidence for early disruption of differentiated asteroids. If iron meteorites were samples of Fe-Ni cores of bodies that cooled slowly inside silicate mantles over ˜50--100 Myr, irons from each core would have

  1. New Meteorite Type NWA 8159 Augite Basalt: Specimen from a Previously Unsampled Location on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agee, C. B.; Muttik, N.; Ziegler, K.; Walton, E. L.; Herd, C. D. K.; McCubbin, F. M.; Santos, A. R.; Simon, J. I.; Peters, T. J.; Tappa, M. J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Up until recently the orthopyroxenite ALH 84001, a singleton martian meteorite type, was the only sample that did not fit within the common SNC types. However with the discovery of the unique basaltic breccia NWA 7034 pairing group [1] the diversity of martian meteorites beyond SNC types was expanded, and now with Northwest Africa (NWA) 8159, and its possible pairing NWA 7635 [2], the diversiy is expanded further with a third unique non-SNC meteorite type. The existence of meteorite types beyond the narrow range seen in SNCs is what might be expected from a random cratering sampling of a geologically long-lived and complex planet such as Mars.

  2. A search for isotopic anomalies in uranium. [in chondritic meteorites and terrestrial basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The U-238/U-235 ratios for nine bulk chondritic meteorites and a terrestrial basalt were measured. The total range in U-238/U-235 determined for both total meteorites and for acid leaches was from 137.2 terrestrial U. The typical errors in a single determination are plus or minus 6 per thousand (2 sigma m) for a 2 ng U sample from a chondrite. Taking the extreme values of delta U-235 for each measurement the maximum amount of excess U-235 that can be allowed to be present ranges from 200 million to 2 billion atoms per gram of bulk meteorite. These results do not support the claims of variations in U-238/U-235 at the percentage levels or number of excess U-235 atoms in some of the same meteorites as reported by several other previous workers.

  3. Elemental Abundance Distributions in Basalt Clays and Meteorites: Is It a Biosignature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, M. R.; Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Joseph, J.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic glass altered by microorganisms exhibits distinctive textures differing significantly from abiotic alteration [1-4]. We have previously presented morphological evidence of bioweathering in sub-oceanic basalt glass [5] and olivine [6], and noted similar alterations in Nakhla [7]. We have also introduced an autonomous Bayesian probabilistic classification methodology to identify biotic and abiotic alteration in sub-oceanic basalts using elemental abundance data [8]. We now present data from multiple sub-oceanic sites addressing the more general question of utilizing elemental abundance distribution in clays as a valid biosignature for the exploration of putative clay alteration products in meteorites.

  4. Lunar Meteorites: What They Tell us About the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Mare Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Neukum, G.; Nyquist, L.

    2010-01-01

    Here we analyze the chronology and statistical distribution of lunar meteorites with emphasis on the spatial and temporal distribution of lunar mare basalts. The data are mostly from the Lunar Meteorite Compendium (http://www-curator.jsc.nasa.gov/ antmet/ lmc/contents.cfm cited hereafter as Compendium) compiled by Kevin Righter, NASA Johnson Space Center, and from the associated literature. The Compendium was last modified on May 12, 2008.

  5. Antarctic meteorite descriptions 1976-1977-1978-1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Score, R.; Schwarz, C. M.; King, T. V. V.; Mason, B.; Bogard, D. D.; Gabel, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    All previously distributed meteorite data sheets, plus a number of new ones for 1979 chondrites are included. A comprehensive sample index listing meteorite name/number, classification, and weathering category is also included. Separate indexes listing all petrologic type 3 and type 4 chondrites, all irons, all achondrites, and all carbonaceous chondrites in the collection is provided.

  6. Meteoritic basalts: the nakhlites, their parental magmas, cooling rates, and equivalents on Earth. Final technical report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Treiman, A.H.

    1987-07-01

    Proposed one-bar phase equilibrium experiments, designed to determine the compositions of the nakhlites' parental magmas, are in progress. Proposed field studies on Earth, designed to find occurrences of rocks like the nakhlites, were extraordinarily successful. Other work supported in the past year included: attendance at the 1986 national meeting of the Geological Society of America; attendance at the 18th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference; completion and publication of a study of core formation in the SNC parent body; initiation of a study of the flux of SNC meteorites onto the Earth; and initiation of petrologic study of the Angra dosmore » Reis achondrite.« less

  7. Abstracts for the 54th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at 54th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritic Society are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Antarctic meteorites; nebula and parent body processing; primary and secondary SNC parent planet processes; enstatite chondrites and aubrites; achondrite stew; refractory inclusions; meteorite exposure ages and sizes; interstellar/meteorite connections; lunar origins, processes and meteorites; craters, cratering and tektites; cretaceous-tertiary impact(s); IDPs (LDEF, stratosphere, Greenland and Antarctica); chondrules; and chondrites.

  8. The Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Lunar Mare Basalts As Deduced From Analysis of Data for Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, Laurence; Basilevsky, A.; Neukum, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we analyze chronological data for lunar meteorites with emphasis on the spatial and temporal distribution of lunar mare basalts. The data are mostly from the Lunar Meteorite Compendium (http://www-curator.jsc.nasa.gov/antmet/lmc/contents.cfm cited thereafter as Compendium) compiled by Kevin Righter and from the associated literature.

  9. Partial melting of the Allende (CV3) meteorite - Implications for origins of basaltic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jones, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Eucrites and angrites are distinct types of basaltic meteorites whose origins are poorly known. Experiments in which samples of the Allende (CV3) carbonaceous chondrite were partially melted indicate that partial melts can resemble either eucrites or angrites, depending only on the oxygen fugacity. Melts are eucritic if this variable is below that of the iron-wuestite buffer or angritic if above it. With changing pressure, the graphite-oxygen redox reaction can produce oxygen fugacities that are above or below those of the iron-wuestite buffer. Therefore, a single, homogeneous, carbonaceous planetoid greater than 110 kilometers in radius could produce melts of drastically different composition, depending on the depth of melting.

  10. Olivine-Orthopyroxene Equilibrium in Metal-rich Systems: Applications to Achondrites and Equilibrated Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Benedix, G. K.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    Olivine and orthopyroxene are major minerals in every type of stony meteorite. The majority of achondritic meteorites and silicate-bearing iron meteorites have experienced high temperatures. If these temperatures persisted for an extended period of time then the iron contents of olivine and orthopyroxene should be in equilibrium. In their study of ungrouped clasts and chondritic meteorites, suggested that the equilibrium compositions of olivine and orthopyroxene should fall on a mixing line between LL chondrites and aubrites. Here we show that this is not necessarily the case and that a range of FeO contents in olivine and orthopyroxene can be in equilibrium with each other. The key parameters that determine the equilibrium Fe content in these minerals are temperature, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silica activity (aSiO2).

  11. Antarctic meteorite newsletter. Volume 4: Number 1, February 1981: Antarctic meteorite descriptions, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R.; Schwarz, C. M.; King, T. V. V.; Mason, B.; Bogard, D. D.; Gabel, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter is essentially a catalog of all antarctic meteorites in the collections of the Johnson Space Center Curation Facility and the Smithsonian except for 288 pebbles now being classed. It includes listings of all previously distributed data sheets plus a number of new ones for 1979. Indexes of samples include meteorite name/number, classification, and weathering category. Separate indexes list type 3 and 4 chondrites, all irons, all achondrites, and all carbonaceous chondrites.

  12. Ibitira: A basaltic achondrite from a distinct parent asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2004-01-01

    I have done detailed petrologic study of Ibitira, nominally classified as a basaltic eucrite. The Fe/Mn ratio of Ibitira pyroxenes with <10 mole % wollastonite component is 36.4 0.4, and is well-resolved from those of five basaltic eucrites studied for comparison; 31.2-32.2. Data for the latter completely overlap. Ibitira pyroxenes have lower Fe/Mg than the basaltic eucrite pyroxenes. Thus, the higher Fe/Mn ratio does not reflect a simple difference in oxidation state. Ibitira also has an oxygen isotopic composition, alkali element contents and a Ti/Hf ratio that distinguish it from basaltic eucrites. These differences support derivation from a distinct parent asteroid. Ibitira is the first recognized representative of the fifth known asteroidal basaltic crust.

  13. The SNC Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    The SNC (Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny) group, are achondritic meteorites. Of all SNC meteorites recognized up to date, shergottites are the most abundant group. The petrographic study of Shergotty began several years ago when Tschermak, (1872) identified this rock as an extraterrestrial basalt. Oxygen isotopes in SNC meteorites indicate that these rocks are from a single planetary body (Clayton and Mayeda, 1983). Because the abundance patterns of rare gases trapped in glasses from shock melts (e.g., Pepin, 1985) turned out to be very similar to the Martian atmosphere (as analyzed by the Viking landers, Owen, 1976), the SNC meteorites are believed to originate from Mars (e.g. McSween, 1994). Possibly, they were ejected from the Martian surface either in a giant impact or in several impact events (Meyer 2006). Although there is a broad consensus for nakhlites and chassignites being -1.3Ga old, the age of the shergottites is a matter of ongoing debates. Different lines of evidences indicate that these rocks are young (180Ma and 330-475Ma), or very old (> 4Ga). However, the young age in shergottites could be the result of a resetting of these chronometers by either strong impacts or fluid percolation on these rocks (Bouvier et al., 2005-2009). Thus, it is important to check the presence of secondary processes, such as re-equilibration or pressure-induce metamorphism (El Goresy et al., 2013) that can produce major changes in compositions and obscure the primary information. A useful tool, that is used to reconstruct the condition prevailing during the formation of early phases or the secondary processes to which the rock was exposed, is the study of glass-bearing inclusions hosted by different mineral phases. I will discuss the identification of extreme compositional variations in many of these inclusions (Varela et al. 2007-2013) that constrain the assumption that these objects are the result of closed-system crystallization. The question then arises whether these

  14. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Asteroidal Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin, Jason S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental process of planetary differentiation is the segregation of metal-sulfide and silicate phases, leading eventually to the formation of a metallic core. Asteroidal meteorites provide a glimpse of this process frozen in time from the early solar system. While chondrites represent starting materials, iron meteorites provide an end product where metal has been completely concentrated in a region of the parent asteroid. A complimentary end product is seen in metal-poor achondrites that have undergone significant igneous processing, such as angrites, HED's and the majority of aubrites. Metal-rich achondrites such as acapulcoite/lodranites, winonaites, ureilites, and metal-rich aubrites may represent intermediate stages in the metal segregation process. Among these, acapulcoite-lodranites and ureilites are examples of primary metal-bearing mantle restites, and therefore provide an opportunity to observe the metal segregation process that was captured in progress. In this study we use bulk trace element compositions of acapulcoites-lodranites and ureilites for this purpose.

  15. 40 Years of Collecting Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, R. C.; Sattershite, C. E.; Righter, K.; Harrington, R.

    2017-01-01

    This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first Martian meteorite found in Antarctica by ANSMET, ALH 77005. Since then, an additional 14 Martian meteorites have been found by the ANSMET team making for a total of 15 Martian meteorites in the Antarctic collection at Johnson Space Center. Of the 15 meteorites, some have been paired so the 15 meteorites actually represent a total of approximately 9 separate meteorites. The first Martian meteorite found by ANSMET was ALH 77005 (482.500 g), a lherzolitic shergottite. When collected, this meteorite was split as a part of the joint expedition with the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) Japan. Originally classified as an "achondrite-unique", it was re-classified as a Martian lherzolitic shergottites in 1982 [1]. This meteorite has been allocated to 125 scientists for research and there are 181.964 g remaining at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Two years later, one of the most significant Martian meteorites of the collection at JSC was found at Elephant Moraine, EET 79001 (7942.000 g), a shergottite. This meteorite is the largest in the Martian collection at JSC and was the largest stony meteorite sample collected during the 1979 season. In addition to its size, this meteorite is of particular interest because it contains a linear contact separating two different igneous lithologies, basaltic and olivine-phyric. EET 79001 has glass inclusions that contain chemical compositions that are proportionally identical to the Martian atmosphere, as measured by the Viking spacecraft [2]. This discovery helped scientists to identify where the "SNC" meteorite suite had originated, and that we actually possessed Martian samples. This meteorite has been allocated to 195 scientists for research and there are 5304.770 g of sample is available. Five years later, ANSMET found ALH 84001 (1930.900 g), the only Martian orthopyroxenite. This meteorite was initially classified as a diogenite but was reclassified as being a Martian

  16. Oxygen Isotope Compositions of the Kaidun Meteorite - Indications for Aqeuous Alteration of E-Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, K.; Zolensky, M.; Young, E. D.; Ivanov, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Kaidun microbreccia is a unique meteorite due to the diversity of its constituent clasts. Fragments of various types of carbonaceous (CI, CM, CV, CR), enstatite (EH, EL), and ordinary chondrites, basaltic achondrites, and impact melt products have been described, and also several unknown clasts [1, and references therein]. The small mm-sized clasts represent material from different places and times in the early solar system, involving a large variety of parent bodies [2]; meteorites are of key importance to the study of the origin and evolution of the solar system, and Kaidun is a collection of a range of bodies evidently representing samples from across the asteroid belt. The parent-body on which Kaidun was assembled is believed to be a C-type asteroid, and 1-Ceres and the martian moon Phobos have been proposed [1-4]. Both carbonaceous (most oxidized) and enstatite (most reduced) chondrite clasts in Kaidun show signs of aqueous alterations that vary in type and degree and are most likely of pre-Kaidun origin [1, 4].

  17. Indigenous Amino Acids in Iron Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Johnson, N. M.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the organic content of meteorites and the potential delivery of molecules relevant to the origin of life on Earth is an important area of study in astrobiology. There have been many studies of meteoritic organics, with much focus on amino acids as monomers of proteins and enzymes essential to terrestrial life. The majority of these studies have involved analysis of carbonaceous chondrites, primitive meteorites containing approx. 3-5 wt% carbon. Amino acids have been observed in varying abundances and distributions in representatives of all eight carbonaceous chondrite groups, as well as in ungrouped carbonaceous chondrites, ordinary and R chondrites, ureilites, and planetary achondrites [1 and references therein].

  18. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 87, 2003 July

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, S.S.; Zipfel, J.; Folco, L.; Jones, R.; Grady, M.M.; McCoy, T.; Grossman, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin No. 87 lists information for 1898 newly classified meteorites, comprising 1048 from Antarctica, 462 from Africa, 356 from Asia (355 of which are from Oman), 18 from North America, 5 from South America, 5 from Europe, and 3 from Australia. Information is provided for 10 falls (Beni M'hira, Elbert, Gasseltepaoua, Hiroshima, Kilabo, Neuschwanstein, Park Forest, Pe??, Pe??te??lkole??, and Thuathe). Two of these-Kilabo and Thuathe-fell on the same day. Orbital characteristics could be calculated for Neuschwanstein. Noteworthy specimens include 8 Martian meteorites (5 from Sahara, 2 from Oman and 1 from Antarctica), 13 lunar meteorites (all except one from Oman), 3 irons, 3 pallasites, and many carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites.

  19. Basalt or Not? Near-infrared Spectra, Surface Mineralogical Estimates, and Meteorite Analogs for 33 Vp-type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardersen, Paul S.; Reddy, Vishnu; Cloutis, Edward; Nowinski, Matt; Dievendorf, Margaret; Genet, Russell M.; Becker, Savan; Roberts, Rachel

    2018-07-01

    Investigations of the main asteroid belt and efforts to constrain that population’s physical characteristics involve the daunting task of studying hundreds of thousands of small bodies. Taxonomic systems are routinely employed to study the large-scale nature of the asteroid belt because they utilize common observational parameters, but asteroid taxonomies only define broadly observable properties and are not compositionally diagnostic. This work builds upon the results of work by Hardersen et al., which has the goal of constraining the abundance and distribution of basaltic asteroids throughout the main asteroid belt. We report on the near-infrared (NIR: 0.7 to 2.5 μm) reflectance spectra, surface mineralogical characterizations, analysis of spectral band parameters, and meteorite analogs for 33 Vp asteroids. NIR reflectance spectroscopy is an effective remote sensing technique to detect most pyroxene group minerals, which are spectrally distinct with two very broad spectral absorptions at ∼0.9 and ∼1.9 μm. Combined with the results from Hardersen et al., we identify basaltic asteroids for ∼95% (39/41) of our inner-belt Vp sample, but only ∼25% (2/8) of the outer-belt Vp sample. Inner-belt basaltic asteroids are most likely associated with (4) Vesta and represent impact fragments ejected from previous collisions. Outer-belt Vp asteroids exhibit disparate spectral, mineralogical, and meteorite analog characteristics and likely originate from diverse parent bodies. The discovery of two additional likely basaltic asteroids provides additional evidence for an outer-belt basaltic asteroid population.

  20. The Chronology and Petrogenesis of the Mare Basalt Clast from Lunar Meteorite Dhofar 287: Rb-Sr and Sm- Nd Isotopic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Nazarov, M. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Sm-Nd isochron for lunar mare basalt meteorite Dhofar 287A yields T = 3.46 +/- 0.03 Ga and Nd = 0.6 +/- 0.3. Its Rb-Sr isotopic system is severely altered. The basalt is unique, probably coming from an enriched mantle source. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Meteoritic basalts. Final report, 1986-1989

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Treiman, A.H.

    1989-10-01

    The objectives were to: explain the abundances of siderophile elements in the SNC meteorite suite, of putative Martian origin; discover the magmatic origins and possibly magma compositions behind the Nakhla meteorite, one of the SNC meteorites; and a re-evaluation of the petrology of Angra dos Reis, a unique meteorite linked to the earliest planetary bodies of the solar nebula. A re-evaluation of its petrography showed that the accepted scenario for its origin, as a cumulate igneous rock, was not consistent with the meteorite's textures (Treiman). More likely is that the meteorite represents a prophyritic igneous rock, originally with magma dominant.more » Studies of the Nakhla meteorite, of possible Martian origin, although difficult, were successful. It became necessary to reject the basic categorization of Nakhla: that is was a cumulate igneous rock. Detailed studies of the chemical zoning of Nakhlas' minerals, coupled with the failure of experimental studies to yield expected results, forced the conclusion that Nakhla is not a cumulate rock in the usual sense: a rock composed of igneous crystals and intercrystal magma. Study of the siderophile element abundances in the SNC meteorite groups involved trying to find reasonable core formation processes and parameters that would reproduce the observed abundances. Modelling was successful, and delimited a range of models which overlap with those reasonable from geophysical constraints.« less

  2. Mineralization of Bacteria in Terrestrial Basaltic Rocks: Comparison With Possible Biogenic Features in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of biogenic features altered by diagenesis or mineralization is important in determining whether specific features in terrestrial rocks and in meteorites may have a biogenic origin. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed the formation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, which may be important to these phenomena, including the controversy over possible biogenic features in basaltic martian meteorite ALH84001. To explore the presence of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we examined microcosms growing in basaltic small-scale experimental growth chambers or microcosms. Microbial communities were harvested from aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) group and grown in a microcosm containing unweathered basalt chips and groundwater (technique described in. These microcosms simulated natural growth conditions in the deep subsurface of the CRB, which should be a good terrestrial analog for any putative martian subsurface ecosystem that may have once included ALH84001. Here we present new size measurements and photomicrographs comparing the putative martian fossils to biogenic material in the CRB microcosms. The range of size and shapes of the biogenic features on the CRB microcosm chips overlaps with and is similar to those on ALH84001 chips. Although this present work does not provide evidence for the biogenicity of ALH84001 features, we believe that, based on criteria of size, shape, and general morphology, a biogenic interpretation for the ALH84001 features remains plausible.

  3. Impact melts in the MAC88105 lunar meteorite - Inferences for the lunar magma ocean hypothesis and the diversity of basaltic impact melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The MAC88105 lunar meteorite, as represented by thin section 78, contains three major types of impact melt breccias. The most abundant type is clast-laden, fine-grained, and rich in Al2O3 (28 wt pct); these clasts constitute most of the meteorite. Their abundance and aluminous nature indicate that the MAC88105 source area was very aluminous. This is consistent with formation of the primordial lunar crust from a global magma ocean. The second type of impact melt is represented by only one clast in 78. It has a basaltic bulk composition similar to many other lunar impact melts, but is significantly richer in P2O5 than most and has a much lower MgO/(MgO + FeO). The third impact-melt type resembles a prominent melt group at Apollo 16, but has lower MgO/(MgO + FeO). These data show that basaltic impact melts are compositionally diverse. Dating samples of the Al-rich impact melts and the new types of basaltic impact melts from this meteorite can test the idea that the Moon suffered a terminal cataclysm 3.9 Ga ago.

  4. The Record of Meteorite Infall During the Jurassic as Derived from Chrome-Spinel Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, C.; Huss, G. R.; Schmitz, B.; Nagashima, K.

    2017-12-01

    We study sediment-dispersed chrome-spinels in the stratigraphic record to determine how the types and amounts of meteorites falling to Earth have changed over time. The parent meteorite type of chrome-spinel grains can be determined using characteristic elemental and O-isotope compositions. In this study, we present data on grains from the Jurassic period ( 160 Ma). The Jurassic was chosen because of the possibility of discovering remnants from the breakup of the Baptistina asteroid family estimated to have occurred 160 Ma (+30, -20 Myr) (Bottke et al., 2007). Chrome-spinel grains derived from 400 kg of condensed limestone near Carcabuey, Spain were measured for their chemical compositions by electron microprobe, and their O-isotope compositions were measured by ion microprobe at the University of Hawai'i. Initial results show that 43% of the grains come from ordinary chondrites (OCs) and 18% from known types of achondrites. The remaining grains are extraterrestrial, as shown by their O-isotopes, but have not yet been classified. Some may represent material that is not currently falling on Earth. Meteorites falling on Earth today are 90.6% OCs and 7.1% achondrites. The Jurassic samples show a lower percentage of chrome-spinels from OCs (even though OCs are chrome-spinel rich). Other time periods also show meteorite abundances that are different than today. About 466 Ma there was an overwhelming influx of L-chondritic material (>99% of infalling material), due to the breakup of the L-chondrite parent body (Schmitz et al., 2001). One million years prior to the breakup, 56% of the infalling meteorites were OCs and 44% were achondrites (Heck et al., 2017). A new study suggests that 80% of the material falling in the Early Cretaceous (145-133 Ma) were from OCs and 10% were from achondrites (Schmitz et al., 2017). With just a few windows into Earth's past, we are already seeing significant changes in the mixture of materials that have fallen to Earth throughout time.

  5. The asteroid-meteorite connection: Forging a new link to Vesta as the parent body of basaltic achondrite (HED) meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta has been at the center of the debate over the identity of the howardite eucrite diogenite (HED) parent body since the early 1970s. Despite its unique (among the 500 largest asteroids) compositional match to HED meteorites, substantial dynamical difficulties in delivering fragments from Vesta to the Earth have precluded any conclusive HED parent body link. These dynamical difficulties arise because Vesta's orbital location is far from known resonances. Consequently, it has been argued as dynamically improbable that meteoroid-sized (1 km) fragments could be excavated from Vesta with sufficient velocities to reach the resonances. Through new astronomical observations, numerous small (4-7 km) asteroids between Vesta and the 3:1 resonance have been discovered to have eucrite and diogenite compositions. Based on similar orbital elements to Vesta, all of these new asteroids are likely large impact fragments excavated from Vesta. Their current orbits imply ejection velocities in excess of 700 m/sec. Smaller (1 km) fragments can therefore be expected to have been ejected with velocities greater than 1 km/sec, sufficient to reach the 3:1 and v6 resonances. Thus it now appears to be dynamically viable for Vesta to be linked as the HED parent body.

  6. Time differences in the formation of meteorites as determined from the ratio of lead-207 to lead-206

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.; Knight, R.J.; Allegre, C.J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the lead isotopic composition and the uranium, thorium, and lead concentrations in meteorites were made in order to obtain more precise radiometric ages of these members of the solar system. The newly determined value of the lead isotopic composition of Canyon Diablo troilite is as follows: 206Pb/204Pb = 9.307, 207Pb/204Pb = 10.294, and 208Pb/204Pb = 29.476. The leads of Angra dos Reis, Sioux County, and Nuevo Laredo achondrites are very radiogenic, the 206Pb/204Pb values are about 200, and the uranium-thorium-lead systems are nearly concordant. The ages of the meteorites as calculated from a single-stage 207Pb/206Pb isochron based on the newly determined primordial lead value and the newly reported 235U and 238U decay constants, are 4.528 ?? 10 9 years for Sioux County and Nuevo Laredo and 4.555 ?? 10 9 years for Angra dos Reis. When calculated with the uranium decay constants used by Patterson, these ages are 4.593 ?? 109 years and 4.620 ?? 109 years, respectively, and are therefore 40 to 70 ?? 106 years older than the 4.55 ?? 109 years age Patterson reported. The age difference of 27 ?? 106 years between Angra dos Reis and the other two meteorites is compatible with the difference between the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio of Angra dos Reis and that of seven basaltic achondrites observed by Papanastassiou and Wasserburg. The time difference is also comparable to that determined by 129I-129Xe chronology. The ages of ordinary chondrites (H5 and L6) range from 4.52 to 4.57 ?? 109 years, and, here too, time differences in the formation of the parent bodies or later metamorphic events are indicated. Carbonaceous chondrites (C2 and C3) appear to contain younger lead components.

  7. Meteorite heat capacities: Results to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G.; Macke, R.; Britt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Heat capacity is an essential thermal property for modeling asteroid internal metamorphism or differentiation, and dynamical effects like YORP or Yarkovsky perturbations. We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive method for measuring the heat capacity of meteorites at low temperature [1]. A sample is introduced into a dewar of liquid nitrogen and an electronic scale measures the amount of nitrogen boiled away as the sample is cooled from the room temperature to the liquid nitrogen temperature; given the heat of vaporization of liquid nitrogen, one can then calculate the heat lost from the sample during the cooling process. Note that heat capacity in this temperature range is a strong function of temperature, but this functional relation is essentially the same for all materials; the values we determine are equivalent to the heat capacity of the sample at 175 K. To correct for systematic errors, samples of laboratory-grade quartz are measured along with the meteorite samples. To date, more than 70 samples of more than 50 different meteorites have been measured in this way, including ordinary chondrites [1], irons [2], basaltic achondrites [3], and a limited number of carbonaceous chondrites [1]. In general, one can draw a number of important conclusions from these results. First, the heat capacity of a meteorite is a function of its mineral composition, independent of shock, metamorphism, or other physical state. Second, given this relation, heat capacity can be strongly altered by terrestrial weathering. Third, the measurement of heat capacity in small (less than 1 g) samples as done typically by commercial systems runs a serious risk of giving misleading results for samples that are heterogeneous on scales of tens of grams or more. Finally, we demonstrate that heat capacity is a useful tool for determining and classifying a sample, especially if used in conjunction with other intrinsic variables such as grain density and magnetic susceptibility

  8. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 92, 2007 September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Harold C.; Smith, Caroline; Benedix, Gretchen; Folco, Luigi; Righter, Kevin; Zipfel, Jutta; Yamaguchi, Akira; Aoudjehane, Hasnaa Chennaoui

    In this editon of The Meteoritical Bulletin, 1394 recognized meteorites are reported, 27 from specific locations within Africa, 133 from Northwest Africa, 1227 from Antartica (from ANSMET, PNRA, and PRIC expeditions), and 7 from Asia. The Meteoritical Bulletin announces the approval of four new names series by the Nomenclature Committee of the Meteoritical Society, two from Africa and one from Asia, including Al Haggounia, from Al Haggounia, Morocco, which is projected to be on the order of 3 metric tons of material related to enstatite chondrites and aubrites. Approved are two falls from Africa, Bassikounou (Mauretania) and Gashua (Nigeria). Approved from areas other than Antarctica are one lunar, two Martian, 32 other achondrites, three mesosiderites, two pallasites, one CM, two CK, one CR2, two CV3, one CR2, and four R chondrites. The Nomenclature Committee of the Meteoritical Society 48 newly approved relict meteorites from two new name series, Österplana and Gullhögen (both from Sweden).

  9. Variability in Abundances of Meteorites in the Ordovician

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, P. R.; Schmitz, B.; Kita, N.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge of the flux of extraterrestrial material throughout Earth's history is of great interest to reconstruct the collisional evolution of the asteroid belt. Here, we present a review of our investigations of the nature of the meteorite flux to Earth in the Ordovician, one of the best-studied time periods for extraterrestrial matter in the geological record [1]. We base our studies on compositions of extraterrestrial chromite and chrome-spinel extracted by acid dissolution from condensed marine limestone from Sweden and Russia [1-3]. By analyzing major and minor elements with EDS and WDS, and three oxygen isotopes with SIMS we classify the recovered meteoritic materials. Today, the L and H chondrites dominate the meteorite and coarse micrometeorite flux. Together with the rarer LL chondrites they have a type abundance of 80%. In the Ordovician it was very different: starting from 466 Ma ago 99% of the flux was comprised of L chondrites [2]. This was a result of the collisional breakup of the parent asteroid. This event occurred close to an orbital resonance in the asteroid belt and showered Earth with >100x more L chondritic material than today during more than 1 Ma. Although the flux is much lower at present, L chondrites are still the dominant type of meteorites that fall today. Before the asteroid breakup event 467 Ma ago the three groups of ordinary chondrites had about similar abundances. Surprisingly, they were possibly surpassed in abundance by achondrites, materials from partially and fully differentiated asteroids [3]. These achondrites include HED meteorites, which are presumably fragments released during the formation of the Rheasilvia impact structure 1 Ga ago on asteroid 4 Vesta. The enhanced abundance of LL chondrites is possibly a result of the Flora asteroid family forming event at 1 Ga ago. The higher abundance of primitive achondrites was likely due to smaller asteroid family forming events that have not been identified yet but that did

  10. Meteoritical Implications of the Vesta Asteroid Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. F.

    1993-07-01

    The discovery of a large dynamical family of basaltic asteroids associated with Vesta and extending to the 3:1 Jupiter resonance [1] provides firm evidence at last that Vesta is the actual parent body of the basaltic achondrite meteorites [2]. This discovery raises several interesting questions. The Vesta family demonstrates that objects as large as ~10km can be ejected from large asteroids at velocities up to 500 m/sec, which is adequate to deliver material to a strong resonance from almost anywhere in the asteroid belt. However, most other asteroid families show a much smaller range of ejection velocities and a more symmetrical distribution of the fragments in orbital element space. These families probably come from complete disruption of parent bodies, which would therefore appear to be the dominant process. Meteoritical evidence is also relevant. There are at least six large dunite (A-class) asteroids, only one of which is providing brachinites to the Earth. Even more striking, the Nysa asteroid family is predominantly composed of the mysterious F-class asteroids, which have no meteorite analog at all. The evidence suggests that the Vesta event is atypical and that there is considerable bias in meteorite delivery. The family is extended in a but narrowly confined in e and i. Curiously, Vesta is not at one end but in the middle. The very narrow sunward leg of the family contains a rare pure-olivine (Class A) asteroid among the many eucrites (Class V) and diogenites (Class J), while in the more diffuse anti-sunward leg no olivine objects have yet been found. This mineral distribution mimics the mineral map of Vesta derived from telescopic spectroscopy [3], in which a small olivine spot is semi-antipodal to a large diogenite patch. This suggests that the sunward leg is direct ejecta from a large crater, while the anti-sunward leg (and the populartion of HEDs reaching Earth) is composed of crustal fragments spalled off by focused shock waves. This mechanism is well

  11. Elemental composition analysis of stony meteorites discovered in Phitsanulok, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loylip, T.; Wannawichian, S.

    2017-09-01

    A meteorite is a fragment of pure stone, iron or the mixture of stony-iron. The falling of meteorites into Earth’s surface is part of Earth’s accretion process from dust and rocks in our solar system. When these fragments come close enough to the Earth to be attracted by its gravity, they may fall into the Earth. Following the detection of objects that fall from the sky onto a home in Phitsanulok in June 27, the meteorites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) instruments. The results from SEM/EDS analysis show that the meteorites are mainly composed of Fe-Ni and Fe-s. The meteorite is Achondrite, a class of meteorite which does not contain Chondrule. The meteorites in this work are thought to be part of a large asteroid.

  12. The Distinct Genetics of Carbonaceous and Non-Carbonaceous Meteorites Inferred from Molybdenum Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, G.; Burkhardt, C.; Kleine, T.

    2017-07-01

    Mo isotope systematics manifest a fundamental dichotomy in the genetic heritage of carbonaceous and non-carbonaceous meteorites. We discuss its implications in light of the most recent literature data and new isotope data for primitive achondrites.

  13. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Volume 11, Number 2, August 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Presented are classifications and descriptions of a large number of meteorites which include the last samples from the 1984 collection and the first samples from the 1987 collection. There is a particularly good selection of meteorites of special petrologic type in the 1987 collection. The achondrites include aubrites, ureilites, howardites, eucrites, and a diogenite. The howardites are particularly notable because of their size and previous scarcity in the Antarctic collection. Noteworthy among the 7 irons and 3 mesosiderities are 2 anamolous irons and 2 large mesosiderites. The carbonaceous chondrites include good suites of C2 and C4 meteorites, and 2 highly equilibrated carbonaceous chondrites tentatively identified as C5 and C6 meteorites. Also included are surveys of numerous meteorites for Al-26 and thermoluminescence. These studies provide information on the thermal and radiation histories of the meteorites and can be used as measures of their terrestrial ages.

  14. Mars Crust: Made of Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    By combining data from several sources, Harry Y. (Hap) McSween (University of Tennessee), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawaii) and Michael B. Wyatt (Brown University) show that the surface of Mars is composed mostly of basalt not unlike those that make up the Earth's oceanic crust. McSween and his colleagues used data from Martian meteorites, analyses of soils and rocks at robotic landing sites, and chemical and mineralogical information from orbiting spacecraft. The data show that Mars is composed mostly of rocks similar to terrestrial basalts called tholeiites, which make up most oceanic islands, mid-ocean ridges, and the seafloor beneath sediments. The Martian samples differ in some respects that reflect differences in the compositions of the Martian and terrestrial interiors, but in general are a lot like Earth basalts. Cosmochemistst have used the compositions of Martian meteorites to discriminate bulk properties of Mars and Earth, but McSween and coworkers' synthesis shows that the meteorites differ from most of the Martian crust (the meteorites have lower aluminum, for example), calling into question how diagnostic the meteorites are for understanding the Martian interior.

  15. THE LU ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF ACHONDRITES: CLOSING THE CASE FOR ACCELERATED DECAY OF {sup 176}LU

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wimpenny, Josh; Yin, Qing-zhu; Amelin, Yuri, E-mail: jbwimpenny@ucdavis.edu

    Studies of Lu–Hf isotope systematics in meteorites have produced apparent “ages” that are older than Pb–Pb ages and older than the estimated age of our solar system. One proposed explanation for this discrepancy is that irradiation by cosmic rays caused excitation of {sup 176}Lu to its short-lived isomer that then underwent rapid decay to {sup 176}Hf. This explanation can account for apparent excesses in {sup 176}Hf that correlate with Lu/Hf ratio. Mass balance requires that samples with measurable excess in {sup 176}Hf should also have measurable deficiencies in {sup 176}Lu on the order of 1‰–3‰. To unambiguously test the acceleratedmore » decay hypothesis, we have measured the {sup 176}Lu/{sup 175}Lu ratio in terrestrial materials and achondrites to search for evidence of depletion in {sup 176}Lu. To a precision of 0.1‰ terrestrial standards, cumulate and basaltic eucrites and angrites all have the same {sup 176}Lu/{sup 175}Lu ratio. Barring a subsequent mass-dependent fractionation event, these results suggest that the apparent excesses in {sup 176}Hf are not caused by accelerated decay of {sup 176}Lu, and so another hypothesis is required to explain apparently old Lu–Hf ages.« less

  16. Petrogenesis of the Elephant Moraine A79001 meteorite Multiple magma pulses on the shergottite parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.; Jarosewich, E.

    1983-01-01

    The EETA 79001 achondrite consists of two distinct igneous lithologies joined along a planar, non-brecciated contact. Both are basaltic rocks composed primarily of pigeonite, augite, and maskelynite, but one contains zoned megacrysts of olivine, orthopyroxene, and chromite that represent disaggregated xenoliths of harzburzite. Both lithologies probably formed from successive volcanic flows or multiple injections of magma into a small, shallow chamber. Many similarities between the two virtually synchronous magmas suggest that they are related. Possible mechanisms to explain their differences involve varying degrees of assimilation, fractionation from similar parental magmas, or partial melting of a similar source peridotite; of these, assimilation of the observed megacryst assemblage seems most plausible. However, some isotopic contamination may be required in any of these petrogenetic models. The meteorite has suffered extensive shock metamorphism and localized melting during a large impact event that probably excavated and liberated it from its parent body.

  17. Laboratory spectroscopy of HED meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, M.; Coradini, A.; Carli, C.; Ammannito, E.; Consolmagno, G.; De sanctis, M.; Di Iorio, T.; Turrini, D.

    2011-12-01

    4 Vesta is one of the largest and the most massive asteroid in the Main Asteroid Belt. This asteroid possesses a basaltic surface and apparently formed and differentiated very early in the history of the solar system. There are strong evidences that indicate Vesta as the parent body of Howardites, Diogenites and Eucrites (HEDs). HED meteorites are a subgroup of achondrite meteorites and they are a suite of rocks that formed at high temperature and experienced igneous processing similar to the magmatic rocks found on Earth. The visible and near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra of Vesta's surface show high similarity with the laboratory spectra of HED meteorites. Vesta and HEDs spectra have two crystal field absorption bands close to 0.9 μm and 1.9 μm indicative of the presence of ferrous iron in pyroxenes. The HEDs differ from each other primarily based on variation in pyroxene composition and the pyroxene-plagioclase ratio as well as rocks texture characteristics (e.g., size of crystals). These differences suggest that a combined VNIR spectra studies of Vesta and HED meteorites might reveal the different characteristics of the surface compositions and shed new light on the origin and the thermal history of Vesta. Moreover the link between Vesta and HEDs could provide a test bed to understand the short-lived radionuclide-driven differentiation of planetary bodies. Here we present preliminary result of a study of spectral characteristics of different HED samples, provided to us by the Vatican Observatory. Bidirectional reflectance spectra of slabs of meteorites are performed in the VNIR, between (0.35/2.50) μm, using a Fieldspec spectrometer mounted on a goniometer, in use at the SLAB (Spectroscopy laboratory, INAF, Rome). The spectra are acquired in standard conditions with an incidence angle i=30o and an emission angle e=0o, measuring a spot with a diameter of 5 mm. Different Howardite, Diogenite and Eucrite samples are "mapped" considering several spots on

  18. Meteorite falls in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiri, Fouad; Ibhi, Abderrahmane; Saint-Gerant, Thierry; Medjkane, Mohand; Ouknine, Lahcen

    2017-10-01

    The study of meteorites provides insight into the earliest history of our solar system. From 1800, about the year meteorites were first recognized as objects falling from the sky, until December 2014, 158 observed meteorite falls were recorded in Africa. Their collected mass ranges from 1.4 g to 175 kg with the 1-10 kg cases predominant. The average rate of African falls is low with only one fall recovery per 1.35-year time interval (or 0.023 per year per million km2). This African collection is dominated by ordinary chondrites (78%) just like in the worldwide falls. The seventeen achondrites include three Martian meteorite falls (Nakhla of Egypt, Tissint of Morocco and Zagami of Nigeria). Observed Iron meteorite falls are relatively rare and represent only 5%. The falls' rate in Africa is variable in time and in space. The number of falls continues to grow since 1860, 80% of which were recovered during the period between 1910 and 2014. Most of these documented meteorite falls have been recovered from North-Western Africa, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa. They are concentrated in countries which have a large surface area and a large population with a uniform distribution. Other factors are also favorable for observing and collecting meteorite falls across the African territory, such as: a genuine meteorite education, a semi-arid to arid climate (clear sky throughout the year most of the time), croplands or sparse grasslands and possible access to the fall location with a low percentage of forest cover and dense road network.

  19. Spatially Resolved Mid-IR Spectra from Meteorites; Linking Composition, Crystallographic Orientation and Spectra on the Micro-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N. R.

    2016-08-01

    IR spectroscopy is used to infer composition of extraterrestrial bodies, comparing bulk spectra to databases of separate mineral phases. We extract spatially resolved meteorite-specific spectra from achondrites with respect to zonation and orientation.

  20. Cosmogenic radionuclides in stone meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This document presents the techniques and compilation of results of cosmogenic Al-26 measurements at Goddard Space Flight Center on 91 samples of 76 stone meteorites. Short-lived radionuclides, including Na-22, Sc-46, Mn-54, and Co-60, were measured in 13 of these meteorites. About one-third of these data has not previously been published. The results are discussed briefly in terms of (1) depletion of Al-26 and natural potassium due to weathering, (2) possible exposure of several chondrites to an unusually high cosmic-ray flux, (3) comparison of Al-26, Na-22, Sc-46, and Mn5-54 in chondrites with the spallation Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio as a shielding indicator, and (4) comparison of (Al-26)-(Ne-22)/Ne-21 data for achondrite classes with the chondrite trend.

  1. Uranium-lead systematics of low-Ti basaltic meteorite Dhofar 287A: Affinity to Apollo 15 green glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Kentaro; Sasaki, Yu; Anand, Mahesh; Sano, Yuji; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Horie, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    Dhofar 287 is a lunar meteorite found in Oman in 2001, which consists of a major portion (95%) of low-Ti mare basalt (Dho 287A) and a minor attached part (˜ 5%) of regolith breccia (Dho 287B). Here, we report the U-Pb systematics of Dho 287A using data collected with a Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP). In-situ analyses of five merrillite and three apatite grains, which are resistant to secondary petrologic events, resulted in a total Pb/U isochron age of 3.34 ± 0.20 Ga, in 238U/206Pb-207Pb/206Pb-204Pb/206Pb 3-D space (95% confidence level). The observed Pb-Pb isochron of these eight phosphates coupled with four plagioclase grains also yielded a 207Pb/206Pb age of 3.35 ± 0.13 Ga. This formation age, when considered as the crystallization age of Dho 287A, is similar to crystallization ages of Apollo 15 low-Ti olivine-normative basalts (ONB; 3.3 ± 0.1 Ga). However, the estimated μ-value (238U/204Pb ratio) of Dho 287A is ˜ 18, which is very different from the reported μ-values of ˜ 300 for mare basalts from the Apollo collections, including the Apollo 15 ONBs. These μ-values are still significantly lower than those of Apollo KREEP basalt (500 to 1000), although a possible assimilation with KREEP has been previously proposed for Dho 287A using geochemical criteria. Our U-Pb study of Dho 287A, instead, indicates a closer affinity to Apollo 15 green glasses (207Pb/206Pb age of 3.41 Ga with μ-value of 19 to 55), which are considered to be the most primitive products of lunar volcanism. Combining our U-Pb data with the previously reported Sm-Nd systematics (negative ɛNd) of Dho 287A clearly distinguishes this meteorite from those of the Yamato 793169 and Asuka 88175 group which have extremely low μ-value of 10-22, old crystallization ages of 3.9 Ga, and high positive ɛNd, suggesting that Dho 287A may be a representative of an entirely new group of mare basalt derived from previously unsampled source region on the Moon.

  2. Unmelted meteoritic debris in the Late Pliocene iridium anomaly - Evidence for the ocean impact of a nonchondritic asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ir-bearing particles have been recovered from two piston cores in the Antarctic Basin in the southeastern Pacific. In core E13-3, the particles closely correspond to the Late Pliocene Ir anomaly and have a fluence of about 100 mg/cm sq. In core E13-4, 120 km to the southwest, the particle fluence is about 4 mg/cm sq. Particles with diameters from 0.5 to 4 mm contain at least 35 percent of the Ir in this horizon. Three types of particles have been identified: (1) vesicular, (2) basaltic, and (3) metal. The vesicular particles appear to be shock-melted debris derived from the oceanic impact of a howarditic asteroid containing a minor metal component. These particles have recrystallized from a melt and impact into the ocean has resulted in the incorporation of Na, K, Cl, and radiogenic Sr from the ocean water target. The basaltic clasts appear to be unmelted fragments of the original asteroid which may have separated from the main body prior to impact. Combined vesicular and basaltic particles are believed to have formed by collisions in the debris cloud. Estimates of the diameter of the projectile range from 100 to 500 m. By many orders of magnitude, this is the most massive achondrite sampled by a single meteorite fall.

  3. Meteorites for K-12 Classrooms: NASA Meteorite Educational Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, M.; Allen, J.

    1995-09-01

    The fall of a new meteorite is an event that catches the interest of the public in matters of science. The threat of a huge impact like last year's comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 gives us all reason to evaluate such potential risks. NASA's meteorite educational materials use our natural interest in rocks from space to present classroom activities on planetary science. The meteorite educational package includes a meteorite sample disk, a teachers's guide and a slide set. The sample disk is a lucite disk containing chips of six different kinds of meteorites (3 chondrites, achondrite, iron, stony-iron). EXPLORING METEORITE MYSTERIES is a teacher's guide with background information and 19 hands-on or heads-on activities for grades 4-12. It was prepared in a partnership of planetary scientists and teachers. The slide set consists of 48 slides with captions to be used with the activities. The materials will be available in Fall 1995. Teachers may obtain a loan of the whole package from NASA Teacher Resource Centers; researchers may borrow them from the JSC meteorite curator. The booklet is available separately from the same sources, and the slide set will be available from NASA CORE. EXPLORING METEORITE MYSTERIES is an interdisciplinary planetary science unit which teaches basic science concepts and techniques together with math, reading, writing and social studies The activities are done in a variety of different teaching styles which emphasize observation, experimentation and critical thinking. The activities are ideal for middle schools where teaming makes interdisciplinary units desireable, but most of the activities can be easily modified for grade levels from upper elementary through high school. Meteorites are a natural subject for interdisciplinary teaching because their study involves all fields of science and offers fascinating historical accounts and possibilities for creative expression. Topics covered in EXPLORING METEORITE MYSTERES are centered around basic

  4. Pulmonary Inflammatory Responses to Acute Meteorite Dust Exposures - to Acute Meteorite Dust Exposures - Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Kaur, J.; Smirnov, A.; Galdanes, K.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Chen, L. C.; Tsirka, S. E.; Gordon, T.

    2017-01-01

    New initiatives to begin lunar and martian colonization within the next few decades are illustrative of the resurgence of interest in space travel. One of NASA's major concerns with extended human space exploration is the inadvertent and repeated exposure to unknown dust. This highly interdisciplinary study evaluates both the geochemical reactivity (e.g. iron solubility and acellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation) and the relative toxicity (e.g. in vitro and in vivo pulmonary inflammation) of six meteorite samples representing either basalt or regolith breccia on the surface of the Moon, Mars, and Asteroid 4Vesta. Terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is also used for comparison. The MORB demonstrated higher geochemical reactivity than most of the meteorite samples but caused the lowest acute pulmonary inflammation (API). Notably, the two martian meteorites generated some of the highest API but only the basaltic sample is significantly reactive geochemically. Furthermore, while there is a correlation between a meteorite's soluble iron content and its ability to generate acellular ROS, there is no direct correlation between a particle's ability to generate ROS acellularly and its ability to generate API. However, assorted in vivo API markers did demonstrate strong positive correlations with increasing bulk Fenton metal content. In summary, this comprehensive dataset allows for not only the toxicological evaluation of astromaterials but also clarifies important correlations between geochemistry and health.

  5. Northwest Africa 5298: A Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Brandon, Alan; Shafer, John

    2009-01-01

    NWA 5298 is a single 445 g meteorite found near Bir Gandouz, Morocco in March 2008 [1]. This rock has a brown exterior weathered surface instead of a fusion crust and the interior is composed of green mineral grains with interstitial dark patches containing small vesicles and shock melts [1]. This meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite [2]. A petrologic study of this Martian meteorite is being carried out with electron microprobe analysis and soon trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Oxygen fugacity is calculated from Fe-Ti oxides pairs in the sample. The data from this study constrains the petrogenesis of basaltic shergottites.

  6. Consortium study of lunar meteorites Yamato-793169 and Asuka-881757: Geochemical evidence of mutual similarity, and dissimilarity versus other mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1993-01-01

    Compositions of bulk powders and separated minerals from two meteorites derived from the mare lava plains of the Earth's Moon, Yamato-793169 and Asuka-881757, indicate a remarkable degree of similarity to one another, and clearly favor lunar origin. However, these meteorites are unlike any previously studied lunar rock. In both cases, the bulk-rock TiO2 content is slightly greater than the level separating VLT from low-Ti mare basalt, yet the Sc content is much higher than previously observed except among high-Ti mare basalts. Conceivably, the Sc enrichment in A881757 reflects origin of this rock as a cumulate from a mare magma of 'normal' Sc content, but this seems unlikely. Mineral-separate data suggest that most of the Sc is in pyroxene, and a variety of evidence weighs against the cumulus hypothesis as a major cause for the high Sc. The remarkable similarity between Y793169 and A881757 suggests the possibility that they were derived from a single source crater on the Moon.

  7. Lunar Mare Basalts as Analogues for Martian Volcanic Compositions: Evidence from Visible, Near-IR, and Thermal Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The lunar mare basalts potentially provide a unique sample suite for understanding the nature of basalts on the martian surface. Our current knowledge of the mineralogical and chemical composition of the basaltic material on Mars comes from studies of the basaltic martian meteorites and from orbital and surface remote sensing observations. Petrographic observations of basaltic martian meteorites (e.g., Shergotty, Zagami, and EETA79001) show that the dominant phases are pyroxene (primarily pigeonite and augite), maskelynite (a diaplectic glass formed from plagioclase by shock), and olivine [1,2]. Pigeonite, a low calcium pyroxene, is generally not found in abundance in terrestrial basalts, but does often occur on the Moon [3]. Lunar samples thus provide a means to examine a variety of pigeonite-rich basalts that also have bulk elemental compositions (particularly low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalts) that are comparable to basaltic SNC meteorites [4,5]. Furthermore, lunar basalts may be mineralogically better suited as analogues of the martian surface basalts than the basaltic martian meteorites because the plagioclase feldspar in the basaltic Martian meteorites, but not in the lunar surface basalts, is largely present as maskelynite [1,2]. Analysis of lunar mare basalts my also lead to additional endmember spectra for spectral libraries. This is particularly important analysis of martian thermal emission spectra, because the spectral library apparently contains a single pigeonite spectrum derived from a synthetic sample [6].

  8. Laboratory mid-IR spectra of equilibrated and igneous meteorites. Searching for observables of planetesimal debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, B. L.; Skogby, H.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Min, M.

    2018-06-01

    Meteorites contain minerals from Solar System asteroids with different properties (like size, presence of water, core formation). We provide new mid-IR transmission spectra of powdered meteorites to obtain templates of how mid-IR spectra of asteroidal debris would look like. This is essential for interpreting mid-IR spectra of past and future space observatories, like the James Webb Space Telescope. First we present new transmission spectra of powdered ordinary chondrite, pallasite and HED meteorites and then we combine them with already available transmission spectra of chondrites in the literature, giving a total set of 64 transmission spectra. In detail we study the spectral features of minerals in these spectra to obtain measurables used to spectroscopically distinguish between meteorite groups. Being able to differentiate between dust from different meteorite types means we can probe properties of parent bodies, like their size, if they were wet or dry and if they are differentiated (core formation) or not. We show that the transmission spectra of wet and dry chondrites, carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites and achondrite and chondrite meteorites are distinctly different in a way one can distinguish in astronomical mid-IR spectra. Carbonaceous chondrites type < 3 (aqueously altered) show distinct features of hydrated silicates (hydrosilicates) compared to the olivine and pyroxene rich ordinary chondrites (dry and equilibrated meteorites). Also the iron concentration of the olivine in carbonaceous chondrites differs from ordinary chondrites, which can be probed by the wavelength peak position of the olivine spectral features. The transmission spectra of chondrites (not differentiated) are also strongly different from the achondrite HED meteorites (meteorites from differentiated bodies like 4 Vesta), where the latter show much stronger pyroxene signatures. The two observables that spectroscopically separate the different meteorites groups (and thus the different

  9. Asteroid 2008 TC3 Breakup and Meteorite Fractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Fioretti, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The recovery of meteorites from the impact of asteroid 2008 TC3 in the Nubian Desert of Sudan on October 7, 2008, marked the first time meteorites were collected from an asteroid observed in space by astronomical techniques before impacting. Search teams from the University of Khartoum traced the location of the strewn field and collected about 660 meteorites in four expeditions to the fall region, all of which have known fall coordinates. Upon further study, the Almahata Sitta meteorites proved to be a mixed bag of mostly ureilites (course grained, fine grained, and sulfide-metal assemblages), enstatite chondrites (EL3-6, EH3, EH5, breccias) and ordinary chondrites (H5-6, L4-5). One bencubbinite-like carbonaceous chondrite was identified, as well as one unique Rumuruti-like chondrite and an Enstatite achondrite. New analysis: The analysed meteorites so far suggest a high 30-40 percent fraction of non-ureilites among the recovered samples, but that high fraction does not appear to be in agreement with the meteorites in the University of Khartoum (UoK) collection. Ureilites dominate the meteorites that were recovered by the Sudanese teams. To better understand the fraction of recovered materials that fell to Earth, a program has been initiated to type the meteorites in the UoK collection in defined search areas. At this meeting, we will present some preliminary results from that investigation.

  10. The distribution of evaporitic weathering products on Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velbel, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    White evaporite deposits of terrestrial origin occur on some 5 percent of Antarctic meteorites. The few previous studies, and new mineralogical analyses, indicate that the deposits are predominately carbonates and/or sulfates of magnesium. The distribution of white evaporitic salt deposits differs among different meteorite compositional groups and weathering categories. Salts occur with unusual frequency on carbonaceous chondrites, and are especially common in carbonaceous chondrites of weathering categories A and B. Among achondrites, weathering categories A and A/B show the most examples of salt weathering. Unlike carbonaceous chondrites and achrondites, most salt-bearing ordinary (H and L) chondrites are from rustier meteorites of weathering categories B, and to a lesser degree, B/C and C. The LL chondrites are conspicuous by their complete lack or any salt-weathering product. Almost two-thirds of all evaporite-bearing meteorites belong to weathering categories, A, A/B, and B. Where chemical and/or mineralogical data are available, there is a persistent suggestion that evaporite formation is accompanied by elemental redistribution from meteorite interiors. Meteorites of weathering categories B, A/B, and even A may have experienced significant element redistribution and/or contamination as a result of terrestrial exposure.

  11. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: implications for possible life in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Coleman, A.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martian meteorite ALH84001.

  12. On the original igneous source of Martian fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.; Clark, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    The composition of the silicate portion of Martian regolith fines indicates derivation of the fines from mafic to ultramafic rocks, probably rich in pyroxene. Rock types similar in chemical and mineralogical composition include terrestrial Archean basalts and certain achondrite meteorites. If these igneous rocks weathered nearly isochemically, the nontronitic clays proposed earlier as an analog to Martian fines could be formed. Flood basalts of pyroxenitic lavas may be widespread and characteristic of early volcanism on Mars, analogous to maria flood basalts on the moon and early Precambrian basaltic komatiites on earth. Compositional differences between lunar, terrestrial, and Martian flood basalts may be related to differences in planetary sizes and mantle compositions of the respective planetary objects.

  13. Reduction of mare basalts by sulfur loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic Fe content and S abundance are inversely correlated in mare basalts. Either S volatilization from the melt results in reduction of Fe2+ to Fe0 or else high S content decreases Fe0 activity in the melt, thus explaining the correlation. All considerations favor the model that metallic iron in mare basalts is due to sulfur loss. The Apollo 11 and 17 mare basalt melts were probably saturated with S at the time of eruption; the Apollo 12 and 15 basalts were probably not saturated. Non-mare rocks show a positive correlation of S abundance with metallic Fe content; it is proposed that this is due to the addition of meteoritic material having a fairly constant Fe0/S ratio. If true, metallic Fe content or S abundance in non-mare rocks provides a measure of degree of meteoritic contamination. ?? 1976.

