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Sample records for base transition metal

  1. Transition-Metal-Free Biomolecule-Based Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Hao, Rui; Guo, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is successfully fabricated based on an earth-abundant biomass derived redox-active biomolecule, named lawsone. Such an ASC exhibits comparable or even higher energy densities than most of the recently reported transition-metal-based ASCs, and this green ASC generation from renewable resources is promising for addressing current issues of electronic hazard processing, high cost, and unsustainability. PMID:26890876

  2. Multiferroic materials based on organic transition-metal molecular nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wu, Menghao; Burton, J D; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Jena, Puru

    2012-09-01

    We report on the density functional theory aided design of a variety of organic ferroelectric and multiferroic materials by functionalizing crystallized transition-metal molecular sandwich nanowires with chemical groups such as -F, -Cl, -CN, -NO(2), ═O, and -OH. Such functionalized polar wires exhibit molecular reorientation in response to an electric field. Ferroelectric polarizations as large as 23.0 μC/cm(2) are predicted in crystals based on fully hydroxylized sandwich nanowires. Furthermore, we find that organic nanowires formed by sandwiching transition-metal atoms in croconic and rhodizonic acids, dihydroxybenzoquinone, dichloro-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone, or benzene decorated by -COOH groups exhibit ordered magnetic moments, leading to a multiferroic organometallic crystal. When crystallized through hydrogen bonds, the microscopic molecular reorientation translates into a switchable polarization through proton transfer. A giant interface magnetoelectric response that is orders of magnitude greater than previously reported for conventional oxide heterostructure interfaces is predicted. PMID:22881120

  3. Superconductivity in transition metal subsituted iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshenbaum, Kevin

    I report on superconductivity in undoped SrFe2As 2 and find that it is caused by lattice strain in the as-grown crystals that can be removed or returned with annealing or pressure, respectively. To study the magnetic/structural transition I measure the evolution of these transitions in solid solutions of the [Ca, Sr, Ba]Fe2As2 series and determine that the Neel temperature is independent of the size of the antiferromagnetically ordered moment. I present the first reported phase diagrams for Ni- and Pt-substitution in SrFe2As2, showing that the simple charge-counting picture of chemical substitution cannot completely describe the onset and offset of the superconducting phase. Finally, I use the transport scattering rate to explain the variation in Tc seen in transition metal substituted 122s. I will show that pair breaking can explain the variation in the optimum transition temperature, and that the rate of suppression of Tc with scattering will show that the pairing symmetry of the iron-based superconductors is a sign-changing, multiband s-wave order parameter that must include both inter- and intraband scattering.

  4. Transition-metal dichalcogenide-based dipolariton optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakov, German; Byrnes, Tim; He, Andy; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    Using computational modeling, we simulate the dynamics of dipolaritons in an optical microcavity, which encompasses the transition-metal dichalcogenide double-layer structure. We demonstrate that dipolaritons, a three-way superposition of photons, direct excitons and indirect excitons, are guided by a pattern deposited on the microcavity and can be driven by an external electric field or voltage applied to the structure. Focusing on a normal dipolariton gas in Y- and Psi-shaped patterns, we isolate conditions when the dipolariton flow can be switched between the channel branches of the pattern by the electric field. We also studied the superfluid dynamics of dipolariton Bose-Einstein condensates in patterned substrates at low temperatures, showing that the condensate in the channels can be accelerated and then directed by the electric field. We compare the obtained results with those for GaAs-based microcavities and demonstrate that dipolaritons in transition-metal dichalcogenide-based microcavities can be utilized for the design of optical switches and transistors for optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  5. Preparation and magnetic properties of phthalocyanine-based carbon materials containing transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Z.; Sato, S.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.

    2016-07-01

    A simple method for the preparation of bulk quantities of magnetic carbon materials, which contain uniformly dispersed transition metals (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) as the magnetic components, is presented. By using highly chlorinated metal phthalocyanine as the building block and potassium as the coupling reagent, phthalocyanine-based carbon materials (PBCMs) containing transition metals were obtained. Our experiments demonstrate the structure of these PBCMs consists of transition metals embedded in graphitic carbon that includes a square planar MN4 magnetic core and the Fe and Co-PBCM possess spontaneous magnetization at room temperature. In addition, carbon-coated transition metal particles were obtained by the Wurtz-type reaction with excess amount of potassium coupling agent. The large transition metal surface area and magnetization of these M-PBCMs are useful for spintronic and catalytic applications.

  6. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  7. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    PubMed

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  8. Transition-metal-free atropo-selective synthesis of biaryl compounds based on arynes.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Frédéric R; Berthelot, Anaïs; Bonnafoux, Laurence; Panossian, Armen; Colobert, Françoise

    2012-11-01

    A modular way towards biaryls: Highly enantioenriched biphenyls can be prepared based on a transition-metal-free aryl-aryl coupling followed by efficient desymmetrization or deracemization and chemoselective functionalization (see scheme).

  9. Strain Engineering for Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Based Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tingting; Penumatcha, Ashish V; Appenzeller, Joerg

    2016-04-26

    Using electrical characteristics from three-terminal field-effect transistors (FETs), we demonstrate substantial strain induced band gap tunability in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) in line with theoretical predictions and optical experiments. Devices were fabricated on flexible substrates, and a cantilever sample holder was used to apply uniaxial tensile strain to the various multilayer TMD FETs. Analyzing in particular transfer characteristics, we argue that the modified device characteristics under strain are clear evidence of a band gap reduction of 100 meV in WSe2 under 1.35% uniaxial tensile strain at room temperature. Furthermore, the obtained device characteristics imply that the band gap does not shrink uniformly under strain relative to a reference potential defined by the source/drain contacts. Instead, the band gap change is only related to a change of the conduction band edge of WSe2, resulting in a decrease in the Schottky barrier (SB) for electrons without any change for hole injection into the valence band. Simulations of SB device characteristics are employed to explain this point and to quantify our findings. Last, our experimental results are compared with DFT calculations under strain showing excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the experimental data presented here. PMID:27043387

  10. 2D Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide-Nanosheet-Based Composites for Photocatalytic and Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qipeng; Yu, Yifu; Ma, Qinglang; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is one of the most important clean and renewable energy sources for future energy sustainability. Nowadays, photocatalytic and electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reactions (HERs) from water splitting are considered as two of the most efficient methods to convert sustainable energy to the clean energy carrier, H2. Catalysts based on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are recognized as greatly promising substitutes for noble-metal-based catalysts for HER. The photocatalytic and electrocatalytic activities of TMD nanosheets for the HER can be further improved after hybridization with many kinds of nanomaterials, such as metals, oxides, sulfides, and carbon materials, through different methods including the in situ reduction method, the hot-injection method, the heating-up method, the hydro(solvo)thermal method, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and thermal annealing. Here, recent progress in photocatalytic and electrocatalytic HERs using 2D TMD-based composites as catalysts is discussed.

  11. Transition Metal Ion Complexes of Schiff-bases. Synthesis, Characterization and Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Munawar, Asifa; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2001-01-01

    Some novel transition metal [Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)] complexes of substituted pyridine Schiff-bases have been prepared and characterized by physical, spectral and analytical data. The synthesized Schiff-bases act as deprotonated tridentate for the complexation reaction with Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions. The new compounds, possessing the general formula [M(L)2] where [M=Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) and HL=HL1, HL2, HL3 and HL4] show an octahedral geometry. In order to evaluate the effect of metal ions upon chelation, the Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for antibacterial activity against the strains such as Escherichia coli,Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The complexed Schiff bases have shown to be more antibacterial against one more bacterial species as compared to uncomplexed Schiff-bases. PMID:18475987

  12. Synthesis and structures of transition metal pacman complexes of heteroditopic Schiff-base pyrrole macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Leeland, James W; Finn, Colin; Escuyer, Bérengère; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nichol, Gary S; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Love, Jason B

    2012-12-01

    A series of polydentate dual-compartment, Schiff-base pyrrole macrocycles has been prepared through the straightforward Lewis acid catalysed [1 + 1] condensation reactions between ONO or O(5)-linked aryldiamines and dipyrromethane dialdehydes. These macrocycles display hydrogen-bond acceptor and donor properties and provide distinct N(4) and O(5)/ONO donor sets for metallation reactions, so forming alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal complexes that were characterised spectroscopically and crystallographically. While the conformationally flexible O(5) donor set allows the formation of helical potassium salt structures, the transition metal complexes of all variants of these macrocycles invariably adopt wedged, Pacman-shaped structures in which the metal is bound in the pyrrole-imine N(4) donor set, so leaving the ONO/O(5) donor set pendant and apical. In some cases (V, Cr, and Co), this proximate combination of Lewis acid binding site and hydrogen bond acceptor facilitates the coordination of water within the molecular cleft; alternatively, direct interaction between the pendant arm and the metal is seen (e.g. Ti). Higher order [2 + 2] macrocycles were also prepared as minor, inseparable by-products of cyclisation, and Fe(2), Mn(2), and Co(2) complexes of these larger macrocycles were found to adopt binuclear helical structures by X-ray crystallography.

  13. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  14. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  15. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  16. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  17. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  18. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF[sub 2], ThO[sub 2], YDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]-0.15YO[sub 1.5]), and LDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]- 0.15LaO[sub 1.5]) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  19. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}, YDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}-0.15YO{sub 1.5}), and LDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}- 0.15LaO{sub 1.5}) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  20. Rapid detection of transition metals in welding fumes using paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Cate, David M; Nanthasurasak, Pavisara; Riwkulkajorn, Pornpak; L'Orange, Christian; Henry, Charles S; Volckens, John

    2014-05-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  1. Rapid detection of transition metals in welding fumes using paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Cate, David M; Nanthasurasak, Pavisara; Riwkulkajorn, Pornpak; L'Orange, Christian; Henry, Charles S; Volckens, John

    2014-05-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments.

  2. Rapid Detection of Transition Metals in Welding Fumes Using Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Volckens, John

    2014-01-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  3. Transition metal cation separations with a resorcinarene-based amino acid stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Allen, Lee J; Harrison, Roger G; Lamb, John D

    2013-03-01

    A resorcinarene-based macrocyclic ligand functionalized with alanine and undecyl groups (AUA) was synthesized and applied to ion chromatographic separations. The selectivity and separation of transition metal ions on a column packed with AUA adsorbed onto 55% cross-linked styrene-divinylbenzene resin are presented. The upper and lower rims of the resorcinarene were modified with amino acids and -C(11)H(23) alkyl chains, respectively. The four carboxylic acid groups on the upper rim act as cation-exchangers while the four -C(11)H(23) alkyl chains serve to anchor the ligand to the resin surface by the hydrophobic effect. A systematic study of the effect of different eluent components including non-metal-chelating (HNO(3)) and chelating acids (oxalic acid, succinic acid, dipicolinic acid, and citric acid) on the retention of transition metal ions was investigated. Six metal ions (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) were separated on the AUA column within a reasonable time with a single eluent gradient using oxalic acid. The separation is compared to that obtained using a commercial column containing carboxylic acid functional groups. The AUA column containing four preorganized carboxylic acid groups showed selectivity for Cu(2+) when no chelating eluent was present, a selectivity which was not observed with the comparison column.

  4. Transition Metal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nies, Dietrich H; Grass, Gregor

    2009-08-01

    This chapter focuses on transition metals. All transition metal cations are toxic-those that are essential for Escherichia coli and belong to the first transition period of the periodic system of the element and also the "toxic-only" metals with higher atomic numbers. Common themes are visible in the metabolism of these ions. First, there is transport. High-rate but low-affinity uptake systems provide a variety of cations and anions to the cells. Control of the respective systems seems to be mainly through regulation of transport activity (flux control), with control of gene expression playing only a minor role. If these systems do not provide sufficient amounts of a needed ion to the cell, genes for ATP-hydrolyzing high-affinity but low-rate uptake systems are induced, e.g., ABC transport systems or P-type ATPases. On the other hand, if the amount of an ion is in surplus, genes for efflux systems are induced. By combining different kinds of uptake and efflux systems with regulation at the levels of gene expression and transport activity, the concentration of a single ion in the cytoplasm and the composition of the cellular ion "bouquet" can be rapidly adjusted and carefully controlled. The toxicity threshold of an ion is defined by its ability to produce radicals (copper, iron, chromate), to bind to sulfide and thiol groups (copper, zinc, all cations of the second and third transition period), or to interfere with the metabolism of other ions. Iron poses an exceptional metabolic problem due its metabolic importance and the low solubility of Fe(III) compounds, combined with the ability to cause dangerous Fenton reactions. This dilemma for the cells led to the evolution of sophisticated multi-channel iron uptake and storage pathways to prevent the occurrence of unbound iron in the cytoplasm. Toxic metals like Cd2+ bind to thiols and sulfide, preventing assembly of iron complexes and releasing the metal from iron-sulfur clusters. In the unique case of mercury, the

  5. Melting of Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Japel, S; Boehler, R

    2005-04-11

    We review the transition melting studies carried out at Mainz, and describe a recently developed model used to explain that the relatively low melting slopes are due to the partially filled d-bands, and the persistence of the pressure induced s-d transition. The basic tenets of the model have now been reconfirmed by new measurements for Cu and Ni. The measurements show that Cu which has a filled 3d-band, has a melt slope that is about 2.5 greater than its neighbor Ni. In the case of Mo, the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting can be explained by accounting for the change in melt slope due to the bcc-cp transition observed in the shock studies. The Fe melt curve is revisited. The possible relevance of the Jahn-Teller effect and recently observed transition metal melts with Icosahedral Short-Range Order (ISRO) is discussed.

  6. Recent advances in transition-metal dichalcogenide based nanomaterials for water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengmei; Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Zhan, Xueying; Huang, Yun; Liu, Kaili; Cheng, Zhongzhou; Jiang, Chao; He, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The desire for sustainable and clean energy future continues to be the concern of the scientific community. Researchers are incessantly targeting the development of scalable and abundant electro- or photo-catalysts for water splitting. Owing to their suitable band-gap and excellent stability, an enormous amount of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with hierarchical nanostructures have been extensively explored. Herein, we present an overview of the recent research progresses in the design, characterization and applications of the TMD-based electro- or photo-catalysts for hydrogen and oxygen evolution. Emphasis is given to the layered and pyrite-phase structured TMDs encompassing semiconducting and metallic nanomaterials. Illustrative results and the future prospects are pointed out. This review will provide the readers with insight into the state-of-the-art research progresses in TMD based nanomaterials for water splitting.

  7. Transition-metal-nitride-based thin films as novel energy harvesting materials

    PubMed Central

    Kerdsongpanya, Sit; Alling, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have seen a rise in the interest in early transition-metal and rare-earth nitrides, primarily based on ScN and CrN, for energy harvesting by thermoelectricity and piezoelectricity. This is because of a number of important advances, among those the discoveries of exceptionally high piezoelectric coupling coefficient in (Sc,Al)N alloys and of high thermoelectric power factors of ScN-based and CrN-based thin films. These materials also constitute well-defined model systems for investigating thermodynamics of mixing for alloying and nanostructural design for optimization of phase stability and band structure. These features have implications for and can be used for tailoring of thermoelectric and piezoelectric properties. In this highlight article, we review the ScN- and CrN-based transition-metal nitrides for thermoelectrics, and drawing parallels with piezoelectricity. We further discuss these materials as a models systems for general strategies for tailoring of thermoelectric properties by integrated theoretical–experimental approaches. PMID:27358737

  8. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  9. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  10. Performance limits of tunnel transistors based on mono-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiang-Wei Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-05-12

    Performance limits of tunnel field-effect transistors based on mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenides are investigated through numerical quantum mechanical simulations. The atomic mono-layer nature of the devices results in a much smaller natural length λ, leading to much larger electric field inside the tunneling diodes. As a result, the inter-band tunneling currents are found to be very high as long as ultra-thin high-k gate dielectric is possible. The highest on-state driving current is found to be close to 600 μA/μm at V{sub g} = V{sub d} = 0.5 V when 2 nm thin HfO{sub 2} layer is used for gate dielectric, outperforming most of the conventional semiconductor tunnel transistors. In the five simulated transition-metal dichalcogenides, mono-layer WSe{sub 2} based tunnel field-effect transistor shows the best potential. Deep analysis reveals that there is plenty room to further enhance the device performance by either geometry, alloy, or strain engineering on these mono-layer materials.

  11. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.J.

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  12. Metal to semiconductor transition in metallic transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Tongay, Sefaattin; Yue, Qu; Kang, Jun; Wu, Junqiao; Li, Jingbo

    2013-11-01

    We report on tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of metallic transition metal dichalcogenides (mTMDCs) by 2D to 1D size confinement. The stability of the mTMDC monolayers and nanoribbons is demonstrated by the larger binding energy compared to the experimentally available semiconducting TMDCs. The 2D MX2 (M = Nb, Ta; X = S, Se) monolayers are non-ferromagnetic metals and mechanically softer compared to their semiconducting TMDCs counterparts. Interestingly, mTMDCs undergo metal-to-semiconductor transition when the ribbon width approaches to ˜13 Å and ˜7 Å for zigzag and armchair edge terminations, respectively; then these ribbons convert back to metal when the ribbon widths further decrease. Zigzag terminated nanoribbons are ferromagnetic semiconductors, and their magnetic properties can also be tuned by hydrogen edge passivation, whereas the armchair nanoribbons are non-ferromagnetic semiconductors. Our results display that the mTMDCs offer a broad range of physical properties spanning from metallic to semiconducting and non-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic that is ideal for applications where stable narrow bandgap semiconductors with different magnetic properties are desired.

  13. Novel Two-Dimensional Mechano-Electric Generators and Sensors Based on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sheng; Eshun, Kwesi; Zhu, Hao; Li, Qiliang

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, provide two-dimensional atomic crystals with semiconductor band gap. In this work, we present a design of new mechano-electric generators and sensors based on transition metal dichalcogenide nanoribbon PN junctions and heterojunctions. The mechano-electric conversion was simulated by using a first-principle calculation. The output voltage of MoS2 nanoribbon PN junction increases with strain, reaching 0.036 V at 1% strain and 0.31 V at 8% strain, much larger than the reported results. Our study indicates that the length, width and layer number of TMDC nanoribbon PN junctions have an interesting but different impact on the voltage output. Also, the results indicate that doping position and concentration only cause a small fluctuation in the output voltage. These results have been compared with the mechano-electric conversion of TMDC heterojunctions. Such novel mechano-electric generators and sensors are very attractive for applications in future self-powered, wearable electronics and systems. PMID:26238461

  14. An ammonium soap solution based method for the preparation of ceramic/transition metal microcomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.A.; Maginnis, M.A.

    1995-12-01

    A process for the preparation of transition metal/ceramic composites has been developed. This method was initially used to prepare silver/Y BaCuO composites and is currently being used to prepare other transition metal/ceramic superconductors and metal nitrides. An ammonium soap of 2-ethylhexonate is used to prepare a metallorganic in solution that is rapidly gelled or precipitated around a suspended and dispersed ceramic. This step is followed by a low temperature heat treatment in hydrogen or oxygen to produce the desired composite.

  15. Quasiparticle band structure of the almost-gapless transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, M.; Şaşıoǧlu, E.; Galanakis, I.; Friedrich, C.; Blügel, S.

    2016-05-01

    Transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors are promising materials for a variety of applications ranging from spintronics to thermoelectricity. Employing the G W approximation within the framework of the FLAPW method, we study the quasiparticle band structure of a number of such compounds being almost gapless semiconductors. We find that in contrast to the s p -electron based semiconductors such as Si and GaAs, in these systems, the many-body corrections have a minimal effect on the electronic band structure and the energy band gap increases by less than 0.2 eV, which makes the starting point density functional theory (DFT) a good approximation for the description of electronic and optical properties of these materials. Furthermore, the band gap can be tuned either by the variation of the lattice parameter or by the substitution of the s p -chemical element.

  16. Robust Quantum-Based Interatomic Potentials for Multiscale Modeling in Transition Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, J A; Benedict, L X; Glosli, J N; Hood, R Q; Orlikowski, D A; Patel, M V; Soderlind, P; Streitz, F H; Tang, M; Yang, L H

    2005-09-27

    First-principles generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT) provides a fundamental basis for transferable multi-ion interatomic potentials in transition metals and alloys within density-functional quantum mechanics. In the central bcc metals, where multi-ion angular forces are important to materials properties, simplified model GPT or MGPT potentials have been developed based on canonical d bands to allow analytic forms and large-scale atomistic simulations. Robust, advanced-generation MGPT potentials have now been obtained for Ta and Mo and successfully applied to a wide range of structural, thermodynamic, defect and mechanical properties at both ambient and extreme conditions. Selected applications to multiscale modeling discussed here include dislocation core structure and mobility, atomistically informed dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity, and thermoelasticity and high-pressure strength modeling. Recent algorithm improvements have provided a more general matrix representation of MGPT beyond canonical bands, allowing improved accuracy and extension to f-electron actinide metals, an order of magnitude increase in computational speed for dynamic simulations, and the development of temperature-dependent potentials.

  17. A high-performance complementary inverter based on transition metal dichalcogenide field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ah-Jin; Park, Kee Chan; Kwon, Jang-Yeon

    2015-03-01

    For several years, graphene has been the focus of much attention due to its peculiar characteristics, and it is now considered to be a representative 2-dimensional (2D) material. Even though many research groups have studied on the graphene, its intrinsic nature of a zero band-gap, limits its use in practical applications, particularly in logic circuits. Recently, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which are another type of 2D material, have drawn attention due to the advantage of having a sizable band-gap and a high mobility. Here, we report on the design of a complementary inverter, one of the most basic logic elements, which is based on a MoS2 n-type transistor and a WSe2 p-type transistor. The advantages provided by the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) configuration and the high-performance TMD channels allow us to fabricate a TMD complementary inverter that has a high-gain of 13.7. This work demonstrates the operation of the MoS2 n-FET and WSe2 p-FET on the same substrate, and the electrical performance of the CMOS inverter, which is based on a different driving current, is also measured.

  18. A high-performance complementary inverter based on transition metal dichalcogenide field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ah-Jin; Park, Kee Chan; Kwon, Jang-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    For several years, graphene has been the focus of much attention due to its peculiar characteristics, and it is now considered to be a representative 2-dimensional (2D) material. Even though many research groups have studied on the graphene, its intrinsic nature of a zero band-gap, limits its use in practical applications, particularly in logic circuits. Recently, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which are another type of 2D material, have drawn attention due to the advantage of having a sizable band-gap and a high mobility. Here, we report on the design of a complementary inverter, one of the most basic logic elements, which is based on a MoS2 n-type transistor and a WSe2 p-type transistor. The advantages provided by the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) configuration and the high-performance TMD channels allow us to fabricate a TMD complementary inverter that has a high-gain of 13.7. This work demonstrates the operation of the MoS2 n-FET and WSe2 p-FET on the same substrate, and the electrical performance of the CMOS inverter, which is based on a different driving current, is also measured. PMID:25852410

  19. Molecular precursor routes to transition metal sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinnage, Christopher Walker

    This thesis is primarily concerned with the synthesis of homoleptic early transition meta thiolates and the subsequent preparation of bulk and thin-film metal disulfides from these compounds. Chapter 1 gives an introduction into the properties, preparation procedures and uses of bulk and thin-film transition metal disulfides as well as giving an overview of early transition metal thiolates synthesied so far in the literature (for titanium, zirconium, tantalum and niobium). Chapter 2 is concerned with the synthesis of a number of ionic and neutral transition metal thiolates. The main synthetic methodologies discussed in this chapter include substitution reactions of transition metal amides and alkyls with thiols, salt metathesis reactions of transition metal chlorides with alkali metal thiolates or with a base / thiol and the use of Grignard reagents. Chapter 3 discusses the preparation of bulk transition metal disulfides using the thiolates prepared in the previous chapter via a thio "sol-gel" route. The preparation of a range of bulk metal and mixed-metal disulfides using transition metal chlorides and hexamethyldisilathiane is also discussed in this chapter. Finally, chapter 4 is concerned with the attempted preparation of thin-films of some transition metal disulfides. Decomposition studies of some of the thiolates prepared in chapter 2 are discussed using thermal gravimetric analysis. Vapour-phase deposition studies are also explored in order to test the potential of the transition metal thiolates as precursors to the disulfides. Experiments using low-pressure chemical vapour deposition and aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition are also described.

  20. Asymmetric total synthesis of (+)-aphanamol I based on the transition metal catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloaddition of allenes and vinylcyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Wender, P A; Zhang, L

    2000-07-27

    A concise asymmetric total synthesis of (+)-aphanamol I is described, based on the transition metal catalyzed [5 + 2] allenyl-vinylcyclopropane cycloaddition. The key cycloaddition precursor is convergently assembled from (R)-(+)-limonene and cyclopropane diester through a novel decarboxylative dehydration reaction. The metal-catalyzed [5 + 2] cycloaddition of this precursor proceeds with complete chemo, endo/exo, and diastereoselectivity in 93% yield, representing an effective general route to bicyclo[5.3.0]decane derivatives.

  1. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  2. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  3. Carrier behavior in special multilayer device composed of different transition metal oxide-based intermediate connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yan-Hong; Chen, Xiang-Yu E-mail: xychen@suda.edu.cn; Ou, Qing-Dong; Wang, Qian-Kun; Jiang, Xiao-Cheng; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Yan-Qing E-mail: xychen@suda.edu.cn

    2014-06-02

    The impact of illumination on the connection part of the tandem organic light-emitting diodes was studied by using a special organic multilayer sample consisted of two organic active layers coupled with different transition metal oxide (TMO)-based intermediate connectors (ICs). Through measuring the current density-voltage characteristic, interfacial electronic structures, and capacitance-voltage characteristic, we observe an unsymmetrical phenomenon in current density-voltage and capacitance-voltage curves of Mg:Alq{sub 3}/MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} composed devices, which was induced by the charge spouting zone near the ICs region and the recombination state in the MoO{sub 3} layer. Moreover, Mg:Alq{sub 3}/MoO{sub 3} composed device displays a photovoltaic effect and the V{sub oc} shifts to forward bias under illumination. Our results demonstrate that the TMO-based IC structure coupled with photovoltaic effect can be a good approach for the study of photodetector, light sensor, and so on.

  4. Quantum simulation of a heterojunction vertical tunnel FET based on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang; Cresti, Alessandro; Esseni, David; Pala, Marco

    2016-02-01

    We simulate a band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistor based on a vertical heterojunction of single-layer MoS2 and WTe2, by exploiting the non-equilibrium Green's function method and including electron-phonon scattering. For both in-plane and out-of-plane transport, we attempt to calibrate out models to the few available experimental results. We focus on the role of chemical doping and back-gate biasing, and investigate the off-state physics of this device by analyzing the influence of the top-gate geometrical alignment on the device performance. The device scalability as a function of gate length is also studied. Finally, we present two metrics for the switching delay and energy of the device. Our simulations indicate that vertical field-effect transistors based on transition metal dichalcogenides can provide very small values of sub-threshold swing when properly designed in terms of doping concentration and top-gate extension length.

  5. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  6. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  7. Upper critical fields and superconducting transition temperatures of some zirconium-base amorphous transition-metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkut, M. G.; Hake, R. R.

    1983-08-01

    Superconducting upper critical fields Hc2(T), transition temperatures Tc and normal-state electrical resistivities ρn have been measured in the amorphous transition-metal alloy series Zr1-xCox, Zr1-xNix, (Zr1-xTix)0.78Ni0.22, and (Zr1-xNbx)0.78Ni0.22. Structural integrity of these melt-spun alloys is indicated by x-ray, density, bend-ductility, normal-state electrical resistivity, superconducting transition width, and mixed-state flux-pinning measurements. The specimens display Tc=2.1-3.8 K, ρn=159-190 μΩ cm, and |(dHc2dT)Tc|=28-36 kG/K. These imply electron mean free paths l~2-6 Å, zero-temperature Ginzburg-Landau coherence distances ξG0~50-70 Å, penetration depths λG0~(7-10)×103 Å, and extremely high dirtiness parameters ξ0l~300-1300. All alloys display Hc2(T) curves with negative curvature and (with two exceptions) fair agreement with the standard dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM) for physically reasonable values of spin-orbit-coupling induced, electron-spin-flip scattering time τso. This is in contrast to the anomalously elevated Hc2(T) behavior which is nearly linear in T that is observed by some, and the unphysically low-τso fits to WHHM theory obtained by others, for various amorphous alloys. Current ideas that such anomalies may be due to alloy inhomogeneity are supported by present results on two specimens for which relatively low-τso fits of Hc2(T) to WHHM theory are coupled with superconductive evidence for inhomogeneity: relatively broad transitions at Tc and Hc2 current-density-dependent transitions at Hc2 and (in one specimen) a J-dependent, high-H (>Hc2), resistive "beak effect." In the Zr1-xCox and Zr1-xNix series, Tc decreases linearly with x (and with unfilled-shell average electron-to-atom ratio < ea > in the range 5.05<=< ea ><=6.40 in fair agreement with previous results for these systems and contrary to the Tc vs < ea > behavior of both amorphous and crystalline transition-metal alloys formed

  8. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2.

  9. Passively Q-switched waveguide lasers based on two-dimensional transition metal diselenide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen; Liu, Hongliang; Tan, Yang; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-16

    We reported on the passively Q-switched waveguide lasers based on few-layer transition metal diselenide, including molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2), as saturable absorbers. The MoSe2 and WSe2 membranes were covered on silica wafers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A low-loss depressed cladding waveguide was produced by femtosecond laser writing in a Nd:YAG crystal. Under optical pump at 808 nm, the passive Q-switching of the Nd:YAG waveguide lasing at 1064 nm was achieved, reaching maximum average output power of 115 mW (MoSe2) and 45 mW (WSe2), respectively, which are corresponding to single-pulse energy of 36 nJ and 19 nJ. The repetition rate of the Q-switched waveguide lasers was tunable from 0.995 to 3.334 MHz (MoSe2) and 0.781 to 2.938 MHz (WSe2), and the obtained minimum pulse duration was 80ns (MoSe2) and 52 ns (WSe2), respectively.

  10. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2. PMID:27305974

  11. Sensitivity Enhancement of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides/Silicon Nanostructure-based Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qingling; Zeng, Shuwen; Jiang, Li; Hong, Liying; Xu, Gaixia; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Qian, Jun; He, Sailing; Qu, Junle; Coquet, Philippe; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-06-16

    In this work, we designed a sensitivity-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor structure based on silicon nanosheet and two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. This configuration contains six components: SF10 triangular prism, gold thin film, silicon nanosheet, two-dimensional MoS2/MoSe2/WS2/WSe2 (defined as MX2) layers, biomolecular analyte layer and sensing medium. The minimum reflectivity, sensitivity as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum of SPR curve are systematically examined by using Fresnel equations and the transfer matrix method in the visible and near infrared wavelength range (600 nm to 1024 nm). The variation of the minimum reflectivity and the change in resonance angle as the function of the number of MX2 layers are presented respectively. The results show that silicon nanosheet and MX2 layers can be served as effective light absorption medium. Under resonance conditions, the electrons in these additional dielectric layers can be transferred to the surface of gold thin film. All silicon-MX2 enhanced sensing models show much better performance than that of the conventional sensing scheme where pure Au thin film is used, the highest sensitivity can be achieved by employing 600 nm excitation light wavelength with 35 nm gold thin film and 7 nm thickness silicon nanosheet coated with monolayer WS2.

  12. Passively Q-switched waveguide lasers based on two-dimensional transition metal diselenide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen; Liu, Hongliang; Tan, Yang; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-16

    We reported on the passively Q-switched waveguide lasers based on few-layer transition metal diselenide, including molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2), as saturable absorbers. The MoSe2 and WSe2 membranes were covered on silica wafers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A low-loss depressed cladding waveguide was produced by femtosecond laser writing in a Nd:YAG crystal. Under optical pump at 808 nm, the passive Q-switching of the Nd:YAG waveguide lasing at 1064 nm was achieved, reaching maximum average output power of 115 mW (MoSe2) and 45 mW (WSe2), respectively, which are corresponding to single-pulse energy of 36 nJ and 19 nJ. The repetition rate of the Q-switched waveguide lasers was tunable from 0.995 to 3.334 MHz (MoSe2) and 0.781 to 2.938 MHz (WSe2), and the obtained minimum pulse duration was 80ns (MoSe2) and 52 ns (WSe2), respectively. PMID:27409862

  13. Radiative transitions in metallic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalin, A. S.

    2008-02-01

    In this article, a new theoretical approach to studying light-scattering characteristics of nanosized objects based on the solution to the Thomas-Fermi equation and quasi-classical approximation is considered. It is shown that the distribution of valence electrons in the volume of metallic clusters exhibits a specific structure of "spatial zones." With the aid of quasi-classical wave functions, expressions for the appropriate dipole moments of the transitions between the ground and excited states are obtained; the behavior of the spectrum of gold clusters depending on their sizes is studied; a comparison with existing experimental data is carried out.

  14. Molecular Structures, Acid-Base Properties, and Formation of Group 6 Transition Metal Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shenggang; Guenther, Courtney L.; Kelley, Matthew S.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)) were used to study the group 6 metal (M = Cr, Mo, W) hydroxides: MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3), M2O6-m(OH)2m (m = 1-5), M3O9-m(OH)2m (m = 1, 2), and M4O11(OH)2. The calculations were done up to the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the CCSD(T) method. Molecular structures of many low-energy conformers/isomers were located. Brønsted acidities in the gas phase and pKa values in aqueous solution were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) and MnO3n-1(OH)2 (n = 2-4). In addition, Brønsted basicities and Lewis acidities (fluoride affinities) were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) as well as the metal oxide clusters MnO3n (n = 1-3). The metal hydroxides were predicted to be strong Brønsted acids and weak to modest Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. The pKa values can have values as negative as -31. Potential energy surfaces for the hydrolysis of the MnO3n (n = 1-4) clusters were calculated. Heats of formation of the metal hydroxides were predicted from the calculated reaction energies, and the agreement with the limited available experimental data is good. The first hydrolysis step leading to the formation of MnO3n-1(OH)2 was predicted to be exothermic, with the exothermicity becoming less negative as n increases and essentially converged at n = 3. Reaction rate constants for the hydrogen transfer steps were calculated using transition state theory and RRKM theory. Further hydrolysis of MnO3n-1(OH)2 tends to be endothermic especially for M = Cr. Fifty-five DFT exchange-correlation functionals were benchmarked for the calculations of the reaction energies, complexation energies, and reaction barriers by comparing to our CCSD(T) results. Overall, the DFT results for the potential energy surfaces are semiquantitatively correct, but no single functional works for all processes and all three metals. Among the functionals benchmarked, the wB97, wB97X, B1B95, B97-1, mPW1LYP, and X3LYP functionals have the best

  15. Redox-activated MRI contrast agents based on lanthanide and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Tsitovich, Pavel B; Burns, Patrick J; McKay, Adam M; Morrow, Janet R

    2014-04-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) potential of tissue is tightly regulated in order to maintain normal physiological processes, but is disrupted in disease states. Thus, the development of new tools to map tissue redox potential may be clinically important for the diagnosis of diseases that lead to redox imbalances. One promising area of chemical research is the development of redox-activated probes for mapping tissue through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we summarize several strategies for the design of redox-responsive MRI contrast agents. Our emphasis is on both lanthanide(III) and transition metal(II/III) ion complexes that provide contrast either as T1 relaxivity MRI contrast agents or as paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents. These agents are redox-triggered by a variety of chemical reactions or switches including redox-activated thiol groups, and heterocyclic groups that interact with the metal ion or influence properties of other ancillary ligands. Metal ion centered redox is an approach which is ripe for development by coordination chemists. Redox-triggered metal ion approaches have great potential for creating large differences in magnetic properties that lead to changes in contrast. An attractive feature of these agents is the ease of fine-tuning the metal ion redox potential over a biologically relevant range.

  16. Highly selectively monitoring heavy and transition metal ions by a fluorescent sensor based on dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Lok Nath; Thirupathi, Ponnaboina; Jang, Sujung; Jang, Min Jung; Kim, Jung Hwa; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2011-09-15

    Fluorescent sensor (DMH) based on dipeptide was efficiently synthesized in solid phase synthesis. The dipeptide sensor shows sensitive response to Ag(I), Hg(II), and Cu(II) among 14 metal ions in 100% aqueous solution. The fluorescent sensor differentiates three heavy metal ions by response type; turn on response to Ag(I), ratiometric response to Hg(II), and turn off detection of Cu(II). The detection limits of the sensor for Ag(I) and Cu(II) were much lower than the EPA's drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCL). Specially, DMH penetrated live cells and detected intracellular Ag(+) by turn on response. We described the fluorescent change, binding affinity, detection limit for the metal ions. The study of a heavy metal-responsive sensor based on dipeptide demonstrates its potential utility in the environment field.

  17. Vertical Field-Effect Transistor Based on Graphene-Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jatinder; Chien, Hui-Chun; Bellus, Matthew Z.; Sicilian, David L.; Aubin, Davis St.; Chiu, Hsin-Ying; Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas Team

    2014-03-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene has made it possible to create transistors just few atoms thick. A new development was that the other two-dimensional materials can be stacked on it with atomic layer precision, creating numerous heterostructures on demand. Here, novel vertical field-effect transistor composed of graphene- transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) heterostructures is fabricated and characterized at various temperatures. Due to ultrathin nature of these transistors, they present the ultimate limit for electron transport in heterostructures. Tunneling and thermionic transport characteristics are studied among different graphene-TMDs heterostructures. Their electronic properties have been investigated and can be used in vast range of devices.

  18. Development of biomimetic catalytic oxidation methods and non-salt methods using transition metal-based acid and base ambiphilic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Murahashi, Shun-Ichi

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the development of ruthenium and flavin catalysts for environmentally benign oxidation reactions based on mimicking the functions of cytochrome P-450 and flavoenzymes, and low valent transition-metal catalysts that replace conventional acids and bases. Several new concepts and new types of catalytic reactions based on these concepts are described. (Communicated by Ryoji Noyori, M.J.A.).

  19. The electron-transfer based interaction between transition metal ions and photoluminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs): a platform for metal ion sensing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongduan; Liao, Lei; Xu, Xiao; Zou, Mingjian; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2013-12-15

    The electron-transfer based quenching effect of commonly encountered transition metal ions on the photoluminescence of grapheme quantum dots (GQDs) was for the first time investigated, and was found to be associated with electron configuration of the individual metal ion. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), the metal ion chelator, can competitively interact with metal ions to recover the quenched photoluminescence of GQDs. Basically, metal ions with empty or completely filled d orbits could not quench the photoluminescence of GQDs, but this quenching effect was observed for the metal ions with partly filled d orbits. Based on the quenching-recovering strategy, a simple optical metal sensing platform was established by taking Ni(2+) as an example. Using the nickel ion-specific chelating reagent, dimethylglyoxime (DMG), to replace EDTA, a detection limit of 4.1 μM was obtained in standard solution. This proposed strategy does not need further functionalization of GQDs, facilitating the application for simple, fast and cost-effective screening of metal ions.

  20. Stacking Principle and Magic Sizes of Transition Metal Nanoclusters Based on Generalized Wulff Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. F.; Zhao, X. J.; Xu, X. S.; Gao, Y. F.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2013-09-01

    Nanoclusters with extra stability at certain cluster sizes are known as magic clusters with exotic properties. The classic Wulff construction principle, which stipulates that the preferred structure of a cluster should minimize its total surface energy, is often invoked in determining the cluster magicity, resulting in close-shelled Mackay icosahedronal clusters with odd-numbered magic sizes of 13, 55, 147, etc. Here we use transition metal clusters around size 55 as prototypical examples to demonstrate that, in the nanometer regime, the classic Wulff construction principle needs to be generalized to primarily emphasize the edge atom effect instead of the surface energy. Specifically, our detailed calculations show that nanoclusters with much shorter total edge lengths but substantially enlarged total surface areas are energetically much more stable. As a consequence, a large majority of the nanoclusters within the 3d-, 4d-, and 5d-transition metal series are found to be fcc or hcp crystal fragments with much lower edge energies, and the widely perceived magic size of 55 is shifted to its nearby even numbers.

  1. Stacking principle and magic sizes of transition metal nanoclusters based on generalized Wulff construction.

    PubMed

    Li, S F; Zhao, X J; Xu, X S; Gao, Y F; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2013-09-13

    Nanoclusters with extra stability at certain cluster sizes are known as magic clusters with exotic properties. The classic Wulff construction principle, which stipulates that the preferred structure of a cluster should minimize its total surface energy, is often invoked in determining the cluster magicity, resulting in close-shelled Mackay icosahedronal clusters with odd-numbered magic sizes of 13, 55, 147, etc. Here we use transition metal clusters around size 55 as prototypical examples to demonstrate that, in the nanometer regime, the classic Wulff construction principle needs to be generalized to primarily emphasize the edge atom effect instead of the surface energy. Specifically, our detailed calculations show that nanoclusters with much shorter total edge lengths but substantially enlarged total surface areas are energetically much more stable. As a consequence, a large majority of the nanoclusters within the 3d-, 4d-, and 5d-transition metal series are found to be fcc or hcp crystal fragments with much lower edge energies, and the widely perceived magic size of 55 is shifted to its nearby even numbers.

  2. A series of transition and non-transition metal complexes from a N 4O 2 hexadentate Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and efficient antimicrobial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saikat; Dey, Kamalendu

    2010-11-01

    Some transition and non-transition metal complexes of the hexadentate N 4O 2 donor Schiff base ligand 1,8- N-bis(3-carboxy)disalicylidene-3,6-diazaoctane-1,8-diamine, abbreviated to H 4fsatrien, have been synthesized. All the 14 metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic (UV-Vis, IR, NMR, ESR) data. The analytical data helped to elucidate the structures of the metal complexes. The Schiff base, H 4fsatrien, is found to act as a dibasic hexadentate ligand using N 2N 2O 2 donor set of atoms (leaving the COOH group uncoordinated) leading to an octahedral geometry for the complexes around all the metal ions except VO 2+ and UO 22+. However, surprisingly the same ligand functions as a neutral hexadentate and neutral tetradentate one towards UO 22+ and VO 2+, respectively. In case of divalent metal complexes they have the general formula [M(H 2fsatrien)] (where M stands for Cu, Co, Hg and Zn); for trivalent metal complexes it is [M(H 2fsatrien)]X· nH 2O (where M stands for Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and X stands for CH 3COO, Cl, NO 3, ClO 4) and for the complexes of VO 2+ and UO 22+, [M(H 4fsatrien)]Y (where M = VO and Y = SO 4; M = UO 2 and Y = 2 NO 3). The Schiff base ligand and most of the complexes have been screened in vitro to judge their antibacterial ( Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and antifungal ( Aspergillus niger and Pencillium chrysogenum) activities.

  3. Volume-based considerations for the metal-insulator transition of CMR oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, J.J. |; Hundley, M.F.; Cornelius, A.L.; Andres, K.

    1998-03-01

    The sensitivity of {rho} [electrical resistivity] to changes in volume which occur through: (1) applied pressure, (2) variations in temperature, and (3) phase transitions, is evaluated for some selected CMR oxides. It is argued that the changes in volume associated with phase changes are large enough to produce self pressures in the range of 0.18 to 0.45 GPa. The extreme sensitivity of the electrical resistivity to pressure indicates that these self pressures are responsible for large features in the electrical resistivity and are an important component for occurrence the metallicity below {Tc}. It is suggested that this is related to a strong volume dependence of the electron phonon coupling in the CMR oxides.

  4. Combinatorial Search of Hydrogen Catalysts Based on Transition Metal Embedded Graphitic Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woon Ih; Wood, Brandon; Schwegler, Eric; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Quantum Simulation Group Team

    2015-03-01

    To find right d-orbital configuration for hydrogen catalyst among embedded transition metal (TM) atoms into the lattice of graphene, we performed high-throughput computational search out of 300 combinatorial material pools. Theoretical criteria, so called descriptors regarding material stability and catalytic activity are considered and we were able to narrow down to ten materials for hydrogen evolution, two for hydrogen oxidation reaction. Since catalytically active sites are isolated to single TM atom, Volmer-Kubas type of new reaction pathway is expected for hydrogen evolution. Earth-abundant element Mo, bulk form of which doesn't show good catalytic activity at all, turns into catalytically active site as it is dispersed atomically and its d-orbitals splits by the symmetry of local coordination at the binding sites.

  5. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H.

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L1-L3 have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  6. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L(1)-L(3) have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination. PMID:23277183

  7. Syntheses, crystal structures, anticancer activities of three reduce Schiff base ligand based transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui-Qin; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Wei-Na

    2016-02-01

    Three nickel(II) complexes, [Ni2(L1)2(tren)2(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1), [NiL2(tren)2](ClO4)·2.5H2O (2), [NiL2(tren)2]I·1.5H2O·CH3OH (3) based on amino acid reduced Schiff ligands are synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The results show that in all complexes, the amino acid ligand is deprotonated and acts as an anionic ligand. In the dinuclear complex 1, each Ni(II) atom has a distorted octahedron geometry while with different coordination environment. However, the complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear, almost with the same coordination environment. Furthermore, in vitro experiments are carried out, including MTT assay, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting, to assess whether the complexes have antitumor effect. And the results show that all the three complexes have moderate anticancer activity towards human hepatic cancer (HepG2), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human prostate (PC3) cell lines, in a concentration dependent way. The complex 1 exhibit higher cytotoxicity than the other two complexes and can induce human hepatic cancer cell (HepG2) to cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3.

