Science.gov

Sample records for based active noise

  1. Active structural acoustic control of helicopter interior multifrequency noise using input-output-based hybrid control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xunjun; Lu, Yang; Wang, Fengjiao

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the recent advances in reduction of multifrequency noise inside helicopter cabin using an active structural acoustic control system, which is based on active gearbox struts technical approach. To attenuate the multifrequency gearbox vibrations and resulting noise, a new scheme of discrete model predictive sliding mode control has been proposed based on controlled auto-regressive moving average model. Its implementation only needs input/output data, hence a broader frequency range of controlled system is modelled and the burden on the state observer design is released. Furthermore, a new iteration form of the algorithm is designed, improving the developing efficiency and run speed. To verify the algorithm's effectiveness and self-adaptability, experiments of real-time active control are performed on a newly developed helicopter model system. The helicopter model can generate gear meshing vibration/noise similar to a real helicopter with specially designed gearbox and active struts. The algorithm's control abilities are sufficiently checked by single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output experiments via different feedback strategies progressively: (1) control gear meshing noise through attenuating vibrations at the key points on the transmission path, (2) directly control the gear meshing noise in the cabin using the actuators. Results confirm that the active control system is practical for cancelling multifrequency helicopter interior noise, which also weakens the frequency-modulation of the tones. For many cases, the attenuations of the measured noise exceed the level of 15 dB, with maximum reduction reaching 31 dB. Also, the control process is demonstrated to be smoother and faster.

  2. Field evaluation of measuring indoor noise exposure in workplace with task-based active RFID technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Chuan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Wang, Te-Shun; Wang, Peng-Yau

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes the research using RFEMS (Radio Frequency Identification Exposure Monitoring System), which is designed by applying the task-based active RFID (radio frequency identification) technology, to measure the indoor noise exposure dose in a workplace. The RFEMS and sound level meter are mounted on the vests of eight workers to carry out on-site field test by monitoring the time activity pattern (TAP), and the noise dose level exposed by the workers. The data are recorded and instantaneously transmitted to a computer to be saved in the server and later compared to those obtained using the standard method. The results that have a 0.909 correlation coefficient (R(2)), and 1.64% average measure error confirm the accuracy of using RFEMS for monitoring TAP. Additionally, the combined use of RFEMS and sound level meter leads to the development of a semi noise dosimetry (SND), a real-time electronic indirect noise dosimetry (REIND), and an equivalent electronic recording indirect noise dosimetry (EEIND). The results obtained using these three devices are well correlated with the results monitored by using a PND (personal noise dosimetry) with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.915, 0.779 and 0.873, respectively. The errors of noise dose expressed in TWA (time weight average) for these three methods are 0.81, 1.57 and 1.23 dBA, respectively; they are well within the general errors of the average dosimetries. These observations indicate that the RFEMS developed in this research is applicable for conducting task-based measurements of indoor noise. It uses a relatively inexpensive sound level meter to measure the noise exposure doses that are comparable to those obtained with a standard dosimetry in addition to monitoring the worker's time activity pattern. The findings will assist in studying the source of long-term noise exposed by workers, and hence this devise is a valuable tool for tracing and monitoring long-term noise exposure with reduced manpower

  3. Two kinds of active impulsive noise control algorithms based on sigmoid transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Bai, Xuefeng; Ma, Yongjian

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, active noise control of symmetric α stable (SαS) distribution impulsive noise has been studied. Two kinds of algorithm based on Sigmoid transformation of error signal have been proposed. The convergence condition of algorithms also has been analyzed. It does not need the parameter selection and thresholds estimation. Computer simulations were carried out to validate algorithm. Simulation results have proven the effectiveness of the algorithm and achieved the expected control effect. Compared to the previous algorithm, the convergence speed is improved.

  4. Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul (Inventor); Joshi, Suresh M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method to provide active noise control to reduce noise and vibration in reverberant acoustic enclosures such as aircraft, vehicles, appliances, instruments, industrial equipment and the like is presented. A continuous-time multi-input multi-output (MIMO) state space mathematical model of the plant is obtained via analytical modeling and system identification. Compensation is designed to render the mathematical model passive in the sense of mathematical system theory. The compensated system is checked to ensure robustness of the passive property of the plant. The check ensures that the passivity is preserved if the mathematical model parameters are perturbed from nominal values. A passivity-based controller is designed and verified using numerical simulations and then tested. The controller is designed so that the resulting closed-loop response shows the desired noise reduction.

  5. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  6. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Carolyn R.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) techniques are described with reference to their application to crewmembers during aircraft operation to enhance productivity and safety. ANR concepts and theory are explained, and the development of protective ANR systems for direct implementation are described. Sound attenuation testing was conducted to study the feasibility of aircraft-powered ANR systems, and the positive results spurred their development for compatibility with flight helmets. The Helmets Limited ANR system uses a bypass mode at times of limited available power and complements the use of passive sound attenuation. Subjective testing results show that the device is effective, and a planned program of intensive evaluation is discussed. The aircraft that require an ANR system are listed, and key areas of implementation include battery power and the combination of ANR circuitry and helmet oxygen masks. It is suggested that ANR techniques can positively impact the efficiency and performance of crewmembers in high-noise-level aircraft.

  7. An optimal local active noise control method based on stochastic finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airaksinen, T.; Toivanen, J.

    2013-12-01

    A new method is presented to obtain a local active noise control that is optimal in stochastic environment. The method uses numerical acoustical modeling that is performed in the frequency domain by using a sequence of finite element discretizations of the Helmholtz equation. The stochasticity of domain geometry and primary noise source is considered. Reference signals from an array of microphones are mapped to secondary loudspeakers, by an off-line optimized linear mapping. The frequency dependent linear mapping is optimized to minimize the expected value of error in a quiet zone, which is approximated by the numerical model and can be interpreted as a stochastic virtual microphone. A least squares formulation leads to a quadratic optimization problem. The presented active noise control method gives robust and efficient noise attenuation, which is demonstrated by a numerical study in a passenger car cabin. The numerical results demonstrate that a significant, stable local noise attenuation of 20-32 dB can be obtained at lower frequencies (<500 Hz) by two microphones, and 8-36 dB attenuation at frequencies up to 1000 Hz, when 8 microphones are used.

  8. Noise-based body-wave seismic tomography in an active underground mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, G.; Brenguier, F.; Campillo, M.; Lynch, R.; Roux, P.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, ambient noise tomography has become increasingly popular to image the earth's upper crust. The seismic noise recorded in the earth's crust is dominated by surface waves emanating from the interaction of the ocean with the solid earth. These surface waves are low frequency in nature ( < 1 Hz) and not usable for imaging smaller structures associated with mining or oil and gas applications. The seismic noise recorded at higher frequencies are typically from anthropogenic sources, which are short lived, spatially unstable and not well suited for constructing seismic Green's functions between sensors with conventional cross-correlation methods. To examine the use of ambient noise tomography for smaller scale applications, continuous data were recorded for 5 months in an active underground mine in Sweden located more than 1km below surface with 18 high frequency seismic sensors. A wide variety of broadband (10 - 3000 Hz) seismic noise sources are present in an active underground mine ranging from drilling, scraping, trucks, ore crushers and ventilation fans. Some of these sources generate favorable seismic noise, while others are peaked in frequency and not usable. In this presentation, I will show that the noise generated by mining activity can be useful if periods of seismic noise are carefully selected. Although noise sources are not temporally stable and not evenly distributed around the sensor array, good estimates of the seismic Green's functions between sensors can be retrieved for a broad frequency range (20 - 400 Hz) when a selective stacking scheme is used. For frequencies below 100 Hz, the reconstructed Green's functions show clear body-wave arrivals for almost all of the 153 sensor pairs. The arrival times of these body-waves are picked and used to image the local velocity structure. The resulting 3-dimensional image shows a high velocity structure that overlaps with a known ore-body. The material properties of the ore-body differ from

  9. Psychoacoustic active noise control with ITU-R 468 noise weighting and its sound quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hua; Panahi, Issa M S

    2010-01-01

    Non-uniform frequency response of human hearing system requires conventional active noise control (ANC) system to be modified. Psychoacoustic active noise control (PANC) system based on filtered-E least-mean-square (FELMS) structure aims to improve the noise attenuation performance in terms of hearing perception. ITU-R 468 noise weighting reflects human hearing response to random noise. In this paper we incorporate ITU-R 468 noise weighting into PANC system. Sound quality analysis is conducted for attenuated noise with a predictive pleasantness model which combines four psychoacoustic parameters (loudness, sharpness, roughness and tonality). Simulation on realistic MRI acoustic noise shows improvement of sound quality in the new system.