  14. Paleomagnetic Evidence for Partial Differentiation of the Silicate-Bearing IIE Iron Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, C.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Weiss, B. P.; Scholl, A.

    2016-12-01

    The identification of dozens of petrologically diverse chondritic and achondritic meteoritic groups indicates that a diversity of planetesimals formed in the early solar system. It is commonly thought that planetesimals formed as either unmelted or else fully differentiated bodies, implying that chondrites and achondrites cannot have originated on a single body. However, it has been suggested that partially melted bodies with chondritic crusts and achondritic interiors may also have formed. This alternative proposal is supported by the recent identification of post-accretional remanent magnetization in CV, H chondrites, and also possibly in CM chondrites, which has been interpreted as possible evidence for a core dynamo on their parent bodies. Other piece of evidence suggesting the existence of partially differentiated bodies is the existence of the silicate-bearing IIE iron meteorites. The IIEs are composed of a Fe-Ni alloy matrix containing a mixture of chondritic, primitive achondritic, and chondritic silicate inclusions that likely formed on a single parent body. Therefore, IIEs may sample all three putative layers of a layered, partially differentiated body. On the other hand, the siderophile element compositions of the matrix metal demonstrate that it is not the product of fractional crystallization of a molten core. This suggests that the matrix metal is derived from isolated reservoirs of metal in the mantle and/or crust. It is unknown whether a large-scale metallic core, not represented by known meteorite samples, also formed on the same parent planetesimal. We can search for evidence of a molten, advecting core by assessing whether IIE irons contain remanent magnetization produced by a core dynamo. With this goal, we studied the paleomagnetism of a cloudy zone (CZ) interface in the Fe-Ni matrix of the IIE iron Colomera using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM). Our initial results suggest that a steady, intense magnetic field was present

  15. Paleomagnetic Evidence for Partial Differentiation of the Silicate-Bearing IIE Iron Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, C.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Weiss, B. P.; Scholl, A.

    2017-12-01

    The identification of dozens of petrologically diverse chondritic and achondritic meteoritic groups indicates that a diversity of planetesimals formed in the early solar system. It is commonly thought that planetesimals formed as either unmelted or else fully differentiated bodies, implying that chondrites and achondrites cannot have originated on a single body. However, it has been suggested that partially melted bodies with chondritic crusts and achondritic interiors may also have formed. This alternative proposal is supported by the recent identification of post-accretional remanent magnetization in CV, H chondrites, and also possibly in CM chondrites, which has been interpreted as possible evidence for a core dynamo on their parent bodies. Other piece of evidence suggesting the existence of partially differentiated bodies is the existence of the silicate-bearing IIE iron meteorites. The IIEs are composed of a Fe-Ni alloy matrix containing a mixture of chondritic, primitive achondritic, and chondritic silicate inclusions that likely formed on a single parent body. Therefore, IIEs may sample all three putative layers of a layered, partially differentiated body. On the other hand, the siderophile element compositions of the matrix metal demonstrate that it is not the product of fractional crystallization of a molten core. This suggests that the matrix metal is derived from isolated reservoirs of metal in the mantle and/or crust. It is unknown whether a large-scale metallic core, not represented by known meteorite samples, also formed on the same parent planetesimal. We can search for evidence of a molten, advecting core by assessing whether IIE irons contain remanent magnetization produced by a core dynamo. With this goal, we studied the paleomagnetism of a cloudy zone (CZ) interface in the Fe-Ni matrix of the IIE iron Colomera using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM). Our initial results suggest that a steady, intense magnetic field was present

  16. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: Implications for possible life in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Wentworth, S.J.; Allen, C.C.

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, the authors have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralizedmore » filaments are recognized in martial meteorite ALH84001.« less

  17. Asteroid-Meteorite Links: The Vesta Conundrum(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.; Binzel, R.; Bogard, D.; Hiroi, T.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Nyquist, L.; Rivkin, A.; Takeda, H.

    2006-01-01

    Although a direct link between the HED meteorites and the asteroid 4 Vesta is generally acknowledged, several issues continue to be actively examined that tie Vesta to early processes in the solar system. Vesta is no longer the only basaltic asteroid in the Main belt. In addition to the Vestoids of the Vesta family, the small asteroid Magnya is basaltic but appears to be unrelated to Vesta. Similarly, diversity now identified in the collection of basaltic meteorites requires more than one basaltic parent body, consistent with the abundance of differentiated parent bodies implied by iron meteorites. The timing of the formation of the Vestoids (and presumably the large crater at the south pole of Vesta) is unresolved. Peaks in Ar-Ar dates of eucrites suggest this impact event could be related to a possible late heavy bombardment at least 3.5 Gyr ago. On the other hand, the optically fresh appearance of both Vesta and the Vestoids requires either a relatively recent resurfacing event or that their surfaces do not weather in the same manner thought to occur on other asteroids such as the ordinary chondrite parent body. Diversity across the surface of Vesta has been observed with HST and there are hints of compositional variations (possibly involving minor olivine) in near-infrared spectra.

  18. In search of the Earth-forming reservoir: Mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic characterizations of the ungrouped achondrite NWA 5363/NWA 5400 and selected chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Dauphas, Nicolas; Tang, Haolan; Fischer-GöDde, Mario; Qin, Liping; Chen, James H.; Rout, Surya S.; Pack, Andreas; Heck, Philipp R.; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.

    2017-05-01

    High-precision isotope data of meteorites show that the long-standing notion of a "chondritic uniform reservoir" is not always applicable for describing the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth and other planetary bodies. To mitigate the effects of this "isotopic crisis" and to better understand the genetic relations of meteorites and the Earth-forming reservoir, we performed a comprehensive petrographic, elemental, and multi-isotopic (O, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Mo, Ru, and W) study of the ungrouped achondrites NWA 5363 and NWA 5400, for both of which terrestrial O isotope signatures were previously reported. Also, we obtained isotope data for the chondrites Pillistfer (EL6), Allegan (H6), and Allende (CV3), and compiled available anomaly data for undifferentiated and differentiated meteorites. The chemical compositions of NWA 5363 and NWA 5400 are strikingly similar, except for fluid mobile elements tracing desert weathering. We show that NWA 5363 and NWA 5400 are paired samples from a primitive achondrite parent-body and interpret these rocks as restite assemblages after silicate melt extraction and siderophile element addition. Hafnium-tungsten chronology yields a model age of 2.2 ± 0.8 Myr after CAI, which probably dates both of these events within uncertainty. We confirm the terrestrial O isotope signature of NWA 5363/NWA 5400; however, the discovery of nucleosynthetic anomalies in Ca, Ti, Cr, Mo, and Ru reveals that the NWA5363/NWA 5400 parent-body is not the "missing link" that could explain the composition of the Earth by the mixing of known meteorites. Until this "missing link" or a direct sample of the terrestrial reservoir is identified, guidelines are provided of how to use chondrites for estimating the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth.

  19. Barium isotope abundances in meteorites and their implications for early Solar System evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermingham, K. R.; Mezger, K.; Scherer, E. E.; Horan, M. F.; Carlson, R. W.; Upadhyay, D.; Magna, T.; Pack, A.

    2016-02-01

    Several nucleosynthetic processes contributed material to the Solar System, but the relative contributions of each process, the timing of their input into the solar nebula, and how well these components were homogenized in the solar nebula remain only partially constrained. The Ba isotope system is particularly useful in addressing these issues because Ba isotopes are synthesized via three nucleosynthetic processes (s-, r-, p-process). In this study, high precision Ba isotope analyses of 22 different whole rock chondrites and achondrites (carbonaceous chondrites, ordinary chondrites, enstatite chondrites, Martian meteorites, and eucrites) were performed to constrain the distribution of Ba isotopes on the regional scale in the Solar System. A melting method using aerodynamic levitation and CO2-laser heating was used to oxidize SiC, a primary carrier of Ba among presolar grains in carbonaceous chondrites. Destruction of these grains during the fusion process enabled the complete digestion of these samples. The Ba isotope data presented here are thus the first for which complete dissolution of the bulk meteorite samples was certain. Enstatite chondrites, ordinary chondrites, and all achondrites measured here possess Ba isotope compositions that are not resolved from the terrestrial composition. Barium isotope anomalies are evident in most of the carbonaceous chondrites analyzed, but the 135Ba anomalies are generally smaller than previously reported for similarly sized splits of CM2 meteorites. Variation in the size of the 135Ba anomaly is also apparent in fused samples from the same parent body (e.g., CM2 meteorites) and in different pieces from the same meteorite (e.g., Orgueil, CI). Here, we investigate the potential causes of variability in 135Ba, including the contribution of radiogenic 135Ba from the decay of 135Cs and incomplete homogenization of the presolar components on the <0.8 g sample scale.

  20. Basaltic Soil of Gale Crater: Crystalline Component Compared to Martian Basalts and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schmidt, M.; Downs, R. T.; Stolper, E. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Achilles, C. N.; hide

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of the soil of the Rocknest dune is crystalline and is consistent with derivation from unweathered basalt. Minerals and their compositions are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument on MSL Curiosity. Basalt minerals in the soil include plagioclase, olivine, low- and high-calcium pyroxenes, magnetite, ilmenite, and quartz. The only minerals unlikely to have formed in an unaltered basalt are hematite and anhydrite. The mineral proportions and compositions of the Rocknest soil are nearly identical to those of the Adirondack-class basalts of Gusev Crater, Mars, inferred from their bulk composition as analyzed by the MER Spirit rover.

  1. Mineralogy and chemistry of planets and meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The data collection and the interpretation with respect to the mineralogy of meteoritic and terrestrial samples are summarized. The key conclusion is that the Moon underwent a series of melting episodes with complex crystal-liquid differentiation. It was not possible to determine whether the Moon melted completely or only partially. The stage is now set for a systematical geochemical and geophysical survey of the Moon. Emphasis was moved to meteorites in order to sort out their interrelationships from the viewpoint of mineral chemistry. Several parent bodies are needed for the achondrites with different chemical properties. Exploration of Mars is required to test ideas based on the possible assignment of shergottites, nakhlites and chassignite to this planet. Early rocks on the Earth have properties consistent with a heavy bombardment and strong volcanic activity prior to 4 billion years ago.

  2. Composition and evolution of the eucrite parent body - Evidence from rare earth elements. [extraterrestrial basaltic melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consolmagno, G. J.; Drake, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative modeling of the evolution of rare earth element (REE) abundances in the eucrites, which are plagioclase-pigeonite basalt achondrites, indicates that the main group of eucrites (e.g., Juvinas) might have been produced by approximately 10% equilibrium partial melting of a single type of source region with initial REE abundances which were chondritic relative and absolute. Since the age of the eucrites is about equal to that of the solar system, extensive chemical differentiation of the eucrite parent body prior to the formation of eucrites seems unlikely. If homogeneous accretion is assumed, the bulk composition of the eucrite parent body can be estimated; two estimates are provided, representing different hypotheses as to the ratio of metal to olivine in the parent body. Since a large number of differentiated olivine meteorites, which would represent material from the interior of the parent body, have not been detected, the eucrite parent body is thought to be intact. It is suggested that the asteroid 4 Vesta is the eucrite parent body.

  3. Lunar Meteorite Dhofar 026: A Second-Generation Impact Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Taylor, L. A.; Nazarov, M.

    2001-03-01

    Petrology and mineral-chemistry of lunar highlands meteorite Dhofar 026 show that it is a crystalline impact melt of FAN-type material. Crystalline spherules within the meteorite are earlier impact melt fragments derived from a basaltic precursor.

  4. Oriented Mineral Transformation in a Dark Inclusion from the Leoville Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, P. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Hagiya, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Takenouchi, A.; Hasegawa, H.; Ono, H.; Higashi, K.; Ohsumi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Dark inclusions (DIs) in chondrites and achondrites are dark gray to black fragments that include a wide variety of materials that have experienced very different petrologic histories. Based on the law of inclusions, they are rocks that accreted prior to and are older than their host meteorites and possibly rep-resent an earlier generation of material. The origin of these inclusions and their relationship to their host meteorites is not always clear. They are interesting in that they represent lithologies that experienced different parent body histories than their host meteorites and are either exotic components or originated from different regions of the meteorite parent body. In many cases, DIs in CV chondrites have been altered to greater degrees than their host meteorites suggesting pre accretionary alteration [e.g., 1,2,3]. There is debate concerning whether or not these DIs record an earlier era of aqueous alteration and subsequent thermal metamorphism, and how these processes may have also affected the host CV materials. The present study is a description of a dark inclusion found in the Leoville meteorite (specifically, thin section USNM 3535-1). This inclusion has some interesting features that have considerable relevance for this discussion.

  5. A Thermal Infrared Emission Spectra Library for Unpowdered Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mid-infrared thermal emission spectra have been obtained for whole-rock (unpowdered) samples of the following 25 meteorites: Abee, Admire, Allende, Bondoc, Brahin, Bruderheim, Canyon Diablo, Carichic, Clover Springs, Dhofar 007, Estherville, Holbrook, Juancheng, Kapoeta, Long Island, Marion, Modoc, ALH77225, ALH77233, ALH84082, LEW85322, ALH85025, ALH79029, ALH77004, and LEW86015. Meteorites were provided through the Center for Meteorite Studies at ASU, Johnson Space Center and the NASA Antarctic Meteorite Working Group, and from private collections. The database was prepared to aid in the on-going detection and interpretation of meteorites on Mars using the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) instruments on both Mars Exploration Rovers. It therefore includes several specimens of low, moderate, and high weathering intensities, reflecting different levels of water exposure in desert and non-desert environments. Unweathered falls are also considered. Samples represent all three chondrite classes, stony irons (mesosiderites and pallasites), and select achondrites. Special consideration is given to dust-covered iron-nickel meteorites as part of a separate study designed to evaluate the Mini-TES spectra of iron-nickel meteorites on Mars. All samples were analyzed at or near a temperature of 80° C using a modified Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR spectrometer at the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. Data were collected within the 2000 to 200 wavenumber (5 to 50 microns) mid-infrared range. The results show that many meteorite types display moderate to wide variability in the depth and position of prominent absorption features, making them easily distinguishable from each other. Most previous meteorite spectroscopy studies have either focused on near-infrared reflectance spectra [e.g. 1], and/or involved powdered samples to represent asteroid regoliths in the mid-infrared [e.g. 2 & 3]. Particle size- related issues are often at the heart of

  6. Measured oxygen fugacities of the Angra dos Reis achondrite as a function of temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Stephen, Huebner J.; Sato, M.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the oxygen fugacity (f{hook}O2) as a function of temperature (T) were made on an interior bulk sample of the cumulate achondrite, Angra dos Reis. Data clustered between the f{hook}O2-T relationship of the iron-wu??stite assemblage and 1.2 log atm units above iron-wu??stite. Interpretation of the data indicates that, throughout most of the cooling history of the meteorite, f{hook}O2 values were defined by equilibria involving iron-bearing species at values close to the f{hook}O2 of the assemblage iron-wu??stite. Measured f{hook}O2 data are compatible with crystallization and cooling at pressures greater than 50 bars. ?? 1977.

  7. VESTOIDS, PART II: THE BASALTIC NATURE AND HED METEORITE ANALOGS FOR EIGHT V{sub p}-TYPE ASTEROIDS AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH (4) VESTA

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hardersen, Paul S.; Reddy, Vishnu; Roberts, Rachel, E-mail: Hardersen@space.edu

    Improving the constraints on the abundance of basaltic asteroids in the main asteroid belt is necessary for better understanding the thermal and collisional environment in the early solar system, for more rigorously identifying the genetic family for (4) Vesta, for determining the effectiveness of Yarkovsky/YORP in dispersing asteroid families, and for better quantifying the population of basaltic asteroids in the outer main belt (a > 2.5 AU) that is likely unrelated to (4) Vesta. Near-infrared (NIR) spectral observations in this work were obtained for the V{sub p}-type asteroids (2011) Veteraniya, (5875) Kuga, (8149) Ruff, (9147) Kourakuen, (9553) Colas, (15237) 1988 RL{sub 6},more » (31414) Rotaryusa, and (32940) 1995 UW{sub 4} during 2014 August/September utilizing the SpeX spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Spectral band parameter (band centers, band area ratios) and mineralogical analysis (pyroxene chemistry) for each average asteroid NIR reflectance spectrum suggest a howardite–eucrite–diogenite meteorite analog for each asteroid. (5875) Kuga is most closely associated with the eucrite meteorites, (31414) Rotaryusa is most closely associated with the diogenites, and the remaining other six asteroids are most closely associated with the howardite meteorites. Along with their orbital locations in the inner main belt and in the vicinity of (4) Vesta, the existing evidence suggests that these eight V{sub p}-type asteroids are also likely Vestoids.« less

  8. Paired lunar meteorites MAC88104 and MAC88105 - A new 'FAN' of lunar petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Lui, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1991-11-01

    To determine the chemical characteristics of the MAC88104/5 meteorite six thin sections and three bulk samples were analyzed by electron microprobe and instrumental neutron activation. It is concluded that this meteorite is dominated by lithologies of the ferroan anorthosite suite and contains abundant granulitized highland clasts, devitrified glass beads of impact origin, and two small clasts of basaltic origin. It is suggested that one of these basaltic clasts, clast E, is mesostasis material, and clast G is similar to the very low-Ti or low-Ti/high-alumina mare basalts. Impact melt clasts MAC88105, 69, and 72 have major and trace element compositions similar to the bulk meteorite.

  9. Crystal fractionation in the SNC meteorites: Implications for sample selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1988-01-01

    Almost all rock types in the SNC meteorites are cumulates, products of magma differentiation by crystal fractionation (addition or removal of crystals). If the SNC meteorites are from the surface of Mars or near subsurface, then most of the igneous units on Mars are differentiated. Basaltic units probably experienced minor to moderate differientation, but ultrabasic units probably experienced extreme differentiation. Products of this differentiation may include Fe-rich gabbro, pyroxenite, periodotite (and thus serpentine), and possibly massive sulfides. The SNC meteorites include ten lithologies (three in EETA79001), eight of which are crystal cumulates. The other lithologies, EETA79001 A and B are subophitic basalts.

  10. Titanium, vanadium and chromium valences in silicates of ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 and ureilite Y-791538 record highly-reduced origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Goodrich, C. A.; Wirick, S.

    2017-05-01

    Titanium, Cr, and V valences were determined by applying micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (micro-XANES) spectroscopy methods to individual grains of olivine and pyroxene in the ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 and ureilite Y-791538, as well as to plagioclase in NWA 7325. The advantages of applying multiple, multivalent-element-based oxybarometers to individual grains are (1) the ability to cover the entire oxygen fugacity (fO2) range encountered in nature, and (2) the increased reliability from consistent results for semi-independent fO2 proxies. fO2 values were inferred from each mineral valence determination after correcting with available laboratory-experiment-derived, valence-specific partition coefficients to obtain melt valences and then calibrating with the fO2 values of the relevant equal species proportions points suggested for igneous (primarily basaltic) systems. The resulting olivine and pyroxene valences are highly reduced and similar in the two meteorites with substantial fractions of Cr2+, Ti3+ and V2+. The exception is Cr in NWA 7325 pyroxene which is much more oxidized than the Cr in its olivine. Chromium and Ti in plagioclase in NWA 7325 is relatively oxidized (V valence not determined). The anomalously oxidized Cr in NWA 7325 pyroxene may be due to a secondary reheating event that oxidized Cr in the pyroxene without similarly oxidizing Ti and V. Such a separation of the redox couples may be an effect of re-equilibration kinetics, where the valence of Cr would be more rapidly modified. These valences yielded similar mean fO2s for the two meteorites; IW-3.1 ± 0.2 for NWA 7325 and IW-2.8 ± 0.2 for Y-791538, consistent with an origin of NWA 7325 in either Mercury or an asteroid that experienced redox conditions similar to those on the ureilite parent body.

  11. Curation of US Martian Meteorites Collected in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M.; Satterwhite, C.; Allton, J.; Stansbury, E.

    1998-01-01

    To date the ANSMET field team has collected five martian meteorites (see below) in Antarctica and returned them for curation at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Meteorite Processing Laboratory (MPL). ne meteorites were collected with the clean procedures used by ANSMET in collecting all meteorites: They were handled with JSC-cleaned tools, packaged in clean bags, and shipped frozen to JSC. The five martian meteorites vary significantly in size (12-7942 g) and rock type (basalts, lherzolites, and orthopyroxenite). Detailed descriptions are provided in the Mars Meteorite compendium, which describes classification, curation and research results. A table gives the names, classifications and original and curatorial masses of the martian meteorites. The MPL and measures for contamination control are described.

  12. 1991 Urey Prize Lecture: Physical evolution in the solar system - Present observations as a key to the past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The present evaluation of the use of new observational methods for exploring solar system evolutionary processes gives attention to illustrative cases from the constraining of near-earth asteroid sources and the discovery of main-belt asteroid fragments which indicate Vesta to be a source of basaltic achondrite meteorites. The coupling of observational constraints with numerical models clarifies cratering and collisional evolution for both main-belt and Trojan asteroids.

  13. Iron Mossbauer spectral study of weathered Antarctic and SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solberg, T. C.; Burns, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Mossbauer spectral measurements were made on suites of finds from Antarctica and falls collected elsewhere in order to distinguish preterrestrial oxidation products formed on parent meteorite bodies from secondary minerals derived from chemical weathering on earth. Ferric iron is shown to be present throughout the interiors of all the specimens, in amounts ranging from less than 1 to greater than 30 percent Fe(3+). The results indicate that achondrites found to date did not originate from the outermost surface of Mars.

  14. The Nakhla Martian Meteorite is a Cumulate Igenous Rock. Comment on "Glass-Bearing Inclusions in Nakhla (SNC Meteorite) Augite: Heterogeneously Trapped Phases"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    All the properties of the Nakhla Martian meteorite suggest that it is a cumulate igneous rock, formed from a basaltic parental magma. Anomalous magmatic inclusions in Nakhla s augite grains can be explained by disequilibrium processes during crystal growth, and have little significance in the geological history of the meteorite.

  15. Spectra of 5261 Eureka and its family: meteorite spectral analogues of asteroidal and planetary origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, Joshua P.; Mueller, Michael; Rivkin, Andrew S.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Trilling, David E.

    2017-10-01

    The Mars trojan asteroid (5261) Eureka is now known to be the largest member of a dynamical family whose near-IR spectra are dominated by the 1-micron band of olivine (Christou et al. 2013, Ćuk et al. 2015, Borisov et al. 2017, Christou et al. 2017). Recently, Polishook et al. (2017) have suggested that the olivine-dominated spectra of Eureka and two of its family members imply an achondritic composition, which forms an important part of their argument that these objects originated in the Martian mantle. However, we note that the olivine-rich composition of Eureka and its family members is consistent not only with achondrites of planetary origin, but also with achondrites of asteroidal origin such as brachinites and indeed with the R chondrites (e.g. Lim et al. 2011, Sanchez et al. 2014). The Spitzer IRS spectrum of 5261 Eureka will be discussed together with the extant near-IR spectra from the Eureka family in the context of candidate meteorite analogues and their laboratory spectra.

  16. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Volume 31, No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satterwhite, Cecilia (Editor); Righter, Kevin (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This newsletter reports 418 new meteorites from the 2004 and 2006 ANSMET seasons from the Cumulus Hills (CMS), LaPaz Ice Field (LAP), Graves Nunataks (GRA), Grosvenor Mountains (GRO), Larkman Nunatak (LAR), MacAlpine Hills (MAC), Miller Range (MIL), Roberts Massif (RBT), and Scott Glacier (SCO). These new samples include one iron, 1 eucrite, 1 mesosiderite, 6 CK chondrites (2 with pairing), 2 CV3 chondrites, 1 CM1, 7 CM2 (4 with pairing), 3 CR2 (2 with pairing), and one each of a type 3 L and H chondrites. The CK6 chondrites (LAR 06869, 06872, 06873) are unusual in that they have no discernable chondrules, extremely fine-grained texture, and are full of veins. This newsletter represents a break from recent newsletters in which we have announced many unusual and popular samples, including new lunar and martian meteorites, an unusual achondrite (GRA 06128 and 06129 the topic of a special session at this years LPSC).

  17. Do L chondrites come from the Gefion family?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2018-05-01

    Ordinary chondrites (H, L, and LL chondrites) are the most common type of meteorites comprising 80 per cent of the meteorites that fall on Earth. The source region of these meteorites in the main asteroid belt has been a basis of considerable debate in the small bodies community. L chondrites have been proposed to come from the Gefion asteroid family, based on dynamical models. We present results from our observational campaign to verify a link between the Gefion asteroid family and L chondrite meteorites. Near-infrared spectra of Gefion family asteroids (1839) Ragazza, (2373) Immo, (2386) Nikonov, (2521) Heidi, and (3860) Plovdiv were obtained at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Spectral band parameters including band centres and the band area ratio were measured from each spectrum and used to constrain the composition of these asteroids. Based on our results, we found that some members of the Gefion family have surface composition similar to that of H chondrites, primitive achondrites, and basaltic achondrites. No evidence was found for L chondrites among the Gefion family members in our small sample study. The diversity of compositional types observed in the Gefion asteroid family suggests that the original parent body might be partially differentiated or that the three asteroids with non-ordinary chondrite compositions might be interlopers.

  18. FT-IR and µ-IR characterization of HED meteorites in relation to infrared spectra of Vesta-like asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Stefani, S.; Longobardo, A.; Rotundi, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of the FT-IR and µ-IR study of three Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite meteorites (HEDs) compared to the spectroscopic data collected by VIR onboard Dawn spacecraft. The origin of this group of achondrites is thought to be linked to the asteroid 4 Vesta, hypothesis lately reinforced by the data provided by the Dawn mission.

  19. Oxygen isotope variation in stony-iron meteorites.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, R C; Franchi, I A; Jambon, A; Barrat, J A; Burbine, T H

    2006-09-22

    Asteroidal material, delivered to Earth as meteorites, preserves a record of the earliest stages of planetary formation. High-precision oxygen isotope analyses for the two major groups of stony-iron meteorites (main-group pallasites and mesosiderites) demonstrate that each group is from a distinct asteroidal source. Mesosiderites are isotopically identical to the howardite-eucrite-diogenite clan and, like them, are probably derived from the asteroid 4 Vesta. Main-group pallasites represent intermixed core-mantle material from a single disrupted asteroid and have no known equivalents among the basaltic meteorites. The stony-iron meteorites demonstrate that intense asteroidal deformation accompanied planetary accretion in the early Solar System.

  20. A Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) Meteorite Compendium: Summarizing Samples of ASteroid 4 Vesta in Preparation for the Dawn Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, J. M.; Righter, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) suite of achondritic meteorites, thought to originate from asteroid 4 Vesta, has recently been summarized into a meteorite compendium. This compendium will serve as a guide for researchers interested in further analysis of HEDs, and we expect that interest in these samples will greatly increase with the planned arrival of the Dawn Mission at Vesta in August 2011. The focus of this abstract/poster is to (1) introduce and describe HED samples from both historical falls and Antarctic finds, and (2) provide information on unique HED samples available for study from the Antarctic Meteorite Collection at JSC, including the vesicular eucrite PCA91007, the olivine diogenite EETA79002, and the paired ALH polymict eucrites.

  1. The petrology and geochemistry of Miller Range 05035: A new lunar gabbroic meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, K. H.; Crawford, I. A.; Anand, M.; Greenwood, R. C.; Franchi, I. A.; Russell, S. S.

    2008-08-01

    Miller Range (MIL) 05035 is a lunar gabbroic meteorite. The mineralogy, Fe/Mn ratios in olivine and pyroxene, bulk-rock chemical composition and the bulk oxygen isotope values (δ 17O = 2.86-2.97‰ and δ 18O = 5.47-5.71‰) are similar to those of other mare basalts, and are taken as supporting evidence for a lunar origin for this meteorite. The sample is dominated by pyroxene grains (54-61% by area mode of thin section) along with large plagioclase feldspar (25-36% by mode) and accessory quartz, ilmenite, spinel, apatite and troilite. The bulk-rock major element composition of MIL 05035 indicates that the sample has a very low-Ti (VLT) to low-Ti lunar heritage (we measure bulk TiO 2 to be 0.9 Wt.%) and has low bulk incompatible trace element (ITE) concentrations, akin to samples from the VLT mare basalt suite. To account for these geochemical characteristics we hypothesize that MIL 05035's parental melt was derived from a mantle region dominated by early cumulates of the magma ocean (comprised principally of olivine and orthopyroxene). MIL 05035 is likely launch paired with the Asuka-881757 and Yamato-793169 basaltic lunar meteorites and the basaltic regolith breccia MET 01210. This group of meteorites (Y/A/M/M) therefore may be a part of a stratigraphic column consisting of an upper regolith environment underlain by a coarsening downwards basalt lava flow.

  2. The Foreign Clast Populations of Anomalous Polymict Urelite Almahata Sitta (Asteroid 2008 TC(sub3) and Typical Polymict Ureilites: Implications for Asteroid-Meteorite Connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Treiman, A. H.; Zolensky, M.; Kita, N. T.; Defouilloy, C.; Fioretti, A. M.; O'Brien, D. P.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AhS) is the first meteorite to originate from an asteroid (2008 TC3) that had been studied in space before it hit Earth [1,2]. It is also unique because the fallen fragments comprise a variety of types: approximately 69% ureilites (achondrites) and 31% chondrites [3]. Two models have been proposed for the origin 2008 TC3: 1) an accretionary model [3,4]; or 2) a regolith model [5,6]. Typical polymict ureilites are interpreted to represent regolith, and contain a few % foreign clasts [7,8]. The most common are dark (CC matrix-like) clasts similar to those in many meteoritic breccias [9]. A variety of other chondrites, as well as achondrites (angrites), have also been reported [7,9,10]. We have been working to determine the full diversity of these clasts [10-13] for comparison with AhS. We discuss implications for mixing of materials in the early solar system and the origin of 2008 TC3.

  3. Rhenium-osmium isotope and highly-siderophile-element abundance systematics of angrite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riches, Amy J. V.; Day, James M. D.; Walker, Richard J.; Simonetti, Antonio; Liu, Yang; Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2012-11-01

    Coupled 187Os/188Os compositions and highly-siderophile-element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) abundance data are reported for eight angrite achondrite meteorites that include quenched- and slowly-cooled textural types. These data are combined with new major- and trace-element concentrations determined for bulk-rock powder fractions and constituent mineral phases, to assess angrite petrogenesis. Angrite meteorites span a wide-range of HSE abundances from <0.005 ppb Os (e.g., Northwest Africa [NWA] 1296; Angra dos Reis) to >100 ppb Os (NWA 4931). Chondritic to supra-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1201-0.2127) measured for Angra dos Reis and quenched-angrites correspond to inter- and intra-sample heterogeneities in Re/Os and HSE abundances. Quenched-angrites have chondritic-relative rare-earth-element (REE) abundances at 10-15×CI-chondrite, and their Os-isotope and HSE abundance variations represent mixtures of pristine uncontaminated crustal materials that experienced addition (<0.8%) of exogenous chondritic materials during or after crystallization. Slowly-cooled angrites (NWA 4590 and NWA 4801) have fractionated REE-patterns, chondritic to sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1056-0.1195), as well as low-Re/Os (0.03-0.13), Pd/Os (0.071-0.946), and relatively low-Pt/Os (0.792-2.640). Sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os compositions in NWA 4590 and NWA 4801 are unusual amongst planetary basalts, and their HSE and REE characteristics may be linked to melting of mantle sources that witnessed prior basaltic melt depletion. Angrite HSE-Yb systematics suggest that the HSE behaved moderately-incompatibly during angrite magma crystallization, implying the presence of metal in the crystallizing assemblage. The new HSE abundance and 187Os/188Os compositions indicate that the silicate mantle of the angrite parent body(ies) (APB) had HSE abundances in chondritic-relative proportions but at variable abundances at the time of angrite crystallization. The HSE systematics of angrites are

  4. Mineralogy of new Antarctic achondrites with affinity to Lodran and a model of their evolution in an asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Hiroi, Takahiro; Saito, Jun

    1994-01-01

    We studied five new Antartic achondrites, MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 88177, Yamato (Y)74357, Y75274, Y791491 and Elephant Moraine (EET)84302 by mineralogical techniques to gain a better understanding of the mineral assemblages of a group of meteorites with an affinity to Lodran (stony-iron meteorite) and their formation processes. This group is being called lodranites. These meteorites contain major coarse-grained orthopyroxene (Opx) and olivine as in Lodran and variable amounts of FeNi metal and troilite etc. MAC88177 has more augite and less FeNi than Lodran; Y74357 has more olivine and contains minor augite; Y791491 contains in addition plagioclase. EET84302 has an Acapulco-like chondritic mineral assembladge and is enriched in FeNi metal and plagioclase, but one part is enriched in Opx and chromite. The EET84302 and MAC88177 Opx crystals have dusty cores as in Acapulco. EET84302 and Y75274 are more Mg-rich than other members of the lodranite group, and Y74357 is intermediate. Since these meteorites all have coarse-grained textures, similar major mineral assemblages, variable amounts of augite, plagioclase, FeNi metal, chromite and olivine, we suggest that they are related and are linked to a parent body with modified chondritic compositions. The variability of the abundances of these minerals are in line with a proposed model of the surface mineral assemblages of the S asteroids. The mineral assemblages can best be explained by differing degrees of loss or movements of lower temperature partial melts and recrystallization, and reduction. A portion of EET84302 rich in metal and plagioclase may represent a type of component removed from the lodranite group meteorites. Y791058 and Caddo County, which were studied for comparison, are plagioclase-rich silicate inclusions in IAB iron meteorites and may have been derived by similar process but in a different body.

  5. Titanium, vanadium and chromium valences in silicates of ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 and ureilite Y-791538 record highly-reduced origins

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Sutton, S. R.; Goodrich, C. A.; Wirick, S.

    Titanium, Cr, and V valences were determined by applying micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (micro-XANES) spectroscopy methods to individual grains of olivine and pyroxene in the ungrouped achondrite NWA 7325 and ureilite Y-791538, as well as to plagioclase in NWA 7325. The advantages of applying multiple, multivalent-element-based oxybarometers to individual grains are (1) the ability to cover the entire oxygen fugacity (fO2) range encountered in nature, and (2) the increased reliability from consistent results for semi-independent fO2 proxies. fO2 values were inferred from each mineral valence determination after correcting with available laboratory-experiment-derived, valence-specific partition coefficients to obtain melt valences andmore » then calibrating with the fO2 values of the relevant equal species proportions points suggested for igneous (primarily basaltic) systems. The resulting olivine and pyroxene valences are highly reduced and similar in the two meteorites with substantial fractions of Cr2+, Ti3+ and V2+. The exception is Cr in NWA 7325 pyroxene which is much more oxidized than the Cr in its olivine. Chromium and Ti in plagioclase in NWA 7325 is relatively oxidized (V valence not determined). The anomalously oxidized Cr in NWA 7325 pyroxene may be due to a secondary reheating event that oxidized Cr in the pyroxene without similarly oxidizing Ti and V. Such a separation of the redox couples may be an effect of re-equilibration kinetics, where the valence of Cr would be more rapidly modified. These valences yielded similar mean fO2s for the two meteorites; IW-3.1 ± 0.2 for NWA 7325 and IW-2.8 ± 0.2 for Y-791538, consistent with an origin of NWA 7325 in either Mercury or an asteroid that experienced redox conditions similar to those on the ureilite parent body.« less

  6. Search for fullerenes in stone meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oester, M. Y.; Kuechl, D.; Sipiera, P. P.; Welch, C. J.

    1994-07-01

    The possibility of identifying fullerenes in stony meteorites became apparent from a paper given by Radicati de Brozolo. In this paper it was reported that fullerenes were present in the debris resulting from a collision between a micrometeoroid and an orbiting satellite. This fact generated sufficient curiosity to initiate a search for the presence of fullerenes in various stone meteorites. In the present study seven ordinary chondrites (al-Ghanim L6 (find), Dimmitt H4 (find), Lazbuddie LL5 (find), New Concord H5 (fall), Silverton H4 (find), Springlake L6 (find), and Umbarger L3/6 (find)). Four carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 83100 C2 (find), ALH 83108 C30 (find), Allende CV3 (fall), and Murchison CM2 (fall), and one achondrite (Monticello How (find)) were analyzed for the presence of fullerenes. The analytical procedure employed was as follows: 100 mg of meteorite was ground up with a mortar and pestle; 10 mL of toluene was then added and the mixture was refluxed for 90 min; this mixture was then filtered through a short column of silica; a 50 microliter sample was then analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a Buckyclutcher I column with a mobile phase consisting of equal volumes of toluene and hexane at a flow rate of 1.00 mg per minute, with detection at 330 and 600 nm. Three of the meteorites, Allende, Murchison, and al-Ghanim, gave HPLC traces containing peaks with similar retention times to the HPLC trace of an authentic fullerene C60. However, further analysis using an HPLC instrument equipped with a diode-array detector failed to confirm any of the substances detected in the three meteorites as C60. Additional analyses will be conducted to identify what the HPLC traces actually represent.

  7. Detection of reduced carbon in basalt using Raman spectroscopy: a signpost to habitat on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, L. V.; Hutchinson, I. B.; Parnell, J.; Ingley, R.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2013-09-01

    In the search for evidence of the environmental history of the Martian surface, and the possibility of life at some stage in the planet's history, a key component is reduced carbon. Carbon is available to the surface environment through meteoritic infall [1] and erosion of abundant volcanic rocks which contain magmatic carbon [2][3], in addition to the possibility of some biogenic carbonaceous matter. However, reduced carbon has not yet been detected by a range of missions to Mars. Carbonate minerals, containing carbon in inorganic oxidized form, have been recorded [4], which together with carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere and magmatic carbon in Martian meteorites provide evidence for a carbon cycle on Mars [5][6]. The mobility of carbon on Mars is also evident in fracture-bound carbon in the Nakhla meteorite, derived from Martian basalt [7] [8]. Basalts are widespread on Mars, so are readily accessible for sampling and analysis. Basalt-hosted carbon could have a relationship to life in both a consequential or causative manner. Basalt could incorporate carbon from organic matter disseminated in sediments through which the basaltic magma passed. It is even possible that basalt could concentrate carbon scavenged from sediments into carbon-rich structures. Alternatively, basalt could act as a feedstock of carbon to provide biomass for colonizing microbes. In this way, the discovery of carbon in (Martian) basalt could be regarded as a signpost to habitat, i.e. the identification of carbon is a key aspect of the strategy for targeting where evidence of life should be sought. The ExoMars mission, currently intended to fly in 2018, includes a Raman spectroscopy instrument, whose targets for detection include reduced carbon. We report here the study of an analogue for the carbon-bearing Nakhla meteorite, representing nearsurface Martian crust, using Raman spectroscopy and other techniques to demonstrate the potential to detect the reduced carbon therein. The

  8. Iron Isotopes in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehm, K.; Alexander, C. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2001-12-01

    The recent identification of naturally occurring isotopic mass fractionation of the transition met-als on the Earth has prompted a search for similar variability in meteorites. Studies of Cu, Zn, and Fe, for example, have revealed per-mil level and larger mass fractionations between different bulk meteorites. Such variations can result from temperature-sensitive isotope exchange reactions and kinetic processes, and therefore may reflect conditions in the solar nebula and on meteorite parent bodies. Recent advances in ICP-MS have permitted isotope studies of transition metals and other elements with similarly small isotopic mass dispersions. Among the transition metals, Fe is perhaps the most difficult to analyze by ICP-MS because plasma sources are copious producers of argide molecules that interfere with the measurement of iron isotopes. However, the stable isotope behavior of Fe is of special interest because it is a non-refractory major element in meteorites, present in a variety of mineral associations and redox states. Considerable effort has gone into overcoming the inherent analytical difficulties of measuring Fe using ICP-MS. We recently reported on a technique that achieves argide reduction by operating the plasma source in so-called 'cold' mode. In this presentation, we report results from this ongoing work. To date, analyses of nine different meteorites, and eight individual Tieschitz (H3) chondrules have been completed, along with a number of measurements of the Hawaiian basalt sample Kil1919. All of the bulk meteorite compositions, which include both chondrites and irons, have identical 56Fe/54Fe to within ~ 0.14 per mil (2 sigma), and are indistinguishable from the composition of the terrestrial basalt. The Tieschitz chondrules, on the other hand, tend to have isotopically light compositions. This could reflect formation from fractionated starting material. Alternatively, Fe condensation, under non-equilibrium conditions can enrich light isotopes

  9. The Chlorine Isotope Composition of Martian Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Shearer, C. K.; Agee, C.; Burger, P. V.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Cl isotope composition of martian meteorites range from -3.8 to +8.6 per mil. Ol-phyric shergottites are lightest; crustally contaminated samples are heaviest, basaltic shergottites are in-between. The system is explained as two component mixing.

  10. U-Pb Dating of Zircons and Phosphates in Lunar Meteorites, Acapulcoites and Angrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Q.; Zeigler, R. A.; Yin, Q. Z.; Korotev, R. L.; Joliff, B. L.; Amelin, Y.; Marti, K.; Wu, F. Y.; Li, X. H.; Li, Q. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Zircon U-Pb geochronology has made a great contribution to the timing of magmatism in the early Solar System [1-3]. Ca phosphates are another group of common accessory minerals in meteorites with great potential for U-Pb geochronology. Compared to zircons, the lower closure temperatures of the U-Pb system for apatite and merrillite (the most common phosphates in achondrites) makes them susceptible to resetting during thermal metamorphism. The different closure temperatures of the U-Pb system for zircon and apatite provide us an opportunity to discover the evolutionary history of meteoritic parent bodies, such as the crystallization ages of magmatism, as well as later impact events and thermal metamorphism. We have developed techniques using the Cameca IMS-1280 ion microprobe to date both zircon and phosphate grains in meteorites. Here we report U-Pb dating results for zircons and phosphates from lunar meteorites Dhofar 1442 and SaU 169. To test and verify the reliability of the newly developed phosphate dating technique, two additional meteorites, Acapulco, obtained from Acapulco consortium, and angrite NWA 4590 were also selected for this study as both have precisely known phosphate U-Pb ages by TIMS [4,5]. Both meteorites are from very fast cooled parent bodies with no sign of resetting [4,5], satisfying a necessity for precise dating.

  11. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  12. A unique basaltic micrometeorite expands the inventory of solar system planetary crusts

    PubMed Central

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Engrand, Cécile; Zolensky, Michael E.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Micrometeorites with diameter ≈100–200 μm dominate the flux of extraterrestrial matter on Earth. The vast majority of micrometeorites are chemically, mineralogically, and isotopically related to carbonaceous chondrites, which amount to only 2.5% of meteorite falls. Here, we report the discovery of the first basaltic micrometeorite (MM40). This micrometeorite is unlike any other basalt known in the solar system as revealed by isotopic data, mineral chemistry, and trace element abundances. The discovery of a new basaltic asteroidal surface expands the solar system inventory of planetary crusts and underlines the importance of micrometeorites for sampling the asteroids' surfaces in a way complementary to meteorites, mainly because they do not suffer dynamical biases as meteorites do. The parent asteroid of MM40 has undergone extensive metamorphism, which ended no earlier than 7.9 Myr after solar system formation. Numerical simulations of dust transport dynamics suggest that MM40 might originate from one of the recently discovered basaltic asteroids that are not members of the Vesta family. The ability to retrieve such a wealth of information from this tiny (a few micrograms) sample is auspicious some years before the launch of a Mars sample return mission. PMID:19366660

  13. Report of the Workshop on Unmixing the SNCs: Chemical, Isotopic, and Petrologic Components of Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H. (Editor); Herd, Christopher D. K. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    Geochemical and petrologic studies of the Martian meteorites (nicknamed the SNCs) have proliferated in the past few years, from a wealth of new samples and the perfection of new analytical methods. An intriguing result from these studies is that the chemical and isotopic compositions of the Martian meteorites, all basalts or derived from basaltic magma, can be modeled as mixtures of a limited number of components. These mixing components were the focus of the workshop.

  14. Age of Lunar Meteorite LAP02205 and Implications for Impact-Sampling of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.; Bogard, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured the age of lunar meteorite LAP02205 by the Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar methods. Sm-Nd analyses are in progress. The Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar ages indicate a crystallization age of approx. 3 Ga. Comparing the ages of LAP02205 and other lunar mare basaltic meteorites to mare surface ages based on the density of impact craters shows no significant bias in impact- sampling of lunar mare surfaces. Comparing the isotopic and geochemical data for LAP02205 to those for other lunar mare basalts suggests that it is a younger variant of the type of volcanism that produced the Apollo 12 basalts. Representative impact-sampling of the lunar surface

  15. Orthopyroxene as a recorder of primitive achondrite petrogenesis: Major-, minor-, and trace-element systematics of orthopyroxene in Lodran. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Spilde, M. N.; Fowler, G. W.; Shearer, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable attention has been paid recently to the primitive achondrites because they may form a link between chondrites and more differentiated achondrite meteorites. A recent paper by Miyamoto and Takeda addresses the thermal history of lodranites Yamato 74357 and MAC 88177 as inferred from chemical zoning of pyroxene and olivine determined by electron microprobe analyses. Their results suggested that interstitial melt was present and then extracted. We have taken the analysis of Lodran-type meteorites one step further by incorporating the techniques of Electromagnetic Pulse/Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (EMP/WDS) compositional imaging and scanning ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. Orthopyroxene in Lodran is strongly zoned in CaO, Al2O3, TiO2, and Cr2O3 within the last 10-30 microns from the grain boundaries. The rims are reversely zoned in Mg-Fe, exhibiting Mg enrichment, and compositions change from a fairly uniform Wo3En94 within the grains to Wo1En96 at the rims. CaO drops from 1.6 to 0.6 wt% and Al2O3, TiO2, and Cr2O3 exhibit similar depletions. MnO is fairly uniform throughout the grains at around 0.5 wt%. Olivine is also reversely zoned with respect to not only grain boundaries but also to fractures within the grains, giving many olivine grains a complex, patchy zoning pattern. Some of the core-rim trace-element systematics for orthopyroxene are illustrated. Because of the rather narrow zoned rims in Lodran orthopyroxene and the low trace-element abundances, it is difficult to clearly resolve the trace-element systematics. Nevertheless it is evident that the cores are enriched in the incompatible trace elements Ce, Nd, Dy, Er, Yb, Y, and Zr relative to the rims.

  16. The distribution of zirconium and hafnium in terrestrial rocks, meteorites and the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.; Garg, A. N.; Ali, M. Z.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that Zr and Hf are not always fractionated in terrestrial igneous differentiation or regional metamorphism. Data do support a Zr-Hf fractionation in the differentiation of the alkali olivine magma at St. Helena Island. A strong Zr-Hf fractionation exists among lunar rocks and minerals. Ilmenite is an excellent concentrator of Zr and Hf and always exhibits high Zr/Hf ratios. Chondritic meteorites exhibit rather uniform Zr abundances and Zr/Hf ratios but a distinct Zr-Hf fractionation is observed among the eucrite and diogenite achondrites.

  17. Small main-belt asteroid spectroscopic survey: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Shui; Binzel, Richard P.; Burbine, Thomas H.; Bus, Schelte J.

    1995-01-01

    The spectral characterization of small asteroids is important for understanding the evolution of their compositional and mineralogical properties. We report the results of a CCD spectroscopic survey of small main-belt asteroids which we call the Small Main-belt Asteroid Spectroscopic Survey (SMASS). Spectra of 316 asteroids were obtained, with wavelength coverage ranging from 4000 to 10000 A (0.4 to 1 micrometers). More than half of the objects in our survey have diameters less than 20 km. Survey results include the identification of the first object resembling ordinary chondrite meteorites among the main-belt asteroids (Binzel, R. P., et al, 1993) and observations of more than 20 asteroids showing basaltic achondrite spectral absorption features that strongly link Vesta as the parent body for the basaltic achondrite meteorites (Binzel, R. P., and S. Xu 1993). A potential Mars-crossing asteroid analog to ordinary chondrite meteorites (H chondrites), 2078 Nanking, is reported here. Through a principal component analysis, we have assigned classifications to the members of our sample. The majority of the small main-belt asteroids belong to S and C classes, similar to large asteroids. Our analysis shows that two new classes are justified which we label as J and O. Small asteroids display more diversity in spectral absorption features than the larger ones, which may indicate a greater variation of compositions in the small asteroid population. We found a few candidates for olivine-rich asteroids within the S class. Although the total number of olivine-rich candidates is relatively small, we present evidence suggesting that such objects are more prevalent at smaller sizes.

  18. The Iodine-Xenon System In Achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, S. A.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    The geochemical behaviour of Pu, I and Xe contributed to the volatile reservoirs of terrestrial planets. We report I-Xe data from NWA 7325 and compare to other achondrites, which indicate a range of behaviours during early igneous activity.

  19. The Perils of Partition: Difficulties in Retrieving Magma Compositions from Chemically Equilibrated Basaltic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical compositions of magmas can be derived from the compositions of their equilibrium minerals through mineral/magma partition coefficients. This method cannot be applied safely to basaltic rocks, either solidified lavas or cumulates, which have chemically equilibrated or partially equilibrated at subsolidus temperatures, i.e., in the absence of magma. Applying mineral/ melt partition coefficients to mineral compositions from such rocks will typically yield 'magma compositions' that are strongly fractionated and unreasonably enriched in incompatible elements (e.g., REE's). In the absence of magma, incompatible elements must go somewhere; they are forced into minerals (e.g., pyroxenes, plagioclase) at abundance levels far beyond those established during normal mineral/magma equilibria. Further, using mineral/magma partition coefficients with such rocks may suggest that different minerals equilibrated with different magmas, and the fractionation sequence of those melts (i.e., enrichment in incompatible elements) may not be consistent with independent constraints on the order of crystallization. Subsolidus equilibration is a reasonable cause for incompatible- element-enriched minerals in some eucrites, diogenites, and martian meteorites and offers a simple alternative to petrogenetic schemes involving highly fractionated magmas or magma infiltration metasomatism.

  20. Probing the use of spectroscopy to determine the meteoritic analogues of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouard, A.; Vernazza, P.; Loehle, S.; Gattacceca, J.; Vaubaillon, J.; Zanda, B.; Birlan, M.; Bouley, S.; Colas, F.; Eberhart, M.; Hermann, T.; Jorda, L.; Marmo, C.; Meindl, A.; Oefele, R.; Zamkotsian, F.; Zander, F.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Determining the source regions of meteorites is one of the major goals of current research in planetary science. Whereas asteroid observations are currently unable to pinpoint the source regions of most meteorite classes, observations of meteors with camera networks and the subsequent recovery of the meteorite may help make progress on this question. The main caveat of such an approach, however, is that the recovery rate of meteorite falls is low (<20%), implying that the meteoritic analogues of at least 80% of the observed falls remain unknown. Aims: Spectroscopic observations of incoming bolides may have the potential to mitigate this problem by classifying the incoming meteoritic material. Methods: To probe the use of spectroscopy to determine the meteoritic analogues of incoming bolides, we collected emission spectra in the visible range (320-880 nm) of five meteorite types (H, L, LL, CM, and eucrite) acquired in atmospheric entry-like conditions in a plasma wind tunnel at the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart (Germany). A detailed spectral analysis including a systematic line identification and mass ratio determinations (Mg/Fe, Na/Fe) was subsequently performed on all spectra. Results: It appears that spectroscopy, via a simple line identification, allows us to distinguish the three main meteorite classes (chondrites, achondrites and irons) but it does not have the potential to distinguish for example an H chondrite from a CM chondrite. Conclusions: The source location within the main belt of the different meteorite classes (H, L, LL, CM, CI, etc.) should continue to be investigated via fireball observation networks. Spectroscopy of incoming bolides only marginally helps precisely classify the incoming material (iron meteorites only). To reach a statistically significant sample of recovered meteorites along with accurate orbits (>100) within a reasonable time frame (10-20 years), the optimal solution may be the spatial

  1. Enstatite chondrites and enstatite achondrites (aubrites) were not derived from the same parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brett, Robin; Keil, Klaus

    1986-01-01

    Enstatite achondrites (aubrites) were not derived from known enstatite chondrites by melting and fractionation on one and the same parent body, for these and other reasons: (1) There is no satisfactory mechanism for fractionating metal plus troilite in enstatite chondrites to form these phases in different proportions and with different Ti contents in aubrites. (2) Many enstatite chondrites and aubrites are regolith or fragmental breccias, but clasts of one within the other have not been found. (3) Cosmic ray exposure ages of the two groups are difficult to explain if they are from the same parent body, but are easy to explain if they are from different parent bodies. Siderophile element abundances in metal from the Mt. Egerton meteorite, which consists of enstatite and metallic Fe, Ni, preclude it from being a complementary differentiate of the aubrites. Rather, it appears that Mt. Egerton was formed from the same source material as enstatite chondrites, but the components were mixed in different proportions.

  2. Enstatite chondrites and enstatite achondrites (aubrites) were not derived from the same parent body

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Keil, Klaus

    1986-01-01

    Enstatite achondrites (aubrites) were not derived from known enstatite chondrites by melting and fractionation on one and the same parent body, for these and other reasons: (1) There is no satisfactory mechanism for fractionating metal plus troilite in enstatite chondrites to form these phases in different proportions and with different Ti contents in aubrites. (2) Many enstatite chondrites and aubrites are regolith or fragmental breccias, but clasts of one within the other have not been found. (3) Cosmic ray exposure ages of the two groups are difficult to explain if they are from the same parent body, but are easy to explain if they are from different parent bodies. Siderophile element abundances in metal from the Mt. Egerton meteorite, which consists of enstatite and metallic Fe,Ni, preclude it from being a complementary differentiate of the aubrites. Rather, it appears that Mt. Egerton was formed from the same source material as enstatite chondrites, but the components were mixed in different proportions. ?? 1986.

  3. Characterization of multiple lithologies within the lunar feldspathic regolith breccia meteorite Northeast Africa 001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snape, Joshua F.; Joy, Katherine H.; Crawford, Ian A.

    2011-09-01

    Abstract- Lunar meteorite Northeast Africa (NEA) 001 is a feldspathic regolith breccia. This study presents the results of electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS analyses of a section of NEA 001. We identify a range of lunar lithologies including feldspathic impact melt, ferroan noritic anorthosite and magnesian feldspathic clasts, and several very-low titanium (VLT) basalt clasts. The largest of these basalt clasts has a rare earth element (REE) pattern with light-REE (LREE) depletion and a positive Euanomaly. This clast also exhibits low incompatible trace element (ITE) concentrations (e.g., <0.1 ppm Th, <0.5 ppm Sm), indicating that it has originated from a parent melt that did not assimilate KREEP material. Positive Eu-anomalies and such low-ITE concentrations are uncharacteristic of most basalts returned by the Apollo and Luna missions, and basaltic lunar meteorite samples. We suggest that these features are consistent with the VLT clasts crystallizing from a parent melt which was derived from early mantle cumulates that formed prior to the separation of plagioclase in the lunar magma ocean, as has previously been proposed for some other lunar VLT basalts. Feldspathic impact melts within the sample are found to be more mafic than estimations for the composition of the upper feldspathic lunar crust, suggesting that they may have melted and incorporated material from the lower lunar crust (possibly in large basin-forming events). The generally feldspathic nature of the impact melt clasts, lack of a KREEP component, and the compositions of the basaltic clasts, leads us to suggest that the meteorite has been sourced from the Outer-Feldspathic Highlands Terrane (FHT-O), probably on the lunar farside and within about 1000 km of sources of both Low-Ti and VLT basalts, the latter possibly existing as cryptomaria deposits.