  8. Syntheses, crystal structures, anticancer activities of three reduce Schiff base ligand based transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui-Qin; Jia, Lei; Xu, Jun; Zhu, Tao-Feng; Xu, Zhou-Qing; Chen, Ru-Hua; Ma, Tie-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Wei-Na

    2016-02-01

    Three nickel(II) complexes, [Ni2(L1)2(tren)2(H2O)](ClO4)3 (1), [NiL2(tren)2](ClO4)·2.5H2O (2), [NiL2(tren)2]I·1.5H2O·CH3OH (3) based on amino acid reduced Schiff ligands are synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The results show that in all complexes, the amino acid ligand is deprotonated and acts as an anionic ligand. In the dinuclear complex 1, each Ni(II) atom has a distorted octahedron geometry while with different coordination environment. However, the complexes 2 and 3 are mononuclear, almost with the same coordination environment. Furthermore, in vitro experiments are carried out, including MTT assay, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting, to assess whether the complexes have antitumor effect. And the results show that all the three complexes have moderate anticancer activity towards human hepatic cancer (HepG2), human cervical cancer (HeLa) and human prostate (PC3) cell lines, in a concentration dependent way. The complex 1 exhibit higher cytotoxicity than the other two complexes and can induce human hepatic cancer cell (HepG2) to cell apoptosis by activating caspase 3.

  9. An Ultrasonic Study on the Polyamorphic Transition in La/Ce-based Bulk Metallic Glass to 12 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Welch, D. O.; Jiang, J.; Li, B.

    2015-12-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), also known as amorphous alloys, are one of the most promising materials in the 21st century. With their unique structures, BMGs are at the cutting edge of materials study for both commercial applications and fundamental studies. In the light of engineering applications, some metal-metal alloy BMGs are stronger than steels but able to be shaped and molded like plastics. As a new member of glass family, metallic glasses are also good models for studies of fundamental problems in condensed matter physics. Pressure-induced polyamorphism in Ce-based bulk metallic glasses have attracted interest in recent years. Ultrasonic measurements of the compressional and shear wave velocities not only provide critical information about their interatomic forces, but also offer a unique approach for precise determination of mass densities under pressure that are quite difficult to access by other methods. In this study, the acoustic velocities of La32Ce32Al16Ni5Cu15 bulk metallic glass were measured up to 12.3 GPa using ultrasonic interferometry in a multi-anvil apparatus at room temperature. Both compressional and shear waves exhibited softening behaviors at 0-4 GPa, followed by a continuous increase (stiffening) with pressures. Measurements under decompression exhibit a hysteretic behavior compared to that on compression. The mass density as a function of pressure revealed three different amorphous states and the transition pressures were accompanied by distinct changes in the pressure derivatives of elastic moduli. The interpretation of the residual densification and the softening/stiffening across the polyamorphic transition can be sought via the topological rearrangement of the solute-centered clusters in medium-range order and the possibility of 4f electron localization/delocalization in Ce.

  10. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  11. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezkishko, I. A.; Zagidullin, A. A.; Milyukov, V. A.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2014-06-01

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  12. Monolayer MoS2 metal insulator transition based memcapacitor modeling with extension to a ternary device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Abdul Karim; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2016-09-01

    Memcapacitor model based on its one possible physical realization is developed and simulated in order to know its limitation before making a real device. The proposed device structure consists of vertically stacked dielectric layer and MoS2 monolayer between two external metal plates. The Metal Insulator Transition (MIT) phenomenon of MoS2 monolayer is represented in terms of percolation probabilty which is used as the system state. Cluster based site percolation theory is used to mimic the MIT of MoS2 which shows slight discontinuous change in MoS2 monolayer conductivity. The metal to insulator transition switches the capacitance of the device in hysterical way. An Ioffe Regel criterion is used to determine the MIT state of MoS2 monolayer. A good control of MIT time in the range of psec is also achieved by changing a single parameter in the model. The model shows memcapacitive behavior with an edge of fast switching (in psec range) over the previous general models. The model is then extended into vertical cascaded version which behaves like a ternary device instead of binary.

  13. Synchrotron-based investigation of transition-metal getterability in n-type multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishige, Ashley E.; Jensen, Mallory A.; Hofstetter, Jasmin; Yen, Patricia X. T.; Wang, Chenlei; Lai, Barry; Fenning, David P.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2016-05-01

    Solar cells based on n-type multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers are a promising path to reduce the cost per kWh of photovoltaics; however, the full potential of the material and how to optimally process it are still unknown. Process optimization requires knowledge of the response of the metal-silicide precipitate distribution to processing, which has yet to be directly measured and quantified. To supply this missing piece, we use synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) to quantitatively map >250 metal-rich particles in n-type mc-Si wafers before and after phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG). We find that 820 °C PDG is sufficient to remove precipitates of fast-diffusing impurities and that 920 °C PDG can eliminate precipitated Fe to below the detection limit of μ-XRF. Thus, the evolution of precipitated metal impurities during PDG is observed to be similar for n- and p-type mc-Si, an observation consistent with calculations of the driving forces for precipitate dissolution and segregation gettering. Measurements show that minority-carrier lifetime increases with increasing precipitate dissolution from 820 °C to 880 °C PDG, and that the lifetime after PDG at 920 °C is between the lifetimes achieved after 820 °C and 880 °C PDG.

  14. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  15. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural characterization, electrochemical and antimicrobial activity studies of the Schiff base ligand and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslantaş, Mehmet; Kendi, Engin; Demir, Necmettin; Şabik, Ali E.; Tümer, Mehmet; Kertmen, Metin

    2009-10-01

    In this study, the Schiff base ligand trans-N,N'-bis[(2,4-dichlorophenyl) methylidene] cyclohexane-1,2-diamine (L) and its copper(II), nickel(II) and palladium(II) transition metal complexes were prepared and characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods. The 1H( 13C) NMR spectra of the ligand and its diamagnetic complexes were recorded in DMSO-d 6 solvent and obtained data confirm that the nitrogen atoms of the imine groups coordinated to the metal ions. Electrochemical properties of the ligand and its metal complexes were investigated in the DMF solvent at the 100 and 250 mV s -1 scan rates. The ligand and metal complexes showed both reversible and irreversible processes at these scan rates. The single crystal of the ligand (L) was obtained from MeOH solution, and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction. The C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonding interactions in the molecule were seen which increase the stability of the crystal structure. The antimicrobial activity studies of the ligand and its metal complexes were carried out by using the various bacteria and fungi.

  17. Transition Metal(II) Complexes with Cefotaxime-Derived Schiff Base: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amzoiu, Emilia; Spînu, Cezar Ionuţ

    2014-01-01

    New [ML2(H2O)2] complexes, where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) while L corresponds to the Schiff base ligand, were synthesized by condensation of cefotaxime with salicylaldehyde in situ in the presence of divalent metal salts in ethanolic medium. The complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, conductance, and magnetic measurements, as well as by IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The low values of the molar conductance indicate nonelectrolyte type of complexes. Based on spectral data and magnetic moments, an octahedral geometry may be proposed for Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) complexes while a tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complex. Molecular structure of the Schiff base ligand and its complexes were studied using programs dedicated to chemical modeling and quantomolecular calculation of chemical properties. All the synthesized complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against some pathogenic bacterial strains, namely Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC values shown by the complexes against these bacterial strains revealed that the metal complexes possess superior antibacterial activity than the Schiff base. PMID:24688454

  18. DFT based study of transition metal nano-clusters for electrochemical NH3 production.

    PubMed

    Howalt, J G; Bligaard, T; Rossmeisl, J; Vegge, T

    2013-05-28

    Theoretical studies of the possibility of producing ammonia electrochemically at ambient temperature and pressure without direct N2 dissociation are presented. Density functional theory calculations were used in combination with the computational standard hydrogen electrode to calculate the free energy profile for the reduction of N2 admolecules and N adatoms on transition metal nanoclusters in contact with an acidic electrolyte. This work has established linear scaling relations for the dissociative reaction intermediates NH, NH2, and NH3. In addition, linear scaling relations for the associative reaction intermediates N2H, N2H2, and N2H3 have been determined. Furthermore, correlations between the adsorption energies of N, N2, and H have been established. These scaling relations and the free energy corrections are used to establish volcanoes describing the onset potential for electrochemical ammonia production and hence describe the potential determining steps for the electrochemical ammonia production. The competing hydrogen evolution reaction has also been analyzed for comparison. PMID:23598667

  19. Durability study of transition metal based non-precious cathode in PEFC

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on performance durability of newly developed polyaniline (PANI)-derived non-precious cathode catalyst, whose high oxygen-reduction activity was verified in electrochemical and fuel cell testing, exhibiting onset and half-wave potential (E{sup 1/2}) of oxygen reduction at 0.90 V and 0.77 V, respectively, as well as an insignificant H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yields below 1%. It was found catalyst durability in fuel cell life tests is greatly dependent on the catalyst synthesis including nitrogen precursors, employed transition metals, and supporting materials. Importantly, the working voltages in fuel cell testing have a profound impact on the stability, which much more stable performance can be observed at lower voltage such as 0.4 V when compared with higher voltage, 0.6 V. Preliminary physical and electrochemical characterization present to provide insight into the origin of the possible degradation mechanism for the non-precious active sites.

  20. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  1. Derivatives of phosphate Schiff base transition metal complexes: synthesis, studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Wahab, Z. H. Abd; El-Sarrag, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    We report the synthesis and structural characterization of series of tetra- and hexacoordinate metal chelate complexes of phosphate Schiff base ligands having the general composition LMX n·H 2O and L 2MX n (L=phosphate Schiff base ligand; M=Ag +, Mn 2+, Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Hg 2+, or Fe 3+ and X=NO 3-, Br - or Cl -). The structure of the prepared compounds was investigated using elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR, UV-vis, mass spectra, solid reflectance, magnetic susceptibility and conductance measurements as well as conductometric titration. In all the complexes studied, the ligands act as a chelate ligand with coordination involving the phosphateO-atom and the azomethineN-atom. IR, solid reflectance spectra and magnetic moment measurement are used to infer the structure and to illustrate the coordination capacity of ligand. IR spectra show the presence of coordinated nitrate and water molecule, the magnetic moments of all complexes show normal magnetic behavior and the electronic spectra of the metal complexes indicate a tetra- and octahedral structure for Mn 2+, octahedral structure of Fe 3+ and both square-planar and distorted octahedral structure for Cu 2+ complexes. Antimicrobial activity of the ligands and their complexes were tested using the disc diffusion method and the chosen strains include Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aereuguinosa, Klebsiella penumoniae, Escherichia coli, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophyte and Trichophyton rubrum. Some known antibiotics are included for the sake of comparison and the chosen antibiotic are Amikacin, Doxycllin, Augmantin, Sulperazon, Unasyn, Septrin, Cefobid, Ampicillin, Nitrofurantion, Traivid and Erythromycin.

  2. Quantitative computational thermochemistry of transition metal species.

    PubMed

    Deyonker, Nathan J; Peterson, Kirk A; Steyl, Gideon; Wilson, Angela K; Cundari, Thomas R

    2007-11-01

    The correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA), which has been shown to achieve chemical accuracy (+/-1 kcal mol-1) for a large benchmark set of main group and s-block metal compounds, is used to compute enthalpies of formation for a set of 17 3d transition metal species. The training set includes a variety of metals, ligands, and bonding types. Using the correlation consistent basis sets for the 3d transition metals, we find that gas-phase enthalpies of formation can be efficiently calculated for inorganic and organometallic molecules with ccCA. However, until the reliability of gas-phase transition metal thermochemistry is improved, both experimentally and theoretically, a large experimental training set where uncertainties are near +/-1 kcal mol-1 (akin to commonly used main group benchmarking sets) remains an ambitious goal. For now, an average deviation of +/-3 kcal mol-1 appears to be the initial goal of "chemical accuracy" for ab initio transition metal model chemistries. The ccCA is also compared to a more robust but relatively expensive composite approach primarily utilizing large basis set coupled cluster computations. For a smaller training set of eight molecules, ccCA has a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 3.4 kcal mol-1 versus the large basis set coupled-cluster-based model chemistry, which has a MAD of 3.1 kcal mol-1. However, the agreement for transition metal complexes is more system dependent than observed in previous benchmark studies of composite methods and main group compounds. PMID:17500547

  3. Chromatic Mechanical Response in 2-D Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMDs) based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahneshin, Vahid; Khosravi, Farhad; Ziolkowska, Dominika A.; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-10-01

    The ability to convert photons of different wavelengths directly into mechanical motion is of significant interest in many energy conversion and reconfigurable technologies. Here, using few layer 2H-MoS2 nanosheets, layer by layer process of nanocomposite fabrication, and strain engineering, we demonstrate a reversible and chromatic mechanical response in MoS2-nanocomposites between 405 nm to 808 nm with large stress release. The chromatic mechanical response originates from the d orbitals and is related to the strength of the direct exciton resonance A and B of the few layer 2H-MoS2 affecting optical absorption and subsequent mechanical response of the nanocomposite. Applying uniaxial tensile strains to the semiconducting few-layer 2H-MoS2 crystals in the nanocomposite resulted in spatially varying energy levels inside the nanocomposite that enhanced the broadband optical absorption up to 2.3 eV and subsequent mechanical response. The unique photomechanical response in 2H-MoS2 based nanocomposites is a result of the rich d electron physics not available to nanocomposites based on sp bonded graphene and carbon nanotubes, as well as nanocomposite based on metallic nanoparticles. The reversible strain dependent optical absorption suggest applications in broad range of energy conversion technologies that is not achievable using conventional thin film semiconductors.

  4. Chromatic Mechanical Response in 2-D Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMDs) based Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Rahneshin, Vahid; Khosravi, Farhad; Ziolkowska, Dominika A.; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    The ability to convert photons of different wavelengths directly into mechanical motion is of significant interest in many energy conversion and reconfigurable technologies. Here, using few layer 2H-MoS2 nanosheets, layer by layer process of nanocomposite fabrication, and strain engineering, we demonstrate a reversible and chromatic mechanical response in MoS2-nanocomposites between 405 nm to 808 nm with large stress release. The chromatic mechanical response originates from the d orbitals and is related to the strength of the direct exciton resonance A and B of the few layer 2H-MoS2 affecting optical absorption and subsequent mechanical response of the nanocomposite. Applying uniaxial tensile strains to the semiconducting few-layer 2H-MoS2 crystals in the nanocomposite resulted in spatially varying energy levels inside the nanocomposite that enhanced the broadband optical absorption up to 2.3 eV and subsequent mechanical response. The unique photomechanical response in 2H-MoS2 based nanocomposites is a result of the rich d electron physics not available to nanocomposites based on sp bonded graphene and carbon nanotubes, as well as nanocomposite based on metallic nanoparticles. The reversible strain dependent optical absorption suggest applications in broad range of energy conversion technologies that is not achievable using conventional thin film semiconductors. PMID:27713550

  5. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; von Winbush, Samuel

    1988-01-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  6. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  7. Immobilized transition metal-based radical scavengers and their effect on durability of Aquivion® perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, C.; Oldani, C.; Baglio, V.; Merlo, L.; Aricò, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    A simple and broadly applicable preparation procedure to obtain silica-supported transition metal (namely Cr, Co and Mn)-based radical scavengers, containing sulfonic acid functionalities, is reported. These systems are widely characterised in terms of structure, bulk and surface composition and morphology by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The scavenger material is loaded in ePTFE reinforced membranes prepared from Aquivion® perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) dispersions. All these composite membranes show longer lifetime in Accelerated Stress Tests (AST) and reduced fluoride release in Fenton's tests than the scavenger-free membranes without any loss in electrochemical performance. The Cr-scavenger-based polymer electrolyte shows a three-time larger stability than the pristine membrane.

  8. A chemically triggered and thermally switched dielectric constant transition in a metal cyanide based crystal.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhang, Xi; Cai, Ying; Yao, Ye-Feng; Zhang, Wen

    2015-05-18

    A dielectric constant transition is chemically triggered and thermally switched in (HPy)2[Na(H2O)Co(CN)6] (2, HPy=pyridinium cation) by single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation and structural phase transition, respectively. Upon dehydration, (HPy)2[Na(H2O)2Co(CN)6] (1) transforms to its semi-hydrated form 2, accompanying a transition from a low-dielectric state to a high-dielectric state, and vice versa. This dielectric switch is also realized by a structural phase transition in 2 that occurs between room- and low-temperature phases, and which corresponds to high- and low-dielectric states, respectively. The switching property is due to the variation in the environment surrounding the HPy cation, that is, the hydrogen-bonding interactions and the crystal packing, which exert predominant influences on the dynamics of the cations that transit between the static and motional states.

  9. Gas sorption and transition-metal cation separation with a thienothiophene based zirconium metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SK, Mostakim; Grzywa, Maciej; Volkmer, Dirk; Biswas, Shyam

    2015-12-01

    The modulated synthesis of the thienothiophene based zirconium metal-organic framework (MOF) material having formula [Zr6O4(OH)4(DMTDC)6]·4.8DMF·10H2O (1) (H2DMTDC=3,4-dimethylthieno[2,3-b]thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; DMF=N,N'-dimethylformamide) was carried out by heating a mixture of ZrCl4, H2DMTDC linker and benzoic acid (used as a modulator) with a molar ratio of 1:1:30 in DMF at 150 °C for 24 h. Systematic investigations have been performed in order to realize the effect of ZrCl4/benzoic acid molar ratio on the crystallinity of the material. The activation (i.e., the removal of the guest solvent molecules from the pores) of as-synthesized compound was achieved by stirring it with methanol and subsequently heating under vacuum. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric (TG) and elemental analysis was used to examine the phase purity of the as-synthesized and thermally activated 1. The material displays high thermal stability up to 310 °C in an air atmosphere. As revealed from the XRD measurements, the compound retains its crystallinity when treated with water, acetic acid and 1 M HCl solutions. The N2 and CO2 sorption analyses suggest that the material possesses remarkably high microporosity (SBET=1236 m2 g-1; CO2 uptake=3.5 mmol g-1 at 1 bar and 0 °C). The compound also shows selective adsorption behavior for Cu2+ over Co2+ and Ni2+ ions.

  10. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  11. Synthesis of transition metal carbonitrides

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A. R.; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    1994-01-01

    Transition metal carbonitrides (in particular, titanium carbonitride, TiC.sub.0.5 N.sub.0.5) are synthesized by a self-propagating reaction between the metal (e.g., titanium) and carbon in a nitrogen atmosphere. Complete conversion to the carbonitride phase is achieved with the addition of TiN as diluent and with a nitrogen pressure .gtoreq.0.6 MPa. Thermodynamic phase-stability calculations and experimental characterizations of quenched samples provided revealed that the mechanism of formation of the carbonitride is a two-step process. The first step involves the formation of the nonstoichiometric carbide, TiC.sub.0.5, and is followed by the formation of the product by the incorporation of nitrogen in the defect-structure carbide.

  12. Packing transition in alkali metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, R.; Sung, Ming Wen; Weare, John H.

    1996-03-01

    Small metallic clusters form a local geometric configuration quite different from the bulk crystals. As the cluster size increases, several transitions in the local coordination take place before the bulk structure appears. These transitions involve change in the nature of chemical bonds. We have systematically investigated the structural transition of various alkali metal clusters including binary compounds using an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Among them, Li clusters exhibit unusual transition in their packing pattern. Small lithium clusters (N <= 21) form open structures based on a ``solvation shell''.(M. Sung, R. Kawai, and J. Weare, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73) (1994) 3552., which is quite different from other alkali metal clusters. The bonding of these small clusters is partially ionic. Above N=25, a close-packed structure is established. However, the local configuration still differ from that of the bulk crystal. As the size further increases, the ionic nature decreases and the system reaches another close-packed structure based on the Mackay icosahedron, which is similar to the bulk crystal structure.

  13. Density functional theory study of interaction, bonding and affinity of group IIb transition metal cations with nucleic acid bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Sabyasachi; Mandal, Debasish; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2012-05-01

    The structure, bonding, and energetics of the complexes obtained from the interaction between the most stable tautomeric forms of free DNA and RNA bases and Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+ cations have been studied using density functional B3LYP method. The 6-311+G (2df, 2p) basis set along with LANL2DZ pseudopotentials for the cations are used in the calculations. The tautomerization paths of the nucleobases are investigated and transition states between the tautomeric forms of the free bases are located. The relative stability of the complexes and the tautomers of the free nucleobases are discussed referring to MIA and relative energy values. For uracil, thymine and adenine, interaction of the metal cations with the most stable tautomers form the least stable molecular complexes. For cytosine and guanine, the stability of the metalated complexes differs significantly. The enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (TΔS) and free energy (ΔG) of the complexes at 298 K have also been calculated.

  14. Uniform electron gas for transition metals: Input parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.H. ); Shore, H.B. )

    1993-12-15

    Input parameters are reported for the theory of ideal metals, a uniform electron-gas model of the elemental transition metals. These input parameters, the electron density, and the bonding valence,'' have been given previously for the 3[ital d] and 4[ital d] series of transition metals. Here, we extend our work based on recent calculations of Sigalas [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Rev. B 45, 5777 (1992)] to include the 5[ital d] series. We have also calculated the cohesive energies of the 5[ital d] transition metals using the theory of ideal metals with these parameters. The calculations agree with experiment to within [plus minus]25%.

  15. Pseudopotential-Based Correlation Consistent Composite Approach (rp-ccCA) for First- and Second-Row Transition Metal Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Manivasagam, Sivabalan; Laury, Marie L; Wilson, Angela K

    2015-07-01

    The relativistic-pseudopotential correlation consistent composite approach (rp-ccCA) was used to determine the enthalpy of formation (ΔHf) of 24 first row (3d) transition metal compounds. The rp-ccCA-derived ΔHf's were compared to ΔHf's previously obtained with an all-electron composite method for transition metals (ccCA-TM). For the 3d metal systems, rp-ccCA achieves transition metal accuracy, within 3 kcal/mol of reliable experimental data, overall. By utilizing pseudopotentials within the rp-ccCA methodology, we observed a significant computational time savings (53%) in comparison to the all-electron basis sets employed within ccCA-TM. With the proven reliability and accuracy of rp-ccCA, the methodology was employed to construct a calibration set of 210 second-row (4d) transition metal compounds and their ΔHf's. The 4d calibration set is referred to as 4dHf-210. Within the 4dHf-210 set, there were 61 molecules with available experimental data. The average experimental uncertainty was 4.05 kcal/mol and the mean absolute deviation of rp-ccCA was 3.64 kcal/mol, excluding outliers (10 total). This study provides a large set of energetics that can be used to gauge existing and future computational methodologies and to aid experimentalists in reaction design. PMID:26000954

  16. Efficient Thermal-Light Interconversions Based on Optical Topological Transition in the Metal-Dielectric Multilayered Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Chen, Xi; Guo, L Jay

    2016-04-20

    Metal-dielectric multilayered metamaterials are proposed to work as wideband spectral-selective emitters/absorbers due to the topological change in isofrequency contour around the epsilon-near-zero point. By setting the transition at the border between the visible and IR ranges, the metal-dielectric multilayered metamaterials become good absorbers/emitters for visible light and good reflectors for IR light, which are desirable for efficient thermal-light interconversions.

  17. Magnetism and electronic phase transitions in monoclinic transition metal dichalcogenides with transition metal atoms embedded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xianqing; Ni, Jun

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the energetic, electronic, and magnetic properties of substitutional 3d transition metal dopants in monoclinic transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as topological insulators ( 1 T ' - MX 2 with M = (Mo, W) and X = (S, Se)). We find various favorite features in these doped systems to introduce magnetism and other desirable electronic properties: (i) The Mn embedded monoclinic TMDs are magnetic, and the doped 1 T ' - MoS 2 still maintains the semiconducting character with high concentration of Mn, while an electronic phase transition occurs in other Mn doped monoclinic TMDs with an increasing concentration of Mn. Two Mn dopants prefer the ferromagnetic coupling except for substitution of the nearest Mo atoms in 1 T ' - MoS 2 , and the strength of exchange interaction shows anisotropic behavior with dopants along one Mo zigzag chain having much stronger coupling. (ii) The substitutional V is a promising hole dopant, which causes little change to the energy dispersion around the conduction and valence band edges in most systems. In contrast, parts of the conduction band drop for the electron dopants Co and Ni due to the large structural distortion. Moreover, closing band gaps of the host materials are observed with increasing carrier concentration. (iii) Single Fe dopant has a magnetic moment, but it also dopes electrons. When two Fe dopants have a small distance, the systems turn into nonmagnetic semiconductors. (iv) The formation energies of all dopants are much lower than those in hexagonal TMDs and are all negative in certain growth conditions, suggesting possible realization of the predicted magnetism, electronic phase transitions as well as carrier doping in 1 T ' - MX 2 based topological devices.

  18. Investigation of thin-layer chromatography properties of some transition metal complexes based on ditiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Ergül, Soner

    2006-10-01

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC) and ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (PyDTC) are prepared as their Co or Cu (M) complexes [M(DEDTC)(2) and M(PyDTC)(2), respectively]. The complexes are prepared by reactions of DEDTC and PyDTC with metal (II) nitrates, and they are examined for chromatographic properties using thin-layer chromatography systems. These complexes and their mixtures are spotted on the activated and non-activated 250-microm thick thin layers of commercial silica gel (Si-60GF(254)). Pure toluene and a toluene-cyclohexane mixture (3:1, v/v) are used as mobile phases for running the complexes. These chromatographic systems are successfully used for the qualitative analysis of the corresponding metal cations and the separation of components in both M(DEDTC)(2) and M(PyDTC)(2) complex mixtures. In addition, non-activated layers are more successful than activated layers. This study may be useful in understanding the effects of stationary and mobile phase properties, retention mechanisms, and the effects of the nature of metal and ligand type on the chromatographic behavior and parameters [e.g., retention factors, theoretical plate numbers, and resolution] of the complexes. PMID:17059680

  19. Possible Structural Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgun, Engin; Sahin, Hasan; Peeters, Francois

    2014-03-01

    Most of the the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) have graphene-like hexagonal crystal structure which are composed of metal atom layers (M) sandwiched between layers of chalcogen atoms (X) and these structures have MX2 stoichiometry. Chalcogen layers can be stacked on top of each other in two different forms: H phase made of trigonal prismatic holes for metal atoms and T phase that consists staggered chalcogen layers forming octahedral holes for metals. Among the TMDs that have been reported to be stable, individual layers of MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2 have 1H structure in their ground state while dichalcogens of Ti, V and Ta prefer the 1T phase. In our study we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying for the possible phase transitions in TMDs. Our calculations based on first-principles techniques reveal that in addition to H and T phases various distorted H and T phases can be also stabilized by point defects. These new phases have entirely different electronic properties.

  20. Piperazine pivoted transition metal dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sadaf; Nami, Shahab A. A.; Siddiqi, K. S.

    2008-03-01

    A quadridentate ligand disodium bis(2,2'-dithiopiperazinato-2,2'-diamino diethylamine) Na 2L 2 and its self assembled transition metal complexes of the type, M 2(L 2) 2 {M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II)} have been reported. The piperazine pivoted homodinuclear complexes have been characterized by a range of spectral, thermal, microanalytical and conductometric techniques. On the basis of IR and 1HNMR data a symmetrical bidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamato moiety has been observed in all the cases. The TGA profile of the ligand exhibits two stage thermolytic pattern although the complexes decompose in three steps, respectively. Metal sulfide is found to be the end product. The formation of homodinuclear complexes has been ascertained on the basis of FAB mass spectral data and a probable fragmentation pattern has been proposed. On the basis of UV-visible spectroscopic results and room temperature magnetic moment data a tetrahedral geometry has been proposed for all the complexes except for the Ni(II) and Cu(II) which are found to be square-planar.

  1. Elution of uranium and transition metals from amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Miyamoto, Naomi; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien

    2015-11-30

    High-surface-area amidoxime and carboxylic acid grafted polymer adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were tested for sequestering uranium in a flowing seawater flume system at the PNNL-Marine Sciences Laboratory. FTIR spectra indicate that a KOH conditioning process is necessary to remove the proton from the carboxylic acid and make the sorbent effective for sequestering uranium from seawater. The alkaline conditioning process also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. Both Na2CO3 H2O2 and hydrochloric acid elution methods can remove ~95% of the uranium sequestered by the adsorbent after 42 days of exposure in real seawater. Themore » Na2CO3 H2O2 elution method is more selective for uranium than conventional acid elution. Iron and vanadium are the two major transition metals competing with uranium for adsorption to the amidoxime-based adsorbents in real seawater. Tiron (4,5-Dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt, 1 M) can remove iron from the adsorbent very effectively at pH around 7. The coordination between vanadium (V) and amidoxime is also discussed based on our 51V NMR data.« less

  2. Elution of uranium and transition metals from amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Miyamoto, Naomi; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien

    2015-11-30

    High-surface-area amidoxime and carboxylic acid grafted polymer adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were tested for sequestering uranium in a flowing seawater flume system at the PNNL-Marine Sciences Laboratory. FTIR spectra indicate that a KOH conditioning process is necessary to remove the proton from the carboxylic acid and make the sorbent effective for sequestering uranium from seawater. The alkaline conditioning process also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. Both Na2CO3 H2O2 and hydrochloric acid elution methods can remove ~95% of the uranium sequestered by the adsorbent after 42 days of exposure in real seawater. The Na2CO3 H2O2 elution method is more selective for uranium than conventional acid elution. Iron and vanadium are the two major transition metals competing with uranium for adsorption to the amidoxime-based adsorbents in real seawater. Tiron (4,5-Dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid disodium salt, 1 M) can remove iron from the adsorbent very effectively at pH around 7. The coordination between vanadium (V) and amidoxime is also discussed based on our 51V NMR data.

  3. Synthesis and antioxidant activities of transition metal complexes based 3-hydroxysalicylaldehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal-Demirci, Tülay; Şahin, Musa; Kondakçı, Esin; Özyürek, Mustafa; Ülküseven, Bahri; Apak, Reşat

    2015-03-01

    The nickel(II), iron(III), oxovanadium(IV) complexes of the 3-hydroxysalicylidene-S-methyl-thiosemicarbazone (L) were obtained from the 3-hydroxysalicyldehyde-S-methylthiosemicarbazone with the R1-substituted-salicylaldehyde (R1: H, 3-OH) in the presence of Ni(II), Fe(III), VO(IV) as template ion. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electronic, UV/Vis., 1H NMR, EPR and IR studies. The free ligand and its metal complexes have been tested for in vitro antioxidant capacity by reduction of copper(II) neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) using the CUPRAC method. The ligand exhibited more potent in vitro antioxidant capacity than its complexes. The obtained trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) value of the iron(III) complex (TEACCUPRAC = 3.27) was higher than those of other complexes. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the free ligand and its complexes were determined by in vitro methods measuring the scavenging activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radical (radOH), superoxide anion radical (O2rad -), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), showing that especially the V(IV) and Fe(III) complexes had significant scavenging activity for ROS.

  4. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  5. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  6. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen. PMID:27483171

  7. Recombination Kinetics and Effects of Superacid Treatment in Sulfur- and Selenium-Based Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Amani, Matin; Taheri, Peyman; Addou, Rafik; Ahn, Geun Ho; Kiriya, Daisuke; Lien, Der-Hsien; Ager, Joel W; Wallace, Robert M; Javey, Ali

    2016-04-13

    Optoelectronic devices based on two-dimensional (2D) materials have shown tremendous promise over the past few years; however, there are still numerous challenges that need to be overcome to enable their application in devices. These include improving their poor photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) as well as better understanding of exciton-based recombination kinetics. Recently, we developed a chemical treatment technique using an organic superacid, bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (TFSI), which was shown to improve the quantum yield in MoS2 from less than 1% to over 95%. Here, we perform detailed steady-state and transient optical characterization on some of the most heavily studied direct bandgap 2D materials, specifically WS2, MoS2, WSe2, and MoSe2, over a large pump dynamic range to study the recombination mechanisms present in these materials. We then explore the effects of TFSI treatment on the PL QY and recombination kinetics for each case. Our results suggest that sulfur-based 2D materials are amenable to repair/passivation by TFSI, while the mechanism is thus far ineffective on selenium based systems. We also show that biexcitonic recombination is the dominant nonradiative pathway in these materials and that the kinetics for TFSI treated MoS2 and WS2 can be described using a simple two parameter model. PMID:26978038

  8. Recombination Kinetics and Effects of Superacid Treatment in Sulfur- and Selenium-Based Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Amani, Matin; Taheri, Peyman; Addou, Rafik; Ahn, Geun Ho; Kiriya, Daisuke; Lien, Der-Hsien; Ager, Joel W; Wallace, Robert M; Javey, Ali

    2016-04-13

    Optoelectronic devices based on two-dimensional (2D) materials have shown tremendous promise over the past few years; however, there are still numerous challenges that need to be overcome to enable their application in devices. These include improving their poor photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) as well as better understanding of exciton-based recombination kinetics. Recently, we developed a chemical treatment technique using an organic superacid, bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (TFSI), which was shown to improve the quantum yield in MoS2 from less than 1% to over 95%. Here, we perform detailed steady-state and transient optical characterization on some of the most heavily studied direct bandgap 2D materials, specifically WS2, MoS2, WSe2, and MoSe2, over a large pump dynamic range to study the recombination mechanisms present in these materials. We then explore the effects of TFSI treatment on the PL QY and recombination kinetics for each case. Our results suggest that sulfur-based 2D materials are amenable to repair/passivation by TFSI, while the mechanism is thus far ineffective on selenium based systems. We also show that biexcitonic recombination is the dominant nonradiative pathway in these materials and that the kinetics for TFSI treated MoS2 and WS2 can be described using a simple two parameter model.

  9. The dynamic behavior of thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Sebastian B.; Hartmann, David; Winnacker, Albrecht; Sarfert, Wiebke

    2014-09-01

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have received increasing attention during recent years due to their simple architecture, based on solely air-stabile materials, and ease of manufacture in ambient atmosphere, using solution-based technologies. The LEC's active layer offers semiconducting, luminescent as well as ionic functionality resulting in device physical processes fundamentally different as compared with organic light-emitting diodes. During operation, electrical double layers (EDLs) form at the electrode interfaces as a consequence of ion accumulation and electrochemical doping sets in leading to the in situ development of a light-emitting p-i-n junction. In this paper, we comment on the use of impedance spectroscopy in combination with complex nonlinear squares fitting to derive key information about the latter events in thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells based on the model compound bis-2-phenylpyridine 6-phenyl-2,2'-bipyridine iridium(III) hexafluoridophosphate ([Ir(ppy)2(pbpy)][PF6]). At operating voltages below the bandgap potential of the ionic complex used, we obtain the dielectric constant of the active layer, the conductivity of mobile ions, the transference numbers of electrons and ions, and the thickness of the EDLs, whereas the transient thickness of the p-i-n junction is determined at voltages above the bandgap potential. Most importantly, we find that charge transport is dominated by the ions when carrier injection from the electrodes is prohibited, that ion movement is limited by the presence of transverse internal interfaces and that the width of the intrinsic region constitutes almost 60% of the total active layer thickness in steady state at a low operating voltage.

  10. The dynamic behavior of thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Sebastian B. E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com; Hartmann, David; Sarfert, Wiebke E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com; Winnacker, Albrecht

    2014-09-14

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have received increasing attention during recent years due to their simple architecture, based on solely air-stabile materials, and ease of manufacture in ambient atmosphere, using solution-based technologies. The LEC's active layer offers semiconducting, luminescent as well as ionic functionality resulting in device physical processes fundamentally different as compared with organic light-emitting diodes. During operation, electrical double layers (EDLs) form at the electrode interfaces as a consequence of ion accumulation and electrochemical doping sets in leading to the in situ development of a light-emitting p-i-n junction. In this paper, we comment on the use of impedance spectroscopy in combination with complex nonlinear squares fitting to derive key information about the latter events in thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells based on the model compound bis-2-phenylpyridine 6-phenyl-2,2´-bipyridine iridium(III) hexafluoridophosphate ([Ir(ppy)₂(pbpy)][PF₆]). At operating voltages below the bandgap potential of the ionic complex used, we obtain the dielectric constant of the active layer, the conductivity of mobile ions, the transference numbers of electrons and ions, and the thickness of the EDLs, whereas the transient thickness of the p-i-n junction is determined at voltages above the bandgap potential. Most importantly, we find that charge transport is dominated by the ions when carrier injection from the electrodes is prohibited, that ion movement is limited by the presence of transverse internal interfaces and that the width of the intrinsic region constitutes almost 60% of the total active layer thickness in steady state at a low operating voltage.

  11. Dependence of carrier doping on the impurity potential in transition-metal-substituted FeAs-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Ideta, S; Yoshida, T; Nishi, I; Fujimori, A; Kotani, Y; Ono, K; Nakashima, Y; Yamaichi, S; Sasagawa, T; Nakajima, M; Kihou, K; Tomioka, Y; Lee, C H; Iyo, A; Eisaki, H; Ito, T; Uchida, S; Arita, R

    2013-03-01

    In order to examine to what extent the rigid-band-like electron doping scenario is applicable to the transition metal-substituted Fe-based superconductors, we have performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of Ba(Fe(1-x)Ni(x))(2)As(2) (Ni-122) and Ba(Fe(1-x)Cu(x))(2)As(2) (Cu-122), and compared the results with Ba(Fe(1-x)Co(x))(2)As(2) (Co-122). We find that Ni 3d-derived features are formed below the Fe 3d band and that Cu 3d-derived ones further below it. The electron and hole Fermi surface (FS) volumes are found to increase and decrease with substitution, respectively, qualitatively consistent with the rigid-band model. However, the total extra electron number estimated from the FS volumes (the total electron FS volume minus the total hole FS volume) is found to decrease in going from Co-, Ni-, to Cu-122 for a fixed nominal extra electron number, that is, the number of electrons that participate in the formation of FS decreases with increasing impurity potential. We find that the Néel temperature T(N) and the critical temperature T(c) maximum are determined by the FS volumes rather than the nominal extra electron concentration or the substituted atom concentration.

  12. Elution of Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-Based Polymer Adsorbents for Sequestering Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wai, Chien M.; Miyamoto, Naomi; Joshi, Ruma; Wood, Jordana R.; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Janke, Christopher J.; Oyola, Yatsandra; Das, Sadananda; Mayes, Richard T.; Gill, Gary A.

    2015-11-30

    High-surface-area amidoxime and carboxylic acid grafted polymer adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were tested for sequestering uranium in a flowing seawater flume system at the PNNL-Marine Sciences Laboratory. FTIR spectra indicate that a KOH conditioning process is necessary to remove the proton from the carboxylic acid and make the sorbent effective for sequestering uranium from seawater. The alkaline conditioning process also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. Both Na2CO3-H2O2 and hydrochloric acid elution methods can remove ~95% of the uranium sequestered by the adsorbent after 42 days of exposure in real seawater. The Na2CO3-H2O2 elution method is more selective for uranium than conventional acid elution. Iron and vanadium are the two major transition metals competing with uranium for adsorption to the amidoxime-based adsorbents in real seawater.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some unsymmetrical Schiff base transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Esmadi, Fatima T; Khabour, Omar F; Abbas, Khamis; Mohammad, Abdel Elah; Obeidat, Ra'ad T; Mfady, Doa'a

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several unsymmetrical Schiff bases and their cobalt and manganese complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The unsymmetrical Schiff bases were prepared from reaction of o-phenylendiamine derivatives with 1-hydroxy-2-acetonaphthone and then the product was reacted with the following aldehydes: salicyaldehyde, 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde, 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde and 2-qinolinecarboxaldehyde to produce the desired tetradentate unsymmetrical Schiff base ligands H2SL, H2NL, HPYL and HQN, respectively. Reaction of these ligands with cobalt and manganese salts produced complexes of the general formula [M(SL)], [(NL)], [M(PYL)] and [M(QL)]. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The prepared complexes were examined for their anti-bacterial activity using gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. The following complexes showed strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus: MnSL1, MnSL2 and MnSL3. The genotoxic activity of four complexes, which are MnNL1, MnSL1, CoNL1 and CoSL1, were examined using 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) assay in cultured human blood lymphocytes. All examined complexes were found to be genotoxic at examined concentrations (0.1-100 µg/mL), but with variable magnitudes (p < 0.05). The levels of 8-OHdG induced by MnNL1 and MnSL1 were significantly higher than that induced by CoNL1 and CoSL1 ones. In general, the order of mutagenicity of the compounds is MnSL1 > MnNL1 > CoSL1 > CoNL1. In conclusion, some of the prepared complexes showed some biological activities that might be of interest for future research.

  14. An Ultrahigh-Performance Photodetector based on a Perovskite-Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide Hybrid Structure.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Ho; Pae, Seong Ryul; Shim, Jaewoo; Yoo, Gwangwe; Jeon, Jaeho; Leem, Jung Woo; Yu, Jae Su; Lee, Sungjoo; Shin, Byungha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-09-01

    An ultrahigh performance MoS2 photodetector with high photoresponsivity (1.94 × 10(6) A W(-1) ) and detectivity (1.29 × 10(12) Jones) under 520 nm and 4.63 pW laser exposure is demonstrated. This photodetector is based on a methyl-ammonium lead halide perovskite/MoS2 hybrid structure with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane doping. The performance degradation caused by moisture is also minimized down to 20% by adopting a new encapsulation bilayer of octadecyltrichlorosilane/polymethyl methacrylate.

  15. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  16. High temperature thermoelectric properties of Zr and Hf based transition metal dichalcogenides: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Yumnam, George; Pandey, Tribhuwan; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the electronic and thermal transport properties of bulk MX{sub 2} compounds (M = Zr, Hf and X = S, Se) by first-principles calculations and semi-classical Boltzmann transport theory. The band structure shows the confinement of heavy and light bands along the out of plane and in-plane directions, respectively. This results in high electrical conductivity (σ) and large thermopower leading to a high power factor (S{sup 2}σ) for moderate n-type doping. The phonon dispersion demonstrates low frequency flat acoustical modes, which results in low group velocities (v{sub g}). Consequently, lowering the lattice thermal conductivity (κ{sub latt}) below 2 W/m K. Low κ{sub latt} combined with high power factor results in ZT > 0.8 for all the bulk MX{sub 2} compounds at high temperature of 1200 K. In particular, the ZT{sub max} of HfSe{sub 2} exceeds 1 at 1400 K. Our results show that Hf/Zr based dichalcogenides are very promising for high temperature thermoelectric application.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Tatsumi, Y.; Huang, S.; Ling, X.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  18. Metal Transition in Sodium-Ammonia Nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Hartweg, Sebastian; West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-09-26

    The famous nonmetal-to-metal transition in Na-ammonia solutions is investigated in nanoscale solution droplets by photoelectron spectroscopy. In agreement with the bulk solutions, a strong indication for a transition to the metallic state is found at an average metal concentration of 8.8±2.2 mole%. The smallest entity for the phase transition to be observed consists of approximately 100-200 solvent molecules. The quantification of this critical entity size is a stepping stone toward a deeper understanding of these quantum-classical solutions through direct modeling at the molecular level. PMID:27571535

  19. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  20. New pathways for organic synthesis. Practical applications of transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Colquhoun, H.M.; Holton, J.; Thompson, D.J.; Twigg, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains a considerable number of transition-metal-based procedures that have genuine applications in synthesis, and which are arranged according to the nature of the organic product or synthetic transformation being carried out. The objective is to provide those engaged in the preparation of pharmaceuticals, natural products, herbicides, dyestuffs, and other organic chemicals with a practical guide to the application of transition metals in organic synthesis. Topics considered include the formation of carbon-carbon bonds, the formation of carbocyclic compounds, the formation of heterocyclic compounds, the isomerization of alkenes, the direct introduction and removal of carbonyl groups, reduction, oxidation, and preparing and handling transition metal catalysts.

  1. Synchronization of pairwise-coupled, identical, relaxation oscillators based on metal-insulator phase transition devices: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Abhinav; Shukla, Nikhil; Datta, Suman; Raychowdhury, Arijit

    2015-02-01

    Computing with networks of synchronous oscillators has attracted wide-spread attention as novel materials and device topologies have enabled realization of compact, scalable and low-power coupled oscillatory systems. Of particular interest are compact and low-power relaxation oscillators that have been recently demonstrated using MIT (metal-insulator-transition) devices using properties of correlated oxides. Further the computational capability of pairwise coupled relaxation oscillators has also been shown to outperform traditional Boolean digital logic circuits. This paper presents an analysis of the dynamics and synchronization of a system of two such identical coupled relaxation oscillators implemented with MIT devices. We focus on two implementations of the oscillator: (a) a D-D configuration where complementary MIT devices (D) are connected in series to provide oscillations and (b) a D-R configuration where it is composed of a resistor (R) in series with a voltage-triggered state changing MIT device (D). The MIT device acts like a hysteresis resistor with different resistances in the two different states. The synchronization dynamics of such a system has been analyzed with purely charge based coupling using a resistive (RC) and a capacitive (CC) element in parallel. It is shown that in a D-D configuration symmetric, identical and capacitively coupled relaxation oscillator system synchronizes to an anti-phase locking state, whereas when coupled resistively the system locks in phase. Further, we demonstrate that for certain range of values of RC and CC, a bistable system is possible which can have potential applications in associative computing. In D-R configuration, we demonstrate the existence of rich dynamics including non-monotonic flows and complex phase relationship governed by the ratios of the coupling impedance. Finally, the developed theoretical formulations have been shown to explain experimentally measured waveforms of such pairwise coupled

  2. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  3. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Belyea, Dustin D; Lucas, M S; Michel, E; Horwath, J; Miller, Casey W

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based "high entropy alloys" in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  4. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-10-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants.

  5. Thermomechanical properties of 3d transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Karaoglu, B.; Rahman, S.M.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-05-15

    The authors have investigated the density variation of the Einstein temperatures and elastic constants of the 3d transition metals. In this respect they have employed the transition metal (TM) pair potentials involving the sp contribution with an appropriate exchange and correlation function, the d-band broadening contribution and the d-band hybridization term. These calculations are aimed at testing the TM pair potentials in generating the quasilocal and local thermomechanical properties.