  10. Active Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. E.; Vuksanovic, B.

    1996-02-01

    Most of the current research on active noise control is confined to restricted spaces such as earphones, active silencers, air-conditioning ducts, truck cabins and aircraft fuselages. In this paper the basic concepts of environmental noise reduction by using active noise control in unconfined spaces are explored. The approach is to develop a controlled acoustic shadow, generated by a wall of secondary sources, to reduce unwanted sound in the direction of a complaint area. The basic acoustic theory is considered, followed by computer modelling, and some results to show the effectiveness of the approach. EA Technology and Yorkshire electric in the United Kingdom are supporting this work.

  11. Reduction of propeller noise by active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bschorr, O.; Kubanke, D.

    1992-04-01

    Active noise control, a method of cancelling noise by means of interference with a secondary anti-noise source, is now in full development. The first commercial application of this technique is in the case of active electronically controlled head sets. The next step will be the active noise cancellation in air ducts and in passenger cabins. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibilities of the anti-noise technique for reducing propeller noise. First, by a mathematical simulation the theoretical noise reduction on the ground was calculated and found to be promising for further investigations. In the case of the periodic engine and propeller noise, for example, with only a single anti-noise source, the noise foot prints of the lower propeller harmonics can be reduced by up to 10 dB. In laboratory tests the theoretical values will be confirmed experimentally. For cancellation of the periodic noise one can use synchronous anti-noise generators. Compared with the engine and propeller noise the reduction of jet noise by the anti-noise technique is much more difficult. Therefore a sensor and controlling unit are necessary because of the stochastic nature of jet noise. Since aircraft noise is a severe problem, all methods are to be considered.

  12. Active Control of Multi-Tonal Noise with Reference Generator Based on On-Line Frequency Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S.; PARK, Y.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper, a novel active noise control (ANC) structure with a frequency estimator is proposed for systems with multi-tonal noise. The conventional feedforward ANC algorithms need a measured reference signal to calculate the gradient of the squared error and filter coefficients. For ANC systems applied to aircraft or passenger ships, which reference signals are usually measured are so far from seats where engines from the main part of controllers is placed that the scheme might be difficult to implement or very costly. Feedback ANC algorithms which do not require a measure of reference signals, use error signals alone to update the filter and are usually sensitive to measurement noise and unexpected transient noise such as a sneeze, clapping of hands and so on.The proposed algorithm, which estimates frequencies of the multi-tonal noise in real time using adaptive notch filter (ANF), improves convergence rate, threshold SNR and computational efficiency compared with the conventional ones. The reference signal needed for the feedforward control is not measured directly, but is generated with the estimated frequencies. It has a strong similarity to the conventional IMC-based feedback control because the reference is generated from the error signal in both cases. The proposed ANC algorithm is compared with the conventional IMC-based feedback control algorithm.Cascade ANF, which has a low computational burden, is used to implement the ANC system in real time. Experiments for verifying efficacy of the proposed algorithm are carried out in the laboratory.

  13. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  14. Active noise control for infant incubators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xun; Gujjula, Shruthi; Kuo, Sen M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an active noise control system for infant incubators. Experimental results show that global noise reduction can be achieved for infant incubator ANC systems. An audio-integration algorithm is presented to introduce a healthy audio (intrauterine) sound with the ANC system to mask the residual noise and soothe the infant. Carbon nanotube based transparent thin film speaker is also introduced in this paper as the actuator for the ANC system to generate the destructive secondary sound, which can significantly save the congested incubator space and without blocking the view of doctors and nurses.

  15. Signal and noise transfer properties of CMOS based active pixel flat panel imager coupled to structured CsI:Tl.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Blakesley, J; Olivo, A; Speller, R D

    2009-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors can be optically coupled to CsI:Tl phosphors forming a indirect active pixel flat panel imager (APFPI) for high performance medical imaging. The aim of this work is to determine the x-ray imaging capabilities of CMOS-based APFPI and study the signal and noise transfer properties of CsI:Tl phosphors. Three different CsI:Tl phosphors from two different vendors have been used to produce three system configurations. The performance of each system configuration has been studied in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in the mammographic energy range. A simple method to determine quantum limited systems in this energy range is also presented. In addition, with aid of monochromatic synchrotron radiation, the effect of iodine characteristic x-rays of the CsI:Tl on the MTF has been determined. A Monte Carlo simulation of the signal transfer properties of the imager is also presented in order to study the stages that degrade the spatial resolution of our current system. The effect of using substrate patterning during the growth of CsI:Tl columnar structure was also studied, along with the effect of CsI:Tl fixed pattern noise due to local variations in the scintillation light. CsI:Tl fixed pattern noise appears to limit the performance of our current system configurations. All the system configurations are quantum limited at 0.23 microC/kg with two of them having DQE (0) equal to 0.57. Active pixel flat panel imagers are shown to be digital x-ray imagers with almost constant DQE throughout a significant part of their dynamic range and in particular at very low exposures.

  16. Signal and noise transfer properties of CMOS based active pixel flat panel imager coupled to structured CsI:Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Blakesley, J.; Olivo, A.; Speller, R. D.

    2009-01-15

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors can be optically coupled to CsI:Tl phosphors forming a indirect active pixel flat panel imager (APFPI) for high performance medical imaging. The aim of this work is to determine the x-ray imaging capabilities of CMOS-based APFPI and study the signal and noise transfer properties of CsI:Tl phosphors. Three different CsI:Tl phosphors from two different vendors have been used to produce three system configurations. The performance of each system configuration has been studied in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in the mammographic energy range. A simple method to determine quantum limited systems in this energy range is also presented. In addition, with aid of monochromatic synchrotron radiation, the effect of iodine characteristic x-rays of the CsI:Tl on the MTF has been determined. A Monte Carlo simulation of the signal transfer properties of the imager is also presented in order to study the stages that degrade the spatial resolution of our current system. The effect of using substrate patterning during the growth of CsI:Tl columnar structure was also studied, along with the effect of CsI:Tl fixed pattern noise due to local variations in the scintillation light. CsI:Tl fixed pattern noise appears to limit the performance of our current system configurations. All the system configurations are quantum limited at 0.23 {mu}C/kg with two of them having DQE (0) equal to 0.57. Active pixel flat panel imagers are shown to be digital x-ray imagers with almost constant DQE throughout a significant part of their dynamic range and in particular at very low exposures.

  17. Activity interference and noise annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F. L.; Taylor, S. M.; Birnie, S. E.

    1985-11-01

    Debate continues over differences in the dose-response functions used to predict the annoyance at different sources of transportation noise. This debate reflects the lack of an accepted model of noise annoyance in residential communities. In this paper a model is proposed which is focussed on activity interference as a central component mediating the relationship between noise exposure and annoyance. This model represents a departure from earlier models in two important respects. First, single event noise levels (e.g., maximum levels, sound exposure level) constitute the noise exposure variables in place of long-term energy equivalent measures (e.g., 24-hour Leq or Ldn). Second, the relationships within the model are expressed as probabilistic rather than deterministic equations. The model has been tested by using acoustical and social survey data collected at 57 sites in the Toronto region exposed to aircraft, road traffic or train noise. Logit analysis was used to estimate two sets of equations. The first predicts the probability of activity interference as a function of event noise level. Four types of interference are included: indoor speech, outdoor speech, difficulty getting to sleep and awakening. The second set predicts the probability of annoyance as a function of the combination of activity interferences. From the first set of equations, it was possible to estimate a function for indoor speech interference only. In this case, the maximum event level was the strongest predictor. The lack of significant results for the other types of interference is explained by the limitations of the data. The same function predicts indoor speech interference for all three sources—road, rail and aircraft noise. The results for the second set of equations show strong relationships between activity interference and the probability of annoyance. Again, the parameters of the logit equations are similar for the three sources. A trial application of the model predicts a higher

  18. Noise Characterization of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistors for X-ray Imagers Based on Active Pixel Architectures.

    PubMed

    Antonuk, L E; Koniczek, M; McDonald, J; El-Mohri, Y; Zhao, Q; Behravan, M

    2008-01-01

    An examination of the noise of polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors, in the context of flat panel x-ray imager development, is reported. The study was conducted in the spirit of exploring how the 1/f, shot and thermal noise components of poly-Si TFTs, determined from current noise power spectral density measurements, as well as through calculation, can be used to assist in the development of imagers incorporating pixel amplification circuits based on such transistors.