  4. Effect of static pressure on absolute paleointensity recording with implications for meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Michael W. R.; Gilder, Stuart A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic stress on the recording process of magnetic field intensity with particular relevance for meteorites that experienced pressures lower than 5 GPa corresponding to the lowest shock stage classification (S1) in meteorites. Thermal remanent magnetizations were imparted on natural obsidian samples containing pseudo-single domain titanomagnetite, analogous to some achondritic meteorites. Thellier-type paleointensity experiments were carried out at ambient conditions after pressure cycling to 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 GPa. Each experiment used 10 samples to assess reproducibility, which is better than ±5%. The recorded paleointensity decreased 10%/GPa under hydrostatic stress and 20%/GPa under nonhydrostatic stress, leading to the fundamental conclusion that paleointensity results from meteorites may be appreciably underestimated. Pressure cycling shifts the blocking and unblocking spectra, thereby producing more linear slopes on an Arai diagram with increasing strain. We explain why, for samples with a single magnetization component that does not alter, a two-step paleointensity protocol sufficiently resolves the true paleointensity. Moreover, we propose that pressure cycling of pseudo-single domain bearing samples will remove the inherent curvature of the Arai slope, thereby allowing one to obtain a more accurate estimate of the true paleointensity. This likely also holds true for samples possessing multidomain grains. Conversely, linear trends on Arai plots in meteorites might have their origin in a pressure effect that does not necessarily reflect the ubiquitous presence of single domain particles.

  5. Meteorite Linked to Rock at Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This meteorite, a basalt lava rock nearly indistinguishable from many Earth rocks, provided the first strong proof that meteorites could come from Mars. Originally weighing nearly 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds), it was collected in 1979 in the Elephant Moraine area of Antarctica. The side of the cube at the lower left in this image measures 1 centimeter (0.4 inches).

    This picture shows a sawn face of this fine-grained gray rock. (The vertical stripes are saw marks.) The black patches in the rock are melted rock, or glass, formed when a large meteorite hit Mars near the rock. The meteorite impact probably threw this rock, dubbed 'EETA79001,' off Mars and toward Antarctica on Earth. The black glass contains traces of martian atmosphere gases.

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has discovered that a rock dubbed 'Bounce' at Meridiani Planum has a very similar mineral composition to this meteorite and likely shares common origins. Bounce itself is thought to have originated outside the area surrounding Opportunity's landing site; an impact or collision likely threw the rock away from its primary home.

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Meteorites to and from the Moon and Mars: My Planet or Yours?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Meteorites from Mars - Constraints from Numerical Modeling; 2) Iron Oxidation Products in Martian Ordinary Chondrite Finds as Possible Indicators of Liquid Water Exposure at Mars Exploration Rover Landings Sites; 3) Meteorites on Mars; 4) Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts; 5) Exposure and Terrestrial Histories of New Lunar and Martian Meteorites.

  7. History of the Pasamonte achondrite: Relative susceptibility of the SmNd, RbSr, and UPb systems to metamorphic events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, D.M.; Nakamura, N.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1977-01-01

    The RbSr, SmNd, and UPb systematics of the eucrite Pasamonte have been studied in order to investigate the relative susceptibility of the different systems to post-crystallization events and to determine the age and history of the meteorite. The RbSr and 238U-206Pb data of mineral separates do not define an isochron but the SmNd data define an internal isochron which corresponds to the formation age of 4.58 ?? 0.12 b.y. (109 years). The 207Pb-206Pb data of mineral separates define an apparent age of 4.53 ?? 0.03 b.y., however we conclude that this age, while in agreement with the SmNd age, is not strictly valid since the UPb data indicate at least three stages of evolution. The UPb data indicate that the parent body of the meteorite experienced brecciation shortly after the formation of the parent body surface (???4.2-4.45 b.y. ago) and a recent disturbance (collision?) 6 ?? 30 m.y. ago. The latter age is within the range of cosmic ray exposure ages for achondrites. ?? 1977.

  8. Candidates source regions of martian meteorites as identified by OMEGA/MEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ody, A.; Poulet, F.; Quantin, C.; Bibring, J.-P.; Bishop, J. L.; Dyar, M. D.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify and map spectral analogues of some key martian meteorites (basaltic shergottites Los Angeles, Shergotty, QUE 94201, lherzolitic shergottite ALH A77005, Nakhla, Chassigny and the orthopyroxenite ALH 84001) in order to localize terrain candidates for their source regions. We develop a best fit procedure to reproduce the near-infrared (NIR) spectral properties of the martian surface as seen by the hyperspectral imaging spectrometer OMEGA/MEx from the NIR spectra of the martian meteorites. The fitting process is tested and validated, and Root Mean Square (RMS) global maps for each meteorite are obtained. It is found that basaltic shergottites have NIR spectral properties the most representative of the martian surface with the best spectral analogues found in early Hesperian volcanic provinces. Sites with spectral properties similar to those of ALH A77005 are scarce. They are mainly localized in olivine-bearing regions such as Nili Fossae and small Noachian/early Hesperian terrains. The only plausible source region candidate for Chassigny is the Nili Patera caldera dated to 1.6 Ga. Widespread spectral analogues for the ALH 84001 meteorite are found northeast of Syrtis Major and northwest of the Hellas basin. While this distribution is in agreement with the low-calcium-pyroxene-rich composition and old age (4.1 Ga) of this meteorite, the modal mineralogy of these candidates is not consistent with that of this meteorite. No convincing spectral analogue is found for the Amazonian-aged Nakhla meteorite suggesting that its olivine/high-calcium-pyroxene-rich composition could be representative of the Amazonian terrains buried under dust. Finally, some young rayed craters are proposed as possible candidates for source craters of the studied martian meteorites.

  9. Petrologic and Oxygen-Isotopic Investigations of Eucritic and Anomalous Mafic Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Greenwood, R. C.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.; Berger, E. L.; Barrett, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    The most common asteroidal igneous meteorites are eucrite-type basalts and gabbros rocks composed of ferroan pigeonite and augite, calcic plagioclase, silica, ilmenite, troilite, Ca-phosphate, chromite and Fe-metal. These rocks are thought to have formed on a single asteroid along with howardites and diogenites (HEDs). However, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011 is mineralogically identical to eucrites, but has an O-isotopic composition distinct from them and was derived from a different asteroid. Modern analyses with higher precision have shown that some eucrites have smaller O-isotopic differences that are nevertheless well-resolved from the group mean.

  10. Xe-129 - Xe-128 and Ar-40 - Ar-39 chronology of two Antarctic enstatite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    Xe-129 - Xe-128 and Ar-40 - Ar-39 analyses has been performed on two Antarctic enstatite meteorites, the chondrite Y-691 and the aubrite (enstatite achondrite) ALH-78113. Both meteorites have complex Ar-40 - Ar-39 release patterns to which no unambiguous age assignment is possible. Both give apparently satisfactory Xe-129 - Xe-128 correlations corresponding to unusual ages. The I-Xe age of the chondrite Y-691 is 16 Ma after Bjurbole, not unusual for chondrites in general but 10 Ma later than previously known ages for enstatite chondrites. The I-Xe age of the aubrite ALH-78113 is 210 Ma after Bjurbole, the latest age (rather than a limit) so far observed by the I-Xe technique, but this age assignment must be considered tentative because of the possibility that it is significantly influenced by terrestrial I contamination.

  11. Compositional Evidence for Launch Pairing of the YQ and Elephant Moraine Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jollitt, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Haskin, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Arai and Warren provide convincing evidence that QUE (Queen Alexandra Range) 94281 derives from the same regolith as Y (Yamato) 793274 and, therefore, that the two meteorites were likely ejected from the Moon by the same impact. Recently discovered Y981031 is paired with Y793274. The "YQ" meteorites (Y793274/Y981031 and QUE 94281 are unique among lunar meteorites in being regolith breccias composed of subequal amounts of mare volcanic material (a VLT [very-low-Ti] basalt or gabbro) and feldspathic highland material. EET (Elephant Moraine) 87521 and its pair EET 96008 are fragmental breccias composed mainly of VLT basalt or gabbro. Warren, Arai, and colleagues note that the volcanic components of the YQ and EET meteorites are texturally similar more similar to each other than either is to mare basalts of the Apollo collection. Warren and colleagues address the issue of possible launch pairing of YQ and EET, but note compositional differences between EET and the volcanic component of YQ, as inferred from extrapolations of regressions to high FeO concentration. We show here that: (1) EET 87/96 consists of fragments of a differentiated magma body, (2) subsamples of EET represent a mixing trend between Fe-rich and Mg-rich differentiates, and (3) the inferred volcanic component of YQ is consistent with a point on the EET mixing line. Thus, there is no compositional impediment to the hypothesis that YQ is launch paired with EET.

  12. Rb-Sr age of the Shergotty achondrite and implications for metamorphic resetting of isochron ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Wooden, J.; Bansal, B.; Wiesmann, H.; Mckay, G.

    1979-01-01

    The age of the Shergotty achondrite is determined by Rb-Sr isotope analysis and the metamorphic resetting of isochron ages, which is presumed to have occurred during a shock event in the history of the meteorite, is discussed. The isochron best fitting the Rb-Sr evolution diagram is found to correspond to an age of 165 million years, with an initial Sr-87/Sr-86 value of 0.72260. Different apparent ages obtained by the K-Ar and Sm-Nd methods are interpreted in terms of a model which quantifies the degree of resetting of internal isochron ages by low temperature solid state diffusion. On the basis of these considerations, it is concluded that Shergotty crystallized from a melt 650 million years ago, was shock heated to 300 to 400 C after its parent body was involved in a collision 165 million years ago, and was first exposed to cosmic rays two million years ago.

  13. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Basaltic Plagioclase from Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Major, minor and trace element analysis of silicates has allowed for the study of planetary basalts in a comparative planetary mineralogy context. We continue this initiative by exploring the chemistry of plagioclase feldspar in basalts from the Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta. This paper presents new data on plagioclase from six terrestrial basalt suites including Keweenawan, Island Arc, Hawaiian, Columbia Plateau, Taos Plateau, and Ocean Floor; six lunar basalt suites including Apollo 11 Low K, Apollo 12 Ilmenite, Apollo 12 Olivine, Apollo 12 Pigeonite, Apollo 15 Olivine, and Apollo 15 Pigeonite; two basaltic martian meteorites, Shergotty and QUE 94201; and one unequilibrated eucrite, Pasamonte.

  14. Petrogenesis and provenance of ungrouped achondrite Northwest Africa 7325 from petrology, trace elements, oxygen, chromium and titanium isotopes, and mid-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Kita, Noriko T.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Sanborn, Matthew E.; Williams, Curtis D.; Nakashima, Daisuke; Lane, Melissa D.; Boyle, Shannon

    2017-04-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 7325 is an ungrouped achondrite that has recently been recognized as a sample of ancient differentiated crust from either Mercury or a previously unknown asteroid. In this work we augment data from previous investigations on petrography and mineral compositions, mid-IR spectroscopy, and oxygen isotope compositions of NWA 7325, and add constraints from Cr and Ti isotope compositions on the provenance of its parent body. In addition, we identify and discuss notable similarities between NWA 7325 and clasts of a rare xenolithic lithology found in polymict ureilites. NWA 7325 has a medium grained, protogranular to poikilitic texture, and consists of 10-15 vol.% Mg-rich olivine (Fo 98), 25-30 vol.% diopside (Wo 45, Mg# 98), 55-60 vol.% Ca-rich plagioclase (An 90), and trace Cr-rich sulfide and Fe,Ni metal. We interpret this meteorite to be a cumulate that crystallized at ⩾1200 °C and very low oxygen fugacity (similar to the most reduced ureilites) from a refractory, incompatible element-depleted melt. Modeling of trace elements in plagioclase suggests that this melt formed by fractional melting or multi-stage igneous evolution. A subsequent event (likely impact) resulted in plagioclase being substantially remelted, reacting with a small amount of pyroxene, and recrystallizing with a distinctive texture. The bulk oxygen isotope composition of NWA 7325 plots in the range of ureilites on the CCAM line, and also on a mass-dependent fractionation line extended from acapulcoites. The ε54Cr and ε50Ti values of NWA 7325 exhibit deficits relative to terrestrial composition, as do ordinary chondrites and most achondrites. Its ε54Cr value is distinct from that of any analyzed ureilite, but is not resolved from that of acapulcoites (as represented by Acapulco). In terms of all these properties, NWA 7325 is unlike any known achondrite. However, a rare population of clasts found in polymict ureilites ("the magnesian anorthitic lithology") are strikingly

  15. Petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of lunar meteorite Sayh al Uhaymir 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Weibiao; Zhang, Aicheng; Bartoschewitz, Rainer; Guan, Yunbin; Ushikubo, Takayuki; KrńHenbÜHl, Urs; Niedergesaess, Rainer; Pepelnik, Rudolf; Reus, Ulrich; Kurtz, Thomas; Kurtz, Paul

    2008-08-01

    We report here the petrography, mineralogy, and geochemistry of lunar meteorite Sayh al Uhaymir 300 (SaU 300). SaU 300 is dominated by a fine-grained crystalline matrix surrounding mineral fragments (plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, and ilmenite) and lithic clasts (mainly feldspathic to noritic). Mare basalt and KREEPy rocks are absent. Glass melt veins and impact melts are present, indicating that the rock has been subjected to a second impact event. FeNi metal and troilite grains were observed in the matrix. Major element concentrations of SaU 300 (Al2O3 21.6 wt% and FeO 8.16 wt%) are very similar to those of two basalt-bearing feldspathic regolith breccias: Calcalong Creek and Yamato (Y-) 983885. However, the rare earth element (REE) abundances and pattern of SaU 300 resemble the patterns of feldspathic highlands meteorites (e.g., Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 93069 and Dar al Gani (DaG) 400), and the average lunar highlands crust. It has a relatively LREE-enriched (7 to 10 x CI) pattern with a positive Eu anomaly (˜11 x CI). Values of Fe/Mn ratios of olivine, pyroxene, and the bulk sample are essentially consistent with a lunar origin. SaU 300 also contains high siderophile abundances with a chondritic Ni/Ir ratio. SaU 300 has experienced moderate terrestrial weathering as its bulk Sr concentration is elevated compared to other lunar meteorites and Apollo and Luna samples. Mineral chemistry and trace element abundances of SaU 300 fall within the ranges of lunar feldspathic meteorites and FAN rocks. SaU 300 is a feldspathic impact-melt breccia predominantly composed of feldspathic highlands rocks with a small amount of mafic component. With a bulk Mg# of 0.67, it is the most mafic of the feldspathic meteorites and represents a lunar surface composition distinct from any other known lunar meteorites. On the basis of its low Th concentration (0.46 ppm) and its lack of KREEPy and mare basaltic components, the source region of SaU 300 could have been within a highland

  16. Lunar Meteorites: A Global Geochemical Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Joy, K. H.; Arai, T.; Gross, J.; Korotev, R. L.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    To date, the world's meteorite collections contain over 260 lunar meteorite stones representing at least 120 different lunar meteorites. Additionally, there are 20-30 as yet unnamed stones currently in the process of being classified. Collectively these lunar meteorites likely represent 40-50 distinct sampling locations from random locations on the Moon. Although the exact provenance of each individual lunar meteorite is unknown, collectively the lunar meteorites represent the best global average of the lunar crust. The Apollo sites are all within or near the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), thus lithologies from the PKT are overrepresented in the Apollo sample suite. Nearly all of the lithologies present in the Apollo sample suite are found within the lunar meteorites (high-Ti basalts are a notable exception), and the lunar meteorites contain several lithologies not present in the Apollo sample suite (e.g., magnesian anorthosite). This chapter will not be a sample-by-sample summary of each individual lunar meteorite. Rather, the chapter will summarize the different types of lunar meteorites and their relative abundances, comparing and contrasting the lunar meteorite sample suite with the Apollo sample suite. This chapter will act as one of the introductory chapters to the volume, introducing lunar samples in general and setting the stage for more detailed discussions in later more specialized chapters. The chapter will begin with a description of how lunar meteorites are ejected from the Moon, how deep samples are being excavated from, what the likely pairing relationships are among the lunar meteorite samples, and how the lunar meteorites can help to constrain the impactor flux in the inner solar system. There will be a discussion of the biases inherent to the lunar meteorite sample suite in terms of underrepresented lithologies or regions of the Moon, and an examination of the contamination and limitations of lunar meteorites due to terrestrial weathering. The

  17. Oral Histories in Meteoritics and Planetary Science—XIX: Klaus Keil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    2012-12-01

    Abstract- Klaus Keil (Fig. 1) grew up in Jena and became interested in meteorites as a student of Fritz Heide. His research for his Dr. rer. nat. became known to Hans Suess who--with some difficulty--arranged for him to move to La Jolla, via Mainz, 6 months before the borders of East Germany were closed. In La Jolla, Klaus became familiar with the electron microprobe, which has remained a central tool in his research and, with Kurt Fredriksson, he confirmed the existence of Urey and Craig's chemical H and L chondrite groups, and added a third group, the LL chondrites. Klaus then moved to NASA Ames where he established a microprobe laboratory, published his definitive paper on enstatite chondrites, and led in the development of the Si(Li) detector and the EDS method of analysis. After 5 years at Ames, Klaus became director of the Institute of Meteoritics at the University of New Mexico where he built up one of the leading meteorite research groups while working on a wide variety of projects, including chondrite groups, chondrules, differentiated meteorites, lunar samples, and Hawai'ian basalts. The basalt studies led to a love of Hawai'i and a move to the University of Hawai'i in 1990, where he has continued a wide variety of meteorite projects, notably the role of volcanism on asteroids. Klaus Keil has received honorary doctorates from Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena, and the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. He was President of the Meteoritical Society in 1969-1970 and was awarded the Leonard Medal in 1988.

    Klaus Keil at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, 2007.

  18. Petrology of Anomalous Mafic Achondrite Polymict Breccia Pasamonte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Berger, E. L.; Le, L.

    2017-01-01

    The most common asteroidal igneous meteorites are eucrite-type basalts and gabbros - rocks composed of ferroan pigeonite and augite, calcic plagioclase, silica, ilmenite, troilite, Ca-phosphate, chromite and Fe-metal [1]. These rocks are thought to have formed on a single asteroid, widely considered to be 4 Vesta, along with howardites and diogenites [1, 2]. High precision O-isotopic analyses have shown that some eucrites have small, well-resolved O-isotopic differences from the group mean [3-5]. These Oanomalous eucrites are thought to hail from asteroidal parents that are distinct from that of eucrites [5]. Three O-anomalous eucrites are PCA 82502, PCA 91007 (paired) and Pasamonte, all of which have the same O-isotopic composition [5, 6]. Our petrologic studies have shown that PCA 82502 and PCA 91007 have well-resolved anomalies in low-Ca pyroxene Fe/Mn compared to eucrites [6]. Divalent Mn and Fe are homologous species that do not greatly fractionate during igneous processes; mafic mineral Fe/Mn can be used to fingerprint parent object sources [7]. Previous petrological studies of Pasamonte [8-10] have not yielded sufficiently precise Fe/Mn ratios to allow distinction of anomalies of the scale of those found for the PCA basalts. We have begun petrological study of Pasamonte for comparison with our results on normal and anomalous eucrites [6], and to constrain its origin.

  19. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jaclyn; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo samples and meteorites first hand. Lunar rocks and soil, embedded in Lucite disks, are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks reveals the early history of our Earth-Moon system and meteorites reveal much of the history of the early solar system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet and solar system and the basic processes accretion, differentiation, impact and volcanism. With these samples, educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by many NASA planetary missions. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the

  20. Asteroid 4 Vesta: A Fully Differentiated Dwarf Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David

    2014-01-01

    One conclusion derived from the study of meteorites is that some of them - most irons, stony irons, some achondrites - hail from asteroids that were heated to the point where metallic cores and basaltic crusts were formed. Telescopic observations show that there remains only one large asteroid with a basaltic crust, 4 Vesta; present day mean radius 263 km. The largest clan of achondrites, the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites, represent the crust of their parent asteroid. Diogenites are cumulate harzburgites and orthopyroxenites from the lower crust whilst eucrites are cumulate gabbros, diabases and basalts from the upper crust. Howardites are impact-engendered breccias of diogenites and eucrites. A strong case can be made that HEDs are derived from Vesta. The NASA Dawn spacecraft orbited Vesta for 14 months returning data allowing geological, mineralogical, compositional and geophysical interpretations of Vesta's surface and structure. Combined with geochemical and petrological observations of HED meteorites, differentiation models for Vesta can be developed. Proto-Vesta probably consisted of primitive chondritic materials. Compositional evidence, primarily from basaltic eucrites, indicates that Vesta was melted to high degree (>=50%) which facilitated homogenization of the silicate phase and separation of immiscible Fe,Ni metal plus Fe sulphide into a core. Geophysical models based on Dawn data support a core of 110 km radius. The silicate melt vigorously convected and initially followed a path of equilibrium crystallization forming a harzburgitic mantle, possibly overlying a dunitic restite. Once the fraction of crystals was sufficient to cause convective lockup, the remaining melt collected between the mantle and the cool thermal boundary layer. This melt undergoes fractional crystallization to form a dominantly orthopyroxenite (diogenite) lower crust. The initial thermal boundary layer of primitive chondritic material is gradually replaced by a

  1. Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 9th, Houston, Tex., March 13-17, 1978, Proceedings. Volume 1 - Petrogenetic studies: The moon and meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Various aspects of lunar science are discussed including origins and evolution, mare basalts, nonmare rocks, and breccias. Consideration is also given to meteorites, giving attention to petrography and chemistry, the Allende meteorite, and experimental studies.

  2. Meteorite Unit Models for Structural Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Carlozzi, Alexander A.; Karajeh, Zaid S.; Bryson, Kathryn L.

    2017-10-01

    To assess the threat posed by an asteroid entering Earth’s atmosphere, one must predict if, when, and how it fragments during entry. A comprehensive understanding of the asteroid material properties is needed to achieve this objective. At present, the meteorite material found on earth are the only objects from an entering asteroid that can be used as representative material and be tested inside a laboratory. Due to complex composition, it is challenging and expensive to obtain reliable material properties by means of laboratory test for a family of meteorites. In order to circumvent this challenge, meteorite unit models are developed to determine the effective material properties including Young’s modulus, compressive and tensile strengths and Poisson’s ratio, that in turn would help deduce the properties of asteroids. The meteorite unit model is a representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, cracks and matrix composition.The Young’s Modulus and Poisson’s Ratio in the meteorite units are calculated by performing several hundreds of Monte Carlo simulations by randomly distributing the various phases inside these units. Once these values are obtained, cracks are introduced in these units. The size, orientation and distribution of cracks are derived by CT-scans and visual scans of various meteorites. Subsequently, simulations are performed to attain stress-strain relations, strength and effective modulus values in the presence of these cracks. The meteorite unit models are presented for H, L and LL ordinary chondrites, as well as for terrestrial basalt. In the case of the latter, data from the simulations is compared with experimental data to validate the methodology. These meteorite unit models will be subsequently used in fragmentation modeling of full scale asteroids.

  3. Meteorite Material Model for Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Carlozzi, Alexander A.; Karajeh, Zaid S.; Bryson, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the threat posed by an asteroid entering Earth's atmosphere, one must predict if, when, and how it fragments during entry. A comprehensive understanding of the asteroid material properties is needed to achieve this objective. At present, the meteorite material found on earth are the only objects from an entering asteroid that can be used as representative material and be tested inside a laboratory setting. Due to complex petrology, it is technically challenging and expensive to obtain reliable material properties by means of laboratory test for a family of meteorites. In order to circumvent this challenge, meteorite unit models are developed to determine the effective material properties including Youngs modulus, compressive and tensile strengths and Poissons ratio, that in turn would help deduce the properties of asteroids. The meteorite unit is a representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, cracks and matrix composition. The Youngs Modulus and Poissons Ratio in the meteorite units are calculated by performing several hundreds of Monte-Carlo simulations by randomly distributing the various phases inside these units. Once these values are obtained, cracks are introduced in these meteorite units. The size, orientation and distribution of cracks are derived by extensive CT-scans and visual scans of various meteorites from the same family. Subsequently, simulations are performed to attain stress-strain relations, strength and effective modulus values in the presence of these cracks. The meteorite unit models are presented for H, L and LL ordinary chondrites, as well as for terrestrial basalt. In the case of the latter, data from the simulations is compared with experimental data to validate the methodology. These material models will be subsequently used in fragmentation modeling of full scale asteroids.

  4. A "Mesosiderite" Rock from Northern Siberia, Russia: Not a Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Lindstrom, David J.; Schwandt, Craig S.; Franchi, Ian A.; Morgan, Matthew L.

    2002-01-01

    A possible mesosiderite meteorite was found in the area of the Putorana Plateau, Noril'sk district, Siberia, Russia. Although this rock resembles a mesosiderite in its hand-sample aspect and in having Ni-bearing iron metal, it is not a meteorite. This inference is based on the lack of a fusion crust, the lack of cosmogenic nuclides, oxygen with terrestrial isotope ratios, and several mineral chemical criteria. Most likely, the rock is from the iron-metal-bearing basalts of the Siberian Trap basalt sequence, which are mined for their base and platinum-group metals. Mesosiderite imposters like this may be recognized by: (1) the presence of Cu metal in hand sample or as microscopic blebs in the low-Ni metal (kamacite), (2) the absence of high-Ni metal (taenite), and (3) the presence of iron carbide (cohenite) enclosing the kamacite. Even if these macroscopic tests are inconclusive, isotopic and mineral chemical tests will also distinguish rocks like this from mesosiderites.

  5. Chronology of Planetesimal Differentiation Based on the Timing of Achondrite Formation in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, D. R.; Wadhwa, M.

    2018-05-01

    Chronology of achondrites provide critical insights into accretion and differentiation timescales in the early solar system. A diverse suite of achondrites are presented here to constrain the thermal histories of a number of distinct planetesimals.

  6. Ten Windows Into the Meteorite Flux to Earth During the Past 500 Million Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, B.

    2017-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the variations through deep time in the types of meteorites arriving at Earth. In an ongoing project we are searching ancient sediments from ten different time periods through the Phanerozoic for relict extraterrestrial spinel grains from micrometeorites (Schmitz, 2013). Samples, 300-1500 kg large, of slowly formed pelagic limestone are dissolved in acids leaving a residue of extraterrestrial spinels. The time periods studied include the middle Cambrian, Ordovician before and after the breakup of the L-chondrite parent body, late Silurian, late Devonian, middle Jurassic, early and late Cretaceous, early Paleocene and late Eocene. The approach builds on complex methodological considerations and a thorough understanding also of the spinel fraction in recent meteorites is necessary. In order to obtain some insights into the changes in the meteorite flux carefully calibrated analyses of the isotopic and elemental composition of the recovered spinel grains as well as consistent data treatment is required for the different time windows. Our results indicate that the background meteorite flux has changed significantly through the Phanerozoic. The results so far suggest that there may have been a gradual long-term (on the order of hundred million years) turnover in the meteorite flux from dominance of achondrites in the early Phanerozoic to ordinary chondrites in the late Phanerozoic interrupted by short-term (a few million years) meteorite cascades from single asteroid breakup events. This scenario may change, however, as results from additional time windows emerge. B. Schmitz (2013) Extraterrestrial spinels and the astronomical perspective on Earth's geological record and evolution of life: Chemie der Erde 73:117-145.

  7. Meteorite-catalyzed syntheses of nucleosides and of other prebiotic compounds from formamide under proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Saladino, Raffaele; Carota, Eleonora; Botta, Giorgia; Kapralov, Mikhail; Timoshenko, Gennady N.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Krasavin, Eugene; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Liquid formamide has been irradiated by high-energy proton beams in the presence of powdered meteorites, and the products of the catalyzed resulting syntheses were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Relative to the controls (no radiation, or no formamide, or no catalyst), an extremely rich, variegate, and prebiotically relevant panel of compounds was observed. The meteorites tested were representative of the four major classes: iron, stony iron, chondrites, and achondrites. The products obtained were amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases, sugars, and, most notably, four nucleosides: cytidine, uridine, adenosine, and thymidine. In accordance with theoretical studies, the detection of HCN oligomers suggests the occurrence of mechanisms based on the generation of radical cyanide species (CN·) for the synthesis of nucleobases. Given that many of the compounds obtained are key components of extant organisms, these observations contribute to outline plausible exogenous high-energy–based prebiotic scenarios and their possible boundary conditions, as discussed. PMID:25870268

  8. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christopher R. J.

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 MΩ water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ˜4.

  9. The Germanium Dichotomy in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humayun, M.; Yang, S.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium is a moderately volatile and siderophile element that follows silicon in its compatibility during partial melting of planetary mantles. Despite its obvious usefulness in planetary geochemistry germanium is not analyzed routinely, with there being only three prior studies reporting germanium abundances in Martian meteorites. The broad range (1-3 ppm) observed in Martian igneous rocks is in stark contrast to the narrow range of germanium observed in terrestrial basalts (1.5 plus or minus 0.1 ppm). The germanium data from these studies indicates that nakhlites contain 2-3 ppm germanium, while shergottites contain approximately 1 ppm germanium, a dichotomy with important implications for core formation models. There have been no reliable germanium abundances on chassignites. The ancient meteoritic breccia, NWA 7533 (and paired meteorites) contains numerous clasts, some pristine and some impact melt rocks, that are being studied individually. Because germanium is depleted in the Martian crust relative to chondritic impactors, it has proven useful as an indicator of meteoritic contamination of impact melt clasts in NWA 7533. The germanium/silicon ratio can be applied to minerals that might not partition nickel and iridium, like feldspars. We report germanium in minerals from the 3 known chassignites, 2 nakhlites and 5 shergottites by LAICP- MS using a method optimized for precise germanium analysis.

  10. The Thermal and Radiation Exposure History of Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Symes, Steven J. K.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) of seven lunar meteorites in order to examine their crystallization, irradiation, and recent thermal histories. Lunar meteorites have induced TL properties similar to Apollo samples of the same provenance (highland or mare), indicating similar crystallization and metamorphic histories. MacAlplne Hills 88104/5 has experienced the greatest degree of impact/regolith processing among the highland-dominated meteorites. The basaltic breccia QUE 94281 is dominated by mare component but may also contain a significant highland component. For the mare-dominated meteorites, EET 87521 may have a significant highland impact-melt component, while Asuka 881757 and Y-793169 have been heavily shocked. The thermal history of Y-793169 included slow cooling, either during impact processing or during its initial crystallization. Our natural TL data indicate that most lunar meteorites have apparently been irradiated in space a few thousand years, with most less than 15,000 a. Elephant Moraine 87521 has the lowest irradiation exposure time, being less than 1,000 a. Either the natural TL of ALHA81005, Asuka 881757 and Y-82192 was only partially reset by lunar ejection or these meteorites were in small perihelia orbits (less than or equal to 0.7 AU).

  11. Pressure demagnetization of the Martian crust: Ground truth from SNC meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Trukhin, Vladimir I.

    2007-12-01

    We performed hydrostatic pressure demagnetization experiments up to 1.3 GPa on Martian meteorites: nakhlite NWA998 (magnetite-bearing), basaltic shergottites NWA1068 (pyrrhotite-bearing) and Los Angeles (titanomagnetite-bearing) as well as terrestrial rocks: rhyolite (hematite-bearing) and basalt (titanomagnetite-bearing), using a new non-magnetic high-pressure cell. The detailed description of measuring techniques and experimental set-up is presented. We found that under 1.3 GPa the samples lost up to 54% of their initial saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM). Repeated loading resulted in a further decrease of magnetization of the samples. Our experiments show that the resistance of IRM to hydrostatic pressure is not exclusively controlled by the remanent coercivity of the sample, but is strongly dependant on its magnetic mineralogy. There is no simple equivalence between pressure demagnetization and alternating field demagnetization. The extrapolation of these results of pressure demagnetization of IRM of Martian meteorites to the demagnetization of the Martian crust by impacts is discussed.

  12. Gas adsorption on crushed quartz and basalt. [in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, C.; Torkelson, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    The new surfaces generated by crushing rocks and minerals adsorb gases. Different gases are adsorbed to different extents so that both the total amount and composition of the released gases are changed. This affects the interpretation of the composition of the gases obtained by vacuum crushing lunar basalts, meteorites and minerals with fluid inclusions.

  13. Investigation of Effective Material Properties of Stony Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Carlozzi, Alex; Bryson, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    To assess the threat posed by an asteroid entering Earth's atmosphere, one must predict if, when, and how it fragments during entry. A comprehensive understanding of the Asteroid material properties is needed to achieve this objective. At present, the meteorite material found on Earth are the only objects from an entering asteroid that can be used as representative material and be tested inside a laboratory setting. Therefore, unit cell models are developed to determine the effective material properties of stony meteorites and in turn deduce the properties of asteroids. The unit cell is representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, and matrix composition inside a meteorite. The various classes under investigation includes H-class, L-class, and LL-class chondrites. The effective mechanical properties such as Young's Modulus and Poisson's Ratio of the unit cell are calculated by performing several hundreds of Monte-Carlo simulations. Terrestrial analogs such as Basalt and Gabbro are being used to validate the unit cell methodology.

  14. Isotopic anomalies of H2 and C in the peat from the Tunguska meteorite impact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. M.

    Core samples of peat collected at the site of the Tunguska meteorite impact were mixed with CuO and burned inside evacuated and sealed quartz ampules. As a result, the organic components of peat were transformed to H2O and CO2 which were then separated and analyzed using a mass spectrometer. Results show that layers located above the level dated by 1908 are characterized by lighter H2 isotopes and heavier C isotopes, compared with lower layers. These effects are ascribed to the conservation and gradual redistribution of cosmic matter (e.g., regular chondrites, achondrites, and C4-type carbon chondrites) in the upper peat layers.

  15. The isotopic composition of uranium and lead in Allende inclusions and meteoritic phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of uranium and lead in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende chondrite and in whitlockite from the St. Severin chondrite and the Angra dos Reis achondrite are reported. Isoptopic analysis of acid soluble fractions of the Allende inclusions and the meteoritic whitlockite, which show isotopic anomalies in other elements, reveals U-235/U-238 ratios from 1/137.6 to 1/138.3, within 20 per mil of normal terrestrial U abundances. The Pb isotopic compositions of five coarse-grained Allende inclusions give a mean Pb-207/Pb-206 model age of 4.559 + or - 0.015 AE, in agreement with the U results. Pb isotope ratios of two fine-grained inclusions and a coarse-grained inclusion with strong mass fractionation and some nonlinear isotopic anomalies indicate that the U-Pb systems of these inclusions have evolved differently from the rest of Allende. Th/U abundance ratios in the Allende inclusions and meteoritic phosphate are found to range from 3.8 to 96, presumably indicating an optimal case for Cm/U fractionation, although the normal U concentrations do not support claims of abundant live Cm-247 or Cm-247/U-238 fractionation at the time of meteorite formation, in contrast to previous results. A limiting Cm-247/U-235 ratio of 0.004 at the time of meteorite formation is calculated which implies that the last major r process contribution at the protosolar nebula was approximately 100 million years prior to Al-26 formation and injection.

  16. Near-Earth object 2012XJ112 as a source of bright bolides of achondritic nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, José M.; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Williams, Iwan P.; Konovalova, Natalia; Ortiz, José L.; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Pastor, Sensi; de los Reyes, José A.; Cabrera-Caño, Jesús

    2014-04-01

    We analyse the likely link between the recently discovered near-Earth object 2012XJ112 and a bright fireball observed over the south of Spain on 2012 December 27. The bolide, with an absolute magnitude of -9 ± 1, was simultaneously imaged during the morning twilight from two meteor stations operated by the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). It was also observed by several casual witnesses. The emission spectrum produced during the ablation of the meteoroid in the atmosphere was also recorded. From its analysis, the chemical nature of this particle was inferred. Although our orbital association software identified several potential parent bodies for this meteoroid, the analysis of the evolution of the orbital elements performed with the MERCURY 6 symplectic integrator supports the idea that NEO 2012XJ112 is the source of this meteoroid. The implications of this potential association are discussed here. In particular, the meteoroid bulk chemistry is consistent with a basaltic achondrite, and this emphasizes the importance to deduce from future Earth approaches the reflectance spectrum and taxonomic nature of 2012XJ112.

  17. The Divnoe meteorite: Petrology, chemistry, oxygen isotopes and origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petaev, M. I.; Barsukova, L. D.; Lipschultz, M. E.; Wang, M.-S.; Ariskin, A. A.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    The Divnoe meteorite is an olivine-rich primitive achondrite with subchondritic chemistry and mineralogy. It has a granoblastic, coarse-grained, olivine groundmass (CGL: coarse-grained lithology) with relatively large pyroxene-plagioclase poiklitic patches (PP) and small fine-grained domains of an opaque-rich lithology (ORL). Both PP and ORL are inhomogeneously distributed and display reaction boundaries with the groundmass. Major silicates, olivine Fa(20-28) and orthopyroxyene Fs(20-28 Wo(0.5-2.5), display systematic differences in composition between CGL and ORL as well as a complicated pattern of variations within CGL. Accessory plagioclase has low K content and displays regular igneous zoning with core compositions An(40-45) and rims An(32-37). The bulk chemical composition of Divnoe is similar to that of olivine-rich primitive achondrites, except for a depletion of incompatible elements and minor enrichment of refractory siderophiles. Oxygen isotope compositions for whole-rock and separated minerals from Divnoe fall in a narrow range, with mean delta O-18 = +4.91, delta O-17 = +2.24, and Delta O-17 = -0.26 +/- 0.11. The isotopic composition is not within the range of any previously recognized group but is very close to that of the brachinites. To understand the origin of Divnoe lithologies, partial melting and crystallization were modelled using starting compositions equal to that of Divnoe and some chondritic meteorites. It was found that the Divnoe composition could be derived from a chondritic source region by approximately 20 wt% partial melting at Ta approximately 1300 C and log(fO2) = IW-1.8, followed by approximtely 60 wt% crystallization of the partial melt formed, and removal of the still-liquid portion of the partial melt. Removal of the last partial melt resulted in depletion of the Divnoe plagioclase in Na and K. In this scenario, CGL represents the residue of partial melting, and PP is a portion of the partial melt that crystallized in situ. The

  18. Isotopic signatures and distribution of nitrogen and trapped and radiogenic xenon in the Acapulco and FRO90011 meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    Acapulco metal and silicate show distinct N isotopic signatures. Trapped heavy noble gases are carried by 'magnetic' opx and radiogenic Xe-129 excesses are observed in phosphate and in minor surficial phases on metal grains. N and Xe isotopic signatures in FRO90011 do not agree with those observed in Acapulco. The Acapulco meteorite is unique in having achondritic texture and chondritic composition. Its mineralogical study shows the record of high temperature (1100 C) recrystallization. However, this meteorite shows abundances of volatile elements close to the levels observed in carbonaceous chondrites and concentrations of heavy noble gases comparable to those observed in type 4 ordinary chondrites, not expected for a presumed highly equilibrated object. Nitrogen measurements in bulk Acapulco revealed two different isotopic signatures, in apparent conflict with evidence for a high degree of recrystallization. N and Xe were studied in separated mineral phases to search for the carriers in order to better understand the formation and thermal history of the Acapulco parent body.

  19. Geologic History of Asteroid 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Some types of meteorites - most irons, stony irons, some achondrites - hail from asteroids that were heated to the point where magmatism occurred within a very few million years of the formation of the earliest solids in the solar system. The largest clan of achondrites, the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites, represent the crust of their parent asteroid]. Diogenites are cumulate harzburgites and orthopyroxenites from the lower crust whilst eucrites are basalts, diabases and cumulate gabbros from the upper crust. Howardites are impact-engendered breccias mostly of diogenites and eucrites. There remains only one large asteroid with a basaltic crust, 4 Vesta, which is thought to be the source of the HED clan. Differentiation models for Vesta are based on HED compositions. Proto-Vesta consisted of chondritic materials containing Al-26, a potent, short-lived heat source. Inferences from compositional data are that Vesta was melted to high degree (=50%) allowing homogenization of the silicate phase and separation of a metallic core. Convection of the silicate magma ocean allowed equilibrium crystallization, forming a harzburgitic mantle. After convective lockup occurred, melt collected between the mantle and the cool thermal boundary layer and underwent fractional crystallization forming an orthopyroxene-rich (diogenite) lower crust. The initial thermal boundary layer of chondritic material was replaced by a mafic upper crust through impact disruption and foundering. The mafic crust thickened over time as additional residual magma intrudes and penetrates the mafic crust forming plutons, dikes, sills and flows of cumulate and basaltic eucrite composition. This magmatic history may have taken only 2-3 Myr. This magma ocean scenario is at odds with a model of heat and magma transport that indicates that small degrees of melt would be rapidly expelled from source regions, precluding development of a magma ocean. Constraints from radiogenic Mg-26 distibutions

  20. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Bacterium within Artificial Meteorite Survives Entry into the Earth's Atmosphere on FOTON-M4 Satellite Landing Module

    PubMed Central

    Slobodkin, Alexander; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ionov, Victor; Iliyin, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    One of the key conditions of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microorganisms situated within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through the Earth’s atmosphere. So far, all experimental proof of this possibility has been based on tests with sounding rockets which do not reach the transit velocities of natural meteorites. We explored the survival of the spore-forming thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus, placed within 1.4-cm thick basalt discs fixed on the exterior of a space capsule (the METEORITE experiment on the FOTON-M4 satellite). After 45 days of orbital flight, the landing module of the space vehicle returned to Earth. The temperature during the atmospheric transit was high enough to melt the surface of basalt. T. siderophilus survived the entry; viable cells were recovered from 4 of 24 wells loaded with this microorganism. The identity of the strain was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence and physiological tests. This is the first report on the survival of a lifeform within an artificial meteorite after entry from space orbit through Earth’s atmosphere at a velocity that closely approached the velocities of natural meteorites. The characteristics of the artificial meteorite and the living object applied in this study can serve as positive controls in further experiments on testing of different organisms and conditions of interplanetary transport. PMID:26151136

  1. Spore-Forming Thermophilic Bacterium within Artificial Meteorite Survives Entry into the Earth's Atmosphere on FOTON-M4 Satellite Landing Module.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, Alexander; Gavrilov, Sergey; Ionov, Victor; Iliyin, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    One of the key conditions of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microorganisms situated within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through the Earth's atmosphere. So far, all experimental proof of this possibility has been based on tests with sounding rockets which do not reach the transit velocities of natural meteorites. We explored the survival of the spore-forming thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus, placed within 1.4-cm thick basalt discs fixed on the exterior of a space capsule (the METEORITE experiment on the FOTON-M4 satellite). After 45 days of orbital flight, the landing module of the space vehicle returned to Earth. The temperature during the atmospheric transit was high enough to melt the surface of basalt. T. siderophilus survived the entry; viable cells were recovered from 4 of 24 wells loaded with this microorganism. The identity of the strain was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence and physiological tests. This is the first report on the survival of a lifeform within an artificial meteorite after entry from space orbit through Earth's atmosphere at a velocity that closely approached the velocities of natural meteorites. The characteristics of the artificial meteorite and the living object applied in this study can serve as positive controls in further experiments on testing of different organisms and conditions of interplanetary transport.

  2. Effects of lunar soil, Zagami meteorite, and ocean ridge basalt on the excretion of itoic acid, a siderophore, and coproporphyrin by Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, T.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of lunar soil (10084,151), Zagami meteorite, postulated to be ejected from Mars, and ocean ridge basalt, the most abundant volcanic rock on earth, all completely inhibited the excretion of itoic acid and of coproporphyrin by Bacillus subtilis, a common airborne bacterium. Since such inhibition has been known to occur only under iron rich growth conditions(the excretion of these compounds occurs under iron deficient growth conditions), the result indicated that the organism was capable of extracting iron quite readily from these materials. A sample of synthetic ilmenite completely failed to inhibit the excretion of coproporphyrin, and inhibited the excretion of itoic acid only slightly. The result suggested that much of the iron extracted by the organism must have come from iron sources other than ilmenite,such as pyroxenes and olivines,in these natural materials tested.

  3. Volatile Behavior in Lunar and Terrestrial Basalts During Shock: Implications for Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaklader, Johny; Shearer, C. K.; Hoerz, F.; Newsom, H. E.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of water in martian magmas has significant ramifications for the martian atmosphere-hydrosphere cycle. Large D-enrichments have been observed in kaersutitic amphiboles in Zagami, Chassigny and Shergotty meteorites (delta-D values up to 4400 per mil) suggesting that substantial amounts of H escaped Mars in its past. Furthermore, martian meteorites with inclusions of biotite and apatite imply possible origins in a hydrous mantle. However, whether martian magmas ever possessed considerable proportions of water remains controversial and unclear. The H-content of mica and amphibole melt inclusions has been found to be low, while bulk-rock H2O content is also low ranging from 0.013 to 0.035 wt. % in Shergotty. Hydrous martian magmas were considered responsible for light lithophile element (LLE) zoning patterns observed in Nakhlite and Shergottite pyroxenes. Since LLEs, such as Li and B, partition into aqueous fluids at temperatures greater than 350 C, workers interpreted Li-B depletions in pyroxene rims as evidence that supercritical fluid exsolution occurred during magma degassing. In that many martian basalts experienced substantial shock (15-45 GPa) it is possible that the magmatic volatile record preserved in martian basalts has been disturbed. Previous shock experiments suggest that shock processes may effect water content and H/D. To better understand the possible effects of shock on this volatile record, we are studying the redistribution of volatile elements in naturally and experimentally shocked basalts. Here, we report the initial results from shocked basalts associated with the Lonar Crater, India and an experimentally shocked lunar basalt.

  4. Curious kinetic behavior in silica polymorphs solves seifertite puzzle in shocked meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Tomoaki; Kato, Takumi; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of seifertite, one of the high-pressure polymorphs of silica, in achondritic shocked meteorites has been problematic because this phase is thermodynamically stable at more than ~100 GPa, unrealistically high-pressure conditions for the shock events in the early solar system. We conducted in situ x-ray diffraction measurements at high pressure and temperatures, and found that it metastably appears down to ~11 GPa owing to the clear difference in kinetics between the metastable seifertite and stable stishovite formations. The temperature-insensitive but time-sensitive kinetics for the formation of seifertite uniquely constrains that the critical shock duration and size of the impactor on differentiated parental bodies are at least ~0.01 s and ~50 to 100 m, respectively, from the presence of seifertite. PMID:26601182

  5. The accumulation rate of meteorite falls at the earth's surface - The view from Roosevelt County, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Wells, Gordon L.; Rendell, Helen M.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of 154 meteorite fragments within an 11-sq km area of wind-excavated basins in Roosevelt County, New Mexico, permits a new calculation of the accumulation rate of meteorite falls at the earth's surface. Thermoluminescence dating of the coversand unit comprising the prime recovery surface suggests the maximum terrestrial age of the meteorites to be about 16.0 ka. The 68 meteorite fragments subjected to petrological analyses represent a minimum of 49 individual falls. Collection bias has largely excluded carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites, requiring the accumulation rate derived from the recovered samples to be increased by a factor of 1.25. Terrestrial weathering destroying ordinary chondrites can be modeled as a first-order decay process with an estimated half-life of 3.5 + or - 1.9 ka on the semiarid American High Plains. Having accounted for the age of the recovery surface, area of field searches, pairing of finds, collection bias and weathering half-life, an accumulation rate of 940 falls/a per 10 to the 6th sq km is calculated for falls greater than 10 g total mass. This figure exceeds the best-constrained previous estimate by more than an order of magnitude. One possible reason for this disparity may be the extraordinary length of the fall record preserved in the surficial geology of Roosevelt County. The high accumulation rate determined for the past 16 ka may point to the existence of periods when the meteorite fall rate was significantly greater than at present.

  6. Spectral analysis of meteorites ablated in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouard, A.; Vernazza, P.; Loehle, S.; Gattacceca, J.; Zander, T.; Eberhart, M.; Meindl, A.; Oefele, R.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.

    2017-09-01

    Recently and for the very first time, experiments simulating vaporization of a meteorite sample were performed in a wind tunnel near Stuttgart with the specific aim to record emission spectra of the vaporized material. Using a high enthalpy air plasma flow for modeling an equivalent air friction of an entry speed of about 10 km/s, three meteorite types (H, CM and HED) and two meteoritical analogues (basalt and argillite) were ablated and high resolution spectra were recorded simultaneously. After the identification of all atomic lines, we per- formed a detailed study of our spectra using two approaches: (i) by direct comparison of multiplet in- tensities between the samples and (ii) by computation of a synthetic spectrum to constrain some physical parameters (temperature, elemental abundance). Finally, we compared our results to the elemental composition of our samples and we determined how much compositional information can be retrieved for a given meteor using visible sectroscopy.

  7. Elephant Moraine 87521 - The first lunar meteorite composed of predominantly mare material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of trace-element analyses and detailed petrography obtained for the Elephant Moraine 87521 meteorite (EET87521) found recently in Antarctica. Its high values found for the Fe/Mn ratio and the bulk-Co content indicate that the EET87521 is not, as was originally classified, a eucrite. Moreover, its low Ga/Al and Na/Ca ratios exclude the possibility that it is an SNC meteorite. These and other characteristics (e.g., a very low Ti content) of the EET87521 suggest its affinity with very-low-Ti high-alumina varieties of lunar mare basalt.

  8. Soil Components in Heterogeneous Impact Glass in Martian Meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Martian soil composition can illuminate past and ongoing near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Though the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) have analyzed the major-element composition of Martian soils, no soil samples have been returned to Earth for detailed chemical analysis. Rao et al. [1] suggested that Martian meteorite EETA79001 contains melted Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) based on sulfur enrichment of Lithology C relative to the meteorite s basaltic lithologies (A and B) [1,2]. If true, it may be possible to extract detailed soil chemical analyses using this meteoritic sample. We conducted high-resolution (0.3 m/pixel) element mapping of Lithology C in thin section EETA79001,18 by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). We use these data for principal component analysis (PCA).

  9. Bounce Rock-A shergottite-like basalt encountered at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zipfel, J.; Schroder, C.; Jolliff, B.L.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R.; Bell, J.F.; Brückner, J.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; de Souza, P.A.; Dreibus, G.; D'uston, C.; Economou, T.; Gorevan, S.P.; Hahn, B.C.; Klingelhofer, G.; McCoy, T.J.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Rodionov, D.S.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wright, S.P.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The Opportunity rover of the Mars Exploration Rover mission encountered an isolated rock fragment with textural, mineralogical, and chemical properties similar to basaltic shergottites. This finding was confirmed by all rover instruments, and a comprehensive study of these results is reported here. Spectra from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the Panoramic Camera reveal a pyroxene-rich mineralogy, which is also evident in M??ssbauer spectra and in normative mineralogy derived from bulk chemistry measured by the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The correspondence of Bounce Rock's chemical composition with the composition of certain basaltic shergottites, especially Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201, is very close, with only Cl, Fe, and Ti exhibiting deviations. Chemical analyses further demonstrate characteristics typical of Mars such as the Fe/Mn ratio and P concentrations. Possible shock features support the idea that Bounce Rock was ejected from an impact crater, most likely in the Meridiani Planum region. Bopolu crater, 19.3km in diameter, located 75km to the southwest could be the source crater. To date, no other rocks of this composition have been encountered by any of the rovers on Mars. The finding of Bounce Rock by the Opportunity rover provides further direct evidence for an origin of basaltic shergottite meteorites from Mars. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.

  10. Hydrogen in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hervig, R.; Irving, T.

    2017-01-01

    Most volatile studies of Mars have targeted its surface via spacecraft and rover data, and have evidenced surficial water in polar caps and the atmosphere, in the presence of river channels, and in the detection of water bearing minerals. The other focus of Martian volatile studies has been on Martian meteorites which are all from its crust. Most of these studies are on hydrous phases like apatite, a late-stage phase, i.e. crystallizing near the end of the differentiation sequence of Martian basalts and cumulates. Moreover, calculating the water content of the magma a phosphate crystallized from is not always possible, and yet is an essential step to estimate how much water was present in a parent magma and its source. Water, however, is primarily dissolved in the interiors of differentiated planets as hydrogen in lattice defects of nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar) of the crust and mantle. This hydrogen has tremendous influence, even in trace quantities, on a planet's formation, geodynamics, cooling history and the origin of its volcanism and atmosphere as well as its potential for life. Studies of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous phases of Martian meteorites are rare. Measuring water contents and hydrogen isotopes in well-characterized nominally anhydrous minerals of Martian meteorites is the goal of our study. Our work aims at deciphering what influences the distribution and origin of hydrogen in Martian minerals, such as source, differentiation, degassing and shock.

  11. Elephant Moraine 87521: The first lunar meteorite composed of predominantly mare material

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Warren, P.H.; Kallemeyn, G.W.

    1989-12-01

    The trace-element chemistry and detailed petrography of brecciated Antarctic meteorite EET87521 reveal that it is not, as originally classified, a eucrite. Its Fe/Mn ratio and bulk Co content are fair higher than expected for a eucrite. Only one known type of extraterrestrial material resembles EET87521 in all important respects for which constraints exist: very-low-Ti (VLT) lunar mare basalts. Even compared to VLT basalts, EET87521 is enriched in REE. However, other varieties of high-alumina, low-Ti mare basalt are known that contain REE at even higher concentrations than EET87521. Several clasts in EET87521 preserve clear vestiges of coarse-grained igneous, possibly orthocumulate, textures.more » Mineralogically, these coarse-grained clasts are diverse; e.g., olivine ranges from Fo{sub 15} in one to Fo{sub 67} in another. One clast with an anomalously fine-grained texture is anorthositic and contains exceptionally Mg-rich pyroxene and Na-poor plagioclase, along with the only FeNi-metal in the thin section. Its FeNi-metals have compositions typical of metals incorporated into lunar soils and polymict breccias as debris from metal-rich meteorites. However, the low Ni and Ir contents of our bulk-rock analysis imply that the proportion of impact-projectile matter in our chip sample is probably small. The moderate degree of lithologic diversity among the lithic lasts and the bulk composition in general indicate that EET87521 is dominated by a single rock type: VLT mare basalt.« less

  12. Material Modeling of Stony Meteorites for Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.

    2016-12-01

    modeling of atmospheric entry for asteroids. Terrestrial analogs such as Basalt and Gabbro are being used to validate the unit cell methodology. Structural tests are also being performed on some of the meteorites including Tamdakht and Mbole to validate the predictions from unit cell models.

  13. What we have learned about Mars from SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are thought to be igneous martian rocks, based on their young crystallization ages and a close match between the composition of gases implanted in them during shock and the atmosphere of Mars. A related meteorite, ALH84001, may be older and thus may represent ancient martian crust. These petrologically diverse basalts and ultramafic rocks are mostly cumulates, but their parent magmas share geochemical and radiogenic isotopic characteristics that suggest they may have formed by remelting the same mantle source region at different times. Information and inferences about martian geology drawn from these samples include the following: Planetary differentiation occured early at approximately 4.5 GA, probably concurrently with accretion. The martian mantle contains different abundances of moderately volatile and siderophile elements and is more Fe-rich than that of the Earth, which has implications for its mineralogy, density, and origin. The estimated core composition has a S abundance near the threshold value for inner core solidification. The former presence of a core dynamo may be suggested by remanent magnetization in Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassignite (SNC) meteorites, although these rocks may have been magnetized during shock. The mineralogy of martian surface units, inferred from reflectance spectra, matches that of basaltic shergottites, but SNC lithologies thought to have crystallized in the subsurface are not presently recognized. The rheological properties of martian magmas are more accurately derived form these metorites than from observations of martian flow morphology, although the sampled range of magma compositions islimited. Estimates of planetary water abundance and the amount of outgassed water based on these meteorites are contridictory but overlap estimates based on geological observations and atmospheric measurements. Stable isotope measurements indicate that the martian hydrosphere experienced only limited exchange with the

  14. Characterization and Distribution of Lunar Mare Basalt Types Using Remote Sensing Techniques. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C.

    1977-01-01

    The types of basal to be found on the moon were identified using reflectance spectra from a variety of lunar mare surfaces and craters as well as geochemical interpretations of laboratory measurements of reflectance from lunar, terrestrial, and meteoritic samples. Findings indicate that major basaltic units are not represented in lunar sample collections. The existence of late stage high titanium basalts is confirmed. All maria contain lateral variations of compositionally heterogenous basalts; some are vertically inhomogenous with distinctly different subsurface composition. Some basalt types are spectrally gradational, suggesting minor variations in composition. Mineral components of unsampled units can be defined if spectra are obtained with sufficient spectral coverage (.3 to 2.5 micron m) and spatial resolution (approximating .5 km).