  6. Base-promoted synthesis of coumarins from salicylaldehydes and aryl-substituted 1,1-dibromo-1-alkenes under transition-metal-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Xin; Shi, Lijun; Liu, Muwen; Yue, Yuanyuan; Li, Fuwei; Zhuo, Kelei

    2014-09-01

    Facile synthesis of coumarin via the tandem reaction of salicylaldehyde with aryl-substituted 1,1-dibromo-1-alkene was developed. This new protocol proceeds smoothly under mild and transition-metal-free conditions, it allows rapid access to coumarins containing various heteroatoms that are more difficult to prepare by traditional methods. Based on the isolated intermediate of 4-(diethylamino)-3-phenylchroman-2-one and detailed mechanistic studies, a credible tandem pathway was proposed. PMID:25027244

  7. Defect-Tolerant Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Rasmussen, Filip A.; Kuhar, Korina; Olsen, Thomas; Jacobsen, Karsten W.; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2016-04-01

    Localized electronic states formed inside the band gap of a semiconductor due to crystal defects can be detrimental to the material's optoelectronic properties. Semiconductors with lower tendency to form defect induced deep gap states are termed defect tolerant. Here we provide a systematic first principles investigation of defect tolerance in 29 monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) of interest for nanoscale optoelectronics. We find that the TMDs based on group VI and X metals form deep gap states upon creation of a chalcogen (S, Se, Te) vacancy while the TMDs based on group IV metals form only shallow defect levels and are thus predicted to be defect tolerant. Interestingly, all the defect sensitive TMDs have valence and conduction bands with very similar orbital composition. This indicates a bonding/anti-bonding nature of the gap which in turn suggests that dangling bonds will fall inside the gap. These ideas are made quantitative by introducing a descriptor that measures the degree of similarity of the conduction and valence band manifolds. Finally, the study is generalized to non-polar nanoribbons of the TMDs where we find that only the defect sensitive materials form edge states within the band gap.

  8. Synthesis, structural, thermal studies and biological activity of a tridentate Schiff base ligand and their transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Abd El-halim, Hanan F; Omar, M M; Mohamed, Gehad G

    2011-01-01

    Schiff base (L) ligand is prepared via condensation of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxaldehyde with -2-aminopyridine. The ligand and its metal complexes are characterized based on elemental analysis, mass, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, and thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA). The molar conductance reveals that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra shows that L ligand behaves as neutral tridentate ligand and bind to the metal ions via the two azomethine N and pyridine N. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral (Cr(III), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Th(IV)) and tetrahedral (Mn(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and UO2(II)). The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* are calculated from the DTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligand, in comparison to their metal complexes also was screened for its antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus pyogones and Fungi (Candida). The activity data shows that the metal complexes to be more potent/antibacterial than the parent Schiff base ligand against one or more bacterial species.

  9. Methyl Complexes of the Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Peloso, Riccardo; Carmona, Ernesto

    2016-05-01

    Organometallic chemistry can be considered as a wide area of knowledge that combines concepts of classic organic chemistry, that is, based essentially on carbon, with molecular inorganic chemistry, especially with coordination compounds. Transition-metal methyl complexes probably represent the simplest and most fundamental way to view how these two major areas of chemistry combine and merge into novel species with intriguing features in terms of reactivity, structure, and bonding. Citing more than 500 bibliographic references, this review aims to offer a concise view of recent advances in the field of transition-metal complexes containing M-CH3 fragments. Taking into account the impressive amount of data that are continuously provided by organometallic chemists in this area, this review is mainly focused on results of the last five years. After a panoramic overview on M-CH3 compounds of Groups 3 to 11, which includes the most recent landmark findings in this area, two further sections are dedicated to methyl-bridged complexes and reactivity.

  10. Transition metal contacts to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Politou, Maria De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc; Asselberghs, Inge; Radu, Iuliana; Conard, Thierry; Richard, Olivier; Martens, Koen; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Tokei, Zsolt; Lee, Chang Seung; Sayan, Safak

    2015-10-12

    Achieving low resistance contacts to graphene is a common concern for graphene device performance and hybrid graphene/metal interconnects. In this work, we have used the circular Transfer Length Method (cTLM) to electrically characterize Ag, Au, Ni, Ti, and Pd as contact metals to graphene. The consistency of the obtained results was verified with the characterization of up to 72 cTLM structures per metal. Within our study, the noble metals Au, Ag and Pd, which form a weaker bond with graphene, are shown to result in lower contact resistance (Rc) values compared to the more reactive Ni and Ti. X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization for the latter have shown the formation of Ti and Ni carbides. Graphene/Pd contacts show a distinct intermediate behavior. The weak carbide formation signature and the low Rc values measured agree with theoretical predictions of an intermediate state of weak chemisorption of Pd on graphene.

  11. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  12. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  13. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  14. Synthesis of Nanoporous Iminodiacetic Acid Sorbents for Binding Transition Metals

    PubMed Central

    Busche, Brad; Wiacek, Robert; Davidson, Joseph; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Yantasee, Wassana; Addleman, R. Shane; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2009-01-01

    Iminodiacetic acid (IDAA) forms strong complexes with a wide variety of metal ions. Using self-assembled monolayers in mesoporous supports (SAMMS) to present the IDAA ligand potentially allows for multiple metal-ligand interactions to enhance the metal binding affinity relative to that of randomly oriented polymer-based supports. This manuscript describes the synthesis of a novel nanostructured sorbent material built using self-assembly of a IDAA ligand inside a nanoporous silica, and demonstrates its use for capturing transition metal cations, and anionic metal complexes, such as PdCl4−2. PMID:22068901

  15. Microwave-assisted synthesis of transition metal phosphide

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-12-30

    A method of synthesizing transition metal phosphide. In one embodiment, the method has the steps of preparing a transition metal lignosulfonate, mixing the transition metal lignosulfonate with phosphoric acid to form a mixture, and subjecting the mixture to a microwave radiation for a duration of time effective to obtain a transition metal phosphide.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and biological approach of metal chelates of some first row transition metal ions with halogenated bidentate coumarin Schiff bases containing N and O donor atoms.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Chetan T; Patil, Sangamesh A; Toragalmath, Shivakumar S; Kinnal, Shivashankar M; Badami, Prema S

    2016-04-01

    The impregnation of halogen atoms in a molecule is an emerging trend in pharmaceutical chemistry. The presence of halogens (Cl, Br, I and F) increases the lipophilic nature of molecule and improves the penetration of lipid membrane. The presence of electronegative halogen atoms increases the bio- activity of core moiety. In the present study, Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are synthesised using Schiff bases (HL(I) and HL(II)), derived from 8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin/3-chloro-8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin with 2,4-difluoroaniline/o-toluidine respectively. The synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral (IR, NMR, UV-visible, Mass, ESI-MS, ESR), thermal, fluorescence and molar conductivity studies. All the synthesized metal complexes are completely soluble in DMF and DMSO. The non-electrolytic nature of the metal complexes was confirmed by molar conductance studies. Elemental analysis study suggest [ML2(H2O)2] stoichiometry, here M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=deprotonated ligand. The obtained IR data supports the binding of metal ion to Schiff base. Thermal study suggests the presence of coordinated water molecules. Electronic spectral results reveal six coordinated geometry for the synthesized metal complexes. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes were evaluated for antibacterial (Pseudomonas aureginosa and Proteus mirabilis), antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae), anthelmintic (Pheretima posthuma) and DNA cleavage (Calf Thymus DNA) activities. PMID:26874303

  17. Synthesis, characterization and biological approach of metal chelates of some first row transition metal ions with halogenated bidentate coumarin Schiff bases containing N and O donor atoms.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Chetan T; Patil, Sangamesh A; Toragalmath, Shivakumar S; Kinnal, Shivashankar M; Badami, Prema S

    2016-04-01

    The impregnation of halogen atoms in a molecule is an emerging trend in pharmaceutical chemistry. The presence of halogens (Cl, Br, I and F) increases the lipophilic nature of molecule and improves the penetration of lipid membrane. The presence of electronegative halogen atoms increases the bio- activity of core moiety. In the present study, Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are synthesised using Schiff bases (HL(I) and HL(II)), derived from 8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin/3-chloro-8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin with 2,4-difluoroaniline/o-toluidine respectively. The synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral (IR, NMR, UV-visible, Mass, ESI-MS, ESR), thermal, fluorescence and molar conductivity studies. All the synthesized metal complexes are completely soluble in DMF and DMSO. The non-electrolytic nature of the metal complexes was confirmed by molar conductance studies. Elemental analysis study suggest [ML2(H2O)2] stoichiometry, here M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=deprotonated ligand. The obtained IR data supports the binding of metal ion to Schiff base. Thermal study suggests the presence of coordinated water molecules. Electronic spectral results reveal six coordinated geometry for the synthesized metal complexes. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes were evaluated for antibacterial (Pseudomonas aureginosa and Proteus mirabilis), antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae), anthelmintic (Pheretima posthuma) and DNA cleavage (Calf Thymus DNA) activities.

  18. Nuclear Scattering from Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; McKeough, James; Valerio, Mario; Cathey, Tommy

    2016-03-01

    In view of the continued interest in the scattering of light projectiles by metallic nuclei, we present a computational study of the interactions between different nuclear species of atoms such as H through F (Z <= 9) and the nuclei of Silver, Palladium and other metals. Recent work has shown that neutron scattering can be used to record holographic images of materials. We have developed a FORTRAN computer program to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Ag and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 50 to 210 keV. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies also have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of a Schiff base derived from cephalexin and sulphathiazole and its transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Anacona, J R; Rodriguez, Juan Luis; Camus, Juan

    2014-08-14

    Metal(II) coordination compounds of a cephalexin Schiff base (HL) derived from the condensation of cephalexin antibiotic with sulphathiazole were synthesized. The Schiff base ligand, mononuclear [ML(OAc)(H2O)2] (M(II)=Mn, Co, Ni, Zn) complexes and magnetically diluted trinuclear copper(II) complex [Cu3L(OH)5] were characterized by several techniques, including elemental and thermal analysis, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, FT-IR, EPR and (1)H NMR spectral studies. The analytical and molar conductance values indicated that the acetate ions coordinate to the metal ions. The Schiff base ligand HL behaves as a monoanionic tridentate NNO and tetradentate NNOO chelating agent in the mono and trinuclear complexes respectively.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of a Schiff base derived from cephalexin and sulphathiazole and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacona, J. R.; Rodriguez, Juan Luis; Camus, Juan

    2014-08-01

    Metal(II) coordination compounds of a cephalexin Schiff base (HL) derived from the condensation of cephalexin antibiotic with sulphathiazole were synthesized. The Schiff base ligand, mononuclear [ML(OAc)(H2O)2] (M(II) = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn) complexes and magnetically diluted trinuclear copper(II) complex [Cu3L(OH)5] were characterized by several techniques, including elemental and thermal analysis, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, FT-IR, EPR and 1H NMR spectral studies. The analytical and molar conductance values indicated that the acetate ions coordinate to the metal ions. The Schiff base ligand HL behaves as a monoanionic tridentate NNO and tetradentate NNOO chelating agent in the mono and trinuclear complexes respectively.

  1. Electronic entanglement in late transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Thunström, Patrik; Di Marco, Igor; Eriksson, Olle

    2012-11-01

    We present a study of the entanglement in the electronic structure of the late transition metal monoxides--MnO, FeO, CoO, and NiO--obtained by means of density-functional theory in the local density approximation combined with dynamical mean-field theory. The impurity problem is solved through exact diagonalization, which grants full access to the thermally mixed many-body ground state density operator. The quality of the electronic structure is affirmed through a direct comparison between the calculated electronic excitation spectrum and photoemission experiments. Our treatment allows for a quantitative investigation of the entanglement in the electronic structure. Two main sources of entanglement are explicitly resolved through the use of a fidelity based geometrical entanglement measure, and additional information is gained from a complementary entropic entanglement measure. We show that the interplay of crystal field effects and Coulomb interaction causes the entanglement in CoO to take a particularly intricate form.

  2. rf-microwave switches based on reversible semiconductor-metal transition of VO2 thin films synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas-Bouchiat, F.; Champeaux, C.; Catherinot, A.; Crunteanu, A.; Blondy, P.

    2007-11-01

    Microwave switching devices based on the semiconductor-metal transition of VO2 thin films were developped on two types of substrates (C-plane sapphire and SiO2/Si), and in both shunt and series configurations. Under thermal activation, the switches achieved up to 30-40dB average isolation of the radio-frequency (rf) signal on 500MHz -35GHz frequency band with weak insertion losses. These VO2-based switches can be electrically activated with commutation times less than 100ns, which make them promising candidates for realizing efficient and simple rf switches.

  3. Synthesis of Schiff base 24-membered trivalent transition metal derivatives with their anti-inflammation and antimicrobial evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gajendra; Devi, Shoma; Kumar, Dharmendra

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of macrocyclic complexes [{M(C52H36N12O4)X}X2] of Cr(III), Mn(III) and Fe(III) with Schiff base ligand (C52H36N12O4) obtained through the condensation of 1,4-dicarbonyl phenyl dihydrazide with 1,2-di(1H-indol-1-yl)ethane-1,2-dione. The newly formed Schiff base and its complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analysis, condensation measurements, magnetic measurements and their structure configuration have been determined by various spectroscopic (electronic, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, GCMS) techniques. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate a five coordinate square pyramidal geometry of the center metal ion. These metal complexes and ligand were tested for their anti-inflammation and antimicrobial inhibiting potential and compared with standard drugs Phenyl butazone (anti-inflammation), Imipenem (antibacterial) and Miconazole (antifungal).

  4. Unsymmetrical Schiff base (ON) ligand on complexation with some transition metal ions: synthesis, spectral characterization, antibacterial, fluorescence and thermal studies.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omyma A M; El-Medani, Samir M; Abu Serea, Maha R; Sayed, Abeer S S

    2015-02-01

    A series of eight metal Schiff base complexes were synthesized by the thermal reaction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Zn(II), Hg(II), La(III) or Sm(III) with a Schiff base "L" produced by the condensation of furfuraldehyde and 1,2-diaminobenzene. These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, FT-IR, molar conductance, mass spectrometry, thermal and fluorescence studies. The studies suggested the coordination of the ligand L to metal through azomethine imine nitrogen and furan oxygen atoms of Schiff base moiety. Thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses data were studied and indicated high stability for all complexes and suggested the presence of lattice and/or coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Coats-Redfern method has been used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveal that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes which can attain a square planner arrangements. The ligand and its complexes exhibited intraligand (π-π(∗)) fluorescence and can potentially serve as photoactive materials. Both the ligand and its complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities.

  5. Unsymmetrical Schiff base (ON) ligand on complexation with some transition metal ions: Synthesis, spectral characterization, antibacterial, fluorescence and thermal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Omyma A. M.; El-Medani, Samir M.; Abu Serea, Maha R.; Sayed, Abeer S. S.

    2015-02-01

    A series of eight metal Schiff base complexes were synthesized by the thermal reaction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Zn(II), Hg(II), La(III) or Sm(III) with a Schiff base "L" produced by the condensation of furfuraldehyde and 1,2-diaminobenzene. These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, FT-IR, molar conductance, mass spectrometry, thermal and fluorescence studies. The studies suggested the coordination of the ligand L to metal through azomethine imine nitrogen and furan oxygen atoms of Schiff base moiety. Thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses data were studied and indicated high stability for all complexes and suggested the presence of lattice and/or coordinated water molecules in the complexes. Coats-Redfern method has been used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveal that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes which can attain a square planner arrangements. The ligand and its complexes exhibited intraligand (π-π∗) fluorescence and can potentially serve as photoactive materials. Both the ligand and its complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities.

  6. Transition metal-catalyzed functionalization of pyrazines.

    PubMed

    Nikishkin, Nicolai I; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2013-06-14

    Transition metal-catalyzed reactions are generally used for carbon-carbon bond formation on pyrazines and include, but are not limited to, classical palladium-catalyzed reactions like Sonogashira, Heck, Suzuki, and Stille reactions. Also a few examples of carbon-heteroatom bond formation in pyrazines are known. This perspective reviews recent progress in the field of transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions on pyrazine systems. It deals with the most important C-C- and C-X-bond formation methodologies.

  7. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P.; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-06-01

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (NF ∼ E_MD^b) . Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, μ, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of μ as a function of displacement threshold energy, Ed, is presented for bcc metals.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some transition metal complexes containing ONO tridentate Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    Belal, A A M; El-Deen, I M; Farid, N Y; Zakaria, Rosan; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-01

    The main target of this paper is to get an interesting data for the preparation and characterizations of metal oxide (MO) nanoparticles using H2L Schiff base complexes as precursors through the thermal decomposition procedure. Five Schiff base complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) metal ions were synthesized from 2-[(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-ylmethylene)-amino]-benzoic acid new adduct (H2L). Theses complexes were characterized using infrared, electronic, mass and (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The elemental analysis data was confirmed that the stoichiometry of (metal:H2L) is 1:1 molar ratio. The molar conductance indicates that all of complexes are non electrolytic. The general chemical formulas of these complexes is [M(L)(NH3)]·nH2O. All complexes are tetrahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition behavior of H2L hydrated and anhydrous complexes has been discussed using thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA) under nitrogen atmosphere. The crystalline phases of the reaction products were checked using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some transition metal complexes containing ONO tridentate Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    Belal, A A M; El-Deen, I M; Farid, N Y; Zakaria, Rosan; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-01

    The main target of this paper is to get an interesting data for the preparation and characterizations of metal oxide (MO) nanoparticles using H2L Schiff base complexes as precursors through the thermal decomposition procedure. Five Schiff base complexes of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) metal ions were synthesized from 2-[(2-hydroxy-naphthalen-1-ylmethylene)-amino]-benzoic acid new adduct (H2L). Theses complexes were characterized using infrared, electronic, mass and (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The elemental analysis data was confirmed that the stoichiometry of (metal:H2L) is 1:1 molar ratio. The molar conductance indicates that all of complexes are non electrolytic. The general chemical formulas of these complexes is [M(L)(NH3)]·nH2O. All complexes are tetrahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition behavior of H2L hydrated and anhydrous complexes has been discussed using thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA) under nitrogen atmosphere. The crystalline phases of the reaction products were checked using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:25989615

  10. Transition-metal substitutions in iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezusyy, V. L.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Malinowski, A.; Cieplak, Marta Z.

    2015-03-01

    The a b -plane resistivity and Hall effect are studied in Fe1 -yMyTe0.65Se0.35 single crystals doped with two transition-metal elements, M = Co or Ni, over a wide doping range, 0 ≤y ≤0.2 . The superconducting transition temperature, Tc, reaches zero for Co at y ≃0.14 and for Ni at y ≃0.032 , while the resistivity at the Tc onset increases weakly with Co doping, and strongly with Ni doping. The Hall coefficient RH, positive for y =0 , remains so at high temperatures for all y , while it changes sign to negative at low T for y >0.135 (Co) and y >0.06 (Ni). The analysis based on a two-band model suggests that at high T residual hole pockets survive the doping, but holes get localized upon the lowering of T , so that the effect of the electron doping on the transport becomes evident. The suppression of the Tc by Co impurity is related to electron doping, while in the case of the Ni impurity strong electron localization most likely contributes to fast decrease of the Tc.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of transition metal complexes with Schiff bases derived from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde with glycine and methionine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bibhesh K.; Rajour, Hemant K.; Prakash, Anant

    Schiff bases derived from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde with amino acids (glycine, methionine) and their Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. From spectral studies, it has been concluded that the ligands acts as bidentate molecule, coordinates metal through azomethine nitrogen and carboxylate oxygen. Mass spectrum explains the successive degradation of the molecular species in solution and justifies ML2 complexes. X-ray powder diffraction helps to determine the cell parameters of the complexes. Molecular structure of the complexes has been optimized by MM2 calculations and suggests a square planar geometry. The ligands and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro against Streptococcus, Staph, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherchia coli bacteria in order to assess their antibacterial potential. The results indicate that the biological activity increases on complexation.

  12. Transition Metal Phosphide Hydroprocessing Catalysts: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.; Gott, T; Zhao, H; Lee, Y

    2009-01-01

    The diminishing quality of oil feedstocks coupled with increasingly more stringent environmental regulations limiting the content of sulfur in transportation fuels have given rise to a need for improved hydroprocessing technology. This review begins with a summary of the major improvements in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) catalysts and processes that have been reported in recent years. It then describes a new class of hydroprocessing catalysts, the transition metal phosphides, which have emerged as a promising group of high-activity, stable catalysts. The phosphides have physical properties resembling ceramics, so are strong and hard, yet retain electronic and magnetic properties similar to metals. Their crystal structures are based on trigonal prisms, yet they do not form layered structures like the sulfides. They display excellent performance in HDS and HDN, with the most active phosphide, Ni{sub 2}P, having activity surpassing that of promoted sulfides on the basis of sites titrated by chemisorption (CO for the phosphides, O{sub 2} for the sulfides). In the HDS of difficult heteroaromatics like 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene Ni{sub 2}P operates by the hydrogenation pathway, while in the HDN of substituted nitrogen compounds like 2-methylpiperidine it carries out nucleophilic substitution. The active sites for hydrogenation in Ni{sub 2}P have a square pyramidal geometry, while those for direct hydrodesulfurization have a tetrahedral geometry. Overall, Ni{sub 2}P is a promising catalyst for deep HDS in the presence of nitrogen and aromatic compounds.

  13. Revisiting the Polyoxometalate-Based Late-Transition-Metal-Oxo Complexes: The “Oxo Wall” Stands

    SciTech Connect

    O; Halloran, Kevin P.; Zhao, Chongchao; Ando, Nicole S.; Schultz, Arthur J.; Koetzle, Thomas F.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Bobyr, Elena; Kirk, Martin L.; Knottenbelt, Sushilla; Depperman, Ezra C.; Stein, Benjamin: Anderson, Travis M.; Cao, Rui; Geletii, Yurii V.; Hardcastle, Kenneth I.; Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Neiwert, Wade A.; Fang, Xikui; Morokuma, Keiji; Wu, Shaoxiong; Koegerler, Paul, Hill, Craig L.

    2012-06-13

    Terminal oxo complexes of the late transition metals Pt, Pd, and Au have been reported by us in Science and Journal of the American Chemical Society. Despite thoroughness in characterizing these complexes (multiple independent structural methods and up to 17 analytical methods in one case), we have continued to study these structures. Initial work on these systems was motivated by structural data from X-ray crystallography and neutron diffraction and 17O and 31P NMR signatures which all indicated differences from all previously published compounds. With significant new data, we now revisit these studies. New X-ray crystal structures of previously reported complexes K14[P2W19O69(OH2)] and “K10Na3[PdIV(O)(OH)WO(OH2)(PW9O34)2]” and a closer examination of these structures are provided. Also presented are the 17O NMR spectrum of an 17O-enriched sample of [PW11O39]7– and a careful combined 31P NMR-titration study of the previously reported “K7H2[Au(O)(OH2)P2W20O70(OH2)2].” These and considerable other data collectively indicate that previously assigned terminal Pt-oxo and Au-oxo complexes are in fact cocrystals of the all-tungsten structural analogues with noble metal cations, while the Pd-oxo complex is a disordered Pd(II)-substituted polyoxometalate. The neutron diffraction data have been re-analyzed, and new refinements are fully consistent with the all-tungsten formulations of the Pt-oxo and Au-oxo polyoxometalate species.

  14. Anti-Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors Based On Few-Layer 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Wang, Yan; Huang, Le; Wang, Xiaoting; Li, Xingyun; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Jingbo

    2016-06-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials and their related van der Waals heterostructures have attracted considerable interest for their fascinating new properties. There are still many challenges in realizing the potential of 2D semiconductors in practical (opto)electronics such as signal transmission and logic circuit, etc. Herein, we report the gate-tunable anti-ambipolar devices on the basis of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) heterostructures to gain higher information storage density. Our study shows that carrier concentration regulated by the gate voltage plays a major role in the "anti-ambipolar" behavior, where the drain-source current can only pass through in specific range of gate voltage (Vg) and it will be restrained if the Vg goes beyond the range. Several improved strategies were theoretically discussed and experimentally adopted to obtain higher current on/off ratio for the anti-ambipolar devices, such as choosing suitable p-/n-pair, increasing carrier concentration by using thicker-layer TMDs, and so on. The modified SnS2/WSe2 device with the current on/off ratio exceeding 200 and on-state Vg ranging from -20 to 0 V was successfully achieved. On the basis of the anti-ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs), we also reveal the potential of three-channel device unit for signal processing and information storage. With the equal quantity N of device units, 3(N) digital signals can be obtained from such three-channel devices, which are much larger than 2(N) ones obtained from traditional two-channel complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). PMID:27258569

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some transition metals with Schiff base derived from 2-thiophene carboxaldehyde and aminobenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Omar, M. M.; Hindy, Ahmed M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Metal complexes of Schiff base derived from 2-thiophene carboxaldehyde and 2-aminobenzoic acid (HL) are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis (TGA). The ligand dissociation as well as the metal-ligand stability constants were calculated pH metrically at 25 °C and ionic strength μ = 0.1 (1 M NaCl). The complexes are found to have the formulae [M(HL) 2](X) n· yH 2O (where M = Fe(III) (X = Cl, n = 3, y = 3), Co(II) (X = Cl, n = 2, y = 1.5), Ni(II) (X = Cl, n = 2, y = 1) and UO 2(II) (X = NO 3, n = 2, y = 0)) and [M(L) 2] (where M = Cu(II) (X = Cl) and Zn(II) (X = AcO)). The molar conductance data reveal that Fe(III) and Co(II), Ni(II) and UO 2(II) chelates are ionic in nature and are of the type 3:1 and 2:1 electrolytes, respectively, while Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that HL is coordinated to the metal ions in a terdentate manner with ONS donor sites of the carboxylate O, azomethine N and thiophene S. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structure of these complexes are octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, Δ H*, Δ S* and Δ G* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligands, in comparison to their metal complexes also were screened for their antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus pyogones and Fungi (Candida). The activity data show that the metal complexes to be more potent/antibacterial than the parent Schiff base ligand against one or more bacterial species.

  16. High Pressure Synthesis of Transition Metal Carbonyls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, A. P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment which uses readily available starting materials and inexpensive equipment for synthesis of transition metal carbonyls at 1000 atm and which is intended to give students experience in techniques used in research and industry. Safety precautions are emphasized. (Author/SA)

  17. Toward Photochemical Water Splitting Using Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors and Transition-Metal Based Molecular Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Muckerman,J.T.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Fujita, E.

    2009-06-07

    We are carrying out coordinated theoretical and experimental studies of toward photochemical water splitting using band-gap-narrowed semiconductors (BGNSCs) with attached multi-electron molecular water oxidation and hydrogen production catalysts. We focus on the coupling between the materials properties and the H{sub 2}O redox chemistry, with an emphasis on attaining a fundamental understanding of the individual elementary steps in the following four processes: (1) Light-harvesting and charge-separation of stable oxide or oxide-derived semiconductors for solar-driven water splitting, including the discovery and characterization of the behavior of such materials at the aqueous interface; (2) The catalysis of the four-electron water oxidation by dinuclear hydroxo transition-metal complexes with quinonoid ligands, and the rational search for improved catalysts; (3) Transfer of the design principles learned from the elucidation of the DuBois-type hydrogenase model catalysts in acetonitrile to the rational design of two-electron hydrogen production catalysts for aqueous solution; (4) Combining these three elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on BGNSC photoanode surfaces and hydrogen production catalysts on cathode surfaces at the aqueous interface to understand the challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

  18. A Density Functional Theory Based Protocol to Compute the Redox Potential of Transition Metal Complex with the Correction of Pseudo-Counterion: General Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2013-07-01

    We propose an accurate scheme to evaluate the redox potential of a wide variety of transition metal complexes by adding a charge-dependent correction term for a counterion around the charged complexes, which is based on Generalized Born theory, to the solvation energy. The mean absolute error (MAE) toward experimental redox potentials of charged complexes is considerably reduced from 0.81 V (maximum error 1.22 V) to 0.22 V (maximum error 0.50 V). We found a remarkable exchange-correlation functional dependence on the results rather than the basis set ones. The combination of Wachters+f (for metal) and 6-31++G(d,p) (for other atoms) with the B3LYP functional gives the least MAE 0.15 V for the test complexes. This scheme is applicable to other solvents, and heavier transition metal complexes such as M1(CO)5(pycn) (M1 = Cr, Mo, W), M2(mnt)2 (M2 = Ni, Pd, Pt), and M3(bpy)3 (M3 = Fe, Ru, Os) with the same quality.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of a tridentate Schiff base derived from cephalothin and sulfadiazine, and its transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Anacona, J R; Noriega, Natiana; Camus, Juan

    2015-02-25

    Metal(II) coordination compounds of a cephalothin Schiff base (H2L) derived from the condensation of cephalothin antibiotic with sulfadiazine were synthesized. The Schiff base ligand, mononuclear [ML(H2O)3] (M(II)=Mn,Co,Ni,Zn) complexes and magnetically diluted dinuclear copper(II) complex [CuL(H2O)3]2 were characterized by several techniques, including elemental and thermal analysis, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, FT-IR, EPR and (1)H NMR spectral studies. The cephalothin Schiff base ligand H2L behaves as a dianionic tridentate NOO chelating agent. The biological applications of complexes have been studied on two bacteria strains (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) by agar diffusion disc method.

  20. A structure-based analysis of the vibrational spectra of nitrosyl ligands in transition-metal coordination complexes and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz, Carlos; Sheppard, Norman

    2011-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of nitrogen monoxide or nitric oxide (NO) bonded to one or to several transition-metal (M) atom(s) in coordination and cluster compounds are analyzed in relation to the various types of such structures identified by diffraction methods. These structures are classified in: (a) terminal (linear and bent) nitrosyls, [M(σ-NO)] or [M(NO)]; (b) twofold nitrosyl bridges, [M 2(μ 2-NO)]; (c) threefold nitrosyl bridges, [M 3(μ 3-NO)]; (d) σ/π-dihaptonitrosyls or " side-on" nitrosyls; and (e) isonitrosyls (oxygen-bonded nitrosyls). Typical ranges for the values of internuclear N-O and M-N bond-distances and M-N-O bond-angles for linear nitrosyls are: 1.14-1.20 Å/1.60-1.90 Å/180-160° and for bent nitrosyls are 1.16-1.22 Å/1.80-2.00 Å/140-110°. The [M 2(μ 2-NO)] bridges have been divided into those that contain one or several metal-metal bonds and those without a formal metal/metal bond (M⋯M). Typical ranges for the M-M, N-O, M-N bond distances and M-N-M bond angles for the normal twofold NO bridges are: 2.30-3.00 Å/1.18-1.22 Å/1.80-2.00 Å/90-70°, whereas for the analogous ranges of the long twofold NO bridges these are 3.10-3.40 Å/1.20-1.24 Å/1.90-2.10 Å/130-110°. In both situations the N-O vector is approximately at right angle to the M-M (or M⋯M) vector within the experimental error; i.e. the NO group is symmetrical bonded to the two metal atoms. In contrast the threefold NO bridges can be symmetrically or unsymmetrically bonded to an M 3-plane of a cluster compound. Characteristic values for the N-O and M-N bond-distances of these NO bridges are: 1.24-1.28 Å/1.80-1.90 Å, respectively. As few dihaptonitrosyl and isonitrosyl complexes are known, the structural features of these are discussed on an individual basis. The very extensive vibrational spectroscopy literature considered gives emphasis to the data from linearly bonded NO ligands in stable closed-shell metal complexes; i.e. those which are consistent with the

  1. Schiff base ligands and their transition metal complexes in the mixtures of ionic liquid + organic solvent: a thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Shekaari, Hemayat; Kazempour, Amir; Khoshalhan, Maryam

    2015-01-21

    Schiff bases and their metal complexes in the mixtures of ionic liquid (IL) + organic solvent have shown great potential in attractive oxidation catalytic processes. The efficiency of such a process is strongly dependent on the various molecular interactions occurring between components. Thermodynamic properties of these systems can provide valuable information about structural interactions. Therefore, in this work, the interactions of the IL 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([HMIm]Cl) with Schiff bases in organic solvents were studied through the measurements of density, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. The effect of solvent on the interactions was examined by the solutions of IL + BPIC Schiff base + solvent (C2H6O-C3H8O-C4H10O). Moreover, the influence of Schiff base ligand and Schiff base complex structures was probed by the solutions of IL + DMA + ligand (salcn/salpr/salen) and IL + DMA + complex (VO(3-OMe-salen)/VO(salophen)/VO(salen)), respectively. Using the experimental data, some important thermodynamic properties, such as standard partial molar volume (V(0)(φ,IL)), experimental slope (Sv), viscosity B-coefficient, solvation number (B/V(0)(φ,IL) and limiting molar conductivity (Λ0) were calculated and discussed in terms of solute-solvent (IL-DMF/alcohol) and solute-cosolute (IL-Schiff base) interactions.

  2. Flexible transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for band-selective photodetection

    PubMed Central

    Velusamy, Dhinesh Babu; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Cha, Soonyoung; Huh, June; Khazaeinezhad, Reza; Kassani, Sahar Hosseinzadeh; Song, Giyoung; Cho, Suk Man; Cho, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ihn; Lee, Jinseong; Oh, Kyunghwan; Choi, Hyunyoug; Park, Cheolmin

    2015-01-01

    The photocurrent conversions of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets are unprecedentedly impressive, making them great candidates for visible range photodetectors. Here we demonstrate a method for fabricating micron-thick, flexible films consisting of a variety of highly separated transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for excellent band-selective photodetection. Our method is based on the non-destructive modification of transition metal dichalcogenide sheets with amine-terminated polymers. The universal interaction between amine and transition metal resulted in scalable, stable and high concentration dispersions of a single to a few layers of numerous transition metal dichalcogenides. Our MoSe2 and MoS2 composites are highly photoconductive even at bending radii as low as 200 μm on illumination of near infrared and visible light, respectively. More interestingly, simple solution mixing of MoSe2 and MoS2 gives rise to blended composite films in which the photodetection properties were controllable. The MoS2/MoSe2 (5:5) film showed broad range photodetection suitable for both visible and near infrared spectra. PMID:26333531

  3. Synthesis, spectral, antimicrobial and antitumor assessment of Schiff base derived from 2-aminobenzothiazole and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etaiw, Safaa Eldin H.; Abd El-Aziz, Dina M.; Abd El-Zaher, Eman H.; Ali, Elham A.

    2011-09-01

    N-(thiophen-2-ylmethylene)benzo[ d]thiazol-2-amine Schiff base (L) derived from 2-aminobenzothiazole and 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde was synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, IR, mass spectra, 1H NMR and UV-vis spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II), Fe(III), Ni(II) and Zn(II) were prepared and isolated as solid products and characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, spectral techniques as well as magnetic susceptibility. The IR spectra showed that the Schiff base under investigation behaves as bidentate ligand. The UV-vis spectra and magnetic moment data suggested octahedral geometry around Cu(II) and Fe(III) and tetrahedral geometry around Ni(II) and Zn(II). In view of the biological activity of the Schiff base and its complexes, it has been observed that the antimicrobial activity of the Schiff base increased on complexation with the metal ion. In vitro antitumor activity assayed against five human tumor cell lines furnished the significant toxicities of the Schiff base and its complexes.

  4. I. Gas adsorption properties and porosity of transition metal-based cyanogels. II. Novel energy transfer processes in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul Shrikant

    The gas adsorption properties and porosity of cyanide-bridged transition metal-based gels are investigated in the first part of this dissertation. The cyanide bridges, connecting two transition metal centers, are characteristic of these gels; hence, these gels are termed cyanogels. Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect, both, on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas adsorption on these cyanogels. Carbon dioxide is selectively adsorbed on palladium-cobalt-based cyanogels; the adsorption is fully reversible on both types of gels discussed. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the gas adsorption processes on these gels are analyzed here. From the ease and reproducibility of the CO2 desorption and the associated enthalpy values, it is concluded that CO2 is physisorbed on these gels. Both the adsorption and desorption processes are first-order in the gels. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the palladium-cobalt cyanogels is also investigated. Unlike CO 2 physisorption, carbon monoxide is chemisorbed on these gels. An uptake of CO brings about a profound change in the xerogel morphology. The palladium-cobalt-based aerogels possess both micro- and mesoporosity; the xerogels are predominantly microporous with a narrow microporosity. The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption. Unlike the aerogels, the xerogels do not possess surface fractality. The mechanism of adsorption of different gases on these gels is analyzed based on the gel morphologies. These transition metal-based gels are promising for a variety of applications such as heterogeneous catalysts, gas filters and magnetic materials. The porosity of these gels can be exploited to make gel-embedded filters to separate mixtures of gases based on the their differential adsorption propensities. The reversible adsorption of CO2 can be harnessed practically by using these gels as CO2 storage reservoirs. In the second part of this dissertation, the first, balanced, white

  5. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  6. Magnetic and Metal-Insulator Transition in natural Transition Metal Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxiong; Metz, Tristin; Liu, I.-Lin; Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Xiangfeng; Jeffries, J. R.; Saha, S. R.; Greene, R. L.; Paglione, J.; Santelli, C. C.; Post, J.,

    In collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, we present detailed studies of a class of natural minerals with potential to harbor correlated behavior. Transition metal sulfide minerals, such as Bornite (Cu5FeS4), are an important family of compounds known for their thermoelectric properties. We will present low temperature experimental studies of magnetic transitions and focus on a compound that exhibits a metal to insulator transition concident with entrance to an antiferromagnetic ground state, suggesting a potentially interesting system with promise for realizing new correlated states of matter in a naturally occurring mineral.

  7. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, $b$, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy ($N_F$$ \\sim$$E_{MD}^b$). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, $\\mu$, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of $\\mu$ as a function of displacement threshold energy, $E_d$, is presented for bcc metals.

  8. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E; Wirth, Brian D; Kurtz, Richard J

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N(F) ~ E(MD)(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, μ, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of μ as a function of displacement threshold energy, E(d), is presented for bcc metals. PMID:25985256

  9. Topological phase transition in layered transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha-Jun; Chang, Kee Joo

    Despite considerable interests in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as MX2 with M = (Mo, W) and X = (S, Se, Te), the physical origin of their topological nature is still in its infancy. The conventional view of topological phase transition (TPT) in TMDs is that the band inversion occurs between the metal d and chalcogen p orbital bands. More precisely, the former is pulled down below the latter. Here we introduce an explicit scheme for analyzing TPT in topological materials and find that the TPT in TMDs is different from the conventional speculation. When the 1T phase undergoes a structural transformation to the 1T' phase in monolayer MX2, the band topology changes from trivial to non-trivial, leading to the TPT. We discuss the exact role of the metal d and chalcogen p orbital bands during the TPT. Our finding would provide clear guidelines for understanding the topological nature not only in TMDs but also in other topological materials yet to be explored.

  10. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  11. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  12. The metal-rich sulfides and phosphides of the early transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Franzen, H.F. |

    1996-06-01

    Early work on the preparation of refractory metal-rich compounds of the early transition metals resulted in the understanding that metal-metal bonding results in a structural variety that plays an important role in the high-temperature chemistry of these systems. The binary metal-rich systems have been thoroughly studied at high temperatures, and the structures of most, if not all, of the refractory sulfides and phosphides are known. More recently new ternary phases have been discovered, and these have been shown to result from distributed fractional site occupation of metal atom sites in complex structures. The extent of metal-metal bonding has been quantified by Extended-Hueckel Tight-Bonding calculations using Mullikan Overlap Populations. Correlations of site occupancy with MOP based upon the DFSO model have been observed. 44 refs.

  13. Aging of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Baichang; Tan, Jiawei; Chow, Phil; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-02-23

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal dichalcogenides are an emerging class of atomically thin semiconductors that are considered to be "air-stable", similar to graphene. Here we report that, contrary to current understanding, chemical vapor deposited transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers exhibit poor long-term stability in air. After room-temperature exposure to the environment for several months, monolayers of molybdenum disulfide and tungsten disulfide undergo dramatic aging effects including extensive cracking, changes in morphology, and severe quenching of the direct gap photoluminescence. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy reveal that this effect is related to gradual oxidation along the grain boundaries and the adsorption of organic contaminants. These results highlight important challenges associated with the utilization of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We also demonstrate a potential solution to this problem, featuring encapsulation of the monolayer sheet by a 10-20 nm thick optically transparent polymer (parylene C). This strategy is shown to successfully prevent the degradation of the monolayer material under accelerated aging (i.e., high-temperature, oxygen-rich) conditions.

  14. Aging of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Baichang; Tan, Jiawei; Chow, Phil; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-02-23

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal dichalcogenides are an emerging class of atomically thin semiconductors that are considered to be "air-stable", similar to graphene. Here we report that, contrary to current understanding, chemical vapor deposited transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers exhibit poor long-term stability in air. After room-temperature exposure to the environment for several months, monolayers of molybdenum disulfide and tungsten disulfide undergo dramatic aging effects including extensive cracking, changes in morphology, and severe quenching of the direct gap photoluminescence. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy reveal that this effect is related to gradual oxidation along the grain boundaries and the adsorption of organic contaminants. These results highlight important challenges associated with the utilization of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We also demonstrate a potential solution to this problem, featuring encapsulation of the monolayer sheet by a 10-20 nm thick optically transparent polymer (parylene C). This strategy is shown to successfully prevent the degradation of the monolayer material under accelerated aging (i.e., high-temperature, oxygen-rich) conditions. PMID:26808328

  15. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  16. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:26494184

  17. Probing the possibility of coexistence of martensite transition and half-metallicity in Ni and Co-based full-Heusler alloys: An ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tufan; Pandey, Dhanshree; Chakrabarti, Aparna

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we have studied the mechanical, electronic, and magnetic properties of Heusler alloys, namely, Ni2B C and Co2B C (B = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn as well as Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Tc; C = Ga and Sn). On the basis of electronic structure (density of states) and mechanical properties (tetragonal shear constant), as well as magnetic interactions (Heisenberg exchange coupling parameters), we probe the properties of these materials in detail. We calculate the formation energy of these alloys in the (face-centered) cubic austenite structure to probe the stability of all these materials. From the energetic point of view, we have studied the possibility of the electronically stable alloys having a tetragonal phase lower in energy compared to the respective cubic phase. A large number of the magnetic alloys is found to have the cubic phase as their ground state. On the other hand, for another class of alloys, the tetragonal phase has been found to have lower energy compared to the cubic phase. Further, we find that the values of tetragonal shear constant show a consistent trend: a high positive value for materials not prone to tetragonal transition and low or negative for others. In the literature, materials which have been seen to undergo the martensite transition are found to be metallic in nature. We probe here if there is any Heusler alloy which has a tendency to undergo a tetragonal transition and at the same time possesses a high spin polarization at the Fermi level. From our study, it is found that out of the four materials which exhibit a martensite phase as their ground state, three of these, namely, Ni2MnGa , Ni2MoGa , and Co2NbSn have a metallic nature; on the contrary, Co2MoGa exhibits a high spin polarization.

  18. Pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ligang; Li, Quan; Corr, Serena A.; Meng, Yue; Park, Changyong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Ko, Changhyun; Wu, Junqiao; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of pressure-induced phase transitions and metallization in VO2 based on synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Our isothermal compression experiments at room temperature and 383 K show that the room temperature monoclinic phase (M 1 ,P 21/c ) and the high-temperature rutile phase (R ,P 42/m n m ) of VO2 undergo phase transitions to a distorted M 1 monoclinic phase (M 1' ,P 21/c ) above 13.0 GPa and to an orthorhombic phase (CaCl2-like, P n n m ) above 13.7 GPa, respectively. Upon further compression, both high-pressure phases transform into a new phase (phase X ) above 34.3 and 38.3 GPa at room temperature and 383 K, respectively. The room temperature M 1 -M 1' phase transition structurally resembles the R -CaCl2 phase transition at 383 K, suggesting a second-order displacive type of transition. Contrary to previous studies, our electrical resistivity results, Raman measurements, as well as ab initio calculations indicate that the new phase X , rather than the M 1' phase, is responsible for the metallization under pressure. The metallization mechanism is discussed based on the proposed crystal structure.

  19. Q-switched fiber laser based on transition metal dichalcogenides MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2), and WSe(2).

    PubMed

    Chen, Bohua; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Kan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report 4 different saturable absorbers based on 4 transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2), WSe(2)) and utilize them to Q-switch a ring-cavity fiber laser with identical cavity configuration. It is found that MoSe(2) exhibits highest modulation depth with similar preparation process among four saturable absorbers. Q-switching operation performance is compared from the aspects of RF spectrum, optical spectrum, repetition rate and pulse duration. WS(2) Q-switched fiber laser generates the most stable pulse trains compared to other 3 fiber lasers. These results demonstrate the feasibility of TMDs to Q-switch fiber laser effectively and provide a meaningful reference for further research in nonlinear fiber optics with these TMDs materials.

  20. Vibrational scaling factors for transition metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, M. K.; Devera, J. L.; Brathwaite, A. D.; Mosley, J. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Vibrational frequencies for a selected set of transition metal carbonyl complexes are computed with various forms of density functional theory (B3LYP, BP86, M06, and M06-L), employing several different basis sets. The computed frequencies for the carbonyl stretches are compared to the experimental values obtained from gas phase infrared spectra of isolated neutrals and ions. Recommended carbonyl-stretch scaling factors which are developed vary significantly for different functionals, but there is little variation with basis set. Scaled frequencies compared to experimental spectra for cobalt and tantalum carbonyl cations reveal additional variations in multiplet patterns and relative band intensities for different functionals.

  1. Strain Engineering of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, Ali; Pasupathy, Abhay; Herman, Irving; Wang, Dennis; Kang, Kyungnam; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    The application of strain to materials can cause changes to bandwidth, effective masses, degeneracies and even structural phases. In the case of the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, small strain (around 1 percent) is expected to change band gaps and mobilities, while larger strains are expected to cause phase changes from the triangular 2H phase to orthorhombic 1T' phases. We will describe experimental techniques to apply small and large (around 10 percent) strains to one or few layer samples of the TMD semiconductors, and describe the effect of the strain using optical (Raman, photoluminescence) and cryogenic transport techniques.