  19. Detection of geodynamic activity areas based on the Earth's electromagnetic noise parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, Vasily F.; Malyshkov, Sergey Yu; Shtalin, Sergey G.; Polivach, Vitaly I.; Krutikov, Vladimir A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a method of using the Earth's natural pulsed electromagnetic noise for mapping of anomalies of intensely strained state of the Earth's crust is substantiated. Examples of using the method for mapping of geodynamically dangerous sites and monitoring of processes that pose threats to the operation of industrial facilities are presented.

  20. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  1. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  2. A local active noise control system based on a virtual-microphone technique for railway sleeping vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J.; Egaña, J. M.; Viñolas, J.

    2006-11-01

    Low-frequency broadband noise generated on a railway vehicle by the wheel-rail interaction could be a big annoyance for passengers in sleeping cars. Low-frequency acoustic radiation is extremely difficult to attenuate by using passive devices. In this article, an active noise control (ANC) technique has been proposed for this purpose. A three-dimensional cabin was built in the laboratory to carry out the experiments. The proposed scheme is based on a Filtered-X Least Mean Square (FXLMS) control algorithm, particularised for a virtual-microphone technique. Control algorithms were designed with the Matlab-Simulink tool, and the Real Time Windows Target toolbox of Matlab was used to run in real time the ANC system. Referring to the results, different simulations and experimental performances were analysed to enlarge the silence zone around the passenger's ear zone and along the bed headboard. Attenuations of up to 20 and 15 dB(A) (re:20 μPa) were achieved at the passenger's ear in simulations and in experimental results, respectively.

  3. Developing active noise control systems for noise attenuation in ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Rosely V.; Ivo, Rodrigo C.; Medeiros, Eduardo B.

    2002-11-01

    The present work describes some of the research effort on Active Noise Control (ANC) being jointly developed by the Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC-MINAS) and the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG). Considerations about the implementation of Digital Signal Processing for noise control in ducts has been presented. The objective is to establish a study on Active Noise Control in ducts combining geometry and acoustic parameters modification together with adaptive digital filtering implementation. Both algorithm and digital signal processing details are also discussed. The main results for a typical application where real attenuation has been obtained are presented and considered according to their use in developing real applications. The authors also believe that the present text should provide an interesting overview for both designers and students concerned about Active Noise Control in ducts. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  4. Noise exposure from leisure activities: a review.

    PubMed

    Clark, W W

    1991-07-01

    Over the past two decades there has been increasing concern about the role of nonoccupational, or leisure noise on hearing. This paper reviews published studies that detail the noise levels and potential effects of some noisy leisure activities. Considered are the most common sources of leisure noise: exposure to live or amplified rock, classical, or jazz music; exposures from personal listening devices ("walkman" type); noise around the home, and hunting and target shooting. Although all activities listed above have the potential for dangerous levels of noise exposure, the most serious threat to hearing comes from recreational hunting or target shooting.

  5. Active Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depuru-Mohan, N. K.; Doty, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Jet noise is often a dominant component of aircraft noise, particularly at takeoff. To meet the stringent noise regulations, the aircraft industry is in a pressing need of advanced noise reduction concepts. In the present study, the potential of piezoelectrically-activated chevrons for jet noise reduction was experimentally investigated. The perturbations near the nozzle exit caused by piezoelectrically-activated chevrons could be used to modify the growth rate of the mixing layer and thereby potentially reduce jet noise. These perturbations are believed to increase the production of small-scale disturbances at the expense of large-scale turbulent structures. These large-scale turbulent structures are responsible for the dominant portion of the jet mixing noise, particularly low-frequency noise. Therefore, by exciting the static chevron geometry through piezoelectric actuators, an additional acoustic benefit could possibly be achieved. To aid in the initial implementation of this concept, several flat-faced faceted nozzles (four, six, and eight facets) were investigated. Among the faceted nozzles, it was found that the eight-faceted nozzle behaves very similarly to the round nozzle. Furthermore, among the faceted nozzles with static chevrons, the four-faceted nozzle with static chevrons was found to be most effective in terms of jet noise reduction. The piezoelectrically-activated chevrons reduced jet noise up to 2 dB compared to the same nozzle geometry without excitation. This benefit was observed over a wide range of excitation frequencies by applying very low voltages to the piezoelectric actuators.

  6. Noise enhanced activity in a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Anshul; Kohar, Vivek; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-09-01

    We consider the influence of local noise on a generalized network of populations having positive and negative feedbacks. The population dynamics at the nodes is nonlinear, typically chaotic, and allows cessation of activity if the population falls below a threshold value. We investigate the global stability of this large interactive system, as indicated by the average number of nodal populations that manage to remain active. Our central result is that the probability of obtaining active nodes in this network is significantly enhanced under fluctuations. Further, we find a sharp transition in the number of active nodes as noise strength is varied, along with clearly evident scaling behaviour near the critical noise strength. Lastly, we also observe noise induced temporal coherence in the active sub-network, namely, there is an enhancement in synchrony among the nodes at an intermediate noise strength.

  7. Effects of aircraft noise on human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoult, M. D.; Gilfillan, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of aircrft noise on human activities was investigated by developing a battery of tasks (1) representative of a range of human activities and (2) sensitive to the disruptive effects of noise. The noise used were recordings of jet aircraft and helicopter sounds at three lvels of loudness--60, 70, and 80 dB(A). Experiment 1 investigated 12 different cognitive tasks, along with two intelligibility tasks included to validate that the noises were being effective. Interference with intelligibility was essentially the same as found in the research literature, but only inconsistent effects were found on either accuracy or latency of performance on the cognitive tasks. When the tasks were grouped into four categories (Intelligibility, Matching, Verbal, and Arithmetic), reliable differences in rated annoyingness of the noises were related to the task category and to the type of noise (jet or helicopter).

  8. Effect of noise on higher nervous activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of continuous, regular and irregular intermittent white noises consisting of three kinds of unpleasant noises (frying pan noise (FN), synthesizer noise (SN) and white noise (WN)), pure tones of 125, 250, 500, 1k, 2k, 4k and 8k Hz, and band-limited noises with the same center frequencies as pure tones were estimated by using electroencephalograms (EEG) and auditory evoked potential (AEP), to make clear the relationship between the unpleasantness of noise and brain activity. The results obtained were as follows. Alpha-wave appearance rate differed in continuous, regular and irregular intermittent white noise exposures. Psychologically unpleasant noises, estimated by the method of paired comparisons and a rating scale, brought about changes in brain waves that corresponded to the degree of unpleasantness. Changes in the number and the total power of the peak frequency in brain waves of the subjects exposed to pure tones showed a tendency to be similar to the equal loudness contour. Changes in the AEP components of N 1 and P 2 latencies and P 2 amplitude due to both pure tones and band noises with the same center frequency as each pure tone showed the same pattern, with the shortest latency and amplitude between the frequencies of 1 kHz and 2 kHz. The changes in AEP were also similar to the equal loudness contour.

  9. Novel active noise-reducing headset using earshell vibration control.

    PubMed

    Rafaely, Boaz; Carrilho, Joao; Gardonio, Paolo

    2002-10-01

    Active noise-reducing (ANR) headsets are available commercially in applications varying from aviation communication to consumer audio. Current ANR systems use passive attenuation at high frequencies and loudspeaker-based active noise control at low frequencies to achieve broadband noise reduction. This paper presents a novel ANR headset in which the external noise transmitted to the user's ear via earshell vibration is reduced by controlling the vibration of the earshell using force actuators acting against an inertial mass or the earshell headband. Model-based theoretical analysis using velocity feedback control showed that current piezoelectric actuators provide sufficient force but require lower stiffness for improved low-frequency performance. Control simulations based on experimental data from a laboratory headset showed that good performance can potentially be achieved in practice by a robust feedback controller, while a single-frequency real-time control experiment verified that noise reduction can be achieved using earshell vibration control.

  10. Electromagnetic films as lightweight actuators for active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Delf; Kletschkowski, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The increasing industrialization and markets across the globe do result in noise pollution that affects humans. In order to reduce the sound pressure level (SPL) of disturbing noise active noise control (also known as noise cancellation, active noise reduction (ANR) or anti-noise) is a good option. Herewith unwanted noise from a primary sound source can be reduced significantly by anti-noise generated from a secondary source: At present commercial active noise reduction systems are using moving-coil loudspeakers as actuators. These actuators need a quite large built-in volume and they are not lightweight. Therefore the industrial application of ANR in vehicles is limited. To reduce these difficulties the use of flat loudspeakers made of electromagnetic films seems to be a promising approach. It is a precondition for the use of such new technologies within an ANR- system to have a basic understanding of the dynamic systems behaviour and the sound transmission behaviour of such a lightweight active component: This paper describes the investigation of a flat panel speaker which is based on electrostatic loudspeaker technology. First of all the passive transmission properties have been measured in a test bed. The passive acoustic insulation has been analyzed and weak spots in the frequency response were discovered. Afterwards the flat panel speaker has been used as actuator in an ANR-System to support insulation at those frequencies. An adaptive filter (FxLMS) was adjusted to the panel and the reduction capabilities of a single-output system have been determined.