  15. Lunar Meteorites and Implications for Compositional Remote Sensing of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    unreasonable viewpoint, is that such data offer no constraint. For example, if one were to cut up the Apollo 17 landing site (which was selected for its diversity) into softball-sized pieces, some of those pieces (e.g., sample 70135) would be crystalline mare basalts like Y 793169 whereas others (e.g., sample 73131 would be feldspathic regolith breccias like MAC 88104/ 88105. However, nature is not so devious. Warren argues that LMs come from craters of only a few kilometers in diameter. If so, even though CRE data allow, for example, that ALHA 81005 and Y 791197) were launched simultaneously from the same crater, the probability is nevertheless low because the two meteorites are compositionally and mineralogically distinct. Thus, within the allowed range (5-11) for the number of locations represented by the LMs, values at the high end of the range are probably more likely. Mare Meteorites: Three LMs consist almost entirely of mare basalt. Two, Y 793169 and Asuka 881757, are unbrecciated, low-Ti, crystalline rocks that are compositionally and mineralogically similar (but not identical) to each other; they probably derive from a single lunar-mare location. The third, EET 87521/96008, is a fragmental breccia consisting predominantly of VLT mare basalt. Thus, these LMs probably represent only two lunar mare locations. The basaltic LMs have mineral and bulk compositions distinct from Apollo mare basalts. The petrography of Calcalong Creek has not been described in detail, but compositionally it is unique in that it corresponds to a mixture (breccia) of about one-half feldspathic material (i.e., the mean composition of the feldspathic lunar meteorites, below), one-fourth KREEP norite, one-fourth VLT mare basalt (like EET 87521), and 1% CI chondrite. With 4 micro g/g Th and correspondingly high concentrations of other incompatible elements, it is the only lunar meteorite that is likely to have come from within the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT). Yamato 793274 and QUE 94281 are

  16. Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) with Raman Imaging Applied to Lunar Meteorites.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph P; Smith, Frank C; Booksh, Karl S

    2018-03-01

    Lunar meteorites provide a more random sampling of the surface of the Moon than do the returned lunar samples, and they provide valuable information to help estimate the chemical composition of the lunar crust, the lunar mantle, and the bulk Moon. As of July 2014, ∼96 lunar meteorites had been documented and ten of these are unbrecciated mare basalts. Using Raman imaging with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), we investigated portions of polished thin sections of paired, unbrecciated, mare-basalt lunar meteorites that had been collected from the LaPaz Icefield (LAP) of Antarctica-LAP 02205 and LAP 04841. Polarized light microscopy displays that both meteorites are heterogeneous and consist of polydispersed sized and shaped particles of varying chemical composition. For two distinct probed areas within each meteorite, the individual chemical species and associated chemical maps were elucidated using MCR-ALS applied to Raman hyperspectral images. For LAP 02205, spatially and spectrally resolved clinopyroxene, ilmenite, substrate-adhesive epoxy, and diamond polish were observed within the probed areas. Similarly, for LAP 04841, spatially resolved chemical images with corresponding resolved Raman spectra of clinopyroxene, troilite, a high-temperature polymorph of anorthite, substrate-adhesive epoxy, and diamond polish were generated. In both LAP 02205 and LAP 04841, substrate-adhesive epoxy and diamond polish were more readily observed within fractures/veinlet features. Spectrally diverse clinopyroxenes were resolved in LAP 04841. Factors that allow these resolved clinopyroxenes to be differentiated include crystal orientation, spatially distinct chemical zoning of pyroxene crystals, and/or chemical and molecular composition. The minerals identified using this analytical methodology-clinopyroxene, anorthite, ilmenite, and troilite-are consistent with the results of previous studies of the two meteorites using electron microprobe

  17. L7 chondrites in FRO 90 Antarctic meteorite collection: A discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, F. A.; Levi-Donati, G. R.

    1994-07-01

    A major problem in stony meteorite research appears to still be unsolved. A clear identification of a petrologic transition from chondritic to achondritic material is not yet obtained. The texture of the Shaw chondrite was for several years of peculiar interest. Being classified as an L7 chondrite, it looked to be not just rare but unique. It is now possible to extend the study to recently recovered material. The examination of the U.S. Antarctic Meteorite Collection, which contains the characterization of 5537 specimens, reveals two samples ascribable to the L7 group. They are LEW 88663, a stone of 14.5 g, severely weathered and PAT 91501, a mass of 8550.6 g, showing moderate weathering. The Frontier Mountain Expedition (FRO), organized by EUROMET, between 1990 December and 1991 January, recovered 256 samples, of which 6 were terrestrial rocks and 250 meteorite specimens. At least 12 of them are L7 chondrites. However, it should be considered that this is the first time that such a high number of L7 samples have been found in a single location. Moreover, the existence of unusual features, symptoms of shock metamorphism, undoubtedly supports the hypothesis of a common origin and/or a common history. They are among others: presence in several samples of the FRO-collection of maskelynite, a diaplectic glass of plagioclasic origin, frequent 'mosaicism' in olivine crystals; and extensive appearance of planar features. We may then confirm that it is desirable that an accurate comparison of the samples be performed, using all possible research methods, hoping in this way to contribute to the solution of the problem.

  18. New Martian Meteorite Is One of the Most Oxidized Found to Date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Shafer, John T.; Brandon, Alan D.; Irving, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    As of 2013, about 60 meteorites from the planet Mars have been found and are being studied. Each time a new Martian meteorite is found, a wealth of new information comes forward about the red planet. The most abundant type of Martian meteorite is a shergottite; its lithologies are broadly similar to those of Earth basalts and gabbros; i.e., crustal igneous rocks. The entire suite of shergottites is characterized by a range of trace element, isotopic ratio, and oxygen fugacity values that mainly reflect compositional variations of the Martian mantle from which these magmas came. A newly found shergottite, NWA 5298, was the focus of a study performed by scientists within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in 2012. This sample was found in Morocco in 2008. Major element analyses were performed in the electron microprobe (EMP) laboratory of ARES at JSC, while the trace elements were measured at the University of Houston by laser inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). A detailed analysis of this stone revealed that this meteorite is a crystallized magma that comes from the enriched end of the shergottite spectrum; i.e., trace element enriched and oxidized. Its oxidation comes in part from its mantle source and from oxidation during the magma ascent. It represents a pristine magma that did not mix with any other magma or see crystal accumulation or crustal contamination on its way up to the Martian surface. NWA 5298 is therefore a direct, albeit evolved, melt from the Martian mantle and, for its lithology (basaltic shergottite), it represents the oxidized end of the shergottite suite. It is thus a unique sample that has provided an end-member composition for Martian magmas.

  19. A large planetary body inferred from diamond inclusions in a ureilite meteorite.

    PubMed

    Nabiei, Farhang; Badro, James; Dennenwaldt, Teresa; Oveisi, Emad; Cantoni, Marco; Hébert, Cécile; El Goresy, Ahmed; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Gillet, Philippe

    2018-04-17

    Planetary formation models show that terrestrial planets are formed by the accretion of tens of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos through energetic giant impacts. However, relics of these large proto-planets are yet to be found. Ureilites are one of the main families of achondritic meteorites and their parent body is believed to have been catastrophically disrupted by an impact during the first 10 million years of the solar system. Here we studied a section of the Almahata Sitta ureilite using transmission electron microscopy, where large diamonds were formed at high pressure inside the parent body. We discovered chromite, phosphate, and (Fe,Ni)-sulfide inclusions embedded in diamond. The composition and morphology of the inclusions can only be explained if the formation pressure was higher than 20 GPa. Such pressures suggest that the ureilite parent body was a Mercury- to Mars-sized planetary embryo.

  20. Spectroscopic Detection of Minerals in Martian Meteorites using Reflectance and Emittance Spectroscopy and Applications to Surface Mineralogy on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2001-12-01

    Martian meteorites provide direct information about crustal rocks on Mars. In this study we are measuring reflectance and emittance spectra of multiple Martian meteorites in order to characterize the spectral properties of the minerals present and to develop comprehensive criteria for remote detection of rocks and minerals. Previous studies have evaluated mid-IR emittance spectra [Hamilton et al., 1997] and visible/IR reflectance spectra [Bishop et al., 1998a,b] of Martian meteorites independently. The current study includes comparisons of the visible/NIR and mid-IR spectral regions and also involves comparison of mid-IR spectra measured using biconical reflectance and thermal emission techniques. Combining spectral analyses of Martian meteorite chips and powders enables characterization of spectral bands for remote detection of potential source regions for meteorite-like rocks on the surface of Mars using both Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) datasets and visible/NIR datasets from past and future missions. Identification of alteration minerals in these meteorites also provides insights into the alteration processes taking place on Mars. Analysis of TES data on Mars has identified global regions of basaltic and andesitic surface material [e.g. Bandfield et al., 2000; Christensen et al., 2000]; however neither of these spectral endmembers corresponds well to the spectra of Martian meteorites. Some preliminary findings suggest that small regions on the surface of Mars may relate to meteorite compositions [e.g. Hoefen et al., 2000; Hamilton et al., 2001]. Part of the difficulty in identifying meteorite compositions on Mars may be due to surface alteration. We hope to apply the results of our spectroscopic analyses of Martian meteorites, as well as fresh and altered basaltic material, toward analysis of composition on Mars using multiple spectral datasets. References: Bandfield J. et al., Science 287, 1626, 2000. Bishop J. et al., MAPS 33, 699, 1998a. Bishop J. et

  1. Basaltic volcanism on the eucrite parent body - Petrology and chemistry of the polymict eucrite ALHA80102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The polymict eucrite meteorite ALHA80102 is an unequilibrated breccia of basaltic and gabbroic clasts in a fragmental matrix. Clasts include basalts of many textural types, cumulate gabbro, black 'glass', and ferroan troctolite (plagioclase, silica, Fe-rich olivine, ilmenite, mesostasis). Ferroan troctolite has not been previously reported from eucrites or howardites; it is interpreted as the end-product of fractional crystallization of eucritic magmas. Bulk and trace element compositions (by electron microprobe and INAA) of clasts and matrix from ALHA80102 are similar to those of other eucrites; the meteorite contains clasts similar to Juvinas and to Stannern. A clast of cumulate eucrite gabbro is enriched in the light rare earths (La/Lu = 2XCI). This clast is interpreted as an unrepresentative sample of metamorphically equilibrated gabbro; LREE-enriched magmas need not be invoked. ALHA80102 is similar to other polymict eucrites from the Allan Hills and may be paired with ALHA76005, ALHA77302, and ALHA78040.

  2. Mapping the Iron Oxidation State in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Treimann, A. H.; Righter, K.

    2017-01-01

    Several types of Martian igneous meteorites have been identified: clinopyroxenites (nakhlites), basaltic shergottites, peridotitic shergottites, dunites (chassignites) and orthopyroxenites [1,2]. In order to constrain the heterogeneity of the Martian mantle and crust, and their evolution through time, numerous studies have been performed on the iron oxidation state of these meteorites [3,4,5,6,7,8,9]. The calculated fO2 values all lie within the FMQ-5 to FMQ+0.5 range (FMQ representing the Fayalite = Magnetite + Quartz buffer); however, discrepancies appear between the various studies, which are either attributed to the choice of the minerals/melts used, or to the precision of the analytical/calculation method. The redox record in volcanic samples is primarily related to the oxidation state in the mantle source(s). However, it is also influenced by several deep processes: melting, crystallization, magma mixing [10], assimilation and degassing [11]. In addition, the oxidation state in Martian meteorites is potentially affected by several surface processes: assimilation of sediment/ crust during lava flowing at Mars' surface, low temperature micro-crystallization [10], weathering at the surface of Mars and low temperature reequilibration, impact processes (i.e. high pressure phase transitions, mechanical mixing, shock degassing and melting), space weathering, and weathering on Earth (at atmospheric conditions different from Mars). Decoding the redox record of Martian meteorites, therefore, requires large-scale quantitative analysis methods, as well as a perfect understanding of oxidation processes.

  3. The Mean Life Squared Relationship for Abundances of Extinct Radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, K.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    2004-01-01

    We discovered that the abundances of now extinct radioactivities (relative to stable reference isotopes) in meteorites vary as a function of their mean lifetimes squared. This relationship applies to chondrites, achondrites, and irons but to calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAIs). Certain meteorites contain excesses in isotopic abundances from the decay of radioactive isotopes with half-lives much less than the age of the solar system. These short-lived radioactivities are now extinct, but they were alive when meteorites assembled in the early solar system. The origin of these radioactivities and the processes which control their abundances in the solar nebula are still not well understood. Some clues may come from our finding that the meteoritic abundances of now extinct radioactivities (relative to stable reference isotopes) vary as a function of their mean lifetimes squared. This relationship applies to chondrites, achondrites, and irons, but not to CAIs. This points to at least two different processes establishing the abundances of short-lived isotopes found in the meteoritic record.

  4. Petrography and Origin of the Unique Achondrite GRA 06128 & 06129: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Morris, R. V.; Kring, D. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jones, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    GRA 06128 and 06129 are paired achondrites with unique mineral proportions (75% oligoclase), mineral compositions, and oxygen isotope ratios. They appear to represent alkalic igneous rock from a hitherto unsampled differentiated parent body, modified significantly by thermal and shock metamorphism.

  5. Basaltic Shergottite NWA 856: Differentiation of a Martian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2016-01-01

    NWA 856 or Djel Ibone, is a basaltic shergottite discovered as a single stone of 320 g in South Morocco in April, 2001. This meteorite is fresh, i.e. shows minimal terrestrial weathering for a desert find. No shergottite discovered in North Africa can be paired with NWA 856. The purpose of this study is to constrain its crystallization history using textural observations, crystallization sequence modeling and in-situ trace element analysis in order to understand differentiation in shergottite magmatic systems.

  6. Constraints on the Composition and Evolution of the Lunar Crust from Meteorite NWA 3163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, C. L.; Brandon, A. D.; Fernandes, V. A.; Peslier, A. H.; Lapen, T. J.; Irving, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    The lunar meteorite NWA 3163 (paired with NWA 4881, 4483) is a ferroan, feldspathic granulitic breccia characterized by pigeonite, augite, olivine, maskelynite and accessory Tichromite, ilmenite and troilite. Bulk rock geochemical signatures indicate the lack of a KREEP- derived component (Eu/Eu* = 3.47), consistent with previously studied lunar granulites and anorthosites. Bulk rock chondrite-normalized signatures are however distinct from the anorthosites and granulites sampled by Apollo missions and are relatively REE-depleted. In-situ analyses of maskelynite reveal little variation in anorthite content (average An% is 96.9 +/- 1.6, 2 sigma). Olivine is relatively ferroan and exhibits very little variation in forsterite content with mean Fo% of 57.7 +/- 2.0 (2 sigma). The majority of pyroxene is low-Ca pigeonite (En57Fs33Wo10). Augite (En46Fs21Wo33) is less common, comprising approximately 10% of analyzed pyroxene. Two pyroxene thermometry on co-existing orthopyroxene and augite yield an equilibrium temperature of 1070C which is in reasonable agreement with temperatures of 1096C estimated from pigeonite compositions. Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of separated fractions yield an average measured Sr-87/Sr-87 of 0.699282+/-0.000007 (2 sigma). Sr model ages are calculated using a modern day Sr-87/Sr-86 Basaltic Achondrite Best Initial (BABI) value of 0.70475, from an initial BABI value Sr-87/Sr-86 of 0.69891 and a corresponding Rb-87/Sr-97 of 0.08716. The Sr model Thermomechanical analysis (TMA) age, which represents the time of separation of a melt from a source reservoir having chondritic evolution, is 4.56+/-0.1 Ga. A Sr model T(sub RD) age, which is a Rb depletion age and assumes no contribution from Rb in the sample in the calculation, yields 4.34+/-0.1 Ga (i.e. a minimum age). The Ar-Ar dating of paired meteorite NWA 4881 reveals an age of c. 2 Ga, likely representing the last thermal event this meteorite experienced. An older Ar-40/Ar-39 age of c. 3.5 Ga may

  7. Groups of meteorite-producing meteoroids containing carbonaceous chondrite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalova, N. A.; A.. Ibrohimov, A.; Kalashnikova, T. M.

    2017-09-01

    Proposed probable links of meteorite and meteorite-producing fireballs were been considered. Group associations between meteorite-producing meteoroids and meteorites were been determined for four carbonaceous chondrites Murchison, Maribo, Shutters Mill and Tagish Lake and potentially meteorite-producing bolides on the basis of links of their orbits. In result the several meteorite-producing sporadic slowly fireballs were found as the possible members of groups of four studied carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. One can presume that at present the identified groups may still contain large meteorite-dropping bodies.

  8. Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Korotev, Randy

    2017-05-01

    For thousands of years, people living in Egypt, China, Greece, Rome, and other parts of the world have been fascinated by shooting stars, which are the light and sound phenomena associated with meteorite impacts. The earliest written record of meteorite fall is logged by Chinese chroniclers back to 687 bce. However, centuries before that, Egyptians have been using "heavenly iron" to make their first iron tools, including a dagger recently found in King Tutankhamun's tomb that dates back to the 14th century bce. Even though human beings have a long history of observing meteors and utilizing meteorites, we did not start to recognize their true celestial origin until the Age of Enlightenment. In 1794 German physicist and musician Ernst Chladni was the first to summarize the scientific evidences and to demonstrate that these unique objects are indeed from outside of the Earth. After more than two centuries of joint efforts by countless keen amateur, academic, institutional, and commercial collectors, more than 55,000 meteorites have been catalogued and classified in the Meteoritical Bulletin Database. This number is continually growing, and meteorites are found all over the world, especially in dry and sparsely populated regions such as Antarctica and Sahara Desert. Although there are thousands of individual meteorites, they can be handily classified into three broad groups by simple examinations of the specimens. The most common type is stony meteorite, which is made of mostly silicate rocks. Iron meteorites are the easiest to be preserved for thousands (or even millions) of years on the Earth's surface environments, and they are composed of more than 90% iron and nickel metals. The stony-irons contain roughly the same amount of metals and silicates, and these spectacular meteorites are the favorites of many collectors and museums. After 200 years, meteoritics (the science of meteorites) has grown out of its infancy and become a vibrant area of research today. The

  9. Exposure history of the lunar meteorite, Elephant Moraine 87521

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Eugster, O.; Michel, TH.; Niedermann, S.; Kraehenbuhl, U.; Middleton, R.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Fink, D.; Klein, J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the noble gas concentrations and the Al-26, Be-10, Cl-36, and Ca-41 activities of the Antarctic lunar meteorite Elephant Moraine 87521. Although the actual exposure history of the meteorite may have been more complex, the following model history accounts satisfactorily for the cosmogenic nuclide data: A first stage of lunar irradiation for about 1 Ma at a depth of 1-5 g/sq cm followed, not necessarily directly, by a second one for 26 Ma at about 565 g/sq cm; launch from the moon less than 0.1 Ma ago; and arrival on earth 15-50 ka ago. The small concentration of trapped gases shows that except for some material that may have been introduced at the moment of launch, EET 87521 spent less than 1 Ma at a lunar depth less than 1 g/sq cm. EET 87521 has a K/Ar age in the range 3.0-3.4 Ga, which is typical for lunar mare basalts.

  10. Meteorite Dunite Breccia MIL 03443: A Probable Crustal Cumulate Closely Related to Diogenites from the HED Parent Asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous types of differentiated meteorites, but most represent either the crusts or cores of their parent asteroids. Ureilites, olivine-pyroxene-graphite rocks, are exceptions; they are mantle restites [1]. Dunite is expected to be a common mantle lithology in differentiated asteroids. In particular, models of the eucrite parent asteroid contain large volumes of dunite mantle [2-4]. Yet dunites are very rare among meteorites, and none are known associated with the howardite, eucrite, diogenite (HED) suite. Spectroscopic measurements of 4 Vesta, the probable HED parent asteroid, show one region with an olivine signature [5] although the surface is dominated by basaltic and orthopyroxenitic material equated with eucrites and diogenites [6]. One might expect that a small number of dunitic or olivine-rich meteorites might be delivered along with the HED suite. The 46 gram meteoritic dunite MIL 03443 (Fig. 1) was recovered from the Miller Range ice field of Antarctica. This meteorite was tentatively classified as a mesosiderite because large, dunitic clasts are found in this type of meteorite, but it was noted that MIL 03443 could represent a dunite sample of the HED suite [7]. Here I will present a preliminary petrologic study of two thin sections of this meteorite.

  11. Petrologic constraints on the surface processes on asteroid 4 Vesta and on excavation depths of diogenite fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    The eucrite-howardite-diogenite meteorite groups are though to be related by magmatic processes. Asteroid 4 Vesta has been proposed as the parent body for these basaltic achondrite meteorites. The similarity of the planetesimal's surface composition to eucrite and diogenite meteorites and the large size of the asteroid (r = 250 km) make it an attractive source, but its position in the asteroid belt far from the known resonances from which meteorites originate make a relation between Vesta and eucrite-howardite-giogenite group problematic. It has been proposed that diogenites are low-Ca pyroxene-rich cumulates that crystallized from a magnesian parent (identified in howardite breccias), and this crystallization process led to evolved eucrite derivative magmas. This eucrite-diogenite genetic relationship places constraints on the physical conditions under which crystallization occurred. Elevated pressure melting experiments on magnesian eucrite parent compositions show that the minimum pressure at which pyroxene crystallization could lead to the observed compositions of main series eucrites is 500 bars, equivalent to a depth of 135 km in a 4 Vesta-sized eucrite parent body. Therefore, the observation of diogenite on the surface of 4 Vesta requires a post-crystallization process that excavates diogenite cumulate from depth. The discovery of diogenite asteroidal fragments is consistent with an impact event on 4 Vesta that penetrated the deep interior of this planetesimal.

  12. Alteration of Rock Fragments from Columbia River Basalt Microcosms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; McKay, David S.; Stevens, Todd O.

    1999-01-01

    During an earlier study, microorganisms were grown microcosms consisting of sterilized chips of Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and natural CRB ground water with its natural microflora; environmental conditions simulated a deep subsurface, anaerobic, dark environment. Subsequent scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM) studies revealed the presence of several types of bacteria and biofilm, some of which were mineralized. Some of these biological features are very similar to possible biogenic features found in two meteorites from Mars, ALH84001 (found in Antarctica) and Nakhla (observed to fall in Egypt). Both ALH84001 and Nakhla contain traces of low-temperature aqueous alteration of silicates, oxides, and sulfides. The goals of this study are to use high-resolution field-emission SEM (FE-SEM) to examine the CRB samples for evidence of alteration features similar to those in the martian meteorites, to determine the extent of alteration during the CRB microcosm experiments, and to determine whether effects of biological activity can be distinguished from inorganic effects.

  13. Petrogenesis of Igneous-Textured Clasts in Martian Meteorite Northwest Africa 7034

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, A. R.; Agee, C. B.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    The martian meteorite Northwest Africa 7034 (and pairings) is a breccia that samples a variety of materials from the martian crust. Several previous studies have identified multiple types of igneous-textured clasts within the breccia [1-3], and these clasts have the potential to provide insight into the igneous evolution of Mars. One challenge presented by studying these small rock fragments is the lack of field context for this breccia (i.e., where on Mars it formed), so we do not know how many sources these small rock fragments are derived from or the exact formation his-tory of these sources (i.e., are the sources mantle de-rived melt or melts contaminated by a meteorite impactor on Mars). Our goal in this study is to examine specific igneous-textured clast groups to determine if they are petrogenetically related (i.e., from the same igneous source) and determine more information about their formation history, then use them to derive new insights about the igneous history of Mars. We will focus on the basalt clasts, FTP clasts (named due to their high concentration of iron, titanium, and phosphorous), and mineral fragments described by [1] (Fig. 1). We will examine these materials for evidence of impactor contamination (as proposed for some materials by [2]) or mantle melt derivation. We will also test the petrogenetic models proposed in [1], which are igneous processes that could have occurred regardless of where the melt parental to the clasts was formed. These models include 1) derivation of the FTP clasts from a basalt clast melt through silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI), 2) derivation of the FTP clasts from a basalt clast melt through fractional crystallization, and 3) a lack of petrogenetic relationship between these clast groups. The relationship between the clast groups and the mineral fragments will also be explored.

  14. Book reviews - Catalogue of Meteorites, 5th ed., revised and enlarged, by Monica M. Grady. Cambridge University Press, 2000, 689 pp., US $150.00 (ISBN 0521-66303-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Marina A.

    2002-02-01

    The Catalogue of Meteorites has a long tradition and is one of the most important reference publications for meteorite researchers and cosmochemists. The first Guide to the Catalogue of Meteorites was published in 1881 by Lazarus Fletcher, Keeper of Minerals at the British Museum (Natural History), and contained a description of the nature of meteorites and a list of the 361 samples then in the museum's collection. Over the past century, this list was expanded to include more than just the meteorites that were in the possession of the British Museum; an attempt was made to include names, location, and other information on all meteorites known at the time. Thus, the first Catalogue of Meteorites was published in 1923 by G. T. Prior. His successor at the British Museum was Max H. Hey, who published appendixes to Prior's Catalogue, as well as the second and third editions of the Catalogue of Meteoritesin 1953 and 1966. An appendix to the third edition was published in 1977. Traditionally, the Catalogue contained a listing of all the specimens in any of the world's meteorite collections, in museums or otherwise. With the discovery of large numbers of meteorites in Antarctica, starting in 1969, the publishers of the Catalogue encountered some problems, as hundreds-even thousands-of specimens, many of which may be paired, were brought back from Antarctica from the 1970s onward. The fourth edition of the Catalogue, published in 1985 by Andrew Graham, Alex Bevan, and Robert Hutchison, was the first to deal with this sudden inflation of the number of meteorites. Because most of the thousands of Antarctic meteorites (except the obviously more unusual types, such as irons and certain achondrites) had not been studied in any detail, the fourth edition of the Catalogue wisely limited the entries of these meteorites (in some cases, only those with masses larger than 500 g were included in the Catalogue). The fourth edition of the Catalogue was a handsome and handy reference book

  15. Re-analysis of previous laboratory phase curves: 2. Connections between opposition effect morphology and spectral features of stony meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déau, Estelle; Spilker, Linda J.; Flandes, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We investigate connections between the opposition phase curves and the spectra from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths of stony meteorites. We use two datasets: the reflectance dataset of Capaccioni et al. ([1990] Icarus, 83, 325), which consists of optical phase curves (from 2° to 45°) of 17 stony meteorites (three carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, and three achondrites), and the spectral dataset from the RELAB database consisting of near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra of the same meteorites. We re-analyzed the first dataset and fit it with two morphological models to derive the amplitude A, the angular width HWHM of the surge and the slope S of the linear part. Our re-analysis confirms that stony meteorites have a non-monotonic behavior of the surge amplitude with albedo, which is also observed in planetary surfaces (Déau et al. [2013] Icarus, 226, 1465), laboratory samples (Nelson et al. [2004] Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf., 35, p. 1089) and asteroids (Belskaya and Shevchenko [2000] Icarus, 147, 94). We find a very strong correlation between the opposition effect morphological parameters and the slope of the spectra between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. In particular, we found that meteorites with a positive amplitude-albedo correlation have a positive spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm, while meteorites with a negative amplitude-albedo correlation have a negative spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. We have ruled out the role of the meteorite samples' macro-properties (grain size, porosity and macroscopic roughness) in the correlations found because these properties were constant during the preparation of the samples. If this hypothesis is correct, this implies that other properties like the composition or the micro-properties (grain inclusions, grain shape or microscopic roughness) could have a preponderant role in the non-monotonic behavior of the surge morphology with albedo at small and moderate phase angles. Further

  16. Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS): Stony Asteroids Abundant in the Background and Family Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2016-10-01

    The Hungaria region represents a "purgatory" for the closest, preserved samples of the material from which the terrestrial planets accreted. The Hungaria region harbors a collisional family of Xe-type asteroids, which are situated among a background of predominantly S-complex asteroids. Deciphering their surface composition may provide constraints on the nature of the primordial building blocks of the terrestrial planets. We hypothesize that planetesimals in the inner part of the primordial asteroid belt experienced partial- to full-melting and differentiation, the Hungaria region should retain any petrologically-evolved material that formed there.We have undertaken an observational campaign entitled the Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) to record near-infrared (NIR) spectra to characterize taxonomy, surface mineralogy, and potential meteorite analogs. We used NIR instruments at two ground-based facilities (NASA IRTF; TNG). Our data set includes spectra of 82 Hungaria asteroids (61 background; 21 family), 65 were observed during HARTSS. We compare S-complex background asteroids to calibrations developed via laboratory analyses of ordinary chondrites, and to our analyses (EPMA, XRD, VIS+NIR spectra) of 11 primitive achondrite (acapulcoite-lodranite clan) meteorites.We find that stony S-complex asteroids dominate the Hungaria background population (~80%). Background objects exhibit considerable spectral diversity, when quantified by spectral band parameter measurements, translates to a variety of surface compositions. Two main meteorite groups are represented within the Hungaria background: unmelted, nebular L chondrites (and/or L chondrites), and partially-melted primitive achondrites. H-chondrite mineralogies appear to be absent from the Hungaria background. Xe-type Hungaria family members exhibit spectral homogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that the family was derived from the disruption of a parent body analogous to an enstatite

  17. Putative Indigenous Carbon-Bearing Alteration Features in Martian Meteorite Yamato 000593

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Everett K.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; McKay, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We report the first observation of indigenous carbonaceous matter in the martian meteorite Yamato 000593. The carbonaceous phases are heterogeneously distributed within secondary iddingsite alteration veins and present in a range of morphologies including areas composed of carbon-rich spheroidal assemblages encased in multiple layers of iddingsite. We also observed microtubular features emanating from iddingsite veins penetrating into the host olivine comparable in shape to those interpreted to have formed by bioerosion in terrestrial basalts. Key Words: Meteorite—Yamato 000593—Mars—Carbon. Astrobiology 14, 170–181. PMID:24552234

  18. Characterization and petrologic interpretation of olivine-rich basalts at Gusev Crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Wyatt, M.B.; Gellert, Ralf; Bell, J.F.; Morris, R.V.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Crumpler, L.S.; Milam, K.A.; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bartlett, P.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J.A.; Des Marais, D.J.; Economou, T.; Farmer, J.D.; Farrand, W.; Ghosh, A.; Golombek, M.; Gorevan, S.; Greeley, R.; Hamilton, V.E.; Johnson, J. R.; Joliff, B.L.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D.; Moersch, J.E.; Rieder, R.; Ruff, S.W.; Schrorder, C.; de Souza, P.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    Rocks on the floor of Gusev crater are basalts of uniform composition and mineralogy. Olivine, the only mineral to have been identified or inferred from data by all instruments on the Spirit rover, is especially abundant in these rocks. These picritic basalts are similar in many respects to certain Martian meteorites (olivine-phyric shergottites). The olivine megacrysts in both have intermediate compositions, with modal abundances ranging up to 20-30%. Associated minerals in both include low-calcium and high-calcium pyroxenes, plagioclase of intermediate composition, iron-titanium-chromium oxides, and phosphate. These rocks also share minor element trends, reflected in their nickel-magnesium and chromium-magnesium ratios. Gusev basalts and shergottites appear to have formed from primitive magmas produced by melting an undepleted mantle at depth and erupted without significant fractionation. However, apparent differences between Gusev rocks and shergottites in their ages, plagioclase abundances, and volatile contents preclude direct correlation. Orbital determinations of global olivine distribution and compositions by thermal emission spectroscopy suggest that olivine-rich rocks may be widespread. Because weathering under acidic conditions preferentially attacks olivine and disguises such rocks beneath alteration rinds, picritic basalts formed from primitive magmas may even be a common component of the Martian crust formed during ancient and recent times. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Characterization and Petrologic Interpretation of Olivine-Rich Basalts at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Wyatt, M. B.; Gellert, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, R. V.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Milam, K. A.; Stockstill, K. R.; Tornabene, L. L.; hide

    2006-01-01

    Rocks on the floor of Gusev crater are basalts of uniform composition and mineralogy. Olivine, the only mineral to have been identified or inferred from data by all instruments on the Spirit rover, is especially abundant in these rocks. These picritic basalts are similar in many respects to certain Martian meteorites (olivine-phyric shergottites). The olivine megacrysts in both have intermediate compositions, with modal abundances ranging up to 20-30%. Associated minerals in both include low-calcium and high-calcium pyroxenes, plagioclase of intermediate composition, iron-titanium-chromium oxides, and phosphate. These rocks also share minor element trends, reflected in their nickel-magnesium and chromium-magnesium ratios. Gusev basalts and shergottites appear to have formed from primitive magmas produced by melting an undepleted mantle at depth and erupted without significant fractionation. However, apparent differences between Gusev rocks and shergottites in their ages, plagioclase abundances, and volatile contents preclude direct correlation. Orbital determinations of global olivine distribution and compositions by thermal emission spectroscopy suggest that olivine-rich rocks may be widespread. Because weathering under acidic conditions preferentially attacks olivine and disguises such rocks beneath alteration rinds, picritic basalts formed from primitive magmas may even be a common component of the Martian crust formed during ancient and recent times.

  20. Santorini, Another Meteorite on Mars and Third of a Kind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, C.; Ashley, J. W.; Chapman, M. G.; Cohen, B. A.; Farrand, W. H.; Fleischer, I.; Gellert, R.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B. L.; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity has been studying Meridiani Planum for five years. On sol 1634 of its mission, Opportunity left Victoria crater after investigating it for approximately 682 sols [1] and is now on a journey towards Endeavour, a 24 km diameter crater about 12 km southeast of Victoria. A priority along the way is the investigation of cobbles, which in the jargon of the MER science team denotes any loose rock fragment larger than a couple of centimeters. Cobbles investigated thus far are of diverse origin [2] and provide the only means to investigate material other than the ubiquitous sulfate-rich outcrop, basaltic sand or hematiterich spherules dubbed blueberries. Some of these cobbles are meteorites [3]. Meteorites on Mars are not just a curiosity that make Mars a more Earth-like planet. Metallic iron in meteorites, for example, may be used as a more sensitive tracer for volatile surface interactions compared to igneous minerals [4]. Between sols 1713 and 1749, including the period of Mars solar conjunction, Opportunity investigated a cobble informally named Santorini. Its chemical and mineralogical composition is very similar to Barberton and Santa Catarina, two cobbles that were identified as meteorites and which are probably related to each other [3]. Santorini was investigated with the rover s Panoramic Camera (Pancam), Microscopic Imager (MI), Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Moessbauer (MB) spectrometer. The miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (mini-TES) was not operational at the time. The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) could not be used to brush off potential dust coatings because of unfavorable geometry.

  1. Remanence carrying minerals in meteorites: a journey through an exotic jungle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Uehara, M.

    2011-12-01

    Well-known remanence carrying minerals in meteorites are magnetite and pyrrhotite, familiar on Earth, and Fe-Ni metal alloys. In Fe-Ni metal the difficulty in interpreting paleomagnetic data is due to the presence of multiple metastable phases which follow complex transformation paths during thermal treatment. A minor phase, tetrataenite (ordered Fe0.5Ni0.5), usually carries most of the remanence [1]. It is intimately mixed with high susceptibility phases (kamacite and taenite), implying strong interaction effects. FeNi phosphide and carbide (schreibersite and cohenite), often associated with metal, are usually overlooked although they may be responsible for the remanence of enstatite chondrites and some lunar basalts, with Tc around 200°C. They are also likely responsible for the claim of "magnetic carbon" found in Canyon Diablo meteorite [2]. Sulfides, a wide variety of which occurs in meteorites, provide even more thrill. Concerning pyrrhotite, there is still imperfect understanding of the observation that not monoclinic but hexagonal pyrrhotite is the ferromagnetic phase present in some martian meteorites and Rumuruti chondrites. The most common sulfide in meteorites, troilite (FeS), is an antiferromagnet (TN= 320°C), showing a susceptibility anomaly at 140°C. Recently a transition toward weak ferromagnetism has been proposed below 60-70 K [3]. However it has been shown subsequently that this weak ferromagnetism is due to impurities of chromite [4] an ubiquitous phase in meteorites that becomes ferromagnetic below a Tc of 40 to 150 K (a wide range linked to the various possible substitutions). Other sulfides found in meteorites show low temperature transitions. Alabandite ( (Fe,Mn)S) and Daubreelite (FeCr2S4) have been reviewed in [3]. Chalcopyrite (FeCuS2), an antiferromagnet at room temperature, shows magnetic ordering of Cu+ ions at 50 K with appearance of weak ferromagnetism [5]. Magnetic properties of cubanite (Fe2CuS3), a RT ferrimagnet found in CI

  2. Evidence from Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions that the Martian Mantle has a Chondritic D/H Ratio and that Some Young Basalts have Assimilated Old Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Magmatic degassing of volatile elements affects the climate and near-surface environment of Mars. Telescopic and meteorite studies have revealed that the Martian atmosphere and near-surface materials have D/H ratios 5-6 times terrestrial values [e.g., 1, 2]. Such high D/H ratios are interpreted to result from the preferential loss of H relative to heavier D from the Martian atmosphere, assuming that the original Martian water inventory had a D/H ratio similar to terrestrial values and to H in primitive meteorites [e.g., 1, 3]. However, the primordial Martian D/H ratio has, until now, not been well constrained. The uncertainty over the Martian primordial D/H ratio has arisen both from the scarcity of primitive Martian meteorites and as a result of contamination by terrestrial and, perhaps, Martian surface waters that obscure the signature of the Martian mantle. This study reports a comprehensive dataset of magmatic volatiles and D/H ratios in Martian primary magmas based on low-contamination, in situ ion microprobe analyses of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from both depleted [Yamato 980459 (Y98)] and enriched [Larkman Nunatak 06319 (LAR06)] Martian basaltic meteorites. Analyses of these primitive melts provide definitive evidence that the Martian mantle has retained a primordial D/H ratio and that young Martian basalts have assimilated old Martian crust.

  3. Solving the Martian meteorite age conundrum using micro-baddeleyite and launch-generated zircon.

    PubMed

    Moser, D E; Chamberlain, K R; Tait, K T; Schmitt, A K; Darling, J R; Barker, I R; Hyde, B C

    2013-07-25

    Invaluable records of planetary dynamics and evolution can be recovered from the geochemical systematics of single meteorites. However, the interpreted ages of the ejected igneous crust of Mars differ by up to four billion years, a conundrum due in part to the difficulty of using geochemistry alone to distinguish between the ages of formation and the ages of the impact events that launched debris towards Earth. Here we solve the conundrum by combining in situ electron-beam nanostructural analyses and U-Pb (uranium-lead) isotopic measurements of the resistant micromineral baddeleyite (ZrO2) and host igneous minerals in the highly shock-metamorphosed shergottite Northwest Africa 5298 (ref. 8), which is a basaltic Martian meteorite. We establish that the micro-baddeleyite grains pre-date the launch event because they are shocked, cogenetic with host igneous minerals, and preserve primary igneous growth zoning. The grains least affected by shock disturbance, and which are rich in radiogenic Pb, date the basalt crystallization near the Martian surface to 187 ± 33 million years before present. Primitive, non-radiogenic Pb isotope compositions of the host minerals, common to most shergottites, do not help us to date the meteorite, instead indicating a magma source region that was fractionated more than four billion years ago to form a persistent reservoir so far unique to Mars. Local impact melting during ejection from Mars less than 22 ± 2 million years ago caused the growth of unshocked, launch-generated zircon and the partial disturbance of baddeleyite dates. We can thus confirm the presence of ancient, non-convecting mantle beneath young volcanic Mars, place an upper bound on the interplanetary travel time of the ejected Martian crust, and validate a new approach to the geochronology of the inner Solar System.

  4. Early metal-silicate differentiation during planetesimal formation revealed by acapulcoite and lodranite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaliwal, Jasmeet K.; Day, James M. D.; Corder, Christopher A.; Tait, Kim T.; Marti, Kurt; Assayag, Nelly; Cartigny, Pierre; Rumble, Doug; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2017-11-01

    from different nebular sources, and do not form a well-defined mass-dependent fractionation line. Modeling of HSE inter-element fractionation suggests a continuum of melting in the Fe-Ni-S system and partitioning between solid metal and sulfur-bearing mineral melt, where lower S contents in the melt resulted in lower Pt/Os and Pd/Os ratios, as observed in lodranites. The transitional meteorites, EET 84302 and GRA 95209, exhibit the most elevated HSE abundances and do not follow modelled Pt/Os and Pd/Os solid metal-liquid metal partitioning trends. We interpret this to reflect metal melt pooling into domains that were sampled by these meteorites, suggesting that they may originate from deeper within the acapulcoite-lodranite parent body, perhaps close to a pooled metallic 'core' region. Petrographic examination of transitional samples reveals the most extensive melting, pooling and networking of metal among the acapulcoite-lodranite meteorites. Overall, our results show that solid metal-liquid metal partitioning in the Fe-Ni-S system in primitive achondrites follows a predictable sequence of limited partial melting and metal melt pooling that can lead to significant HSE inter-element fractionation effects in proto-planetary materials.

  5. Compositions of Mars Rocks: SNC Meteorites, Differentiates, and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Minitti, M.; Weitz, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The 13 samples from Mars identified in the terrestrial meteorite collections vary from dunite to pyroxenite to microgabbro or basalt. All of these rocks appear to have formed from primitive melts with similar major element compositional characteristics; i.e., FeO-rich and Al2O3-Poor melts relative to terrestrial basalt compositions. Although all of the SNC rocks can be derived by melting of the same Al-depleted mantle, contamination of SNC's by a Rb-enriched mantle or crustal source is required to explain the different REE characteristics of SNC rocks. Thus, there are indications of an old crustal rocktype on Mars, and this rock does not appear to have been sampled. This paper focuses primarily on the composition of the SNC basalts, however, and on the compositions of rocks which could be derived from SNC basaltic melt by magmatic processes. In particular, we consider the possible compositions which could be achieved through accumulation of early-formed crystals in the SNC primitive magma. Through a set of experiments we have determined (1) melt (magma) compositions which could be produced by melt evolution as crystals are removed from batches of this magma cooling at depth, and (2) which evolved (Si02enriched, MgO-depleted) rock compositions could be produced from the SNC magma, and how these compare with the Pathfinder andesite composition. Finally, we compare the SNC magma compositions to the Mars soil composition in order to determine whether any source other than SNC is required.

  6. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V.; Mhatre, Snehit S.; Chowdhury, Somak P.; Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Marathe, Nachiket P.; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21–47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments. PMID:26834712

  7. Mass and Size Frequency Distribution of the Impact Debris from Disruption of Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanVeghten, T. W.; Flynn, G. J.; Durda, D. D.; Hart, S.; Asphaug, E.

    2003-01-01

    Since direct observation of the collision of asteroids in space is not always convenient for earthbound observers, we have undertaken simulations of these collisions using the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). To simulate the collision of asteroids in space, and aluminum projectiles with velocities ranging from approx.1 to approx.6 km/sec were fired at 70g to approx.200 g fragments of chondritic meteorites. The target meteorite was placed in an evacuated chamber at the AVGR. Detectors, usually four, were set up around the target meteorite. These detectors consisted of aerogel and aluminum foil of varying thickness. The aerogel's purpose was to catch debris after the collision, and the aluminum foil.s purpose was to show the size of the debris particles through the size of the holes in the aluminum foil. Outside the chamber, a camera was set up to record high-speed film of the collision. This camera recorded at either 500 frames per second or 1000 frames per second. Three different types of targets were used for these tests. The first were actual meteorites, which varied in mineralogical composition, density, and porosity. The second type of target was a Hawaiian basalt, consisting of olivine phenocrysts in a porous matrix, which we thought might be similar to the chondritic meteorites, thus providing data for comparison. The final type was made out of Styrofoam. The Styrofoam was thought to simulate very low-density asteroids and comets.

  8. Experimental Simulation of Meteorite Ablation during Earth Entry using a Plasma Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehle, Stefan; Zander, Fabian; Hermann, Tobias; Eberhart, Martin; Meindl, Arne; Oefele, Rainer; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Colas, Francois; Vernazza, Pierre; Drouard, Alexis; Gattacceca, Jerome

    2017-03-01

    Three different types of rocks were tested in a high enthalpy air plasma flow. Two terrestrial rocks, basalt and argillite, and an ordinary chondrite, with a 10 mm diameter cylindrical shape were tested in order to observe decomposition, potential fragmentation, and spectral signature. The goal was to simulate meteoroid ablation to interpret meteor observation and compare these observations with ground based measurements. The test flow with a local mass-specific enthalpy of 70 MJ kg-1 results in a surface heat flux at the meteorite fragment surface of approximately 16 MW m-2. The stagnation pressure is 24 hPa, which corresponds to a flight condition in the upper atmosphere around 80 km assuming an entry velocity of 10 km s-1. Five different diagnostic methods were applied simultaneously to characterize the meteorite fragmentation and destruction in the ground test: short exposure photography, regular video, high-speed imaging with 10 kHz frame rate, thermography, and Echelle emission spectroscopy. This is the first time that comprehensive testing of various meteorite fragments under the same flow condition was conducted. The data sets indeed show typical meteorite ablation behavior. The cylindrically shaped fragments melt and evaporate within about 4 s. The spectral data allow the identification of the material from the spectra which is of particular importance for future spectroscopic meteor observations. For the tested ordinary chondrite sample a comparison to an observed meteor spectra shows good agreement. The present data show that this testing methodology reproduces the ablation phenomena of meteoritic material alongside the corresponding spectral signatures.

  9. Isotopic Dichotomy among Meteorites and Its Bearing on the Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.; Krot, Alexander N.; Sanders, Ian S.

    2018-02-01

    Whole rock Δ17O and nucleosynthetic isotopic variations for chromium, titanium, nickel, and molybdenum in meteorites define two isotopically distinct populations: carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) and some achondrites, pallasites, and irons in one and all other chondrites and differentiated meteorites in the other. Since differentiated bodies accreted 1–3 Myr before the chondrites, the isotopic dichotomy cannot be attributed to temporal variations in the disk. Instead, the two populations were most likely separated in space, plausibly by proto-Jupiter. Formation of CCs outside Jupiter could account for their characteristic chemical and isotopic composition. The abundance of refractory inclusions in CCs can be explained if they were ejected by disk winds from near the Sun to the disk periphery where they spiraled inward due to gas drag. Once proto-Jupiter reached 10–20 M ⊕, its external pressure bump could have prevented millimeter- and centimeter-sized particles from reaching the inner disk. This scenario would account for the enrichment in CCs of refractory inclusions, refractory elements, and water. Chondrules in CCs show wide ranges in Δ17O as they formed in the presence of abundant 16O-rich refractory grains and 16O-poor ice particles. Chondrules in other chondrites (ordinary, E, R, and K groups) show relatively uniform, near-zero Δ17O values as refractory inclusions and ice were much less abundant in the inner solar system. The two populations were plausibly mixed together by the Grand Tack when Jupiter and Saturn migrated inward emptying and then repopulating the asteroid belt with roughly equal masses of planetesimals from inside and outside Jupiter’s orbit (S- and C-type asteroids).

  10. Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Meteorites have long been known to offer a unique window into planetary formation processes at the time of solar system formation and into the materials that rained down on Earth at the time of the origin of life. Their material properties determine the impact hazard of Near Earth Asteroids. Some insight into how future laboratory studies of meteorites and laboratory astrophysics simulations of relevant physical processes can help address open questions in these areas and generate new astronomical observations, comes from what was learned from the recent laboratory studies of freshly fallen meteorites. The rapid recovery of Almahata Sitta (a polymict Ureilite), Sutter's Mill (a CM chondrite regolith breccia), Novato (an L6 chondrite), and Chelyabinsk (an LL5 chondrite) each were followed by the creation of a meteorite consortium, which grew to over 50 researchers in the case of Chelyabinsk. New technologies were used to probe the organic content of the meteorites as well as their magnetic signatures, isotopic abundances, trapped noble gasses, and cosmogenic radio nucleides, amongst others. This has resulted in fascinating insight into the nature of the Ureilite parent body, the likely source region of the CM chondrites in the main asteroid belt, and the collisional environment of the CM parent body. This work has encouraged follow-up in the hope of catching more unique materials. Rapid response efforts are being developed that aim to recover meteorites as pristinely as possible from falls for which the approach orbit was measured. A significant increase in the number of known approach orbits for different meteorite types will help tie meteorite types to their asteroid family source regions. Work so far suggests that future laboratory studies may recognize multiple source regions for iron-rich ordinary chondrites, for example. Hope is that these source regions will give insight into the material properties of impacting asteroids. At least some future laboratory

  11. METEORITE - ASTRONOMY

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-08-28

    S85-39565 (For release August 1996) --- According to scientists, this 4.5 billion year old rock, labeled meteorite ALH84001, is believed to have once been a part of Mars and to contain fossil evidence that primitive life may have existed on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. The rock is a portion of a meteorite that was dislodged from Mars by a huge impact about 16 million years ago and that fell to Earth in Antarctica 13,000 years ago. The meteorite was found in Allan Hills ice field, Antarctica, by an annual expedition of the National Science Foundation?s Antarctic Meteorite Program in 1984. It is preserved for study at the Johnson Space Center?s (JSC) Meteorite Processing Laboratory in Houston, Texas.

  12. Petrology and Geochemistry of New Paired Martian Meteorites Larkman Nunatak 12240 and Larkman Nunatak 12095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, R. C.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Humayun, M.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the latest Martian meteorites found in Antarctica, paired olivine-phyric shergottites LAR 12240 and LAR 12095, are described in order to decipher their petrological context, and place constraints on the geological history of Mars. This project identifies all phases found in LAR 12240 and 12095 and analyzes them for major and trace elements. The textural relationships among these phases are examined in order to develop a crystallization history of the magma(s) that formed these basalts.

  13. Magnetism of Tissint Martian meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Hewins, R.; Lagroix, F.; Uehara, M.; Cournede, C.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Zanda, B.; Bernstein Scorzelli, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Tissint meteorite, an olivine-phyric shergottite that fell in July 2010 in Morocco, is only the fifth Martian meteorite fall. It offers the opportunity to study the magnetic mineralogy and the paleomagnetic signal of a pristine sample from Mars. We have performed such a magnetic study of 35 samples from the Tissint meteorite, with mass ranging from 30 mg to 30 g. We have measured a variety of magnetic properties (natural remanence an its behaviour upon thermal and alternating field demagnetization, hysteresis parameters at room and low temperatures, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, unblocking temperature spectrum etc). Less conventional experiments include magneto-optical imaging (coupled with electron microprobe analyses) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic mineralogy of Tissint consists of 0.6 wt.% of metastable hexagonal ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite, and 0.1 wt.% of low Ti titanomagnetite formed by oxidation/exsolution of ulvöspinel grains. The magnetic mineralogy of Tissint consists of 0.6 wt.% of metastable hexagonal ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite, and 0.1 wt.% of low Ti titanomagnetite formed by oxidation/exsolution of ulvöspinel grains, for those minerals that are ferromagnetic at temperatures encountered at the Martian surface. Chromite (with a Curie temperature of 70K) is present with an abundance of 0.5 wt.%. Overall, these properties are in broad agreement with the other pyrrhotite-bearing basaltic shergottites, but the presence of magnetite exsolution in ulvöspinel has rarely been documented in other shergottites. We show for the first time that the magnetic fabric is homogeneous in direction in the meteorite, and may well be a proxy to the Martian paleohorizontal at the time of crystallization. The natural remanent magnetization of Tissint was acquired during post-impact cooling in a stable ambient field of about 1 μT of crustal origin. It is noteworthy that the oxides in Tissint are not magnetized, indicating that they were formed at low

  14. Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, W. A.; Rancitelli, L. A.

    1982-04-01

    An abundance of meteorites has been discovered on two sites in the Antarctic which may assist in the study of the origins of meteorites and the history of the solar system. Characteristics particular to those meteorites discovered in this region are explained. These specimens, being well preserved due to the climate, have implications in the study of the cosmic ray flux through time, the meteoroid complex in space, and cosmic ray exposure ages. Implications for the study of the Antarctic, particularly the ice flow, are also discussed. Further discoveries of meteorites in this region are anticipated.

  15. International Workshop on Antarctic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annexstad, J. O.; Schultz, L.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: meteorite concentration mechanisms; meteorites and the Antarctic ice sheet; iron meteorites; iodine overabundance in meteorites; entrainment, transport, and concentration of meteorites in polar ice sheets; weathering of stony meteorites; cosmic ray records; radiocarbon dating; element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorites; thermoanalytical characterization; trace elements; thermoluminescence; parent sources; and meteorite ablation and fusion spherules in Antarctic ice.

  16. Petrogenesis of the Northwest Africa 4898 high-Al mare basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaolin; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin; Wang, Linyan; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 4898 is the only low-Ti, high-Al basaltic lunar meteorite yet recognized. It predominantly consists of pyroxene (53.8 vol%) and plagioclase (38.6 vol%). Pyroxene has a wide range of compositions (En12-62Fs25-62Wo11-36), which display a continuous trend from Mg-rich cores toward Ca-rich mantles and then to Fe-rich rims. Plagioclase has relatively restricted compositions (An87-96Or0-1Ab4-13), and was transformed to maskelynite. The REE zoning of all silicate minerals was not significantly modified by shock metamorphism and weathering. Relatively large (up to 1 mm) olivine phenocrysts have homogenous inner parts with Fo ~74 and sharply decrease to 64 within the thin out rims (~30 μm in width). Four types of inclusions with a variety of textures and modal mineralogy were identified in olivine phenocrysts. The contrasting morphologies of these inclusions and the chemical zoning of olivine phenocrysts suggest NWA 4898 underwent at least two stages of crystallization. The aluminous chromite in NWA 4898 reveals that its high alumina character was inherited from the parental magma, rather than by fractional crystallization. The mineral chemistry and major element compositions of NWA 4898 are different from those of 12038 and Luna 16 basalts, but resemble those of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. However, the trace element compositions demonstrate that NWA 4898 and Apollo 14 high-Al basalts could not have been derived from the same mantle source. REE compositions of its parental magma indicate that NWA 4898 probably originated from a unique depleted mantle source that has not been sampled yet. Unlike Apollo 14 high-Al basalts, which assimilated KREEPy materials during their formation, NWA 4898 could have formed by closed-system fractional crystallization.

  17. Hungaria asteroid region telescopic spectral survey (HARTSS) I: Stony asteroids abundant in the Hungaria background population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2017-07-01

    different S-subtypes are represented therein, which translates to a variety of surface compositions. We identify the Gaffey S-subtype (Gaffey et al. [1993]. Icarus 106, 573-602) and potential meteorite analogs for 24 of these S-complex background asteroids. Additionally, we estimate the olivine and orthopyroxene mineralogy for 18 of these objects using spectral band parameter analysis established from laboratory-based studies of ordinary chondrite meteorites. Nine of the asteroids have band parameters that are not consistent with ordinary chondrites. We compared these to the band parameters measured from laboratory VIS+NIR spectra of six primitive achondrite (acapulcoite-lodranite) meteorites. These comparisons suggest that two main meteorite groups are represented among the Hungaria background asteroids: unmelted, nebular L- (and possibly LL-ordinary chondrites), and partially-melted primitive achondrites of the acapulcoite-lodranite meteorite clan. Our results suggest a source region for L chondrite like material from within the Hungarias, with delivery to Earth via leakage from the inner boundary of the Hungaria region. H chondrite like mineralogies appear to be absent from the Hungaria background asteroids. We therefore conclude that the Hungaria region is not a source for H chondrite meteorites. Seven Hungaria background asteroids have spectral band parameters consistent with partially-melted primitive achondrites, but the probable source region of the acapulcoite-lodranite parent body remains inconclusive. If the proposed connection with the Hungaria family to fully-melted enstatite achondrite meteorites (i.e., aubrites) is accurate (Gaffey et al. [1992]. Icarus 100, 95-109; Kelley and Gaffey [2002]. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 37, 1815-1827), then asteroids in the Hungaria region exhibit a full range of petrologic evolution: from nebular, unmelted ordinary chondrites, through partially-melted primitive achondrites, to fully-melted igneous aubrite meteorites.