  2. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  3. Synthesis and biological activities of transition metal complexes based on acetylsalicylic acid as neo-anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rubner, Gerhard; Bensdorf, Kerstin; Wellner, Anja; Kircher, Brigitte; Bergemann, Silke; Ott, Ingo; Gust, Ronald

    2010-10-14

    [(μ(4)-η(2))-(Prop-2-ynyl)-2-acetoxybenzoate]dicobalthexacarbonyl (Co-ASS), a derivative of aspirin (ASS), demonstrated high growth-inhibitory potential against various tumor cells with interference in the arachidonic acid cascade as probable mode of action. The significance of the kind of metal and cluster was verified in this structure-activity study: Co(2)(CO)(6) was respectively exchanged by a tetrameric cobalt-, trimeric ruthenium-, or trimeric ironcarbonyl cluster. Furthermore, the metal binding motif was changed from alkyne to 1,3-butadiene. Compounds were evaluated for growth inhibition, antiproliferative effects, and apoptosis induction in breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB 231) and colon cancer (HT-29) cell lines and for COX-1/2 inhibitory effects at isolated isoenzymes. Additionally, the major COX metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) was quantified in arachidonic acid-stimulated MDA-MB 231 breast tumor cells. It was demonstrated that the metal cluster was of minor importance for effects on cellular activity if an alkyne was used as ligand. Generally, no correlation existed between growth inhibition and COX activity. Cellular growth inhibition and antiproliferative activity at higher concentrations of the most active compounds Prop-ASS-Co(4) and Prop-ASS-Ru(3) correlated well with apoptosis induction.

  4. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Bioorthogonal Cycloaddition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maiyun; Yang, Yi; Chen, Peng R

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, bioorthogonal reactions have emerged as a powerful toolbox for specific labeling and visualization of biomolecules, even within the highly complex and fragile living systems. Among them, copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is one of the most widely studied and used biocompatible reactions. The cytotoxicity of Cu(I) ions has been greatly reduced due to the use of Cu(I) ligands, which enabled the CuAAC reaction to proceed on the cell surface, as well as within an intracellular environment. Meanwhile, other transition metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and silver are now under development as alternative sources for catalyzing bioorthogonal cycloadditions. In this review, we summarize the development of CuAAC reaction as a prominent bioorthogonal reaction, discuss various ligands used in reducing Cu(I) toxicity while promoting the reaction rate, and illustrate some of its important biological applications. The development of additional transition metals in catalyzing cycloaddition reactions will also be briefly introduced. PMID:27572985

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic, cytotoxic aspects and computational study of N-(pyridine-2-ylmethylene)benzo[d]thiazol-2-amine Schiff base and some of its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Aziz, Dina M.; Etaiw, Safaa Eldin H.; Ali, Elham A.

    2013-09-01

    N-(pyridine-2-ylmethylene)benzo[d]thiazol-2-amine Schiff base (L) and its Cu(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by a set of chemical and spectroscopic measurements using elemental analysis, electrical conductance, mass spectra, magnetic susceptibility and spectral techniques (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR). Elemental and mass spectrometric data are consistent with the proposed formula. IR spectra confirm the bidentate nature of the Schiff base ligand. The octahedral geometry around Cu(II), Fe(III), Ni(II) and Zn(II) as well as tetrahedral geometry around Co(II) were suggested by UV-Vis spectra and magnetic moment data. The thermal degradation behavior of the Schiff base and its complexes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The structure of the Schiff base and its transition metal complexes was also theoretically studied using molecular mechanics (MM+). The obtained structures were minimized with a semi-empirical (PM3) method. The in vitro antitumor activity of the synthesized compounds was studied. The Zn-complex exhibits significant decrease in surviving fraction of breast carcinoma (MCF 7), liver carcinoma (HEPG2), colon carcinoma (HCT116) and larynx carcinoma (HEP2) cell lines human cancer.

  6. Metal-Insulator Transition of Dirac Fermions: Variational Cluster Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebato, Masaki; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori

    2015-04-01

    A comparative study is made on the metal-insulator transition of Dirac fermions in the honeycomb and π-flux Hubbard models at half filling by means of the variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical impurity approximation. Paying particular attention to the choice of the geometry of solver clusters and the inclusion of particle-bath sites, we show that the direct transition from the Dirac semimetallic state to the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator state occurs in these models, and therefore, the spin liquid phase is absent in the intermediate region, in agreement with recent quantum-Monte-Carlo-based calculations.

  7. Laser Assisted Additively Manufactured Transition Metal Coating on Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Hitesh D.; Rajamure, Ravi Shanker; Roy, Anurag; Srinivasan, S. G.; Sundararajan, G.; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2016-07-01

    Various physical and chemical properties of surface and subsurface regions of Al can be improved by the formation of transition metal intermetallic phases (Al x TM y ) via coating of the transition metal (TM). The lower equilibrium solid solubility of TM in Al (<1 at.%) is a steep barrier to the formation of solid solutions using conventional alloying methods. In contrast, as demonstrated in the present work, surface engineering via a laser-aided additive manufacturing approach can effectively synthesize TM intermetallic coatings on the surface of Al. The focus of the present work included the development of process control to achieve thermodynamic and kinetic conditions necessary for desirable physical, microstructural and compositional attributes. A multiphysics finite element model was developed to predict the temperature profile, cooling rate, melt depth, dilution of W in Al matrix and corresponding micro-hardness in the coating, and the interface between the coating and the base material and the base material.

  8. Transition-metal-catalyzed C-S bond coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin-Fa; Liu, Yi-Chen; Badsara, Satpal Singh

    2014-03-01

    Sulfur-containing molecules such as thioethers are commonly found in chemical biology, organic synthesis, and materials chemistry. While many reliable methods have been developed for preparing these compounds, harsh reaction conditions are usually required in the traditional methods. The transition metals have been applied in this field, and the palladium-catalyzed coupling of thiols with aryl halides and pseudo halides is one of the most important methods in the synthesis of thioethers. Other metals have also been used for the same purpose. Here, we summarize recent efforts in metal-catalyzed C-S bond cross-coupling reactions, focusing especially on the coupling of thiols with aryl- and vinyl halides based on different metals.

  9. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dupé, B; Bihlmayer, G; Böttcher, M; Blügel, S; Heinze, S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations. PMID:27257020

  10. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Bihlmayer, G.; Böttcher, M.; Blügel, S.; Heinze, S.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations.

  11. Tailoring magnetic skyrmions in ultra-thin transition metal films.

    PubMed

    Dupé, Bertrand; Hoffmann, Markus; Paillard, Charles; Heinze, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Skyrmions in magnetic materials offer attractive perspectives for future spintronic applications since they are topologically stabilized spin structures on the nanometre scale, which can be manipulated with electric current densities that are by orders of magnitude lower than those required for moving domain walls. So far, they were restricted to bulk magnets with a particular chiral crystal symmetry greatly limiting the number of available systems and the adjustability of their properties. Recently, it has been experimentally discovered that magnetic skyrmion phases can also occur in ultra-thin transition metal films at surfaces. Here we present an understanding of skyrmions in such systems based on first-principles electronic structure theory. We demonstrate that the properties of magnetic skyrmions at transition metal interfaces such as their diameter and their stability can be tuned by the structure and composition of the interface and that a description beyond a micromagnetic model is required in such systems. PMID:24893652

  12. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, B.; Bihlmayer, G.; Böttcher, M.; Blügel, S.; Heinze, S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations. PMID:27257020

  13. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dupé, B; Bihlmayer, G; Böttcher, M; Blügel, S; Heinze, S

    2016-06-03

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations.

  14. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  15. Theoretical studies of transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The CASSCF approach was used to perform the MCSCF calculations for a number of transition metal dimers, including the Sc2, Ti2, Cr2, Cu2, TiV, Y2, Nb2, and Mo2 molecules; in addition, CASSCF/CI calculations were carried out for Sc2, Ti2, Cu2, and Y2. The CASSCF procedure is shown to provide a consistent set of calculations for these molecules, from which trends and a simple qualitative picture of the electronic structure may be derived. In particular, the calculations confirmed the ground states of the Sc2 and the TiV, and led to predictions for other molecules in this series. In addition to specific predictions, the study provides a simple qualitative picture of the bonding in these dimers.

  16. Generic trend of work functions in transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, Michiko

    2014-11-15

    Transition-metal carbides and nitrides (TMCs and TMNs) are promising electrode materials for various electronic devices such as metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and metal-insulator-metal capacitors. In this paper, the work functions of TMCs and TMNs are discussed systematically. Based upon the origin of the work function, the effect upon transition metal species by different periodic table groups is explained, carbides are compared with nitrides for the same transition metal, and the effect of carbon or nitrogen vacancies is discussed. In addition, a method to estimate the generic trend of the work function is proposed for TMC{sub x}, TMN{sub x}, TMC{sub 1−y}N{sub y} (transition metal carbonitrides), and TM{sub 1−z}TM′{sub z}C (alloy carbides)

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and magnetic properties of homo- and heterodinuclear complexes of transition and non-transition metal ions with a new Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saikat; Biswas, Susobhan; Dey, Kamalendu

    2008-12-01

    Four homodinuclear complexes of Ni(II)-Ni(II), Cu(II)-Cu(II), Co(II)-Co(II) and Co(III)-Co(II) and five heterodinuclear complexes of Co(III)-Zn(II), Co(III)-Cu(II), Co(III)-Ni(II), Cu(II)-Zn(II) and Zn(II)-Cu(II) with the octadentate Schiff base compartmental ligand 1,8- N-bis(3-carboxy)disalicylidene-3,6-diazaoctane-1,8-diamine (H 4fsatrien) have been synthesized. The complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductances, magnetic susceptibilities and spectroscopic (UV-vis, IR, ESR) data. Cryomagnetic data also helped to elucidate the structural features of the Cu(II) complexes.

  18. New Gallides and Germanides of Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of the average atomic volumes (AAV) of the intermediate phases from the concentration was done in many two-component systems. It was shown that in some systems (namely transition metal with non-transition element from the IIIrd or IVth group of the periodic table) the AAV of the intermediate phases are much more less than the sum of the volumes of the pure components. It means that the formation of the intermediate phases in such systems is accompanied by a rather large decreasing of the volume in comparison with the mixture of elements. For this reason the high pressure conditions are favourable for the formation of the intermediate phases in such systems from the thermodynamical point of view. On the ground of these data the systems W-Ga, W-Ge, Re-Ga, Os-Ga, Sc-Ga, Ta-Ga, were investigated at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that many new phases are crystallised in these systems. All of them are metastable at room pressure. The composition and crystal structures of these phases were investigated at ordinary conditions.

  19. Polytypism in superhard transition-metal triborides

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yongcheng; Yang, Jiong; Yuan, Xun; Qiu, Wujie; Zhong, Zheng; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    The quest of novel compounds with special structures and unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern materials science. Even though their exact structures have puzzled scientists for decades, superhard transition-metal borides (TMBs) have long been believed to exist only in simple crystal structures. Here, we report on a polytypic phenomenon in superhard WB3 and MoB3 with a series of energetically degenerate structures due to the random stacking of metal layers amongst the interlocking boron layers. Such polytypism can create a multiphase solid-solution compound with a large number of interfaces amongst different polytypes, and these interfaces will strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movement within each polytype, thereby further increase the hardness of this particular material. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional knowledge that intrinsically strong chemical bonds in superhard materials should lead to high lattice thermal conductivity, the polytypic TMB3 manifest anomalously low lattice thermal conductivity due to structural disorders and phonon folding. These findings promise to open a new avenue to searching for novel superhard materials with additional functionalities. PMID:24863493

  20. Soldering of Carbon Materials Using Transition Metal Rich Alloys.

    PubMed

    Burda, Marek; Lekawa-Raus, Agnieszka; Gruszczyk, Andrzej; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2015-08-25

    Joining of carbon materials via soldering has not been possible up to now due to lack of wetting of carbons by metals at standard soldering temperatures. This issue has been a severely restricting factor for many potential electrical/electronic and mechanical applications of nanostructured and conventional carbon materials. Here we demonstrate the formation of alloys that enable soldering of these structures. By addition of several percent (2.5-5%) of transition metal such as chromium or nickel to a standard lead-free soldering tin based alloy we obtained a solder that can be applied using a commercial soldering iron at typical soldering temperatures of approximately 350 °C and at ambient conditions. The use of this solder enables the formation of mechanically strong and electrically conductive joints between carbon materials and, when supported by a simple two-step technique, can successfully bond carbon structures to any metal terminal. It has been shown using optical and scanning electron microscope images as well as X-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive X-ray mapping that the successful formation of carbon-solder bonds is possible, first, thanks to the uniform nonreactive dispersion of transition metals in the tin-based matrix. Further, during the soldering process, these free elements diffuse into the carbon-alloy border with no formation of brazing-like carbides, which would damage the surface of the carbon materials. PMID:26256042

  1. The development of a biological interface for transition metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Kim R.

    The specific goal of this research was to develop an in vitro model for a root-form endosseous dental implant that contains a periodontal ligament and that is biologically integratable into alveolar bone. This objective was based on the following two hypotheses. (1) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the number of fibroblast cells attached to the surface of the metal. (2) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the strength of the fibroblast cell attachment to the surface of the metal. The model needed to have a well-controlled surface that was reproducible. Thus, a layer of Au was deposited over a Ti base, and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) a chemical containing disulfide groups was adsorbed to the Au. Next, extracellular matrix proteins which are periodontal ligament components were attached to the free end group of the chemical that was adsorbed to the Au. This surface served as an attachment substrate on which additional periodontal ligament components such as fibroblast cells could grow. From this model a new implant interface may be developed. This model was tested using the following polypeptides; collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and poly-D-lysine. L929 cells were grown on Ti, Ti + Au, Ti + Au + polypeptide, and Ti + Au + DSP + polypeptide. After 72 hours, the live cells were stained with neutral red. The substrates were then subjected to increasing centrifugal forces. The viable stained cells were fixed onto the substrates and cells were counted. The hypotheses were proven for three polypeptides: fibronectin, collagen type I, and poly-D-lysine. The strongest attachment was found with collagen type I. Collagen type IV did not provide any advantage for attachment over uncoated transition metals.

  2. Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Averkiev, Boris B.; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2007-11-05

    Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry primarily for hydrocarbon compounds, but it has been extended to compounds containing transition-metal atoms. Recent findings of aromaticity and antiaromaticy in all-metal clusters have stimulated further researches in describing the chemical bonding, structures, and stability in transition-metal clusters and compounds on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, which are reviewed here. The presence of d-orbitals endows much more diverse chemistry, structure, and chemical bonding to transition-metal clusters and compounds. One interesting feature is the existence of a new type of δ-aromaticity, in addition to σ- and π-aromaticity that are only possible for main group compounds. Another striking characteristic in the chemical bonding of transition-metal systems is the multi-fold nature of aromaticity, antiaromaticity, or even conflicting aromaticity. Separate sets of counting rules have been proposed for cyclic transition-metal systems to account for the three types of σ-, π-, and δ-aromaticity/antiaromaticity. The diverse transition-metal clusters and compounds reviewed here indicate that multiple aromaticity and antiaromaticity may be much more common in chemistry than one would anticipate. It is hoped that the current review will stimulate interest in further understanding the structure and bonding, on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, of other known or unknown transition-metal systems, such as the active sites of enzymes or other biomolecules, which contain transition-metal atoms and clusters.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activities of mixed ligand transition metal complexes with isatin monohydrazone Schiff base ligands and heterocyclic nitrogen base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha

    2015-01-01

    Mixed ligand complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with various uninegative tridentate ligands derived from isatin monohydrazone with 2-hydroxynapthaldehyde/substituted salicylaldehyde and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductometric studies, magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, mass and ESR). On the basis of these characterizations, it was revealed that Schiff base ligands existed as monobasic tridentate ONO bonded to metal ion through oxygen of carbonyl group, azomethine nitrogen and deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline existed as monobasic bidentate ON bonded through oxygen of hydroxyl group and nitrogen of quinoline ring with octahedral or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. All the compounds have been tested in vitro against various pathogenic Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria and fungi using different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL) of ligands and their complexes. Comparative study of antimicrobial activity of ligands, and their mixed complexes indicated that complexes exhibit enhanced activity as compared to free ligands and copper(II) Cu(LIV)(Q)ṡH2O complex was found to be most potent antimicrobial agent.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activities of mixed ligand transition metal complexes with isatin monohydrazone Schiff base ligands and heterocyclic nitrogen base.

    PubMed

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha

    2015-01-25

    Mixed ligand complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with various uninegative tridentate ligands derived from isatin monohydrazone with 2-hydroxynapthaldehyde/substituted salicylaldehyde and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductometric studies, magnetic susceptibility and spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, mass and ESR). On the basis of these characterizations, it was revealed that Schiff base ligands existed as monobasic tridentate ONO bonded to metal ion through oxygen of carbonyl group, azomethine nitrogen and deprotonated hydroxyl oxygen and heterocyclic nitrogen base 8-hydroxyquinoline existed as monobasic bidentate ON bonded through oxygen of hydroxyl group and nitrogen of quinoline ring with octahedral or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. All the compounds have been tested in vitro against various pathogenic Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria and fungi using different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL) of ligands and their complexes. Comparative study of antimicrobial activity of ligands, and their mixed complexes indicated that complexes exhibit enhanced activity as compared to free ligands and copper(II) Cu(LIV)(Q)⋅H2O complex was found to be most potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:25129626

  5. Resonant Ultrasound Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Henry Bass; Dr. J. R. Gladden

    2008-08-18

    Department of Energy EPSCoR The University of Mississippi Award: DE-FG02-04ER46121 Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides The central thrust of this DOE funded research program has been to apply resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), an elegant and efficient method for determining the elastic stiffness constants of a crystal, to the complex and poorly understood class of materials known as transition metal oxides (TMOs). Perhaps the most interesting and challenging feature of TMOs is their strongly correlated behavior in which spin, lattice, and charge degrees of freedom are strongly coupled. Elastic constants are a measure of the interatomic potentials in a crystal and are thus sensitive probes into the atomic environment. This sensitivity makes RUS an ideal tool to study the coupling of phase transition order parameters to lattice strains. The most significant result of the project has been the construction of a high temperature RUS apparatus capable of making elastic constant measurements at temperatures as high as 1000 degrees Celsius. We have designed and built novel acoustic transducers which can operate as high as 600 degrees Celsius based on lithium niobate piezoelectric elements. For measurement between 600 to 1000 C, a buffer rod system is used in which the samples under test and transducers are separated by a rod with low acoustic attenuation. The high temperature RUS system has been used to study the charge order (CO) transition in transition metal oxides for which we have discovered a new transition occurring about 35 C below the CO transition. While the CO transition exhibits a linear coupling between the strain and order parameter, this new precursor transition shows a different coupling indicating a fundamentally different mechanism. We have also begun a study, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to study novel thermoelectric materials at elevated temperatures. These materials include silicon

  6. Synthesis, solvatochromaticity and bioactivities of some transition metal complexes with 2-(R-benzylideneamino)-pyridin-3-ol Schiff base derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, I. S.; Kassem, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    New four Schiff bases are prepared by condensation of 2-amino-pyridin-3-ol with 3, 4-dihydroxy-benzaldehyde (I), 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde (II), 5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde (III), and 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (IV). The structures of these compounds are characterized based on elemental analyses (C. H. N), IR and 1H NMR. Also, the electronic absorption spectra are recorded in organic solvents of different polarity. The solvents are selected to be covered a wide range of parameters (refractive index, dielectric constant and hydrogen bonding capacity). The UV-vis absorption spectra of Schiff base compounds are investigated in aqueous buffer solutions of varying pH and utilized for the determination of ionization constant, p Ka and activation free energy, Δ G* of the ionization process. The biological activity against bacterial species and fungi as microorganisms representing different microbial categories such as (two Gram-negative bacteria, Eschericha coli and Agrobacterium sp.),three Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtlus and Bacillus megatherium), yeast ( Candida albicans), and fungi ( Aspergillus niger) were studied.

  7. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ketolainen, T. Havu, V.; Puska, M. J.

    2015-02-07

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green’s function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  8. Excitonic polarons in low-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagam, A.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the excitonic polaron properties of common monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2). The excitonic polaron is formed when excitons interact with acoustic or optical phonons via coupling to the deformation potentials associated with the conduction and valence bands. A unitary transformation which performs an approximate diagonalization of the exciton-phonon operator is used to evaluate the ground state energy of the excitonic polaron. We derive analytical expressions of the changes in the excitonic polaron energy and mass at small exciton wavevectors involving the deformation potential due to optical phonons. The polaronic effect of the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides is examined by comparing changes in the energy gap shift and effective masses based on known deformation potential constants for carrier-phonon interactions. Our results indicate the occurrence of comparable energy shifts when the ground state exciton interacts with optical or acoustic phonons. We extend our calculations to explore the influence of exciton-lattice interactions on the binding energies and the self-trapping of excitons in two-dimensional layers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

  9. M-DNA/Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Hybrid Structure-based Bio-FET sensor with Ultra-high Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung-Youl; Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Kang, Dong-Ho; Yoo, Gwangwe; Kim, Jinok; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Jeon, Jaeho; Kim, Minwoo; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo; Heo, Jonggon; Jeon, Young Jin; Park, Sung Ha; Park, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a high performance biosensor based on (i) a Cu2+-DNA/MoS2 hybrid structure and (ii) a field effect transistor, which we refer to as a bio-FET, presenting a high sensitivity of 1.7 × 103 A/A. This high sensitivity was achieved by using a DNA nanostructure with copper ions (Cu2+) that induced a positive polarity in the DNA (receptor). This strategy improved the detecting ability for doxorubicin-like molecules (target) that have a negative polarity. Very short distance between the biomolecules and the sensor surface was obtained without using a dielectric layer, contributing to the high sensitivity. We first investigated the effect of doxorubicin on DNA/MoS2 and Cu2+-DNA/MoS2 nanostructures using Raman spectroscopy and Kelvin force probe microscopy. Then, we analyzed the sensing mechanism and performance in DNA/MoS2- and Cu2+-DNA/MoS2-based bio-FETs by electrical measurements (ID-VG at various VD) for various concentrations of doxorubicin. Finally, successful operation of the Cu2+-DNA/MoS2 bio-FET was demonstrated for six cycles (each cycle consisted of four steps: 2 preparation steps, a sensing step, and an erasing step) with different doxorubicin concentrations. The bio-FET showed excellent reusability, which has not been achieved previously in 2D biosensors. PMID:27775004

  10. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  11. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  12. Structural, magnetic, and redox diversity of first-row transition metal complexes of a pyridine-based macrocycle: well-marked trends supported by theoretical DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Drahoš, Bohuslav; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    A series of first-row transition metal complexes with 15-membered pyridine-based macrocycle (3,12,18-triaza-6,9-dioxabicyclo[12.3.1]octadeca-1(18),14,16-triene = L) was prepared ([M(II)(L)Cl2], where M = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn (1, 3, 4, 6); [Fe(III)(L)Cl2]Cl (2), [Cu(II)(L)Cl]Cl (5)) and thoroughly characterized. Depending on the complexated metal atom, the coordination number varies from 7 (Mn, Fe, Co), through 5 + 2 for Ni and 4 + 1 for Cu, to 5 for Zn accompanied by changes in the coordination geometry from the pentagonal bipyramid (1-4) to the square pyramid (5 and 6). Along the series, the metal-oxygen distances were prolonged in such manner that their bonding character was investigated, apart from X-ray structural analysis, also by ab initio calculations (Mayer's bond order, electron localization function), which confirmed that, in 4 and 5, two and one oxygen donor atoms are semicoordinated, respectively, and one and two oxygen atoms are uncoordinated in 5, and 6, respectively. On the basis of the temperature variable magnetic susceptibility measurements, 1 and 2 behave as expected for 3d(5) high-spin configuration with negligible zero-field splitting (ZFS). On the other hand, a large axial ZFS (D(Co) ≈ 40 cm(-1), D(Ni) ≈ -6.0 cm(-1)) was found for 3 and 4, and rhombic ZFS (E/D ≈ 0.15) for 4. Antiferromagnetic exchange coupling was observed for 4 and 5 (J(Ni) = -0.48 cm(-1), and J(Cu) = -2.43 cm(-1), respectively). The obtained results correlate well with ab initio calculations of ZFS parameters as well as J-values, which indicate that the antiferromagnetic exchange is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The complexes were also investigated by cyclic voltammetry in water or acetonitrile. A quasi-reversible couple Mn(II)/Mn(III) at 1.13/0.97 V, an almost reversible couple Fe(II)/Fe(III) at 0.51/0.25 V, and a one-step/multistep reduction/oxidation of Cu(II) complex 5 at -0.33 V/0.06-0.61 V were detected. PMID:25761063

  13. M5Si3(M=Ti, Nb, Mo) Based Transition-Metal Silicides for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhihong

    2007-01-01

    Transition metal silicides are being considered for future engine turbine components at temperatures up to 1600 C. Although significant improvement in high temperature strength, room temperature fracture toughness has been realized in the past decade, further improvement in oxidation resistance is needed. Oxidation mechanism of Ti5Si3-based alloys was investigated. Oxidation behavior of Ti5Si3-based alloy strongly depends on the atmosphere. Presence of Nitrogen alters the oxidation behavior of Ti5Si3 by nucleation and growth of nitride subscale. Ti5Si3.2and Ti5Si3C0.5 alloys exhibited an excellent oxidation resistance in nitrogen bearing atmosphere due to limited dissolution of nitrogen and increased Si/Ti activity ratio. MoSi2 coating developed by pack cementation to protect Mo-based Mo-Si-B composites was found to be effective up to 1500 C. Shifting coating composition to T1+T2+Mo3Si region showed the possibility to extend the coating lifetime above 1500 C by more than ten times via formation of slow growing Mo3Si or T2 interlayer without sacrificing the oxidation resistance of the coating. The phase equilibria in the Nb-rich portion of Nb-B system has been evaluated experimentally using metallographic analysis and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was shown that Nbss (solid solution) and NbB are the only two primary phases in the 0-40 at.% B composition range, and the eutectic reaction L {leftrightarrow} NbSS + NbB was determined to occur at 2104 ± 5 C by DTA.

  14. Development of hybrid materials based on sponge supported reduced graphene oxide and transition metal hydroxides for hybrid energy storage devices

    PubMed Central

    Dubal, Deepak P.; Holze, Rudolf; Gomez-Romero, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Earnest efforts have been taken to design hybrid energy storage devices using hybrid electrodes based on capacitive (rGO) and pseudocapacitive (Ni(OH)2 and Co(OH)2) materials deposited on the skeleton of 3D macroporous (indicate sponge material) sponge support. Conducting framework was formed by coating rGO on macroporous sponge on which subsequent deposition of Ni(OH)2 and Co(OH)2 was carried out. The synergetic combination of rGO and Ni(OH)2 or Co(OH)2) provides dual charge-storing mechanisms whereas 3D framework of sponge allows excellent accessibility of electrolyte to hybrid electrodes. Moreover, to further increase the energy density, hybrid devices have been fabricated with SP@rGO@Ni or SP@rGO@Co and SP@rGO as positive and negative electrodes, respectively. These hybrid devices operate with extended operating voltage windows and achieve remarkable electrochemical supercapacitive properties which make them truly promising energy storage devices for commercial production. PMID:25483007

  15. Nutritional immunity: transition metals at the pathogen-host interface

    PubMed Central

    Hood, M. Indriati; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals occupy an essential niche in biological systems. Their electrostatic properties stabilize substrates or reaction intermediates in the active sites of enzymes, while their heightened reactivity is harnessed for catalysis. However, the latter property renders transition metals toxic at high concentrations. Bacteria, like all living organisms, must regulate the levels of these elements to satisfy their physiological needs while avoiding harm. It is therefore not surprising that the host capitalizes on both the essentiality and toxicity of transition metals to defend against bacterial invaders. This review will discuss established and emerging paradigms in nutrient metal homeostasis at the pathogen-host interface. PMID:22796883

  16. Nutritional immunity: transition metals at the pathogen-host interface.

    PubMed

    Hood, M Indriati; Skaar, Eric P

    2012-07-16

    Transition metals occupy an essential niche in biological systems. Their electrostatic properties stabilize substrates or reaction intermediates in the active sites of enzymes, and their heightened reactivity is harnessed for catalysis. However, this heightened activity also renders transition metals toxic at high concentrations. Bacteria, like all living organisms, must regulate their intracellular levels of these elements to satisfy their physiological needs while avoiding harm. It is therefore not surprising that the host capitalizes on both the essentiality and toxicity of transition metals to defend against bacterial invaders. This Review discusses established and emerging paradigms in nutrient metal homeostasis at the pathogen-host interface.

  17. Transition metal coordination polymers based on tetrabromoterephthalic and bis(imidazole) ligands: Syntheses, structures, topological analysis and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Xing, Peiqi; Geng, Xiujuan; Sun, Daofeng; Xiao, Zhenyu; Wang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Eight new coordination polymers (CPs), namely, [Zn(1,2-mbix)(tbtpa)]n (1), [Co(1,2-mbix)(tbtpa)]n (2), [CdCl(1,2-mbix)(tbtpa)0.5]n (3), {[Cd(1,2-bix)(tbtpa)]·H2O}n (4), {[Cd0.5(1,2-bix)(tbtpa)0.5]·H2O}n (5), {[Co0.5(1,2-bix)(tbtpa)0.5]·2H2O}n (6), {[Co(1,2-bix)(tbtpa)]·H2O}n (7) and {[Co(1,2-bix)(tbtpa)]·Diox·2H2O}n (8), were synthesized under solvothermal conditions based on mix-ligand strategy (H2tbtpa=tetrabromoterephthalic acid and 1,2-mbix=1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene, 1,2-bix=1,2-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene). All of the CPs have been structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). X-ray diffraction analyses show that 1 and 2 are isotypics which have 2D highly undulated networks with (4,4)-sql topology with the existence of C-H ⋯Br interactions; for 3, it has a 2D planar network with (4,4)-sql topology with the occurrence of C-H ⋯Cl interactions other than C-H ⋯Br interactions; 4 shows a 3D 2-fold interpenetrated nets with rare 65·8-mok topology which has a self-catention property. As the same case as 1 and 2, 5 and 6 are also isostructural with planar layers with 44-sql topology which further assembled into 3D supramolecular structure through the interdigitated stacking fashion and the C-Br ⋯Cph interactions. As for 7, it has a 2D slightly undulated networks with (4,4)-sql topology which has one dimension channel. While 8 has a 2-fold interpenetrated networks with (3,4)-connect jeb topology with point symbol {63}{65·8}. And their structures can be tuned by conformations of bis(imidazol) ligands and solvent mixture. Besides, the TGA properties for all compounds and the luminescent properties for 1, 3, 4, 5 are discussed in detail.

  18. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements. PMID:27762334

  19. Studies on DNA binding behaviour of biologically active transition metal complexes of new tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff bases: Inhibitory activity against bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobha, S.; Mahalakshmi, R.; Raman, N.

    A series of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of the type ML have been synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-acetoacetotoluidide, 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine/1,4-diaminobutane. The complexes are insoluble in common organic solvents but soluble in DMF and DMSO. The measured molar conductance values in DMSO indicate that the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. All the six metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The analytical data helped to elucidate the structure of the metal complexes. The Schiff bases are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around all the metal ions. The binding properties of metal complexes with DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. Detailed analysis reveals that the metal complexes intercalate into the DNA base stack as intercalators. All the metal complexes cleave the pUC19 DNA in presence of H2O2. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for their antibacterial activity against five bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) by disk diffusion method. All the metal complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  20. Trion formation in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Tsiklauri, Shalva M.

    We present three-body calculations for trions binding energy in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides using the method of hyperspherical harmonics (HH). In numerical calculations for a proper treatment of Coulomb screening in two dimensions we assume that electrons and holes are interacted via Keldysh potential. The convergences of binding energy calculations for the ground state of the trion as a function of the grand angular momentum are studied. For the trion binding energy in MoS2 we obtain 19.2 mev. This value is remarkably close to the experimental one of 18 meV. A comparison with results of other calculations are presented. We also study solutions of a hyperradial equation in a minimal approximation for the ground angular momentum to examine two regimes: a long range and a short range cases when the inter particle distance is much greater and much less than the screening length. For these cases, we find analytical expressions for the energy and wave function for trion states

  1. Patterning Superatom Dopants on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaeeun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Bouilly, Delphine; Han, Minyong; Kim, Philip; Steigerwald, Michael L; Roy, Xavier; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-05-11

    This study describes a new and simple approach to dope two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) using the superatom Co6Se8(PEt3)6 as the electron dopant. Semiconducting TMDCs are wired into field-effect transistor devices and then immersed into a solution of these superatoms. The degree of doping is determined by the concentration of the superatoms in solution and by the length of time the films are immersed in the dopant solution. Using this chemical approach, we are able to turn mono- and few-layer MoS2 samples from moderately to heavily electron-doped states. The same approach applied on WSe2 films changes their characteristics from hole transporting to electron transporting. Moreover, we show that the superatom doping can be patterned on specific areas of TMDC films. To illustrate the power of this technique, we demonstrate the fabrication of a lateral p-n junction by selectively doping only a portion of the channel in a WSe2 device. Finally, encapsulation of the doped films with crystalline hydrocarbon layers stabilizes their properties in an ambient environment. PMID:27082448

  2. Transition metal-free olefin polymerization catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sen, Ayusman; Wojcinski, II, Louis M.; Liu, Shengsheng

    2001-01-01

    Ethylene and/or propylene are polymerized to form high molecular weight, linear polymers by contacting ethylene and/or propylene monomer, in the presence of an inert reaction medium, with a catalyst system which consists essentially of (1) an aluminum alkyl component, such as trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum and diethylaluminum hydride and (2) a Lewis acid or Lewis acid derivative component, such as B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3, [(CH.sub.3).sub.2 N (H) (C.sub.6 H.sub.5)].sup.+ [B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5)4].sup.-, [(C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.3 NH].sup.+ [B C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ],.sup.-, [C(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3 ].sup.+ [B(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ].sup.-, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(OCH.sub.3), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenoxide), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5)Al(2,6 -di-t-butylphenoxide).sub.2, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butylphonoxide) , 2,6 -di-t-butylphenol.multidot.methylaluminoxane or an alkylaluminoxane, and which may be completely free any transition metal component(s).

  3. Impact Electrochemistry of Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Shan; Tan, Shu Min; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-08-25

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit paramount importance in the electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction. It is crucial to determine the size of the electrocatalytic particles as well as to establish their electrocatalytic activity, which occurs at the edges of these particles. Here, we show that individual TMD (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, or WSe2; in general MX2) nanoparticles impacting an electrode surface provide well-defined current "spikes" in both the cathodic and anodic regions. These spikes originate from direct oxidation of the nanoparticles (from M(4+) to M(6+)) at the anodic region and from the electrocatalytic currents generated upon hydrogen evolution in the cathodic region. The positive correlation between the frequency of the impacts and the concentration of TMD nanoparticles is also demonstrated here, enabling determination of the concentration of TMD nanoparticles in colloidal form. In addition, the size of individual TMD nanoparticles can be evaluated using the charge passed during every spike. The capability of detecting both the "indirect" catalytic effect of an impacting TMD nanoparticle as well as "direct" oxidation indicates that the frequency of impacts in both the "indirect" and "direct" scenarios are comparable. This suggests that all TMD nanoparticles, which are electrochemically oxidizable (thus capable of donating electrons to electrodes), are also capable of catalyzing the hydrogen reduction reaction.

  4. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described. PMID:26828562

  5. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  6. Novel metal-based pharmacologically dynamic agents of transition metal(II) complexes: Designing, synthesis, structural elucidation, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Jeyamurugan, R.; Sakthivel, A.; Mitu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Novel Schiff base Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been designed and synthesized using the macrocyclic ligand derived from the condensation of diethylphthalate with Schiff base, obtained from benzene-1,2-diamine and 3-benzylidene-pentane-2,4-dione. The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by UV-vis, viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammogram studies. The intrinsic binding constants for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are 1.6 × 10 6, 1.8 × 10 6, 2.0 × 10 6 and 1.5 × 10 6 M -1 respectively which are obtained from electronic absorption experiment. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder (distamycin) suggest the major groove binding tendency for the synthesized complexes. In the presence of a reducing agent like 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), the synthesized complexes show chemical nuclease activity under dark reaction condition. The complexes also show efficient photo-induced DNA cleavage activity on irradiation with a monochromatic UV light of 360 nm in the presence of inhibitors. Control experiments show inhibition of cleavage in the presence of singlet oxygen quencher like sodium azide and enhancement of cleavage in D 2O, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen as a reactive species in a type-II process.

  7. Modern Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbon-Halogen Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Petrone, David A; Ye, Juntao; Lautens, Mark

    2016-07-27

    The high utility of halogenated organic compounds has prompted the development of a vast number of transformations which install the carbon-halogen motif. Traditional routes to these building blocks have commonly involved multiple steps, harsh reaction conditions, and the use of stoichiometric and/or toxic reagents. In this regard, using transition metals to catalyze the synthesis of organohalides has become a mature field in itself, and applying these technologies has allowed for a decrease in the production of waste, higher levels of regio- and stereoselectivity, and the ability to produce enantioenriched target compounds. Furthermore, transition metals offer the distinct advantage of possessing a diverse spectrum of mechanistic possibilities which translate to the capability to apply new substrate classes and afford novel and difficult-to-access structures. This Review provides comprehensive coverage of modern transition metal-catalyzed syntheses of organohalides via a diverse array of mechanisms. Attention is given to the seminal stoichiometric organometallic studies which led to the corresponding catalytic processes being realized. By breaking this field down into the synthesis of aryl, vinyl, and alkyl halides, it becomes clear which methods have surfaced as most favored for each individual class. In general, a pronounced shift toward the use of C-H bonds as key functional groups, in addition to methods which proceed by catalytic, radical-based mechanisms has occurred. Although always evolving, this field appears to be heading in the direction of using starting materials with a significantly lower degree of prefunctionalization in addition to less expensive and abundant metal catalysts. PMID:27341176

  8. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  9. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals.

    PubMed

    Pogatscher, S; Leutenegger, D; Schawe, J E K; Uggowitzer, P J; Löffler, J F

    2016-04-22

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a 'real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory.

  10. Solid-solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-04-01

    Observing solid-solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid-solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a `real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory.

  11. Correlated electron pseudopotentials for 3d-transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Trail, J. R. Needs, R. J.

    2015-02-14

    A recently published correlated electron pseudopotentials (CEPPs) method has been adapted for application to the 3d-transition metals, and to include relativistic effects. New CEPPs are reported for the atoms Sc − Fe, constructed from atomic quantum chemical calculations that include an accurate description of correlated electrons. Dissociation energies, molecular geometries, and zero-point vibrational energies of small molecules are compared with all electron results, with all quantities evaluated using coupled cluster singles doubles and triples calculations. The CEPPs give better results in the correlated-electron calculations than Hartree-Fock-based pseudopotentials available in the literature.

  12. The nature of the bonding in the transition metal trimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic structure of the transition metal (TM) trimers was studied by comparing the bonding in the Ca3, Sc3, and Cu3 molecules. The complete active space SCF/externally contracted configuration interaction (CI) ratio for the low-lying states of Sc3 and Sc3(+) and the SCF/CI ratio for Ca3 and Cu3 trimers, all for near equilateral triangle geometries, were calculated. In addition, vertical excitation energies for Cu3 were computed, leading to a new assignment of the upper state in the resonant two-photon ionization spectrum. Based on these studies, bonding in other TM trimers was discussed.

  13. Cross-plane thermal properties of transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Muratore, C.; Varshney, V.; Gengler, J. J.; Hu, J. J.; Bultman, J. E.; Smith, T. M.; Shamberger, P. J.; Roy, A. K.; Voevodin, A. A.; Qiu, B.; Ruan, X.

    2013-02-25

    In this work, we explore the thermal properties of hexagonal transition metal dichalcogenide compounds with different average atomic masses but equivalent microstructures. Thermal conductivity values of sputtered thin films were compared to bulk crystals. The comparison revealed a >10 fold reduction in thin film thermal conductivity. Structural analysis of the films revealed a turbostratic structure with domain sizes on the order of 5-10 nm. Estimates of phonon scattering lengths at domain boundaries based on computationally derived group velocities were consistent with the observed film microstructure, and accounted for the reduction in thermal conductivity compared to values for bulk crystals.

  14. Syntheses, structures, and properties of transition metal coordination polymers based on a long semirigid tetracarboxylic acid and multidentate N-donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Bai, Hui; Bing, Ying-Ying; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Six transition metal coordination polymers based on a semirigid tetracarboxylic acid and the multidentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method, namely, {[Co(H2obda) (μ2-H2O) (H2O)2]·2H2O}n (1), {[Co(obda)0.5(bpe) (H2O)2]·3H2O}n (2), {[Zn(H2obda) (H2O)4]·H4obda·6H2O}n (3), {[Zn(bpy) (H2O)4]·H2obda}n (4), {[Ni(bpy) (H2O)4]·H2obda}n (5) and {[Cu(H2obda) (bpy)2]}n (6) (H4obda = 1,4-bis(4-oxy-1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid)benzene, bpe = 1,2-Bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene), bpy = 4,4‧-bipyridine). Compounds 1-6 were structurally characterized by the elemental analyses, infrared spectra, and single crystal X-ray diffractions. Compounds 1-2 exhibit the 2D quadrilateral and polygonal layered grid structures, respectively; a 3D supramolecular structure of 2 has been build via π···π and hydrogen bonds interactions. Compounds 3-6 reveal the 1D zigzag and linear chains structures, respectively; furthermore, 3-5 display the diverse 3D supramolecular structures via hydrogen bonds, respectively. The 1-D infinite water chain in 3 has been found between the lattice water molecules. In addition, the thermogravimetric analyses of 1-6, magnetic property of 1, and photoluminescence of 3-4 have been investigated, respectively.

  15. Transition Metal and Vacancy Defect Complexes in Phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mukul; Babar, Rohit

    Inducing magnetic moment in otherwise nonmagnetic two-dimensional semiconducting materials is the first step to design spintronic material. Here, we study the adsorption of transition-metals on pristine and defected phosphorene, within density functional theory. We predict that increased transition-meal diffusivity on the pristine phosphorene would hinder controlled magnetism. In contrast, point-defects anchor the transiton-metal to reduce metal diffusivity. The di-vacancy complex is more important in this context due to their increased thermodynamic stability over the mono-vacancy. For most cases, the defect-transition metal complexes retain the intrinsic semiconducting properties, and induce a local moment. We provide a simple microscopic model which describe the local moment of these transition metal and defect complexes.

  16. Storing excitons in transition-metal dichalcogenides using dark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunlycke, Daniel; Tseng, Frank; Simsek, Ergun

    Monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides exhibit strongly bound excitons confined to two dimensions. One challenge in exploiting these excitons is that they have a finite life time and collapse through electron-hole recombination. We propose that the exciton life time could be extended by transitioning the exciton population into dark states. The symmetry of these dark states require the electron and hole to be spatially separated, which not only causes these states to be optically inactive but also inhibits electron-hole recombination. Based on an atomistic model we call the Triangular Lattice Exciton (3ALE) model, we derive transition matrix elements and approximate selection rules showing that excitons could be transitioned into and out of dark states using a pulsed infrared laser. For illustration, we also present exciton population scenarios based on different recombination decay constants. Longer exciton lifetimes could make these materials candidates for applications in energy management and quantum information processing. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  17. Magnetism in transition-metal-doped silicon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Briere, Tina M; Kumar, Vijay; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-10-01

    Using first-principles density functional calculations, we show that hexagonal metallic silicon nanotubes can be stabilized by doping with 3d transition metal atoms. Finite nanotubes doped with Fe and Mn have high local magnetic moments, whereas Co-doped nanotubes have low values and Ni-doped nanotubes are mostly nonmagnetic. The infinite Si24Fe4 nanotube is found to be ferromagnetic with nearly the same local magnetic moment on each Fe atom as in bulk iron. Mn-doped nanotubes are antiferromagnetic, but a ferrromagnetic state lies only 0.03 eV higher in energy with a gap in the majority spin bands near the Fermi energy. These materials are interesting for silicon-based spintronic devices and other nanoscale magnetic applications.

  18. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis (invited 'Focus' article),

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  19. Transition Metal-Free Tryptophan-Selective Bioconjugation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yohei; Ishiyama, Takashi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Abe, Junpei; Sohma, Youhei; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-08-31

    Chemical modifications of native proteins can facilitate production of supernatural protein functions that are not easily accessible by complementary methods relying on genetic manipulations. However, accomplishing precise control over selectivity while maintaining structural integrity and homogeneity still represents a formidable challenge. Herein, we report a transition metal-free method for tryptophan-selective bioconjugation of proteins that is based on an organoradical and operates under ambient conditions. This method exhibits low levels of cross-reactivity and leaves higher-order structures of the protein and various functional groups therein unaffected. The strategy to target less abundant amino acids contributes to the formation of structurally homogeneous conjugates, which may even be suitable for protein crystallography. The absence of toxic metals and biochemically incompatible conditions allows a rapid functional modulation of native proteins such as antibodies and pathogenic aggregative proteins, and this method may thus easily find therapeutic applications. PMID:27534812

  20. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  2. Chiral phase transition in lattice QCD as a metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Antonio M.; Osborn, James C.

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the lattice QCD Dirac operator with staggered fermions at temperatures around the chiral phase transition. We present evidence of a metal-insulator transition in the low lying modes of the Dirac operator around the same temperature as the chiral phase transition. This strongly suggests the phenomenon of Anderson localization drives the QCD vacuum to the chirally symmetric phase in a way similar to a metal-insulator transition in a disordered conductor. We also discuss how Anderson localization affects the usual phenomenological treatment of phase transitions a la Ginzburg-Landau.