  11. Advanced Study for Active Noise Control in Aircraft (ASANCA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Ingo U.; Emborg, Urban; Sollo, Antonio; Waterman, Elly H.; Paillard, Jacques; Larsen, Peter N.; Venet, Gerard; Goeransson, Peter; Martin, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft interior noise and vibration measurements are included in this paper from ground and flight tests. In addition, related initial noise calculations with and without active noise control are conducted. The results obtained to date indicate that active noise control may be an effective means for reducing the critical low frequency aircraft noise.

  12. Advanced Study for Active Noise Control in Aircraft (ASANCA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Ingo U.; Emborg, Urban; Sollo, Antonio; Waterman, Elly H.; Paillard, Jacques; Larsen, Peter N.; Venet, Gerard; Goeransson, Peter; Martin, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft interior noise and vibration measurements are included in this paper from ground and flight tests. In addition, related initial noise calculations with and without active noise control are conducted. The results obtained to date indicate that active noise control may be an effective means for reducing the critical low frequency aircraft noise.

  13. Diagnostics and Active Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    This project deals with developing advanced methods for investigating and controlling interior noise in aircraft. The work concentrates on developing and applying the techniques of Near Field Acoustic Holography (NAH) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to the aircraft interior noise dynamic problem. This involves investigating the current state of the art, developing new techniques and then applying them to the particular problem being studied. The knowledge gained under the first part of the project was then used to develop and apply new, advanced noise control techniques for reducing interior noise. A new fully active control approach based on the PCA was developed and implemented on a test cylinder. Finally an active-passive approach based on tunable vibration absorbers was to be developed and analytically applied to a range of test structures from simple plates to aircraft fuselages.

  14. Application of Feedforward Adaptive Active-Noise Control for Reducing Blade Passing Noise in Centrifugal Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, J.-D.; BAI, M. R.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes two configurations of feedforward adaptive active-noise control (ANC) technique for reducing blade passing noise in centrifugal fans. In one configuration, the control speaker is installed at the cut-off region of the fan, while in the other configuration at the exit duct. The proposed ANC system is based on the filtered-x least-mean-squares (FXLMS) algorithm with multi-sine synthesized reference signal and frequency counting and is implemented by using a digital signal processor (DSP). Experiments are carried out to evaluate the proposed system for reducing the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its harmonics at various flow speeds. The results of the experiment indicated that the ANC technique is effective in reducing the blade passing noise for two configurations by using the feedforward adaptive control.

  15. Firefighter noise exposure during training activities and general equipment use.

    PubMed

    Root, Kyle S; Schwennker, Catherine; Autenrieth, Daniel; Sandfort, Delvin R; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multiple noise measurements were taken on 6 types of fire station equipment and 15 types of emergency response vehicle-related equipment used by firefighters during routine and emergency operations at 10 fire stations. Five of the six types of fire station equipment, when measured at a distance of one meter and ear level, emitted noise equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including lawn maintenance equipment, snow blowers, compressors, and emergency alarms. Thirteen of 15 types of equipment located on the fire engines emitted noise levels equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including fans, saws, alarms, and extrication equipment. In addition, noise measurements were taken during fire engine operations, including the idling vehicle, vehicle sirens, and water pumps. Results indicated that idling fire-engine noise levels were below 85 dBA; however, during water pump and siren use, noise levels exceeded 85 dBA, in some instances, at different locations around the trucks where firefighters would be stationed during emergency operations. To determine if the duration and use of fire fighting equipment was sufficient to result in overexposures to noise during routine training activities, 93 firefighter personal noise dosimetry samples were taken during 10 firefighter training activities. Two training activities per sampling day were monitored during each sampling event, for a mean exposure time of 70 min per day. The noise dosimetry samples were grouped based on job description to compare noise exposures between the different categories of job tasks commonly associated with fire fighting. The three job categories were interior, exterior, and engineering. Mean personal dosimetry results indicated that the average noise exposure was 78 dBA during the training activities that lasted 70 min on average. There was no significant difference in noise exposure between each of the three job categories. Although firefighters routinely use equipment and emergency response vehicles that

  16. Highway traffic noise prediction based on GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianghua; Qin, Qiming

    2014-05-01

    Before building a new road, we need to predict the traffic noise generated by vehicles. Traditional traffic noise prediction methods are based on certain locations and they are not only time-consuming, high cost, but also cannot be visualized. Geographical Information System (GIS) can not only solve the problem of manual data processing, but also can get noise values at any point. The paper selected a road segment from Wenxi to Heyang. According to the geographical overview of the study area and the comparison between several models, we combine the JTG B03-2006 model and the HJ2.4-2009 model to predict the traffic noise depending on the circumstances. Finally, we interpolate the noise values at each prediction point and then generate contours of noise. By overlaying the village data on the noise contour layer, we can get the thematic maps. The use of GIS for road traffic noise prediction greatly facilitates the decision-makers because of GIS spatial analysis function and visualization capabilities. We can clearly see the districts where noise are excessive, and thus it becomes convenient to optimize the road line and take noise reduction measures such as installing sound barriers and relocating villages and so on.

  17. Active attenuation of propeller blade passage noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalas, J. M.; Tichy, J.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic measurements are presented to show that active cancellation can be used to achieve significant reduction of blade passage noise in a turboprop cabin. Simultaneous suppression of all blade passage frequencies was attained. The spatial volume over which cancellation occurred, however, is limited. Acoustic intensity maps are presented to show that the acoustic input to the fuselage was sufficiently non-localized so as to require more judicious selection of cancellation speaker location.

  18. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  19. Wind noise in hearing aids: I. Effect of wide dynamic range compression and modulation-based noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Chung, King

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine the effect of wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) and modulation-based noise reduction (NR) algorithms on wind noise levels at the hearing aid output; and (2) to derive effective strategies for clinicians and engineers to reduce wind noise in hearing aids. Three digital hearing aids were fitted to KEMAR. The noise output was recorded at flow velocities of 0, 4.5, 9.0, and 13.5 m/s in a wind tunnel as the KEMAR head was turned from 0° to 360°. Flow noise levels were compared between the 1:1 linear and 3:1 WDRC conditions, and between NR-activated and NR-deactivated conditions when the hearing aid was programmed to the directional and omnidirectional modes. The results showed that: (1) WDRC increased low-level noise and reduced high-level noise; and (2) different noise reduction algorithms provided different amounts of wind noise reduction in different microphone modes, frequency regions, flow velocities, and head angles. Wind noise can be reduced by decreasing the gain for low-level inputs, increasing the compression ratio for high-level inputs, and activating modulation-based noise reduction algorithms.

  20. Simple noise-reduction method based on nonlinear forecasting.

    PubMed

    Tan, James P L

    2017-03-01

    Nonparametric detrending or noise reduction methods are often employed to separate trends from noisy time series when no satisfactory models exist to fit the data. However, conventional noise reduction methods depend on subjective choices of smoothing parameters. Here we present a simple multivariate noise reduction method based on available nonlinear forecasting techniques. These are in turn based on state-space reconstruction for which a strong theoretical justification exists for their use in nonparametric forecasting. The noise reduction method presented here is conceptually similar to Schreiber's noise reduction method using state-space reconstruction. However, we show that Schreiber's method has a minor flaw that can be overcome with forecasting. Furthermore, our method contains a simple but nontrivial extension to multivariate time series. We apply the method to multivariate time series generated from the Van der Pol oscillator, the Lorenz equations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal spiking activity, and to two other univariate real-world data sets. It is demonstrated that noise reduction heuristics can be objectively optimized with in-sample forecasting errors that correlate well with actual noise reduction errors.

  1. Simple noise-reduction method based on nonlinear forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, James P. L.