  18. Habitability Conditions Constrained by Martian Meteorites: Implications for Microbial Colonization and Mars Sample Return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivak, J. N.; Banerjee, N.; Flemming, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results of a comparative study of the crustal environmental conditions recorded by several Martian meteorites (Nakhla, Los Angeles, and Zagami). Though no samples have yet been returned from Mars, numerous meteorites are known and these provide the only samples of the Martian crust currently available for study. Terrestrial basalts and other mafic igneous rocks are analogous in many ways to much of the Martian crust, as evidenced by the composition of known Martian meteorites and measurements from planetary missions [1]. Microorganisms are known to thrive in the terrestrial geosphere and make use of many different substrates within rock in the subsurface of the Earth [2]. The action of aqueous solutions in the Martian crust has been well established through the study of alteration mineral assemblages present in many Martian meteorites, such as the nakhlites [3]. Aqueous activity in terrestrial chemolithoautotrophic habitats provides numerous energy and nutrient sources for microbes [4], suggesting the potential for habitable endolithic environments in Martian rocks. Fayalite in Nakhla has experienced extensive aqueous alteration to reddish-brown 'iddingsite' material within a pervasive fracture system. Textural imaging shows the replacement of primary olivine with various alteration phases and infiltration of this alteration front into host grains. Geochemical analysis of the alteration material shows the addition of iron and silica and removal of magnesium during alteration. Novel In situ Micro-XRD and Raman Spectroscopy of this material reveals a new assemblage consisting of iron oxides, smectite clays, carbonates, and a minor serpentine component. The alteration mineral assemblage here differs from several that have been previously reported [4] [5], allowing for a reevaluation of the environmental conditions during fluid action. Los Angeles and Zagami show no evidence of aqueous activity, though their primary basaltic mineralogies show many

  19. Comparison of the LEW88516 and ALHA77005 martian meteorites: Similar but distinct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Mckay, G. A.; Bogard, D. D.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Wang, M.-S.; Keller, L.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Garrison, D.

    1994-01-01

    By mineral and bulk compositions, the Lewis Cliff (LEW) 88516 meteorite is quite similar to the ALHA77005 martian meteorite. These two meteorites are not paired because their mineral compositions are distinct, they were found 500 km apart in ice fields with different sources for meteorites, and their terrestrial residence ages are different. Minerals in LEW88516 include: olivine, pyroxenes (low- and high-Ca), and maskelynite (ater plagioclase); and the minor minerals chromite, whitlockite, ilmenite, and pyrrhotite. Mineral grains in LEW88516 range up to a few mm. Texturally, the meteorite is complex, with regions of olivine and chromite poikilitically enclosed in pyroxene, regions of interstitial basaltic texture, and glass-rich (shock) veinlets. Olivine compositions range from Fo(sub 64) to Fo(sub 70), (avg. Fo(sub 67)), more ferroan and with more variation than in ALHA77005 (Fo(sub 69) to Fo(sub 73)). Pyroxene compositions fall between En(sub 77)Wo(sub 4) and En(sub 65)Wo(sub 15) and in clusters near En(sub 63)Wo(sub 9) and En(sub 53)Wo(sub 33), on average more magnesian and with more variation than in ALHA77005. Shock features in LEW88516 range from weak deformation through complete melting. Bulk chemical analyses by modal recombination of electron microprobe analyses, instrumental neutron activation, and radiochemical neutron activation confirm that LEW88516 is more closely related to ALHA77005 than to other known martian meteorites. Key element abundance ratios are typical of martian meteorites, as is it nonchondritic rare earth pattern. Differences between the chemical compositions of LEW88516 and ALHA77005 are consistent with slight differences in the proportions of their constituent minerals and not from fundamental petrogenetic differences. Noble gas abundances in LEW88516, like those in ALHA77005, show modest excesses of Ar-40 and Xe-129 from trapped (shock-implanted) gas. As with other ALHA77005 and the shergottite martian meteorites (except EETA79001

  20. Secondary Sulfate Mineralization and Basaltic Chemistry of Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho: Potential Martian Analog

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Lindsay J. McHenry

    2012-05-01

    Secondary deposits associated with the basaltic caves of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM) in southern Idaho were examined using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The secondary mineral assemblages are dominated by Na-sulfate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) with a small fraction of the deposits containing minor concentrations of Na-carbonate minerals. The assemblages are found as white, efflorescent deposits in small cavities along the cave walls and ceilings and as localized mounds on the cave floors. Formation of the deposits is likely due to direct and indirectmore » physiochemical leaching of meteoritic water through the overlying basalts. Whole rock data from the overlying basaltic flows are characterized by their extremely high iron concentrations, making them good analogs for martian basalts. Understanding the physiochemical pathways leading to secondary mineralization at COM is also important because lava tubes and basaltic caves are present on Mars. The ability of FTICR-MS to consistently and accurately identify mineral species within these heterogeneous mineral assemblages proves its validity as a valuable technique for the direct fingerprinting of mineral species by deductive reasoning or by comparison with reference spectra.« less

  1. A petrologic, thermodynamic and experimental study of brachinites: Partial melt residues of an R chondrite-like precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner-Vandy, Kathryn G.; Lauretta, Dante S.; McCoy, Timothy J.

    2013-12-01

    The primitive achondrites provide a window into the initial melting of asteroids in the early solar system. The brachinites are olivine-dominated meteorites with a recrystallized texture that we and others interpret as evidence of partial melting and melt removal on the brachinite parent body. We present a petrologic, thermodynamic and experimental study of the brachinites to evaluate the conditions under which they formed and test our hypothesis that the precursor material to the brachinites was FeO-rich compared to the precursors of other primitive achondrites. Petrologic analysis of six brachinites (Brachina, Allan Hills (ALH) 84025, Hughes 026, Elephant Moraine (EET) 99402, Northwest Africa (NWA) 3151, and NWA 4969) and one brachinite-like achondrite (NWA 5400) shows that they are meteorites with recrystallized texture that are enriched in olivine (⩾80 vol.%) and depleted in other minerals with respect to a chondritic mineralogy. Silicates in the brachinites are FeO-rich (Fa32-36). Brachinite-like achondrite Northwest Africa 5400 is similar in mineralogy and texture to the brachinites but with a slightly lower FeO-content (Fa30). Thermodynamic calculations yield equilibration temperatures above the Fe,Ni-FeS cotectic temperature (∼950 °C) for all meteorites studied here and temperatures above the silicate eutectic (∼1050 °C) for all but two. Brachina formed at an fO2 of ∼IW, and the other brachinites and NWA 5400 formed at ∼IW - 1. All the meteorites show great evidence of formation by partial melting having approximately chondritic to depleted chondritic mineralogies, equilibrated mineral compositions, and recrystallized textures, and having reached temperatures above that required for melt generation. In an attempt to simulate the formation of the brachinite meteorites, we performed one-atmosphere, gas-mixing partial melting experiments of R4 chondrite LaPaz Ice Field 03639. Experiments at 1250 °C and an oxygen fugacity of IW - 1 produce residual

  2. Meteorite Falls and the Fragmentation of Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momeni, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the fragmentation of objects entering the atmosphere and why some produce more fragments than others, I have searched the Meteoritical Society database for meteorites greater than 20 kilograms that fell in the USA, China, and India. I also studied the video and film records of 21 fireballs that produced meteorites. A spreadsheet was prepared that noted smell, fireball, explosion, whistling, rumbling, the number of fragments, light, and impact sounds. Falls with large numbers of fragments were examined to look for common traits. These were: the Norton County aubrite, explosion and a flare greater than 100 fragments; the Forest City H5 chondrite explosion, a flare, a dust trail, 505 specimens; the Richardton H5 chondrite explosion and light, 71 specimens; the Juancheng H5 chondrite explosion, a rumbling, a flare, a dust trail,1000 specimens; the Tagish Lake C2 chondrite explosion, flare, dust trail, 500 specimens. I conclude that fragmentation is governed by the following: (1) Bigger meteors undergo more stress which results in more specimens; (2) Harder meteorites also require more force to break them up which will cause greater fragmentation; (3) Force and pressure are directly proportional during falls. General observations made were; (1) Meteorites produce fireballs sooner due to high friction; (2) Meteors tend to explode as well because of high stress; (3) Softer meteorites tend to cause dust trails; (4) Some falls produce light as they fall at high velocity. I am grateful to NASA Ames for this opportunity and Derek Sears, Katie Bryson, and Dan Ostrowski for discussions.

  3. Meteoritics, Number 19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-06-01

    of the Migeya meteorite, which contains volatile organic compounds (a feature which proves the absence of overheating during its life), is 4.3...pattern in their discovery of gallium and germanium in iron meteorites as small ad- mixtures. Iron meteorites are divided into four groups by their content...as a basis for the classification of meteorites by their composition that we have suggested- By comparing the data they obtained on gallium and

  4. Rediscovery of Polish meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymiński, Z.; Stolarz, M.; Żołądek, P.; Wiśniewski, M.; Olech, A.

    2016-01-01

    The total number of Polish registered meteorites (by July 2016) including the meteoritical artifacts as Czestochowa Raków I and II is 22. Most of them are described by the pioneer of Polish Meteoritics Jerzy Pokrzywnicki who also identified the meteorite fall locations. In recent years prospectors found impressive specimens of known Polish meteorites such as Morasko: 34 kg, 50 kg, 164 kg, 174 kg and 261 kg or Pultusk: 1578 g, 1576 g, 1510 g, 610 g and 580 g expanding and determining precisely the known meteorite strewn fields.

  5. On the existence of near-Earth-object meteoroid complexes producing meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J.; Madiedo, J.; Williams, I.

    2014-07-01

    is fracturing. Many asteroids are known to be rubble piles and such structures can be unstable during a close approach to a planet due to tidal forces. The irregular shape of many fast-rotators can allow the YORP effect to increase the spin rate, also leading to fracturing [7]. The escape speed from a fragmenting asteroid is considerably smaller than the orbital velocity so a large amount of the initial mass can be ejected. The fragmentation process is likely to produce many metre-sized rocks as well as few tens of meters fragmental asteroids that could form a complex of fragments, all moving on nearly identical orbits. The lifetime of such orbital complexes is quite short (few tens of thousand of years) as consequence of planetary perturbations[8], except perhaps for those cases exhibiting orbits with high inclination, where lifetimes can be considerably higher [9]. Catastrophic disruptions in the main asteroid belt have been extensively studied, but little is known about the relevance of the process in the NEO population. The Spanish Fireball Network (SPMN) regularly monitors the skies and is obtaining evidence that NEO complexes can be a source of meteorites. By performing backward integrations of meteoroid orbits and NEO candidates, previously identified by using our ORAS software to compute several orbital similarity criteria, we have identified several complexes associated with NEOs of chondritic nature [10-12] and even one, 2012 XJ_{112} of likely achondritic nature [13]. Another recent example was probably the Feb 15th, 2013 Chelyabinsk superbolide. The meteorites recovered were shocked to a very high level [14,15], and the ˜19-meter-diameter Chelyabinsk NEA was probably a monolithic single stone produced from its presumable progenitor, the 2.2 km in diameter asteroid (86039) [16]. This association should, however, be tested by performing backward integrations of both orbits.

  6. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Lunar Rocks from Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Mineralogy and Petrology of Unbrecciated Lunar Basaltic Meteorite LAP 02205; LAP02205 Lunar Meteorite: Lunar Mare Basalt with Similarities to the Apollo 12 Ilmenite Basalt; Mineral Chemistry of LaPaz Ice Field 02205 - A New Lunar Basalt; Petrography of Lunar Meteorite LAP 02205, a New Low-Ti Basalt Possibly Launch Paired with NWA 032; KREEP-rich Basaltic Magmatism: Diversity of Composition and Consistency of Age; Mineralogy of Yamato 983885 Lunar Polymict Breccia with Alkali-rich and Mg-rich Rocks; Ar-Ar Studies of Dhofar Clast-rich Feldspathic Highland Meteorites: 025, 026, 280, 303; Can Granulite Metamorphic Conditions Reset 40Ar-39Ar Ages in Lunar Rocks? [#1009] A Ferroan Gabbronorite Clast in Lunar Meteorite ALHA81005: Major and Trace Element Composition, and Origin; Petrography of Lunar Meteorite PCA02007, a New Feldspathic Regolith Breccia; and Troilite Formed by Sulfurization: A Crystal Structure of Synthetic Analogue

  7. Antarctic meteorite descriptions, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Score, R.; Schwarz, C. M.; Mason, B.; Bogard, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens found in the Alan Hills area include 361 ordinary chondrites, 4 carbonaceous chondrites, 6 achondrites, and 2 irons. Thirteen specimens measured over 11 cm in diameter and 69 between 5 to 10 cm in diameter are reported. The remainder of the finds were small, and many were paired. One of the irons was estimated to weigh about 20 kilograms.

  8. Asteroid/meteorite streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, J.

    The independent discovery of the same three streams (named alpha, beta, and gamma) among 139 Earth approaching asteroids and among 89 meteorite producing fireballs presents the possibility of matching specific meteorites to specific asteroids, or at least to asteroids in the same stream and, therefore, presumably of the same composition. Although perhaps of limited practical value, the three meteorites with known orbits are all ordinary chondrites. To identify, in general, the taxonomic type of the parent asteroid, however, would be of great scientific interest since these most abundant meteorite types cannot be unambiguously spectrally matched to an asteroid type. The H5 Pribram meteorite and asteroid 4486 (unclassified) are not part of a stream, but travel in fairly similar orbits. The LL5 Innisfree meteorite is orbitally similar to asteroid 1989DA (unclassified), and both are members of a fourth stream (delta) defined by five meteorite-dropping fireballs and this one asteroid. The H5 Lost City meteorite is orbitally similar to 1980AA (S type), which is a member of stream gamma defined by four asteroids and four fireballs. Another asteroid in this stream is classified as an S type, another is QU, and the fourth is unclassified. This stream suggests that ordinary chondrites should be associated with S (and/or Q) asteroids. Two of the known four V type asteroids belong to another stream, beta, defined by five asteroids and four meteorite-dropping (but unrecovered) fireballs, making it the most probable source of the eucrites. The final stream, alpha, defined by five asteroids and three fireballs is of unknown composition since no meteorites have been recovered and only one asteroid has an ambiguous classification of QRS. If this stream, or any other as yet undiscovered ones, were found to be composed of a more practical material (e.g., water or metalrich), then recovery of the associated meteorites would provide an opportunity for in-hand analysis of a potential

  9. Asteroid/meteorite streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J.

    1991-01-01

    The independent discovery of the same three streams (named alpha, beta, and gamma) among 139 Earth approaching asteroids and among 89 meteorite producing fireballs presents the possibility of matching specific meteorites to specific asteroids, or at least to asteroids in the same stream and, therefore, presumably of the same composition. Although perhaps of limited practical value, the three meteorites with known orbits are all ordinary chondrites. To identify, in general, the taxonomic type of the parent asteroid, however, would be of great scientific interest since these most abundant meteorite types cannot be unambiguously spectrally matched to an asteroid type. The H5 Pribram meteorite and asteroid 4486 (unclassified) are not part of a stream, but travel in fairly similar orbits. The LL5 Innisfree meteorite is orbitally similar to asteroid 1989DA (unclassified), and both are members of a fourth stream (delta) defined by five meteorite-dropping fireballs and this one asteroid. The H5 Lost City meteorite is orbitally similar to 1980AA (S type), which is a member of stream gamma defined by four asteroids and four fireballs. Another asteroid in this stream is classified as an S type, another is QU, and the fourth is unclassified. This stream suggests that ordinary chondrites should be associated with S (and/or Q) asteroids. Two of the known four V type asteroids belong to another stream, beta, defined by five asteroids and four meteorite-dropping (but unrecovered) fireballs, making it the most probable source of the eucrites. The final stream, alpha, defined by five asteroids and three fireballs is of unknown composition since no meteorites have been recovered and only one asteroid has an ambiguous classification of QRS. If this stream, or any other as yet undiscovered ones, were found to be composed of a more practical material (e.g., water or metalrich), then recovery of the associated meteorites would provide an opportunity for in-hand analysis of a potential

  10. Formation and composition of the moon. [carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Many of the properties of the moon are discussed including the enrichment in Ca, Al, Ti, U, Th, Ba, Sr and the REE and the depletion in Fe, Rb, K, Na and other volatiles which could be understood if the moon represents a high temperature condensate from the solar nebula. Thermodynamic calculations show that Ca, Al and Ti rich compounds condense first in a cooling nebula. The initial high temperature mineralogy is gehlenite, spinel, perovskite, Ca-Al-rich pyroxenes and anorthite. Inclusions in Type III carbonaceous chondrites such as the Allende meteorite are composed primarily of these minerals and, in addition, are highly enriched in refractories such as REE relative to carbonaceous chondrites. These inclusions can yield basalt and anorthosite in the proportions required to eliminate the europium anomaly, leaving a residual spinel-melilite interior.

  11. Andreyivanovite: A Second New Phosphide from the Kaidun Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Andreyivanovite (ideally FeCrP) is another new phosphide species from the Kaidun meteorite, which fell in South Yemen in 1980. Kaidun is a unique breccia containing an unprecedented variety of fragments of different chondritic as well as achondritic lithologies. Andreyivanovite was found as individual grains and linear arrays of grains with a maximum dimension of 8 m within two masses of Fe-rich serpentine. In one sample it is associated with Fe-Ni-Cr sulfides and florenskyite (FeTiP). Andreyivanovite is creamy white in reflected light, and its luster is metallic. The average of nine electron microprobe analyses yielded the formula Fe(Cr0.587 Fe0.150 V0.109 Ti0.081 Ni0.060 Co0.002)P. Examination of single grains of andreyivanovite using Laue patterns collected by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and by electron backscattered diffraction revealed that it is isostructural with florenskyite; we were unable to find single crystals of sufficient quality to perform a complete structure analysis. Andreyivanovite crystallizes in the space group Pnma, and has the anti-PbCl2 structure. Previously-determined cell constants of synthetic material [a = 5.833(1), b = 3.569(1), c = 6.658(1) A] were consistent with our XRD work. We used the XPOW program to calculate a powder XRD pattern; the 5 most intense reflections are d = 2.247 (I = 100), 2.074 (81), 2.258 (46), 1.785 (43), and 1.885 A (34). Andreyivanovite is the second new phosphide to be described from the Kaidun meteorite. Andreyivanovite could have formed as a result of cooling and crystallization of a melted precursor consisting mainly of Fe-Ni metal enriched in P, Ti, and Cr. Serpentine associated with andreyivanovite would then have formed during aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. It is also possible that the andreyivanovite could have formed during aqueous alteration, however, artificial FeTiP has been synthesized only during melting experiments, at low oxygen fugacity, and there is no evidence that

  12. Chlorine in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs, and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, [1]), given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO (e.g., [2]). When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks (e.g., [3-4]), lunar samples often display heavy chlorine isotope compositions [5-9]. Boyce et al. [8] found a correlation between delta Cl-37 (sub Ap) and bulk-rock incompatible trace elements (ITEs) in lunar basalts, and used this to propose that early degassing of Cl (likely as metal chlorides) from the LMO led to progressive enrichment in remaining LMO melt in Cl-37over Cl-35- the early degassing model. Barnes et al. [9] suggested that relatively late degassing of chlorine from urKREEP (to yield delta Cl-37 (sub urKREEP greater than +25 per mille) followed by variable mixing between KREEPy melts and mantle cumulates (characterized by delta Cl-370 per mille) could explain the majority of Cl isotope data from igneous lunar samples. In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed an in situ study of chlorine isotopes and abundances of volatiles in lunar apatite from a diverse suite of lunar basalts spanning a range of geochemical types.

  13. A TEM Investigation of the Fine-Grained Matrix of the Martian Basaltic Breccia NWA 7034

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muttik, N.; Keller, L. P.; Agee, C. B.; McCubbin, F. M.; Santos, A. R.; Rahman, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The martian basaltic breccia NWA 7034 is characterized by fine-grained groundmass containing several different types of mineral grains and lithologic clasts. The matrix composition closely resembles Martian crustal rock and soil composition measured by recent rover and orbiter missions. The first results of NWA 7034 suggest that the brecciation of this martian meteorite may have formed due to eruptive volcanic processes; however, impact related brecciation processes have been proposed for paired meteorites NWA 7533 and NWA 7475]. Due to the very fine grain size of matrix, its textural details are difficult to resolve by optical and microprobe observations. In order to examine the potential nature of brecciation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies combined with focused ion-beam technique (FIB) has been undertaken. Here we present the preliminary observations of fine-grained groundmass of NWA 7034 from different matrix areas by describing its textural and mineralogical variations and micro-structural characteristics.

  14. Hydrothermal Origin for Carbonate Globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analogue from Spitsbergen (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Blake, David F.; Bunch, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Carbonate minerals in the ancient Martian meteorite ALH84001 are the only known solid phases that bear witness to the processing of volatile and biologically critical compounds (CO2, H2O) on early Mars. Similar carbonates have been found in xenoliths and their host basalts from Quaternary volcanic centers in northern Spitsbergen (Norway). These carbonates were deposited by hot (i.e., hydrothermal) waters associated with the volcanic activity. By analogy with the Spitsbergen carbonates, the ALH84001 carbonates were probably also deposited by hot water. Hydrothermal activity was probably common and widespread on Early Mars, which featured abundant basaltic rocks, water as ice or liquid, and heat from volcanos and asteroid impacts. On Earth, descendants of the earliest life forms still prefer hydrothermal environments, which are now shown to have been present on early Mars.

  15. Tracking the depleted mantle signature in melt inclusions and host glass of basaltic martian shergottites using secondary ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, T. J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Economos, R. C.; Schmitt, A. K.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the CAMECA ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for all analyses in Y98 and possibly for those from Tissint as well display a flattening of the LREE that suggests an early crustal contribution to the shergottite mantle.

  16. Chondritic meteorites and the lunar surface.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Scott, R F

    1967-12-01

    The landing dynamics of and soil penetration by Surveyor I indicated that the lunar soil has a porosity in the range 0.35 to 0.45. Experiments with Surveyor III's surface sampler for soil mechanics show that the lunar soil is approximately incompressible (as the word is used in soil mechanics) and that it has an angle of internal friction of 35 to 37 degrees; these results likewise point to a porosity of 0.35 to 0.45 for the lunar soil. Combination of these porosity measurements with the already-determined radar reflectivity fixes limits to the dielectric constant of the grains of the lunar soil. The highest possible value is about 5.9, relative to vacuum; a more plausible value is near 4.3. Either figure is inconsistent with the idea that the lunar surface is covered by chondritic meteorites or other ultrabasic rocks. The data point to acid rocks, or possibly vesicular basalts; carbonaceous chondrites are not excluded.

  17. Bounce Rock - A shergottite-like basalt encountered at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, Jutta; Schräder, Christian; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Gellert, Ralf; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Rieder, Rudolf; Anderson, Robert; Bell, James F., III; Brückner, Johannes; Crisp, Joy A.; Christensen, Philip R.; Clark, Benton C.; de Souza, Paulo A., Jr.; Dreibus, Gerlind; D'Uston, Claude; Economou, Thanasis; Gorevan, Steven P.; Hahn, Brian C.; Klingelhäfer, Göstar; McCoy, Timothy J.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Rodionov, Daniel S.; Squyres, Steven W.; Wńnke, Heinrich; Wright, Shawn P.; Wyatt, Michael B.; Yen, Albert S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract- The Opportunity rover of the Mars Exploration Rover mission encountered an isolated rock fragment with textural, mineralogical, and chemical properties similar to basaltic shergottites. This finding was confirmed by all rover instruments, and a comprehensive study of these results is reported here. Spectra from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer and the Panoramic Camera reveal a pyroxene-rich mineralogy, which is also evident in Mössbauer spectra and in normative mineralogy derived from bulk chemistry measured by the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The correspondence of Bounce Rock’s chemical composition with the composition of certain basaltic shergottites, especially Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201, is very close, with only Cl, Fe, and Ti exhibiting deviations. Chemical analyses further demonstrate characteristics typical of Mars such as the Fe/Mn ratio and P concentrations. Possible shock features support the idea that Bounce Rock was ejected from an impact crater, most likely in the Meridiani Planum region. Bopolu crater, 19.3 km in diameter, located 75 km to the southwest could be the source crater. To date, no other rocks of this composition have been encountered by any of the rovers on Mars. The finding of Bounce Rock by the Opportunity rover provides further direct evidence for an origin of basaltic shergottite meteorites from Mars.

  18. Are There High Meteorite Concentrations in the Atacama Desert/Chile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, P.; Delisle, G.

    1992-07-01

    We have visited numerous regions of the Atacama desert between Copiapo (27 degrees, 15'S) and Calama (22 degrees, 25'S) to assess their potential as a high-yield meteorite concentration surface, easily exploitable by search efforts within a reasonable time frame. According to our observations, this desert is characterized by the following features: a) A high percentage of the desert consists of sloping surfaces on which soil movement occurs, presumably by very infrequent, though heavy rain. b) Vast areas of the desert are covered by a dm-thick sand layer of dark colour. Since the sand is too coarse-grained to be transported by wind it presumably resulted from in-situ weathering of rock debris derived from nearby mountains. We suspect that impacting smaller objects can easily penetrate the sand layer. c) The sand layer is typically dotted by rocks, fist-size or smaller, that are covered by a thick layer of desert paint (reddish-brown to black colour). Most country rocks are of volcanic origin (rhyolite, andesite, basalt) and are typically of grey to black colour. A noticeable colour contrast in particular to potential stony meteorites is almost nonexistent. d) Soil salts with a potential to speed up weathering processes are ubiquitous near the surface. e) The Pampa de Mejillones, 45 km north of Antofagasta, is one of the few light-coloured areas in the Atacama desert. The surface, being of Mio-Pliocene age, consists of an almost continuous layer of light-brown fossil shells (bivalves and gastropodes). Fluvially transported dark rocks from adjacent outcrops rest on top. The latter material is covered again by desert paint. Few meteorite discoveries have been reported from this area (Pampa (a),(b),(c)). f) Numerous old tire tracks, in particular around mines in operation, crisscross most areas of the Atacama. Undetected objects such as large masses of iron bodies are not likely to have remained undiscovered in great numbers any more. We conclude that the potential of

  19. Kinetic Damage from Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William; Brown, Peter; Matney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A Near Earth object impacting into Earth's atmosphere may produce damaging effects at the surface due to airblast, thermal pulse, or kinetic impact in the form of meteorites. At large sizes (>many tens of meters), the damage is amplified by the hypersonic impact of these large projectiles moving with cosmic velocity, leaving explosively produced craters. However, much more common is simple "kinetic" damage caused by the impact of smaller meteorites moving at terminal speeds. As of this date a handful of instances are definitively known of people or structures being directly hit and/or damaged by the kinetic impact of meteorites. Meteorites known to have struck humans include the Sylacauga, Alabama fall (1954) and the Mbale meteorite fall (1992). Much more common is kinetic meteorite damage to cars, buildings, and even a post box (Claxton, Georgia - 1984). Historical accounts indicate that direct kinetic damage by meteorites may be more common than recent accounts suggest (Yau et al., 1994). In this talk we will examine the contemporary meteorite flux and estimate the frequency of kinetic damage to various structures, as well as how the meteorite flux might affect the rate of human casualties. This will update an earlier study by Halliday et al (1985), adding variations expected in meteorite flux with latitude (Le Feuvre and Wieczorek, 2008) and validating these model predictions of speed and entry angle with observations from the NASA and SOMN fireball networks. In particular, we explore the physical characteristics of bright meteors which may be used as a diagnostic for estimating which fireballs produce meteorites and hence how early warning of such kinetic damage may be estimated in advance through observations and modelling.

  20. Kinetic Damage from Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William; Brown, Peter; Matney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    A Near Earth object impacting into Earth's atmosphere may produce damaging effects at the surface due to airblast, thermal pulse, or kinetic impact in the form of meteorites. At large sizes (greater than many tens of meters), the damage is amplified by the hypersonic impact of these large projectiles moving with cosmic velocity, leaving explosively produced craters. However, much more common is simple "kinetic" damage caused by the impact of smaller meteorites moving at terminal speeds. As of this date a handful of instances are definitively known of people or structures being directly hit and/or damaged by the kinetic impact of meteorites. Meteorites known to have struck humans include the Sylacauga, Alabama fall (1954) and the Mbale meteorite fall (1992). Much more common is kinetic meteorite damage to cars, buildings, and even a post box (Claxton, Georgia - 1984). Historical accounts indicate that direct kinetic damage by meteorites may be more common than recent accounts suggest (Yau et al., 1994). In this talk we will examine the contemporary meteorite flux and estimate the frequency of kinetic damage to various structures, as well as how the meteorite flux might affect the rate of human casualties. This will update an earlier study by Halliday et al (1985), adding variations expected in meteorite flux with latitude (Le Feuvre and Wieczorek, 2008) and validating these model predictions of speed and entry angle with observations from the NASA and SOMN fireball networks. In particular, we explore the physical characteristics of bright meteors which may be used as a diagnostic for estimating which fireballs produce meteorites and hence how early warning of such kinetic damage may be estimated in advance through observations and modeling.

  1. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    unintelligible and devoid of information even to the intelligent, educated non-expert. Classifications have functions. A major one must be communication; i.e., a name for a mare basalt provides a common understanding of what the basalt is. For the small number of suites currently available, the present labels (though inefficient and insufficient) may work; with continued recognition of more basalts, Antarctic meteorite samples, orbiter data, sample returns, and lunar base studies, labels will become increasingly inefficient. Clementine and Prospector data have made mapping of mare basalts a much more visible activity than it was, and increasingly common ground among sample petrologists and remote sensers has emerged. To establish a usable classification, there must be some criteria for relationships. Petrologists need to decide what the most significant characters are, and how these can be translated into a classification. The common distinction on the basis of Ti (the major element with the greatest variation) may or may not be appropriate. It remains to be established whether the use of Ti is of fundamental value both in relating basalts to each other and in communication, or merely an historical accident or response to its variance. Additional information contained in original

  2. Partitioning of light lithophile elements during basalt eruptions on Earth and application to Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Marie

    2015-02-01

    An enigmatic record of light lithophile element (LLE) zoning in pyroxenes in basaltic shergottite meteorites, whereby LLE concentrations decrease dramatically from the cores to the rims, has been interpreted as being due to partitioning of LLE into a hydrous vapor during magma ascent to the surface on Mars. These trends are used as evidence that Martian basaltic melts are water-rich (McSween et al., 2001). Lithium and boron are light lithophile elements (LLE) that partition into volcanic minerals and into vapor from silicate melts, making them potential tracers of degassing processes during magma ascent to the surface of Earth and of other planets. While LLE degassing behavior is relatively well understood for silica-rich melts, where water and LLE concentrations are relatively high, very little data exists for LLE abundance, heterogeneity and degassing in basaltic melts. The lack of data hampers interpretation of the trends in the shergottite meteorites. Through a geochemical study of LLE, volatile and trace elements in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, it can be demonstrated that lithium behaves similarly to the light to middle rare Earth elements during melting, magma mixing and fractionation. Considerable heterogeneity in lithium and boron is inherited from mantle-derived primary melts, which is dominant over the fractionation and degassing signal. Lithium and boron are only very weakly volatile in basaltic melt erupted from Kilauea Volcano, with vapor-melt partition coefficients <0.1. Degassing of LLE is further inhibited at high temperatures. Pyroxene and associated melt inclusion LLE concentrations from a range of volcanoes are used to quantify lithium pyroxene-melt partition coefficients, which correlate negatively with melt H2O content, ranging from 0.13 at low water contents to <0.08 at H2O contents >4 wt%. The observed terrestrial LLE partitioning behavior is extrapolated to Martian primitive melts through modeling. The zoning

  3. Foundations of Forensic Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1992-07-01

    It may be useful to know if a meteorite was found at the site where it fell. For instance, the polymict ureilites North Haig and Nilpena were found 1100 km apart, yet are petrologically identical [1]. Could this distance represent transport from a single strewn field, or does it represent distinct fall sites? A meteorite may contain sufficient clues to suggest some characteristics of its fall site. If these inferences are inconsistent with the find site, one may infer that the meteorite has been transported. It will likely be impossible to determine the exact fall site of a transported meteorite. Data relevant to a meteorite's fall site may be intrinsic to the meteorite, or acquired at the site. For instance, an intrinsic property is terrestrial residence age (from abundances of cosmogenic radioisotopes and their decay products); a meteorite's terrestrial residence age must be the same or less than that of the surface on which it fell. After falling, a meteorite may acquire characteristic telltales of terrestrial geological, geochemical, and biological processes. These telltale clues may include products of chemical weathering, adhering geological materials, biological organisms living (or once living) on the meteorite, and biological materials adhering to (but never living on) the meteorite. The effects of chemical weathering, present in all but the freshest finds, range from slight rusting to extensive decomposition and veining The ages of weathering materials and veins, as with terrestrial residence ages above, must be less than the age of the fall surface. The mineralogy and chemistry, elemental and isotopic, of weathering materials will differ according to the mineralogy and composition of the meteorite, and the mineralogy, geochemistry, hydrology, and climate of the fall site. Weathering materials may also vary as climate changes and may vary among the microenvironments associated with a meteorite on the Earth's surface. Geological materials (rock, sediment

  4. Vesta's Elemental Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Beck, A. W.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCoy, T. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peplowski, P. N.; Raymond, C. A.; Reedy, R. C.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Many lines of evidence (e.g. common geochemistry, chronology, O-isotope trends, and the presence of different HED rock types in polymict breccias) indicate that the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites originated from a single parent body. Meteorite studies show that this protoplanet underwent igneous differentiation to form a metallic core, an ultramafic mantle, and a basaltic crust. A spectroscopic match between the HEDs and 4 Vesta along with a plausible mechanism for their transfer to Earth, perhaps as chips off V-type asteroids ejected from Vesta's southern impact basin, supports the consensus view that many of these achondritic meteorites are samples of Vesta's crust and upper mantle. The HED-Vesta connection was put to the test by the NASA Dawn mission, which spent a year in close proximity to Vesta. Measurements by Dawn's three instruments, redundant Framing Cameras (FC), a Visible-InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer, and a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND), along with radio science have strengthened the link. Gravity measurements by Dawn are consistent with a differentiated, silicate body, with a dense Fe-rich core. The range of pyroxene compositions determined by VIR overlaps that of the howardites. Elemental abundances determined by nuclear spectroscopy are also consistent with HED-compositions. Observations by GRaND provided a new view of Vesta inaccessible by telescopic observations. Here, we summarize the results of Dawn's geochemical investigation of Vesta and their implications.

  5. Evidence for a Single Ureilite Parent Asteroid from a Petrologic Study of Polymict Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Hilary; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Ureilites are ultramafic achondrites composed of olivine and pyroxene, with minor elemental C, mostly as graphite [1]. The silicate composition indicates loss of a basaltic component through igneous processing, yet the suite is very heterogeneous in O isotopic composition inherited from nebular processes [2]. Because of this, it has not yet been established whether ureilites were derived from a single parent asteroid or from multiple parents. Most researchers tacitly assume a single parent asteroid, but the wide variation in mineral and oxygen isotope compositions could be readily explained by an origin in multiple parent asteroids that had experienced a similar evolution. Numerous ureilite meteorites have been found in Antarctica, among them several that are clearly paired (Fig. 1) and two that are strongly brecciated (EET 83309, EET 87720). We have begun a detailed petrologic study of these latter two samples in order to characterize the range of materials in them. One goal is to attempt to determine whether ureilites were derived from a single parent asteroid.

  6. Lunar & Planetary Science, 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents a summary of each paper presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference at the Johnson Space Center, Houston in March 1980. Topics relate to Venus, Jupiter, Mars, asteroids, meteorites, regoliths, achondrites, remote sensing, and cratering studies. (SA)

  7. The Northwest Africa 8159 martian meteorite: Expanding the martian sample suite to the early Amazonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, Christopher D. K.; Walton, Erin L.; Agee, Carl B.; Muttik, Nele; Ziegler, Karen; Shearer, Charles K.; Bell, Aaron S.; Santos, Alison R.; Burger, Paul V.; Simon, Justin I.; Tappa, Michael J.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Lagroix, France; Sanborn, Matthew E.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Cassata, William S.; Borg, Lars E.; Lindvall, Rachel E.; Kruijer, Thomas S.; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Kleine, Thorsten; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Caffee, Marc W.

    2017-12-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 8159 is an augite-rich shergottite, with a mineralogy dominated by Ca-, Fe-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, and magnetite. NWA 8159 crystallized from an evolved melt of basaltic composition under relatively rapid conditions of cooling, likely in a surface lava flow or shallow sill. Redox conditions experienced by the melt shifted from relatively oxidizing (with respect to known Martian lithologies, ∼QFM) on the liquidus to higher oxygen fugacity (∼QFM + 2) during crystallization of the groundmass, and under subsolidus conditions. This shift resulted in the production of orthopyroxene and magnetite replacing olivine phenocryst rims. NWA 8159 contains both crystalline and shock-amorphized plagioclase (An50-62), often observed within a single grain; based on known calibrations we bracket the peak shock pressure experienced by NWA 8159 to between 15 and 23 GPa. The bulk composition of NWA 8159 is depleted in LREE, as observed for Tissint and other depleted shergottites; however, NWA 8159 is distinct from all other martian lithologies in its bulk composition and oxygen fugacity. We obtain a Sm-Nd formation age of 2.37 ± 0.25 Ga for NWA 8159, which represents an interval in Mars geologic time which, until recently, was not represented in the other martian meteorite types. The bulk rock 147Sm/144Nd value of 0.37 ± 0.02 is consistent with it being derived directly from its source and the high initial ε143Nd value indicates this source was geochemically highly depleted. Cr, Nd, and W isotopic compositions further support a unique mantle source. While the rock shares similarities with the 2.4-Ga NWA 7635 meteorite, there are notable distinctions between the two meteorites that suggest differences in mantle source compositions and conditions of crystallization. Nevertheless, the two samples may be launch-paired. NWA 8159 expands the known basalt types, ages and mantle sources within the Mars sample suite to include a second igneous unit from

  8. The Northwest Africa 8159 martian meteorite: Expanding the martian sample suite to the early Amazonian

    DOE PAGES

    Herd, Christopher D. K.; Walton, Erin L.; Agee, Carl B.; ...

    2017-09-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 8159 is an augite-rich shergottite, with a mineralogy dominated by Ca-, Fe-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, and magnetite. NWA 8159 crystallized from an evolved melt of basaltic composition under relatively rapid conditions of cooling, likely in a surface lava flow or shallow sill. Redox conditions experienced by the melt shifted from relatively oxidizing (with respect to known Martian lithologies, ~QFM) on the liquidus to higher oxygen fugacity (~QFM + 2) during crystallization of the groundmass, and under subsolidus conditions. This shift resulted in the production of orthopyroxene and magnetite replacing olivine phenocryst rims. NWA 8159 contains both crystallinemore » and shock-amorphized plagioclase (An 50–62), often observed within a single grain; based on known calibrations we bracket the peak shock pressure experienced by NWA 8159 to between 15 and 23 GPa. The bulk composition of NWA 8159 is depleted in LREE, as observed for Tissint and other depleted shergottites; however, NWA 8159 is distinct from all other martian lithologies in its bulk composition and oxygen fugacity. Here, we obtain a Sm-Nd formation age of 2.37 ± 0.25 Ga for NWA 8159, which represents an interval in Mars geologic time which, until recently, was not represented in the other martian meteorite types. The bulk rock 147Sm/ 144Nd value of 0.37 ± 0.02 is consistent with it being derived directly from its source and the high initial ε 143Nd value indicates this source was geochemically highly depleted. Cr, Nd, and W isotopic compositions further support a unique mantle source. While the rock shares similarities with the 2.4-Ga NWA 7635 meteorite, there are notable distinctions between the two meteorites that suggest differences in mantle source compositions and conditions of crystallization. Nevertheless, the two samples may be launch-paired. Finally, NWA 8159 expands the known basalt types, ages and mantle sources within the Mars sample suite to include a

  9. The Northwest Africa 8159 martian meteorite: Expanding the martian sample suite to the early Amazonian

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Herd, Christopher D. K.; Walton, Erin L.; Agee, Carl B.

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 8159 is an augite-rich shergottite, with a mineralogy dominated by Ca-, Fe-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, and magnetite. NWA 8159 crystallized from an evolved melt of basaltic composition under relatively rapid conditions of cooling, likely in a surface lava flow or shallow sill. Redox conditions experienced by the melt shifted from relatively oxidizing (with respect to known Martian lithologies, ~QFM) on the liquidus to higher oxygen fugacity (~QFM + 2) during crystallization of the groundmass, and under subsolidus conditions. This shift resulted in the production of orthopyroxene and magnetite replacing olivine phenocryst rims. NWA 8159 contains both crystallinemore » and shock-amorphized plagioclase (An 50–62), often observed within a single grain; based on known calibrations we bracket the peak shock pressure experienced by NWA 8159 to between 15 and 23 GPa. The bulk composition of NWA 8159 is depleted in LREE, as observed for Tissint and other depleted shergottites; however, NWA 8159 is distinct from all other martian lithologies in its bulk composition and oxygen fugacity. Here, we obtain a Sm-Nd formation age of 2.37 ± 0.25 Ga for NWA 8159, which represents an interval in Mars geologic time which, until recently, was not represented in the other martian meteorite types. The bulk rock 147Sm/ 144Nd value of 0.37 ± 0.02 is consistent with it being derived directly from its source and the high initial ε 143Nd value indicates this source was geochemically highly depleted. Cr, Nd, and W isotopic compositions further support a unique mantle source. While the rock shares similarities with the 2.4-Ga NWA 7635 meteorite, there are notable distinctions between the two meteorites that suggest differences in mantle source compositions and conditions of crystallization. Nevertheless, the two samples may be launch-paired. Finally, NWA 8159 expands the known basalt types, ages and mantle sources within the Mars sample suite to include a

  10. Volatiles in High-K Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jessica J.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, Ann; Boyce, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine is an unusual isotopic system, being essentially unfractionated ((delta)Cl-37 approximately 0 per mille ) between bulk terrestrial samples and chondritic meteorites and yet showing large variations in lunar (approximately -4 to +81 per mille), martian, and vestan (HED) samples. Among lunar samples, the volatile-bearing mineral apatite (Ca5(PO4)3[F,Cl,OH]) has been studied for volatiles in K-, REE-, and P (KREEP), very high potassium (VHK), low-Ti and high-Ti basalts, as well as samples from the lunar highlands. These studies revealed a positive correlation between in-situ (delta)Cl-37 measurements and bulk incompatible trace elements (ITEs) and ratios. Such trends were interpreted to originate from Cl isotopic fractionation during the degassing of metal chlorides during or shortly after the differentiation of the Moon via a magma ocean. In this study, we investigate the volatile inventories of a group of samples for which new-era volatile data have yet to be reported - the high-K (greater than 2000 ppm bulk K2O), high-Ti, trace element-rich mare basalts. We used isotope imaging on the Cameca NanoSIMS 50L at JSC to obtain the Cl isotopic composition [((Cl-37/(35)Clsample/C-37l/(35)Clstandard)-1)×1000, to get a value in per thousand (per mille)] which ranges from approximately -2.7 +/- 2 per mille to +16.1 +/- 2 per mille (2sigma), as well as volatile abundances (F & Cl) of apatite in samples 10017, 10024 & 10049. Simply following prior models, as lunar rocks with high bulk-rock abundances of ITEs we might expect the high-K, high-Ti basalts to contain apatite characterized by heavily fractionated (delta)Cl-37 values, i.e., Cl obtained from mixing between unfractionated mantle Cl (approximately 0 per mille) and the urKREEP reservoir (possibly fractionated to greater than +25 per mille.). However, the data obtained for the studied samples do not conform to either the early degassing or mixing models. Existing petrogentic models for the origin of the high

  11. Discovery of moganite in a lunar meteorite as a trace of H2O ice in the Moon’s regolith

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Sekine, Toshimori; Tomeoka, Kazushige; Matsumoto, Megumi; Kobayashi, Takamichi

    2018-01-01

    Moganite, a monoclinic SiO2 phase, has been discovered in a lunar meteorite. Silica micrograins occur as nanocrystalline aggregates of mostly moganite and occasionally coesite and stishovite in the KREEP (high potassium, rare-earth element, and phosphorus)–like gabbroic-basaltic breccia NWA 2727, although these grains are seemingly absent in other lunar meteorites. We interpret the origin of these grains as follows: alkaline water delivery to the Moon via carbonaceous chondrite collisions, fluid capture during impact-induced brecciation, moganite precipitation from the captured H2O at pH 9.5 to 10.5 and 363 to 399 K on the sunlit surface, and meteorite launch from the Moon caused by an impact at 8 to 22 GPa and >673 K. On the subsurface, this captured H2O may still remain as ice at estimated bulk content of >0.6 weight %. This indicates the possibility of the presence of abundant available water resources underneath local sites of the host bodies within the Procellarum KREEP and South Pole Aitken terranes. PMID:29732406

  12. Abiogenic photochemical synthesis on surface of meteorites and other small space bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Michael B.; Kuzicheva, Eugenia A.

    The abiogenic photochemical synthesis of complex biochemical compounds on the surface of small bodies in our Solar system was examined. Hydrated minerals are found within a chondrite matrix of meteorites together with significant amounts of organic matter. Clays are likely to have formed when water was present on parent meteoritic bodies. In order to verify the existence of a relationship between abiogenic synthesis of nucleotides and inorganic components of the meteorites, we have investigated possible abiogenic reactions associated with different clay (montmorillonite, kaolinite) and a basaltic one (Tyatya's volcanic ash) under action of open space energy sources as a model of different exobiological environments on the surface of small space bodies. The abiogenic synthesis of natural adenine nucleotides from a mixture of adenosine and inorganic phosphate has been observed following irradiation with VUV light in the presence of different mineral samples. The yields of the products (5'AMP, 2'AMP, 3'AMP, 2'3'cAMP and 3'5'cAMP) depended on irradiation time and kinds of minerals used. The discovery that meteoritic organic compounds may be trapped and protected within a clay mineral matrix has implications for our understanding of prebiotic molecular evolution in the early Solar system. Clay minerals may also have concentrated organic compounds thereby promoting polymerization reactions. An adsorption/binding of nucleic acids components by clay crystals could change the electron distribution and/or the conformation of the molecules. The remnant water molecules in the clay sheets also could influence the course of the reaction. Clay immobilization of phosphate could play an important role in this reaction. Chondritic material could have been a common component of the inner Solar system shortly after its formation and the biologically useful products of clay mineral-organic matter interactions could have also widespread, and delivered to planetary surfaces through the

  13. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Meteorite, Dhofar 378: An Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorite, Dhofar 378 (Dho378) is a basaltic shergottite from Oman, weighing 15 g, and possessing a black fusion crust. Chemical similarities between Dho378 and the Los Angeles 001 shergottite suggests that they might have derived from the same Mars locale. The plagioclase in other shergottites has been converted to maskelenite by shock, but Dho378 apparently experienced even more intense shock heating, estimated at 55-75 GPa. Dho378 feldspar (approximately 43 modal %) melted, partially flowed and vesiculated, and then partially recrystallized. Areas of feldspathic glass are appreciably enriched in K, whereas individual plagioclases show a range in the Or/An ratio of approximately 0.18-0.017. Radiometric dating of martian shergottites indicate variable formation times of 160-475 Myr, whereas cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of shergottites indicate most were ejected from Mars within the past few Myr. Most determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of shergottites appear older than other radiometric ages because of the presence of large amounts of martian atmosphere or interior Ar-40. Among all types of meteorites and returned lunar rocks, the impact event that initiated the CRE age very rarely reset the Ar-Ar age. This is because a minimum time and temperature is required to facilitate Ar diffusion loss. It is generally assumed that the shock-texture characteristics in martian meteorites were produced by the impact events that ejected the rocks from Mars, although the time of these shock events (as opposed to CRE ages) are not directly dated. Here we report Ar-39-Ar-40 dating of Dho378 plagioclase. We suggest that the determined age dates the intense shock heating event this meteorite experienced, but that it was not the impact that initiated the CRE age.

  14. Meteorite Source Regions as Revealed by the Near-Earth Object Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Burt, Brian J.; Polishook, David; Burbine, Thomas H.; Bus, Schelte J.; Tokunaga, Alan; Birlan, Mirel

    2014-11-01

    Spectroscopic and taxonomic information is now available for 1000 near-Earth objects, having been obtained through both targeted surveys (e.g. [1], [2], [3]) or resulting from all-sky surveys (e.g. [4]). We determine their taxonomic types in the Bus-DeMeo system [5] [6] and subsequently examine meteorite correlations based on spectral analysis (e.g. [7],[8]). We correlate our spectral findings with the source region probabilities calculated using the methods of Bottke et al. [9]. In terms of taxonomy, very clear sources are indicated: Q-, Sq-, and S-types most strongly associated with ordinary chondrite meteorites show clear source signatures through the inner main-belt. V-types are relatively equally balanced between nu6 and 3:1 resonance sources, consistent with the orbital dispersion of the Vesta family. B- and C-types show distinct source region preferences for the outer belt and for Jupiter family comets. A Jupiter family comet source predominates for the D-type near-Earth objects, implying these "asteroidal" bodies may be extinct or dormant comets [10]. Similarly, near-Earth objects falling in the spectrally featureless "X-type" category also show a strong outer belt and Jupiter family comet source region preference. Finally the Xe-class near-Earth objects, which most closely match the spectral properties of enstatite achondrite (aubrite) meteorites seen in the Hungaria region[11], show a source region preference consistent with a Hungaria origin by entering near-Earth space through the Mars crossing and nu6 resonance pathways. This work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant 0907766 and NASA Grant NNX10AG27G.[1] Lazzarin, M. et al. (2004), Mem. S. A. It. Suppl. 5, 21. [2] Thomas, C. A. et al. (2014), Icarus 228, 217. [3] Tokunaga, A. et al. (2006) BAAS 38, 59.07. [4] Hasselmann, P. H., Carvano, J. M., Lazzaro, D. (2011) NASA PDS, EAR-A-I0035-5-SDSSTAX-V1.0. [5] Bus, S.J., Binzel, R.P. (2002). Icarus 158, 146. [6] DeMeo, F.E. et al. (2009), Icarus

  15. Formation Conditions of Basalts at Gale Crater, Mars from ChemCam Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, J.; Bridges, J.; Dasgupta, R.; Edwards, P.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Surface igneous rocks shed light onto the chemistry, tectonic, and thermal state of planetary interiors. For the purpose of comparative planetology, therefore, it is critical to fully utilize the compositional diversity of igneous rocks for different terrestrial planets. For Mars, igneous float rocks and conglomerate clasts at Gale Crater, as analyzed by ChemCam [1] using a new calibration [2], have a larger range in chemistry than have been analyzed at any other landing site or within the Martian meteorite collection [3, 4]. These rocks may reflect different conditions of melting within the Martian interior than any previously analyzed basalts. Here we present new formation conditions for basaltic and trachybasalt/dioritic rocks at Gale Crater from ChemCam analyses following previous procedures [5, 6]. We then compare these estimates of basalt formation with previous estimates for rocks from the Noachian (Gusev Crater, Meridiani Planum, and a clast in the NWA 7034 meteorite [5, 6]), Hesperian (surface volcanics [7]), and Amazonian (surface volcanics and shergottites [7-8]), to calculate an average mantle potential temperature for different Martian epochs and investigate how the interior of Mars has changed through time. Finally, we will compare Martian mantle potential temperatures with petrologic estimate of cooling for the Earth. Our calculated estimate for the mantle potential temperature (TP) of rocks at Gale Crater is 1450 ± 45 °C which is within error of previous estimates for Noachian aged rocks [5, 6]. The TP estimates for the Hesperian and Amazonian, based on orbital analyses of the crust [7], are lower in temperature than the estimates for the Noachian. Our results are consistent with simple convective cooling of the Martian interior. [1] Wiens R. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev 170. 167-227. [2] Anderson R. et al. (2015) LPSC. Abstract #7031. [3] Schmidt M.E. et al. (2014) JGRP 2013JE004481. [4] Sautter V. et al. (2014) JGRP 2013JE004472. [5] Filiberto J

  16. Antarctic Meteorite Location Map Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John (Editor); Fessler, Brian (Editor); Cassidy, William (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Antarctica has been a prolific source of meteorites since meteorite concentrations were discovered in 1969. The Antarctic Search For Meteorites (ANSMET) project has been active over much of the Trans-Antarctic Mountain Range. The first ANSMET expedition (a joint U.S.-Japanese effort) discovered what turned out to be a significant concentration of meteorites at the Allan Hills in Victoria Land. Later reconnaissance in this region resulted in the discovery of meteorite concentrations on icefields to the west of the Allan Hills, at Reckling Moraine, and Elephant Moraine. Antarctic meteorite location maps (reduced versions) of the Allan Hills main, near western, middle western, and far western icefields and the Elephant Moraine icefield are presented. Other Antarctic meteorite location maps for the specimens found by the ANSMET project are being prepared.

  17. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  18. Radiocarbon datings of Yamato meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kigoshi, K.; Matsuda, E.

    1986-01-01

    The terrestrial ages of five Yamato Meteorites were measured by the content of cosmic-ray-produced carbon-14. Three Yamato Meteorites Y-74013, Y-74097, and Y-74136, which are all diogenites, were found at sites from one to two kilometers apart from each other. Evidence is presented for these three meteorites being a single meteorite. Also presented is a method adopted in the experimental procedure which includes a check for modern carbon contamination in the meteorites.

  19. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy on meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; de Pascale, O.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2007-12-01

    The classification of meteorites when geological analysis is unfeasible is generally made by the spectral line emission ratio of some characteristic elements. Indeed when a meteorite impacts Earth's atmosphere, hot plasma is generated, as a consequence of the braking effect of air, with the consequent ablation of the falling body. Usually, by the plasma emission spectrum, the meteorite composition is determined, assuming the Boltzmann equilibrium. The plasma generated during Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment shows similar characteristics and allows one to verify the mentioned method with higher accuracy. On the other hand the study of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy on meteorite can be useful for both improving meteorite classification methods and developing on-flight techniques for asteroid investigation. In this paper certified meteorites belonging to different typologies have been investigated by LIBS: Dofhar 461 (lunar meteorite), Chondrite L6 (stony meteorite), Dofhar 019 (Mars meteorite) and Sikhote Alin (irony meteorite).

  20. The U-Th-Pb, Sm-Nd, and Ar-Ar isotopic systematics of lunar meteorite Yamato-793169

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoye, Noriko; Misawa, Keji; Dalrymple, G. Brent; Tatsumoto, Mitsunobu

    1993-01-01

    U-Th-Pb, Sm-Nd, and (Ar-40)-(Ar-39) isotopic studies were performed on Yamato (Y)-793169, an unbrecciated diabasic lunar meteorite whose chemical composition is close to low Ti(LT) and very low-Ti (VLT) mare basalts. The isotopic data indicate that the meteorite was formed earlier than 3.9 Ga from a source with low U/Pb and high Sm/Nd and was distributed by a thermal event at 751 Ma. due to the small sample size (104 mg), a plagioclase crystal and glass grains were handpicked for Ar analysis, leaving four fractions for the U-Th-Pb and Sm-Nd studies; a fine-grained fraction (less than 63 microns; Fine) and three medium-grained fractions (63-150 microns). Medium-grained fractions were divided by density; a heavy fraction (rho greater than 3.3) consisting mainly of pyroxene (PX1), a lighter fraction (rho less than 2.8) consisting of plagioclase (PL), and a middle density fraction (predominantly pyroxene; PX2). The fractions were washed with acetone and alcohol, and then leached in 0.01 HBr and 0.1N HBr in order to remove any terrestrial Pb contamination. Analysis of the HBr leaches revealed that this meteorite was heavily contaminated with terrestrial Pb during its residence in Antarctic ice.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of feldspathic impact-melt breccia Abar al' Uj 012, the first lunar meteorite from Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, Marianna; Hofmann, Beda A.; Lanari, Pierre; Korotev, Randy L.; Gnos, Edwin; Greber, Nicolas D.; Leya, Ingo; Greenwood, Richard C.; Jull, A. J. Timothy; Al-Wagdani, Khalid; Mahjoub, Ayman; Al-Solami, Abdulaziz A.; Habibullah, Siddiq N.