  3. Transition-Metal-Doped p-Type ZnO Nanoparticle-Based Sensory Array for Instant Discrimination of Explosive Vapors.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jiang; Ge, Yuru; Zu, Baiyi; Li, Yuxiang; Dou, Xincun

    2016-03-01

    The development of portable, real-time, and cheap platforms to monitor ultratrace levels of explosives is of great urgence and importance due to the threat of terrorism attacks and the need for homeland security. However, most of the previous chemiresistor sensors for explosive detection are suffering from limited responses and long response time. Here, a transition-metal-doping method is presented to remarkably promote the quantity of the surface defect states and to significantly reduce the charge transfer distance by creating a local charge reservoir layer. Thus, the sensor response is greatly enhanced and the response time is remarkably shortened. The resulting sensory array can not only detect military explosives, such as, TNT, DNT, PNT, PA, and RDX with high response, but also can fully distinguish some of the improvised explosive vapors, such as AN and urea, due to the huge response reaching to 100%. Furthermore, this sensory array can discriminate ppb-level TNT and ppt-level RDX from structurally similar and high-concentration interfering aromatic gases in less than 12 s. Through comparison with the previously reported chemiresistor or Schottky sensors for explosive detection, the present transition-metal-doping method resulting ZnO sensor stands out and undoubtedly challenges the best.

  4. Transition-Metal-Doped p-Type ZnO Nanoparticle-Based Sensory Array for Instant Discrimination of Explosive Vapors.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jiang; Ge, Yuru; Zu, Baiyi; Li, Yuxiang; Dou, Xincun

    2016-03-01

    The development of portable, real-time, and cheap platforms to monitor ultratrace levels of explosives is of great urgence and importance due to the threat of terrorism attacks and the need for homeland security. However, most of the previous chemiresistor sensors for explosive detection are suffering from limited responses and long response time. Here, a transition-metal-doping method is presented to remarkably promote the quantity of the surface defect states and to significantly reduce the charge transfer distance by creating a local charge reservoir layer. Thus, the sensor response is greatly enhanced and the response time is remarkably shortened. The resulting sensory array can not only detect military explosives, such as, TNT, DNT, PNT, PA, and RDX with high response, but also can fully distinguish some of the improvised explosive vapors, such as AN and urea, due to the huge response reaching to 100%. Furthermore, this sensory array can discriminate ppb-level TNT and ppt-level RDX from structurally similar and high-concentration interfering aromatic gases in less than 12 s. Through comparison with the previously reported chemiresistor or Schottky sensors for explosive detection, the present transition-metal-doping method resulting ZnO sensor stands out and undoubtedly challenges the best. PMID:26763156

  5. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of some transition metal complexes of a novel Schiff base ligands derived from 5-phenylazo-salicyladehyde and o-amino benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Deen, Ibrahim M.; Ibrahim, Hassan K.; El-Ghool, Samir

    2006-12-01

    Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) metal complexes with novel heterocyclic Schiff base derived from 5-phenyl azo-salicyladehyde and o-amino benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, electronic, IR, and 1H NMR spectra, and also by aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction, molar ratio measurements, molar conductivity measurements, and thermogravimetric analyses. It has been found that the Schiff base behaves as neutral tridentate (ONO) ligand forming chelates with 1:1 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry.

  6. Electrolytic separation of crystals of transition-metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnott, R. J.; Feretti, A.; Kunnamann, W.

    1969-01-01

    Versatile flux system grows large, well-formed, stoichiometric single crystals of mixed oxides of the transition-metal elements. These crystals have important uses in the microwave field, and applications as lasers and masers in communications.

  7. On metal-insulator transition in cubic fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu

    The interplay between degenerate orbital and electron correlation is a key to characterize the electronic phases in, for example, transition metal compounds and alkali-doped fullerides. Besides, the degenerate orbital couples to spin and lattice degrees of freedom ,giving rise to exotic phenomena. Here, we develop the self-consistent Gutzwiller approach for the simultaneous treatment of the Jahn-Teller effect and electron correlation, and apply the methodology to reveal the nature of the ground electronic state of fullerides. For small Coulomb repulsion on site U, the fulleride is quasi degenerate correlated metal. With increase of U, we found the quantum phase transition from the metallic phase to JT split phase. In the latter, the Mott transition (MT) mainly develops in the half-filled subband, whereas the empty and the completely filled subbands are almost uninvolved. Therefore, we can qualify the metal-insulator transition in fullerides as an orbital selective MT induced by JT effect.

  8. Theory of semiconductor and transition metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex

    1997-03-01

    There is a lot of talk about computer-aided discoveries/design of new materials, but the simple fact is that even limiting oneself to materials made of just two elements, (e.g., Cu-Au or Si-Ge), and to a substitutional system, there can exist as many as 2^N configurations that include compounds, alloys, superlattices, and impurities. Indeed, even for modest number of sites N, this is an astronomical number. Thus, the conventional energy minimization approach (e.g., first-principles pseudopotentials) for selecting the most stable crystal structure for A_qBq is hopeless if one considers the full 2^N space configurations of A, B on a lattice of N points. Molecular-dynamics is of no help, since it does not explore effectively the space of lattice configurations. Thus, contemporary energy minimization approaches use instead the method of ``rounding-up the usual suspects'': selecting the lowest energy from only a small number of well-known candidate configurations. The potential for missing new and important structures is obviously large. This talk gives an outline of the solution. It addresses the questions of (i) finding the lowest energy configuration of substitutional systems, (ii) calculating their composition-temperature phase diagram, and (iii) their finite-temperature thermodynamic properties, using the first-principles local density approximation (LDA). Mapping of the LDA energies of only 10-20 A_qBq compounds onto an Ising-like ``cluster-expansion'' enables use of lattice statistical mechanics techniques that elegantly solve the above problems. This extends the utility of the LDA from simple, perfectly-ordered compounds to truly complex structures, beyond the reach of direct LDA calculations. I will illustrate the method for semiconductor systems and transition-metal intermetallic systems, showing how previously unsuspected structures and materials are predicted, and how one can calculate free energies, short range-order and phase-diagrams of alloys. See

  9. Hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline over carbon-supported transition metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Eijsbouts, S.; De Beer, V.H.J.; Prins, R. )

    1991-02-01

    Transition metal sulfide (TMS) catalysts were prepared by impregnation of an activated carbon support with aqueous solutions of first-, second-, and third-row (group V-VIII) transition metal salts, drying and in situ sulfidation. The catalysts were tested in the hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline (653 K, 5.5 MPa) in microautoclaves and microflow reactors. The first-row transition metal sulfides had low quinoline conversions to hydrocarbons, and their periodic trend formed a U-shaped curve with a minimum at Mn/C and Fe/C and maxima at V/C and Ni/C. The quinoline conversions to hydrocarbons of the second- and third-row TMS formed volcano curves with maxima at Rh/C and Ir/C and with Mo/C and W/C having the lowest conversions. The transition metal sulfide catalysts with a low quinoline hydrogenation (first-row transition metal sulfides, Mo/C and W/C) also had a low quinoline conversion to hydrocarbons. The transition metal sulfides with the highest quinoline conversions to hydrocarbons (Rh/C, Pd/C, Os/C, Ir/C and Pt/C) had a very highquinoline hydrogenation and a high selectivity for propylcyclohexane. Ru/C and especially Re/C had a good quinoline conversion to hydrocarbons, but also an exceptionally high selectivity for propylbenzene.

  10. Metal-metal multiple bonding in C3-symmetric bimetallic complexes of the first row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Krogman, Jeremy P; Thomas, Christine M

    2014-05-25

    Metal-metal multiple bonds have been an intense area of focus in inorganic chemistry for many decades as a result of their fundamentally interesting bonding properties, as well as their potential applications in multielectron transfer and small molecule activation processes. Much of what is known in this field revolves around 2nd and 3rd row transition metals, with fundamental knowledge lacking in the area of bonds between elements of the first transition series. The smaller size and tendency of first row ions to adopt high-spin electron configurations weaken metal-metal interactions and serve to complicate the interpretation of the electronic structure and bonding in bimetallic species containing first row transition metals. Furthermore, traditional tetragonal "paddlewheel" complexes dominate the metal-metal multiple bond literature, and only recently have researchers begun to take advantage of the weaker ligand field in three-fold symmetric bimetallic complexes to encourage more favourable metal-metal bonding interactions. In the past 5 years, several research groups have exploited three-fold symmetric frameworks to investigate new trends in metal-metal bonding involving the first row transition metals. This feature article serves to highlight recent achievements in this area and to use C3-symmetric systems as a model to better understand the fundamental aspects of multiple bonds featuring first row transition metals.

  11. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen.

    PubMed

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A; Ceperley, David M; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3) a0. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin's GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results. PMID:26590549

  12. Aqueous solutions of transition metal containing micelles.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter C; Fallis, Ian A; Tatchell, Thomas; Bushby, Lisa; Beeby, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Incorporation of d- or f-block metals into ligand systems that renders a metal complex surface-active or drives its partitioning into surfactant phases enables the localisation of chemical functionality at interfaces. This article discusses a number of fundamental aspects of these interesting materials and examines potential applications. PMID:18812239

  13. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials.

  14. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials.

  15. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  16. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  17. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  18. Superconductivity Series of Ion-gated Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijing; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    Semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted considerable interest as typical two-dimensional (2D) materials. By mechanical cleavage, atomically flat and chemically stable thin flakes of TMDs can be readily obtained from bulk crystals. Recently, coupling with high efficient ionic media, TMD thin flakes have exhibited extraordinary electronic and opto-valleytronic properties in the form of electrical double layer transistors (EDLTs). The introduction of high-density carriers have also induced metal-insulator transition and superconductivity in MoS2, revealing an enhanced Tc and a dome-like phase diagram that are inaccessible through conventional chemically doping. In this work, we report the discovery of a superconductivity series based on a further exploration of other available semiconducting TMDs (MoSe2, MoTe2, WS2, WSe2) by using different ionic media. The present results not only complement important superconducting properties in TMDs, but also suggest a close correlation between transistor operation and the possibility of inducing superconductivity, providing general guidelines for the optimization of charge accumulation and the induction of superconductivity in other material series via ionic gating. Present address: University of Groningen.

  19. Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V

    2006-02-09

    This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

  20. Chemical Trends for Transition Metal Compound Bonding to Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Bjoern; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Transition metal compounds are of interest as catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, a perfect candidate to replace expensive platinum has not yet been identified. To tailor a specific compound, several properties come into play. One is the bonding to the underlying substrate, for which π-bonded carbon nanostructures are promising candidates. Here we analyze the bonding of small transition metal compound nanoclusters to a graphene layer for a range of chemical compositions: MxAy (M = Mo, Ti; A = S, O, B, N, C). The clusters are generated by an unbiased random search algorithm. We perform total energy calculations based on density functional theory to identify lowest energy clusters. We calculate binding energies using the PBE and HSE functionals with explicit van der Waals treatment and benchmark those against RPA cluster calculations. Our results indicate that molybdenum-carbides and -nitrides tend to bond tightly to graphene. Mo-oxides and -sulfides show small binding energies, indicating van der Waals bonding.

  1. Design, spectral characterization, DFT and biological studies of transition metal complexes of Schiff base derived from 2-aminobenzamide, pyrrole and furan aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B S; Sharma, Deepansh

    2015-05-15

    A series of two biologically active Schiff base ligands L(1), L(2) have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 2-aminobenzamide with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde and furan-2-carboxaldehyde. The synthesized Schiff bases were used for complexation with different metal ions like Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) by using a molar ratio of ligand: metal as 2:1. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by (1)H NMR, UV-Vis, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry, EPR and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complexes. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antimicrobial activities, against four bacterial strains and two fungal strains by using serial dilution method. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  2. Design, spectral characterization, DFT and biological studies of transition metal complexes of Schiff base derived from 2-aminobenzamide, pyrrole and furan aldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B. S.; Sharma, Deepansh

    2015-05-01

    A series of two biologically active Schiff base ligands L1, L2 have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 2-aminobenzamide with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde and furan-2-carboxaldehyde. The synthesized Schiff bases were used for complexation with different metal ions like Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) by using a molar ratio of ligand: metal as 2:1. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by 1H NMR, UV-Vis, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry, EPR and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff bases and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complexes. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antimicrobial activities, against four bacterial strains and two fungal strains by using serial dilution method. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  3. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqun; Tran, Kha; Scott, Marie E.; Overbeck, Vincent; et al

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  4. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones.

  5. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Iton, Lennox E.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  6. Thermodynamic behavior near a metal-insulator transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paalanen, M. A.; Graebner, J. E.; Bhatt, R. N.; Sachdev, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the low-temperature specific heat of phosphorus-doped silicon for densities near the metal-insulator transition show an enhancement over the conduction-band itinerant-electron value. The enhancement increases toward lower temperatures but is less than that found for the spin susceptibility. The data are compared with various theoretical models; the large ratio of the spin susceptibility to specific heat indicates the presence of localized spin excitations in the metallic phase as the metal-insulator transition is approached.

  7. Melting of bcc Transition Metals and Icosahedral Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Boehler, R; Japel, S

    2006-05-26

    In contrast to polyvalent metals, transition metals have low melting slopes(dT/dP) that are due to partially filled d-bands that allow for a lowering of liquid phase energy through s-d electron transfer and the formation of local structures. In the case of bcc transition metals we show the apparent discrepancy of DAC melting measurements with shock melting of Mo can be understood by reexamining the shock data for V and Ta and introducing the presence of an icosahedral short range order (ISRO) melt phase.

  8. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  9. Exchange coupling in transition metal monoxides: Electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Guntram; Daene, Markus W; Ernst, Arthur; Bruno, Patrick; Lueders, Martin; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Wolfam, Hergert

    2009-01-01

    An ab initio study of magnetic-exchange interactions in antiferromagnetic and strongly correlated 3d transition metal monoxides is presented. Their electronic structure is calculated using the local self-interaction correction approach, implemented within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band-structure method, which is based on multiple scattering theory. The Heisenberg exchange constants are evaluated with the magnetic force theorem. Based on these the corresponding Neel temperatures TN and spin-wave dispersions are calculated. The Neel temperatures are obtained using mean-field approximation, random-phase approximation and Monte Carlo simulations. The pressure dependence of TN is investigated using exchange constants calculated for different lattice constants. All the calculated results are compared to experimental data.

  10. Conversion and displacement reaction types of transition metal compounds for sodium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo-Ying; Sun, Qian; Yue, Ji-Li; Shadike, Zulipiya; Yang, Yin; Ding, Fei; Sang, Lin; Fu, Zheng-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal compounds of FeSe and CuWO4 thin films have been successfully fabricated by using R.F. sputtering method. Although two kinds of transition metal compounds of FeSe and CuWO4 thin films can react with sodium electrochemically, they exhibit different electrochemical features. The nanosized metal Fe is highly dispersed into Na2Se matrix and metal Cu is extruded from Na2WO4 mixture after the FeSe/Na and CuWO4/Na cells are discharged, respectively. The conversion reaction mechanism between FeSe and Na2Se is proposed for the FeSe/Na cell. While the displacement reaction mechanism for CuWO4/Na cell is proposed for the first time based on the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) data. These various mechanisms make transition metal compounds interesting materials for rechargeable sodium ion batteries.

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of a variety of transition metal incorporated DNA double helices.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Pralok K; Pati, Swapan K

    2014-02-01

    By using density functional theory calculations, the structural, energetic, magnetic, and optical properties for a variety of transition metal (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) ions incorporated modified-DNA (M-DNA) double helices has been investigated. The DNA is modified with either hydroxypyridone (H) or bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine (S-en) metalated bases. We find the formation of extended M-O network leading to the ferromagnetic interactions for the case of H-DNA for all the metal ions. More ordered stacking arrangement was found for S-en-DNA. We calculate the exchange coupling constant (J) considering Heisenberg Hamiltonian for quantitative description of magnetic interactions. The ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are obtained by varying different transition metal ions. The extent of the magnetic interaction depends on the number of transition metal ions. Optical profiles show peaks below 2 eV, a clear signature of spin-spin coupling.

  12. Reversible mechanism for spin crossover in transition-metal cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mukul; van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2011-03-01

    Spin transitions generally occur in compounds of octahedrally coordinated 3 d transition metal ions. These transitions can be induced by external perturbations such as light, heat, pressure, magnetic field, and chemical substitution. Transition metal cyanides are one such material, which exhibit reversible spin transition while perturbed with light at T < 10 K . Here we report the first-principles (DFT+U) study of anhydrated KCoFe (CN)6 . We find that the complete spin transition from the low spin ground sate (S=0) to a high spin (S=2) state takes place due to intra-atomic and inter-atomic charge transfers in two steps. In the first step a d-electron is transferred from Fe to Co through cyanide ligand, which is followed by the d-electron rearrangement in the Co. This spin transition is strongly correlated with the internal lattice, and we find as large as 10% extension of the Co -N bond via a Jahn-Teller active (tetragonally distorted) lattice in the intermediate spin (S = 1) state. The calculated energy required for this transition is in agreement with experiments. We further predict that this spin transition in such materials can be induced, and further tuned, by external pressure to enable realization of such reversible transitions at ambient temperatures.

  13. Magnetization of ternary alloys based on Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar with 3d transition metal additions: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masatoshi; Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Freeman, Arthur J.; Popescu, Voicu; Matsen, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Smart susceptors are being developed for use as tooling surfaces in molding machines that use apply electro-magnetic induction heating to mold and form plastics or metal powders into structural parts, e.g., on aerospace and automotive manufacturing lines. The optimal magnetic materials for the induction heating process should have large magnetization, high magnetic permeability, but also small thermal expansion coefficient. The Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar alloy with its negligible thermal expansion coefficient is thus a natural choice for this application. Here, we use density functional theory as implemented through the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method within the coherent-potential approximation, to design new alloys with the large magnetization desired for smart susceptor applications. We consider the Fe0.65-xNi0.35-yMx+y alloys derived from Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar adding a third element M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, or Co with concentration (x + y) reaching up to 5 at. %. We find that the total magnetization depends linearly on the concentration of M. Specifically, the early 3d transition metals from Sc to Cr decrease the magnetization with respect to that of the invar alloy whereas Mn and Co increase it.

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies and inhibitory activity against bacteria and fungi of acyclic and macrocyclic transition metal complexes containing a triamine coumarine Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hussein, A A; Linert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-15

    Two series of new mono and binuclear complexes with a Schiff base ligand derived from the condensation of 3-acetylcoumarine and diethylenetriamine, in the molar ratio 2:1 have been prepared. The ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, (1)H-NMR and mass spectra. The reaction of the Schiff base ligand with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV) lead to mono or binuclear species of cyclic or macrocyclic complexes, depending on the mole ratio of metal to ligand and as well as on the method of preparation. The Schiff base ligand behaves as a cyclic bidentate, tetradendate or pentaentadentae ligand. The formation of macrocyclic complexes depends significantly on the dimension of the internal cavity, the rigidity of the macrocycles, the nature of its donor atoms and on the complexing properties of the anion involved in the coordination. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate that the geometries of the metal centers are either square pyramidal or octahedral for acyclic or macro-cyclic complexes. The structures are consistent with the IR, UV-visible, ESR, (1)H-NMR, mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies and inhibitory activity against bactria and fungi of acyclic and macrocyclic transition metal complexes containing a triamine coumarine Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, A. A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Two series of new mono and binuclear complexes with a Schiff base ligand derived from the condensation of 3-acetylcoumarine and diethylenetriamine, in the molar ratio 2:1 have been prepared. The ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, 1H-NMR and mass spectra. The reaction of the Schiff base ligand with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV) lead to mono or binuclear species of cyclic or macrocyclic complexes, depending on the mole ratio of metal to ligand and as well as on the method of preparation. The Schiff base ligand behaves as a cyclic bidentate, tetradendate or pentaentadentae ligand. The formation of macrocyclic complexes depends significantly on the dimension of the internal cavity, the rigidity of the macrocycles, the nature of its donor atoms and on the complexing properties of the anion involved in the coordination. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate that the geometries of the metal centers are either square pyramidal or octahedral for acyclic or macro-cyclic complexes. The structures are consistent with the IR, UV-visible, ESR, 1H-NMR, mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  16. High-capacity chitosan-based chelating resin for on-line collection of transition and rare-earth metals prior to inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Katarina, Rosi Ketrin; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2009-10-15

    High-capacity chitosan-based chelating resin, N-(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine-type chitosan, was synthesized using chloromethyloxirane (CMO) as a cross-linker and a coupling arms and hydroxylethylamine and bromoacetic acid as a synthesizer for the N-(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine chelating moiety. The CMO could bind with both of hydroxyl and amino group of the chitosan resin, and then couple with the chelating moiety. Increasing the amounts of chelating moiety could increase the capacity of the resin toward metal ions. Most transition and rare-earth metals could adsorb quantitatively on the resin at wide pH ranges and could be separated from alkaline and alkaline-earth metals. The resin was packed in a mini-column (40 mm length x 2 mm i.d.) which was installed in a Multi-Auto-Pret system. The Multi-Auto-Pret system coupled with ICP-AES was successfully applied to the determination of transition and rare-earth metals in river water samples.

  17. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  18. Universal transition state scaling relations for (de)hydrogenation over transition metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Petzold, V; Tripkovic, V; Kleis, J; Howalt, J G; Skúlason, E; Fernández, E M; Hvolbæk, B; Jones, G; Toftelund, A; Falsig, H; Björketun, M; Studt, F; Abild-Pedersen, F; Rossmeisl, J; Nørskov, J K; Bligaard, T

    2011-12-14

    We analyse the transition state energies for 249 hydrogenation/dehydrogenation reactions of atoms and simple molecules over close-packed and stepped surfaces and nanoparticles of transition metals using Density Functional Theory. Linear energy scaling relations are observed for the transition state structures leading to transition state scaling relations for all the investigated reactions. With a suitable choice of reference systems the transition state scaling relations form a universality class that can be approximated with one single linear relation describing the entire range of reactions over all types of surfaces and nanoclusters. PMID:21996683

  19. Infrared study of the metal-insulator transition regime in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazilbash, M. M.; Chae, B. G.; Kim, H. T.; Basov, D. N.

    2007-03-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a metal-insulator transition at Tc 340 K. The transition region of a VO2 film has been studied with infrared ellipsometry and near-normal incidence reflectance between 40 cm-1 and 5000 cm-1. The measured optical constants are compared to calculations based on effective medium theories. The anomalies in the frequency and temperature dependence of the optical constants will be presented. The implications of the data for the mechanism of the metal-insulator transition will be discussed.

  20. Memristor using a transition metal nitride insulator

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, James E; Marinella, Matthew; Lohn, Andrew John

    2014-10-28

    Apparatus is disclosed in which at least one resistive switching element is interposed between at least a first and a second conducting electrode element. The resistive switching element comprises a metal oxynitride. A method for making such a resistive switching element is also disclosed.

  1. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Tomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of bimetallic complexes derived from tridentate or tetradentate Schiff bases of some di- and tri-valent transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Adel A. A.; Abou-Hussen, Azza A. A.

    2006-07-01

    Two series of new binuclear complexes with Schiff base ligands, H 4L a or H 2L b, derived from the reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and ethylenediamine, in the molar ratio 1:1 and 1:2 have been prepared, respectively. The two ligands react with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Cr(III) and Fe(III)-nitrates to get binuclear complexes. The ligands were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and mass spectra. The complexes were synthesized by direct and template methods. Different types of products were obtained for the same ligand and metal salts according to the method of preparation. The H 4L a ligand behaves as a macrocyclic tetrabasic with two N 2O 2 sits, while the H 2L b ligand behaves as a dibasic with two N 2O sites. The H 4L a ligand is a compartmental ligand which hosts the two metal ions at the centers of two cis-N 2O 2 sites, while the metal complexes of H 2L b ligand are binuclear, where the ligand hosts two metal ions at the centers of two N 2O sites. In both cases, deprotonation of the hydrogen atoms of the phenolic OH groups occur except in the case of the Ni(II), Fe(III) and Cr(III) complexes. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate that the geometries of the metal centers are either octahedral or tetrahedral. The structures are consistent with the IR, UV-vis, ESR, 1H NMR, mass spectra, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA) as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements.

  3. Intrinsic disorder in graphene on transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankowitz, Matthew; Larentis, Stefano; Kim, Kyounghwam; Xue, Jiamin; McKenzie, Devin; Huang, Shengqiang; Paggen, Marina; Ali, Mazhar; Cava, Robert; Tutuc, Emanuel; Leroy, Brian J.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, semiconducting materials in the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) family have gained great popularity for use in novel graphene-based heterostructure devices such as tunneling transistors, highly efficient flexible photovoltaic devices, and nonvolatile memory cells. TMDs have also been explored as alternatives to hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) as substrates for pristine graphene devices. However, their quality has thus far been significantly worse than comparable hBN devices. We examine graphene on numerous TMD substrates (MoS2, WS2, WSe2, MoTe2) with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and find that point and line defects intrinsic to all TMD crystals (both of natural and synthetic origin) result in scattering of electrons in graphene. Our findings suggest that the quality of graphene on TMD heterostructures is limited by the intrinsic crystalline quality of the TMDs.

  4. The Role of Carbon in Catalytically Stabilized Transition Metal Sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelty,S.; Berhault, G.; Chianelli, R.

    2007-01-01

    Since WWII considerable progress has been made in understanding the basis for the activity and the selectivity of molybdenum and tungsten based hydrotreating catalysts. Recently, the focus of investigation has turned to the structure of the catalytically stabilized active catalyst. The surface of the catalytically stabilized MoS2 has been shown to be carbided with the formula MoSxCy under hydrotreating conditions. In this paper we review the basis for this finding and present new data extending the concept to the promoted TMS (transition metal sulfides) systems CoMoC and NiMoC. Freshly sulfided CoMoS and NiMoS catalyst have a strong tendency to form the carbided surface phases from any available carbon source.

  5. Extrinsic Spin Hall Effect Due to Transition-Metal Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kontani, H.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the extrinsic spin Hall effect in the electron gas model due to transition-metal impurities based on the single-impurity Anderson model with orbital degrees of freedom. Both the skew scattering and side jump mechanisms are analyzed in a unified way, and the significant role of orbital degrees of freedom are clarified. The obtained spin Hall conductivities are in proportion to the spin-orbit polarization at the Fermi level < {l} . {s} >_{μ} as is the case with the intrinsic spin Hall effect: skew scattering term {SH}^{ss} ∝ < {l} . {s} >_{μ} δ_1 σ_{xx}, and side jump term σ_{SH}^{sj} ∝ < {l} . {s} >_{μ}, where δ_1 is the phase shift for p (l = 1) partial wave. Furthermore, the present study indicates the existence of a nontrivial close relationship between the intrinsic term σ_{SH}^{int} and the extrinsic side jump term σ_{SH}^{sj}.

  6. Metallization and charge-transfer gap closure of transition-metal iodides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. Li-Chung

    1993-05-01

    It is shown with resistivity and near-IR absorption measurements that NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2}, and FeI{sub 2} metallize under pressure by closure of the charge-transfer energy gap at pressures of 17, 10, and 23 GPa, respectively, which is close to the antiferromagnetic-diamagnetic transition in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}. Thus, the magnetic transitions probably are caused by the metallization; in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}, the insulator-metal transitions are first order. Moessbauer and XRD data were also collected. Figs, 46 refs.

  7. Transition metal chalcogenides: ultrathin inorganic materials with tunable electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: After the discovery of graphene and the development of powerful exfoliation techniques, experimental preparation of two-dimensional (2D) crystals can be expected for any layered material that is known to chemistry. Besides graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal chalcogenides (TMC) are among the most studied ultrathin materials. In particular, single-layer MoS2, a direct band gap semiconductor with ∼1.9 eV energy gap, is popular in physics and nanoelectronics, because it nicely complements semimetallic graphene and insulating h-BN monolayer as a construction component for flexible 2D electronics and because it was already successfully applied in the laboratory as basis material for transistors and other electronic and optoelectronic devices. Two-dimensional crystals are subject to significant quantum confinement: compared with their parent layered 3D material, they show different structural, electronic, and optical properties, such as spontaneous rippling as free-standing monolayer, significant changes of the electronic band structure, giant spin-orbit splitting, and enhanced photoluminescence. Most of those properties are intrinsic for the monolayer and already absent for two-layer stacks of the same 2D crystal. For example, single-layer MoS2 is a direct band gap semiconductor with spin-orbit splitting of 150 meV in the valence band, while the bilayer of the same material is an indirect band gap semiconductor without observable spin-orbit splitting. All these properties have been observed experimentally and are in excellent agreement with calculations based on density-functional theory. This Account reports theoretical studies of a subgroup of transition metal dichalcogenides with the composition MX2, with M = Mo, or W and X = Se or S, also referred to as "MoWSeS materials". Results on the electronic structure, quantum confinement, spin-orbit coupling, spontaneous monolayer rippling, and change of electronic properties in the

  8. Covalency, Excitons, Double Counting and the Metal-Insulator Transition in Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2012-02-01

    We present single-site dynamical mean-field studies of realistic models of transition metal oxides, including the cuprate superconductors and rare earth nickelates (in bulk and superlattice form). We include orbital multiplet effects and hybridization to ligands. We explicitly calculate the d-d exciton spectra for cuprates, finding sharp exciton lines in both metallic and insulating phases, which should be visible in experiments. We also find that the additional d3z^2-r^2 orbital does not contribute to an additional Fermi surface at any reasonable doping, in contradiction to previous slave-boson studies. The hybridization to ligands is shown to have crucial effects, for example suppressing the ferro-orbital order previously found in Hubbard model studies of nickelates. Hybridization to ligands is shown to be most naturally parametrized by the d-orbital occupancy. For cuprates and nickelates, insulating behavior is found to be present only for a very narrow range of d-occupancy, irrespective of the Coulomb repulsion. The d-occupancy predicted by standard band calculations is found to be very far from the values required to obtain an insulating phase, calling into question the interpretation of these materials as charge transfer insulators. [4pt] This work is done in collaboration with A.J. Millis, M.J. Han, C.A. Marianetti, L. de' Medici, and H.T. Dang, and is supported by NSF-DMR-1006282, the Army Office of Scientific Research, and the Condensed Matter Theory Center and CNAM at University of Maryland. [4pt] [1] X. Wang, H. T. Dang, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. B 84, 014530 (2011).[0pt] [2] X. Wang, M. J. Han, L. de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, arXiv:1110.2782.[0pt] [3] M. J. Han, X. Wang, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 206804 (2011).

  9. Transistor-like behavior of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Guckian, Adrian; Ulstrup, Jens; Vos, Johannes G

    2005-07-01

    Electron transport through semiconductor and metallic nanoscale structures, molecular monolayers, and single molecules connected to external electrodes display rectification, switch, and staircase functionality of potential importance in future miniaturization of electronic devices. Common to most reported systems is, however, ultrahigh vacuum and/or cryogenic working conditions. Here we introduce a single-molecule device concept based on a class of robust redox active transition metal (Os(II)/(III)) complexes inserted between the working electrode and tip in an electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (in situ STM). This configuration resembles a single-molecule transistor, where the reference electrode corresponds to the gate electrode. It operates at room temperature in a condensed matter (here aqueous) environment. Amplification on-off ratios up to 50 are found when the redox level is brought into the energy window between the Fermi levels of the electrodes by the overpotential ("gate voltage"). The current-voltage characteristics for two Os(II)/(III) complexes have been characterized systematically and supported by theoretical frames based on molecular charge transport theory.

  10. Electronic properties of transition-metal-decorated silicene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbin; Yun, Kyung-Han; Cho, Sung Beom; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-12-15

    The electronic properties of 3d transition metal (TM)-decorated silicene were investigated by using density functional calculations in an attempt to replace graphene in electronic applications, owing to its better compatibility with Si-based technology. Among the ten types of TM-doped silicene (TM-silicene) studied, Ti-, Ni-, and Zn-doped silicene became semiconductors, whereas Co and Cu doping changed the substrate to a half-metallic material. Interestingly, in cases of Ti- and Cu-doped silicene, the measured band gaps turned out to be significantly larger than the previously reported band gap in silicene. The observed band-gap openings at the Fermi level were induced by breaking the sublattice symmetry caused by two structural changes, that is, the Jahn-Teller distortion and protrusion of the TM atom. The present calculation of the band gap in TM-silicene suggests useful guidance for future experiments to fabricate various silicene-based applications such as a field-effect transistor, single-spin electron source, and nonvolatile magnetic random-access memory.

  11. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  12. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Guy

    2012-06-29

    high temperatures and long reaction times. To address this issue, we have developed several new families of carbon- and boron-based ligands, which are even better donors. The corresponding metal complexes (particularly gold, rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium) of all these species will be tested in the Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of alkynes, allenes, and also alkenes with ammonia and hydrazine. We will also develop metal-free catalytic processes for the functionalization of ammonia and hydrazine. By possessing both a lone pair of electrons and an accessible vacant orbital, singlet carbenes resemble and can mimic the chemical behavior of transition metals. Our preliminary results demonstrate that specially designed carbenes can split the N–H bond of ammonia by an initial nucleophilic activation that prevents the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts, which is the major hurdle for the transition metal catalyzed functionalization of NH3. The use of purely organic compounds as catalysts will eliminate the major drawbacks of transition-metal-catalysis technology, which are the excessive cost of metal complexes (metal + ligands) and in many cases the toxicity of the metal.

  13. Electronic, magnetic and topological properties of transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi

    III in AgO. Another interesting aspect of transition metal oxides is their topological properties that are attracting much attention in recent years. The semi-Dirac point, first discovered by Pardo et al and later modeled by Banerjee et al, has linear dispersion along the diagonal and quadratic dispersion perpendicular to the diagonal. In this thesis, we revisit the tight-binding Hamiltonian proposed by Banerjee and extend it to include the effects of external magnetic field on the energy spectrum and topological properties. We also discuss the forms of effective model Hamiltonians that can generate non-zero Berry phase. First principles calculations have been successful in guiding the experimental search for high Tc superconductors, the most recent example being high Tc (203K) superconductor H 3S under pressure (200GPa). The superconductivity of H3S was first predicted by Duan et al using DFT combined with structure optimization algorithms and validated soon after. Though elemental hydrogen was predicted to metallize under pressure in 1930, it was not realized until recently that hydrogen based compounds rather than pure hydrogen atoms are better candidates for high Tc superconductors. In this thesis, we carried out first principle calculations to study the unusual van Hove singularities located near the Fermi level that lead to a sharp peak, and analyzed the hybridization between sulfur and hydrogen states by constructing a tight-binding model.

  14. DNA binding mode of transition metal complexes, a relationship to tumor cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, M; Najam, T; Shah, S S A; Ahmad, M M; Shaheen, S; Tabassum, R; Rivera, G

    2014-01-01

    Transition metal-based compounds constitute a distinct class of chemotherapeutics extensively used in the clinic as antitumor and antiviral agents. However, drug resistance and side effects of established antitumor metallodrugs such as cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)] and its analogues, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, have limited their clinical utility. These limitations have prompted a search for more effective and less toxic metal-based antitumor agents. The unique properties of metal ions, such as redox transfer/electron shuttling, and versatile coordination geometries arising from various oxidation states, result in metal ions and complexes that have potential medicinal applications that could be complementary to organic compounds and which are widely sought in drug discovery efforts. This review summarizes the results that show that transition metal complexes exhibit antitumor effects that differ from cisplatin or its analogues.

  15. Transition-Metal Doped Ceria Microspheres with Nanoporous Structures for CO Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Ze; Chen, Zhuwen; Hong, Mei; Zhu, Rongshu; Liang, Yongye; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) is of great importance in many different fields of industry. Until now it still remains challenging to use non-noble metal based catalysts to oxidize CO at low temperature. Herein, we report a new class of nanoporous, uniform, and transition metal-doped cerium (IV) oxide (ceria, CeO2) microsphere for CO oxidation catalysis. The porous and uniform microsphere is generated by sacrificed polymer template. Transition-metals, like Cu, Co, Ni, Mn and Fe, were doped into CeO2 microspheres. The combination of hierarchical structure and metal doping afford superior catalytic activities of the doped ceria microspheres, which could pave a new way to advanced non-precious metal based catalysts for CO oxidation. PMID:27030159

  16. Insulator-metal transition in highly compressed NiO.

    PubMed

    Gavriliuk, Alexander G; Trojan, Ivan A; Struzhkin, Viktor V

    2012-08-24

    The insulator-metal transition was observed experimentally in nickel monoxide (NiO) at very high pressures of ~240 GPa. The sample resistance becomes measurable at about 130 GPa and decreases substantially with the pressure increase to ~240 GPa. A sharp drop in resistance by about 3 orders of magnitude has been observed at ~240 GPa with a concomitant change of the resistance type from semiconducting to metallic. This is the first experimental observation of an insulator-metal transition in NiO, which was anticipated by Mott decades ago. From simple multielectron consideration, the metallic phase of NiO forms when the effective Hubbard energy U(eff) is almost equal to the estimated full bandwidth 2W. PMID:23002762

  17. Hund’s rule in superatoms with transition metal impurities

    PubMed Central

    Medel, Victor M.; Reveles, Jose Ulises; Khanna, Shiv N.; Chauhan, Vikas; Sen, Prasenjit; Castleman, A. Welford

    2011-01-01

    The quantum states in metal clusters bunch into supershells with associated orbitals having shapes resembling those in atoms, giving rise to the concept that selected clusters could mimic the characteristics of atoms and be classified as superatoms. Unlike atoms, the superatom orbitals span over multiple atoms and the filling of orbitals does not usually exhibit Hund’s rule seen in atoms. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of enhancing exchange splitting in superatom shells via a composite cluster of a central transition metal and surrounding nearly free electron metal atoms. The transition metal d states hybridize with superatom D states and result in enhanced splitting between the majority and minority sets where the moment and the splitting can be controlled by the nature of the central atom. We demonstrate these findings through studies on TMMgn clusters where TM is a 3d atom. The clusters exhibit Hund’s filling, opening the pathway to superatoms with magnetic shells. PMID:21646542

  18. Ternary transition metal phosphides: High-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Barz, H.; Ku, H. C.; Meisner, G. P.; Fisk, Z.; Matthias, B. T.

    1980-01-01

    Two systems of ternary transition metal phosphides with the ordered Fe2P-type hexagonal structure are reported. They have the general formula MRuP and MOsP, in which M can be Ti, Zr, or Hf. An onset of the superconducting transition temperature as high as 13.0 K is reported for the ZrRuP compound. PMID:16592838

  19. Photoluminescence response of colloidal quantum dots on VO2 film across metal to insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have proposed a method to probe metal to insulator transition in VO2 measuring photoluminescence response of colloidal quantum dots deposited on the VO2 film. In addition to linear luminescence intensity decrease with temperature that is well known for quantum dots, temperature ranges with enhanced photoluminescence changes have been found during phase transition in the oxide. Corresponding temperature derived from luminescence dependence on temperature closely correlates with that from resistance measurement during heating. The supporting reflectance data point out that photoluminescence response mimics a reflectance change in VO2 across metal to insulator transition. Time-resolved photoluminescence study did not reveal any significant change of luminescence lifetime of deposited quantum dots under metal to insulator transition. It is a strong argument in favor of the proposed explanation based on the reflectance data. PACS 71.30. + h; 73.21.La; 78.47.jd PMID:25404877

  20. Cumulant Approximated Second-Order Perturbation Theory Based on the Density Matrix Renormalization Group for Transition Metal Complexes: A Benchmark Study.

    PubMed

    Phung, Quan Manh; Wouters, Sebastian; Pierloot, Kristine

    2016-09-13

    The complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) can be extended to larger active spaces by using the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) as solver. Two variants are commonly used: the costly DMRG-CASPT2 with exact 4-particle reduced density matrix (4-RDM) and the cheaper DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 in which the 4-cumulant is discarded. To assess the accuracy and limitations of the latter variant DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 we study the spin state energetics of iron porphyrin Fe(P) and its model compound FeL2, a model for the active center of NiFe hydrogenase, and manganese-oxo porphyrin MnO(P)(+); a series of excited states of chromium hexacarbonyl Cr(CO)6; and the interconversion of two Cu2O2(2+) isomers. Our results clearly show that PT2 on top of DMRG is essential in order to obtain quantitative results for transition metal complexes. Good results were obtained with DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 as compared to full CASPT2 and DMRG-CASPT2 in calculations with small- and medium-sized active spaces. In calculations with large-sized active spaces (∼30 active orbitals), the performance of DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 is less impressive due to the errors originating from both the finite number of renormalized states m and the 4-RDM approximation. PMID:27547847

  1. Yield stress in metallic glasses: The jamming-unjamming transition studied through Monte Carlo simulations based on the activation-relaxation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2009-11-01

    A Monte Carlo approach allowing for stress control is employed to study the yield stress of a two-dimensional metallic glass in the limit of low temperatures and long (infinite) time scales. The elementary thermally activated events are determined using the activation-relaxation technique (ART). By tracking the minimum-energy state of the glass for various applied stresses, we find a well-defined jamming-unjamming transition at a yield stress about 30% lower than the steady-state flow stress obtained in conventional strain-controlled quasistatic simulations. ART is then used to determine the evolution of the distribution of thermally activated events in the glass microstructure both below and above the yield stress. We show that aging below the yield stress increases the stability of the glass, both thermodynamically (the internal potential energy decreases) and dynamically (the aged glass is surrounded by higher-energy barriers than the initial quenched configuration). In contrast, deformation above the yield stress brings the glass into a high internal potential energy state that is only marginally stable, being surrounded by a high density of low-energy barriers. The strong influence of deformation on the glass state is also evidenced by the microstructure polarization, revealed here through an asymmetry of the distribution of thermally activated inelastic strains in glasses after simple shear deformation.

  2. 2D crystals of transition metal dichalcogenide and their iontronic functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Yoshida, M.; Suzuki, R.; Iwasa, Y.

    2015-12-01

    2D crystals based on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) provide a unique platform of novel physical properties and functionalities, including photoluminescence, laser, valleytronics, spintronics, piezoelectric devices, field effect transistors (FETs), and superconductivity. Among them, FET devices are extremely useful because of voltage-tunable carrier density and Fermi energy. In particular, high density charge accumulation in electric double layer transistor (EDLT), which is a FET device driven by ionic motions, is playing key roles for expanding the functionalities of TMD based 2D crystals. Here, we report several device concepts which were realized by introducing EDLTs in TMDs, taking the advantage of their extremely unique band structures and phase transition phenomena realized simply by thinning to the monolayer level. We address two kinds of TMDs based on group VI and group V transition metals, which basically yield semiconductors and metals, respectively. For each system, we first introduce peculiar characteristics of TMDs achieved by thinning the crystals, followed by the related FET functionalities.

  3. Transition metal bimetallic oxycarbides: Synthesis, characterization, and activity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.T.; Yu, C.C.; Ramanathan, S.

    1999-06-10

    A new family of bimetallic oxycarbide compounds M{sup I}-M{sup II}-O-C (M{sup I} = Mo, W; M{sup II} = V, Nb, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni) has been synthesized by carburizing bimetallic oxide precursors using a temperature-programmed method. The oxide precursors are prepared by conventional solid-state reaction between two appropriate monometallic oxides. The synthesis involves passing a 20 mol% CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2} mixture over the oxide precursors while raising the temperature at a linear rate of 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} K/s (5 K/min) to a final temperature (T{sub max}) which is held for a period of time (t{sub hold}). The synthesis, chemisorption properties, and reactivation of the materials indicate that the compounds can be divided into two groups of different reducibility (high and low). Their surface activity and surface area are evaluated based on CO chemisorption and N{sub 2} physisorption measurements. It is found that the CO number density correlates with the reducibility of the compounds. The catalysts were evaluated for hydroprocessing in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 643 K. The feed was a model liquid mixture containing 3000 ppm sulfur (dibenzothiophene), 2000 ppm nitrogen (quinoline), 500 ppm oxygen (benzofuran), 20 wt% aromatics (tetralin), and balance aliphatics (tetradecane). The bimetallic oxycarbides had moderate activity for HDN of quinoline, with Nb-Mo-O-C showing higher HDN than a commercial sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst tested at the same conditions. X-ray diffraction of the spent catalysts indicated that the oxycarbides of the early transition metals were tolerant of sulfur, while those involving the late transition metals showed bulk sulfide phases.

  4. Electronic mechanism of hardness enhancement in transition-metal carbonitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    1999-05-01

    Transition-metal carbides and nitrides are hard materials widely used for cutting tools and wear-resistant coatings. Their hardness is not yet understood at a fundamental level. A clue may lie in the puzzling fact that transition-metal carbonitrides that have the rock-salt structure (such as TiCxN1-x) have the greatest hardness for a valence-electron concentration of about 8.4 per cell, which suggests that the hardness may be determined more by the nature of the bonding than by the conventional microstructural features that determine the hardness of structural metals and alloys. To investigate this possibility, we have evaluated the shear modulus of various transition-metal carbides and nitrides using ab initio pseudopotential calculations. Our results show that the behaviour of these materials can be understood on a fundamental level in terms of their electronic band structure. The unusual hardness originates from a particular band of σ bonding states between the non-metal p orbitals and the metal d orbitals that strongly resists shearing strain or shape change. Filling of these states is completed at a valence-electron concentration of about 8.4, and any additional electrons would go into a higher band which is unstable against shear deformations.

  5. Quasiparticle transformation during a metal-insulator transition in graphene.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica L; Emtsev, Konstantin V; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Kevan, Stephen D; Rotenberg, Eli

    2009-07-31

    Here we show, with simultaneous transport and photoemission measurements, that the graphene-terminated SiC(0001) surface undergoes a metal-insulator transition upon dosing with small amounts of atomic hydrogen. We find the room temperature resistance increases by about 4 orders of magnitude, a transition accompanied by anomalies in the momentum-resolved spectral function including a non-Fermi-liquid behavior and a breakdown of the quasiparticle picture. These effects are discussed in terms of a possible transition to a strongly (Anderson) localized ground state. PMID:19792520

  6. Magnetic properties of lithium-transition metal orthophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkin, Mikhail; Choi, Ki-Young; Sim, Hasung; Urusova, Natali; Volegov, Aleksey; Barykina, Julia; Kellerman, Dina; Park, Je-Geun; Pirogov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic properties of the lithium-transition metal orthophosphates LiNiPO4, LiNi0.9Co0.1PO4, LiNi0.9Mn0.1PO4 and LiMnPO4 single crystals have been studied. Temperature behavior of a susceptibility against a type of 3d-transition ion was analyzed. Anomalous behavior is observed over narrow temperature region near Neel point. This is caused by a commensurate-incommensurate magnetic phase transition in pure LiNiPO4, Co- and Mn-doped samples. Using Curie-Weiss model we calculated magnetic constants.