    2017-03-01

    Nonparametric detrending or noise reduction methods are often employed to separate trends from noisy time series when no satisfactory models exist to fit the data. However, conventional noise reduction methods depend on subjective choices of smoothing parameters. Here we present a simple multivariate noise reduction method based on available nonlinear forecasting techniques. These are in turn based on state-space reconstruction for which a strong theoretical justification exists for their use in nonparametric forecasting. The noise reduction method presented here is conceptually similar to Schreiber's noise reduction method using state-space reconstruction. However, we show that Schreiber's method has a minor flaw that can be overcome with forecasting. Furthermore, our method contains a simple but nontrivial extension to multivariate time series. We apply the method to multivariate time series generated from the Van der Pol oscillator, the Lorenz equations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal spiking activity, and to two other univariate real-world data sets. It is demonstrated that noise reduction heuristics can be objectively optimized with in-sample forecasting errors that correlate well with actual noise reduction errors.

  2. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1989-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  3. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1987-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  4. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1989-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  5. Self-learning active noise control.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J

    2008-10-01

    An important step for active noise control (ANC) systems to be practical is to develop model independent ANC (MIANC) systems that tolerate parameter variations in sound fields. Reliabilities and stabilities of many MIANC systems depend on results of online system identifications. Parameter errors due to system identifications may threaten closed-loop stabilities of MIANC systems. A self-learning active noise control (SLANC) system is proposed in this study to stabilize and optimize an ANC system in case identified parameters are unreliable. The proposed system uses an objective function to check closed-loop stability. If partial or full value of the objective function exceeds a conservatively preset threshold, a stability threat is detected and the SLANC system will stabilize and optimize the controller without using parameters of sound fields. If the reference signal is available, the SLANC system can be combined with a feedforward controller to generate both destructive interference and active damping in sound fields. The self-learning method is simple and stable for many feedback ANC systems to deal with a worst case discussed in this study.

  6. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  7. Pilot task-based assessment of noise levels among firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, RL; Hong, O; Quinlan, P; Hulea, R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Over one million American firefighters are routinely exposed to various occupational hazards agents. While efforts have been made to identify and reduce some causes of injuries and illnesses among firefighters, relatively little has been done to evaluate and understand occupational noise exposures in this group. The purpose of this pilot study was to apply a task-based noise exposure assessment methodology to firefighting operations to evaluate potential noise exposure sources, and to use collected task-based noise levels to create noise exposure estimates for evaluation of risk of noise-induced hearing loss by comparison to the 8-hr and 24-hr recommended exposure limits (RELs) for noise of 85 and 80.3 dBA, respectively. METHODS Task-based noise exposures (n=100 measurements) were measured in three different fire departments (a rural department in Southeast Michigan and suburban and urban departments in Northern California). These levels were then combined with time-at-task information collected from firefighters to estimate 8-hr noise exposures for the rural and suburban fire departments (n=6 estimates for each department). Data from 24-hr dosimetry measurements and crude self-reported activity categories from the urban fire department (n=4 measurements) were used to create 24-hr exposure estimates to evaluate the bias associated with the task-based estimates. RESULTS Task-based noise levels were found to range from 82–109 dBA, with the highest levels resulting from use of saws and pneumatic chisels. Some short (e.g., 30 min) sequences of common tasks were found to result in nearly an entire allowable daily exposure. The majority of estimated 8-hr and 24-hr exposures exceeded the relevant recommended exposure limit. Predicted 24-hr exposures showed substantial imprecision in some cases, suggesting the need for increased task specificity. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate potential for overexposure to noise from a variety of firefighting tasks and

  8. Pilot task-based assessment of noise levels among firefighters.

    PubMed

    Neitzel, Rl; Hong, O; Quinlan, P; Hulea, R

    2013-11-01

    Over one million American firefighters are routinely exposed to various occupational hazards agents. While efforts have been made to identify and reduce some causes of injuries and illnesses among firefighters, relatively little has been done to evaluate and understand occupational noise exposures in this group. The purpose of this pilot study was to apply a task-based noise exposure assessment methodology to firefighting operations to evaluate potential noise exposure sources, and to use collected task-based noise levels to create noise exposure estimates for evaluation of risk of noise-induced hearing loss by comparison to the 8-hr and 24-hr recommended exposure limits (RELs) for noise of 85 and 80.3 dBA, respectively. Task-based noise exposures (n=100 measurements) were measured in three different fire departments (a rural department in Southeast Michigan and suburban and urban departments in Northern California). These levels were then combined with time-at-task information collected from firefighters to estimate 8-hr noise exposures for the rural and suburban fire departments (n=6 estimates for each department). Data from 24-hr dosimetry measurements and crude self-reported activity categories from the urban fire department (n=4 measurements) were used to create 24-hr exposure estimates to evaluate the bias associated with the task-based estimates. Task-based noise levels were found to range from 82-109 dBA, with the highest levels resulting from use of saws and pneumatic chisels. Some short (e.g., 30 min) sequences of common tasks were found to result in nearly an entire allowable daily exposure. The majority of estimated 8-hr and 24-hr exposures exceeded the relevant recommended exposure limit. Predicted 24-hr exposures showed substantial imprecision in some cases, suggesting the need for increased task specificity. The results indicate potential for overexposure to noise from a variety of firefighting tasks and equipment, and suggest a need for further

  9. Active Control of Wind Tunnel Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Patrick (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The need for an adaptive active control system was realized, since a wind tunnel is subjected to variations in air velocity, temperature, air turbulence, and some other factors such as nonlinearity. Among many adaptive algorithms, the Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm, which is the simplest one, has been used in an Active Noise Control (ANC) system by some researchers. However, Eriksson's results, Eriksson (1985), showed instability in the ANC system with an ER filter for random noise input. The Restricted Least Squares (RLS) algorithm, although computationally more complex than the LMS algorithm, has better convergence and stability properties. The ANC system in the present work was simulated by using an FIR filter with an RLS algorithm for different inputs and for a number of plant models. Simulation results for the ANC system with acoustic feedback showed better robustness when used with the RLS algorithm than with the LMS algorithm for all types of inputs. Overall attenuation in the frequency domain was better in the case of the RLS adaptive algorithm. Simulation results with a more realistic plant model and an RLS adaptive algorithm showed a slower convergence rate than the case with an acoustic plant as a delay plant. However, the attenuation properties were satisfactory for the simulated system with the modified plant. The effect of filter length on the rate of convergence and attenuation was studied. It was found that the rate of convergence decreases with increase in filter length, whereas the attenuation increases with increase in filter length. The final design of the ANC system was simulated and found to have a reasonable convergence rate and good attenuation properties for an input containing discrete frequencies and random noise.

  10. Active control of road booming noise in automotive interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Shi-Hwan; Kim, Hyoun-Suk; Park, Youngjin

    2002-01-01

    An active feedforward control system has been developed to reduce the road booming noise that has strong nonlinear characteristics. Four acceleration transducers were attached to the suspension system to detect reference vibration and two loudspeakers were used to attenuate the noise near the headrests of two front seats. A leaky constraint multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm with an IIR-based filter that has fast convergence speed and frequency selective controllability was proposed to increase the control efficiency in computing power and memory usage. During the test drive on the rough asphalt and turtle-back road at a constant speed of 60 km/h, we were able to achieve a reduction of around 6 dB of A-weighted sound pressure level in the road booming noise range with the proposed algorithm, which could not be obtained with the conventional multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm.

  11. Active control of road booming noise in automotive interiors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shi-Hwan; Kim, Hyoun-suk; Park, Youngjin

    2002-01-01

    An active feedforward control system has been developed to reduce the road booming noise that has strong nonlinear characteristics. Four acceleration transducers were attached to the suspension system to detect reference vibration and two loudspeakers were used to attenuate the noise near the headrests of two front seats. A leaky constraint multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm with an IIR-based filter that has fast convergence speed and frequency selective controllability was proposed to increase the control efficiency in computing power and memory usage. During the test drive on the rough asphalt and turtle-back road at a constant speed of 60 km/h, we were able to achieve a reduction of around 6 dB of A-weighted sound pressure level in the road booming noise range with the proposed algorithm, which could not be obtained with the conventional multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm.

  12. Deep neural network and noise classification-based speech enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenhua; Zhang, Xiongwei; Zou, Xia; Han, Wei

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a speech enhancement method using noise classification and Deep Neural Network (DNN) was proposed. Gaussian mixture model (GMM) was employed to determine the noise type in speech-absent frames. DNN was used to model the relationship between noisy observation and clean speech. Once the noise type was determined, the corresponding DNN model was applied to enhance the noisy speech. GMM was trained with mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients (MFCC) and the parameters were estimated with an iterative expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. Noise type was updated by spectrum entropy-based voice activity detection (VAD). Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method could achieve better objective speech quality and smaller distortion under stationary and non-stationary conditions.