    2016-10-01

    Abar al' Uj (AaU) 012 is a clast-rich, vesicular impact-melt (IM) breccia, composed of lithic and mineral clasts set in a very fine-grained and well-crystallized matrix. It is a typical feldspathic lunar meteorite, most likely originating from the lunar farside. Bulk composition (31.0 wt% Al2O3, 3.85 wt% FeO) is close to the mean of feldspathic lunar meteorites and Apollo FAN-suite rocks. The low concentration of incompatible trace elements (0.39 ppm Th, 0.13 ppm U) reflects the absence of a significant KREEP component. Plagioclase is highly anorthitic with a mean of An96.9Ab3.0Or0.1. Bulk rock Mg# is 63 and molar FeO/MnO is 76. The terrestrial age of the meteorite is 33.4 ± 5.2 kyr. AaU 012 contains a 1.4 × 1.5 mm2 exotic clast different from the lithic clast population which is dominated by clasts of anorthosite breccias. Bulk composition and presence of relatively large vesicles indicate that the clast was most probably formed by an impact into a precursor having nonmare igneous origin most likely related to the rare alkali-suite rocks. The IM clast is mainly composed of clinopyroxenes, contains a significant amount of cristobalite (9.0 vol%), and has a microcrystalline mesostasis. Although the clast shows similarities in texture and modal mineral abundances with some Apollo pigeonite basalts, it has lower FeO and higher SiO2 than any mare basalt. It also has higher FeO and lower Al2O3 than rocks from the FAN- or Mg-suite. Its lower Mg# (59) compared to Mg-suite rocks also excludes a relationship with these types of lunar material.

  2. Stability of Basalt plus Anhydrite plus Calcite at HP-HT: Implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    "Canali" observed at Venus surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding the temperature at Venus surface. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 which are alteration products of basalts melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials might release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle) . Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we performed piston

  3. Water in Pyroxene and Olivine from Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Water in the interior of terrestrial planets can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) like olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Although these minerals contain only tens to hundreds of ppm H2O, this water can amount to at least one ocean in mass when added at planetary scales because of the modal dominance of NAM in the mantle and crust [4]. Moreover these trace amounts of water can have drastic effects on melting temperature, rheology, electrical and heat conductivity, and seismic wave attenuation [5]. There is presently a debate on how much water is present in the martian mantle. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies of NAM [6], amphiboles and glass in melt inclusions [7-10], and apatites [11, 12] from Martian meteorites report finding as much water as in the same phases from Earth's igneous rocks. Most martian hydrous minerals, however, generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [13, 14], and experiments using Cl [15] in parent melts can reproduce Martian basalt compositions as well as those with water [16]. We are in the process of analyzing Martian meteorite minerals by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) in order to constrain the role of water in this planet s formation and magmatic evolution

  4. Lu-Hf systematics of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarro, M.; Baker, J. A.; Haack, H.

    2003-04-01

    We have measured Lu-Hf concentrations and Hf isotope ratios on a number of solar system objects with a new digestion and chemical separation technique (1). The analysed materials include a variety of carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites (CC and OC), basaltic eucrites and a diogenite, and work is ongoing on angrites, aubrites and mesosiderites. Nineteen analyses of OC and CC define, for the first time, a statistically significant Lu-Hf isochron with a slope of 0.09465 ± 145 and intercept of 0.279628 ± 47 (2). In contrast to the CC and type 3 OC (176Lu/177Hf = 0.032-0.034), the more highly metamorphosed OC have a large range of 176Lu/177Hf ratios (0.026-0.036). The large range of 176Lu/177Hf values may be related to heterogeneous variations in phosphate abundances in equilibrated OC, which is supported by the observation that most of the observed variation is defined by this type of material. The present-day bulk-earth 176Hf/177Hf ratio calculated from this study, and a 176Lu/177Hf ratio of 0.0332, is identical to the value of (3) and confirms that the chondritic Hf-Hd isotopic composition is displaced (3 ɛ units) to unradiogenic Hf compared to the terrestrial array. The slope and intercept derived from individual regressions of either the OC or the L type alone are identical within analytical uncertainty. Using a mean age of 4.56 Ga for the chondrite forming event, we derive a value for λ176Lu = 1.983 ± 33 time 10-11 y-1 from the regression of the chondrite meteorites, ca. 6% faster than a recent calibration based on terrestrial material, which has important implications for the differentiation of the early Earth (2, 4). The four basaltic eucrites analysed align on the same array as the chondrites and, as such, chondrites and basaltic eucrites also define a statistically significant isochron with a slope of 0.09462 ± 68 and intercept of 0.279627 ± 20, identical to the values derived from the chondrites alone. Moreover, a recent Lu-Hf study of basaltic

  5. Evaluation of meteorites as habitats for terrestrial microorganisms: Results from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia, a Mars analogue site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Alastair W.; Wilson, Siobhan A.; Tomkins, Andrew G.; Gagen, Emma J.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Southam, Gordon

    2017-10-01

    Unambiguous identification of biosignatures on Mars requires access to well-characterized, long-lasting geochemical standards at the planet's surface that can be modified by theoretical martian life. Ordinary chondrites, which are ancient meteorites that commonly fall to the surface of Mars and Earth, have well-characterized, narrow ranges in trace element and isotope geochemistry compared to martian rocks. Given that their mineralogy is more attractive to known chemolithotrophic life than the basaltic rocks that dominate the martian surface, exogenic rocks (e.g., chondritic meteorites) may be good places to look for signs of prior life endemic to Mars. In this study, we show that ordinary chondrites, collected from the arid Australian Nullarbor Plain, are commonly colonized and inhabited by terrestrial microorganisms that are endemic to this Mars analogue site. These terrestrial endolithic and chasmolithic microbial contaminants are commonly found in close association with hygroscopic veins of gypsum and Mg-calcite, which have formed within cracks penetrating deep into the meteorites. Terrestrial bacteria are observed within corrosion cavities, where troilite (FeS) oxidation has produced jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6]. Where terrestrial microorganisms have colonized primary silicate minerals and secondary calcite, these mineral surfaces are heavily etched. Our results show that inhabitation of meteorites by terrestrial microorganisms in arid environments relies upon humidity and pH regulation by minerals. Furthermore, microbial colonization affects the weathering of meteorites and production of sulfate, carbonate, Fe-oxide and smectite minerals that can preserve chemical and isotopic biosignatures for thousands to millions of years on Earth. Meteorites are thus habitable by terrestrial microorganisms, even under highly desiccating environmental conditions of relevance to Mars. They may therefore be useful as chemical and isotopic ;standards; that preserve evidence of

  6. The compositional diversity of non-Vesta basaltic asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Thomas B.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Mayne, Rhiannon G.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Takir, Driss; Burt, Brian J.; Binzel, Richard P.; Pefkou, Dimitra

    2017-10-01

    We present near-infrared (0.78-2.45 μm) reflectance spectra for nine middle and outer main belt (a > 2.5 AU) basaltic asteroids. Three of these objects are spectrally distinct from all classifications in the Bus-DeMeo system and could represent spectral end members in the existing taxonomy or be representatives of a new spectral type. The remainder of the sample are classified as V- or R-type. All of these asteroids are dynamically detached from the Vesta collisional family, but are too small to be intact differentiated parent bodies, implying that they originated from differentiated planetesimals which have since been destroyed or ejected from the solar system. The 1- and 2-μm band centers of all objects, determined using the Modified Gaussian Model (MGM), were compared to those of 47 Vestoids and fifteen HED meteorites of known composition. The HEDs enabled us to determine formulas relating Band 1 and Band 2 centers to pyroxene ferrosilite (Fs) compositions. Using these formulas we present the most comprehensive compositional analysis to date of middle and outer belt basaltic asteroids. We also conduct a careful error analysis of the MGM-derived band centers for implementation in future analyses. The six outer belt V- and R-type asteroids show more dispersion in parameter space than the Vestoids, reflecting greater compositional diversity than Vesta and its associated bodies. The objects analyzed have Fs numbers which are, on average, between five and ten molar percent lower than those of the Vestoids; however, identification and compositional analysis of additional outer belt basaltic asteroids would help to confirm or refute this result. Given the gradient in oxidation state which existed within the solar nebula, these results tentatively suggest that these objects formed at either a different time or location than 4 Vesta.

  7. Fullerenes in Allende Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, L.; Bada, J. L.; Winans, R. E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The detection of fullerenes in deposits from meteor impacts has led to renewed interest in the possibility that fullerenes are present in meteorites. Although fullerenes have not previously been detected in the Murchison and Allende meteorites, the Allende meteorite is known to contain several well-ordered graphite particles which are remarkably similar in size and appearance to the fullerene-related structures carbon onions and nanotubes. We report that fullerenes are in fact present in trace amounts in the Allende meteorite. In addition to fullerenes, we detected many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Allende meteorite, consistent with previous reports. In particular, we detected benzofluoranthene and corannulene (C20H10), five-membered ring structures which have been proposed as precursors to the formation of fullerene synthesis, perhaps within circumstellar envelopes or other sites in the interstellar medium.

  8. The Twenty-Fifth Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Part 2: H-O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Various papers on lunar and planetary science are presented, covering such topics as: planetary geology, lunar geology, meteorites, shock loads, cometary collisions, planetary mapping, planetary atmospheres, chondrites, chondrules, planetary surfaces, impact craters, lava flow, achondrites, geochemistry, stratigraphy, micrometeorites, tectonics, mineralogy, petrology, geomorphology, and volcanology.

  9. Meteorite Magazine: Promoting Science, Discovery, And Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; Lebofsky, N. R.; Sears, H.; Sears, D.

    2006-09-01

    In late 2005, Larry and Nancy Lebofsky and Derek and Hazel Sears took over the editing and publishing of Meteorite magazine. We saw a great educational potential for the magazine. With a circulation over 600, the magazine reaches a broad readership: meteorite scientists, hunters, collectors, and enthusiasts. Unlike the professional journal of the Meteoritical Society, Meteoritics and Planetary Sciences, the articles in Meteorite range from scientific articles, reports from meteorite shows, and how to preserve meteorites to stories about searching for meteorites around the world. Meteorites are of interest to people. Asteroids, meteoroids, meteors, and meteorites are in many states' science standards. Yet, how many museums have meteorite collections with staff who know little about them? How many amateur astronomers, when seeing meteors or meteor showers, can explain how asteroids, comets, meteors, and meteorites are related and what they tell us about the formation of our Solar System? How many meteorite collectors are knowledgeable about how these objects are related to each other? How do we reach the broader community? Unlike the hundreds of amateur and school astronomy clubs, there are no meteorite clubs. While one can point out the wonders of the night sky and what can be seen through a telescope at star parties, there is no such thing as school meteorite hunting parties. The meteorite and planetary sciences communities working together can bring the excitement of meteorites and the science behind these fascinating objects to teachers, students, and museum and planetarium staff. We will present ideas for accomplishing this.

  10. Gypsum, jarosite, and hydrous iron-phosphate in Martian meteorite Roberts Massif 04262: Implications for sulfate geochemistry on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Gypsum has been identified on Mars by MEX OMEGA [1] and jarosite identified via MER-B lander [2] and both minerals are examples of the importance of calcium and iron sulfates in Martian weathering processes. The weathering of Martian basalt to form Ca and iron sulfates should be an important process on Mars. Martian jarosite has been identified in MIL 03346 [3] and Ca-sulfate has been identified in EETA 79001 [4], but both phases have yet to be identified in the same Martian sample. In Roberts Massif 04262, an olivine-phyric shergottite, iron-sulfide and calcium-phosphate minerals are undergoing reaction (dissolution and reprecipitation?) to form gypsum, jarosite, and an iron-phosphate phase, presumably during the meteorite's residence in Antarctica. If true, then an acidic and oxidizing fluid was present in this meteorite, due to the formation of jarosite which requires fluid of this type to form [5]. The weathering of iron-sulfides on Earth to form acidic and oxidizing fluids is common, thus this can be reconciled with the formation of an acidic fluid in a basic rock. Presumably, under more extensive weathering of silicate minerals in Martian basalt, the pH would be raised to values where jarosite would not be stable. While the weathering of RBT 04262 is likely occurring in Antarctica, a similar susceptibility of the apatite and pyrrhotite to incipient weathering on Mars may be expected. Oxidizing crustal fluids on Mars may attack iron- sulfides first in Martian basalts. The weathering of iron-sulfides leads to increasing acidity of fluids, which would enhance the dissolution of the calcium-phosphate minerals [6]. The formation of jarosite, gypsum, and iron-phosphate minerals during the early stages of weathering of Martian basalts may be an important process on Mars globally. [1] Gendrin, A. et al. (2005) Science, 307, 1587-1591. [2] Klingelhöfer et al. (2004) Science, 306, 1740- 1745. [3] Vicenzi E. P. et al. (2007) LPSC XXXVIII, Abstract 2335. [4] Gooding J

  11. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Nancy S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Meteorite collection, which is comprised of over 18,700 meteorites, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world. These meteorites have been collected since the late 1970's as part of a three-agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution [1]. Samples collected each season are analyzed at NASA s Meteorite Lab and the Smithsonian Institution and results are published twice a year in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, which has been in publication since 1978. Each newsletter lists the samples collected and processed and provides more in-depth details on selected samples of importance to the scientific community. Data about these meteorites is also published on the NASA Curation website [2] and made available through the Meteorite Classification Database allowing scientists to search by a variety of parameters

  12. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  13. Meteorites, Microfossils and Exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of evidence for biogenic activity and possible microfossils in a Martian meteorite may have initiated a paradigm shift regarding the existence of extraterrestrial microbial life. Terrestrial extremophiles that live in deep granite and hydrothermal vents and nanofossils in volcanic tuffs have altered the premise that microbial life and microfossils are inconsistent with volcanic activity and igneous rocks. Evidence for biogenic activity and microfossils in meteorites can no longer be dismissed solely because the meteoritic rock matrix is not sedimentary. Meteorite impact-ejection and comets provide mechanisms for planetary cross-contamination of biogenic chemicals, microfossils, and living microorganisms. Hence, previously dismissed evidence for complex indigenous biochemicals and possible microfossils in carbonaceous chondrites must be re-examined. Many similar, unidentifiable, biological-like microstructures have been found in different carbonaceous chondrites and the prevailing terrestrial contaminant model is considered suspect. This paper reports the discovery of microfossils indigenous to the Murchison meteorite. These forms were found in-situ in freshly broken, interior surfaces of the meteorite. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) and optical microscopy images indicate that a population of different biological-like forms are represented. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy reveals these forms have high carbon content overlaying an elemental distribution similar to the matrix. Efforts at identification with terrestrial microfossils and microorganisms were negative. Some forms strongly resemble bodies previously isolated in the Orgueil meteorite and considered microfossils by prior researchers. The Murchison forms are interpreted to represent an indigenous population of the preserved and altered carbonized remains (microfossils) of microorganisms that lived in the parent body of this meteorite at diverse times during the past 4.5 billion

  14. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Studies of Olivine-Phyric Shergottites RBT 04262 and LAR 06319: Isotopic Evidence for Relationship to Enriched Basaltic Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.

    2009-01-01

    RBT 04262 and LAR 06319 are two Martian meteorites recently discovered in Antarctica. Both contain abundant olivines, and were classified as olivine-phyric shergottites. A detailed petrographic study of RBT 04262 suggested it should be reclassified as a lherzolitic shergottite. However, the moderately LREE-depleted REE distribution pattern indicated that it is closely related to enriched basaltic shergottites like Shergotty, Zagami, Los Angeles, etc. In earlier studies of a similarly olivinephyric shergottite NWA 1068 which contains 21% modal olivine, it was shown that it probably was produced from an enriched basaltic shergottite magma by olivine accumulation . As for LAR 06319, recent petrographic studies suggested that it is different from either lherzolitic shergottites or the highly LREE-depleted olivine-phyric shergottites. We performed Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses on RBT 04262 and LAR 06319 to determine their crystallization ages and Sr and Nd isotopic signatures, and to better understand the petrogenetic relationships between them and other basaltic, lherzolitic and depleted olivine-phyric shergottites.

  15. Classification of an unidentified meteorite through TXRF technique and the chemical comparison with a known meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Wafaa

    2013-12-01

    Meteorites, space rocks, are characterized by several distinctive properties that distinguish them from terrestrial (Earth) rocks. Meteorites may have all or most of such properties. Sometimes, meteorite characterization requires detailed chemical analyses. Two types of meteorites were studied and chemically analyzed. One, had already been located and listed internationally (AL-Taamem Meteorite77). The other one is not listed yet as it fell in 1993 at the northern Kurdistan region of Iraq. The chemical analysis of grinded meteorite was conducted using TXRF technique. The analysis involved the utilization of one type of carrier and one type of disks (quartz). High purity silicon was used for fixing the meteorite powder onto the quartz glass disks for vacuum uses. Each sample test was carried out twice using the Bruker S2 Picofox TXRF instrument (for 600s). The spectra were investigated and several indicative characteristics were concluded. The samples were identified as meteorite, particularly for the appearance of the typical nickel peak near the iron peak in the spectra. This is in accordance with the method of classification of meteorites and by comparison between the listed and unlisted samples. All these analyses were conducted in the laboratories of Chemistry for Technologies in Brescia University, Italy).

  16. Geological and geochemical record of 3400-million-year-old terrestrial meteorite impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Donald R.; Byerly, Gary R.; Asaro, Frank; Kyte, Frank T.

    1989-01-01

    Beds of sand-sized spherules in the 3400-million-year-old Fig Tree Group, Barberton Greenstone belt, South Africa, formed by the fall of quenched liquid silicate droplets into a range of shallow- to deep-water depositional environments. The regional extent of the layers, their compositional complexity, and lack of included volcanic debris suggest that they are not products of volcanic activity. The layers are greatly enriched in iridium and other platinum group elements in roughly chondritic proportions. Geochemical modeling based on immobile element abundances suggests that the original average spherule composition can be approximated by a mixture of fractionated tholeiitic basalt, komatiite, and CI carbonaceous chondrite. The spherules are thought to be the products of large meteorite impacts on the Archean earth.

  17. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, N. S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic Meteorite collection, which is comprised of over 18,700 meteorites, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world. These meteorites have been collected since the late 1970 s as part of a three-agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution [1]. Samples collected each season are analyzed at NASA s Meteorite Lab and the Smithsonian Institution and results are published twice a year in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, which has been in publication since 1978. Each newsletter lists the samples collected and processed and provides more in-depth details on selected samples of importance to the scientific community. Data about these meteorites is also published on the NASA Curation website [2] and made available through the Meteorite Classification Database allowing scientists to search by a variety of parameters. This paper describes enhancements that have been made to the database and to the data and photo acquisition process to provide the meteorite community with faster access to meteorite data concurrent with the publication of the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter twice a year.

  18. Petrology of enstatite chondrites and anomalous enstatite achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Niekerk, Deon

    2012-01-01

    Chondrites are meteorites that represent unmelted portions of asteroids. The enstatite chondrites are one class of chondrites. They consist of reduced mineral assemblages that formed under low oxygen fugacity in the solar nebula, prior to accretion into asteroids. There are two groups of enstatite chondrites---EH and EL. I studied EL3 meteorites, which are understood to be unmetamorphosed and thus to only preserve primitive nebular products. I show in a petrographic study that the EL3s are in fact melt--breccias in which impact-melting produced new mineral assemblages and textures in portions of the host chondrites, after accretion. I document meta- land sulfide assemblages that are intergrown with silicate minerals (which are often euhedral), and occur outside chondrules; these assemblages probably represent impact-melting products, and are different from those in EH3 chondrites that probably represent nebular products. In situ siderophile trace element compositions of the metal in EL3s, obtained by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are consistent with an impact-melting hypothesis. The trace element concentrations show no clear volatility trend, and are thus probably not the result of volatile-driven petrogenetic processes that operated in the solar nebula. Trace element modeling suggests that the character of the trace element patterns together with deviations from the mean bulk EL metal pattern is consistent with metal that crystallized in a coexisting liquid-solid metal system in which dissolved carbon influenced element partitioning. I also conducted a petrographic and mineral-chemistry study of several anomalous enstatite meteorites. These have igneous textures, but unfractionated mineralogy similar to unmelted chondrites. I show that with the exception of one, the meteorites are related to each other, and probably formed by crystallization from an impact melt instead of metamorphism through the decay of short lived radionuclides

  19. Organics In Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sherwood

    1996-01-01

    The variety of classes of organic compounds that occur in carbonaceous meteorites suggests a rich pre-planetary chemistry with possible connections to interstellar, solar nebular and parent body processes. Structural diversity prevails within all classes examined in detail. Among amino acids for instance, all possible isomers are found up to species containing 4-6 carbon atoms, with abundances decreasing with increasing molecular weight. Such diversity seems limited to those carbonaceous meteorites which show evidence of having been exposed to liquid water; meteorites lacking such evidence also show much lower abundances and less structural diversity in their organic contents. This apparent dependency on water suggests a role for cometary ices in the chemical evolution of organic compounds on parent bodies. Measurements of the stable isotope compositions of C, H, N and S in classes of compounds and at the individual compound level show strong deviations from average chondritic values. These deviations are difficult to explain by solar system or parent body processes, and precedents for some of these isotopic anomalies exist in interstellar (e.g., high D/H ratios) and circumstellar chemistry. Therefore, presolar origins for much if not all of the meteoritic organic compounds (or their precursors) is a distinct possibility. In contrast, evidence of solar nebular origins is either lacking or suspect. Results from molecular and isotopic analyses of meteoritic organics, from laboratory simulations and from a model of interstellar grain reactions will be used to flesh out the hypothesis that this material originated with interstellar chemistry, was distributed within the early solar system as cometary ices, and was subsequently altered on meteorite parent bodies to yield the observed compounds.

  20. Relict chondrules in primitive achondrites: Remnants from their precursor parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Devin L.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Gardner-Vandy, Kathryn

    2017-05-01

    We studied the petrography, analyzed the chemical compositions, constrained the closure temperatures (via geothermometry), and determined the oxidation states of relict chondrules in Campo del Cielo (IAB iron meteorite), Graves Nunataks (GRA) 98028 (acapulcoite), and Netschaëvo (IIE iron meteorite) to constrain their formation conditions and investigate links to known meteorite groups. Despite having been thermally metamorphosed, mineral phases within relict chondrules retain information about their precursor compositions. The sizes and textures of relict chondrules, and silicate and chromite compositions indicate that Campo del Cielo, GRA 98028, and Netschaëvo had distinct parent bodies that were similar to, but different from, known chondrite groups. To determine the utility of relict chondrule sizes in thermally metamorphosed meteorites, we determined the chondrule size distributions in the LL chondrites Semarkona (LL3.00), Soko-Banja (LL4), Siena (LL5), and Saint-Séverin (LL6), and the H chondrites Clovis (No. 1) (H3.6), Kesen (H4), Arbol Solo (H5), and Estacado (H6). As expected, mean chondrule diameters increase with degree of thermal metamorphism. We find that Campo del Cielo and GRA 98028 were reduced during thermal metamorphism, consistent with previous studies, indicating that their precursors were initially more FeO-rich than their current compositions. In contrast to previous studies, we find no evidence for reduction of silicates in Netschaëvo. Normal zoning of olivine in Netschaëvo is consistent with crystallization and suggests its silicates are near their primary FeO-contents. The presence of elongated chromite grains along olivine grain boundaries in Netschaëvo indicates formation during thermal metamorphism under oxidizing conditions. Due to the absence of reduction and the composition of chromite being distinct from that of metamorphosed H chondrites, we conclude that Netschaëvo, and by extension the IIE iron meteorites, are not from the H

  1. The Mineralogy and Petrology of Anomalous Eucrite Emmaville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Ross, D. K.; Greenwood, R. C.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Grady, M. M.; Charlier, B. L. A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that certain basaltic achondrites share similarities with eucrites. These eucrite-like achondrites have distinct isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics indicative of formation on a separate parent body from the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller isotopic variations but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The Emmaville eucrite has a delta O-17 value of -0.137 plus or minus 0.024 per mille (1 sigma), which is substantially different from the eucrite mean of -0.246 plus or minus 0.014 per mille (2 sigma), but similar to those of A-881394 and Bunburra Rockhole (BR). Currently little data exist for Emmaville in terms of petrology or bulk composition. Studying anomalous eucrites allows us to more completely understand the numbers of asteroids represented by eucrite- like basalts and thus constrain the heterogeneity of the HED suite. In this study, we present our preliminary petrological and mineral composition results for Emmaville.

  2. Guide to the US collection of antarctic meteorites 1976-1988 (everything you wanted to know about the meteorite collection). Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Volume 13, Number 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Score, Roberta; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1990-01-01

    The state of the collection of Antarctic Meteorites is summarized. This guide is intended to assist investigators plan their meteorite research and select and request samples. Useful information is presented for all classified meteorites from 1976 to 1988 collections, as of Sept. 1989. The meteorite collection has grown over 13 years to include 4264 samples of which 2754 have been classified. Most of the unclassified meteorites are ordinary chondrites because the collections have been culled for specimens of special petrologic type. The guide consists of two large classification tables. They are preceded by a list of sample locations and important notes to make the tables understandable.

  3. Meteorites from Cluj-Napoca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Gelu; Pop, Dana

    2003-04-01

    The article represents an interview of the journalist Gelu Radu with the director of the Meteorites Museum from the Geological Faculty of the Cluj-Napoca University (Romania) Dana Pop concerning the History, Collection and Actual state of an unique in Romania Meteorites Museum, founded in 1882 after the fall of the Mociu Meteorit (Cluj County) on 3 february 1882. One discusses about the collection of the Museum and the policy of changes with other similar museums throughout the world.

  4. Mysterious iodine-overabundance in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.; Schultz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Halogen as well as other trace element concentrations in meteorite finds can be influenced by alteration processes on the Earth's surface. The discovery of Antarctic meteorites offered the opportunity to study meteorites which were kept in one of the most sterile environment of the Earth. Halogen determination in Antartic meteorites was compared with non-Antarctic meteorites. No correlation was found between iodine concentration and the weathering index, or terrestrial age. The halogen measurements indicate a contaminating phase rich in iodine and also containing chlorine. Possible sources for this contamination are discussed.

  5. Amino and fatty acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of two carbonaceous meteorites have provided much of the latest evidence which seems to support Oparin's theory on the origin of life. The meteorites involved are the Murray meteorite, which fell in 1950, and the Murchison meteorite, which fell in 1969. The amino acids in the two meteorites are similar in composition. Eight of the twenty amino acids found belong to amino acids present in proteins. A number of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic fatty acids were also found in the meteorites.

  6. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  7. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  8. Proceedings of the 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Lunar Basalts; Chemical and Physical Properties of the Lunar Regolith; Lunar Dust and Transient Surface Phenomena; Lunar Databases and Data Restoration; Meteoritic Samples of the Moon; Chondrites, Their Clasts, and Alteration; Achondrites: Primitive and Not So Primitive; Iron Meteorites; Meteorite Methodology; Antarctic Micrometeorites; HEDs and Vesta; Dust Formation and Transformation; Interstellar Organic Matter; Early Solar System Chronology; Comparative Planetology; Impacts I: Models and Experiments; Impacts II: Craters and Ejecta; Mars: Volcanism; Mars: Tectonics and Dynamics; Martian Stratigraphy: Understanding the Geologic History of Mars Through the Sedimentary Rock Record; Mars: Valleys and Valley Networks; Mars: Aqueous Processes in Valles Marineris and the Southern Highlands; Mars: Aqueous Geomorphology; Martian Gullies: Morphology and Origins; Mars: Dunes, Dust, and Wind; Mars: Remote Sensing; Mars: Geologic Mapping, Photogrammetry, and Cratering; Martian Mineralogy: Constraints from Missions and Laboratory Investigations; Mars Analogs: Chemical and Physical; Mars Analogs: Sulfates and Sulfides; Missions: Approaches, Architectures, Analogs, and Actualities; Not Just Skin Deep: Electron Microscopy, Heat Flow, Radar, and Seismology Instruments and Planetary Data Systems, Techniques, and Interpretation.

  9. Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites- Update 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Welten, K. C.; Caffee, Marc W.

    1999-01-01

    We are continuing our ongoing study of cosmogenic nuclides in Antarctic meteorites. In addition to the studies of exposure histories of meteorites, we study terrestrial ages and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and desert meteorites. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites provide information on meteorite accumulation mechanisms, mean weathering lifetimes, and influx rates. The determination of Cl-36(half-life=3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) terrestrial ages is one of our long-term on-going projects, however, in many instances neither Cl-36 or C-14 (5,730 y) yields an accurate terrestrial age. Using Ca-14 (1.04 x 10(exp 5) y) for terrestrial age determinations solves this problem by filling the c,ap in half-life between 14-C and Cl-36 ages. We are now applying the new Ca-41- Cl-36 terrestrial age method as well as the Cl-36-Be-10 method to Antarctic meteorites. Our measurements and C-14 terrestrial age determinations by the University of Arizona group are always complementary. We have measured Cl-36 in over 270 Antarctic meteorites since our previous compilation of terrestrial ages. Since a large number of meteorites have been recovered from many different icefields in Antarctica, we continue to survey the trends of terrestrial ages for different icefields. We have also measured detailed terrestrial ages vs. sample locations for Allan Hills, Elephant Moraine, and Lewis Cliff Icefields, where meteorites have been found with very long ages. The updated histograms of terrestrial ages of meteorites from the Allan Hills Main Icefield and Lewis Cliff Icefield are shown. These figures include C-14 ages obtained by the University of Arizona group. Pairs of meteorites are shown as one object for which the age is the average of all members of the same fall. The width of the bars represents 70,000 years, which was a typical uncertainty for Cl-36 ages. We reduced the uncertainty of terrestrial age determinations to approx. 40,000 years by using pairs of nuclides such as Ca-41-Cl-36 or Cl

  10. Thermoluminescence and Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Hasan, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The level of natural thermoluminescence (TL) in meteorites is the result of competition between build-up, due to exposure to cosmic radiation, and thermal decay. Antarctic meteorites tend to have lower natural TL than non-Antarctic meteorites because of their generally larger terrestrial ages. However, since a few observed falls have low TL due to a recent heating event, such as passage within approximately 0.7 astronomical units of the Sun, this could also be the case for some Antarctic meteorites. Dose rate variations due to shielding, heating during atmospheric passage, and anomalous fading also cause natural TL variations, but the effects are either relatively small, occur infrequently, or can be experimentally circumvented. The TL sensitivity of meteorites reflects the abundance and nature of the feldspar. Thus intense shock, which destroys feldspar, causes the TL sensitivity to decrease by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, while metamorphism, which generates feldspar through the devitrification of glass, causes TL sensitivity to increase by a factor of approximately 10000. The TL-metamorphism relationship is particularly strong for the lowest levels of metamorphism. The order-disorder transformation in feldspar also affect the TL emission characteristics and thus TL provides a means of paleothermometry.

  11. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  12. The Use of Basalt, Basalt Fibers and Modified Graphite for Nuclear Waste Repository - 12150

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gulik, V.I.; Biland, A.B.

    2012-07-01

    New materials enhancing the isolation of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are continuously being developed.. Our research suggests that basalt-based materials, including basalt roving chopped basalt fiber strands, basalt composite rebar and materials based on modified graphite, could be used for enhancing radioactive waste isolation during the storage and disposal phases and maintaining it during a significant portion of the post-closure phase. The basalt vitrification process of nuclear waste is a viable alternative to glass vitrification. Basalt roving, chopped basalt fiber strands and basalt composite rebars can significantly increase the strength and safety characteristics of nuclear waste and spentmore » nuclear fuel storages. Materials based on MG are optimal waterproofing materials for nuclear waste containers. (authors)« less

  13. An abiogenic photochemical synthesis on surface of meteorites and other small space bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, M.; Kuzicheva, E.

    Abiogenic photochemical synthesis of complex biochemical compounds on the surface of small bodies in our Solar system was examined. The hydrated minerals are found within a chondrite matrix of meteorites together with significant amounts of organic matter. Clays are likely to have formed when water was presented on parent meteoritic bodies. In order to verify the existence of a relationship between abiogenic synthesis of nucleotides and inorganic components of the meteorites we have investigated possible abiogenic reactions at the presence of different clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite) and basaltic sample (Tjatja's volcanic ash) under action of open space energy sources for modeling of different exobiological environments on the surface of small space bodies. The abiogenic synthesis of natural adenine nucleotides from mixture of adenosine plus inorganic phosphate has been observed under an irradiation with VUV radiation at the presence of different mineral samples. The yields of the products (5'AMP, 2'AMP, 3'AMP, 2'3'cAMP and 3'5'cAMP) were depended from irradiation time and kind of used minerals. The discovery that meteoritic organic compounds may be trapped and protected within a clay mineral matrix has implications for our understanding of prebiotic molecular evolution in the early Solar system. Clay minerals may have concentrated organic compounds thereby promoting polymerization reactions also. An adsorption/binding of nucleic acids components by clay crystals could change in the electron distribution and/or the conformation of the molecules. The remnant water molecules in the clay sheets also could influence on the course of the reaction. Besides, an immobilization of phosphate on clay also could play an important role in our reaction. Chondritic material would have been a common component of the inner Solar system shortly after its formation and the biologically useful products of clay mineral-organic matter interactions would have also widespread

  14. Comments on 'Extinct radioactivities: Trapped residuals of presolar grains'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, B. M. P.

    1977-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that extinct I-129 and Pu-244 were trapped in primitive-solar-nebula ('presolar') grains and decayed into radiogenic Xe-129 and fission Xe before the grains were incorporated into meteorite bodies. This idea is reconsidered in light of the thermal and metamorphic history of meteorites. The criteria that parent and daughter species should never separate and that minerals or grains containing the anomalous xenon should not be subjected to temperatures exceeding 500 C are applied to iron meteorites, achondrites, and chondrites to determine whether presolar grains could be the carriers of rare-gas anomalies to meteorites. The results strongly indicate that the xenon anomaly could not have originated in presolar grains. Other difficulties with the presolar-grain model are discussed, including insufficiently small grain sizes, large variations in Xe-129/I-127 ratios in various meteorites, and apparently unrealistic meteorite formation times and locations.

  15. An extremely low U Pb source in the Moon: UThPb, SmNd, RbSr, and 40Ar 39Ar isotopic systematics and age of lunar meteorite Asuka 881757

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misawa, K.; Tatsumoto, M.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Yanai, K.

    1993-01-01

    We have undertaken UThPb, SmNd, RbSr, and 40Ar 39Ar isotopic studies on Asuka 881757, a coarse-grained basaltic lunar meteorite whose chemical composition is close to low-Ti and very low-Ti (VLT) mare basalts. The PbPb internal isochron obtained for acid leached residues of separated mineral fractions yields an age of 3940 ?? 28 Ma, which is similar to the U-Pb (3850 ?? 150 Ma) and Th-Pb (3820 ?? 290 Ma) internal isochron ages. The Sm-Nd data for the mineral separates yield an internal isochron age of 3871 ?? 57 Ma and an initial 143Nd 144Nd value of 0.50797 ?? 10. The Rb-Sr data yield an internal isochron age of 3840 ?? 32 Ma (??(87Rb) = 1.42 ?? 10-11 yr-1) and a low initial 87Sr 86Sr ratio of 0.69910 ?? 2. The 40Ar 39Ar age spectra for a glass fragment and a maskelynitized plagioclase are relatively flat and give a weighted mean plateau age of 3798 ?? 12 Ma. We interpret these ages to indicate that the basalt crystallized from a melt 3.87 Ga ago (the Sm-Nd age) and an impact event disturbed the Rb-Sr system and completely reset the K-Ar system at 3.80 Ga. The slightly higher Pb-Pb age compared to the Sm-Nd age could be due to the secondary Pb (from terrestrial and/or lunar surface Pb contamination) that remained in the residues after acid leaching. Alternatively, the following interpretation is also possible; the meteorite crystallized at 3.94 Ga (the Pb-Pb age) and the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and K-Ar systems were disturbed by an impact event at 3.80 Ga. The crystallization age obtained here is older than those reported for low-Ti basalts (3.2-3.5 Ga) and for VLT basalts (3.4 Ga), but similar to ages of some mare basalts, indicating that the basalt may have formed from a magma related to a basin-forming event (Imbrium?). The age span for VLT basalts from different sampling sites suggest that they were erupted over a wide area during an interval of at least ~500 million years. The impact event that thermally reset the K-Ar system of Asuka 881757 must have been post

  16. The 45th Annual Meteoritical Society Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, P. (Compiler); Turner, L. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Impact craters and shock effects, chondrite formation and evolution, meteorites, chondrules, irons, nebular processes and meteorite parent bodies, regoliths and breccias, antarctic meteorite curation, isotopic studies of meteorites and lunar samples, organics and terrestrial weathering, refractory inclusions, cosmic dust, particle irradiations before and after compaction, and mineralogic studies and analytical techniques are discussed.

  17. Petrology of eucrites, howardites and mesosiderites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duke, M.B.; Silver, L.T.

    1967-01-01

    The eucrite and howardite calcium-rich achondrites and many mesosiderites are considered as a coherent meteorite assemblage, their silicates consisting essentially of calciumpoor monoclinic and orthorhombic pyroxenes and calcium-rich plagioclase feldspar. The achondrites can be grouped according to their brecciated structure as follows: eucrites-unbrecciated and monomict brecciated achondrites; howardites-polymict brecciated achondrites. Many mesosiderites contain brecciated structures; they are distinguished from the achondrites by their large metallic fraction. The structure and composition of rock fragments in the breccias indicate a complicated sequence of events including magmatic differentiation, brecciation, recrystallization and refragmentation, and ejection from the parent body. Detailed mineralogical and chemical data suggest that the magmatic differentiation proceeded primarily by the separation of pyroxene from an ultrabasic parent material that had a much lower alkali content than ordinary chondrites. Magmatic crystallization took place in environments ranging from extrusive to deep-seated intrusive. Polymict breccias contain fragments with a wide variety of magmatic and recrystallization textures, which suggests that the breccias were formed either in very large or repeated fragmentation events. Monomict breccias contain fragments with a small range of similar magmatic textures, which suggests that these breccias were formed by small or single events. Petrographic evidence suggests that many of the breccias are impact breccias. Either in their original magmatic crystallization sites or in the sites of breccia accumulation, most of these meteorites apparently had a near-surface location prior to ejection from the parent body. Evidence obtained from eucrites, howardites and mesosiderites forms an important part of our understanding of the early evolution of the surface regions of their parent body. Chemical and oxidation conditions were different from

  18. Effective radium-226 concentration in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Frédéric; Perrier, Frédéric; Moreira, Manuel; Zanda, Brigitte; Rochette, Pierre; Teitler, Yoram

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of noble gases in meteorites provides constraints on the early solar system and the pre-solar nebula. This requires a better characterization and understanding of the capture, production, and release of noble gases in meteorites. The knowledge of transfer properties of noble gases for each individual meteorite could benefit from using radon-222, radioactive daughter of radium-226. The radon-222 emanating power is commonly quantified by the effective radium-226 concentration (ECRa), the product of the bulk radium-226 concentration and of the emanation coefficient E, which represents the probability of one decaying radium-226 to inject one radon-222 into the free porous network. Owing to a non-destructive, high-sensitivity accumulation method based on long photomultiplier counting sessions, we are now able to measure ECRa of meteorite samples, which usually have mass smaller than 15 g and ECRa < 0.5 Bq kg-1. We report here the results obtained from 41 different meteorites, based on 129 measurements on 70 samples using two variants of our method, showing satisfactory repeatability and a detection limit below 10-2 Bq kg-1 for a sample mass of 1 g. While two meteorites remain below detection level, we obtain for 39 meteorites heterogeneous ECRa values with mean (min-max range) of ca. 0.1 (0.018-1.30) Bq kg-1. Carbonaceous chondrites exhibit the largest ECRa values and eucrites the smallest. Such values are smaller than typical values from most terrestrial rocks, but comparable with those from Archean rocks (mean of ca. 0.18 Bq kg-1), an end-member of terrestrial rocks. Using uranium concentration from the literature, E is inferred from ECRa for all the meteorite samples. Values of E for meteorites (mean 40 ± 4%) are higher than E values for Archean rocks and reported values for lunar and Martian soils. Exceptionally large E values likely suggest that the 238U-226Ra pair would not be at equilibrium in most meteorites and that uranium and/or radium are most

  19. 40 Years of Processing Pieces of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satterwhite, C. E.; Funk, R. C.; Righter, K.; Harrington, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    This year marks the 40th year anniversary for the Antarctic Search for Meteorite (ANSMET) program. In 1976, the ANSMET program led the first expedition to Antarctica. The ANSMET program is a US-led field-based science project that recovers meteorite samples from Antarctica. Once a year from late November to late January, a field team consisting of 8 to 12 people, spends 6-8 weeks camping on the ice and collecting meteorites. Since 1976, more than 22,000 meteorite samples have been recovered. These meteorites come from asteroids, planets and other bodies of the solar system. Once collected, the Antarctic meteorites are shipped to NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) Houston, TX. in a refrigerated truck and are kept frozen to minimize oxidation until they are ready for initial processing. In Antarctica each meteorite is given a field tag which consists of numbers, once in the lab, this is replaced by an official tag, consisting of the Antarctic field location and year collected. The types and numbers of meteorites that have been classified include 849 carbonaceous chondrites, 135 enstatites, 512 achondrites, 64 stony, 115 irons, 48 others (27 R chondrites, 7 ungrouped), 6,161 H chondrites, 7,668 L chondrites, and 4,589 LL chondrites. Although 80-85 percent of the collected meteorites fall in the ordinary chondrite group, the other approximately 15 percent represent rare types of achondrites and carbonaceous chondrites. These rare meteorites include 25 lunar meteorites, 15 Martian meteorites, scores of various types of carbonaceous chondrites, and unique achondrites. The Antarctic meteorites that have been collected are processed in the Meteorite Processing Lab at JSC in Houston, TX. Initial processing of the meteorites begins with thawing/drying the meteorites in a nitrogen glove box for 24 to 48 hours. The meteorites are then photographed, measured, weighed and a description of the interior and exterior of each meteorite is written. The meteorite is broken and a

  20. The Weathering of Antarctic Meteorites: Climatic Controls on Weathering Rates and Implications for Meteorite Accumulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Akridge, J. M. C.; Sears, D. W. G.; Bland, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Weathering of meteorites includes a variety of chemical and mineralogical changes, including conversion of metal to iron oxides, or rust. Other changes include the devitrification of glass, especially in fusion crust. On a longer time scale, major minerals such as olivine, pyroxene, and feldspar are partially or wholly converted to various phyllosilicates. The degree of weathering of meteorite finds is often noted using a qualitative system based on visual inspection of hand specimens. Several quantitative weathering classification systems have been proposed or are currently under development. Wlotzka has proposed a classification system based on mineralogical changes observed in polished sections and Mossbauer properties of meteorite powders have also been used. In the current paper, we discuss induced thermoluminescence (TL) as an indicator of degree of weathering of individual meteorites. The quantitative measures of weathering, including induced TL, suffer from one major flaw, namely that their results only apply to small portions of the meteorite.

  1. The regolith portion of the lunar meteorite Sayh al Uhaymir 169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kathiri, A.; Gnos, E.; Hofmann, B. A.

    Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU) 169 is a composite lunar meteorite from Oman that consists of polymict regolith breccia (8.44 ppm Th), adhering to impact-melt breccia (IMB; 32.7 ppm Th). In this contribution we consider the regolith breccia portion of SaU 169, and demonstrate that it is composed of two generations representing two formation stages, labeled II and III. The regolith breccia also contains the following clasts: Ti-poor to Ti-rich basalts, gabbros to granulites, and incorporated regolith breccias. The average SaU 169 regolith breccia bulk composition lies within the range of Apollo 12 and 14 soil and regolith breccias, with the closest correspondence being with that of Apollo 14, but Sc contents indicate a higher portion of mare basalts. This is supported by relations between Sm-Al2O3, FeO-Cr2O3-TiO2, Sm/Eu and Th-K2O. The composition can best be modeled as a mixture of high-K KREEP, mare basalt and norite/troctolite, consistent with the rareness of anorthositic rocks. The largest KREEP breccia clast in the regolith is identical in its chemical composition and total REE content to the incompatible trace-element (ITE)- rich high-K KREEP rocks of the Apollo 14 landing site, pointing to a similar source. In contrast to Apollo 14 soil, SaU 169 IMB and SaU 169 KREEP breccia clast, the SaU 169 regolith is not depleted in K/Th, indicating a low contribution of high-Th IMB such as the SaU 169 main lithology in the regolith. The data presented here indicate the SaU 169 regolith breccia is from the lunar front side, and has a strong Procellarum KREEP Terrane signature.

  2. Evidence from Polymict Ureilite Meteorites for a Single "Rubble-Pile" Ureilite Parent Asteroid Gardened by Several Distinct Impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, Hilary; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Kita, Noriko T.; Valley, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Ureilites are ultramafic achondrite meteorites that have experienced igneous processing whilst retaining heterogeneity in mg# and oxygen isotope ratios. Polymict ureilites represent material derived from the surface of the ureilite parent asteroid(s). Electron microprobe analysis of more than 500 olivine and pyroxene clasts in six polymict ureilites reveals that they cover a statistically identical range of compositions to that shown by all known monomict ureilites. This is considered to be convincing evidence for derivation from a single parent asteroid. Many of the polymict ureilites also contain clasts that have identical compositions to the anomalously high Mn/Mg olivines and pyroxenes from the Hughes 009 monomict ureilite (here termed the Hughes cluster ). Four of the six samples also contain distinctive ferroan lithic clasts that have been derived from oxidized impactors. The presence of several common distinctive lithologies within the polymict ureilites is additional evidence that the ureilites were derived from a single parent asteroid. Olivine in a large lithic clast of augite-bearing ureilitic has an mg# of 97, extending the compositional range of known ureilite material. Our study confirms that ureilitic olivine clasts with mg#s < 85 are much more common than those with mg# > 85, which also show more variable Mn contents, including the melt-inclusion bearing "Hughes cluster" ureilites. We interpret this to indicate that the parent ureilite asteroid was disrupted by a major impact at a time when melt was still present in regions with a bulk mg# > 85, giving rise to the two types of ureilites: common ferroan ones that were already residual after melting and less common magnesian ones that were still partially molten when disruption occurred, some of which are the result of interaction of melts with residual mantle during disruption. A single daughter asteroid re-accreted from the disrupted remnants of the mantle of the proto-ureilite asteroid, giving rise

  3. Meteoritic Microfossils in Eltanin Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Gersonde, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km-sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain nun-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored approximately 80,000 sq-km. of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 0.4 to 2.8 g/cm2. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth.

  4. Detection of a meteorite 'stream' - Observations of a second meteorite fall from the orbit of the Innisfree chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.

    1987-03-01

    The first observational evidence of multiple meteorite falls from the same orbit is adduced from the February 6, 1980 fall of a meteorite precisely 3 yr after the fall of the Innisfree meteorite. Due consideration of the detection probability for two related objects with the meteorite camera network in western Canada suggests that the Innisfree brecciated LL chondrite was a near-surface fragment from a parent object whose radius was of the order of several tens of meters. A meteorite mass of 1.8 kg is predicted for the new object, whose recovery in the vicinity of Ridgedale, Saskatchewan, is now sought for the sake of comparison with the Innisfree chondrite.

  5. Synthesis of a spinifex-textured basalt as an analog to Gusev crater basalts, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bost, Nicolas; Westall, Frances; Gaillard, Fabrice; Ramboz, Claire; Foucher, Frédéric

    2012-05-01

    Analyses by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Spirit, of Martian basalts from Gusev crater show that they are chemically very different from terrestrial basalts, being characterized in particular by high Mg- and Fe-contents. To provide suitable analog basalts for the International Space Analogue Rockstore (ISAR), a collection of analog rocks and minerals for preparing in situ space missions, especially, the upcoming Mars mission MSL-2011 and the future international Mars-2018 mission, it is necessary to synthesize Martian basalts. The aim of this study was therefore to synthesize Martian basalt analogs to the Gusev crater basalts, based on the geochemical data from the MER rover Spirit. We present the results of two experiments, one producing a quench-cooled basalt (<1 h) and one producing a more slowly cooled basalt (1 day). Pyroxene and olivine textures produced in the more slowly cooled basalt were surprisingly similar to spinifex textures in komatiites, a volcanic rock type very common on the early Earth. These kinds of ultramafic rocks and their associated alteration products may have important astrobiological implications when associated with aqueous environments. Such rocks could provide habitats for chemolithotrophic microorganisms, while the glass and phyllosilicate derivatives can fix organic compounds.

  6. An Experimental Analog for Metal-Sulfide Partitioning in Acapulcoite-Lodranite Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaliwal, J. K.; Chabot, N. L.; Ash, R. D.; McCoy, T. J.

    2018-05-01

    This study builds on prior analyses of highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances in primitive achondrites. We performed melting experiments of naturally occurring FeNi and FeS to examine the effect of sulfur on HSE inter-element partitioning.

  7. Four new iron meteorite finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Wasson, J. T.; Bild, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Four new iron meteorites are described: Buenaventura (IIIB) from Chihuahua, Mexico: mass 114 kg; Denver City (anomalous) from Texas, USA: mass 26.1 kg; Kinsella (IIIB) from Alberta, Canada: mass 3.7 kg; and Tacoma (IA) from Washington, USA: mass 17 g. Denver City is unique - i.e., not related to any other known iron. Tacoma is the smallest iron meteorite recorded. The meteorites were initially discovered in 1969, 1975, 1946, and between 1925 and 1932, respectively.

  8. Keto-acids in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G.; Chang, P. M.; Dugas, A.; Byrd, A.; Chang, P. M.; Washington, N.

    2005-01-01

    The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry and are generally used as references for organic compounds in extraterrestrial material. Among the classes of organic compounds found in these meteorites are amino acids, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Such compounds, important in contemporary biochemistry, are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets and may have played a role in early life and/or the origin of life. Absent among (today's) critically important biological compounds reported in carbonaceous meteorites are keto acids, i.e., pyruvic acid, acetoacetic acid, and higher homologs. These compounds are key intermediates in such critical processes as glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. In this study several individual meteoritic keto acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (see figure below). All compounds were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), isopropyl ester (ISP), and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (tBDMS) derivatives. In general, the compounds follow the abiotic synthesis pattern of other known meteorite classes of organic compounds [1,2]: a general decrease in abundance with increasing carbon number within a class of compounds and many, if not all, possible isomers present at a given carbon number. The majority of the shown compounds was positively identified by comparison of their mass spectra to commercially available standards or synthesized standards.

  9. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 88, 2004 July

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, S.S.; Folco, L.; Grady, M.M.; Zolensky, M.E.; Jones, R.; Righter, K.; Zipfel, J.; Grossman, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    The Meteoritical Bulletin No. 88 lists information for 1610 newly classified meteorites, comprising 753 from Antarctica, 302 from Africa, 505 from Asia (495 of which are from Oman), 40 from North America, 5 from South America, 4 from Europe, and 1 of unknown origin. Information is provided for 9 falls (Alby sur Che??ran, Al Zarnkh, Devgaon, Kamioka, Kendrapara, Maromandia, New Orleans, Sivas, and Villalbeto de la Pen??a). Noteworthy specimens include a eucrite fall (Alby sur Che??ran), 6 martian meteorites, 13 lunar meteorites, and 12 irons including one weighing 3 metric ions (Dronino). ?? Meteoritical Society, 2004.

  10. Meteorites and the Evolution of Our Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The study of meteorites has long been of intense interest ever since these objects were discovered to be of extraterrestrial origin. Meteorite research contributes to unraveling the mysteries in understanding the formation and evolution processes of our solar system. Meteorites, of which there are a variety of widely diverse types of chemical and mineralogical compositions, are the most ancient of solar system objects that can be studied in the laboratory. They preserve a unique historical record of the astronomical and astrophysical events of our solar system. This record is being discerned by a host of ever evolving analytical laboratory methods. Recent discoveries of what are believed to be Martian meteorites, lunar meteorites, a meteorite containing indigenous water, and the recovery from the Cretaceous layer of a small meteorite fragment thought to be from the dinosaur-killing asteroid have fueled additional excitement for studying meteorites.

  11. The parent magma of the Nakhla (SNC) meteorite: Reconciliation of composition estimates from magmatic inclusions and element partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    The composition of the parent magma of the Nakhla meteorite was difficult to determine, because it is accumulate rock, enriched in olivine and augite relative to a basalt magma. A parent magma composition is estimated from electron microprobe area analyses of magmatic inclusions in olivine. This composition is consistent with an independent estimate based on the same inclusions, and with chemical equilibria with the cores of Nakhla's augites. This composition reconciles most of the previous estimates of Nakhla's magma composition, and obviates the need for complex magmatic processes. Inconsistency between this composition and those calculated previously suggests that magma flowed through and crystallized into Nakhla as it cooled.

  12. Microfossils in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Microfossils of large filamentous trichomic prokaryotes have been detected during in-situ investigations of carbonaceous meteorites. This research has been carried out using the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) to examine freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorites. The images obtained reveal that many of these remains are embedded in the meteorite rock matrix. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies establish that the filamentous microstructures have elemental compositions consistent with the meteorite matrix, but are often encased within carbon-rich electron transparent sheath-like structures infilled with magnesium sulfate. This is consistent with the taphonomic modes of fossilization of cyanobacteria and sulphur bacteria, since the life habits and processes of these microorganisms frequently result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with the properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the sheath. In this paper the evidence for biogenicity presented includes detailed morphological and morphometric data consistent with known characteristics of uniseriate and multiseriate cyanobacteria. Evidence for indigeneity includes the embedded nature of the fossils and elemental compositions inconsistent with modern biocontaminants.

  13. Organic Chemistry of Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the molecular structures and C,N,H-isotopic compositions of organic matter in meteorites reveal a complex history beginning in the parent interstellar cloud which spawned the solar system. Incorporation of interstellar dust and gas in the protosolar nebula followed by further thermal and aqueous processing on primordial parent bodies of carbonaceous, meteorites have produced an inventory of diverse organic compounds including classes now utilized in biochemistry. This inventory represents one possible set of reactants for chemical models for the origin of living systems on the early Earth. Evidence bearing on the history of meteoritic organic matter from astronomical observations and laboratory investigations will be reviewed and future research directions discussed.

  14. Uranium-lead isotope systematics of Mars inferred from the basaltic shergottite QUE 94201

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Gaffney, A M; Borg, L E; Connelly, J N

    2006-12-22

    Uranium-lead ratios (commonly represented as {sup 238}U/{sup 204}Pb = {mu}) calculated for the sources of martian basalts preserve a record of petrogenetic processes that operated during early planetary differentiation and formation of martian geochemical reservoirs. To better define the range of {mu} values represented by the source regions of martian basalts, we completed U-Pb elemental and isotopic analyses on whole rock, mineral and leachate fractions from the martian meteorite Queen Alexandra Range 94201 (QUE 94201). The whole rock and silicate mineral fractions have unradiogenic Pb isotopic compositions that define a narrow range ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb = 11.16-11.61). In contrast, themore » Pb isotopic compositions of weak HCl leachates are more variable and radiogenic. The intersection of the QUE 94201 data array with terrestrial Pb in {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb-{sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb-{sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb compositional space is consistent with varying amounts of terrestrial contamination in these fractions. We calculate that only 1-7% contamination is present in the purified silicate mineral and whole rock fractions, whereas the HCl leachates contain up to 86% terrestrial contamination. Despite the contamination, we are able to use the U-Pb data to determine the initial {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb of QUE 94201 (11.086 {+-} 0.008) and calculate the {mu} value of the QUE 94201 mantle source to be 1.823 {+-} 0.008. This is the lowest {mu} value calculated for any martian basalt source, and, when compared to the highest values determined for martian basalt sources, indicates that {mu} values in martian source reservoirs vary by at least 100%. The range of source {mu} values further indicates that the {mu} value of bulk silicate Mars is approximately three. The amount of variation in the {mu} values of the mantle sources ({mu} {approx} 2-4) is greater than can be explained by igneous processes involving silicate phases alone. We suggest the possibility that a

  15. New Insights in Preservation of Meteorites in Hot Deserts: The Oldest Hot Desert Meteorite Collection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzler, A.; Rochette, P.; Bourlès, D.; Gattacceca, J.; Merchel, S.; Jull, A. J. T.; Valenzuela, M.