  7. Directly Predicting Water Quality Criteria from Physicochemical Properties of Transition Metals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wu, Fengchang; Mu, Yunsong; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Meng, Wei; Zhao, Xiaoli; Giesy, John P.; Feng, Chenglian; Wang, Peifang; Liao, Haiqing; Chen, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are a group of elements widespread in aquatic environments that can be hazardous when concentrations exceeding threshold values. Due to insufficient data, criteria maximum concentrations (CMCs) of only seven transition metals for protecting aquatic life have been recommended by the USEPA. Hence, it is deemed necessary to develop empirical models for predicting the threshold values of water quality criteria (WQC) for other transition metals for which insufficient information on toxic potency is available. The present study established quantitative relationships between recommended CMCs and physicochemical parameters of seven transition metals, then used the developed relationships to predict CMCs for other transition metals. Seven of 26 physicochemical parameters examined were significantly correlated with the recommended CMCs. Based on this, five of the seven parameters were selected to construct a linear free energy model for predicting CMCs. The most relevant parameters were identified through principle component analysis, and the one with the best correlation with the recommended CMCs was a combination of covalent radius, ionic radius and electron density. Predicted values were largely consistent with their toxic potency values. The present study provides an alternative approach to develop screening threshold level for metals which have insufficient information to use traditional methods. PMID:26936420

  8. Magnetic Phenomena and Ballistic Transport in Monatomic Transition Metal Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio

    2004-03-01

    I will address the general issue of possible magnetism in ultimately thin, vacuum suspended monatomic transition metal nanowires, and of its eventual consequences on ballistic conductance. First I will show, based on zero-temperature electronic structure calculations, that magnetism will generally occur in 4d nanowires made of Rh, Ru, and Pd, and also in 5d nanowires made of Pt,Os as well as of Ir under stress [1]. Magnetization magnitudes obtained are stress dependent, and roughly in the order of 1/2 Bohr magneton per atom at zero stress. This apparent resurgence of Hund's rule magnetism, usually quenched in these transition metals in bulk, can be attributed to d-band narrowing in the nanowire, accompanied by a slightly more effective emptying of the d-bands in favor of s-bands than in the bulk metal. In addition Pd exemplifies a case where 1-dimensional band edge singularities represent the factor that triggers awake an otherwise dormant Hund's rule magnetism. Analysis of the band structures of the wires indicates that the onset of magnetism should generally reduce, although not by much, the number of conducting bands crossing the Fermi level. This in turn suggests that ballistic conductance through the wires should also be affected by magnetism, at least at zero temperature. Conductance calculations based on an extension of the complex band structure method to ultrasoft pseudopotentials [2] are presently under way, to describe that. A discussion of the expected nanowire conductance in connection with experimental data will also be given, particularly in connection with fractional conductance peaks recently reported. We show that magnetization reversals inside the nanowire[3] could in principle lead to fractional conductance. However, some such fractional peaks were seen at room temperature and zero field [4], where nanowire magnetism seems unlikely to survive. Their origin is disputed [5] and remains unclear at the moment. Work done in collaboration with A

  9. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  10. Measurements of Schottky barrier heights formed from metals and 2D transition metal dichalcogedides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsik; Moon, Inyong; Nam, Seunggeol; Cho, Yeonchoo; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Seongjun; Yoo, Won Jong

    Schottky barrier height (SBH) is an important parameter that needs to be considered for designing electronic devices. However, for two dimensional (2D) materials based devices, SBH control is limited by 2D structure induced quantum confinement and 2D surface induced Fermi level pinning. In this work, we explore differences in measuring SBH between 2D and 3D materials. Recently, low temperature I-V measurement has been reported to extract SBH based on thermionic emission equation for Schottky diode. However, 2D devices are not real Schottky diode in that both source and drain metal electrodes make Schottky contact. According to our experimental results, SBH extracted from linear slope of ln (I/T3/2) against 1/T show widely diverse values, dependent on applied voltage bias and tested temperature which affect carrier transport including tunneling or thermionic emission across the metal-2D material interface. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the method to determine SBH and Fermi level pinning which are attributed to 2D transition metal dichalcogedides, differently from conventional 3D materials. .

  11. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, T.; Tsud, N.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Matolín, V.

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed.

  12. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  13. Role of transition metal ferrocyanides (II) in chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaluddin; Nath, Mala; Deopujari, Sushama W.; Sharma, Archana

    1990-05-01

    Due to ease of formation of cyanide under prebiotic conditions, cyanide ion might have formed stable complexes with transition metal ions on the primitive earth. In the course of chemical evolution insoluble metal cyano complexes, which settled at the bottom of primeval sea could have formed peptide and metal amino acid complexes through adsorption processes of amino acids onto these metal cyano complexes. Adsorption of amino acids such as glycine, aspartic acid, and histidine on copper ferrocyanide and zinc ferrocyanide have been studied over a wide pH range of 3.6 8.5. Amino acids were adsorbed on the metal ferrocyanide complexes for different time periods. The progress of the adsorption was followed spectro-photometrically using ninhydrin reagent. Histidine was found to show maximum adsorption on both the adsorbents at neutral pH. Zinc ferrocyanide exhibits good sorption behaviour for all the three amino acids used in these investigations.

  14. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Skála, T; Tsud, N; Stetsovych, V; Mysliveček, J; Matolín, V

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed. PMID:27494195

  15. Thin film reaction of transition metals with germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudet, S.; Detavernier, C.; Kellock, A.J.; Desjardins, P.; Lavoie, C.

    2006-05-15

    A systematic study of the thermally induced reaction of 20 transition metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, Mn, Re, Fe, Ru, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Cu) with Ge substrates was carried out in order to identify appropriate contact materials in Ge-based microelectronic circuits. Thin metal films, nominally 30 nm thick, were sputter deposited on both amorphous Ge and crystalline Ge(001). Metal-Ge reactions were monitored in situ during ramp anneals at 3 deg. C s{sup -1} in an atmosphere of purified He using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, diffuse light scattering, and resistance measurements. These analyses allowed the determination of the phase formation sequence for each metal-Ge system and the identification of the most promising candidates--in terms of sheet resistance and surface roughness--for their use as first level interconnections in microelectronic circuits. A first group of metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, and Ta) reacted with Ge only at temperatures well above 450 deg. C and was prone to oxidation. Another set (Cr, Mo, Mn, Re, Rh, Ru, and Ir) did not form low resistivity phases (<130 {mu}{omega} cm) whereas no reaction was observed in the case of W even after annealing at up to 1000 deg. C. We found that Fe, Co, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Cu were the most interesting candidates for microelectronic applications as they reacted at relatively low temperatures (150-360 deg. C) to form low resistivity phases (22-129 {mu}{omega} cm). Among those, two monogermanides, NiGe and PdGe, exhibited the lowest resistivity values (22-30 {mu}{omega} cm) and were stable over the widest temperature window during ramp anneals. In passing, we note that Cu, Ni, and Pd were the most effective in lowering the crystallization temperature of amorphous Ge, by up to 290 deg. C for our typical ramp anneals at 3 deg. C s{sup -1}.

  16. The Electrochemical Synthesis of Transition-Metal Acetylacetonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, S. R.; Browning, S. R.; Lagowski, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of transition-metal acetylacetonates described here can form the basis of assisting in the transformation of an entry-level laboratory course into a research-like environment where all members of a class are working on the same problem, but where each member has a personal responsibility for the synthesis and…

  17. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Seibt, M.; Schroeter, W.

    2000-10-01

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are discussed and illustrated. Needs for further research are considered. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Metal-insulator transitions due to self-doping

    SciTech Connect

    Blawid, S.; Tuan, H.A.; Yanagisawa, T.; Fulde, P.

    1996-09-01

    We investigate the influence of an unoccupied band on the transport properties of a strongly correlated electron system. For that purpose, additional orbitals are coupled to a Hubbard model via hybridization. The filling is one electron per site. Depending on the position of the additional band, both a metal-to-insulator and an insulator-to-metal transition occur with increasing hybridization. The latter transition from a Mott insulator into a metal via {open_quote}{open_quote}self-doping{close_quote}{close_quote} was recently proposed to explain the low carrier concentration in Yb{sub 4}As{sub 3}. We suggest a restrictive parameter regime for this transition, making use of exact results in various limits. The predicted absence of the self-doping transition for nested Fermi surfaces is confirmed by means of an unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation and an exact diagonalization study in one dimension. In the general case metal-insulator phase diagrams are obtained within the slave-boson mean-field and the alloy-analog approximations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes. PMID:22179333

  20. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  1. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  2. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  3. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior. PMID:27601669

  4. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior.

  5. Distinct metallization and atomization transitions in dense liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-03-13

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations driven by accurate quantum Monte Carlo forces on dense liquid hydrogen. There is a recent report of a complete atomization transition between a mixed molecular-atomic liquid and a completely dissociated fluid in an almost unaccessible pressure range [Nat. Commun. 5, 3487 (2014)]. Here, instead, we identify a different transition between the fully molecular liquid and the mixed-atomic fluid at ∼400  GPa, i.e., in a much more interesting pressure range. We provide numerical evidence supporting the metallic behavior of this intermediate phase. Therefore, we predict that the metallization at finite temperature occurs in this partially dissociated molecular fluid, well before the complete atomization of the liquid. At high temperature this first-order transition becomes a crossover, in very good agreement with the experimental observation. Several systematic tests supporting the quality of our large scale calculations are also reported.

  6. Preparation of nanoporous metal foam from high nitrogen transition metal complexes

    DOEpatents

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Huynh, My Hang V.; Hiskey, Michael A.; Son, Steven F.; Oschwald, David M.; Chavez, David E.; Naud, Darren L.

    2006-11-28

    Nanoporous metal foams are prepared by ignition of high nitrogen transition metal complexes. The ammonium salts of iron(III) tris[bi(tetrazolato)-amine], cobalt(III) tris(bi(tetrazolato)amine), and high nitrogen compounds of copper and silver were prepared as loose powders, pressed into pellets and wafers, and ignited under an inert atmosphere to form nanoporous metal foam monoliths having very high surface area and very low density.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterisation, DNA cleavage, superoxidase dismutase activity and antibacterial properties of some transition metal complexes of a novel bidentate Schiff base derived from isatin and 2-aminopyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitha, L. P.; Aswathy, R.; Mathews, Niecy Elsa; Sindhu kumari, B.; Mohanan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) with a Schiff base, formed by the condensation of isatin with 2-aminopyrimidine have been synthesised and characterised through elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis, 1HNMR, FAB mass and EPR spectral studies. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acts as neutral bidentate, coordinating to the metal ion through the carbonyl oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. Molar conductance values adequately support the electrolytic nature of the complexes. On the basis of the above observations the complexes have been formulated as [M(ISAP)2]X2, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); X = Cl, OAc; ISAP = 2-[N-indole-2-one]aminopyrimidine. The ligand and copper(II) complex were subjected to X-ray diffraction studies. The DNA cleavage study was monitored by gel electrophoresis method. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activities of the ligand and the metal complexes were checked using NBT assay. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds has been tested against gram negative and gram positive bacteria.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and antipathogenic studies of some transition metal complexes with N,O-chelating Schiff's base ligand incorporating azo and sulfonamide Moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Bayoumi, Hoda A.; Ammar, Yousry A.; Aldhlmani, Sharah A.

    2013-03-01

    Chromium(III), Manganese(II), Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and cadmium(II) complexes of 4-[4-hydroxy-3-(phenyliminomethyl)-phenylazo]benzenesulfonamide, were prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, spectral, magnetic, molar conductance and thermal analysis. Square planar, tetrahedral and octahedral geometries have been assigned to the prepared complexes. Dimeric complexes are obtained with 2:2 molar ratio except chromium(III) complex is monomeric which is obtained with 1:1 molar ratios. The IR spectra of the prepared complexes were suggested that the Schiff base ligand(HL) behaves as a bi-dentate ligand through the azomethine nitrogen atom and phenolic oxygen atom. The crystal field splitting, Racah repulsion and nepheloauxetic parameters and determined from the electronic spectra of the complexes. Thermal studies suggest a mechanism for degradation of HL and its metal complexes as function of temperature supporting the chelation modes. Also, the activation thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔE*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* for the different thermal decomposition steps of HL and its metal complexes were calculated. The pathogenic activities of the synthesized compounds were tested in vitro against the sensitive organisms Staphylococcus aureus (RCMB010027), Staphylococcus epidermidis (RCMB010024) as Gram positive bacteria, Klebsiella pneumonia (RCMB 010093), Shigella flexneri (RCMB 0100542), as Gram negative bacteria and Aspergillus fumigates (RCMB 02564), Aspergillus clavatus (RCMB 02593) and Candida albicans (RCMB05035) as fungus strain, and the results are discussed.

  9. Honeycomb Structures of Transition Metal-Group 6A Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataca, Can; Sahin, Hasan; Akturk, Ethem; Ciraci, Salim

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the structural, electronic, magnetic properties and stability of MoS2 like honeycomb structures, namely MX2 where M is a transition metal atom (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, Mo, W) and two group (X) 6A elements (O, S, Se, Te) in a unit cell, using first-principles density functional theory. The structure consists of three layers, two for group 6A elements and one for the transition metal atom. The stabilities of various new structures are further testified by phonon dispersion analysis. Unlike graphene, some of the new honeycomb structures resulted in magnetic ground states. It is also noted that metallic honeycomb structures also exist.

  10. Wetting transition for carbon nanotube arrays under metal contacts.

    PubMed

    Perebeinos, V; Tersoff, J

    2015-02-27

    Structural arrays with nanoscale spacing arise in many device concepts. Carbon nanotube transistors are an extreme example, where a practical technology will require arrays of parallel nanotubes with spacing of order 10 nm or less. We show that with decreasing pitch there is a first-order transition, from a robust structure in which the metal wets the substrate between tubes, to a poorly wetting structure in which the metal rides atop the nanotube array without touching the substrate. The latter is analogous to the superhydrophobic "lotus leaf effect." There is a sharp minimum in the delamination energy of metal contacts at the transition pitch. We discuss implications for contact resistance and possible mitigation strategies. PMID:25768770

  11. Wetting Transition for Carbon Nanotube Arrays under Metal Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perebeinos, V.; Tersoff, J.

    2015-02-01

    Structural arrays with nanoscale spacing arise in many device concepts. Carbon nanotube transistors are an extreme example, where a practical technology will require arrays of parallel nanotubes with spacing of order 10 nm or less. We show that with decreasing pitch there is a first-order transition, from a robust structure in which the metal wets the substrate between tubes, to a poorly wetting structure in which the metal rides atop the nanotube array without touching the substrate. The latter is analogous to the superhydrophobic "lotus leaf effect." There is a sharp minimum in the delamination energy of metal contacts at the transition pitch. We discuss implications for contact resistance and possible mitigation strategies.

  12. Metal-insulator transition in films of doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Reich, K V; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Fu, Han; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Shklovskii, B I

    2016-03-01

    To fully deploy the potential of semiconductor nanocrystal films as low-cost electronic materials, a better understanding of the amount of dopants required to make their conductivity metallic is needed. In bulk semiconductors, the critical concentration of electrons at the metal-insulator transition is described by the Mott criterion. Here, we theoretically derive the critical concentration nc for films of heavily doped nanocrystals devoid of ligands at their surface and in direct contact with each other. In the accompanying experiments, we investigate the conduction mechanism in films of phosphorus-doped, ligand-free silicon nanocrystals. At the largest electron concentration achieved in our samples, which is half the predicted nc, we find that the localization length of hopping electrons is close to three times the nanocrystals diameter, indicating that the film approaches the metal-insulator transition.

  13. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of r{sub s} = 2.27(3) a{sub 0}. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin’s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  14. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, antimicrobial activities and antitumor of a new monodentate V-shaped Schiff base and its transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Ramadan M; Abu Al-Nasr, Ahmad K; Noureldeen, Amani F H

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of 4-aminoacetophenone and 4-bromobenzaldehyde in ethanol resulted in the formation of the monodentate V-shaped Schiff base (E)-1-(4-((4-bromo-benzylidene)amino)phenyl)ethanone (L). Interaction of L with different di- and trivalent metal ions revealed disubstituted derivatives. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR and NMR spectrometry. Biological activities of the ligand and complexes against the Escherchia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacterias, and the two fungus Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans were screened. The cytotoxicity of the compounds were checked as antitumor agents on liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2). They exhibited in vitro broad range of antitumor activities towards the cell line; the [ZnL2(H2O)2](NO3)2 complex was stronger antitumor towards HepG2 cell line as well as two breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and T47D) relative to cis-platin.

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, antimicrobial activities and antitumor of a new monodentate V-shaped Schiff base and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Ramadan M.; Abu Al-Nasr, Ahmad K.; Noureldeen, Amani F. H.

    2014-11-01

    Reaction of 4-aminoacetophenone and 4-bromobenzaldehyde in ethanol resulted in the formation of the monodentate V-shaped Schiff base (E)-1-(4-((4-bromo-benzylidene)amino)phenyl)ethanone (L). Interaction of L with different di- and trivalent metal ions revealed disubstituted derivatives. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR and NMR spectrometry. Biological activities of the ligand and complexes against the Escherchia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacterias, and the two fungus Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans were screened. The cytotoxicity of the compounds were checked as antitumor agents on liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2). They exhibited in vitro broad range of antitumor activities towards the cell line; the [ZnL2(H2O)2](NO3)2 complex was stronger antitumor towards HepG2 cell line as well as two breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and T47D) relative to cis-platin.

  17. Formation of carbyne and graphyne on transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qinghong; Ding, Feng

    2014-10-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of carbyne on various transition metal surfaces were investigated by theoretical calculations. It was found that carbyne on non-active metal surfaces has a polyynic structure, while a polycumulenic structure is more stable on active catalyst surfaces. The self-assembly of carbyne on a metal substrate could lead to the synthesis of graphyne.The electronic and geometric structures of carbyne on various transition metal surfaces were investigated by theoretical calculations. It was found that carbyne on non-active metal surfaces has a polyynic structure, while a polycumulenic structure is more stable on active catalyst surfaces. The self-assembly of carbyne on a metal substrate could lead to the synthesis of graphyne. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Computational details and structural information of carbon chains on Ni(111) and Rh(111) surfaces, carbon island on Cu(111), Ni(111), Rh(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03757j

  18. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of some transition metal complexes of a new hexadentate N(2)S(2)O(2) Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saikat; Dey, Kamalendu

    2005-11-01

    A novel interesting hexadentate dibasic N(2)S(2)O(2) donor Schiff base ligand, H(4)dcsalpte, was synthesized by the condensation of 3-formylsalicylic acid and 1,2-di(o-aminophenylthio)ethane and characterized. The reactions of the ligand with different metal(II/III)salts under varied reaction conditions afforded a series of metal complexes. The ligand, H(4)dcsalpte, behaves either as a dibasic or neutral hexadentate one, depending on the reaction conditions. Structural investigations on the ligand and their complexes have been made based on elemental analyses, molar conductance values, magnetic moment values, cryomagnetic and spectral (UV-vis, IR, (1)H NMR, and Mössbauer) data. Based on magnetic susceptibility, Mössbauer and electronic spectral data the iron(III) complex [Fe(III)(H(2)dcsalpte)]ClO(4) (8), isolated in the present investigation, it is inferred that the spin states 5/2 and 1/2 are in equilibrium. Similarly a tri-iron(III) complex [Fe(III)(3)(H(2)dcsalpte)(H(3)dcsalpte)Cl(3)]Cl(3) (7), isolated in this study, has been inferred to contain two iron(III) sites in tetrahedral environment and one in the octahedral environment. The aerial oxidation of an equimolar mixture of H(4)dcsalpte and Co(CH(3)COO)(2).4H(2)O in ethanol under reflux gave two products, [Co(H(2)dcsalpte)]CH(3)COO (10) and [(Hbtcsaldm)Co(Hbvcsaldm)] (11), a cobalt(III) complex bound to two dissimilar tridentate NSO donor ligands formed as a result of the oxidative cleavage of the CS bond. In the complex 11, Hbtcsaldm stands for the dianion of the tridentate Schiff base ligand N-(2'-benzenethiol)-3-carboxysalicylaldimine and Hbvcsaldm stands for the mono anion of the tridentate Schiff base ligand N-(benzene-2'-S-vinyl)-3-carboxysalicylaldimine, both being formed as a result of the oxidative cleavage of H(4)dcsalpte. PMID:16257739

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of some transition metal complexes of a new hexadentate N 2S 2O 2 Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saikat; Dey, Kamalendu

    2005-11-01

    A novel interesting hexadentate dibasic N 2S 2O 2 donor Schiff base ligand, H4dcsalpte, was synthesized by the condensation of 3-formylsalicylic acid and 1,2-di( o-aminophenylthio)ethane and characterized. The reactions of the ligand with different metal(II/III)salts under varied reaction conditions afforded a series of metal complexes. The ligand, H4dcsalpte, behaves either as a dibasic or neutral hexadentate one, depending on the reaction conditions. Structural investigations on the ligand and their complexes have been made based on elemental analyses, molar conductance values, magnetic moment values, cryomagnetic and spectral (UV-vis, IR, 1H NMR, and Mössbauer) data. Based on magnetic susceptibility, Mössbauer and electronic spectral data the iron(III) complex [Fe III( H2dcsalpte)]ClO 4 ( 8), isolated in the present investigation, it is inferred that the spin states 5/2 and 1/2 are in equilibrium. Similarly a tri-iron(III) complex [Fe III3( H2dcsalpte)( H3dcsalpte)Cl 3]Cl 3 ( 7), isolated in this study, has been inferred to contain two iron(III) sites in tetrahedral environment and one in the octahedral environment. The aerial oxidation of an equimolar mixture of H4dcsalpte and Co(CH 3COO) 2·4H 2O in ethanol under reflux gave two products, [Co( H2dcsalpte)]CH 3COO ( 10) and [( Hbtcsaldm)Co( Hbvcsaldm)] ( 11), a cobalt(III) complex bound to two dissimilar tridentate NSO donor ligands formed as a result of the oxidative cleavage of the C sbnd S bond. In the complex 11, Hbtcsaldm stands for the dianion of the tridentate Schiff base ligand N-(2'-benzenethiol)-3-carboxysalicylaldimine and Hbvcsaldm stands for the mono anion of the tridentate Schiff base ligand N-(benzene-2'-S-vinyl)-3-carboxysalicylaldimine, both being formed as a result of the oxidative cleavage of H4dcsalpte.

  20. Transition Metal d-Orbital Splitting Diagrams: An Updated Educational Resource for Square Planar Transition Metal Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bo¨rgel, Jonas; Campbell, Michael G.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of d-orbital splitting diagrams for square planar transition metal complexes in textbooks and educational materials is often inconsistent and therefore confusing for students. Here we provide a concise summary of the key features of orbital splitting diagrams for square planar complexes, which we propose may be used as an updated…

  1. Asymmetries in transition metal XPS spectra: metal nanoparticle structure, and interaction with the graphene-structured substrate surface.

    PubMed

    Sacher, E

    2010-03-16

    Transition-metal XPS spectra have traditionally been considered to possess a natural asymmetry, extending to the high-binding-energy side. This is based on the fact that these spectra have generally been found experimentally to have such an asymmetry, as well as on the confirmation of asymmetry offered by the Doniach-Sunjić equation, an equation based on the proposal that the conduction electron scattering amplitude for interband absorption or emission in metals, at the Fermi level, is a singularity. Our discovery that metal nanoparticles, prepared under vacuum and characterized without exposure to air, have symmetric peaks, which become asymmetric with time, informed us that these peak asymmetries have other sources. On the basis of our belief that all metal spectra are composed of symmetric peaks, where the asymmetries are attributed to overlapping minor peaks that are consistent with known physical and chemical phenomena associated with that metal, we have shown that, for the metals that we have studied, these asymmetries contain much information, otherwise unavailable, on the structures, contaminants, oxidation, and interfacial interactions of nanoparticle surfaces. The existence of this information has been demonstrated for several metals, and its value is shown by its use in explaining the strong interfacial bonding of the nanoparticles with substrates having graphene structures. A possible future research direction is offered in the field of metal-metal interactions in nanoparticle alloys.

  2. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on post-transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James L.

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide to liquid products is an important component in the utilization of CO2 and in the high-density storage of intermittent renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds. Materials based on indium and tin, which yield predominantly formic acid, have been investigated in order to gain a greater understanding of the electrochemically active species and the mechanism of CO2 reduction on these heavy post-transition metals, since prior studies on the bulk metals did not provide thermodynamically sensible reaction pathways. Nanoparticles of the oxides and hydroxides of tin and indium have been prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and various electrochemical methods in order to obtain structural information and analyze the role of various surface species on the CO2 reduction pathway. On both indium and tin, metastable surface-bound hydroxides bound CO2 and formed metal carbonates, which can then be reduced electrochemically. The relevant oxidation state of tin was suggested to be SnII rather than SnIV, necessitating a pre reduction to generate the CO2-binding species. Metallic indium nanoparticles partially oxidized in air and became highly efficient CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. Unit Faradaic efficiencies for formate, much higher than on bulk indium, were achieved with only 300 mV of overpotential on these particles, which possessed an oxyhydroxide shell surrounding a conductive metallic core. Alloys and mixed-metal oxide and hydroxide particles of tin and indium have also been studied for their carbon dioxide electrocatalytic capabilities, especially in comparison to the pure metal species. Additionally, a solar-driven indium-based CO2 electrolyzer was developed to investigate the overall efficiency for intermittent energy storage. The three flow cells were powered by a commercial photovoltaic array and had a maximum conversion efficiency of incident

  3. Metallic-like to nonmetallic transitions in a variety of heavily oxygen deficient ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, Jonathan A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Randall, Clive A.; Lee, Soonil

    2015-08-31

    The coupling between ferroelectric distortions and electron transport is an important factor in understanding ferroelectric/noncentrosymmetric materials with metallic conductivities and ferroelectric-based thermoelectrics. Here, multiple d{sup 0} ferroelectrics with a variety of crystal structures are doped via oxygen deficiency, resulting in metallic-like conduction in the paraelectric state. It is found that most of the studied systems show a metallic-like to nonmetallic transition near the paraelectric-ferroelectric transition. The metallic-like to nonmetallic transition temperature can be shifted using mechanisms that shift the paraelectric-ferroelectric transition temperature. It was found that the metallic-like to nonmetallic transition temperature could be shifted from 373 K to 273 K by varying (Ba{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x})TiO{sub 3−δ} from x = 0 to x = 0.3 and x = 1. The most probable mechanism for ferroelectric-electron transport coupling was determined to be Anderson localization associated with polarization with short-range order.

  4. A novel method to enhance the conductance of transitional metal oxide electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ranran; Chen, Zheng; Yu, Hang; Jia, Xilai; Gao, Lian; Sun, Jing; Hicks, Robert F; Lu, Yunfeng

    2014-04-01

    Transitional metal oxides hold great potential for high capacity anodes. However, the low electron conductivity of such materials leads to poor cycling stability and inferior rate capability. We reported herein the use of a novel hydrogen plasma technology to improve the conductance of metal oxides, which leads great success in improving the rate performance of CuO nanotube based anodes. This method has the potential to be widely adopted in the field of lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors. PMID:24577667

  5. Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2012-05-11

    A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

  6. Buckley Prize Talk: The Suprerconductor-(Metal)-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2015-03-01

    While the classical theory of phase transitions has been extraordinarily successful, there are several reasons to exercise caution when applying this approach to the zero temperature superconducting transition. First, experimental identification of the relevant phases requires extrapolation to zero temperature, which becomes complicated, especially when one needs to identify sources of dissipation. In addition, since superconductivity may be highly inhomogeneous as appreciable superconducting order parameter may be concentrated in ``superconducting puddles'' due to disorder and/or spontaneous phase separation, the nature of the quantum phase transition to a superconducting state may be highly anomalous, where the system attempts to optimizes the formation of puddles with the Josephson coupling among them to obtain global superconductivity. In this talk we will review some of the consequences of these considerations, emphasizing the possible emergence of anomalous metallic phases close to the superconductor-insulator transition.

  7. Atomic interactions and phase transition in hydrogen metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical mechanical behavior of H in pure metals and metal alloys is investigated using elasticity theory and lattice-gas models. The interactions between H atoms are separated into elastic and electronic contributions, and only the elastic contributions are evaluated. Three studies are reported: trapping of H by interstitial and substitutional impurities in bbc metals; modeling of H in impure metals; and modeling of H in concentration metal hydrides. The elastic interactions between H and interstitial and substitutional impurities in bbc metals are calculated using the method of lattice statics. Comparison with experimentally-measured trapping energies indicates that trapping by interstitial impurities is due solely to elastic energy, whereas both elastic and electronic interactions contribute to trapping by substitutional impurities. To include the effect of substitutional trapping on the phase transitions of H in metal alloys, the random-field lattice-gas model is developed. Interactions between H atoms are determined using the effective metal atom approximation. Hydrogen-impurity interactions are treated as a random field, in analogy with the random-field Ising model. Phase diagrams of the Nb/sub .95/Mo/sub .05/-H and Nb/sub .85/Mo/sub .15/-H systems are calculated by Monte Carlo simulation using the random-field model. The model gives qualitatively correct predictions of the phase behavior when the random field is included.

  8. Synthesis of organosiloxy: Transition metal polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marano, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The new compound, Mo(OSiPH3)4 (where Ph is C6H5) was synthesized. An overall chemical reaction which accounts for the observed products is given by the redox approach. Results indicate that Mo(OSiPH3)4 is thermally stable up to 230 C and relatively unreactive toward most common acids and bases even at elevated temperatures. Its behavior is not unlike that of Ti(OSiPH3)4.

  9. Dislocations and Plasticity in bcc Transition Metals at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L H; Tang, M; Moriarty, J A

    2009-01-23

    Using first-principles electronic structure calculations, quantum-based atomistic simulations and atomistically informed dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, we have studied individual dislocation behavior and the multiscale modeling of single-crystal plasticity in the prototype bcc transition metals Ta, Mo and V under both ambient and high pressure conditions. The primary focus in this work is on the pressure-dependent structure, mobility and interaction of a/2<111> screw dislocations, which dominate the plastic deformation properties of these materials. At the electronic scale, first-principles calculations of elasticity, ideal strength and generalized stacking fault energy surfaces have been used to validate quantum-based multi-ion interatomic potentials. At the atomistic scale, these potentials have been used in flexible Green's function boundary condition simulations to study the core structure, Peierls stress {tau}{sub P}, thermally activated kink-pair formation and mobility below {tau}{sub P}, and phonon-drag mobility above {tau}{sub P}. These results have then been distilled into analytic velocity laws and used directly in predictive microscale DD simulations of flow stress and resolved yield stress over wide ranges of pressure, temperature and strain rate.

  10. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future.

  11. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sean T; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Hendon, Christopher H; Dumesic, James A; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti(0.1)W(0.9)C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading, enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.

  12. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentialsmore » to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.« less

  13. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentials to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results also compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.

  14. Local electronic structure and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, He; Duan, Haiming

    2008-05-01

    The local electronic structure and magnetic properties of GaAs doped with 3d transition metal (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) were studied by using discrete variational method (DVM) based on density functional theory. The calculated result indicated that the magnetic moment of transition metal increases first and then decreases, and reaches the maximum value when Mn is doped into GaAs. In the case of Mn concentration of 1.4%, the magnetic moment of Mn is in good agreement with the experimental result. The coupling between impure atoms in the system with two impure atoms was found to have obvious variation. For different transition metal, the coupling between the impure atom and the nearest neighbor As also has different variation.

  15. Prebiotic coordination chemistry: The potential role of transition-metal complexes in the chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, M.

    1979-01-01

    In approaching the extremely involved and complex problem of the origin of life, consideration of the coordination chemistry appeared not only as a possibility but as a necessity. The first model experiments appear to be promising because of prebiotic-type synthesis by means of transition-metal complexes. It is especially significant that in some instances various types of vitally important substances (nucleic bases, amino acids) are formed simultaneously. There is ground to hope that systematic studies in this field will clarify the role of transition-metal complexes in the organizatorial phase of chemical evolution. It is obvious that researchers working in the fields of the chemistry of cyano and carbonyl complexes, and of the catalytic effect of transition-metal complexes are best suited to study these aspects of the attractive and interesting problem of the origin of life.

  16. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transitionmore » order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.« less

  17. Valley plasmonics in transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewald, R. E.; Rösner, M.; Schönhoff, G.; Haas, S.; Wehling, T. O.

    2016-05-01

    The rich phenomenology of plasmonic excitations in the dichalcogenides is analyzed as a function of doping. The many-body polarization, the dielectric response function, and electron energy loss spectra are calculated using an ab initio based model involving material-realistic Coulomb interactions, band structure, and spin-orbit coupling. Focusing on the representative case of MoS2, a plethora of plasmon bands are observed, originating from scattering processes within and between the conduction or valence band valleys. We discuss the resulting square-root and linear collective modes, arising from long-range versus short-range screening of the Coulomb potential. We show that the multiorbital nature of the bands and spin-orbit coupling strongly affects intervalley scattering processes by gapping certain two-particle modes at large momentum transfer.

  18. Correlated structural and electronic phase transformations in transition metal chalcogenide under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyu; Ke, Feng; Hu, Qingyang; Yu, Zhenhai; Zhao, Jinggeng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Yan, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report comprehensive studies on the high-pressure structural and electrical transport properties of the layered transition metal chalcogenide (Cr2S3) up to 36.3 GPa. A structural phase transition was observed in the rhombohedral Cr2S3 near 16.5 GPa by the synchrotron angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurement using a diamond anvil cell. Through in situ resistance measurement, the electric resistance value was detected to decrease by an order of three over the pressure range of 7-15 GPa coincided with the structural phase transition. Measurements on the temperature dependence of resistivity indicate that it is a semiconductor-to-metal transition in nature. The results were also confirmed by the electronic energy band calculations. Above results may shed a light on optimizing the performance of Cr2S3 based applications under extreme conditions.

  19. Structure, bonding, and catalytic activity of monodisperse, transition-metal-substituted CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Elias, Joseph S; Risch, Marcel; Giordano, Livia; Mansour, Azzam N; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2014-12-10

    We present a simple and generalizable synthetic route toward phase-pure, monodisperse transition-metal-substituted ceria nanoparticles (M0.1Ce0.9O2-x, M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu). The solution-based pyrolysis of a series of heterobimetallic Schiff base complexes ensures a rigorous control of the size, morphology and composition of 3 nm M0.1Ce0.9O2-x crystallites for CO oxidation catalysis and other applications. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirms the dispersion of aliovalent (M(3+) and M(2+)) transition metal ions into the ceria matrix without the formation of any bulk transition metal oxide phases, while steady-state CO oxidation catalysis reveals an order of magnitude increase in catalytic activity with copper substitution. Density functional calculations of model slabs of these compounds confirm the stabilization of M(3+) and M(2+) in the lattice of CeO2. These results highlight the role of the host CeO2 lattice in stabilizing high oxidation states of aliovalent transition metal dopants that ordinarily would be intractable, such as Cu(3+), as well as demonstrating a rational approach to catalyst design. The current work demonstrates, for the first time, a generalizable approach for the preparation of transition-metal-substituted CeO2 for a broad range of transition metals with unparalleled synthetic control and illustrates that Cu(3+) is implicated in the mechanism for CO oxidation on CuO-CeO2 catalysts. PMID:25406101

  20. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  1. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  2. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  3. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  4. Novel photoinduced phase transitions in transition metal oxides and diluted magnetic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Some transition metal oxides have frustrated electronic states under multiphase competition due to strongly correlated d electrons with spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom and exhibit drastic responses to external stimuli such as optical excitation. Here, we present photoemission studies on Pr0.55(Ca1 − ySry)0.45MnO3 (y = 0.25), SrTiO3, and Ti1 − xCoxO2 (x = 0.05, 0.10) under laser illumination and discuss electronic structural changes induced by optical excitation in these strongly correlated oxides. We discuss the novel photoinduced phase transitions in these transition metal oxides and diluted magnetic semiconductors on the basis of polaronic pictures such as orbital, ferromagnetic, and ferroelectric polarons. PMID:23092248

  5. Wetting Transitions of Inert Gases on Alkali Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, M. J.; McDonald, I. A.; Cole, M. W.; Steele, W. A.

    1996-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental discoveries have been made recently of wetting and prewetting transitions of helium and hydrogen films on alkali metal surfaces [1,2]. New experiments show anomalous nonwetting behavior of Ne on Rb and Cs [3]. Building on earlier work [4], we have done and will describe results from the first Monte Carlo simulations showing wetting transitions for classical gases on alkali metal surfaces. * Research supported by an NSF Materials Research Group grant. 1. R. B.Hallock, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 31, 1995 2. M. W. Cole, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 25, 1995. 3. G. B. Hess, M. Sabatini, and M. H. W. Chan, unpublished 4. J. E. Finn and P. A. Monson, Phys. Rev. A 39, 6402, 1989.

  6. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  7. Inherited (In)stabilities in Transition Metal Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Sven

    2011-03-01

    Many transition metals exhibit a solid phase with a body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure. For some elements, e.g., tungsten (W), bcc is the only solid phase; for others, e.g., titanium (Ti), the bcc phase only appears at high temperatures. Titanium's high-temperature bcc phase exhibits soft phonon modes. These reflect the atomic movements upon transformation into the low-temperature phases. One such mode shows atomic displacements that also appear in the top few layers of tungsten's surface reconstruction. Superlattices constructed from alternating nanometer-thick layers of W and Ti would allow the two displacement patterns to interact. The work presented here uses density functional theory calculations to predict how the structure and mechanical response of such superlattices depends on the choice of transition metal elements and the layer thicknesses.

  8. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  9. Quantum critical transport at a continuous metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, P.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to the first-order correlation-driven Mott metal-insulator transition, continuous disorder-driven transitions are intrinsically quantum critical. Here, we investigate transport quantum criticality in the Falicov-Kimball model, a representative of the latter class in the strong disorder category. Employing cluster-dynamical mean-field theory, we find clear and anomalous quantum critical scaling behavior manifesting as perfect mirror symmetry of scaling curves on both sides of the MIT. Surprisingly, we find that the beta function β (g ) scales as log(g ) deep into the bad-metallic phase as well, providing a sound unified basis for these findings. We argue that such strong localization quantum criticality may manifest in real three-dimensional systems where disorder effects are more important than electron-electron interactions.

  10. Recent Advances in Transition Metal-Catalyzed Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Matthew J.; Nguyen, Hien M.

    2012-01-01

    Having access to mild and operationally simple techniques for attaining carbohydrate targets will be necessary to facilitate advancement in biological, medicinal, and pharmacological research. Even with the abundance of elegant reports for generating glycosidic linkages, stereoselective construction of α- and β-oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates is by no means trivial. In an era where expanded awareness of the impact we are having on the environment drives the state-of-the-art, synthetic chemists are tasked with developing cleaner and more efficient reactions for achieving their transformations. This movement imparts the value that prevention of waste is always superior to its treatment or cleanup. This review will highlight recent advancement in this regard by examining strategies that employ transition metal catalysis in the synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. These methods are mild and effective for constructing glycosidic bonds with reduced levels of waste through utilization of sub-stoichiometric amounts of transition metals to promote the glycosylation. PMID:22924154

  11. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  12. Metal-insulator and charge ordering transitions in oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay Kumar

    Strongly correlated oxides are a class of materials wherein interplay of various degrees of freedom results in novel electronic and magnetic phenomena. Vanadium oxides are widely studied correlated materials that exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in a wide temperature range from 70 K to 380 K. In this Thesis, results from electrical transport measurements on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium oxide bronze (MxV 2O5) (where M: alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations) are presented and discussed. Although the MIT in VO2 has been studied for more than 50 years, the microscopic origin of the transition is still debated since a slew of external parameters such as light, voltage, and strain are found to significantly alter the transition. Furthermore, recent works on electrically driven switching in VO2 have shown that the role of Joule heating to be a major cause as opposed to electric field. We explore the mechanisms behind the electrically driven switching in single crystalline nanobeams of VO2 through DC and AC transport measurements. The harmonic analysis of the AC measurement data shows that non-uniform Joule heating causes electronic inhomogeneities to develop within the nanobeam and is responsible for driving the transition in VO2. Surprisingly, field assisted emission mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel effect is found to be absent and the role of percolation is also identified in the electrically driven transition. This Thesis also provides a new insight into the mechanisms behind the electrolyte gating induced resistance modulation and the suppression of MIT in VO2. We show that the metallic phase of VO2 induced by electrolyte gating is due to an electrochemical process and can be both reversible and irreversible under different conditions. The kinetics of the redox processes increase with temperature; a complete suppression of the transition and the stabilization of the metallic phase are achievable by gating in the rutile metallic phase

  13. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-03

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials.

  14. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials. PMID:26235962

  15. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials. PMID:26235962

  16. Spin-orbit engineering in transition metal dichalcogenide alloy monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Robert, Cedric; Suslu, Aslihan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Alamdari, Sarah; Gerber, Iann C.; Amand, Thierry; Marie, Xavier; Tongay, Sefaattin; Urbaszek, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Binary transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers share common properties such as a direct optical bandgap, spin-orbit splittings of hundreds of meV, light–matter interaction dominated by robust excitons and coupled spin-valley states. Here we demonstrate spin-orbit-engineering in Mo(1−x)WxSe2 alloy monolayers for optoelectronics and applications based on spin- and valley-control. We probe the impact of the tuning of the conduction band spin-orbit spin-splitting on the bright versus dark exciton population. For MoSe2 monolayers, the photoluminescence intensity decreases as a function of temperature by an order of magnitude (4–300 K), whereas for WSe2 we measure surprisingly an order of magnitude increase. The ternary material shows a trend between these two extreme behaviours. We also show a non-linear increase of the valley polarization as a function of tungsten concentration, where 40% tungsten incorporation is sufficient to achieve valley polarization as high as in binary WSe2. PMID:26657930

  17. Magnetic ground state of semiconducting transition-metal trichalcogenide monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadas, Nikhil; Daniels, Matthew W.; Swendsen, Robert H.; Okamoto, Satoshi; Xiao, Di

    2015-06-16

    Layered transition-metal trichalcogenides with the chemical formula ABX3 have attracted recent interest as potential candidates for two-dimensional magnets. Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we investigate the magnetic ground states of monolayers of Mn- and Cr-based semiconducting trichalcogenides.We show that the second and third nearest-neighbor exchange interactions (J2 and J3) between magnetic ions, which have been largely overlooked in previous theoretical studies, are crucial in determining the magnetic ground state. Specifically, we find that monolayer CrSiTe3 is an antiferromagnet with a zigzag spin texture due to significant contribution from J3, whereas CrGeTe3 is a ferromagnet with a Curie temperature of 106 K. Monolayers of Mn compounds (MnPS3 and MnPSe3) always show antiferromagnetic N eel order. We identify the physical origin of various exchange interactions, and demonstrate that strain can be an effective knob for tuning the magnetic properties. Possible magnetic ordering in the bulk is also discussed. In conclusion, our study suggests that ABX3 can be a promising platform to explore two-dimensional magnetic phenomena.

  18. Magnetic brightening of dark excitons in transitional metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Lu, Zhengguang; Cao, Ting; Zhang, Fan; Hone, James; Louie, Steven G.; Li, Zhiqiang; Smirnov, Dmitry; Heinz, Tony

    Transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) in the MX2 (M = Mo, W, X = S, Se) family represent an excellent platform to study of excitonic effects. At monolayer thickness, these materials exhibit both direct band-gap character and enhanced excitonic interactions. Theoretical studies suggest that both the valence and conduction bands are split and exhibit spin polarized character at the K/K' valleys. The lowest energy band-edge excitons are predicted to have different spin configurations for different materials in this family. When the lowest lying exciton has parallel electron and hole spin, radiative decay is forbidden and the state is dark. Here we demonstrate that by applying an in-plane magnetic field we can perturb the exciton spin configuration and brighten this state, allowing it to undergo radiative decay. We identify such a brightened dark state by the emergence of a new emission peak lying below the absorption peak, with a strength growing with applied in-plane magnetic field. On the other hand, for monolayer MoSe2, where no low-lying dark state is expected, we do not see the growth of a new emission feature under application of an in-plane magnetic field. Our experimental findings are in agreement with the calculated properties of dark excitons based on GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation approach

  19. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials.

  20. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  1. Magnetic ground state of semiconducting transition-metal trichalcogenide monolayers

    DOE PAGES

    Sivadas, Nikhil; Daniels, Matthew W.; Swendsen, Robert H.; Okamoto, Satoshi; Xiao, Di

    2015-06-16

    Layered transition-metal trichalcogenides with the chemical formula ABX3 have attracted recent interest as potential candidates for two-dimensional magnets. Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we investigate the magnetic ground states of monolayers of Mn- and Cr-based semiconducting trichalcogenides.We show that the second and third nearest-neighbor exchange interactions (J2 and J3) between magnetic ions, which have been largely overlooked in previous theoretical studies, are crucial in determining the magnetic ground state. Specifically, we find that monolayer CrSiTe3 is an antiferromagnet with a zigzag spin texture due to significant contribution from J3, whereas CrGeTe3 is a ferromagnet with a Curie temperaturemore » of 106 K. Monolayers of Mn compounds (MnPS3 and MnPSe3) always show antiferromagnetic N eel order. We identify the physical origin of various exchange interactions, and demonstrate that strain can be an effective knob for tuning the magnetic properties. Possible magnetic ordering in the bulk is also discussed. In conclusion, our study suggests that ABX3 can be a promising platform to explore two-dimensional magnetic phenomena.« less

  2. APCVD Transition Metal Oxides - Functional Layers in "Smart windows"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesheva, K. A.; Ivanova, T. M.; Bodurov, G. K.