  13. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  14. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  15. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J. (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  16. A nonlinear active noise control algorithm for virtual microphones controlling chaotic noise.

    PubMed

    Das, Debi Prasad; Moreau, Danielle J; Cazzolato, Ben S

    2012-08-01

    In active noise control (ANC) systems, virtual microphones provide a means of projecting the zone of quiet away from the physical microphone to a remote location. To date, linear ANC algorithms, such as the filtered-x least mean square (FXLMS) algorithm, have been used with virtual sensing techniques. In this paper, a nonlinear ANC algorithm is developed for a virtual microphone by integrating the remote microphone technique with the filtered-s least mean square (FSLMS) algorithm. The proposed algorithm is evaluated experimentally in the cancellation of chaotic noise in a one-dimensional duct. The secondary paths evaluated experimentally exhibit non-minimum phase response and hence poor performance is obtained with the conventional FXLMS algorithm compared to the proposed FSLMS based algorithm. This is because the latter is capable of predicting the chaotic signal found in many physical processes responsible for noise. In addition, the proposed algorithm is shown to outperform the FXLMS based remote microphone technique under the causality constraint (when the propagation delay of the secondary path is greater than the primary path). A number of experimental results are presented in this paper to compare the performance of the FSLMS algorithm based virtual ANC algorithm with the FXLMS based virtual ANC algorithm.

  17. Intelligibility in noise of three LPC (Linear Predictive Coders) voice channels with active noise reduction headsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Charles W.; McKinley, Richard L.

    1988-11-01

    Voice communications processed by Linear Predictive Coders (LPC) are vulnerable to degradation by noise. An earlier study demonstrated that the major effect occurs at the listener. Possible mechanisms for this effect range from poor LPC speech quality to the apparent ease of masking LPC speech by noise. The intelligibility of analog systems is increased with improved signal-to-noise ratios at the ear of the listener. The previous study used state-of-the-art communications headsets with passive sound attenuation. The amount of attenuation provided by these headsets has reached a practical limit, consequently the speech-to-noise ratio cannot be increased for wearable devices. Improvements in speech intelligibility provided by the enhanced and high quality LPC vocoders have not eliminated the problem. A prototype Active Noise Reduction (ANR) headset used with the LPC vocoder systems provided active sound attenuation in addition to the passive attenuation of the headset and resulted in reduced noise at the ear. This reduction improved the speech-to-noise ratio which led to improved intelligibility. Current versions of active noise reduction systems have a high potential for markedly reducing the noise masking problem with the vocoders. State-of-the-art active noise reduction has been proven in laboratory and flight tests. This technology should be applied to these vocoder systems and verified in flight demonstrations in the future.

  18. Active noise control: A tutorial for HVAC designers

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, L.J.

    1997-08-01

    This article will identify the capabilities and limitations of ANC in its application to HVAC noise control. ANC can be used in ducted HVAC systems to cancel ductborne, low-frequency fan noise by injecting sound waves of equal amplitude and opposite phase into an air duct, as close as possible to the source of the unwanted noise. Destructive interference of the fan noise and injected noise results in sound cancellation. The noise problems that it solves are typically described as rumble, roar or throb, all of which are difficult to address using traditional noise control methods. This article will also contrast the use of active against passive noise control techniques. The main differences between the two noise control measures are acoustic performance, energy consumption, and design flexibility. The article will first present the fundamentals and basic physics of ANC. The application to real HVAC systems will follow.

  19. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  20. Active impulsive noise control using maximum correntropy with adaptive kernel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Haiquan

    2017-03-01

    The active noise control (ANC) based on the principle of superposition is an attractive method to attenuate the noise signals. However, the impulsive noise in the ANC systems will degrade the performance of the controller. In this paper, a filtered-x recursive maximum correntropy (FxRMC) algorithm is proposed based on the maximum correntropy criterion (MCC) to reduce the effect of outliers. The proposed FxRMC algorithm does not requires any priori information of the noise characteristics and outperforms the filtered-x least mean square (FxLMS) algorithm for impulsive noise. Meanwhile, in order to adjust the kernel size of FxRMC algorithm online, a recursive approach is proposed through taking into account the past estimates of error signals over a sliding window. Simulation and experimental results in the context of active impulsive noise control demonstrate that the proposed algorithms achieve much better performance than the existing algorithms in various noise environments.

  1. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  2. Evaluation of noise environments during daily activities of university students.

    PubMed

    Tristán Hernández, Edgar; Pavón García, Ignacio; López Navarro, Juan Manuel; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Noise conditions specifically in areas inside university facilities and its impact on the quality of life of university students are topics that have received little attention. This paper presents a study of the noise conditions in which university students of various institutions in Madrid, Spain, carry out their daily studies. A representative number of measurements was carried out using noise dosemeters and dataloggers in order to evaluate the levels of noise, noise dose and exposure to noise during school periods and extracurricular activities. The results were compared with the recommendations given by current environmental noise regulations. This paper was complemented with a survey to get to know how students perceive the exposure to noise in university environments.

  3. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  4. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  5. HYBRID SILICON-ON-SAPPHIRE/SCALED CMOS INTERFERENCE MITIGATION FRONT END BASED ON SIMULTANEOUS NOISE CANCELLATION, ACTIVE-INTERFERENCE CANCELLATION AND N-PATH-MIXER FILTERING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    non-recurring engineering cost for the upgrading and maintenance of DoD receiver systems . 15. SUBJECT TERMS interference mitigation technology...maintenance of DoD receiver systems . Figure 1: Proposed Hybrid SOS/Scaled-CMOS Noise-Cancelling, Active-Interference- Cancelling, N-Path-Mixer Filtering...receiver sub- system (RSS). The second IC uses a scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology (namely 45nm SOI CMOS) to implement a

  6. Mechanisms of active control for noise inside a vibrating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1987-01-01

    The active control of propeller-induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder is studied with attention given to the noise reduction mechanisms inherent in the present coupled acoustic shell model. The active noise control model consists of an infinitely long aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.4 m and a thickness of 0.001 m. Pressure maps are shown when the two external sources are driven in-phase at a frequency corresponding to Omega = 0.22.

  7. Mechanisms of active control for noise inside a vibrating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Fuller, Chris R.

    The active control of propeller-induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder is studied with attention given to the noise reduction mechanisms inherent in the present coupled acoustic shell model. The active noise control model consists of an infinitely long aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.4 m and a thickness of 0.001 m. Pressure maps are shown when the two external sources are driven in-phase at a frequency corresponding to Omega = 0.22.

  8. Extracting Coherent Information from Noise Based Correlation Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Extracting Coherent Information from Noise Based...LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of this research is to establish methodologies to utilize ambient noise in the ocean and to determine what scenarios...are best suited for applying these methods. OBJECTIVES Because noise -based correlation processing is based on equilibrium related stationary

  9. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 3; Active Fan Noise Cancellation in the NASA Lewis Active Noise Control Fan Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Hu, Ziqiang; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LERC) 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF). The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for global active noise cancellation of fan tones. The GE ANC system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is canceled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. Inputs to the controller are signals from a shaft encoder and from a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The key results are that the (6,0) was completely eliminated at the 920 Hz design frequency and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 6.8 dB (out of a possible 9.8 dB). Farfield reductions of 15 dB (SPL) were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB PWL decrease. The results indicate that global attenuation of PWL at the target frequency was obtained in the aft quadrant using an ANC actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct. The quality of the results depended on precise mode generation. High spillover into spurious modes generated by the ANC actuator array caused less than optimum levels of PWL reduction. The variation in spillover is believed to be due to calibration procedure, but must be confirmed in subsequent tests.

  10. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  11. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets.

    PubMed

    Cartes, David A; Ray, Laura R; Collier, Robert D

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. ["Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection," Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  12. Numerical evaluation of the performance of active noise control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, C. G.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized numerical technique for evaluating the optimal performance of active noise controllers. In this technique, the indirect BEM numerical procedures are used to derive the active noise controllers for optimal control of enclosed harmonic sound fields where the strength of the noise sources or the description of the enclosure boundary may not be known. The performance prediction for a single-input single-output system is presented, together with the analysis of the stability and observability of an active noise-control system employing detectors. The numerical procedures presented can be used for the design of both the physical configuration and the electronic components of the optimal active noise controller.