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrial ages of a subset of a chilean meteorite collection have been determined with cosmogenic nuclides. We show here that provided the environnement is favorable enough, hot desert meteorites can survive over a million year.

  16. Sulfur Concentration of High-FeO* Basalts at Sulfide Saturation at High Pressures and Temperatures - Implications for Deep Sulfur Cycle on Mars (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Ding, S.

    2013-12-01

    One of the chief influences of magma in the mantles terrestrial planets is its role in outgassing and ingassing of key volatiles and thus affecting planetary dynamics and climate over long timescales. For Mars, magmatic release of greenhouse gases has been argued to be a major factor in creating warm ancient climate. However, the responsible magmatic gas has not been unequivocally identified. SO2 or H2S could have been the main greenhouse gases, yet the magmatic outflux of S from the martian mantle is poorly constrained. Righter et al. [1] showed that the use of sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) models based on low-FeO*, high-alumina terrestrial basalts to martian basalts leads to significant error. However, experiments on high-FeO* basalts remain limited to ≤0.8 GPa [1], although the onset of melting in the martian mantle may take place at 250-400 km depth (3-5 GPa) [2]. To constrain SCSS of martian magmas at mantle conditions, we simulated basalt-sulfide melt equilibria using two synthesized meteorite compositions, i.e., Yamato980459 (FeO* ˜17 wt.%; Al2O3 ˜6 wt.%) and NWA2990 (FeO* ˜16 wt.%; Al2O3 ˜9 wt.%) in both anhydrous and hydrous conditions at 1-3 GPa and 1500-1700 °C. Experiments were conducted in graphite capsules, using an end-loaded piston cylinder device. Sulfur contents of sulfide melt-saturated experimental quenched basalts were determined using electron microprobe. Our experimental results show that SCSS decreases with increasing pressure and increases with increasing temperature and melt hydration. Based on our experimental SCSS and those from previous low-pressure experiments on high-FeO* martian basalts [2], we developed a new parameterization to predict martian basalt SCSS as a function of depth, temperature, and melt composition. Our model suggests that at the conditions of last equilibration with the sulfide-saturated mantle [2], martian basalts may contain as high as 3500-4700 ppm S and thus S-rich gases might have caused the

  17. Shock Experiments on Basalt - Ferric Sulfate Mixes at 21 GPa & 49 GPa and their Relevance to Martian Meteorite Impact Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Ross, D. K.; See, T. H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Sutton, S.; Asimow, P.

    2013-01-01

    Large abundance of Martian atmospheric gases and neutron-induced isotopic excesses as well as Rb-Sr isotopic variations determined in some impact glasses in basaltic shergottites (e.g., Shergotty #DBS, Zagami #H1 and EET79001 #27, #8 and #104) provide definitive evidence for the occurrence of a Martian regolith component in their constituent mineral assemblages. Some of these glass-es, known as gas-rich impact-melts (GRIM), contain numerous micron-sized iron sulfide blebs along with minor amounts of iron sulfate particulates. As these GRIM glasses contain a Martian regolith component and as iron sulfates (but not sulfides) are found to occur abundantly on the Mars surface, we suggested that the sulfide blebs in GRIMs were likely generated by shock-reduction of the parental iron sulfate bearing regolith material that had been incorporated into the cavities/crevices of basaltic host rock prior to the impact event on Mars. To test whether the sulfates could be reduced to sulfides by impact shock, we carried out laboratory shock experiments on a basalt plus ferric sulfate mixture at 49 GPa at the Caltech Shock Wave Laboratory and at 21 GPa at Johnson Space Center (JSC) Experimental Impact Laboratory. The experimental details and the preliminary results for the Caltech 49 GPa experiment were presented at LPSC last year. Here, we report the results for the 21 GPa experiment at JSC and compare these results to obtain further insight into the mechanism of the bleb formation in the GRIM glasses.

  18. Contemporary Inuit Traditional Beliefs Concerning Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardon, A. A.; Mardon, E. G.; Williams, J. S.

    1992-07-01

    Inuit religious mythology and the importance of meteorites as "messages" from the Creator of all things is only now being recognized. Field investigations near Resolute, Cornwallis Island in the high Canadian Arctic in 1988 are the bases for this paper. Through interpreters, several elders of the local Inuit described in detail the Inuit belief, recognition, and wonder at the falling meteors & meteorites during the long Polar Night and Polar Day. Such events are passed on in the oral tradition from generation to generation by the elders and especially those elders who fulfill the shamanistic roles. The Inuit have come across rocks that they immediately recognize as not being "natural" and in the cases of a fall that was observed and the rock recovered the meteorite is kept either on the person or in some hidden niche known only to that person. In one story recounted a meteorite fell and was recovered at the birth of one very old elder and the belief was that if the rock was somehow damaged or taken from his possession he would die. Some indirect indication also was conveyed that the discovery and possession of meteorites allow shaman to have "supernatural" power. This belief in the supernatural power of meteorites can be seen historically in many societies, including Islam and the "black rock" (Kaaba) of Mecca. It should also be noted, however, that metallic meteorites were clearly once the major source of iron for Eskimo society as is indicated from the recovery of meteoritical iron arrow heads and harpoon heads from excavated pre-Viking contact sites. The one evident thing that became clear to the author is that the Inuit distinctly believe that these meteorites are religious objects of the highest order and it brings into question the current academic practice of sending meteorites south to research institutes. Any seeming conflict with the traditional use of meteoric iron is more apparent than real--the animals, the hunt, and the act of survival--all being

  19. Interstellar organic matter in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Epstein, S.

    1983-01-01

    Deuterium-enriched hydrogen is present in organic matter in such meteorites as noncarbonaceous chondrites. The majority of the unequilibrated primitive meteorites contain hydrogen whose D/H ratios are greater than 0.0003, requiring enrichment (relative to cosmic hydrogen) by isotope exchange reactions taking place below 150 K. The D/H values presented are the lower limits for the organic compounds derived from interstellar molecules, since all processes subsequent to their formation, including terrestrial contamination, decrease their D/H ratios. In contrast, the D/H ratios of hydrogen associated with hydrated silicates are relatively uniform for the meteorites analyzed. The C-13/C-12 ratios of organic matter, irrespective of D/H ratio, lie well within those observed for the earth. Present findings suggest that other interstellar material, in addition to organic matter, is preserved and is present in high D/H ratio meteorites.

  20. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter. Volume 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satterwhite, Cecilia (Editor); Lindstrom, Marilyn (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This Newsletter Contains Classifications of 143 New Meteorites from the 1997 ANSMET Collection. Descriptions are given for 6 meteorites;2 eucrites, and 4 ordinary chondrites. We don't expect much excitement from the rest of the 1997 collection. JSC has examined another 100 meteorites to send to the Smithsonian for classification and they appear to be more of the same LL5 shower. However, past experience tells us that there will be some treasures hidden in the remaining samples. Hope rings eternal, but we can't wait to see the 1998 collection described below.

  1. Curation and Allocation of the New Antarctic Nakhlite, MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, K. M.; Righter, K.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Schwarz, C.; Robinson, P.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004, the ANSMET reconnaissance field team (Fig. 1) working in the Miller Range of the Transantarctic Mountains discovered a 715 g achondrite that was instantly recognized as unique. Named MIL03346, initial processing (NASA Johnson Space Center or JSC) and classification (Smithsonian Institution or SI) revealed this achondrite to be a nakhlite (Fig. 2). MIL03346 is the seventh nakhlite recognized in world collections [2], the third nakhlite returned from Antartica, and the first nakhlite in the US Antarctic collection (Table 1). The following is a summary of the steps taken in the processing and allocating of MIL 03346 and some comparisons to some other lunar and martian meteorites processed and allocated at JSC.

  2. Kinetic Damage from Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W.; Brown, P.; Matney, M.

    2017-01-01

    Comparing the natural meteorite flux at the Earth's surface to that of space debris, re-entering debris is 2 orders of magnitude less of a kinetic hazard at all but the very largest (and therefore rarest) sizes compared to natural impactors. Debris re-entries over several metric tonnes are roughly as frequent as natural impactors, but the survival fraction is expected to be much higher. Kinetic hazards from meteorites are very small, with only one recorded (indirect) injury reported. We expect fatalities to be even more rare, on the order of one person killed per several millennia. That several reports exist of small fragments/sand hitting people during meteorite falls is consistent with our prediction that this should occur every decade or so.

  3. Kinetic Damage from Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W.; Matney, M.; Brown, P.

    2017-01-01

    Comparing the natural meteorite flux at the Earth's surface to that of space debris, reentering debris is approx. 2 orders of magnitude less of a kinetic hazard at all but the very largest (and therefore rarest) sizes compared to natural impactors. Debris re-entries over several metric tonnes are roughly as frequent as natural impactors, but the survival fraction is expected to be much higher. Kinetic hazards from meteorites are very small, with only one recorded (indirect) injury reported. We expect fatalities to be even more rare, on the order of one person killed per several millennia. That several reports exist of small fragments/sand hitting people during meteorite falls is consistent with our prediction that this should occur every decade or so.

  4. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites: Implications for concentration mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorites differ from meteorites fallen in other places in their mean terrestrial ages. Boeckl estimated the terrestrial half-life for the disintegration of stone meteorites by weathering under the climatic conditions of the Western United States to be about 3600 years. Antarctic meteorites, however, have terrestrial ages up to 70000 years, indicating larger weathering half-lives. The terrestrial ages of meteorites are determined by their concentration of cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides with suitable half-lives (C-14, Al-26, and Cl-36). These radionuclides have yielded reliable ages for the Antarctic meteorites. The distribution of terrestrial ages of Allan Hills and Yamato meteorites are examined.

  5. Catching Constrains on the Parent Body Genesis of Mesosiderites and a Possible Link to HED (Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite) Meteorites - A New Hope?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baecker, B.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Mesosiderites (MES) are a group of enigmatic stony-iron meteorites exhibiting fragmental matrix breccias and irregular textures; e.g. [1-3]. Mesosiderites contain roughly equal volumes metal (Fe-Ni) and silicates often intimately mixed together (Fig.1). The silicates mostly consist of basaltic, gabbroic, and pyroxenitic components, and appear similar to eucrites and howardites; [4-8]. But unlike HEDs - and other differentiated parent body meteorite groups e.g. ureilites - mesosiderites contain high metal abundances. Several studies have been published to reveal the processes leading to the formation of mesosiderites and attempt to classifiy them [1], [2], [10-15]. Because the silicate inclusions in mesosiderites are often strongly metamorphosed after formation, it is difficult to assess the origin of the silicates and implications for the differentiation process of their parent body [15-17]. Several workers have advanced a formation hypothesis for the mesosiderites where an impact between differentiated bodies occurred prior to 4.47 Ga ago (e.g. [13,18], which could explain the possible incomplete dispersal of the colliding bodies due to their low cosmic ray exposure ages and their special thermal history. However, [13] discuss and favor the model for formation of mesosiderites with the collision of two differentiated bodies, along with disruption events and gravitational re-assembly. The mesosiderites have numerous gabbroid melt clasts with anomalous rare-earth- element (REE) - especially positive Eu - values [19, 20]. HEDs do not show the same. However, the heating mechanisms of both mesosiderites and HED's are puzzling. Mesosiderites are remarkable, they consist of a mix of basalts, which are only found on or near planetary surfaces and undifferentiated metal [1,2]. The probable model is that an asteroid containing a metallic magma impacted onto a second asteroid covered with basalt [18,21]. The mix was then buried under an insulating regolith, and cooled slowly

  6. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 96, September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weisberg, M.K.; Smith, C.; Benedix, G.; Herd, C.D.K.; Righter, K.; Haack, H.; Yamaguchi, A.; Chennaoui, Aoudjehane H.; Grossman, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    The Meteoritical Bulletin No. 96 contains a total of 1590 newly approved meteorite names with their relevant data. These include 12 from specific locations within Africa, 76 from northwest Africa, 9 from the Americas, 13 from Asia, 1 from Australia, 2 from Europe, 950 from Antarctica recovered by the Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE), and 527 from the American Antarctic program (ANSMET). Among these meteorites are 4 falls, Almahata Sitta (Sudan), Sulagiri (India), Ash Creek (United States), and Maribo (Denmark). Almahata Sitta is an anomalous ureilite and is debris from asteroid 2008 TC3 and Maribo is a CM2 chondrite. Other highlights include a lunar meteorite, a CM1 chondrite, and an anomalous IVA iron. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2009.

  7. Thermoluminescence of meteorites and their orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The thermoluminescence levels of 45 ordinary chondrites are measured in order to provide information on the orbital characteristics of the meteorites before impact. Glow curves of the photon emission response of powdered samples of the meteorites to temperatures up to 550 C in the natural state and following irradiation by a laboratory test dose of 110,000 rad were obtained as functions of terrestrial age and compared to those of samples of the Pribram, Lost City and Innisfree meteorites, for which accurate orbital data is available. The thermoluminescence levels in 40 out of 42 meteorites are found to be similar to those of the three control samples, indicating that the vast majority of ordinary chondrites that survive atmospheric entry have perihelia in the range 0.8-1 AU. Of the remaining two, Farmville is observed to exhibit an unusually large gradient in thermoluminescence levels with sample depth, which may be a result of a temperature gradient arising in a slowly rotating meteorite. Finally, the thermoluminescence measured in the Malakal meteorite is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than control samples, which is best explained by thermal draining by solar heating in an orbit with a perihelion distance of 0.5 to 0.6 AU.

  8. The organic inventory of primitive meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples that provide crucial information about the solar system genesis and evolution. This class of meteorites has also a rich organic inventory, which may have contributed the first prebiotic building blocks of life to the early Earth. We have studied the soluble organic inventory of several CR and CM meteorites, using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Our target organic molecules include amino acids, nucleobases and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), among others. CR chondrites contain the highest amino acids concentration ever detected in a meteorite. The degree of aqueous alteration amongst this class of meteorites seems to be responsible for the amino acid distribution. Pioneering compound-specific carbon isotope measurements of nucleobases present in carbonaceous chondrites show that these compounds have a non-terrestrial origin. This suggests that components of the ge-netic code may have had a crucial role in life's origin. Investigating the abundances, distribution and isotopic composition of organic molecules in primitive meteorites significantly improves our knowledge of the chemistry of the early solar system, and the resources available for the first living organisms on Earth.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous-chondrite Inclusions in the Kapoeta Meteorite: Discovery of Nanodiamonds with New Spectral Features and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Yassir A.; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Varela, Maria E.

    2018-03-01

    We report the finding of nanodiamonds, coexisting with amorphous carbon, in carbonaceous-chondrite (CC) material from the Kapoeta achondritic meteorite by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. In the C–H stretching region (3100–2600 cm‑1), the FTIR spectrum of the Kapoeta CC material (KBr pellet) shows bands attributable to aliphatic CH2 and CH3 groups, and is very similar to IR spectra of organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites and the diffuse interstellar medium. Nanodiamonds, as evidenced by micro-Raman spectroscopy, were found in a dark region (∼400 μm in size) in the KBr pellet. Micro-FTIR spectra collected from this region are dramatically different from the KBr-pellet spectrum, and their C–H stretching region is dominated by a strong and broad absorption band centered at ∼2886 cm‑1 (3.47 μm), very similar to that observed in IR absorption spectra of hydrocarbon dust in dense interstellar clouds. Micro-FTIR spectroscopy also indicates the presence of an aldehyde and a nitrile, and both of the molecules are ubiquitous in dense interstellar clouds. In addition, IR peaks in the 1500–800 cm‑1 region are also observed, which may be attributed to different levels of nitrogen aggregation in diamonds. This is the first evidence for the presence of the 3.47 μm interstellar IR band in meteorites. Our results further support the assignment of this band to tertiary CH groups on the surfaces of nanodiamonds. The presence of the above interstellar bands and the absence of shock features in the Kapoeta nanodiamonds, as indicated by Raman spectroscopy, suggest formation by a nebular-condensation process similar to chemical-vapor deposition.

  10. A new analysis of Monturaqui Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniansky, S.; Molnár, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Monturaqui meteorite crater, located in the Andes Mountains, is known to host corroded iron meteorites (Koch and Buchwald, 1994), of probable IAB type. Over three hundred suspicious rocks with an exterior appearance were collected during the two expeditions to Monturaqui crater. A sample has been analyzed in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Canada. The analyses support the conclusion that the Monturaqui rocks are corroded iron meteorites.

  11. The Virtual Museum for Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Meteorites play a fundamental role in education and outreach, as these samples of extraterrestrial materials are very valuable tools to promote the public's interest in Astronomy and Planetary Sciences. Thus, for instance, meteorite exhibitions reveal the interest and fascination of students, educators and even researchers for these peculiar rocks and how these can provide information to explain many fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of our Solar System. However, despite the efforts of private collectors, museums and other institutions to organize meteorite exhibitions, the reach of these is usually limited. But this issue can be addressed thanks to new technologies related to the Internet. In fact we can take advantage of HTML and related technologies to overcome local boundaries and open the possibility of offering these exhibitions for a global audience. With this aim a Virtual Museum for Meteorites has been created and a description of this web-based tool is given here.

  12. Cleaning a Martian Meteoritean Meteorite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-02-13

    A slice of a meteorite scientists have determined came from Mars placed inside an oxygen plasma cleaner, which removes organics from the outside of surfaces. This slice will likely be used here on Earth for testing a laser instrument for NASA's Mars 2020 rover; a separate slice will go to Mars on the rover. Martian meteorites are believed to be the result of impacts to the Red Planet's surface, resulting in rock being blasted into the atmosphere. After traveling through space for eons, some of these rocks entered Earth's atmosphere. Scientists determine whether they are true Martian meteorites based on their rock and noble gas chemistry and mineralogy. The gases trapped in these meteorites bear the unique fingerprint of the Martian atmosphere, as recorded by NASA's Viking mission in 1976. The rock types also show clear signs of igneous processing not possible on smaller bodies, such as asteroids. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22247

  13. Amino acids in the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based amino acid analysis of a Tagish Lake meteorite sample recovered 3 months after the meteorite fell to Earth have revealed that the amino acid composition of Tagish Lake is strikingly different from that of the CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites. We found that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains only trace levels of amino acids (total abundance = 880 ppb), which is much lower than the total abundance of amino acids in the CI Orgueil (4100 ppb) and the CM Murchison (16 900 ppb). Because most of the same amino acids found in the Tagish Lake meteorite are also present in the Tagish Lake ice melt water, we conclude that the amino acids detected in the meteorite are terrestrial contamination. We found that the exposure of a sample of Murchison to cold water lead to a substantial reduction over a period of several weeks in the amount of amino acids that are not strongly bound to the meteorite matrix. However, strongly bound amino acids that are extracted by direct HCl hydrolysis are not affected by the leaching process. Thus even if there had been leaching of amino acids from our Tagish Lake meteorite sample during its 3 month residence in Tagish Lake ice and melt water, a Murchison type abundance of endogenous amino acids in the meteorite would have still been readily detectable. The low amino acid content of Tagish Lake indicates that this meteorite originated fiom a different type of parent body than the CM and CI chondrites. The parent body was apparently devoid of the reagents such as aldehyldes/ketones, HCN and ammonia needed for the effective abiotic synthesis of amino acids. Based on reflectance spectral measurements, Tagish Lake has been associated with P- or D-type asteroids. If the Tagish Lake meteorite was indeed derived fiom these types of parent bodies, our understanding of these primitive asteroids needs to be reevaluated with respect to their potential inventory of biologically important organic compounds.

  14. Enstatite Meteorites and the Original Heterogeneity of Mn-53 Distribution in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, Guenter W.

    1999-01-01

    We have shown earlier that the relative abundance of radiogenic Cr-53 in bulk ordinary chondrites (approximately 0.48 epsilon) is clearly different from that in the earth-moon system (0 epsilon). The SNC parent body (Mars) is characterized by an intermediate Cr-53 excess (approximately 0.23 epsilon). We have also shown that the Mn-Cr systematics of the howardite-eucrite-diogenite parent body (HED PB, the asteroid Vesta) is consistent with the chondritic Mn/Cr ratio in the bulk HED PB and that it has a Cr-53 excess of approximately 0.5 epsilon units which is within error the same as that of chondrites. It appears that the excesses of Cr-53 in these planets are a function of their present heliocentric distance. The study of some other meteorite classes (angrites, pallasites, primitive achondrites) has shown that their Mn-CR systematics is consistent with that of the ordinary chondrites. The observed gradient in the radiogenic Cr-53 abundances can be explained by a). an early volatility controlled radial Mn/Cr fractionation in the nebula or b). an original heterogeneity of Mn-53. The first assumption, however, requires the Mn/Cr ratios of the bulk Earth and Mars to be considerably lower than the inferred model Mn/Cr ratios for these two planets. For this reason, we suggested that the observed gradient is due to an original radial Mn-53 heterogeneity in the late nebula.

  15. Measured microwave scattering cross sections of three meteorite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Three meteorite specimens were used in a microwave scattering experiment to determine the scattering cross sections of stony meteorites and iron meteorites in the frequency range from 10 to 14 GHz. The results indicate that the stony meteorites have a microwave scattering cross section that is 30 to 50 percent of their projected optical cross section. Measurements of the iron meteorite scattering were inconclusive because of specimen surface irregularities.

  16. Cosmochemical Studies: Meteorites and their Parent Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.

    2003-01-01

    This a final technical report that focuses on cosmochemical studies of meteorites and their parent asteroids. The topics include: 1) Formation of iron meteorites and other metal rich meteorites; 2) New perspectives on the formation of chondrules; and 3) Consequences of large aerial bursts. Also a list of seven papers that received significant support from this research are included.

  17. Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-03-31

    Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested inmore » single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in

  18. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 93, 2008 March

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Harold C.; Smith, Caroline; Benedix, Gretchen; Folco, Luigi; Righter, Kevin; Zipfel, Jutta; Yamaguchi, Akira; Aoudjehane, Hasnaa Chennaoui

    2008-03-01

    In this edition of the Meteoritical Bulletin, 1443 approved meteorite names with their relevant data are reported, one from a specific location within Africa, 211 from Northwest Africa, 5 from KOREAMET, 598 from the Chinese Antarctic Expedition, 23 from the Americas, 151 from Asia, three from Australia, two from Europe, two from NOVA, and 447 from ANSMET that were not reported in the Meteoritical Bulletin no. 87. Also reported are 4 falls from the Americas. Some highlights of approved meteorites are 10 lunar (including NWA 5000, an 11.528 kg sample), 3 Martian, 4 irons (one from Indonesia), 2 ureilites, 5 mesosiderites, 1 pallasite, 6 brachinites, 3 CV3s, 4 CO3s, 8 CMs, 12 CK3s, and many more. Finally, the Committee on Nomenclature of the Meteoritical Society announces two new names series in North America.

  19. Alteration of Labile Trace Element Concentrations in Antarctic Meteorites by Weathering: A Five-Year Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.-S.; Xiao, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1992-07-01

    Cl- normalized weight ratio of 0.585+-0.069. Other elements--even Rb, which should be easily transported in a phyllosilicate exposed to water--show no evidence for gain or loss in Antarctica. This is true also for 39 other Antarctic C2-6 chondrites [6]; 3 additional Cl-2 chondrites thermally metamorphosed in their parent bodies [7]; and lunar meteorites studied by us and others. Hydration effects are absent in these meteorites. 3. Eucrites exhibiting evidence for Ce transport: A pair of eucrite clast samples (EET 87503,23 interior and exterior), was previously studied by INAA yield REE data suggesting addition of LREE (except Ce) to the interior during Antarctic residence (Mittlefehldt, personal communication). The exterior/interior ratio for Ce, 1.1, is the same as the mean value for our RNAA trace element suite, 1.1+-0.5. Despite the large uncertainty of this ratio (reflecting the normally heterogeneous distribution of labile elements in eucrites--including falls [8]), results for EET 87503,23 are consistent with the interpretation that our suite of labile trace elements is unaffected by the process that affected REE other than Ce. Our elements are probably dispersed among many host sites, rather than being sited in a single host, like whitlockite. More RNAA measurements of additional eucrite pairs should be done to confirm this result. Further, a putative C3 clast exhibits no evidence for terrestrial alteration of RNAA elements, saponitic matrix, etc. even though REE have apparently been leached from basalts in its host eucrite, LEW 85300 [5]. After five years, numerous investigations confirm meteorite population differences consistent with the RNAA results. While Antarctic processes may have affected REE contents in some eucrites, at present no evidence exists for labile trace element transport into/out of interiors of meteorites of weathering types A to B. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, so continued vigilance remains necessary. Research

  20. The breakup of a meteorite parent body and the delivery of meteorites to earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Whether many of the 10,000 meteorites collected in the Antarctic are unlike those falling elsewhere is contentious. The Antarctic H chondrites, one of the major classes of stony meteorites, include a number of individuals with higher induced thermoluminescence peak temperatures than observed among non-Antarctic H chondrites. The proportion of such individuals decreases with the mean terrestrial age of the meteorites at the various ice fields. These H chondrites have cosmic-ray exposure ages of about 8 million years, experienced little cosmic-ray shielding, and suffered rapid postmetamorphic cooling. Breakup of the H chondrite parent body, 8 million years ago, may have produced two types of material with different size distributions and thermal histories. The smaller objects reached earth more rapidly through more rapid orbital evolution.

  1. Meteorite Material Model for Structural Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.; Carlozzi, A. A.; Karajeh, Z. S.; Bryson, K. L.

    2017-07-01

    In order to prepare material models for the entire family of asteroids, meteorite units are developed for ordinary chondrites. The meteorite unit is a representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, cracks and matrix composition.

  2. The Old Woman, California, IIAB iron meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Howard; Clarke, Roy S.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Corrigan, Catherine M.

    2012-05-01

    The Old Woman meteorite, discovered in March 1976 by two prospectors searching for a fabled lost Spanish gold mine in mountains ˜270 km east of Los Angeles, has achieved the status of a legend among meteorite hunters and collectors. The question of the ownership of the 2753 kg group IIAB meteorite, the second largest ever found in the United States (34°28'N, 115°14'W), gave rise to disputes involving the finders, the Bureau of Land Management, the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, the State of California, the California members of the U.S. Congress, various museums in California, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Department of Justice. Ultimately, ownership of the meteorite was transferred to the Smithsonian under the powers of the 1906 Antiquities Act, a ruling upheld in a U.S. District Court and a U.S. Court of Appeals. After additional debate, the Smithsonian removed a large cut for study and curation, and for disbursement of specimens to qualified researchers. The main mass was then returned to California on long-term loan to the Bureau of Land Management's Desert Discovery Center in Barstow. The Old Woman meteorite litigation served as an important test case for the ownership and control of meteorites found on federal lands. The Old Woman meteorite appears to be structurally unique in containing both hexahedral and coarsest octahedral structures in the same mass, unique oriented schreibersites within hexahedral areas, and polycrystalline parent austenite crystals. These structures suggest that different portions of the meteorite may have transformed via different mechanisms upon subsolidus cooling, making the large slices of Old Woman promising targets for future research.

  3. Concordant Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd Ages for NWA 1460: A 340 Ma Old Basaltic Shergottite Related to Lherzolitic Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages reported by [1] for the NWA 1460 basaltic shergottite are refined to 336+/-14 Ma and 345+/-21 Ma, respectively. These concordant ages are interpreted as dating a lava flow on the Martian surface. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the lherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. We also examine the suggestion that generally "young" ages for other Martian meteorites should be reinterpreted in light of Pb-207/Pb-206 - Pb-204/Pb-206 isotopic systematics [2]. Published U-Pb isotopic data for nakhlites are consistent with ages of approx.1.36 Ga. The UPb isotopic systematics of some Martian shergottites and lherzolites that have been suggested to be approx.4 Ga old [2] are complex. We nevertheless suggest the data are consistent with crystallization ages of approx.173 Ma when variations in the composition of in situ initial Pb as well as extraneous Pb components are considered.

  4. Possible solar noble-gas component in Hawaiian basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    THE noble-gas elemental and isotopic composition in the Earth is significantly different from that of the present atmosphere, and provides an important clue to the origin and history of the Earth and its atmosphere. Possible candidates for the noble-gas composition of the primordial Earth include a solar-like component, a planetary-like component (as observed in primitive meteorites) and a component similar in composition to the present atmosphere. In an attempt to identify the contributions of such components, we have measured isotope ratios of helium and neon in fresh basaltic glasses dredged from Loihi seamount and the East Rift Zone of Kilauea1-3. We find a systematic enrichment in 20Ne and 21Ne relative to 22Ne, compared with atmospheric neon. The helium and neon isotope signatures observed in our samples can be explained by mixing of solar, present atmospheric, radiogenic and nucleogenic components. These data suggest that the noble-gas isotopic composition of the mantle source of the Hawaiian plume is different from that of the present atmosphere, and that it includes a significant solar-like component. We infer that this component was acquired during the formation of the Earth.

  5. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Volume 8, Number 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Requests for samples are welcomed from research scientists of all countries, regardless of their current state of funding for meteorite studies. All sample requests will be reviewed by the Meteorite Working Group (MWG), a peer-review committee that guides the collection, curation, allocation, and distribution of the U.S. Antarctic meteorites. Issurance of samples does not imply a commitment by any agency to fund the proposed research. Requests for financial support must be submitted separately to the appropriate funding agencies. As a matter of policy, U.S. Antarctic meteorites are the property of the National Science Foundation and all allocations are subject to recall.

  6. Development of a Digital Meteorite Identification Program at University of New Mexico (UNM) (Institute of Meteoritics) and Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gakin, R.; Lewis, K.; Simmons, J.; Gchachu, K.; Karner, J. M.; Newsom, H. E.; Jones, R. H.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the origin and chemical composition of suspect extra terrestrial specimens has lead to meteorite identification research programs. Such programs, like the University of New Mexico-Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute partnership, are being inundated with many non-meteorites (meteor wrongs) sent in by interested individuals from all over the world. This meteorite identification program developed a spreadsheet that aids in identifying the types of minerals in a sample for physical properties, possible meteorite characteristics, minerals and rock properties, and possible man made characteristics. Samples that show meteorite distinctiveness are further analyzed via the Scanning Electron Microprobe (SEM).

  7. Crystal Stratigraphy of Two Basalts from Apollo 16: Unique Crystallization of Picritic Basalt 606063,10-16 and Very-Low-Titanium Basalt 65703,9-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Neal, C. R.; Stevens, R. E.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical survey of Apollo 16 regolith fragments found five basaltic samples from among hundreds of 2-4 mm regolith fragments of the Apollo 16 site. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalt (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria (approx. 200 km). Identification of basaltic samples at the site not from the ancient regolith breccia indicates input of material via lateral transport by post-basin impacts. The presence of basaltic rocklets and glass at the site is not unprecedented and is required to satisfy mass-balance constraints of regolith compositions. However, preliminary characterization of olivine and plagioclase crystal size distributions indicated the sample textures were distinct from other known mare basalts, and instead had affinities to impact melt textures. Impact melt textures can appear qualitatively similar to pristine basalts, and quantitative analysis is required to distinguish between the two in thin section. The crystal stratigraphy method is a powerful tool in studying of igneous systems, utilizing geochemical analyses across minerals and textural analyses of phases. In particular, trace element signatures can aid in determining the ultimate origin of these samples and variations document subtle changes occurring during their petrogenesis.

  8. The Chaunskij Meteorite: Mineralogical, Chemical and Isotope Data, Classification and Proposed Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petaev, M. I.; Zaslavskaya, N. I.; Clarke, R. S., Jr.; Olsen, E. J.; Jarosewich, E.; Kononkova, N. N.; Holmberg, B. B.; Davis, A. M.; Ustinov, V. I.; Wood, J. A.

    1992-07-01

    The 1990 g Chaunskij meteorite was found in 1985 and classified as an anomalous ungrouped iron (Meteoritical Bulletin, 1988). The meteorite contains about 10 vol% mono- and polymineralic troilite-phosphate-silicate inclusions, microns to centimeters in size. STRUCTURE AND MINERALOGY. Chaunskij metal displays a mesosiderite structure with unusually high levels of shock damage in the kamacite. Tetrataenite borders 5-10 mm wide enclose large regions of cloudy taenite, which, in turn, sometimes enclose martensitic regions. Much of the tetrataenite has apparently been disordered by shock. Schreibersite occurs as occasional very small precipitates at tetrataenite borders, and infrequently as larger masses at grain boundaries. Shock-affected troilite in moderately large globules (up to several mm) and rounded phosphate inclusions are erratically distributed. Silicate areas of the polymineralic inclusions are, as a rule, irregular in shape. In larger inclusions, these areas are usually surrounded by phosphate rims. The groundmass of the polymineralic inclusions is a fine- grained intergrowth of low-Ca pyroxene (mg' = 28-31), whitlockite, and cordierite (mg' = 83-87), with rare large (50-100 mm) porphyritic grains of the first two minerals. Porphyritic pyroxene grain edges are generally rough. Minor minerals in the silicate inclusions are SiO2, kamacite, taenite, troilite, chromite, ilmenite, rutile, and small relict grains of plagioclase (An 83-95). The chromite and ilmenite vary in MgO, MnO, and Al2O3 contents. Rare grains of pyrophanite, alabandite, native copper, stanfieldite, and of a graftonite-farringtonite mineral are also observed in the meteorite. BULK CHEMISTRY. Bulk chemical data for the silicate-rich portion of one polymineralic inclusion (obtained by defocused beam analyses; Zaslavskaya et al.,1991) suggest a differentiated nature for the inclusions. High Al/Si (0.34) and Mn/Fe (0.029) ratios indicate a basalt-like precursor similar to HED and mesosiderite

  9. Experimental Study into the Stability of Whitlockite in Basaltic Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Barnes, J. J.; Srinivasan, P.; Whitson, E. S.; Vander Kaaden, K. E.; Boyce, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    latter treatment resulted in the dehydrogenation of whitlockite to form merrillite. The presence of merrillite vs. whitlockite was widely thought to serve as an indication that magmas were anhydrous [e.g., 6-7]. However, McCubbin et al., [8] determined that merrillite in the martian meteorite Shergotty had no discernible whitlockite component despite its coexistence with OH-rich apatite. Consequently, McCubbin et al., (2014) speculated that the absence of a whitlockite component in Shergotty merrillite and other planetary merrillites may be a consequence of the limited thermal stability of H in whitlockite (stable only at T less than1050degC), which would prohibit merrillite-whitlockite solid-solution at high temperatures. In the present study, we have aimed to test this hypothesis experimentally by examining the stability of whitlockite in basaltic magmas at 1.2 GPa and a temperature range of -1000- 1300degC.

  10. Coatings on Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Coatings on Gusev Plains Basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings on Gusev Plains basalt have been observed and may contain hematite and nanophase Fe-oxides along with enrichments in P, S, Cl, and K relative to the underlying rock. The Gusev coatings may be derived from the dissolution of adhering soil and/or parent rock along with the addition of S and Cl from outside sources. Transient water for dissolution could be sourced from melting snow during periods of high obliquity, acid fog, and/or ground water (Haskin et al., 2005). Coatings on basalt in the hyper-arid (less than 2mm y(sup -1)) Atacama Desert may assist in understanding the chemistry, mineralogy and formation mechanisms of the Gusev basalt coatings. The Atacama Desert climate is proposed to be analogous to a paleo-Mars climate that was characterized by limited aqueous activity when the Gusev coatings could have formed. The objectives of this work are to (i) determine the chemical nature and extent of surface coatings on Atacama Desert basalt, and (ii) assess coating formation mechanisms in the Atacama Desert. Preliminary backscattered electron imaging of Atacama basalt thin-sections indicated that the coatings are as thick as 20 m. The boundary between the coating and the basalt labradorite, ilmenite, and augite grains was abrupt indicating that the basalt minerals underwent no chemical dissolution. The Atacama coatings have been added to the basalt instead of being derived from basalt chemical weathering. Semi-quantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy shows the coatings to be chemically homogeneous. The coating is depleted in Ca (0.9 wt% CaO) and enriched in K (1.3 wt.% K2O) and Si (69.1 wt.% SiO2) relative to the augite and labradorite grains. A dust source enriched in Si (e.g., poorly crystalline silica) and K and depleted in Ca appears to have been added to the basalt surface. Unlike the Gusev coatings, no P, S, and Cl enrichment was observed. However, Fe (3.2 wt.% FeO) was present in the Atacama coatings suggesting the present of Fe

  11. Meteorites and Microbes: Meteorite Collection and Ice Sampling at Patriot Hills, Thiel Mountains, and South Pole, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipiera, Paul P.; Hoover, Richard B.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the Antarctica 2000 Expedition, sponsored by the Planetary Studies Foundation, meteorites and ice microbiota were collected from the Patriot Hills, and Thiel Mountains of Antarctica and snow samples were at the South Pole. Psychrophilic and psychrotrophic microbiota were obtained from blue ice, cryoconite and ice-bubble systems. Twenty frozen meteorites were collected using aseptic techniques from the blue ice fields near the Moulton Escarpment of the Thiel Mountains (85 S, 94 W) and from the Morris Moraine of the Patriot Hills (80 S, 81 W) Ellsworth Mountains. These ice and meteorite samples are of potential significance to Astrobiology. They may help refine chemical and morphological biomarkers and refine characteristics of microbial life in one of the harshest environments on Earth. We discuss the Antarctica 2000 Expedition and provide preliminary results of the investigation of the meteorites and ice microbiota recovered.

  12. Meteorite and meteoroid: New comprehensive definitions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, A.E.; Grossman, J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Meteorites have traditionally been defined as solid objects that have fallen to Earth from space. This definition, however, is no longer adequate. In recent decades, man-made objects have fallen to Earth from space, meteorites have been identified on the Moon and Mars, and small interplanetary objects have impacted orbiting spacecraft. Taking these facts and other potential complications into consideration, we offer new comprehensive definitions of the terms "meteorite,""meteoroid," and their smaller counterparts: A meteoroid is a 10-??m to 1-m-size natural solid object moving in interplanetary space. A micrometeoroid is a meteoroid 10 ??m to 2 mm in size. A meteorite is a natural, solid object larger than 10 ??m in size, derived from a celestial body, that was transported by natural means from the body on which it formed to a region outside the dominant gravitational influence of that body and that later collided with a natural or artificial body larger than itself (even if it is the same body from which it was launched). Weathering and other secondary processes do not affect an object's status as a meteorite as long as something recognizable remains of its original minerals or structure. An object loses its status as a meteorite if it is incorporated into a larger rock that becomes a meteorite itself. A micrometeorite is a meteorite between 10 ??m and 2 mm in size. Meteorite- "a solid substance or body falling from the high regions of the atmosphere" (Craig 1849); "[a] mass of stone and iron that ha[s] been directly observed to have fallen down to the Earth's surface" (translated from Cohen 1894); "[a] solid bod[y] which came to the earth from space" (Farrington 1915); "A mass of solid matter, too small to be considered an asteroid; either traveling through space as an unattached unit, or having landed on the earth and still retaining its identity" (Nininger 1933); "[a meteoroid] which has reached the surface of the Earth without being vaporized" (1958

  13. What would we miss if we characterized the Moon and Mars with just planetary meteorites, remote mapping, and robotic landers?. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    Exploration of the Moon and planets began with telescopic studies of their surfaces, continued with orbiting spacecraft and robotic landers, and will culminate with manned exploration and sample return. For the Moon and Mars we also have accidental samples provided by impacts on their surfaces, the lunar and martian meteorites. How much would we know about the lunar surface if we only had lunar meteorites, orbital spacecraft, and robotic exploration, and not the Apollo and Luna returned samples? What does this imply for Mars? With martian meteorites and data from Mariner, Viking, and the future Pathfinder missions, how much could we learn about Mars? The basis of most of our detailed knowledge about the Moon is the Apollo samples. They provide ground truth for the remote mapping, timescales for lunar processes, and samples from the lunar interior. The Moon is the foundation of planetary science and the basis for our interpretation of the other planets. Mars is similar to the Moon in that impact and volcanism are the dominant processes, but Mars' surface has also been affected by wind and water, and hence has much more complex surface geology. Future geochemical or mineralogical mapping of Mars' surface should be able to tell us whether the dominant rock types of the ancient southern highlands are basaltic, anorthositic, granitic, or something else, but will not be able to tell us the detailed mineralogy, geochemistry, or age. Without many more martian meteorites or returned samples we will not know the diversity of martian rocks, and therefore will be limited in our ability to model martian geological evolution.

  14. Processes in Early Planetesimals: Evidence from Ureilite Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Downes, H.

    2007-01-01

    Ureilites are primitive ultramafic achondrites composed largely of olivine and pigeonite, with minor augite, carbon, sulphide and metal. They represent very early material in the history of the Solar System and form a bridge between undifferentiated chondrites and fully differentiated asteroids. They show a mixture of chemical characteristics, some of which are considered to be nebula-derived (e.g. a negative correlation between Mg/Fe and Delta O-17 that resembles that of the ordinary chondrites but at lower Delta O-17 values) whereas others have been imposed by asteroidal differentiation. Carbon isotope data show a striking negative correlation of delta C-13 values with mg# in olivine. delta C-13 also correlates positively with Delta O-17, and therefore this isotopic variation was probably also nebula-derived. Thus, oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and Fe-Mg systematics of each monomict ureilite were established before differentiation processes began. Heated by decay of short-lived radioactive isotopes, the ureilite asteroid started to melt. Metal and sulphide would have melted first, forming a Fe-S eutectic liquid, which removed chalcophile elements and incompatible siderophile elements, and basaltic melts that removed Al, Ca and the LREE. Several elements show different abundances and/or correlations with Fo content in olivine, e.g. carbon shows a positive correlation in ferroan ureilites, and a weak or even negative correlation in more magnesian compositions. HSE such as Os and Ir also show different distributions, i.e. ureilites with Fo < 82 have very scattered Os and Ir concentrations, which reach high values, whereas ureilites with Fo > 82 tend to have much less scattered and overall lower Os and Ir abundances. A similar change in elemental behaviour is shown by the Fe-Mn relations in ureilitic olivines: those with Fo contents < 85 show a good negative correlation, whereas those with Fo > 85 show much greater scatter. This suggests that a major change

  15. A New Spinel-Olivine Oxybarometer: Near-Liquidus Partitioning of V between Olivine-Melt, Spinel-Melt, and Spinel-Olivine in Martian Basalt Composition Y980459 as a Function of Oxygen Fugacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Le, L.; Burger, P. V.; Shearer, C. K.; Bell, A. S.; Jones, J.

    2013-01-01

    Our research on valence state partitioning began in 2005 with a review of Cr, Fe, Ti, and V partitioning among crystallographic sites in olivine, pyroxene, and spinel [1]. That paper was followed by several on QUE94201 melt composition and specifically on Cr, V, and Eu partitioning between pyroxene and melt [2-5]. This paper represents the continuation of our examination of the partitioning of multivalent V between olivine, spinel, and melt in martian olivine-phyric basalts of Y980459 composition [6, 7]. Here we introduce a new, potentially powerful oxybarometer, V partitioning between spinel and olivine, which can be used when no melt is preserved in the meteorite. The bulk composition of QUE94201 was ideal for our study of martian pyroxene-phyric basalts and specifically the partitioning between pyroxene-melt for Cr, V, and Eu. Likewise, bulk composition Y980459 is ideal for the study of martian olivine-phyric basalts and specifically for olivine-melt, spinel-melt, and spinel-olivine partitioning of V as a function of oxygen fugacity.

  16. Microfossils of Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopes have been used at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center to investigate freshly fractured interior surfaces of a large number of different types of meteorites. Large, complex, microfossils with clearly recognizable biological affinities have been found embedded in several carbonaceous meteorites. Similar forms were notably absent in all stony and nickel-iron meteorites investigated. The forms encountered are consistent in size and morphology with morphotypes of known genera of Cyanobacteria and microorganisms that are typically encountered in associated benthic prokaryotic mats. Even though many coccoidal and isodiametric filamentous cyanobacteria have a strong morphological convergence with some other spherical and filamentous bacteria and algae, many genera of heteropolar cyanobacteria have distinctive apical and basal regions and cellular differentiation that makes it possible to unambiguously recognize the forms based entirely upon cellular dimensions, filament size and distinctive morphological characteristics. For almost two centuries, these morphological characteristics have historically provided the basis for the systematics and taxonomy of cyanobacteria. This paper presents ESEM and FESEM images of embedded filaments and thick mats found in-situ in the Murchison CM2 and Orgueil cn carbonaceous meteorites. Comparative images are also provided for known genera and species of cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the meteorite filaments typically exhibit dramatic chemical differentiation with distinctive difference between the possible microfossil and the meteorite matrix in the immediate proximity. Chemical differentiation is also observed within these microstructures with many of the permineralized filaments enveloped within electron transparent carbonaceous sheaths. Elemental distributions of

  17. Life on Mars: Evidence from Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Spencer, Lauren; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    New data on martian meteorite 84001 as well as new experimental studies show that thermal or shock decomposition of carbonate, the leading alternative non-biologic explanation for the unusual nanophase magnetite found in this meteorite, cannot explain the chemistry of the actual martian magnetites. This leaves the biogenic explanation as the only remaining viable hypothesis for the origin of these unique magnetites. Additional data from two other martian meteorites show a suite of biomorphs which are nearly identical between meteorites recovered from two widely different terrestrial environments (Egyptian Nile bottomlands and Antarctic ice sheets). This similarity argues against terrestrial processes as the cause of these biomorphs and supports an origin on Mars for these features.

  18. Modeling the Thermal Interactions of Meteorites Below the Antarctic Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, William Jared; Radebaugh, Jani; Stephens, Denise C.; Lorenz, Ralph; Harvey, Ralph; Karner, James

    2017-10-01

    Meteorites with high specific gravities, such as irons, appear to be underrepresented in Antarctic collections over the last 40 years. This underrepresentation is in comparison with observed meteorite falls, which are believed to represent the actual population of meteorites striking Earth. Meteorites on the Antarctic ice sheet absorb solar flux, possibly leading to downward tunneling into the ice, though observations of this in action are very limited. This descent is counteracted by ice sheet flow supporting the meteorites coupled with ablation near mountain margins, which helps to force meteorites towards the surface. Meteorites that both absorb adequate thermal energy and are sufficiently dense may instead reach a shallow equilibrium depth as downward melting overcomes upward forces during the Antarctic summer. Using a pyronometer, we have measured the incoming solar flux at multiple depths in two deep field sites in Antarctica, the Miller Range and Elephant Moraine. We compare these data with laboratory analogues and model the thermal and physical interactions between a variety of meteorites and their surroundings. Our Matlab code model will account for a wide range of parameters used to characterize meteorites in an Antarctic environment. We will present the results of our model along with depth estimates for several types of meteorites. The recovery of an additional population of heavy meteorites would increase our knowledge of the formation and composition of the solar system.

  19. Close-up of a Mars Meteorite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-02-13

    Close-up of a slice of a meteorite scientists have determined came from Mars. This slice will likely be used here on Earth for testing a laser instrument for NASA's Mars 2020 rover; a separate slice will go to Mars on the rover. Martian meteorites are believed to be the result of impacts to the Red Planet's surface, resulting in rock being heaved into the atmosphere. After traveling through space for eons, some of these rocks entered Earth's atmosphere. Scientists determine whether they are true Martian meteorites based on their rock and noble gas chemistry and mineralogy. The gases trapped in these meteorites bear the unique fingerprint of the Martian atmosphere, as recorded by NASA's Viking mission in 1976. The rock types also show clear signs of igneous processing not possible on smaller bodies, such as asteroids. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22246

  20. A Martian Meteorite for Mars 2020

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-02-13

    Rohit Bhartia of NASA's Mars 2020 mission holds a slice of a meteorite scientists have determined came from Mars. This slice will likely be used here on Earth for testing a laser instrument for NASA's Mars 2020 rover; a separate slice will go to Mars on the rover. Martian meteorites are believed to be the result of impacts to the Red Planet's surface, resulting in rock being blasted into the atmosphere. After traveling through space for eons, some of these rocks entered Earth's atmosphere. Scientists determine whether they are true Martian meteorites based on their rock and noble gas chemistry and mineralogy. The gases trapped in these meteorites bear the unique fingerprint of the Martian atmosphere, as recorded by NASA's Viking mission in 1976. The rock types also show clear signs of igneous processing not possible on smaller bodies, such as asteroids. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22245

  1. Mars: Difference Between Lowland and Highland Basalts Confirms A Tendency Observed In Terrestrial and Lunar Basaltic Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    Basalts are very widespread lithology on surfaces of terrestrial planets because their mantles, by general opinion, are predominantly basic in composition. Planetary sur- face unevennesses are often filled with this very fluid under high temperatures ma- terial. Basaltic compositions are however variable and this is helped by a wide iso- morphism of constituent minerals: Na-Ca feldspars and Fe-Mg dark minerals. Ratios between light and dark minerals as well as Fe/Mg ratios in dark minerals play an important role in regulation of basaltic densities. Rock density is a very important factor for constructing tectonic blocks in celestial bodies (Theorem 4, [1]). Angular momenta regulation of different level tectonic blocks in rotating bodies is more effec- tively fulfilled at the crustal level as this level has the longest radius. Thus, composition of crustal basalts is very sensitive to hypsometric (tectonic0 position of certain plan- etary blocks. At Earth oceanic hollows are filled with Fe-rich tholeiites (the deepest Pacific depression is filled with the richest in Fe tholeiites), on continents prevail com- paratively Mg-rich continental basalts. Mare basalts of the Moon are predominantly Fe,Ti-rich. At higher crustal levels appear less dense feldspar-rich, KREEP basalts. This tendency for martian basalts became clear after TES experiment on MGS [2]. The TES data on mineralogy of low-albedo regions show that type1 spectra belong to less dense basic rocks (feldspar 50%, pyroxene 25%) than type2 spectra (feldspar 35%, pyroxene + glass 35%). It means that the highland basaltoids are less dense than the lowland ones. It is interesting that the type1 spectral shape is similar to a spec- trum of the Deccan Traps flood basalts [2]. These continental basalts of the low-lying Indostan subcontinent are known to be relatively Fe-rich and approach the oceanic tholeiites. Global gravity, magnetic, basaltic composition data, available upto now for these bodies: Earth, Moon, Mars

  2. METEORITIC HYDROCARBONS AND EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Anders, E.

    1962-08-29

    A critical discussion is given of the comparison by Nagy Meinschein, and Hennessy of the mass spectra of the hydrocarbons from the distillate of the Orgueil meteorite with the mass spectra of two biogenic materials, butter and sediments. The conclusion of Nagy et al. that biogenic processes occur in the universe beyond the earth, is crfticized on the basis of the following facts: the mass spectra are only superficially similar; contamination is a serious problem at these low concentrations; the meteorite is very porous and hence will absorb considerable amounts of atmospheric constituents; the peak heights are not truly representativemore » of specific compounds; the meteorite contains free suifur, which would dehydrogenate hydrocarbons on heating; etc. (D.L.C.)« less

  3. The Kaidun Meteorite: Where Did It Come From?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Andrei; Zolensky, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Kaidun meteorite, which fell on 3.12.1980 at lat. 15 deg N, long. 48.3 deg E, holds a special place in the world meteorite collection. Kaidun is characterized by an unprecedentedly wide variety of meteorite material in its makeup. The high degree of variability in this meteorite s material is evidenced by the richness of its mineral composition - nearly 60 minerals and mineral phases have been identified in Kaidun, including several never before found in nature, such as florenskiite FeTiP, the first known phosphide of a lithophilic element.

  4. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  5. Flood basalts and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. Jason

    1988-01-01

    There appears to be a correlation between the times of flood basalts and mass-extinction events. There is a correlation of flood basalts and hotspot tracks--flood basalts appear to mark the beginning of a new hotspot. Perhaps there is an initial instability in the mantle that bursts forth as a flood basalt but then becomes a steady trickle that persists for many tens of millions of years. Suppose that flood basalts and not impacts cause the environmental changes that lead to mass-extinctions. This is a very testable hypothesis: it predicts that the ages of the flows should agree exactly with the times of extinctions. The Deccan and K-T ages agree with this hypothesis; An iridium anomaly at extinction boundaries apparently can be explained by a scaled-up eruption of the Hawaiian type; the occurrence of shocked-quartz is more of a problem. However if the flood basalts are all well dated and their ages indeed agree with extinction times, then surely some mechanism to appropriately produce shocked-quartz will be found.

  6. Differentiated meteorites and the components of chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Findings are summarized from research conducted to develop a detailed classification of all kinds of meteorites in an effort to determine the conditions in the solar nebula, the processes that produced chemical fractionations in chondrites and formed chondrules, as well as ascertain the processes that occurred in the parent bodies of differentiated meteorites (which preserve a partial record of the chondritic materials from which they formed). Fractionation patterns within iron meteorite groups are analyzed.

  7. Trace elements in ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Hubbard, N. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the trace elements found in ocean ridge basalts. General assumptions regarding melting behavior, trace element fractionation, and alteration effects are presented. Data on the trace elements are grouped according to refractory lithophile elements, refractory siderophile elements, and volatile metals. Variations in ocean ridge basalt chemistry are noted both for regional and temporal characteristics. Ocean ridge basalts are compared to other terrestrial basalts, such as those having La/Yb ratios greater than those of chondrites, and those having La/Yb ratios less than those of chondrites. It is found that (1) as compared to solar or chondrite ratios, ocean ridge basalts have low ratios of large, highly-charged elements to smaller less highly-charged elements, (2) ocean ridge basalts exhibit low ratios of volatile to nonvolatile elements, and (3) the transition metals Cr through Zn in ocean ridge basalts are not fractionated more than a factor of 2 or 3 from the chondritic abundance ratios.

  8. Combining meteorites and missions to explore Mars.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Timothy J; Corrigan, Catherine M; Herd, Christopher D K

    2011-11-29

    Laboratory studies of meteorites and robotic exploration of Mars reveal scant atmosphere, no evidence of plate tectonics, past evidence for abundant water, and a protracted igneous evolution. Despite indirect hints, direct evidence of a martian origin came with the discovery of trapped atmospheric gases in one meteorite. Since then, the study of martian meteorites and findings from missions have been linked. Although the meteorite source locations are unknown, impact ejection modeling and spectral mapping of Mars suggest derivation from small craters in terrains of Amazonian to Hesperian age. Whereas most martian meteorites are young (< 1.3 Ga), the spread of whole rock isotopic compositions results from crystallization of a magma ocean > 4.5 Ga and formation of enriched and depleted reservoirs. However, the history inferred from martian meteorites conflicts with results from recent Mars missions, calling into doubt whether the igneous histor y inferred from the meteorites is applicable to Mars as a whole. Allan Hills 84001 dates to 4.09 Ga and contains fluid-deposited carbonates. Accompanying debate about the mechanism and temperature of origin of the carbonates came several features suggestive of past microbial life in the carbonates. Although highly disputed, the suggestion spurred interest in habitable extreme environments on Earth and throughout the Solar System. A flotilla of subsequent spacecraft has redefined Mars from a volcanic planet to a hydrologically active planet that may have harbored life. Understanding the history and habitability of Mars depends on understanding the coupling of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface. Sample return that brings back direct evidence from these diverse reservoirs is essential.