    2014-11-01

    Transition metal oxides (TMO) exhibit electrochromic effect. Under a small voltage they change their optical transmittance from transparent to collored (absorbing) state. The individual material can manifest its electrochromic properties only when it is part of electrochromic (EC) multilayer system. Smart window is controlling the energy of solar flux entering the building or car and makes the interiors comfortable and energy utilization more effective. Recently the efforts of material researchers in this field are directed to price decreasing. APCVD technology is considered as promissing as this process permits flowthrough large-scale production process. The paper presents results on device optimization based on WO3-MoO3 working electrode. Extensive research reveals that WO3-MoO3 structure combines positive features of single oxides: excellent electrochromic performance of WO3 and better kinetic properties of MoO3 deposition. The achieved color efficiency of APCVD WO3-MoO3 films is 200cm2/C and optical modulation of 65-70% are practically favorable electrochromic characteristics. To respond to low cost requirement, the expensive hexacarbonyl can be replaced with acetylacetonate. We have started with this precursor to fabricate mixed WxV1-xO3 films. The films possess excellent surface coverage and high growth-rate. CVD deposition of VO2, a promissing thermochromic thin film material is also presented.

  3. Comparison of Structural Relaxation Behavior in As-Cast and Pre-Annealed Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses Just below Glass Transition

    DOE PAGES

    Haruyama, Osami; Yoshikawa, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshikatsu; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-04-25

    In this paper, the α-relaxation of pre-annealed Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was compared with that of as-cast Zr-based BMGs including Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10. The α-relaxation was investigated by volume relaxation. The relaxation behavior was well described by a stretched exponential relaxation function, Φ (t) ≈ exp [ - (t/τ α )β α ], with the isothermal relaxation time, τα, and the Kohlrausch exponent, βα. The βα exhibited the strong temperature dependence for the pre-annealed BMG, while the weak temperature dependence was visualized for the as-cast BMG similar to the dynamic relaxation. The τα’s were modified by Moynihan and Narayanaswamy-Tool-Moynihan methods thatmore » reduce the difference in the thermal history of sample. Finally, as a result, the relaxation kinetics in the glass resembled that of a liquid deduced from the behavior of viscosity in the supercooled liquid.« less

  4. Comparison of Structural Relaxation Behavior in As-Cast and Pre-Annealed Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses Just below Glass Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, Osami; Yoshikawa, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshikatsu; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-04-25

    In this paper, the α-relaxation of pre-annealed Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was compared with that of as-cast Zr-based BMGs including Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10. The α-relaxation was investigated by volume relaxation. The relaxation behavior was well described by a stretched exponential relaxation function, Φ (t) ≈ exp [ - (t/τ α )β α ], with the isothermal relaxation time, τα, and the Kohlrausch exponent, βα. The βα exhibited the strong temperature dependence for the pre-annealed BMG, while the weak temperature dependence was visualized for the as-cast BMG similar to the dynamic relaxation. The τα’s were modified by Moynihan and Narayanaswamy-Tool-Moynihan methods that reduce the difference in the thermal history of sample. Finally, as a result, the relaxation kinetics in the glass resembled that of a liquid deduced from the behavior of viscosity in the supercooled liquid.

  5. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal Immobilization, and Catalytic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Christopher A.; Yuhas, Benjamin D.; McMurdo, Meredith J.; Tilley, T. D.

    2008-12-11

    Silicone nanospheres containing a variety of functional groups (pyridines, phosphines, thiols, amines, etc.) have been prepared by emulsion copolymerization of methyltrimethoxysilane, MeSi(OMe)3, and the functionalized monomer of interest, RSi(OMe)3. This procedure provides a reproducible synthesis of spherical particles in the 12-28 nm size regime as determined by transmission electronSilicone nanospheres containing a variety of functional groups (pyridines, phosphines, thiols, amines, etc.) have been prepared by emulsion copolymerization of methyltrimethoxysilane, MeSi(OMe)₃, and the functionalized monomer of interest, RSi(OMe)₃. This procedure provides a reproducible synthesis of spherical particles in the 12-28 nm size regime as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The presence of the functional groups is supported by a combination of spectroscopic methods including DRUV-vis, DRIFTS, and NMR spectroscopy. Comonomer dispersity within the nanospheres was probed using elemental mapping techniques, and these support a homogeneous distribution of functional groups within the particles. Palladium(0) immobilization on phosphine-substituted nanospheres also results in a random distribution of the transition metal throughout the particles. Nanospheres containing multiple acid/base functionalities were also prepared, and these demonstrate functional group cooperativity based on enhanced conversions in the base-catalyzed Henry reaction, relative to nanosphere catalysts containing only basic groups. The diversity of functional groups that may be incorporated into the spheres suggests that these materials hold considerable promise as ligand supports and catalysts.Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) have been suggested as a promising material for its use as nanoelectromechanical reasonators for highly sensitive force, mass, and charge detection. Therefore the accurate determination of the size-dependent elastic properties of GNRs is desirable for the design of

  6. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  7. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  8. Growth of Hollow Transition Metal (Fe, Co, Ni) Oxide Nanoparticles on Graphene Sheets through Kirkendall Effect as Anodes for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianbo; Qu, Bin; Zhao, Yang; Li, Chunyan; Chen, Yujin; Sun, Chunwen; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Chunling

    2016-01-26

    A general strategy based on the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been developed to grow hollow transition metal (Fe, Co or Ni) oxide nanoparticles on graphene sheets. When applied as lithium-ion battery anodes, these hollow transition metal oxide-based composites exhibit excellent electrochemical performance, with high reversible capacities and long-term stabilities at a high current density, superior to most transition metal oxides reported to date.

  9. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W. ); Fernando, G.W. . Dept. of Physics); Bennett, L.H. . Metallurgy Div.)

    1992-01-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund's rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  10. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.; Fernando, G.W.; Bennett, L.H.

    1992-10-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions & band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund`s rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  11. Unique reactivity of fluorinated molecules with transition metals.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Silvia; Munoz, Sócrates B; Fustero, Santos

    2014-01-01

    Organofluorine and organometallic chemistry by themselves constitute two potent areas in organic synthesis. Thus, the combination of both offers many chemical possibilities and represents a powerful tool for the design and development of new synthetic methodologies leading to diverse molecular structures in an efficient manner. Given the importance of the selective introduction of fluorine atoms into organic molecules and the effectiveness of transition metals in C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation, this review represents an interesting read for this aim.

  12. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    DOEpatents

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  13. First Principles Study of Effect of 3d Transition Metal-Doped Zinc Oxide on Gas Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Murakami, Ri-Ichi

    Two series models were developed in order to investigate the gas sensitivity of 3d transition metal-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) materials. Software based on a discrete variation method (DVM) within the framework of density functional theory was used to calculate the electronic structures of the models. It was possible to determine gas sensitivity using the calculated results, from which a relationship between electronic properties and gas sensitivity was formed. The results showed that doping the transition metals greatly affected the gas sensitivity of ZnO-based materials. The main effect was attributed to the change in carrier concentration. On the contrary, the doping of transition metals had a negligible effect on the mobility of ZnO-based materials. Titanium or iron doped-ZnO is thus expected to have the best gas sensitivity of all of the 3d transition metal-doped ZnO materials.

  14. Optical properties of transition metal oxide quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chungwei; Posadas, Agham; Choi, Miri; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-21

    Fabrication of a quantum well, a structure that confines the electron motion along one or more spatial directions, is a powerful method of controlling the electronic structure and corresponding optical response of a material. For example, semiconductor quantum wells are used to enhance optical properties of laser diodes. The ability to control the growth of transition metal oxide films to atomic precision opens an exciting opportunity of engineering quantum wells in these materials. The wide range of transition metal oxide band gaps offers unprecedented control of confinement while the strong correlation of d-electrons allows for various cooperative phenomena to come into play. Here, we combine density functional theory and tight-binding model Hamiltonian analysis to provide a simple physical picture of transition metal oxide quantum well states using a SrO/SrTiO{sub 3}/SrO heterostructure as an example. The optical properties of the well are investigated by computing the frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The effect of an external electric field, which is essential for electro-optical devices, is also considered.

  15. Calorimetric Study of Kinetic Glass Transition in Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hiki, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2008-02-21

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were carried out for a bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10.0}Be{sub 22.5}, below and above the glass transition temperature T{sub g}. The T{sub g} values were determined from the DSC curves. A wide range of heating rate, q = dT/dt = 0.1-100 K/min, was adopted for the experiment, and the q dependence of the apparent T{sub g} was investigated. As q was decreased, the value of T{sub g} decreased rapidly, then more slowly, and seemed to approach a constant value at low q. The experimental result of this kinetic glass transition phenomenon was analyzed on the basis of the relaxation process occurring in the transition temperature range.

  16. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  17. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  18. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  19. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  20. Alkene synthesis through transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling of N-tosylhydrazones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, alkene synthesis based on the reaction of N-tosylhydrazones is described. The reactivity of tosylhydrazones is determined by either the acidity of α-proton and hydrazone proton or the electropositivity of the carbon of C=N bond. This leads to diverse reactivities and a series of N-tosylhydrazone-based olefination methodologies. Both non-catalytic and transition metal-catalyzed olefinations from N-tosylhydrazones are introduced in this chapter. Most of the transition metal-catalyzed reactions proceed via metal carbene transformations. The synthesis of alkenes through Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of N-tosylhydrazones is particularly attractive and will be discussed in detail.

  1. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  2. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  3. Effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Hu-Chul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2004-07-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels. Three kinds of steels whose compositions were varied from the composition specification of SA 508 steel (grade 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their fracture toughness was examined using an ASTM E1921 standard test method. In the steels that have decreased C and increased Mo and Ni content, the number of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased and the number of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the simultaneous improvement of tensile properties and fracture toughness. Brittle martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents were also formed in these steels during cooling, but did not deteriorate fracture toughness because they were decomposed to ferrite and fine carbides after tempering. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment. These findings indicated that the reduction in C content to inhibit the formation of coarse cementite and to improve toughness and the increase in Mo and Ni to prevent the reduction in hardenability and to precipitate fine M2C carbides were useful ways to improve simultaneously the tensile and fracture properties of the HAZs as well as the base metals.

  4. Control of Magnetic Properties Across Metal to Insulator Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Venta, Jose

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic (FM) thin films without magnetic fields is an on-going challenge in condensed matter physics with multiple technological implications. External stimuli and proximity effects are the most used methods to control the magnetic properties. An interesting possibility arises when ferromagnets are in proximity to materials that undergo a metal-insulator (MIT) and structural phase transition (SPT). The stress associated with the structural changes produces a magnetoelastic anisotropy in proximity coupled ferromagnetic films that allows controlling the magnetic properties without magnetic fields. Canonical examples of materials that undergo MIT and SPT are the vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O3) . VO2 undergoes a metal/rutile to an insulator/monoclinic phase transition at 340 K. In V2O3 the transition at 160 K is from a metallic/rhombohedral to an insulating/ monoclinic phase. We have investigated the magnetic properties of different combinations of ferromagnetic (Ni, Co and Fe) and vanadium oxide thin films. The (0.32%) volume expansion in VO2 or the (1.4%) volume decrease in V2O3 across the MIT produces an interfacial stress in the FM overlayer. We show that the coercivities and magnetizations of the ferromagnetic films grown on vanadium oxides are strongly affected by the phase transition. The changes in coercivity can be as large as 168% and occur in a very narrow temperature interval. These effects can be controlled by the thickness and deposition conditions of the different ferromagnetic films. For VO2/Ni bilayers the large change in the coercivity occurring above room temperature opens the possibilities for technological applications. Work done in collaboration with Siming Wang, J. G. Ramirez, and Ivan K. Schuller. Funded by the US DoE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award FG03-87ER-45332 and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research No. FA9550-12-1-0381.

  5. Disorder and Metal-Insulator Transitions in Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Song, Juntao; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X C

    2015-12-11

    The Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a newly proposed quantum state of matter. It has Weyl nodes in bulk excitations and Fermi arc surface states. We study the effects of disorder and localization in WSMs and find three novel phase transitions. (i) Two Weyl nodes near the Brillouin zone boundary can be annihilated pairwise by disorder scattering, resulting in the opening of a topologically nontrivial gap and a transition from a WSM to a three-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall state. (ii) When the two Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space, the emergent bulk extended states can give rise to a direct transition from a WSM to a 3D diffusive anomalous Hall metal. (iii) Two Weyl nodes can emerge near the zone center when an insulating gap closes with increasing disorder, enabling a direct transition from a normal band insulator to a WSM. We determine the phase diagram by numerically computing the localization length and the Hall conductivity, and propose that the novel phase transitions can be realized on a photonic lattice. PMID:26705648

  6. Hydrogenation-controlled phase transition on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides and their unique physical and catalytic properties

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yuanju; Pan, Hui; Kwok, Chi Tat

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been widely used from nanodevices to energy harvesting/storage because of their tunable physical and chemical properties. In this work, we systematically investigate the effects of hydrogenation on the structural, electronic, magnetic, and catalytic properties of 33 TMDs based on first-principles calculations. We find that the stable phases of TMD monolayers can transit from 1T to 2H phase or vice versa upon the hydrogenation. We show that the hydrogenation can switch their magnetic and electronic states accompanying with the phase transition. The hydrogenation can tune the magnetic states of TMDs among non-, ferro, para-, and antiferro-magnetism and their electronic states among semiconductor, metal, and half-metal. We further show that, out of 33 TMD monolayers, 2H-TiS2 has impressive catalytic ability comparable to Pt in hydrogen evolution reaction in a wide range of hydrogen coverages. Our findings would shed the light on the multi-functional applications of TMDs. PMID:27686869

  7. Hydrogenation-controlled phase transition on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides and their unique physical and catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yuanju; Pan, Hui; Kwok, Chi Tat

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been widely used from nanodevices to energy harvesting/storage because of their tunable physical and chemical properties. In this work, we systematically investigate the effects of hydrogenation on the structural, electronic, magnetic, and catalytic properties of 33 TMDs based on first-principles calculations. We find that the stable phases of TMD monolayers can transit from 1T to 2H phase or vice versa upon the hydrogenation. We show that the hydrogenation can switch their magnetic and electronic states accompanying with the phase transition. The hydrogenation can tune the magnetic states of TMDs among non-, ferro, para-, and antiferro-magnetism and their electronic states among semiconductor, metal, and half-metal. We further show that, out of 33 TMD monolayers, 2H-TiS2 has impressive catalytic ability comparable to Pt in hydrogen evolution reaction in a wide range of hydrogen coverages. Our findings would shed the light on the multi-functional applications of TMDs.

  8. Toward Rational Design of 3d Transition Metal Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation Based on Insights into Hydricity-Controlled Rate-Determining Steps.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide functionalization attracts much interest due to the current environmental and energy challenges. Our earlier work (Mondal, B.; Neese, F.; Ye, S. Inorg. Chem. 2015, 54, 7192-7198) demonstrated that CO2 hydrogenation mediated by base metal catalysts [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Co(III) and Fe(II), n = 1, 2; PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) features discrete rate-determining steps (RDSs). Specifically, the reaction with [Co(III)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](2+) passes through a hydride-transfer RDS, whereas the conversion with [Fe(II)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+) traverses a H2-splitting RDS. More importantly, we found that the nature and barrier of the RDS likely correlate with the hydride affinity or hydricity of the dihydride intermediate [M(H)2(PP3(Ph))]((n-1)+) generated by H2-splitting. In the present contribution, following this notion we design a series of potential Fe(II) and Co(III) catalysts, for which the respective dihydride species possess differential hydricities, and computationally investigated their reactivity toward CO2 hydrogenation. Our results reveal that lowering the hydrictiy of [Co(III)(H)2(PP3(Ph))](+) by introducing anionic anchors in PP3(Ph) dramatically decreases the hydride-transfer RDS barrier, as shown for the enhanced reactivity of [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))](+) and [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))](+) (CP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)methyl, SiP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)silyl), while the same ligand modification increases the H2-splitting RDS barriers for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))] and [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))] relative to that for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+). Conversely, upon increasing the hydricity of [Fe(II)(H)2(PP3(Ph))] by adding an electron-withdrawing group to PP3(Ph), the transformation with [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(PhNO2))](+) (PP3(PhNO2) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)-4-nitrophenyl)phosphine) is predicted to encounter a lower barrier for H2-splitting and a higher barrier for

  9. Toward Rational Design of 3d Transition Metal Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation Based on Insights into Hydricity-Controlled Rate-Determining Steps.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide functionalization attracts much interest due to the current environmental and energy challenges. Our earlier work (Mondal, B.; Neese, F.; Ye, S. Inorg. Chem. 2015, 54, 7192-7198) demonstrated that CO2 hydrogenation mediated by base metal catalysts [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Co(III) and Fe(II), n = 1, 2; PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) features discrete rate-determining steps (RDSs). Specifically, the reaction with [Co(III)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](2+) passes through a hydride-transfer RDS, whereas the conversion with [Fe(II)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+) traverses a H2-splitting RDS. More importantly, we found that the nature and barrier of the RDS likely correlate with the hydride affinity or hydricity of the dihydride intermediate [M(H)2(PP3(Ph))]((n-1)+) generated by H2-splitting. In the present contribution, following this notion we design a series of potential Fe(II) and Co(III) catalysts, for which the respective dihydride species possess differential hydricities, and computationally investigated their reactivity toward CO2 hydrogenation. Our results reveal that lowering the hydrictiy of [Co(III)(H)2(PP3(Ph))](+) by introducing anionic anchors in PP3(Ph) dramatically decreases the hydride-transfer RDS barrier, as shown for the enhanced reactivity of [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))](+) and [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))](+) (CP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)methyl, SiP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)silyl), while the same ligand modification increases the H2-splitting RDS barriers for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))] and [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))] relative to that for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+). Conversely, upon increasing the hydricity of [Fe(II)(H)2(PP3(Ph))] by adding an electron-withdrawing group to PP3(Ph), the transformation with [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(PhNO2))](+) (PP3(PhNO2) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)-4-nitrophenyl)phosphine) is predicted to encounter a lower barrier for H2-splitting and a higher barrier for

  10. Comparative study of the synthesis of layered transition metal molybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.; Gomez-Aviles, A.; Gardner, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-01-15

    Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) prepared by the mild thermal decomposition of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. In this study, we investigate the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs (T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates (LTMs) possessing the general formula AT{sub 2}(OH)(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O, where A=NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Na{sup +} or K{sup +}. The phase selectivity of the reaction was studied with respect to the source of molybdate, the ratio of T to Mo and the reaction pH. LTMs were obtained on reaction of Cu-Al and Zn-Al containing MMOs with aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate. Rehydration of these oxides in the presence of sodium or potassium molybdate yielded a rehydrated LDH phase as the only crystalline product. The LTM products obtained by the rehydration of MMO precursors were compared with LTMs prepared by direct precipitation from the metal salts in order to study the influence of preparative route on their chemical and physical properties. Differences were noted in the composition, morphology and thermal properties of the resulting products. - Graphical abstract: Mixed metal oxides (MMOs) derived from layered double hydroxide precursors differ in their reactivity on exposure to aqueous molybdate containing solutions. We investigate the influence of the molybdate source, the rehydration pH and the ratio of T/Mo on the reactivity of some T-Al containing MMOs (T=Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) towards the formation of layered transition metal molybdates of general formula AT{sub 2}(OH)(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (where A{sup +}=NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +} or Na{sup +}).

  11. Redox noninnocence of nitrosoarene ligands in transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Neil C; Labios, Liezel A; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Figueroa, Joshua S; Wieghardt, Karl

    2011-06-20

    Studies on the coordination of nitrosoarene (ArNO) ligands to late-transition metals are used to provide the first definition of the geometric, spectroscopic, and computational parameters associated with a PhNO electron-transfer series. Experimentally, the Pd complexes PdCl(2)(PhNO)(2), PdL(2)(PhNO)(2), and PdL(2)(TolNO) (L = CNAr(Dipp2); Ar(Dipp2) = 2,6-(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))(2)-C(6)H(3)) are characterized as containing (PhNO)(0), (PhNO)(•1-), and (TolNO)(2-) ligands, respectively, and the structural and spectroscopic changes associated with this electron transfer series provide the basis for an extensive computational study of these and related ArNO-containing late-transition metal complexes. Most notable from the results is the unambiguous characterization of the ground state electronic structure of PdL(2)(PhNO)(2), found to be the first isolable, transition metal ion complex containing an η(1)-N-bound π-nitrosoarene radical anion. In addition to the electron transfer series, the synthesis and characterization of the Fe complex [Fe(TIM)(NCCH(3))(PhNO)][(PF(6))(2)] (TIM = 2,3,9,10-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-1,3,8,10-tetraene) allows for comparison of the geometric and spectroscopic features associated with metal-to-ligand π-backbonding as opposed to (PhNO)(•1-) formation. Throughout these series of complexes, the N-O, M-N, and C-N bond distances as well as the N-O stretching frequencies and the planarity of the ArNO ligands provided distinct parameters for each ligand oxidation state. Together, these data provide a delineation of the factors needed for evaluating the oxidation state of nitrosoarene ligands bound to transition metals in varying coordination modes.

  12. Heterobimetallic coordination polymers involving 3d metal complexes and heavier transition metals cyanometallates

    SciTech Connect

    Peresypkina, Eugenia V.; Samsonenko, Denis G.; Vostrikova, Kira E.

    2015-04-15

    The results of the first steps in the design of coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates of heavier d transitions metals are presented. The 2D structure of the coordination polymers: [(Mn(acacen)){sub 2}Ru(NO)(CN){sub 5}]{sub n} and two complexes composed of different cyanorhenates, [Ni(cyclam)]{sub 2}[ReO(OH)(CN){sub 4}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.25} and [Cu(cyclam)]{sub 2}[Re(CN){sub 7}](H{sub 2}O){sub 12}, was confirmed by single crystal XRD study, the rhenium oxidation state having been proved by the magnetic measurements. An amorphism of [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2} (M=Ni, Cu) polymers does not allow to define strictly their dimensionality and to model anisotropic magnetic behavior of the compounds. However, with high probability a honey-comb like layer structure could be expected for [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2} complexes, studied in this work, because such an arrangement is the most common among the bimetallic assemblies of hexa- and octacyanometallates with a ratio [M(cyclam)]/[M(CN){sub n}]=3/2. For the first time was prepared and fully characterized a precursor (n-Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}[Ru(NO)(CN){sub 5}], soluble in organic media. - Graphical abstract: The very first results in the design of 2D coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates of 4d and5d transitions metals are presented. - Highlights: • Design of coordination polymers based on penta- and heptacyanometallates. • New Ru and Re cyanide based heterobimetallic coordination complexes. • Hydrolysis and ox/red processes involving [Re(CN){sub 7}]{sup 3+} during crystallization. • High magnetic anisotropy of [M(cyclam)]{sub 3}[Re(CN){sub 7}]{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, M=Cu, Ni, complexes.

  13. Exponential Orthogonality Catastrophe at the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the orthogonality catastrophe at the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). The typical overlap F between the ground state of a Fermi liquid and the one of the same system with an added potential impurity is found to decay at the AMIT exponentially with system size L as F ˜exp (-c Lη) , where η is the power of multifractal intensity correlations. Thus, strong disorder typically increases the sensitivity of a system to an added impurity exponentially. We recover, on the metallic side of the transition, Anderson's result that the fidelity F decays with a power law F ˜L-q (EF) with system size L . Its power increases as the Fermi energy EF approaches the mobility edge EM as q (EF)˜[(EF-EM )/EM]-ν η , where ν is the critical exponent of the correlation length ξc. On the insulating side of the transition, F is constant for system sizes exceeding the localization length ξ . While these results are obtained for the typical fidelity F , we find that log F is widely, log normally, distributed with a width diverging at the AMIT. As a consequence, the mean value of the fidelity F converges to one at the AMIT, in strong contrast to its typical value which converges to zero exponentially fast with system size L . This counterintuitive behavior is explained as a manifestation of multifractality at the AMIT.

  14. Discovery of strain glass transition in non-metallic ferroelastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei; Xue, Dezhen; Ren, Xiaobing

    2012-02-01

    Strain glass, a glassy state of lattice strain, has been identified in alloys with shuffle being the principle order parameter and strain being the secondary order parameter. However, it is well known that many non-metallic ferroelastic systems possess long range order with tilt being the first order parameter. But the existence of the glassy state of such strain caused by tilt remains unclear. In the present study, we report that the strain glass indeed exists in the non-metallic ferroelastic material, a Sr and Nb co-doped LaAlO3 system, with randomly frozen tilt strain local order. With increasing defect concentration x in La1-xSrxAl0.95 Nb0.05O3, the martensitic transition is gradually suppressed and finally strain glass transition occurs. The glassy transition is characterized by a typical frequency dispersion of modulus, a broken of ergodicity for static strain, as well as the formation of nano-domains with R local structure. Due to the strong local barrier caused by the randomly distributed point defects, the ideal freezing temperature T0 of strain glass in this system increases with defect concentration, which can be well understood by a modified Landau free energy landscape.

  15. Method of synthesizing bulk transition metal carbide, nitride and phosphide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jae Soon; Armstrong, Beth L; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-04-21

    A method for synthesizing catalyst beads of bulk transmission metal carbides, nitrides and phosphides is provided. The method includes providing an aqueous suspension of transition metal oxide particles in a gel forming base, dropping the suspension into an aqueous solution to form a gel bead matrix, heating the bead to remove the binder, and carburizing, nitriding or phosphiding the bead to form a transition metal carbide, nitride, or phosphide catalyst bead. The method can be tuned for control of porosity, mechanical strength, and dopant content of the beads. The produced catalyst beads are catalytically active, mechanically robust, and suitable for packed-bed reactor applications. The produced catalyst beads are suitable for biomass conversion, petrochemistry, petroleum refining, electrocatalysis, and other applications.

  16. Emerging catalytic applications of transition metal oxide nanomaterials under microwave and conventional heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithambaram, Shanthakumar

    Heterogeneous transition metal oxide catalysts have advantages over homogeneous catalysts, such as easy separations and efficient recycling and minimization of metal traces in the products. Transition metal oxide nanomaterials with different properties such as shapes and particle size were synthesized by hydrothermal, solvothermal, solvent-free and by energy efficient microwave heating methods and characterized using X-Ray and microscopic techniques. The synthesized catalysts were tested for tandem reactions to form quinoxalines, oxidations of hydrocarbons to form alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, epoxidation, epoxide ring opening, and N-aryl coupling reactions. The kinetics and energy consumption associated with these reactions were compared for both microwave and conventionally heated reactions. Further, Synchrotron radiation-based time-resolved XRD experiments under a wide variety of temperature and pressure conditions were conducted to study the reactions under working conditions. EXAFS and XANES data collections were performed to determine inter-atomic distances and oxidation states of the catalysts.

  17. Instability of nano- and microscale liquid metal filaments: Transition from single droplet collapse to multidroplet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, Chris A.; Mahady, Kyle; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Afkhami, Shahriar; Rack, P. D.; Kondic, L.

    2015-11-23

    We carry out experimental and numerical studies to investigate the collapse and breakup of finite size, nano- and microscale, liquid metal filaments supported on a substrate. We find the critical dimensions below which filaments do not break up but rather collapse to a single droplet. The transition from collapse to breakup can be described as a competition between two fluid dynamic phenomena: the capillary driven end retraction and the Rayleigh–Plateau type instability mechanism that drives the breakup. We focus on the unique spatial and temporal transition region between these two phenomena using patterned metallic thin film strips and pulsed-laser-induced dewetting. The experimental results are compared to an analytical model proposed by Driessen et al. and modified to include substrate interactions. Additionally, we report the results of numerical simulations based on a volume-of-fluid method to provide additional insight and highlight the importance of liquid metal resolidification, which reduces inertial effects.

  18. Laser opto-acoustic study of phase transitions in metals confined by transparent dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivochkin, A. Yu.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Karabutov, A. A.; Ksenofontov, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    First-order phase transitions in metal induced by nanosecond laser pulse are studied here. The metal surface is irradiated through a layer of transparent dielectric—an optical glass. Such confinement considerably increases the efficiency of pressure generation at the metal surface. This technique allows to obtain near-critical states of metals—with temperatures ˜104 K and pressures ˜104 atm with table-top equipment. At the same time the glass prevents the ablation plume formation—so the surface temperature can be measured using thermal radiation data. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of pressure, temperature and reflectivity was assembled based on the elaborated method of experimental research. The processes of melting of lead and boiling of mercury were studied. The onset of the phase transition process led to a considerable tightening of the pressure pulse. A substantial drop of surface reflectivity due to increase of temperature and decrease of density was observed.

  19. Giant, ultrafast optical switching based on an Insulator-to-MetalTransition in VO2 Nano-particles: Photo-activation of shape-controlledplasmons at 1.55 mu-m

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Lopez, R.; Feldman,C.; Haglund, R.; Boatner, L.A.; Haynes, T.E.

    2004-07-01

    A new generation of devices where the electronic, optical or magnetic state of a system can be controlled optically on the ultrafast timescale is one of the most compelling technological ramifications of the rapidly advancing field of strongly correlated electrons. However, for real-world applications it is also necessary to incorporate these compounds in appropriate environments (e.g. optical fibers or silicon-based electronics), to ensure compatibility with existing technologies (e.g. telecom wavelengths), room temperature operation and limited power densities. Here, we report on the study of the photo-activated optical switching in nanorods of strongly correlated VO{sub 2}. The particles are grown by ion-implantation and self-assembly within a Silica matrix or an optical fiber, operate at room temperature and can be switched between the insulating and metallic phase within less than 100 fs. The energy threshold to achieve switching corresponds to approximately 500 pJ within the core of a single mode fiber and is compatible with current diode technologies. Tailoring of the spherical/cylindrical geometry results in control of the spectral response of the system, which is dominated by the impulsive formation of a surface plasmon upon the insulator-to-metal transition. The response at the technologically important 1.55 {micro}m wavelength is in this way maximized.

  20. Screening study of mixed transition-metal oxides for use as cathodes in thermal batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1996-05-01

    Over 100 candidates were examined, including commercial materials and many that were synthesized in house. The mixed oxides were based on Ti, V, Nb, Cr, Mo, W, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu doped with other transition metals. A number of individual (single-metal) oxides were included for comparison. The candidates were tested in single cells with Li(Si) anodes and separators based on LiCl-KCl eutectic. Screening was done under constant-current conditions at current densities of 125 me/cm{sup 2} and, to a lesser extent, 50 me/cm{sup 2} at 500 C. Relative performance and limitations of the oxide cathodes are discussed.

  1. First-principles study on transition metal-doped anatase TiO2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqin; Zhang, Ruirui; Li, Jianbao; Li, Liangliang; Lin, Shiwei

    2014-01-28

    The electronic structures, formation energies, and band edge positions of anatase TiO2 doped with transition metals have been analyzed by ab initio band calculations based on the density functional theory with the planewave ultrasoft pseudopotential method. The model structures of transition metal-doped TiO2 were constructed by using the 24-atom 2 × 1 × 1 supercell of anatase TiO2 with one Ti atom replaced by a transition metal atom. The results indicate that most transition metal doping can narrow the band gap of TiO2, lead to the improvement in the photoreactivity of TiO2, and simultaneously maintain strong redox potential. Under O-rich growth condition, the preparation of Co-, Cr-, and Ni-doped TiO2 becomes relatively easy in the experiment due to their negative impurity formation energies, which suggests that these doping systems are easy to obtain and with good stability. The theoretical calculations could provide meaningful guides to develop more active photocatalysts with visible light response.

  2. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  3. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe–Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1‑x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  4. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent 'Stoner type' magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to 'Heisenberg type' in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study. PMID:27143686

  5. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  6. The far-ultraviolet spectra of transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandorfy, C.; Lussier, L. S.; Richer, G.; Goursot, A.; Pénigault, E.; Weber, J.

    1986-03-01

    The intense bands which are found beyond the d-d bands in the electronic absorption spectra of transition metal complexes are usually assigned to intra-ligand or charge transfer transitions. However, Rydberg transitions originating with either the mainly 3d or ligand orbitals are also expected to contribute in this part of the spectrum. To explore this the vapor phase electronic absorption spectra of the tri-hexafluoroacetyl-acetonate complexes of Al, Sc, V, Cr, Fe and Mn have been recorded up to about 80000 cm -1. In order to locate the Rydberg bands, quantum chemical calculations were carried out using the multiple scattering Xα MO method. Among the 4p and 4f type Rydberg bands there are several which are spin, Laporte, symmetry and angular momentum allowed and are expected to contribute strongly to the intensity observed in the ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. The corresponding Rydberg states can mix, however, with valence-shell states of the same symmetry. The far-ultraviolet spectra of three sandwich compounds: bicyclopentadienyl Fe, Co and Ni were also determined. Due to the very low ionization potentials of these compunds, Rydberg transitions can contribute to the observed bands at rather low frequencies.

  7. Selective electrochemical reactivity of rutile VO2 towards the suppression of metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Horrocks, Gregory; Kilcoyne, Colin; Marley, Peter M.; Stabile, Adam A.; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Zhang, Peihong; Sambandamurthy, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate through electrolyte gating measurements of a single nanobeam that the rultile phase of VO2 is electrochemically more reactive than the monoclinic phase. Our results show that the complete suppression of the metal-insulator transition and stabilization of the metallic phase is possible when gate voltage is applied in the rutile metallic phase. The results are discussed based on the formation of oxygen vacancies wherein accommodation of a high concentration of vacancies in the rutile phase selectively stabilizes it by disrupting dimerization of adjacent V-V pairs required for a transition to the monoclinic phase. The creation of oxygen vacancies is proposed to proceed through the oxidation of the electrolyte. Raman spectroscopy data suggest surface metallization upon electrolyte gating with an initial coexistence of insulating monoclinic and metallic domains. The selective electrochemical reactivity of the rutile phase and the resulting defect-induced stabilization of this phase across a vastly expanded temperature window suggest a facile defect engineering route to tune electronic phase transitions.

  8. Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosh, R. C.; Das, Ramprosad; Sen, Sumon C.; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals has been investigated using an expression obtained from the hard-sphere (HS) theory of liquid. The expression is developed from the Mayer's extended surface tension formula [Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 380 (2013) 42-47]. For interionic interaction in metals, Brettonet-Silbert (BS) pseudopotentials and embedded atom method (EAM) potentials have been used. The liquid structure is described by the variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory. The essential ingredient of the expression is the temperature dependent effective HS diameter (or packing fraction), which is calculated from the aforementioned potentials together with the VMHNC theory. The obtained results for the surface entropy using the effective HS diameter are found to be good in agreement with the available experimental as well as other theoretical values.

  9. Abundant topological states in silicene with transition metal adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Yang, Zhongqin

    2013-10-01

    Electronic and topological properties of silicene adsorbed with 4d transition metal (TM) atoms are investigated by using ab initio methods together with tight-binding models. All six kinds of TM adatoms (Y to Ru) we studied prefer hollow sites of silicene. The interplay of TM-induced exchange interactions, spin-orbit coupling, and staggered AB-sublattice potential triggers abundant topological states, including quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) states, valley Hall states, and valley-polarized metallic states. Particularly, QAH states with different Chern numbers are obtained, which is -2 in the Nb/Ru doped system and 1 in the Y doped system. Our results indicate that great potential for information processing applications exists in these systems of silicene adsorbed with TM atoms.

  10. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  11. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  12. The photochemistry of transition metal complexes using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Garino, Claudio; Salassa, Luca

    2013-07-28

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) to study the photochemistry of metal complexes is becoming increasingly important among chemists. Computational methods provide unique information on the electronic nature of excited states and their atomic structure, integrating spectroscopy observations on transient species and excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, we present an overview on photochemically active transition metal complexes investigated by DFT. In particular, we discuss a representative range of systems studied up to now, which include CO- and NO-releasing inorganic and organometallic complexes, haem and haem-like complexes dissociating small diatomic molecules, photoactive anti-cancer Pt and Ru complexes, Ru polypyridyls and diphosphino Pt derivatives.

  13. Thermochemistry and Reactivity of Transition Metal Cluster Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armentrout, P. B.; Griffin, J. B.; Conceićão, J.

    Reactions of transition metal cluster cations with several small molecules have been examined using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. This technique allows the kinetic energy dependence of the reactions to be measured, thereby allowing thermodynamic information to be extracted. Reactions of iron, chromium, and vanadium clusters with D2, O2, and CO2 are described. Reactions with D2 are endothermic and yield only two types of products. Oxidation of metal clusters by O2 proceeds is very efficient, proceeding at the collision limit, and forms many different products. The CO2 systems exhibit interesting dynamics that appears to be related to interactions of two surfaces of different spin. Bond energies for cluster monodeuterides, monoxides, and dioxides are derived from these studies. The deuteride bond energies appear to be sensitive to the cluster geometry while little variation in oxide bond energies is observed as a function of cluster size. Comparison of these cluster bond energies to bulk phase values finds similar thermochemistry.

  14. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  15. Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2000-05-02

    Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

  16. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    DOE PAGES

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promising novel applications in activemore » nanophotonics.« less

  17. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promising novel applications in active nanophotonics.

  18. Ising superconductivity and Majorana fermions in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Benjamin T.; Yuan, Noah F. Q.; Jiang, Hong-Liang; Law, K. T.

    2016-05-01

    In monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), electrons in opposite K valleys are subject to opposite effective Zeeman fields, which are referred to as Ising spin-orbit coupling (SOC) fields. The Ising SOC, originating from in-plane mirror symmetry breaking, pins the electron spins to the out-of-plane directions, and results in Ising superconducting states with strongly enhanced upper critical fields. Here, we show that the Ising SOC generates equal-spin-triplet Cooper pairs with spin polarized in the in-plane directions. Importantly, the spin-triplet Cooper pairs can induce superconducting pairings in a half-metal wire placed on top of the TMD and result in a topological superconductor with Majorana end states. Direct ways to detect equal-spin triplet Cooper pairs and the differences between Ising superconductors and Rashba superconductors are discussed.

  19. Dirac cones in transition metal doped boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Cao, Xuewei; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu

    2015-05-07

    The transition metal (TM) doped zinc blende boron nitride (c-BN) is studied by using the first principle calculation. TM atoms fill in the interstitials in c-BN and form two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The generalized gradient approximation and projector augmented wave method are used. The calculated density of states and band structures show that d electrons of TM atoms form impurity bands in the gap of c-BN. When the TM-BN system is in ferromagnetic or non-magnetic state, Dirac cones emerge at the K point in Brillouin zone. When TM is Ti and Co, the Dirac cones are spin polarized and very close to the Fermi level, which makes them promising candidates of Dirac half-metal [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)]. While TM is Ni and Cu, the system is non-magnetic and Dirac cones located above the Fermi level.

  20. Dirac cones in transition metal doped boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Min; Shao, Bin; Cao, Xuewei; Zuo, Xu

    2015-05-01

    The transition metal (TM) doped zinc blende boron nitride (c-BN) is studied by using the first principle calculation. TM atoms fill in the interstitials in c-BN and form two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The generalized gradient approximation and projector augmented wave method are used. The calculated density of states and band structures show that d electrons of TM atoms form impurity bands in the gap of c-BN. When the TM-BN system is in ferromagnetic or non-magnetic state, Dirac cones emerge at the K point in Brillouin zone. When TM is Ti and Co, the Dirac cones are spin polarized and very close to the Fermi level, which makes them promising candidates of Dirac half-metal [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)]. While TM is Ni and Cu, the system is non-magnetic and Dirac cones located above the Fermi level.

  1. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R; Mascareñas, José L

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  2. Doping dependent plasmon dispersion in 2 H -transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eric; Büchner, Bernd; Habenicht, Carsten; König, Andreas; Knupfer, Martin; Berger, Helmuth; Huotari, Simo

    2016-07-01

    We report the behavior of the charge carrier plasmon of 2 H -transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as a function of intercalation with alkali metals. Intercalation and concurrent doping of the TMD layers have a substantial impact on plasmon energy and dispersion. While the plasmon energy shifts are related to the intercalation level as expected within a simple homogeneous electron gas picture, the plasmon dispersion changes in a peculiar manner independent of the intercalant and the TMD materials. Starting from a negative dispersion, the slope of the plasmon dispersion changes sign and grows monotonously upon doping. Quantitatively, the increase of this slope depends on the orbital character (4 d or 5 d ) of the conduction bands, which indicates a decisive role of band structure effects on the plasmon behavior.

  3. A simple, general route to 2-pyridylidene transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Roselló-Merino, Marta; Díez, Josefina; Conejero, Salvador

    2010-12-28

    Pyridinium 2-carboxylates decompose thermally in the presence of a variety of late transition metal precursors to yield the corresponding 2-pyridylidene-like complexes. The mild reaction conditions and structural diversity that can be generated in the heterocyclic ring make this method an attractive alternative for the synthesis of 2-pyridylidene complexes. IR spectra of the Ir(i) carbonyl compounds [IrCl(NHC)(CO)(2)] indicate that these N-heterocyclic carbene ligands are among the strongest σ-electron donors.

  4. Exploring Transition Metal Catalyzed Reactions via AB Initio Reaction Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hratchian, Hrant P.

    2011-06-01

    The study and prediction of chemical reactivity is one of the most influential contributions of quantum chemistry. A central concept in the theoretical treatment of chemical reactions is the reaction pathway, which can be quite difficult to integrate accurately and efficiently. This talk will outline our developments in the integration of these pathways on ab initio potential energy surfaces. We will also describe results from recent studies on the kinetics of transition metal catalyzed reactions, including the importance of vibrational coupling to the reaction coordinate and the role of this coupling in catalytic rate enhancement.

  5. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  6. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  7. Functionalization of Two-Dimensional Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; McDonald, Aidan R

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are a fascinating class of nanomaterials that have the potential for application in catalysis, electronics, photonics, energy storage, and sensing. TMDs are rather inert, and thus pose problems for chemical derivatization. However, to further modify the properties of TMDs and fully harness their capabilities, routes towards their chemical functionalization must be identified. Herein, recent efforts toward the chemical (bond-forming) functionalization of 2D TMDs are critically reviewed. Recent successes are highlighted, along with areas where further detailed analyses and experimentation are required. This burgeoning field is very much in its infancy but has already provided several important breakthroughs. PMID:26848815

  8. Metal-insulator transition by holographic charge density waves.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yi; Niu, Chao; Wu, Jian-Pin; Xian, Zhuo-Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-08-29

    We construct a gravity dual for charge density waves (CDWs) in which the translational symmetry along one spatial direction is spontaneously broken. Our linear perturbation calculation on the gravity side produces the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity, which exhibits the two familiar features of CDWs, namely, the pinned collective mode and gapped single-particle excitation. These two features indicate that our gravity dual also provides a new mechanism to implement the metal to insulator phase transition by CDWs, which is further confirmed by the fact that dc conductivity decreases with the decreased temperature below the critical temperature. PMID:25215974

  9. Ideal tensile strength of B2 transition-metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal tensile strengths of the B2 -type (CsCl) transition-metal aluminides FeAl , CoAl , and NiAl have been investigated using an ab initio electronic structure total energy method. The three materials exhibit dissimilar mechanical behaviors under the simulated ideal tensile tests along [001], [110], and [111] directions. FeAl is weakest in tension along [001] whereas CoAl and NiAl are strongest in the same direction. The weakness of FeAl along [001] direction is attributed to the instability introduced by the filling of antibonding d states.

  10. Theoretical study of electron correlation effects in transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, G. P.; Jaffe, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Introduction of partially localized orbitals is shown to reduce the number of terms needed to describe the bonding in transition metal clusters. Using this formalism, it is possible to compute the various intra- and inter-atomic electron correlation contributions to the bond energy. Calculations demonstrate the relative importance of several kinds of electron correlation terms involving the 3p, 3d, and 4s electrons. Improved interaction potentials are obtained for the dimers V(2) and Cr(2) when additional correlation is added to the CAS SCF results of Walch, Bauschlicher, Roos, and Nelin (1983).

  11. Metal-insulator transition by holographic charge density waves.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yi; Niu, Chao; Wu, Jian-Pin; Xian, Zhuo-Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-08-29

    We construct a gravity dual for charge density waves (CDWs) in which the translational symmetry along one spatial direction is spontaneously broken. Our linear perturbation calculation on the gravity side produces the frequency dependence of the optical conductivity, which exhibits the two familiar features of CDWs, namely, the pinned collective mode and gapped single-particle excitation. These two features indicate that our gravity dual also provides a new mechanism to implement the metal to insulator phase transition by CDWs, which is further confirmed by the fact that dc conductivity decreases with the decreased temperature below the critical temperature.

  12. Band engineering in transition metal dichalcogenides: Stacked versus lateral heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2016-06-01

    We calculate a large difference in the band alignments for transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterojunctions when arranged in the stacked layer or lateral (in-plane) geometries, using direct supercell calculations. The stacked case follows the unpinned limit of the electron affinity rule, whereas the lateral geometry follows the strongly pinned limit of alignment of charge neutrality levels. TMDs therefore provide one of the few clear tests of band alignment models, whereas three-dimensional semiconductors give less stringent tests because of accidental chemical trends in their properties.