  13. Ranking of Reactions Based on Sensitivity of Protein Noise Depends on the Choice of Noise Measure

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Sucheta; Gadgil, Chetan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is a stochastic process. Identification of the step maximally affecting noise in the protein level is an important aspect of investigation of gene product distribution. There are numerous experimental and theoretical studies that seek to identify this important step. However, these studies have used two different measures of noise, viz. coefficient of variation and Fano factor, and have compared different processes leading to contradictory observations regarding the important step. In this study, we performed systematic global and local sensitivity analysis on two models of gene expression to investigate relative contribution of reaction rate parameters to steady state noise in the protein level using both the measures of noise. We analytically and computationally showed that the ranking of parameters based on the sensitivity of the noise to variation in a given parameter is a strong function of the choice of the noise measure. If the Fano factor is used as the noise measure, translation is the important step whereas for coefficient of variation, transcription is the important step. We derived an analytical expression for local sensitivity and used it to explain the distinct contributions of each reaction parameter to the two measures of noise. We extended the analysis to a generic linear catalysis reaction system and observed that the reaction network topology was an important factor influencing the local sensitivity of the two measures of noise. Our study suggested that, for the analysis of contributions of reactions to the noise, consideration of both the measures of noise is important. PMID:26625133

  14. Graphene-based terahertz photodetector by noise thermometry technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Ji-Wun; Wang, Chun-Lun; Chiang, Yen-Yu; Chang, Hsian-Hong

    2014-01-20

    We report the characteristics of graphene-based terahertz (THz) photodetector based on noise thermometry technique by measuring its noise power at frequency from 4 to 6 GHz. Hot electron system in graphene microbridge is generated after THz photon pumping and creates extra noise power. The equivalent noise temperature and electron temperature increase rapidly in low THz pumping regime and saturate gradually in high THz power regime which is attributed to a faster energy relaxation process involved by stronger electron-phonon interaction. Based on this detector, a conversion efficiency around 0.15 from THz power to noise power in 4–6 GHz span has been achieved.

  15. Multi-domain active sound control and noise shielding.

    PubMed

    Lim, H; Utyuzhnikov, S V; Lam, Y W; Turan, A

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes an active sound control methodology based on difference potentials. The main feature of this methodology is its ability to automatically preserve "wanted" sound within a domain while cancelling "unwanted" noise from outside the domain. This method of preservation of the wanted sounds by active shielding control is demonstrated with various broadband and realistic sound sources such as human voice and music in multiple domains in a one-dimensional enclosure. Unlike many other conventional active control methods, the proposed approach does not require the explicit characterization of the wanted sound to be preserved. The controls are designed based on the measurements of the total field on the boundaries of the shielded domain only, which is allowed to be multiply connected. The method is tested in a variety of experimental cases. The typical attenuation of the unwanted noise is found to be about 20 dB over a large area of the shielded domain and the original wanted sound field is preserved with errors of around 1 dB and below through a broad frequency range up to 1 kHz.

  16. Polarimetry noise in fiber-based optical coherence tomography instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ellen Ziyi; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    High noise levels in fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) have broadly limited its clinical utility. In this study we investigate contribution of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) to the polarimetry noise. We develop numerical models of the PS-OCT system including PMD and validate these models with empirical data. Using these models, we provide a framework for predicting noise levels, for processing signals to reduce noise, and for designing an optimized system. PMID:21935044

  17. Perceptually optimized gain function for cochlear implant signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Dawson, Pam W; Hersbach, Adam A

    2012-01-01

    Noise reduction in cochlear implants has achieved significant speech perception improvements through spectral subtraction and signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction techniques. Current methods use gain functions derived through mathematical optimization or motivated by normal listening psychoacoustic experiments. Although these gain functions have been able to improve speech perception, recent studies have indicated that they are not optimal for cochlear implant noise reduction. This study systematically investigates cochlear implant recipients' speech perception and listening preference of noise reduction with a range of gain functions. Results suggest an advantageous gain function and show that gain functions currently used for noise reduction are not optimal for cochlear implant recipients. Using the cochlear implant optimised gain function, a 27% improvement over the current advanced combination encoder (ACE) stimulation strategy in speech weighted noise and a 7% improvement over current noise reduction strategies were observed in babble noise conditions. The optimized gain function was also most preferred by cochlear implant recipients. The CI specific gain function derived from this study can be easily incorporated into existing noise reduction strategies, to further improve listening performance for CI recipients in challenging environments.

  18. Laboratory experiments on active suppression of advanced turboprop noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The noise generated by supersonic tip speed propellers may be a cabin environment problem for future propeller-driven airplanes. Active suppression from speakers inside the airplane cabin has been proposed for canceling out this noise. The potential of active suppression of advanced turboprop noise was tested by using speakers in a rectangular duct. Experiments were first performed with sine wave signals. The results compared well with the ideal cancellation curve of noise as a function of phase angle. Recorded noise signals from subsonic and supersonic tip speed propellers were than used in the duct to deterthe potential for canceling their noise. The subsonic propeller data showed significant cancellations but less than those obtained with the sine wave. The blade-passing-tone cancellation curve for the supersonic propeller was very similar to the subsonic curve, indicating that it is potentially just as easy to cancel supersonic as subsonic propeller blade-passing-tone noise. Propeller duct data from a recorded propeller source and spatial data taken on a propeller-drive airplane showed generally good agreement when compared versus phase angle. This agreement, combined with the similarity of the subsonic and supersonic duct propeller data, indicates that the area of cancellation for advanced supersonic propellers will be similar to that measured on the airplane. Since the area of cancellation on the airplane was small, a method for improving the active noise suppression by using outside speakers is discussed.

  19. Evaluation of noise pollution level based upon community exposure and response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmiston, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results and procedures are reported from an evaluation of noise pollution level as a predictor of annoyance, based on aircraft noise exposure and community response data. The measures of noise exposure presented include composite noise rating, noise exposure forecast, noise and number index. A proposed measure as a universal noise exposure measure for noise pollution level (L sub NP) is discussed.

  20. Processing data base information having nonwhite noise

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Morreale, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    A method and system for processing a set of data from an industrial process and/or a sensor. The method and system can include processing data from either real or calculated data related to an industrial process variable. One of the data sets can be an artificial signal data set generated by an autoregressive moving average technique. After obtaining two data sets associated with one physical variable, a difference function data set is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of data sets over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function data set to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function data set. A residual function data set is obtained by subtracting the composite function data set from the difference function data set and the residual function data set (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test to provide a validated data base.

  1. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  2. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-15

    NCPA Jet > Near/Far-Field Acoustic Measurements at NCPA > First Joint Experiment HDR/MHz PIV with Acoustics > CFD Simulations of NCPA Configuration...Distribution is Unlimited ACTIVE CONTROL OF NOISE FROM HOT SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 5 CFD PHASED ARRAY METHODOLOGY • Using FWH method, obtain...0752 Approved for Public Release - Distribution is Unlimited ACTIVE CONTROL OF NOISE FROM HOT SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 5 CFD OCTAVE BAND

  3. Factors affecting farm noise during common agricultural activities.

    PubMed

    Franklin, R C; Depczynski, J; Challinor, K; Williams, W; Fragar, L J

    2006-05-01

    Hearing injury due to exposure to excessive noise during common farming activities is a significant problem for farmers. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that affect the level of risk to hearing caused by common farming activities. Noise levels on farms were measured across a range of activities and producer groups, and situational factors that effect noise levels were also investigated. Older tractors were found to be 6 dB louder than newer tractors. Cabs reduced noise to the operator by 16 dB, which was halved to 8 dB if a door was open. Radios added between 3 and 5 dB to the noise in the cab. These variables significantly affect the noise level at the ear of operators and others in the workplace, and affect the subsequent exposure limits that are considered safe. Situational factors need to be considered in assessing the level of risk to farmers' hearing and in choosing noise management strategies on the farm. This information has been incorporated into material about hearing and discussions with farmers who participated in field day hearing screening programs in Australia.

  4. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations

    PubMed Central

    Sætrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between “substitution processes,” which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and “exclusion processes,” which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees. PMID:25352319

  5. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations.

    PubMed

    Saetrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between "substitution processes," which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and "exclusion processes," which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees.

  6. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  7. Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.; Laba, Keith E.; Padula, Sharon L.

    1997-01-01

    Cabin noise in turboprop aircraft causes passenger discomfort, airframe fatigue, and employee scheduling constraints due to OSHA standards for exposure to high levels of noise. The noise levels in the cabins of turboprop aircraft are typically 10 to 30 decibels louder than commercial jet noise levels. However. unlike jet noise the turboprop noise spectrum is dominated by a few low frequency tones. Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The goal is to determine the force inputs and locations for the piezoceramic actuators so that: (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. Computational experiments for data taken from a computer generated model and from a laboratory test article at NASA Langley Research Center are provided.