  9. New data supporting a Sm-146,147-Nd-142,143 formation interval for the lunar mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Wiesmann, H.; Bansal, B. M.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1994-01-01

    Very small variations in Nd-142 abundance in SNC meteorites lunar basalts, and a terrestrial supracrustal rock, have been attributed to the decay of 103 Ma Sm-146 initially present in basalt source regions in varying abundances as a result of planetary differentiation. We previously interpreted variations in Nd-142 abundances in two Apollo 17 high-Ti basalts, three Apollo 12 low-Ti basalts, and two KREEP basalts as defining an isochron giving a formation interval of approximately 94 Ma for the lunar mantle. Here we report new data for a third Apollo 17 high-Ti basalt, two Apollo 15 low-Ti basalts, the VLT basaltic lunar meteorite A881757 (formerly Asuka 31), basalt-like KREEP impact melt rocks 14310 and 14078, and three terrestrial rock standards. Those lunar samples which were not exposed to large lunar surface thermal neutron fluences yield a revised mantle formation interval of 237 +/- 64 Ma.

  10. Compositions of Three Lunar Meteorites: Meteorite Hills 01210, Northeast Africa 001, and Northwest Africa 3136

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Irving, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on compositions obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis on three new lunar meteorites, MET 01210 (Meteorite Hills, Antarctica; 23 g), NEA 001 (Northeast Africa, Sudan; 262 g), and NWA 3136 (Northwest Africa, Algeria or Morocco; 95 g). As in previous similar studies, we divided our samples into many (8-9) small (approximately 30 mg) subsamples prior to analysis.

  11. X-ray investigations related to the shock history of the Shergotty achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.; Hanss, R.; Serna, C.

    1986-01-01

    The shock stress suffered by naturally shocked materials from the Shergotty achondrite was studied using X-ray diffraction techniques and experimentally shocked augite and enstatite as standards. The Shergotty pyroxenes revealed the formation of continuous diffraction rings, line broadening, preferred orientation of small scale diffraction domains, and other evidence of substantial lattice disorders. As disclosed by the application of Debye-Scherrer techniques, they are hybrids between single crystals and fine-grained random powders. The pyroxene lattice is very resistant to shock damage on smaller scales. While measurable lattice disaggregation and progressive fragmentation occur below 25 GPa, little additional damage is suffered from application of pressures between 30 to 60 GPa, making pressure calibration of naturally shocked pyroxenes via X-ray methods difficult. Powder diffractometer scans on pure maskelynite fractions of Shergotty revealed small amounts of still coherently diffracting plagioclase, which may contribute to the high refractive indices of the diaplectic feldspar glasses of Shergotty.

  12. Magnetic studies on Shergotty and other SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisowski, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a study of basic magnetic properties of meteorites within the SNC group, including the four known shergottites and two nakhlites, are presented. An estimate is made of the strength of the magnetic field which produced the remanent magnetization of the Shergotty meteorite, for the purpose of constraining the choices for the parent body of these SNC meteorites. Remanence measurements in several subsamples of Shergotty and Zagami meteorites reveal a large variation in intensity that does not seem to be related to the abundance of remanence carriers. The other meteorites carry only weak remanence, suggesting weak magnetizing fields as the source of their magnetic signal. A paleointensity experiment on a weakly magnetized subsample of Shergotty revealed a low temperature component of magnetization acquired in a field of 2000 gammas, and a high temperature component reflecting a paleofield strength of between 250 and 1000 gammas. The weak field environment that these meteorites seem to reflect is consistent with either a Martian or asteroidal origin, but inconsistent with a terrestrial origin.

  13. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 81, 1997 July

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 81 lists 181 new meteorites. Noteworthy among these are a new lunar meteorite (Dar al Gani 262), four observed falls (Dong Ujimqin Qi, Galkiv, Mount Tazerzait, and Piplia Kalan), four irons (Albion, Great Sand Sea 003, Hot Springs, and Mont Dieu), two mesosiderites (Dong Ujimqin Qi and Lamont), an acapulcoite (FRO 95029), a eucrite (Piplia Kalan), two probably-paired ureilites (Dar al Gani 164 and 165), an R chondrite (Hammadah al Hamra 119), an ungrouped type-3 chondrite (Hammadah al Hamra 180), a highly unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (Wells, LL3.3), and a variety of carbonaceous and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites from Libya and Antarctica. All italicized abbreviations refer to addresses listed in the appendix. ?? Meteoritical Society, 1997.

  14. Workshop on Meteorites From Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Ludolf (Editor); Annexstad, John O. (Editor); Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The current workshop was organized to address the following points: (1) definition of differences between meteorites from Antarctica, hot deserts, and modern falls; (2) discussion of the causes of these differences; (3) implications of possible different parent populations, infall rates, weathering processes, etc.; (4) collection, curation, and distribution of meteorites; and (5) planning and coordination of future meteorite searches.

  15. The Magnetization of Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, James Herndon

    1974-01-01

    Alternating field demagnetization experiments have been conducted on representative samples of the carbonaceous meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites and ureilites). The results indicate that many, if not all, of these meteorites possess an intense and stable magnetic moment of extraterrestrial origin. Thermomagnetic analyses have been conducted on samples of all known carbonaceous meteorites. In addition to yielding quantitative magnetite estimates, these studies indicate the presence of a thermally unstable component, troilite, which reacts with gaseous oxygen to form magnetite. It is proposed that the magnetite found in some carbonaceous chondrites resulted from the oxidation of troilite during the early history of the solar system. The formation of pyrrhotite is expected as a natural consequence of magnetite formation via this reaction. Consideration is given to the implications of magnetite formation on paleointensity studies.

  16. Angrites: A Volatile-rich Variety of Asteroidal Basalt (Except for Alkalis and Gallium!)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1995-09-01

    Angrites are commonly viewed as extremely volatile-depleted, and a related notion is that they formed by differentiation of a very CAI-rich material [e.g., 1]. Partial melting experiments reportedly reproduce the bulk compositions (although not fassaite-rich mineralogy) of angrites with Allende as starting material [2], but highly CAI-rich parent materials are difficult to reconcile with isotopic and REE data [3,4]. Mittlefehldt and Lindstrom [5] inferred from the low Na/Al ratios of angrites that outgassing, and thus primordial magmatism, was more intense on their parent body than on the eucrite parent asteroid. Of seven elements that (a) have been adequately determined in angrites, and (b) are far more volatile (solar-nebula 50% condensation T [6] = 690-430 K) than the alkalis (1000-910 K), four are enriched, and none is significantly depleted, in average angrite compared to average eucrite or low-Ti mare basalt (Figure). Gallium, which is of intermediate volatility (830 K), is depleted to roughly the same extent as Na and K. Results for A881371 [3] are incomplete (Zn, 6 micrograms/g, is near INAA detection limit), but even based only on AdoR and the two LEW angrites, this pattern seems firmly established. Apparent gas cavities in A881371 [7] also suggest that volatiles are far from uniformly depleted. The only elements known to be depleted, as volatiles, by clearly significant factors in angrites versus eucrites or lunar basalts, are alkalis plus gallium. Besides being moderately volatile, a noteworthy characteristic shared among Ga and alkalis (and not shared with elements such as Br, Se, and Zn) is that these elements probably tend to partition into crustal feldspar during gross differentiation of small (low-pressure) bodies. If gallium + alkalis were depleted by a single process starting from "normal" chondritic material, that process would seem to require selective exposure of a feldspar-enriched region (i.e., crust) to extremely high temperature. Igneous

  17. Combining meteorites and missions to explore Mars

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Timothy J.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory studies of meteorites and robotic exploration of Mars reveal scant atmosphere, no evidence of plate tectonics, past evidence for abundant water, and a protracted igneous evolution. Despite indirect hints, direct evidence of a martian origin came with the discovery of trapped atmospheric gases in one meteorite. Since then, the study of martian meteorites and findings from missions have been linked. Although the meteorite source locations are unknown, impact ejection modeling and spectral mapping of Mars suggest derivation from small craters in terrains of Amazonian to Hesperian age. Whereas most martian meteorites are young (< 1.3 Ga), the spread of whole rock isotopic compositions results from crystallization of a magma ocean > 4.5 Ga and formation of enriched and depleted reservoirs. However, the history inferred from martian meteorites conflicts with results from recent Mars missions, calling into doubt whether the igneous histor y inferred from the meteorites is applicable to Mars as a whole. Allan Hills 84001 dates to 4.09 Ga and contains fluid-deposited carbonates. Accompanying debate about the mechanism and temperature of origin of the carbonates came several features suggestive of past microbial life in the carbonates. Although highly disputed, the suggestion spurred interest in habitable extreme environments on Earth and throughout the Solar System. A flotilla of subsequent spacecraft has redefined Mars from a volcanic planet to a hydrologically active planet that may have harbored life. Understanding the history and habitability of Mars depends on understanding the coupling of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface. Sample return that brings back direct evidence from these diverse reservoirs is essential. PMID:21969535

  18. Magnetic study of meteorites recovered in the Atacama desert (Chile): implications for meteorite paleomagnetism and the stability of hot desert surfaces (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Valenzuela, M.; Demory, F.; Rochette, P.

    2010-12-01

    Hot deserts are one of the large reservoirs of meteorites on Earth (about 25% of total meteorites), and some groups of rare meteorites (Rumuruti chondrites or lunar meteorites for instance). Therefore, the paleomagnetic record of hot desert meteorites is potentially a good source of information about the ancient extraterrestrial magnetic fields. However, meteorites recovered in hot deserts have typical terrestrial residence times (their so-called terrestrial ages) in the order of a few to several tens of kyr. During that time, a desert meteorite is exposed to the geomagnetic field, and is likely to acquire a Viscous Remanent Magnetization (VRM) whose intensity is controlled, among other things, by the stability of the desert surface. Moreover, with increasing terrestrial age, metallic and sulphide phases that are the dominant magnetic minerals in meteorites are oxidized and form potentially magnetic weathering minerals, resulting in the possible destruction of the primary remanence and acquisition of secondary terrestrial chemical remanence (CRM). Therefore, the paleomagnetic study of desert meteorites must take into account these terrestrial processes, in order to isolate the extraterrestrial magnetic record. We report here the paleomagnetic data obtained from 8 ordinary chondrites (3 H- and 5 L-chondrites) collected by our group in the Atacama desert (Chile) and oriented in situ with respect to the geographic north. Optical microscopy found that their weathering grades are W3 (60 - 95 % of metal is replaced by oxi-/hydroxides, 4 samples), W2 (moderate oxidation of metal, 20 - 60 % replaced; 2 samples), and W1 (only minor oxidation, 2 samples). Alternating field demagnetization experiments up to 100 mT found that W1 and W2 samples have a very low coercivity component (< 5 mT) and show unstable demagnetization paths above 10 mT, a behavior similar to that of freshly fallen ordinary chondrites. On the other hand, the more weathered samples (weathering stage W3) have

  19. Weathering of stony meteorites in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Weathering produces undesirable physical, chemical, and isotopic changes that might disturb the records of cosmochemical evolution that are sought in meteorites. Meteorites are physically disintegrated by crack propagation phenomena, including ice riving and secondary mineral riving, and are probably abraded by wind that is laden with ice crystals or dust particles. Chemical weathering proceeds by oxidation, hydration, carbonation, and solution and produces a variety of secondary minerals and mineraloids. Differential weathering under freezing conditions is discussed, as well as, the mineralogy of weathering products. Furthermore, the use of Antarctic alteration of meteorites could be used as an excellent analog for weathering on Mars or on cometary bodies.

  20. Enantiomer Ratios of Meteoritic Sugar Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of soluble organic compounds. Studies of these compounds reveal the Solar System's earliest organic chemistry. Among the classes of organic compounds found in meteorites are keto acids (pyruvic acid, etc.), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (1), amino acids, amides, purines and pyrimidines. The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the most studied for soluble and insoluble organic compounds and organic carbon phases. The majority of (indigenous) meteoritic compounds are racemic, (i.e., their D/L enantiomer ratios are 50:50). However, some of the more unusual (non-protein) amino acids contain slightly more of one enantiomer (usually the L) than the other. This presentation focuses on the enantiomer analyses of three to six-carbon (3C to 6C) meteoritic sugar acids. The molecular and enantiomer analysis of corresponding sugar alcohols will also be discussed. Detailed analytical procedures for sugar-acid enantiomers have been described. Results of several meteorite analyses show that glyceric acid is consistently racemic (or nearly so) as expected of non-biological mechanisms of synthesis. Also racemic are 4-C deoxy sugar acids: 2-methyl glyceric acid; 2,4-dihydroxybutyric acid; 2,3-dihydroxybutyric acid (two diastereomers); and 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid. However, a 4C acid, threonic acid, has never been observed as racemic, i.e., it possesses a large D excess. In several samples of Murchison and one of GRA 95229 (possibly the most pristine carbonaceous meteorite yet analyzed) threonic acid has nearly the same D enrichment. In Murchison, preliminary isotopic measurements of individual threonic acid enantiomers point towards extraterrestrial sources of the D enrichment. Enantiomer analyses of the 5C mono-sugar acids, ribonic, arabinonic, xylonic, and lyxonic also show large D excesses. It is worth noting that all four of these acids (all of the possible straight-chained 5C sugar acids) are present in meteorites, including the

  1. Chemical and mineralogical size segregation in the impact disruption of inhomogeneous, anhydrous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George J.; Durda, Daniel D.

    2004-10-01

    the parent body while the average composition of the polar micrometeorites may be more heavily weighted towards the composition of the chondrules and clasts. Thus, neither the IDPs nor the polar micrometeorites may sample the bulk composition of their respective parent bodies. We determined the threshold collisional specific energy (QD*) for these chondritic meteorites to be 1419 J/kg, about twice the value for terrestrial basalt. Comparison of the mass of the largest fragment produced in the disruption of an ˜100g sample of the porous ordinary chondrite Saratov with the largest fragment produced in the disruption of an ˜100g sample of the compact ordinary chondrite MOR001 when each was struck by an impactor having approximately the same kinetic energy confirms that it requires significantly more energy to disrupt a porous target than a non-porous target. These results may also have important implications for the design of spacecraft missions intended to sample the composition and mineralogy of the chondritic asteroids and other inhomogeneous bodies. A Stardust-like spacecraft intended to sample asteroids by collecting only the small debris from a man-made impact onto the asteroid may collect particles that over-sample the matrix of the target and do not provide a representative sample of the bulk composition. The impact collection technique to be employed by the Japanese HAYABUSA (formerly MUSES-C) spacecraft to sample the asteroid Itokawa may result in similar mineral segregation.

  2. Chiral Biomarkers in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The chirality of organic molecules with the asymmetric location of group radicals was discovered in 1848 by Louis Pasteur during his investigations of the rotation of the plane of polarization of light by crystals of sodium ammonium paratartrate. It is well established that the amino acids in proteins are exclusively Levorotary (L-aminos) and the sugars in DNA and RNA are Dextrorotary (D-sugars). This phenomenon of homochirality of biological polymers is a fundamental property of all life known on Earth. Furthermore, abiotic production mechanisms typically yield recemic mixtures (i.e. equal amounts of the two enantiomers). When amino acids were first detected in carbonaceous meteorites, it was concluded that they were racemates. This conclusion was taken as evidence that they were extraterrestrial and produced by abiologically. Subsequent studies by numerous researchers have revealed that many of the amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites exhibit a significant L-excess. The observed chirality is much greater than that produced by any currently known abiotic processes (e.g. Linearly polarized light from neutron stars; Circularly polarized ultraviolet light from faint stars; optically active quartz powders; inclusion polymerization in clay minerals; Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis of parity violations, etc.). This paper compares the measured chirality detected in the amino acids of carbonaceous meteorites with the effect of these diverse abiotic processes. IT is concluded that the levels observed are inconsistent with post-arrival biological contamination or with any of the currently known abiotic production mechanisms. However, they are consistent with ancient biological processes on the meteorite parent body. This paper will consider these chiral biomarkers in view of the detection of possible microfossils found in the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous meteorites. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data obtained on these morphological biomarkers will be

  3. Shock-transformation of whitlockite to merrillite and the implications for meteoritic phosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Adcock, C. T.; Tschauner, O.; Hausrath, E. M.; ...

    2017-03-06

    Meteorites represent the only samples available for study on Earth of a number of planetary bodies. The minerals within meteorites therefore hold the key to addressing numerous questions about our solar system. Of particular interest is the Ca-phosphate mineral merrillite, the anhydrous end-member of the merrillite-whitlockite solid solution series. For example, the anhydrous nature of merrillite in Martian meteorites has been interpreted as evidence of water-limited late-stage Martian melts. However, recent research on apatite in the same meteorites suggests higher water content in melts. One complication of using meteorites rather than direct samples is the shock compression all meteorites havemore » experienced, which can alter meteorite mineralogy. Here we show whitlockite transformation into merrillite by shock-compression levels relevant to meteorites, including Martian meteorites. The results open the possibility that at least part of meteoritic merrillite may have originally been H + -bearing whitlockite with implications for interpreting meteorites and the need for future sample return.« less

  4. Shock-transformation of whitlockite to merrillite and the implications for meteoritic phosphate

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Adcock, C. T.; Tschauner, O.; Hausrath, E. M.

    Meteorites represent the only samples available for study on Earth of a number of planetary bodies. The minerals within meteorites therefore hold the key to addressing numerous questions about our solar system. Of particular interest is the Ca-phosphate mineral merrillite, the anhydrous end-member of the merrillite-whitlockite solid solution series. For example, the anhydrous nature of merrillite in Martian meteorites has been interpreted as evidence of water-limited late-stage Martian melts. However, recent research on apatite in the same meteorites suggests higher water content in melts. One complication of using meteorites rather than direct samples is the shock compression all meteorites havemore » experienced, which can alter meteorite mineralogy. Here we show whitlockite transformation into merrillite by shock-compression levels relevant to meteorites, including Martian meteorites. The results open the possibility that at least part of meteoritic merrillite may have originally been H + -bearing whitlockite with implications for interpreting meteorites and the need for future sample return.« less

  5. Shock-transformation of whitlockite to merrillite and the implications for meteoritic phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, C. T.; Tschauner, O.; Hausrath, E. M.; Udry, A.; Luo, S. N.; Cai, Y.; Ren, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Kunz, M.; Lin, C.

    2017-01-01

    Meteorites represent the only samples available for study on Earth of a number of planetary bodies. The minerals within meteorites therefore hold the key to addressing numerous questions about our solar system. Of particular interest is the Ca-phosphate mineral merrillite, the anhydrous end-member of the merrillite–whitlockite solid solution series. For example, the anhydrous nature of merrillite in Martian meteorites has been interpreted as evidence of water-limited late-stage Martian melts. However, recent research on apatite in the same meteorites suggests higher water content in melts. One complication of using meteorites rather than direct samples is the shock compression all meteorites have experienced, which can alter meteorite mineralogy. Here we show whitlockite transformation into merrillite by shock-compression levels relevant to meteorites, including Martian meteorites. The results open the possibility that at least part of meteoritic merrillite may have originally been H+-bearing whitlockite with implications for interpreting meteorites and the need for future sample return. PMID:28262701

  6. The Wold Cottage meteorite: Not just any ordinary chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillinger, C. T.; Pillinger, J. M.

    1996-09-01

    The Wold Cottage meteorite (fell, 1795), as is well known, played an important part in meteorites being accepted as stones from the sky. In most cases, the very select group of people who have been privileged to witness any meteorite fall, let alone one as important as Wold Cottage, enjoy a moment's fame but then disappear into obscurity. In this respect, Wold Cottage is very different; Edward Topham, the man who reported the fall and who became the meteorite's publicist, was already very well known for many other reasons. This fact contributed substantially to the evidence provided by his workmen being accepted, following two public exhibitions of the meteorite, the second after sworn testimonies were obtained. Here we explore Topham's background in order to reveal his character, particularly the value he placed on truth. When he passed the meteorite over to a public museum, he did so in the belief that he was acting for the benefit of posterity. At a time when the idea of meteorites being extraterrestrial was still controversial, the Wold Cottage stone vitally prompted the observation that specimens from different parts of the globe closely resembled each other, thus stimulating the crucial chemical analyses which verified that they were indeed related. During its first twenty years on Earth, the Wold Cottage meteorite was a prized specimen, a public attraction and sought after for scientific teaching purposes. In researching Wold Cottage, we have been able to discover information about many of the personalities who were involved in providing and studying the first few meteorites to become available for scientific research. The Wold Cottage story gives an interesting perspective on the cultural scene at the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth centuries when there was no clear distinction between the arts and sciences, and meteoritics was the prerogative of often rather flamboyant gentlemen.

  7. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Marchi, S.; Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.

    The majority of basaltic asteroids are found in the inner main belt, although a few have also been observed in the outer main belt and near-Earth space. These asteroids-referred to as V-types-have surface compositions that resemble that of the 530 km sized asteroid Vesta. Besides the compositional similarity, dynamical evidence also links many V-type asteroids to Vesta. Moreover, Vesta is one of the few asteroids to have been identified as source of specific classes of meteorites, the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite achondrites (HEDs). Despite the general consensus on the outlined scenario, several questions remain unresolved. In particular, it is notmore » clear if the observed spectral diversity among Vesta, V-types, and HEDs is due to space weathering, as is thought to be the case for S-type asteroids. In this Letter, SDSS photometry is used to address the question of whether the spectral diversity among candidate V-types and HEDs can be explained by space weathering. We show that visible spectral slopes of V-types are systematically redder with respect to HEDs, in a similar way to what is found for ordinary chondrite meteorites and S-types. On the assumption that space weathering is responsible for the slope mismatch, we estimated an upper limit for the reddening timescale of about 0.5 Ga. Nevertheless, the observed slope mismatch between HEDs and V-types poses several puzzles to understanding its origin. The implication of our findings is also discussed in light of the Dawn mission to Vesta.« less

  8. Obtaining Magnetic Properties of Meteorites Using Magnetic Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Nabelek, L.; Mazanec, M.; Simon, K.; Hruba, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic images of Murchison meteorite's and Chelyabinsk meteorite's thin section have been obtained from magnetic scanning system from Youngwood Science and Engineering (YSE) capable of resolving magnetic anomalies down to 10-3 mT range from about 0.3 mm distance between the probe and meteorite surface (resolution about 0.15 mm). Anomalies were produced repeatedly, each time after application of magnetic field pulse of varying amplitude and constant, normal or reversed, direction. This process resulted in both magnetizing and demagnetizing of the meteorite thin section, while keeping the magnetization vector in the plane of the thin section. Analysis of the magnetic data allows determination of coercivity of remanence (Bcr) for the magnetic sources in situ. Value of Bcr is critical for calculating magnetic forces applicable during missions to asteroids where gravity is compromised. Bcr was estimated by two methods. First method measured varying dipole magnetic field strength produced by each anomaly in the direction of magnetic pulses. Second method measured deflections of the dipole direction from the direction of magnetic pulses (Nabelek et al., 2015). Nabelek, L., Mazanec, M., Kdyr, S., and Kletetschka, G., 2015, Magnetic, in situ, mineral characterization of Chelyabinsk meteorite thin section: Meteoritics & Planetary Science.

  9. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio < 1.7) with disequilibrium textures and low Ba/Sr ratios while Population Two is elongate (aspect ratio > 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic

  10. The Mundrabilla Meteorite in Three-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Carpenter, P. K.; Engel, H. P.

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) using gamma radiation has revealed the interior structure of the anomalous iron meteorite, Mundrabilla. This meteorite is composed of 25 volume percent of iron sulfide with the remainder being iron-nickel. Both phases have been shown to be contiguous, and three dimensional models have been constructed using rapid prototyping techniques.

  11. Extraterrestrial Organic Compounds in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Many organic compounds or their precursors found in meteorites originated in the interstellar or circumstellar medium and were later incorporated into planetesimals during the formation of the solar system. There they either survived intact or underwent further processing to synthesize secondary products on the meteorite parent body. The most distinct feature of CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, two types of stony meteorites, is their high carbon content (up to 3% of weight), either in the form of carbonates or of organic compounds. The bulk of the organic carbon consists of an insoluble macromolecular material with a complex structure. Also present is a soluble organic fraction, which has been analyzed by several separation and analytical procedures. Low detection limits can be achieved by derivatization of the organic molecules with reagents that allow for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The CM meteorite Murchison has been found to contain more than 70 extraterrestrial amino acids and several other classes of compounds including carboxylic acids, hydroxy carboxylic acids, sulphonic and phosphonic acids, aliphatic, aromatic and polar hydrocarbons, fullerenes, heterocycles as well as carbonyl compounds, alcohols, amines and amides. The organic matter was found to be enriched in deuterium, and distinct organic compounds show isotopic enrichments of carbon and nitrogen relative to terrestrial matter.

  12. Petrography and Origin of the Unique Achondrite GRA 06128 and 06129: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Morris, R. V.; Kring, D. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jones, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    GRA 06128 & 06129 are paired achondrites [1], with unique mineral proportions (75% oligoclase), mineral compositions, and oxygen isotope ratios. They appear to represent alkalic igneous rock from a hitherto unsampled differentiated parent body, modified significantly by thermal and shock metamorphism. Samples and Methods: Bulk samples were examined at JSC during splitting for consortium analyses. Microscope and BSE images here are on thick section GRA06128,40. Chemical analyses of minerals were acquired at Johnson Space Center with the Cameca SX100, operated at 15 kV. Feldspar was analyzed with a defocused 5 micron beam @ 5 nA; other minerals were analyzed with a focused beam @ 20 nA. Moessbauer spectra were obtained at ARES, JSC [2]. Intrinsic radioactivity was measured in the low-level counting facility at ARES JSC [3]. An estimated abundance of Al-26 of approx. 70 dpm/kg is within the range determined for eucrites.

  13. A search for presolar organic matter in meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Epstein, S.

    1985-01-01

    The D/H ratios and the C-13/C-12 ratios of acid-insoluble organic matter of 4 meteorites, Ochansk (H4), Plainview (H5), Gladstone (H6) and Odessa (IA), were measured. delta-D values for hydrogen extracted by stepwise combustion were negative, down to -280 deg/infinity. delta-C-13 values were also negative except in the case of the carbon coming off at the highest temperature steps for Plainview and Odessa meteorites. The concentrations of C-13-rich carbon were 3-5 orders of magnitude smaller than those found in Murchison meteorite, suggesting that relic grains of stellar condensates were mostly destroyed in the meteorites examined.

  14. Atmospheric heating of meteorites: Results from nuclear track studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jha, R.

    1984-01-01

    A quantitative model to estimate the degree of annealing of nuclear tracks in mineral grains subjected to a variable temperature history was proposed. This model is applied to study the track annealing records in different meteorites resulting from their atmospheric heating. Scale lengths were measured of complete and partial track annealing, delta X sub 1 and delta X sub 2, respectively. In mineral grain close to fusion crust in about a dozen meteorites. Values of delta X sub 1 and delta X sub 2 depend on extent and duration of heating during atmospheric transit and hence on meteorite entry parameters. To estimate track annealing, the temperature history during atmospheric heating at different distances from the crusted surface of the meteorite is obtained by solving heat conduction equation in conjunction with meteorite entry model, and use of the annealing model to evaluate the degree of annealing of tracks. It is shown that the measured values of delta X sub 1 and delta X sub 2 in three of the meteorites studied are consistent with values using preatmospheric mass, entry velocity and entry angle of these meteorites.

  15. Update (2012-2017) on lunar meteorites from Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotev, Randy L.

    2017-06-01

    This report presents bulk composition data for 10 lunar meteorite stones from Oman for which the names have been approved since June, 2012. On the basis of composition and reported find location, four new meteorites are represented among this group of stones. Data from neutron activation analysis of 371 subsamples of all lunar meteorites from Oman and Saudi Arabia analyzed in this laboratory are presented.

  16. Tracing meteorite source regions through asteroid spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cristina Ana

    By virtue of their landing on Earth, meteorites reside in near-Earth object (NEO) orbits prior to their arrival. Thus the population of observable NEOs, in principle, gives the best representation of meteorite source bodies. By linking meteorites to NEOs, and linking NEOs to their most likely main-belt source locations, we seek to gain insight into the original solar system formation locations for different meteorite classes. To forge the first link between meteorites and NEOs, we have developed a three dimensional method for quantitative comparisons between laboratory measurements of meteorites and telescopic measurements of near-Earth objects. We utilize meteorite spectra from the Reflectance Experiment Laboratory (RELAB) database and NEO data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Using the Modified Gaussian Model (MGM) as a mathematical tool, we treat asteroid and meteorite spectra identically in the calculation of 1-micron and 2-micron geometric band centers and their band area ratios (BARs). Using these identical numerical parameters we quantitatively compare the spectral properties of S-, Sq-, Q- and V-type NEOs with the spectral properties of the meteorites in the H, L, LL and HED meteorite classes. For each NEO spectrum, we assign a set of probabilities for it being related to each of these meteorite classes. Our NEO- meteorite correlation probabilities are then convolved with NEO-source region probabilities to yield a final set of meteorite-source region correlations. An apparent (significant at the 2.1-sigma level) source region signature is found for the H chondrites to be preferentially delivered to the inner solar system through the 3:1 mean motion resonance. A 3:1 resonance H chondrite source region is consistent with the short cosmic ray exposure ages known for H chondrites. The spectroscopy of asteroids is subject to several sources of inherent error. The source region model used a variety of S-type spectra without

  17. Evidence for Microfossils in Ancient Rocks and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, A. Y.; Zhmur, S. I.; Gorlenko, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The McKay et all. detection of chemical biomarkers and possible microfossils in an ancient meteorite from Mars (ALH84001) stimulated research in several areas of importance to the newly emerging field of Astrobiology. Their report resulted in a search for additional evidence of microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and meteorites. These studies of ancient rocks and meteorites were conducted independently (and later collaboratively) in the United States and Russia using the SEM, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). We have encountered in-situ in freshly broken carbonaceous chondrites a large number of complex microstructures that appear to be lithified microbial forms. The meteoritic microstructures have characteristics similar to the lithified remains of filamentous cyanobacteria and bacterial microfossils we have found in ancient phosphorites, ancient graphites and oil shales. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Link microprobe analysis shows the possible microfossils have a distribution of chemical elements characteristic of the meteorite rock matrix, although many exhibit a superimposed carbon enhancement. We have concluded that the mineralized bodies encountered embedded in the rock matrix of freshly fractured meteoritic surfaces can not be dismissed as recent surface contaminants. Many of the forms found in-situ in the Murchison, Efremovka, and Orgueil carbonaceous meteorites are strikingly similar to microfossils of coccoid bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi such as we have found in the Cambrian phosphorites of Khubsugul, Mongolia and high carbon Phanerozoic and Precambrian rocks of the Siberian and Russian Platforms.

  18. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.; Brinton, K. L.; McDonald, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  19. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    PubMed

    Glavin, D P; Bada, J L; Brinton, K L; McDonald, G D

    1999-08-03

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  20. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla

    PubMed Central

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β-alanine, and γ-amino-n-butyric acid (γ-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the d/l ratios (values range from <0.1 to 0.5), is similar to what is found in bacterially degraded organic matter. The amino acids in Nakhla appear to be derived from terrestrial organic matter that infiltrated the meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth. PMID:10430856

  1. High-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Naotaka; Miyahara, Masaaki

    2017-09-01

    Heavily shocked meteorites contain various types of high-pressure polymorphs of major minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and quartz) and accessory minerals (chromite and Ca phosphate). These high-pressure minerals are micron to submicron sized and occur within and in the vicinity of shock-induced melt veins and melt pockets in chondrites and lunar, howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED), and Martian meteorites. Their occurrence suggests two types of formation mechanisms (1) solid-state high-pressure transformation of the host-rock minerals into monomineralic polycrystalline aggregates, and (2) crystallization of chondritic or monomineralic melts under high pressure. Based on experimentally determined phase relations, their formation pressures are limited to the pressure range up to 25 GPa. Textural, crystallographic, and chemical characteristics of high-pressure minerals provide clues about the impact events of meteorite parent bodies, including their size and mutual collision velocities and about the mineralogy of deep planetary interiors. The aim of this article is to review and summarize the findings on natural high-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites that have been reported over the past 50 years.

  2. Meteoritic Amino Acids: Diversity in Compositions Reflects Parent Body Histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Aponte, Jose C.; Blackmond, Donna G.; Burton, Aaron S.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of amino acids in meteorites dates back over 50 years; however, it is only in recent years that research has expanded beyond investigations of a narrow set of meteorite groups (exemplied by the Murchison meteorite) into meteorites of other types and classes. These new studies have shown a wide diversity in the abundance and distribution of amino acids across carbonaceous chondrite groups, highlighting the role of parent body processes and composition in the creation, preservation, or alteration of amino acids. Although most chiral amino acids are racemic in meteorites, the enantiomeric distribution of some amino acids, particularly of the nonprotein amino acid isovaline, has also been shown to vary both within certain meteorites and across carbonaceous meteorite groups. Large -enantiomeric excesses of some extraterrestrial protein amino acids (up to 60) have also been observed in rare cases and point to nonbiological enantiomeric enrichment processes prior to the emergence of life. In this Outlook, we review these recent meteoritic analyses, focusing on variations in abundance, structural distributions, and enantiomeric distributions of amino acids and discussing possible explanations for these observations and the potential for future work.

  3. Meteoritic Amino Acids: Diversity in Compositions Reflects Parent Body Histories

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of amino acids in meteorites dates back over 50 years; however, it is only in recent years that research has expanded beyond investigations of a narrow set of meteorite groups (exemplified by the Murchison meteorite) into meteorites of other types and classes. These new studies have shown a wide diversity in the abundance and distribution of amino acids across carbonaceous chondrite groups, highlighting the role of parent body processes and composition in the creation, preservation, or alteration of amino acids. Although most chiral amino acids are racemic in meteorites, the enantiomeric distribution of some amino acids, particularly of the nonprotein amino acid isovaline, has also been shown to vary both within certain meteorites and across carbonaceous meteorite groups. Large l-enantiomeric excesses of some extraterrestrial protein amino acids (up to ∼60%) have also been observed in rare cases and point to nonbiological enantiomeric enrichment processes prior to the emergence of life. In this Outlook, we review these recent meteoritic analyses, focusing on variations in abundance, structural distributions, and enantiomeric distributions of amino acids and discussing possible explanations for these observations and the potential for future work. PMID:27413780

  4. The impact and recovery of asteroid 2008 TC(3).

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, P; Shaddad, M H; Numan, D; Elsir, S; Kudoda, A M; Zolensky, M E; Le, L; Robinson, G A; Friedrich, J M; Rumble, D; Steele, A; Chesley, S R; Fitzsimmons, A; Duddy, S; Hsieh, H H; Ramsay, G; Brown, P G; Edwards, W N; Tagliaferri, E; Boslough, M B; Spalding, R E; Dantowitz, R; Kozubal, M; Pravec, P; Borovicka, J; Charvat, Z; Vaubaillon, J; Kuiper, J; Albers, J; Bishop, J L; Mancinelli, R L; Sandford, S A; Milam, S N; Nuevo, M; Worden, S P

    2009-03-26

    In the absence of a firm link between individual meteorites and their asteroidal parent bodies, asteroids are typically characterized only by their light reflection properties, and grouped accordingly into classes. On 6 October 2008, a small asteroid was discovered with a flat reflectance spectrum in the 554-995 nm wavelength range, and designated 2008 TC(3) (refs 4-6). It subsequently hit the Earth. Because it exploded at 37 km altitude, no macroscopic fragments were expected to survive. Here we report that a dedicated search along the approach trajectory recovered 47 meteorites, fragments of a single body named Almahata Sitta, with a total mass of 3.95 kg. Analysis of one of these meteorites shows it to be an achondrite, a polymict ureilite, anomalous in its class: ultra-fine-grained and porous, with large carbonaceous grains. The combined asteroid and meteorite reflectance spectra identify the asteroid as F class, now firmly linked to dark carbon-rich anomalous ureilites, a material so fragile it was not previously represented in meteorite collections.

  5. Basaltic volcanism - The importance of planet size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Stolper, E. M.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The volumetrically abundant basalts on the earth, its moon, and the eucrite parent planet all have chemical compositions that are controlled to a large extent by dry, low-pressure, crystal-liquid equilibria. Since this generalization is valid for these three planetary bodies, we infer that it may also apply to the other unsampled terrestrial planets. Other characteristics of basaltic volcanism show variations which appear to be related to planet size: the eruption temperatures, degrees of fractionation, and chemical variety of basalts and the endurance of basaltic volcanism all increase with planet size. Although the processes responsible for chemical differences between basalt suites are known, no simple systematization of the chemical differences between basalts from planet to planet has emerged.

  6. Calcium Sulfate in Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Bright Material in Adirondack Basalt, Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is one of the driest deserts on Earth (< 2mm/y). The hyper-arid conditions allow extraordinary accumulations of sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates in Atacama soils. Examining salt accumulations in the Atacama may assist understanding salt accumulations on Mars. Recent work examining sulfate soils on basalt parent material observed white material in the interior vesicles of surface basalt. This is strikingly similar to the bright-white material present in veins and vesicles of the Adirondack basalt rocks at Gusev Crater which are presumed to consist of S, Cl, and/or Br. The abundance of soil gypsum/anhydrite in the area of the Atacama basalt suggested that the white material consisted of calcium sulfate (Ca-SO4) which was later confirmed by SEM/EDS analysis. This work examines the Ca-SO4 of Atacama basalt in an effort to provide insight into the possible nature of the bright material in the Adirondack basalt of Gusev Crater. The objectives of this work are to (i) discuss variations in Ca-SO4 crystal morphology in the vesicles and (ii) examine the Ca-SO4 interaction(s) with the basalt interior.

  7. Update on Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Terrestial ages are presented for 70 Antarctic meteorites, based on cosmogenic Be-10, Al-26 and Cl-36 in the metal phase. Also, results of leaching experiments are discussed to study possible contamination of stony meteorites with atmospheric Be-10

  8. Meteoritics and Planetary Science Supplement. Volume 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, Derek W. G. (Editor); Binzel, Richard P. (Editor); Gaffey, Michael J. (Editor); Kraehenbuehl, Urs (Editor); Pieters, Carle M. (Editor); Shaw, Denis (Editor); Wieler, Rainer (Editor); Brownlee, Donald E. (Editor); Goldstein, Joseph I. (Editor); Lyon, Ian C. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This special supplement of the Meteoritics and Planetary Science Society Journal contains the abstracts of 324 technical presentations, and the presentations of awards during the Annual meeting of the Meteoritical Society. The abstracts review current research on meteors and planetary sciences.

  9. Identification of new meteorite, Mihonoseki (L), from broken fragments in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Y.; Noma, Y.

    1993-01-01

    New meteorite of Mihonoseki fallen in Shimane-ken was identified by fine broken pieces by using an energy-dispersive scanning electron microprobe analyzer. It shows fusion-crust (i.e. Fe-Si melt), meteoritic minerals (kamacite, taenite, troilite, amorphous plagioclase etc.) and chrondrule with clear glassy rim. Mineralogical, and petrological data of several fine grains suggest that broken fragments of Mihonoseki are L3/4 chondritic meteorite which is the first identification in a Japanese fallen meteorite. The prompt identification method of meteorite-fragments will be applied to the next lunar, Martian and asteroid explorations, as well as meteorite falls on the terrestrial surface.

  10. Carbonaceous Meteorites Contain a Wide Range of Extraterrestrial Nucleobases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, H. James, II; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nuc1eobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nuc1eobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs; purine, 2,6-diminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analoge were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  11. Carbonaceous meteorites contain a wide range of extraterrestrial nucleobases

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, H. James; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nucleobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nucleobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs: purine, 2,6-diaminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analogs were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules. PMID:21836052

  12. Carbonaceous meteorites contain a wide range of extraterrestrial nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Smith, Karen E; Cleaves, H James; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C; Glavin, Daniel P; House, Christopher H; Dworkin, Jason P

    2011-08-23

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nucleobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nucleobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs: purine, 2,6-diaminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analogs were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  13. Cosmic-ray Exposure Ages of Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, G. F.

    2003-12-01

    The classic idea of a cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age for a meteorite is based on a simple but useful picture of meteorite evolution, the one-stage irradiation model. The precursor rock starts out on a parent body, buried under a mantle of material many meters thick that screens out cosmic rays. At a time ti, a collision excavates a precursor rock - a "meteoroid." The newly liberated meteoroid, now fully exposed to cosmic rays, orbits the Sun until a time tf, when it strikes the Earth, where the overlying blanket of air (and possibly of water or ice) again shuts out almost all cosmic rays (cf. Masarik and Reedy, 1995). The quantity tf-ti is called the CRE age, t. To obtain the CRE age of a meteorite, we measure the concentrations in it of one or more cosmogenic nuclides (Table 1), which are nuclides that cosmic rays produce by inducing nuclear reactions. Many shorter-lived radionuclides excluded from Table 1 such as 22Na (t1/2=2.6 yr) and 60Co (t1/2=5.27 yr) can also furnish valuable information, but can be measured only in meteorites that fell within the last few half-lives of those nuclides (see, e.g., Leya et al. (2001) and references therein). Table 1. Cosmogenic nuclides used for calculating exposure ages NuclideHalf-lifea (Myr) Radionuclides 14C0.005730 59Ni0.076 41Ca0.1034 81Kr0.229 36Cl0.301 26Al0.717 10Be1.51 53Mn3.74 129I15.7 Stable nuclides 3He 21Ne 38Ar 83Kr 126Xe a http://www2.bnl.gov/ton. CRE ages have implications for several interrelated questions. From how many different parent bodies do meteorites come? How well do meteorites represent the population of the asteroid belt? How many distinct collisions on each parent body have created the known meteorites of each type? How often do asteroids collide? How big and how energetic were the collisions that produced meteoroids? What factors control the CRE age of a meteorite and how do meteoroid orbits evolve through time? We will touch on these questions below as we examine the data.By 1975, the CRE ages of

  14. The carbon chemistry of meteorites: Relationships to comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1989-01-01

    The carbonaceous meteorites exhibiting alteration by liquid water bear a strong relationship to comets. Not only is their elemental composition closer to solar in relative abundances than other meteorites, they are water rich; and they contain isotopic compositions among refractory and volatile elements indicative of presolar components. Some of these isotopic anomalies occur in organic compounds and carbonaceous grains signifying the presence of discrete and identifiable carbon components derived from interstellar and circumstellar matter. Insofar as comets and meteorites are ultimately formed from interstellar gas and dust, and comets have been subjected to considerably less aqueous and thermal evolution than carbonaceous meteorites, the interstellar imprint should be much stronger and better preserved in comets.

  15. Microbial Populations of Stony Meteorites: Substrate Controls on First Colonizers.

    PubMed

    Tait, Alastair W; Gagen, Emma J; Wilson, Siobhan A; Tomkins, Andrew G; Southam, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Finding fresh, sterilized rocks provides ecologists with a clean slate to test ideas about first colonization and the evolution of soils de novo. Lava has been used previously in first colonizer studies due to the sterilizing heat required for its formation. However, fresh lava typically falls upon older volcanic successions of similar chemistry and modal mineral abundance. Given enough time, this results in the development of similar microbial communities in the newly erupted lava due to a lack of contrast between the new and old substrates. Meteorites, which are sterile when they fall to Earth, provide such contrast because their reduced and mafic chemistry commonly differs to the surfaces on which they land; thus allowing investigation of how community membership and structure respond to this new substrate over time. We conducted 16S rRNA gene analysis on meteorites and soil from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. We found that the meteorites have low species richness and evenness compared to soil sampled from directly beneath each meteorite. Despite the meteorites being found kilometers apart, the community structure of each meteorite bore more similarity to those of other meteorites (of similar composition) than to the community structure of the soil on which it resided. Meteorites were dominated by sequences that affiliated with the Actinobacteria with the major Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) classified as Rubrobacter radiotolerans. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the next most abundant phyla. The soils were also dominated by Actinobacteria but to a lesser extent than the meteorites. We also found OTUs affiliated with iron/sulfur cycling organisms Geobacter spp. and Desulfovibrio spp. This is an important finding as meteorites contain abundant metal and sulfur for use as energy sources. These ecological findings demonstrate that the structure of the microbial community in these meteorites is controlled by the substrate, and will not reach homeostasis

  16. Microbial Populations of Stony Meteorites: Substrate Controls on First Colonizers

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Alastair W.; Gagen, Emma J.; Wilson, Siobhan A.; Tomkins, Andrew G.; Southam, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Finding fresh, sterilized rocks provides ecologists with a clean slate to test ideas about first colonization and the evolution of soils de novo. Lava has been used previously in first colonizer studies due to the sterilizing heat required for its formation. However, fresh lava typically falls upon older volcanic successions of similar chemistry and modal mineral abundance. Given enough time, this results in the development of similar microbial communities in the newly erupted lava due to a lack of contrast between the new and old substrates. Meteorites, which are sterile when they fall to Earth, provide such contrast because their reduced and mafic chemistry commonly differs to the surfaces on which they land; thus allowing investigation of how community membership and structure respond to this new substrate over time. We conducted 16S rRNA gene analysis on meteorites and soil from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. We found that the meteorites have low species richness and evenness compared to soil sampled from directly beneath each meteorite. Despite the meteorites being found kilometers apart, the community structure of each meteorite bore more similarity to those of other meteorites (of similar composition) than to the community structure of the soil on which it resided. Meteorites were dominated by sequences that affiliated with the Actinobacteria with the major Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) classified as Rubrobacter radiotolerans. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the next most abundant phyla. The soils were also dominated by Actinobacteria but to a lesser extent than the meteorites. We also found OTUs affiliated with iron/sulfur cycling organisms Geobacter spp. and Desulfovibrio spp. This is an important finding as meteorites contain abundant metal and sulfur for use as energy sources. These ecological findings demonstrate that the structure of the microbial community in these meteorites is controlled by the substrate, and will not reach homeostasis

  17. Igneous history of the aubrite parent asteroid - Evidence from the Norton County enstatite achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, Akihiko; Keil, Klaus; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Newsom, Horton

    1988-01-01

    Numerous specimens of the Norton County enstatite achondrite (aubrite) were studied by optical microscopy, electron microprobe, and neutron-activation analysis. Norton County is found to be a fragmental impact breccia, consisting of a clastic matrix made mostly of crushed enstatite, into which are embedded a variety of mineral and lithic clasts of both igneous and impact melt origin. The Norton County precursor materials were igneous rocks, mostly plutonic orthopyroxenites, not grains formed by condensation from the solar nebula. The Mg-silicate-rich aubrite parent body experienced extensive melting and igneous differentiation, causing formation of diverse lithologies including dunites, plutonic orthopyroxenites, plutonic pyroxenites, and plagioclase-silica rocks. The presence of impact melt breccias (the microporphyritic clasts and the diopside-plagioclase-silica clast) of still different compositions further attests to the lithologic diversity of the aubrite parent body.

  18. Liebermannite, KAlSi3O8, a new shock-metamorphic, high-pressure mineral from the Zagami Martian meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chi; Tschauner, Oliver; Beckett, John R.; Rossman, George R.; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Bechtel, Hans A.; MacDowell, Alastair

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the occurrence of liebermannite (IMA 2013-128), KAlSi3O8, a new, shock-generated, high-pressure tetragonal hollandite-type structure silicate mineral, in the Zagami basaltic shergottite meteorite. Liebermannite crystallizes in space group I4/m with Z = 2, cell dimensions of a = 9.15 ± 0.14 (1σ) Å, c = 2.74 ± 0.13 Å, and a cell volume of 229 ± 19 Å3 (for the type material), as revealed by synchrotron diffraction. In Zagami, liebermannite likely formed via solid-state transformation of primary igneous K-feldspar during an impact event that achieved pressures of 20 GPa or more. The mineral name is in honor of Robert C. Liebermann, a high-pressure mineral physicist at Stony Brook University, New York, USA.

  19. Proceedings of a Workshop on Antarctic Meteorite Stranding Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, W. A. (Editor); Whillans, I. M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of large numbers of meteorites on the Antarctic Ice Sheet is one of the most exciting developments in polar science in recent years. The meteorites are found on areas of ice called stranding surfaces. Because of the sudden availability of hundreds, and then thousands, of new meteorite specimens at these sites, the significance of the discovery of meteorite stranding surfaces in Antarctica had an immediate and profound impact on planetary science, but there is also in this discovery an enormous, largely unrealized potential to glaciology for records of climatic and ice sheet changes. The glaciological interest derives from the antiquity of the ice in meteorite stranding surfaces. This exposed ice covers a range of ages, probably between zero and more than 500,000 years. The Workshop on Antarctic Meteorite Stranding Surfaces was convened to explore this potential and to devise a course of action that could be recommended to granting agencies. The workshop recognized three prime functions of meteorite stranding surfaces. They provide: (1) A proxy record of climatic change (i.e., a long record of climatic change is probably preserved in the exposed ice stratigraphy); (2) A proxy record of ice volume change; and (3) A source of unique nonterrestrial material.

  20. The planetary and interstellar components of meteorites - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Ursula B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent analyses show that, although most meteorites are collisional debris of asteroids, three meteorites collected on the Antarctic ice sheet were projected to earth from the highlands of the moon, and eight meteorites have chemical and isotopic compositions suggestive of derivation from Mars. Although meteorites are primarily of interest to planetary scientists for the abundance of clues they hold to the materials and processes that formed the solar system, they have begun to engage the attention of astrochemists because of isotopic and mineralogical indications that they contain interstellar components. Although each individual observation to this effect is inconclusive, the body of evidence is becoming ever more persuasive. This paper reviews the main classes of meteorites and their probable sources, with special emphasis on components that appear to be exotic to the solar system.

  1. A gamma-ray spectroscopy survey of Omani meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Patrick; Hofmann, Beda A.; Tolba, Tamer; Vuilleumier, Jean-Luc

    2017-06-01

    The gamma-ray activities of 33 meteorite samples (30 ordinary chondrites, 1 Mars meteorite, 1 iron, 1 howardite) collected during Omani-Swiss meteorite search campaigns 2001-2008 were nondestructively measured using an ultralow background gamma-ray detector. The results provide several types of information: Potassium and thorium concentrations were found to range within typical values for the meteorite types. Similar mean 26Al activities in groups of ordinary chondrites with (1) weathering degrees W0-1 and low 14C terrestrial age and (2) weathering degree W3-4 and high 14C terrestrial age are mostly consistent with activities observed in recent falls. The older group shows no significant depletion in 26Al. Among the least weathered samples, one meteorite (SaU 424) was found to contain detectable 22Na identifying it as a recent fall close to the year 2000. Based on an estimate of the surface area searched, the corresponding fall rate is 120 events/106 km2*a, consistent with other estimations. Twelve samples from the large JaH 091 strewn field (total mass 4.5 t) show significant variations of 26Al activities, including the highest values measured, consistent with a meteoroid radius of 115 cm. Activities of 238U daughter elements demonstrate terrestrial contamination with 226Ra and possible loss of 222Rn. Recent contamination with small amounts of 137Cs is ubiquitous. We conclude that gamma-ray spectroscopy of a selection of meteorites with low degrees of weathering is particularly useful to detect recent falls among meteorites collected in hot deserts.

  2. Previously unknown class of metalorganic compounds revealed in meteorites

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Alexander; Kanawati, Basem; Hertkorn, Norbert; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Moritz, Franco; Harir, Mourad; Lucio, Marianna; Michalke, Bernhard; Wimpenny, Joshua; Shilobreeva, Svetlana; Bronsky, Basil; Saraykin, Vladimir; Gabelica, Zelimir; Gougeon, Régis D.; Quirico, Eric; Ralew, Stefan; Jakubowski, Tomasz; Haack, Henning; Gonsior, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter; Hinman, Nancy W.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The rich diversity and complexity of organic matter found in meteorites is rapidly expanding our knowledge and understanding of extreme environments from which the early solar system emerged and evolved. Here, we report the discovery of a hitherto unknown chemical class, dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates [(OH)2MgO2CR]−, in meteoritic soluble organic matter. High collision energies, which are required for fragmentation, suggest substantial thermal stability of these Mg-metalorganics (CHOMg compounds). This was corroborated by their higher abundance in thermally processed meteorites. CHOMg compounds were found to be present in a set of 61 meteorites of diverse petrological classes. The appearance of this CHOMg chemical class extends the previously investigated, diverse set of CHNOS molecules. A connection between the evolution of organic compounds and minerals is made, as Mg released from minerals gets trapped into organic compounds. These CHOMg metalorganic compounds and their relation to thermal processing in meteorites might shed new light on our understanding of carbon speciation at a molecular level in meteorite parent bodies. PMID:28242686

  3. Sugar-Related Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G.; Kimmich, N.; Belisle, W.; Sarinana, J.; Brabham, K.; Garrel, L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Sugars and related polyols are critical components of all organisms and may have been necessary for the origin of life. To date, this class of organic compounds had not been definitively identified in meteorites. This study was undertaken to determine if polyols were present in the early Solar System as constituents of carbonaceous meteorites. Results of analyses of the Murchison and Murray meteorites indicate that formaldehyde and sugar chemistry may be responsible for the presence of a variety of polyols. We conclude that polyols were present on the early Earth through delivery by asteroids and possibly comets.

  4. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  5. Meteorites and their parent bodies: Evidence from oxygen isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    Isotopic abundance variations among meteorites are used to establish genetic associations between meteorite classes. Oxygen isotope distributions between group II E irons with H-group ordinary chondrites and enstatic meteorites indicate that the parent bodies were formed out of pre-solar material that was not fully mixed at the time condensation occurred within the solar nebula.

  6. 45 CFR 674.4 - Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. 674.4 Section 674.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.4 Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. No person may collect meteorites in...

  7. 45 CFR 674.4 - Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. 674.4 Section 674.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.4 Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. No person may collect meteorites in...

  8. 45 CFR 674.4 - Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. 674.4 Section 674.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.4 Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. No person may collect meteorites in...

  9. Evolution of gas-rich meteorites: Clues from cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of gas-rich meteorites in general, and the setting in which the observed solar-wind, solar-flare irradiation records were imprinted in individual components of these meteorites are understood only in qualitative terms, although contrary viewpoints do exist. The regolith irradiation hypothesis, bolstered by the observations of irradiation features in lunar regolith materials, similar to those observed in gas-rich meteorites, is accepted by many workers in this field. However, a close analysis of the problem suggests that the regolith irradiation may not be the dominant mode in producing the observed precompaction irradiation features in the gas-rich meteorites.

  10. A Peltier-based freeze-thaw device for meteorite disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.

    2018-02-01

    A Peltier-based freeze-thaw device for the disaggregation of meteorite or other rock samples is described. Meteorite samples are kept in six water-filled cavities inside a thin-walled Al block. This block is held between two Peltier coolers that are automatically cycled between cooling and warming. One cycle takes approximately 20 min. The device can run unattended for months, allowing for ˜10 000 freeze-thaw cycles that will disaggregate meteorites even with relatively low porosity. This device was used to disaggregate ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite regoltih breccia meteorites to search for micrometeoroid impact craters.

  11. Mössbauer study of Slovak meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, J.; Sitek, J.; Dekan, J.; Degmová, J.; Porubčan, V.

    2013-04-01

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used as an analytical tool in the investigation of iron containing compounds of two meteorites (Rumanová and Košice) out of total of six which had fallen on Slovak territory. In the magnetic fraction of the iron bearing compounds in the Rumanová meteorite, maghemite, troilite and Fe-Ni alloy were identified. In the non-magnetic fraction silicate phases were found, such as olivine and pyroxene. The paramagnetic component containing Fe3 + ions corresponds probably to small superparamagnetic particles. The Košice meteorite was found near the town of Košice in February 2010. Its magnetic fraction consists of a Fe-Ni alloy with the Mössbauer parameters of the magnetic field corresponding to kamacite α-Fe(Ni, Co) and troilite. The non-magnetic part consists of Fe2 + phases such as olivine and pyroxene and traces of a Fe3 + phase. The main difference between these meteorites is their iron oxide content. These kinds of analyses can bring important knowledge about phases and compounds formed in extraterrestrial conditions, which have other features than their terrestrial analogues.

  12. Dangerous Near-Earth Asteroids and Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Grigoryan, A. E.

    2015-07-01

    The problem of Near-Earth Obje