  13. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of Lithium Transition Metal Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashambhoy, Ayesha Maria

    The lithium ion battery has emerged as one of the most promising hybrid vehicle energy storage systems of the future. Of the potential cathode chemistries explored, lithium transition metal phosphates have generated a significant amount of interest due to their low-cost precursors, potential ease of synthesis, stability, and their environmentally friendly nature. This is in contrast to layered oxide systems such as LiCoO2, which have long been considered state of the art, but are now being reevaluated due to their structural instability at elevated temperatures, and higher cost. In particular, LiFePO4 has an operating potential comparable to those batteries available on the market (˜3.5V vs. Li/Li+), and higher theoretical specific capacity (170mAh/g vs. that of LiCoO2 which is 140mAh/g). The manganese analog to LiFePO4, LiMnPO4, exhibits a higher operating potential (˜4.1V v Li/Li+), and the same theoretical capacity, however Li-ion diffusion through this structure is much more rate limited and its theoretical capacity cannot be realized at rates suitable for commercial applications. The purpose of this work was threefold: 1) To explore the impact of Fe substitution on Mn sites in LiMnPO 4. 2) To examine the effects of alterations to the particle/electrolyte interface on rate capability. 3) To explore a novel fabrication route for LiMnPO4 using microwaves, and determine an optimal power and time combination for best performance. The coexistence of Fe and Mn on the transition metal site M, of LiMPO 4 resulted in an improved apparent Li-ion diffusivity in both Fe and Mn regimes as compared to that observed for LiFePO4 and LiMnPO 4 respectively. Calculations made from two different analysis methods, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic intermittent titration (GITT) drew this same conclusion. The signature characteristics observed from the CVs pertaining to single and dual phase reactions led to a delithiation model of LiFe0.5Mn0.5PO4 proposing the localization

  14. Autocatalytic dissociation of water at stepped transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekoez, Rengin; Woerner, Swenja; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Donadio, Davide

    2014-03-01

    By means of density functional theory calculations, we investigate the adsorption and dissociation of water clusters on flat and stepped surfaces of several transition metals: Rh, Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ru. We find that water binds preferentially to the edge of the steps than to terrace sites, so that isolated clusters or one-dimensional water wires can be isolated by differential desorption. The enhanced reactivity of metal atoms at the step edge and the cooperative effect of hydrogen bonding enhance the chances of partial dissociation of water clusters on stepped surfaces. For example, water dissociation on Pt and Ir surface turns from endothermic at terraces to exothermic at steps. The interpretation of water dissociation is achieved by analyzing changes in the electronic structure of both water and metals, especially focusing on the interaction between the lone-pair electrons of water and the d-band of the metals. The shift in the energetics of water dissociation at steps is expected to play a prominent role in catalysis and fuel cells reactions, as the density of steps at surfaces could be an additional parameter to design more efficient anode materials or catalytic substrates.

  15. He-He and He-metal interactions in transition metals from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengbo; Zou, Tingting; Zhao, Jijun

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the atomistic mechanism of He-He and He-metal interactions in bcc transition metals (V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Fe) using first-principles methods. We calculated formation energy and binding energy of He-He pair as function of distance within the host lattices. The strengths of He-He attraction in Cr, Mo, W, and Fe (0.37-1.11 eV) are significantly stronger than those in V, Nb, and Ta (0.06-0.17 eV). Such strong attractions mean that He atoms would spontaneously aggregate inside perfect Cr, Mo, W, and Fe host lattices in absence of defects like vacancies. The most stable configuration of He-He pair is <100> dumbbell in groups VB metals, whereas it adopts close <110> configuration in Cr, Mo, and Fe, and close <111> configuration in W. Overall speaking, the He-He equilibrium distances of 1.51-1.55 Å in the group VIB metals are shorter than 1.65-1.70 Å in the group VB metals. Moreover, the presence of interstitial He significantly facilitates vacancy formation and this effect is more pronounced in the group VIB metals. The present calculations help understand the He-metal/He-He interaction mechanism and make a prediction that He is easier to form He cluster and bubbles in the groups VIB metals and Fe.

  16. Tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)methane-based heterobimetallic complexes that contain Zn - and Cd - transition-metal bonds: synthesis, structures, and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jens; González-Gallardo, Sandra; Hohnstein, Silvia; Garnier, Delphine; Armbruster, Markus K; Fink, Karin; Klopper, Wim; Breher, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Reactions of the tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)methanide amido complexes [M'{C(3,5-Me2 pz)3 }{N(SiMe3 )2 }] (M'=Mg (1 a), Zn (1 b), Cd (1 c); 3,5-Me2 pz=3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl) with two equivalents of the acidic Group 6 cyclopentadienyl (Cp) tricarbonyl hydrides [MCp(CO)3 H] (M=Cr (2 a), Mo (2 b)) gave different types of heterobimetallic complex. In each case, two reactions took place, namely the conversion of the tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)methanide ligand (Tpmd*) into the -methane derivative (Tpm*) and the reaction of the acidic hydride M = H bond with the M' = N(SiMe3 )2 moiety. The latter produces HN(SiMe3 )2 as a byproduct. The Group 2 representatives [Mg(Tpm*){MCp(CO)3 }2 (thf)] (3 a/b) form isocarbonyl bridges between the magnesium and chromium/molybdenum centres, whereas direct metal-metal bonds are formed in the case of the ions [Zn(Tpm*){MCp(CO)3 }](+) (4 a/b; [MCp(CO)3 ](-) as the counteranion) and [Cd(Tpm*){MCp(CO)3 }(thf)](+) (5 a/b; [Cd{MCp(CO)3 }3 ](-) as the counteranion). Complexes 4 a and 5 a/b are the first complexes that contain Zn - Cr, Cd - Cr, and Cd - Mo bonds (bond lengths 251.6, 269.8, and 278.9 pm, respectively). Quantum chemical calculations on 4 a/b* (and also on 5 a/b*) provide evidence for an interaction between the metal atoms.

  17. Half-metallic exchange bias ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfaces in transition-metal chalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kohji; Kato, Yoshinori; Akiyama, Toru; Ito, Tomonori; Freeman, A J

    2006-02-01

    To investigate half-metallic exchange bias interfaces, magnetic structures at ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) interfaces in the zinc blende transition-metal chalcogenides, and with compensated and uncompensated AFM interfaces, were determined by the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. With the uncompensated AFM interface, an antiparallel alignment of the Cr and Mn moments induces an excellent half-metallicity. More striking still, in the compensated AFM interface the Cr moments in the FM layer lie perpendicular to the Mn moments in the AFM layer but the Mn moments strongly cant to induce a net moment so as to retain the half-metallicity. These findings may offer a key ingredient for exchange biased spintronic devices with 100% spin polarization, having a unidirectional anisotropy to control and manipulate spins at the nanoscale.

  18. Quinoxaline based bio-active mixed ligand transition metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical, antimicrobial, DNA binding, cleavage, antioxidant and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraj, C Justin; Johnson, Jijo

    2015-10-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized from N(2), N(3)-bis(4-nitrophenyl)quinoxaline-2,3-diamine and 1,10-phenanthroline. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis., (1)H NMR, mass and ESR spectra. Octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complex. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. Grain size and surface morphologies of the complexes were determined by powder XRD and SEM analyses. The mixed ligand metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity against bacterial species Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus; fungal species Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans by disc diffusion method. The DNA binding and DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were determined using electronic absorption titration and agarose gel electrophoresis respectively. The superoxide radical scavenging and free radical scavenging activities of the Cu(II) complex was also evaluated. Molecular docking studies of the synthesized mixed ligand metal complexes were carried out against B-DNA dodecamer and the protein Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pf DHFR).

  19. Transition metal oxide as anode interface buffer for impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Tang, Chao; Wang, Xu-Liang; Zhai, Wen-Juan; Liu, Rui-Lan; Rong, Zhou; Pang, Zong-Qiang; Jiang, Bing; Fan, Qu-Li; Huang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is a strong method in electric measurement, which also shows powerful function in research of carrier dynamics in organic semiconductors when suitable mathematical physical models are used. Apart from this, another requirement is that the contact interface between the electrode and materials should at least be quasi-ohmic contact. So in this report, three different transitional metal oxides, V2O5, MoO3 and WO3 were used as hole injection buffer for interface of ITO/NPB. Through the impedance spectroscopy and PSO algorithm, the carrier mobilities and I-V characteristics of the NPB in different devices were measured. Then the data curves were compared with the single layer device without the interface layer in order to investigate the influence of transitional metal oxides on the carrier mobility. The careful research showed that when the work function (WF) of the buffer material was just between the work function of anode and the HOMO of the organic material, such interface material could work as a good bridge for carrier injection. Under such condition, the carrier mobility measured through impedance spectroscopy should be close to the intrinsic value. Considering that the HOMO (or LUMO) of most organic semiconductors did not match with the work function of the electrode, this report also provides a method for wide application of impedance spectroscopy to the research of carrier dynamics.

  20. Wannier function analysis of charge states in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren

    2015-03-01

    The charge (or oxidation) state of a cation has been a crucial concept in analyzing the electronic and magnetic properties of oxides as well as interpreting ``charge ordering'' metal-insulator transitions. In recent years a few methods have been proposed for the objective identification of charge states, beyond the conventional (and occasionally subjective) use of projected densities of states, weighted band structures (fatbands), and Born effective charges. In the past two decades Wannier functions (WFs) and particularly maximally localized WFs (MLWFs), have become an indispensable tool for several different purposes in electronic structure studies. These developments have motivated us to explore the charge state picture from the perspective of MLWFs. We will illustrate with a few transition metal oxide examples such as AgO and YNiO3 that the shape, extent, and location of the charge centers of the MLWFs provide insights into how cation-oxygen hybridization determines chemical bonding, charge distribution, and ``charge ordering.'' DOE DE-FG02-04ER46111.

  1. Synchrotron ultrafast techniques for photoactive transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Borfecchia, Elisa; Garino, Claudio; Salassa, Luca; Lamberti, Carlo

    2013-07-28

    In the last decade, the use of time-resolved X-ray techniques has revealed the structure of light-generated transient species for a wide range of samples, from small organic molecules to proteins. Time resolutions of the order of 100 ps are typically reached, allowing one to monitor thermally equilibrated excited states and capture their structure as a function of time. This review aims at providing a general overview of the application of time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TR-XSS) and time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS), the two techniques prevalently employed in the investigation of light-triggered structural changes of transition metal complexes. In particular, we herein describe the fundamental physical principles for static XSS and XAS and illustrate the theory of time-resolved XSS and XAS together with data acquisition and analysis strategies. Selected pioneering examples of photoactive transition metal complexes studied by TR-XSS and TR-XAS are discussed in depth.

  2. Altered transition metal homeostasis in the cuprizone model of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Nataliya; Al-Ebraheem, Alia; Lobo, Lianne; Park, Raina; Farquharson, Michael J; Bock, Nicholas A

    2015-05-01

    In the cuprizone model of demyelination, the neurotoxin cuprizone is fed to mice to induce a reproducible pattern of demyelination in the brain. Cuprizone is a copper chelator and it has been hypothesized that it induces a copper deficiency in the brain, which leads to demyelination. To test this hypothesis and investigate the possible role of other transition metals in the model, we fed C57Bl/6 mice a standard dose of cuprizone (0.2% dry chemical to dry food weight) for 6 weeks then measured levels of copper, manganese, iron, and zinc in regions of the brain and visceral organs. As expected, this treatment induced demyelination in the mice. We found, however, that while the treatment significantly reduced copper concentrations in the blood and liver in treated animals, there was no significant difference in concentrations in brain regions relative to control. Interestingly, cuprizone disrupted concentrations of the other transition metals in the visceral organs, with the most notable changes being decreased manganese and increased iron in the liver. In the brain, manganese concentrations were also significantly reduced in the cerebellum and striatum. These data suggest a possible role of manganese deficiency in the brain in the cuprizone model. PMID:25749275

  3. Properties of binary transition-metal arsenides (TAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saparov, Bayrammurad; Mitchell, Jonathan E.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2012-08-01

    We present thermodynamic and transport properties of transition-metal (T) arsenides, TAs, with T = Sc to Ni (3d), Zr, Nb, Ru (4d), Hf and Ta (5d). Characterization of these binaries is carried out with powder x-ray diffraction, temperature- and field-dependent magnetization and resistivity, temperature-dependent heat capacity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity. All binaries show metallic behavior except TaAs and RuAs. TaAs, NbAs, ScAs and ZrAs are diamagnetic, while CoAs, VAs, TiAs, NiAs and RuAs show approximately Pauli paramagnetic behavior. FeAs and CrAs undergo antiferromagnetic ordering below TN ≈ 71 K and TN ≈ 260 K, respectively. MnAs is a ferromagnet below TC ≈ 317 K and undergoes hexagonal-orthorhombic-hexagonal transitions at TS ≈ 317 K and 384 K, respectively. For TAs, Seebeck coefficients vary between + 40 and - 40 μV K-1 in the 2-300 K range, whereas thermal conductivity values stay below 18 W m-1 K-1. The Sommerfeld coefficients γ are less than 10 mJ K-2 mol-1. At room temperature with application of 8 T magnetic field, large positive magnetoresistance is found for TaAs (˜25%), MnAs (˜90%) and NbAs (˜75%).

  4. Nanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    Lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and photovoltaic devices have been widely considered as the three major promising alternatives of fossil fuels facing upcoming depletion to power the 21th century. The conventional film configuration of electrochemical electrodes hardly fulfills the high energy and efficiency requirements because heavy electroactive material deposition restricts ion diffusion path, and lowers power density and fault tolerance. In this thesis, I demonstrate that novel nanoarchitectured transition metal oxides (TMOs), e.g. MnO2, V2O 5, and ZnO, and their relevant nanocomposites were designed, fabricated and assembled into devices to deliver superior electrochemical performances such as high energy and power densities, and rate capacity. These improvements could be attributed to the significant enhancement of surface area, shortened ion diffusion distances and facile penetration of electrolyte solution into open structures of networks as well as to the pseudocapacitance domination. The utilization of ForcespinningRTM, a newly developed nanofiber processing technology, for large-scale energy storage and conversion applications is emphasized. This process simplifies the tedious multi-step hybridization synthesis and facilitates the contradiction between the micro-batch production and the ease of large-scale manufacturing. Key Words: Transition metal oxides, energy storage and conversion, ForcespinningRTM, pseudocapacitance domination, high rate capacity

  5. Transition radiation in metal-metal multilayer nanostructures as a medical source of hard x-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A. L.; Kaplan, A. E.; Shkolnikov, P. L.

    2006-08-15

    We show that a periodic metal-metal multilayer nanostructure can serve as an efficient source of hard x-ray transition radiation. Our research effort is aimed at developing an x-ray source for medical applications, which is based on using low-energy relativistic electrons. The approach toward choosing radiator-spacer couples for the generation of hard x-ray resonant transition radiation by few-MeV electrons traversing solid multilayer structures for the energies of interest to medicine (30-50 keV) changes dramatically compared with that for soft x-ray radiation. We show that one of the main factors in achieving the required resonant line is the absence of the contrast of the refractive indices between the spacer and the radiator at the far wings of the radiation line; for that purpose, the optimal spacer, as a rule, should have a higher atomic number than the radiator. Having experimental goals in mind, we have considered also the unwanted effects due to bremsstrahlung radiation, absorption and scattering of radiated photons, detector-related issues, and inhibited coherence of transition radiation due to random deviation of spacing between the layers. Choosing as a model example a Mo-Ag radiator-spacer pair of materials, we demonstrate that the x-ray transition radiation line can be well resolved with the use of spatial and frequency filtering.

  6. Electron-phonon coupling and structural phase transitions in early transition metal oxides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Katie Elizabeth

    Pronounced nonlinear variation of electrical transport characteristics as a function of applied voltage, temperature, magnetic field, strain, or photo-excitation is usually underpinned by electronic instabilities that originate from the complex interplay of spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. This dissertation focuses on two canonical materials that show pronounced discontinuities in their temperature-dependent resistivity as a result of electron---phonon and electron---electron correlations: orthorhombic TaS3 and monoclinic VO2. Strong electron-phonon interactions in transition metal oxides and chalcogenides results in interesting structural and electronic phase transitions. The properties of the material can be changed drastically in response to external stimuli such as temperature, voltage, or light. Understanding the influence these interactions have on the electronic structure and ultimately transport characteristics is of utmost importance in order to take these materials from a fundamental aspect to prospective applications such as low-energy interconnects, steep-slope transistors, and synaptic neural networks. This dissertation describes synthetic routes to nanoscale TaS3 and VO2, develops mechanistic understanding of their electronic instabilities, and in the case of the latter system explores modulation of the electronic and structural phase transition via the incorporation of substitutional dopant atoms. We start in chapter 2 with a detailed study of the synthesis and electronic transport properties of TaS3, which undergoes a Peierls' distortion to form a charge density wave. Scaling this material down to the nanometer-sized regime allows for interrogation of single or discrete phase coherent domains. Using electrical transport and broad band noise measurements, the dynamics of pinning/depinning of the charge density wave is investigated. Chapter 3 provides a novel synthetic approach to produce high-edge-density MoS2 nanorods. MoS2 is a

  7. Versatile Coordination Mode of a New Pyridine-Based Ditopic Ligand with Transition Metals: From Regular Pyridine to Alkyne and Alkenyl Bindings and Indolizinium Formation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Mandon, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    The new BPMPB ligand, namely, bis[1-bis(2-pyridylmethyl),1 (pyridyl)]butyne, can be very easily obtained as a side product in the known reaction of picolyl chloride and sodium acetylide (which major product is the known terminal alkyne-substituted tripod). This symmetrical ligand contains two identical coordination sites with two methylenepyridines and one pyridyl group on each side, linked by an alkyne function providing a semirigid segment. Together with the molecular structure of the ligand which is reported, we describe the preparation of complexes with Fe(II)Cl2, Co(II)Cl2, Ni(II)Cl2, Cu(I)Cl, and Zn(II)Cl2 salts. All complexes have been characterized by X-ray diffraction studies as well as by standard spectroscopic techniques. The striking point in this work is the diversity of the structures that are obtained. Co(II) and Zn(II) provide isostructural dinuclear complexes in which both coordination sites are occupied within a tetrahedral symmetry. The Cu(I) complex is also a dinuclear compound, but in that case, the copper atom is coordinated to the alkyne moiety, two pyridines, and a bridging chloride. The (13)C NMR spectrum of the copper complex confirms that the metal center is coordinated to the alkyne in solution. The coordination of Ni(II) results in the formation of a mononuclear complex in which a pyridine has fused with the alkyne moiety to generate an indolizinium group; the structure of the corresponding alkenyl complex is reported. Finally, the addition of FeCl2 to the ligand results in the formation of a mononuclear complex with a free, noncoordinated indolizinium. The sequence developed in the present work illustrates the possibility for the metal centers to adopt various coordination modes which may be relevant to the conversion of an alkyne and a pyridyl unit into indolizinium. PMID:26200923

  8. Chaos in fermionic many-body systems and the metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, T.; Pluhar, Z.; Tithof, J.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2011-03-15

    We show that finite Fermi systems governed by a mean field and a few-body interaction generically possess spectral fluctuations of the Wigner-Dyson type and are, thus, chaotic. Our argument is based on an analogy to the metal-insulator transition. We construct a sparse random-matrix scaffolding ensemble (ScE) that mimics this transition. Our claim then follows from the fact that the generic random-matrix ensemble modeling a fermionic interacting many-body system is much less sparse than ScE.

  9. Chaos in Fermionic Many-Body Systems and the Metal Insulator Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, Thomas F; Pluhar, Z.; Tithof, J.; Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2011-01-01

    We show that finite Fermi systems governed by a mean field and a few-body interaction generically possess spectral fluctuations of the Wigner-Dyson type and are thus chaotic. Our proof is based on an analogy to the metal-insulator transition. We construct a sparse random-matrix ensemble H^{cr} that mimicks that transition. Our claim then follows from the fact that the generic random-matrix ensemble modeling a fermionic interacting many-body is much less sparse than H^{cr}.

  10. Synthesis of Transition Metal Arsenides and Arsenic Metal Sulfides and Their Role in the Dearsenation of Shale Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, G. H.; Brown, L. D.; Ryan, D. F.

    1994-04-01

    One of the chief problems in upgrading shale oil is the presence of inherent arsenic, which is known to poison downstream catalysts. Highly dispersed transition metal sulfides formed in situ from the decomposition of dithiocarbamate (DTC) complexes of transition metals show excellent potential as dearsenation agents. We have studied the reaction of these sulfides with various arsenic compositions, and characterized the metal arsenides and arsenic metal sulfides formed as well as the ease of their formation. Thus, the reaction of bis(butyldithiocarbamato)Ni, (NiBuDTC), with model compounds was very facile and gave NiAs, NiAsS, and NiAs 2- xS x. In general the effectiveness of the sulfides for dearsenation followed the sequence Ni > Mo ≫ Co, while iron sulfides were totally ineffective. Based upon these results, tests where run in autoclaves (as well as a fixed-bed flow-through unit) with Ni BuDTC and shale oil having 73 ppm inherent As. Under optimum conditions, dearsenation down to less than 1 ppm was obtained.

  11. Phase coexistence and metal-insulator transition in few-layer phosphorene: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David

    2014-07-25

    Based on ab initio density functional calculations, we propose γ-P and δ-P as two additional stable structural phases of layered phosphorus besides the layered α-P (black) and β-P (blue) phosphorus allotropes. Monolayers of some of these allotropes have a wide band gap, whereas others, including γ-P, show a metal-insulator transition caused by in-layer strain or changing the number of layers. An unforeseen benefit is the possibility to connect different structural phases at no energy cost. This becomes particularly valuable in assembling heterostructures with well-defined metallic and semiconducting regions in one contiguous layer.

  12. Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanomaterials for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoshe, Dinsefa M.; Jeon, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Soo Young; Jang, Ho Won

    2015-05-01

    Recently, 2-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have received great attention for solar water splitting and electrocatalysis. In addition to their wide variety of electronic and microstructural properties, their promising catalytic activities for hydrogen production make 2D TMDs as earth-abundant and inexpensive catalysts that can replace noble metals. This paper reviews the electronic, structural, and optical properties of 2D TMDs. We highlight the various synthetic methods for 2D TMDs and their applications in hydrogen evolution based on photoelectrochemical and electrocatalytic cells. We also discuss perspectives and challenges of 2D TMDs for hydrogen production and artificial photosynthesis.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. High pressure behavior of 3d transition metal carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G. A.; Wang, S.; Boulard, E.; Mao, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of carbon-rich phases in Earth's lower mantle is critical for modeling the global carbon cycle since the lower mantle may be the major repository for carbon in our planet. We were interested in the behavior of carbonates containing 3d transition metals, which can exhibit unusual properties at extreme conditions. Thus, we studied siderite (FeCO3) and rhodochrosite (MnCO3) at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell coupled with Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy. In siderite we observed a high to low spin transition and associated volume collapse at approximately 46 GPa which is consistent with previous reports. Our Raman data show that the C-O bonds soften when the Fe2+ volume collapses (Farfan et al, 2012). In contrast, our XES results indicate that the Mn2+ in rhodochrosite does not undergo a spin transition like siderite up to 50 GPa. We observed a new Raman peak emerging above 48 GPa, which is a similar pressure at which a new structure was found in a previous XRD study.

  14. Quantum capacitance in thin film vanadium dioxide metal insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhe; Knighton, Talbot; Tarquini, Vinicio; Torres, David; Wang, Tongyu; Sepulveda, Nelson; Huang, Jian

    We present capacitance measurements of the electronic density of states performed in high quality vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films on sapphire (Al2O3) substrate. These films show the expected metal insulator transition near 60 °C with resistivity changing by 3 orders of magnitude with a hysteresis of 10 °C. To make a capacitive probe, a gate is suspended above the film surface using a flip-chip method with microfabricated supports. The geometric capacitance per-area reached is 40 pF/mm2. Such a large capacitance can be significantly modified by electron interaction and band charging/discharging which appear as an extra term known as the quantum capacitance (Cq). An AC signal applied to the gate allows measurement of the changing density of states (DOS) across the MIT. The DOS abruptly increases as the sample is heated through the transition point. Conversely the low temperature drop of d μ / d n is consistent with an energy gap opening in the insulating phase. These parameters shed light on the transition mechanism. NSF DMR-1105183, NSF ECCS 1306311.

  15. Polynuclear transition metal complexes with thiocarbohydrazide and dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, K. S.; Khan, Sadaf; Nami, Shahab A. A.; El-ajaily, M. M.

    2007-07-01

    Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 was prepared from the precursor Sn(tch) 2 and MCl 2. It was subsequently allowed to react with diethyldithiocarbamate which yielded the trinuclear complexes of the type Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4}, where tch = thiocarbohydrazide, M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and dtc = diethyldithiocarbamate. They were characterized on the basis of microanalytical, thermal (TGA/DSC), spectral (IR, UV-vis, EPR, 1H NMR) studies, conductivity measurement and magnetic moment data. On the basis of spectral data a tetrahedral geometry has been proposed for the halide complexes, Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 except for Cu(II) which exhibits a square planar coordination although the transition metal ion in Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4} achieves an octahedral geometry where the dithiocarbamato moiety acts as a symmetrical bidentate ligand. The bidentate nature has been established by the appearance of a sharp single ν(C-S) around 1000 cm -1. A downfield shift observed in NH a and NH b protons on moving from Sn(tch) 2 to Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 is due to the drift of electrons toward metal atoms. A two-step pyrolysis has been observed in the Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 complexes while their dithiocarbamato derivatives exhibit a three-stage degradation pattern. Finally, the in vitro antibacterial activity of Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4} and the mononuclear Sn(tch) 2 has been carried out on bacterial strains Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. The compounds were found to be active against the test organisms. The activity of the complexes is enhanced with increasing concentration. The maximum activity in both the strains was achieved by cobalt(II) dithiocarbamate complex. Minimum activity was found for Sn(tch) 2 which generally increases with the introduction of transition metal ion in the complex.

  16. Broadband terahertz generation using the semiconductor-metal transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charipar, Nicholas A.; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott A.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of broadband terahertz emitters based on the semiconductor-metal transition in thin film VO2 (vanadium dioxide). With the appropriate geometry, picosecond electrical pulses are generated by illuminating 120 nm thick VO2 with 280 fs pulses from a femtosecond laser. These ultrafast electrical pulses are used to drive a simple dipole antenna, generating broadband terahertz radiation.

  17. Photo- and electrocatalytic H2 production by new first-row transition-metal complexes based on an aminopyridine pentadentate ligand.

    PubMed

    Call, Arnau; Codolà, Zoel; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2014-05-12

    The synthesis and characterisation of the pentadentate ligand 1,4-di(picolyl)-7-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Py2(Ts)tacn) and their metal complexes of general formula [M(CF3SO3)(Py2(Ts)tacn)][CF3SO3], (M = Fe (1Fe), Co (1Co) and Ni (1Ni)) are reported. Complex 1Co presents excellent H2 photoproduction catalytic activity when using [Ir(ppy)2(bpy)]PF6 (PSIr) as photosensitiser (PS) and Et3N as electron donor, but 1Ni and 1Fe result in a low activity and a complete lack of it, respectively. On the other hand, all three complexes have excellent electrocatalytic proton reduction activity in acetonitrile, when using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as a proton source with moderate overpotentials for 1Co (0.59 V vs. SCE) and 1Ni (0.56 V vs. SCE) and higher for 1Fe (0.87 V vs. SCE). Under conditions of CH3CN/H2O/Et3N (3:7:0.2), 1Co (5 μM), with PSIr (100 μM) and irradiating at 447 nm gives a turnover number (TON) of 690 (n H2/n1Co) and initial turnover frequency (TOF) (TON×t(-1)) of 703 h(-1) for H2 production. It should be noted that 1Co retains 25 % of the catalytic activity for photoproduction of H2 in the presence of O2. The inexistence of a lag time for H2 evolution and the absence of nanoparticles during the first 30 min of the reaction suggest that the main catalytic activity observed is derived from a molecular system. Kinetic studies show that the reaction is -0.7 order in catalyst, and time-dependent diffraction light scattering (DLS) experiments indicate formation of metal aggregates and then nanoparticles, leading to catalyst deactivation. By a combination of experimental and computational studies we found that the lack of activity in photochemical water reduction by 1Fe can be attributed to the 1Fe (II/I) redox couple, which is significantly lower than the PSIr (III/II) , while for 1Ni the pKa value (-0.4) is too small in comparison with the pH (11.9) imposed by the use of Et3N as electron donor.

  18. Photo- and electrocatalytic H2 production by new first-row transition-metal complexes based on an aminopyridine pentadentate ligand.

    PubMed

    Call, Arnau; Codolà, Zoel; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2014-05-12

    The synthesis and characterisation of the pentadentate ligand 1,4-di(picolyl)-7-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Py2(Ts)tacn) and their metal complexes of general formula [M(CF3SO3)(Py2(Ts)tacn)][CF3SO3], (M = Fe (1Fe), Co (1Co) and Ni (1Ni)) are reported. Complex 1Co presents excellent H2 photoproduction catalytic activity when using [Ir(ppy)2(bpy)]PF6 (PSIr) as photosensitiser (PS) and Et3N as electron donor, but 1Ni and 1Fe result in a low activity and a complete lack of it, respectively. On the other hand, all three complexes have excellent electrocatalytic proton reduction activity in acetonitrile, when using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as a proton source with moderate overpotentials for 1Co (0.59 V vs. SCE) and 1Ni (0.56 V vs. SCE) and higher for 1Fe (0.87 V vs. SCE). Under conditions of CH3CN/H2O/Et3N (3:7:0.2), 1Co (5 μM), with PSIr (100 μM) and irradiating at 447 nm gives a turnover number (TON) of 690 (n H2/n1Co) and initial turnover frequency (TOF) (TON×t(-1)) of 703 h(-1) for H2 production. It should be noted that 1Co retains 25 % of the catalytic activity for photoproduction of H2 in the presence of O2. The inexistence of a lag time for H2 evolution and the absence of nanoparticles during the first 30 min of the reaction suggest that the main catalytic activity observed is derived from a molecular system. Kinetic studies show that the reaction is -0.7 order in catalyst, and time-dependent diffraction light scattering (DLS) experiments indicate formation of metal aggregates and then nanoparticles, leading to catalyst deactivation. By a combination of experimental and computational studies we found that the lack of activity in photochemical water reduction by 1Fe can be attributed to the 1Fe (II/I) redox couple, which is significantly lower than the PSIr (III/II) , while for 1Ni the pKa value (-0.4) is too small in comparison with the pH (11.9) imposed by the use of Et3N as electron donor. PMID:24692261

  19. K-CO on transition metals: A local ionic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Charles H.; Schultz, Peter A.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of the K-CO interaction on a transition metal surface is addressed when the K:CO stoichiometry is approx. 1. The interaction proposed is transfer of the K 4s electron to CO. A BORN-Haber cycle for this process on a surface has been calculated. The reference state is K plus CO, bound separately to the surface (a). A key point in the cycle is that removal of the electron from K bound to a metal surface (b) is less costly in energy (approx. metal/K surface, i.e., approx. +2.0 eV) than from K in the gas phase (IP = +4.3 eV). This means that the complex is significantly stabilized on the surface. The removed K electron is then transported to the isolated adsorbed CO (c) at a cost of the electron affinity of CO (approx. = 1.5 eV). When the isolated ions are brought together (d) the net stabilization at the equilibrium geometry is approx. - 1.8 eV.

  20. Discovery of elusive structures of multifunctional transition-metal borides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongcheng; Wu, Zhaobing; Yuan, Xun; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Peihong

    2016-01-14

    A definitive determination of crystal structures is an important prerequisite for designing and exploiting new functional materials. Even though tungsten and molybdenum borides (TMBx) are the prototype for transition-metal light-element compounds with multiple functionalities, their elusive crystal structures have puzzled scientists for decades. Here, we discover that the long-assumed TMB2 phases with the simple hP3 structure (hP3-TMB2) are in fact a family of complex TMB3 polytypes with a nanoscale ordering along the axial direction. Compared with the energetically unfavorable and dynamically unstable hP3-TMB2 phase, the energetically more favorable and dynamically stable TMB3 polytypes explain the experimental structural parameters, mechanical properties, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns better. We demonstrate that such a structural and compositional modification from the hP3-TMB2 phases to the TMB3 polytypes originates from the relief of the strong antibonding interaction between d electrons by removing one third of metal atoms systematically. These results resolve the longstanding structural mystery of this class of metal borides and uncover a hidden family of polytypic structures. Moreover, these polytypic structures provide an additional hardening mechanism by forming nanoscale interlocks that may strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movements, which promises to open a new avenue towards designing novel superhard nanocomposite materials by exploiting the coexistence of various polytypes.

  1. Which orbital and charge ordering in transition metal oxides can resonant X-ray diffraction detect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, Sergio

    2009-11-01

    The present article is a brief critical review about the possibility of detecting charge and/or orbital order in transition-metal oxides by means of resonant x-ray diffraction. Many recent models of transition-metal oxides are based on charge and/or orbitally ordered ground-states and it has been claimed in the past that resonant x-ray diffraction is able to confirm or reject them. However, in spite of the many merits of this technique, such claims are ambiguous, because the interpretative frameworks used to analyze such results in transition-metal oxides, where structural distortions are always associated to the claimed charged/orbitally ordered transition, strongly influence (not to say suggest) the answer. In order to clarify this point, I discuss the two different definitions of orbital and charge orderings which are often used in the literature without a clear distinction. My conclusion is that the answer to the question of the title depends on which definition is adopted.

  2. Structural Flexibility and Alloying in Ultrathin Transition-Metal Chalcogenide Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junhao; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhou, Wu; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2016-02-23

    Metallic transition-metal chalcogenide (TMC) nanowires are an important building block for 2D electronics that may be fabricated within semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers. Tuning the geometric structure and electronic properties of such nanowires is a promising way to pattern diverse functional channels for wiring multiple units inside a 2D electronic circuit. However, few experimental investigations have been reported exploring the structural and compositional tunability of these nanowires, due to difficulties in manipulating the structure and chemical composition of an individual nanowire. Here, using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and density functional theory (DFT), we report that TMC nanowires have substantial intrinsic structural flexibility and their chemical composition can be manipulated. Rotational twisting, axial kinking, and branching of an individual nanowire is consistently observed and junctions with well-ordered atomic structures can be fabricated. We also show that the density of states of these nanowires can be finely tuned via alloying either the chalcogen or the transition-metal elements, where the chalcogen alloying can be further controlled by the acceleration voltage of the electron beam during the fabrication. The results open up the possibility of tailoring the properties of TMC nanowires, paving the way for robust ultrasmall interconnects in TMDC-based 2D flexible nanoelectronics.

  3. Investigation of methods for the selective removal and characterization of transition metals associated with solids in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Valin, R.; Morse, J.W.

    1981-02-01

    The operation of an OTEC plant will result in the mixing of large volumes of seawater from different depths within the ocean. Because suspended particulate material is intimately involved in marine food webs and transition metals, such as copper, can have toxic effects, it is important to develop a sound methodology for characterizing and quantifying transition metal behavior associated with the solid material. The characterization of solid-phase-associated transition metals in the marine environment has largely been directed at marine sediments. These studies have generally indicated that it is not possible to uniquely identify the solid phases or chemical speciation of a given metal. There are many reasons for this difficulty, but the probable major analytical problems arise from the fact that many of the transition metals of interest are present only in trace concentrations as adsorbed species on amorphous oxides or as coprecipitates. In one approach transition metals are classified according to how easily they are solubilized when exposed to different types of chemical attack, as defined in chemical extraction schemes. In this study, several of the most widely accepted extraction techniques were compared for many of the most commonly measured transition metals to a variety of marine sediments. Based on the results of this study, the sequential extraction scheme of Tessler et al. (1979) is the recommended method for the characterization of solid-phase associated transition metals. An increase of the reducing agent concentration in the intermediate step and temperature decrease with an additional HCl digestion in the residual step are recommended as improvements, based on the results of the individual extraction method studies.

  4. Enhancement of Platinum Cathode Catalysis by Addition of Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duong, Hung Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) contributes significantly to the loss of cathode overpotential in fuel cells, thus requiring high loadings of platinum (Pt), which is an expensive metal with limited supply. However, Pt and Pt-based alloys are still the best available electrocatalysts for ORR thus far. The research presented…

  5. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  6. Using dark states for exciton storage in transition-metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Frank; Simsek, Ergun; Gunlycke, Daniel

    2016-01-27

    We explore the possibility of storing excitons in excitonic dark states in monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides. In addition to being optically inactive, these dark states require the electron and hole to be spatially separated, thus inhibiting electron/hole recombination and allowing exciton lifetimes to be extended. Based on an atomistic exciton model, we derive transition matrix elements and an approximate selection rule showing that excitons could be transitioned into and out of dark states using a pulsed infrared laser. For illustration, we also present exciton population scenarios based on a population analysis for different recombination decay constants. Longer exciton lifetimes could make these materials candidates for applications in energy management and quantum information processing.

  7. Using dark states for exciton storage in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Frank; Simsek, Ergun; Gunlycke, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of storing excitons in excitonic dark states in monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides. In addition to being optically inactive, these dark states require the electron and hole to be spatially separated, thus inhibiting electron/hole recombination and allowing exciton lifetimes to be extended. Based on an atomistic exciton model, we derive transition matrix elements and an approximate selection rule showing that excitons could be transitioned into and out of dark states using a pulsed infrared laser. For illustration, we also present exciton population scenarios based on a population analysis for different recombination decay constants. Longer exciton lifetimes could make these materials candidates for applications in energy management and quantum information processing.

  8. Charge-transfer gap closure in transition-metal halides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.L.; Yu, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Insulator-to-metal transition induced by pressure has been studied in three transition metal iodides: NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2} and FeI{sub 2} using optical absorption and resistivity measurements at room temperature. Comparisons between the results obtained by these two techniques suggested that the closure of the charge-transfer gap is the principal mechanism responsible for the insulator-to-metal transition in these materials.

  9. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ramesh; Shukla, Seema Dwivedi, Shalini Sharma, Yamini

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  10. The half metallic state of transition metal pnictides in Wurtzite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, M. S.; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2004-03-01

    We perform full potential linear muffin tin orbital (FP-LMTO) calculations for a series transition metal pnictides compounds, including CrAs, CrSb, MnAs, MnSb, VAs and VSb etc., in various four and six fold coordinated structures. The volume expansion can stabilize both the Zinc Blende (ZB) and the Wurtzite (WZ) structures. The energy differences between the ZB and WZ structure are very small and for several compound, such as CrSb, VAs, etc., the WZ structure is more stable than the ZB structure. As in ZB structure, the transition metal pnictides are also half metallic in the WZ structure. The density of states at the Fermi level for majority spin, the band gap for minority spin and the valence band maximum (VBM) for minority spin relative to the Fermi level are very close for two different structures, indicating that the half metallic properties are mainly determined by the local tetrahedron environments which is similar for ZB and WZ structures. While the volume increases, minority band gap increases and the relative Fermi level position to the VBM of minority spin decreases. This is different to the semiconductor band gap dependence on the volume and is caused by the exchange interaction between the majority and the minority spins that will increase with the expansion of the volume. The same effect also causes a slight increase of the DOS for majority spin at Fermi level.

  11. Reactor prospects of muon-catalyzed fusion of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M. Jr. . Fusion Research Center )

    1989-09-01

    It is conjectured that the number of fusion events catalyzed by a single muon is orders of magnitude greater for deuterium and tritium concentrated in a transition metal than in gaseous form and that the recent observation of 2.5-MeV neutrons from a D/sub 2/O electrolytic cell with palladium and titanium cathodes can thereby be interpreted in terms of cosmic muon-catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fusion. This suggests a new fusion reactor reactor consisting of deuterium and tritium concentrated in transition metal fuel elements in a fusion core that surrounds an accelerator-produced muon source. The feasibility of net energy production in such a reactor is established in terms of requirements on the number of fusion events catalyzed per muon. The technological implications for a power reactor based on this concept are examined. The potential of such a concept as a neutron source for materials testing and tritium and plutonium production is briefly discussed.

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and tunable topological states in 3d transition metals doped silicene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Lan-Feng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Silicene is an intriguing 2D topological material which is closely analogous to graphene but with stronger spin orbit coupling effect and natural compatibility with current silicon-based electronics industry. Here we demonstrate that silicene decorated with certain 3d transition metals (Vanadium) can sustain a stable quantum anomalous Hall effect using both analytical model and first-principles Wannier interpolation. We also predict the quantum valley Hall effect and electrically tunable topological states could be realized in certain transition metal doped silicene where the energy band inversion occurs. Our findings provide new scheme for the realization of quantum anomalous Hall effect and platform for electrically controllable topological states which are highly desirable for future nanoelectronics and spintronics application. PMID:24105063

  13. Transition Metal Dithiolene Near-IR Dyes and Thier Applications in Liquid Crystal Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Painter, G.; Lotito, K.; Noto, A.G.; Chang, P.

    2006-08-18

    Numerous commercial and military applications exist for guest–host liquid crystal (LC) devices operating in the near- to mid-IR region. Progress in this area has been hindered by the severe lack of near-IR dyes with good solubility in the LC host, low impact on the inherent order of the LC phase, good thermal and chemical stability, and a large absorbance maximum tunable by structural modification over a broad range of the near-IR region. Transition metal complexes based on nickel, palladium, or platinum dithiolene cores show substantial promise in meeting these requirements. In this paper, we overview our past and present activities in the design and synthesis of transition metal dithiolene dyes, show some specific applications examples for these materials as near-IR dyes in LC electro-optical devices, and present our most recent results in the computational modeling of physical and optical properties of this interesting class of organometallic optical materials.

  14. Thermal radiative near field transport between vanadium dioxide and silicon oxide across the metal insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, F.; Dittberner, M.; Novotny, L.; Passarello, D.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Spieser, M.; Riel, H.; Gotsmann, B.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal radiative near field transport between vanadium dioxide and silicon oxide at submicron distances is expected to exhibit a strong dependence on the state of vanadium dioxide which undergoes a metal-insulator transition near room temperature. We report the measurement of near field thermal transport between a heated silicon oxide micro-sphere and a vanadium dioxide thin film on a titanium oxide (rutile) substrate. The temperatures of the 15 nm vanadium dioxide thin film varied to be below and above the metal-insulator-transition, and the sphere temperatures were varied in a range between 100 and 200 °C. The measurements were performed using a vacuum-based scanning thermal microscope with a cantilevered resistive thermal sensor. We observe a thermal conductivity per unit area between the sphere and the film with a distance dependence following a power law trend and a conductance contrast larger than 2 for the two different phase states of the film.

  15. Ultrasonic study on some borosilicate glasses doped with different transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, S. Y.; Gaafar, M. S.

    2007-12-01

    Longitudinal and shear ultrasonic wave velocities were measured in borosilicate glasses doped with different transition metal oxides (TMOs) (where TMO=NiO, V 2O 5, Fe 2O 3, MnO 2, TiO 2, Cr 2O 3, CoO, CuO) using the pulse echo technique. Measurements were carried out at 4 MHz frequency and at room temperature. Elastic moduli and some other physical parameters such as acoustic impedance, softening temperature, Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, and latent heat of melting have been calculated. Results indicated that these parameters depend upon the TMO modifier, i.e., the ionic radius of the transition metal cation. A quantitative analysis has been carried out, in order to obtain more information about the structure of these glasses, based on bond compression model, and the Makishima and Mackenzie model, i.e., the cation-anion bond of each TMO.

  16. Ab initio calculations on the magnetic properties of transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bodenstein, Tilmann; Fink, Karin

    2015-12-31

    We present a protocol for the ab initio determination of the magnetic properties of mono- and polynuclear transition metal compounds. First, we obtain the low lying electronic states by multireference methods. Then, we include spin-orbit coupling and an external magnetic field for the determination of zero-field splitting and g-tensors. For the polynuclear complexes the magnetic exchange coupling constants are determined by a modified complete active space self consistent field method. Based on the results of the ab initio calculations, magnetic data such as magnetic susceptibility or magnetization are simulated and compared to experimental data. The results obtained for the polynuclear complexes are further analysed by calculations on model complexes where part of the magnetic centers are substituted by diamagnetic ions. The methods are applied to different Co and Ni containing transition metal complexes.

  17. Synthesis of bio-based methacrylic acid by decarboxylation of itaconic acid and citric acid catalyzed by solid transition-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; van Haveren, Jacco; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-09-01

    Methacrylic acid, an important monomer for the plastics industry, was obtained in high selectivity (up to 84%) by the decarboxylation of itaconic acid using heterogeneous catalysts based on Pd, Pt and Ru. The reaction takes place in water at 200-250 °C without any external added pressure, conditions significantly milder than those described previously for the same conversion with better yield and selectivity. A comprehensive study of the reaction parameters has been performed, and the isolation of methacrylic acid was achieved in 50% yield. The decarboxylation procedure is also applicable to citric acid, a more widely available bio-based feedstock, and leads to the production of methacrylic acid in one pot in 41% selectivity. Aconitic acid, the intermediate compound in the pathway from citric acid to itaconic acid was also used successfully as a substrate. PMID:25045161

  18. Ionically-mediated electromechanical hysteresis in transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunseok; Morozovska, Anna N; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Eliseev, Eugene A; Alibart, Fabien; Strukov, Dmitri; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-08-28

    Nanoscale electromechanical activity, remanent polarization states, and hysteresis loops in paraelectric TiO(2) and SrTiO(3) thin films are observed using scanning probe microscopy. The coupling between the ionic dynamics and incipient ferroelectricity in these materials is analyzed using extended Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire (LGD) theory. The possible origins of electromechanical coupling including ionic dynamics, surface-charge induced electrostriction, and ionically induced ferroelectricity are identified. For the latter, the ionic contribution can change the sign of first order LGD expansion coefficient, rendering material effectively ferroelectric. The lifetime of these ionically induced ferroelectric states is then controlled by the transport time of the mobile ionic species and well above that of polarization switching. These studies provide possible explanation for ferroelectric-like behavior in centrosymmetric transition metal oxides.

  19. Are Magnetically Doped Transition-metal Oxides Spin-glasses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, A.; Dvorak, J.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Ogale, S. B.; Shinde, S. R.; Venkatesan, T.; Lofland, S. E.

    2004-03-01

    Many magnetic impurity doped transition-metal oxides exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. Some also exhibit strange magnetic aging behavior. One such material is Co-doped SnO2 which displays a saturation magnetization decrease over time, as well as with successive field applications. From the theoretical perspective, there are two prerequisites for spin-glass behavior which are both satisfied for these samples: disorder and frustration. Disorder is readily satisfied because the dilute magnetic impurities are randomly scattered. Additionally, the suggested RKKY interaction between magnetic impurities, coupled with their random spacing, likely results in frustration. Magnetometry, XAS, and XMCD measurements, with temperature, measurement time, and history dependence help elucidate the magnetic order in these materials, and are consistent with spin-glass character. We would like to acknowledge the support of NSF (MSU), the Office of Naval Research (MSU), DARPA SpinS (UMD) and NSF-MRSEC (UMD).

  20. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.