  8. Active noise control using a steerable parametric array loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanaka, Motoki

    2010-06-01

    Arguably active noise control enables the sound suppression at the designated control points, while the sound pressure except the targeted locations is likely to augment. The reason is clear; a control source normally radiates the sound omnidirectionally. To cope with this problem, this paper introduces a parametric array loudspeaker (PAL) which produces a spatially focused sound beam due to the attribute of ultrasound used for carrier waves, thereby allowing one to suppress the sound pressure at the designated point without causing spillover in the whole sound field. First the fundamental characteristics of PAL are overviewed. The scattered pressure in the near field contributed by source strength of PAL is then described, which is needed for the design of an active noise control system. Furthermore, the optimal control law for minimizing the sound pressure at control points is derived, the control effect being investigated analytically and experimentally. With a view to tracking a moving target point, a steerable PAL based upon a phased array scheme is presented, with the result that the generation of a moving zone of quiet becomes possible without mechanically rotating the PAL. An experiment is finally conducted, demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  9. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  10. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  11. Photon-noise effect on detection in coherent active images.

    PubMed

    Réfrégier, Philippe; Goudail, François; Delyon, Guillaume

    2004-01-15

    We analyze photon-noise effects on target detection performance in low-flux coherent active imagery systems. We show that when photon noise is expected, the performance of classical detection techniques designed for pure and fully developed speckle images can be improved with no increase in algorithm complexity. Furthermore, the mean photon number under which photon noise becomes sensitive is higher when the target and background mean values are unknown than in the idealized case, where they are assumed to be known, and when the reflectivity ratio between the target and the background is low.

  12. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, S A; Goeringer, D E; Glish, G L

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly pronated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap.

  13. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Achievements and tasks for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Jiri

    This short survey attempted to highlight some achievements of the latest active control applications. Except for the active control of a one-dimensional sound field in ducts and active headphones, the applications for active control technology are still being developed. Although the principles of active control are simple, their applications still require substantial research and modeling of the sound fields to find optimal solutions. There is no doubt that active control of sound field triggered extensive research of the fundamental properties of the sound field which goes beyond the textbook simplifications. Also, new hardware, particularly actuators, are under development. As more realism is brought into assessment of applicability of active control, we will see in the future increasing confidence of industry to adopt this new technology.

  15. Active noise control system incorporating psychoacoustic and spectrum-tuning features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hua

    Acoustic noise problem is gaining more and more attention in modern society. Traditionally, passive noise control devices are used to block the undesired sound. However, they are inconvenient and costly in some situations. Instead, active noise control (ANC) technique can attenuate the noise in a more flexible and more effective way. ANC technique works on the principal of acoustic superposition with electrically controlled loudspeaker(s) sending out anti-noise signal to cancel out the undesired noise in a target zone. The core component of ANC system is the adaptive filter, which updates the filter coefficients to control the anti-noise sent out by loudspeaker(s). It should be noted that the ultimate goal of ANC is to minimize the annoyance brought by environmental noise to human being. Therefore human hearing characteristics are important factors to improve ANC performance in term of human perception. Psychoacoustics focuses on the study of human perception of sound by objective models. In this dissertation, psychoacoustic considerations are incorporated in ANC systems in two ways. Noise weightings are included in ANC system considering the non-uniform sensitivity of human hearing system. A new ANC architecture is proposed to give listeners flexibility to adjust the spectrum of residual noise considering individual discrepant preferences. In the first scheme, two typical noise weightings, A-weighting and ITU-R 468 noise weighting, are incorporated in the ANC system based on filtered-error least mean square (FELMS) structure. Instead of sound pressure level (SPL), psychoacoustic metrics are utilized to evaluate the noise attenuation performance. In the second approach, we propose a spectrum-tuning active noise control (STANC) structure which could tune the noise spectrum with a tuning filter. In the mean time, the change of tuning filter has no influence on system adaptation, which enssures the system stability and makes online tuning possible. Conventional ANC

  16. Thermal-Mechanical Noise Based CMUT Characterization and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Since the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics where a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. These measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-μm diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10-20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element method and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure. PMID:22718877

  17. Residential road traffic noise and general mental health in youth: The role of noise annoyance, neighborhood restorative quality, physical activity, and social cohesion as potential mediators.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel; Tilov, Boris; Markevych, Iana; Dimitrova, Donka

    2017-09-13

    Given the ubiquitous nature of both noise pollution and mental disorders, their alleged association has not escaped the spotlight of public health research. The effect of traffic noise on mental health is probably mediated by other factors, which have not been elucidated sufficiently. Herein, we aimed to disentangle the pathways linking road traffic noise to general mental health in Bulgarian youth, with a focus on several candidate mediators - noise annoyance, perceived restorative quality of the living environment, physical activity, and neighborhood social cohesion. A cross-sectional sample was collected in October - December 2016 in the city of Plovdiv, Bulgaria. It consisted of 399 students aged 15-25years, recruited from two high schools and three universities. Road traffic noise exposure (Lden) was derived from the strategic noise map of Plovdiv. Mental health was measured with the 12-item form of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Noise annoyance, perceived restorative quality of the living environment, commuting and leisure time physical activity, and neighborhood social cohesion were assessed using validated questionnaires. Analyses were based on linear regression mediation models and a structural equation modeling (SEM) to account for the hypothesized interdependencies between candidate mediators. Results showed that higher noise exposure was associated with worse mental health only indirectly. More specifically, tests of the single and parallel mediation models indicated independent indirect paths through noise annoyance, social cohesion, and physical activity. In addition, the SEM revealed that more noise annoyance was associated with less social cohesion, and in turn with worse mental health; noise annoyance was also associated with lower neighborhood restorative quality, thereby with less social cohesion and physical activity, and in turn with worse mental health. However, causality could not be established. Further research is warranted to

  18. Speckle noise in satellite based lidar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    The lidar system model was described, and the statistics of the signal and noise at the receiver output were derived. Scattering media effects were discussed along with polarization and atmospheric turbulence. The major equations were summarized and evaluated for some typical parameters.

  19. Active local control of propeller-aircraft run-up noise.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Murray; Guo, Jingnan; Germain, Pierre

    2003-12-01

    Engine run-ups are part of the regular maintenance schedule at Vancouver International Airport. The noise generated by the run-ups propagates into neighboring communities, disturbing the residents. Active noise control is a potentially cost-effective alternative to passive methods, such as enclosures. Propeller aircraft generate low-frequency tonal noise that is highly compatible with active control. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the feasibility and effectiveness of controlling run-up noise from propeller aircraft using local active control. Computer simulations for different configurations of multi-channel active-noise-control systems, aimed at reducing run-up noise in adjacent residential areas using a local-control strategy, were performed. These were based on an optimal configuration of a single-channel control system studied previously. The variations of the attenuation and amplification zones with the number of control channels, and with source/control-system geometry, were studied. Here, the aircraft was modeled using one or two sources, with monopole or multipole radiation patterns. Both free-field and half-space conditions were considered: for the configurations studied, results were similar in the two cases. In both cases, large triangular quiet zones, with local attenuations of 10 dB or more, were obtained when nine or more control channels were used. Increases of noise were predicted outside of these areas, but these were minimized as more control channels were employed. By combining predicted attenuations with measured noise spectra, noise levels after implementation of an active control system were estimated.

  20. Approaches to Adaptive Active Acoustic Noise Control at a Point Using Feedforward Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulch, Peter A.

    Active acoustic noise control systems have been of interest since their birth in the 1930's. The principle is to superimpose on an unwanted noise wave shape its inverse with the intention of destructive interference. This work presents two approaches to this idea. The first approach uses a direct design method to develop a controller using an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model that will be used to condition the primary noise to produce the required anti-noise for cancellation. The development of this approach has shown that the stability of the controller relies heavily on a non-minimum phase model of the secondary noise path. For this reason, a second approach, using a controller consisting of two parts was developed. The first part of the controller is designed to cancel broadband noise and the second part is an adaptive controller designed to cancel periodic noise. A simple technique for identifying the parameters of the broadband controller is developed. An ARMA model is used, and it is shown that its stability is improved by prefiltering the test signal with a minimum-phase inverse of the secondary noise channel. The periodic controller uses an estimate of the fundamental frequency to cancel the first few harmonics of periodic noise. A computationally efficient adaptive technique based on least squares is developed for updating the harmonic controller gains at each time step. Experimental results are included for the broadband controller, the harmonic controller, and the combination of the two algorithms. The advantages of using both techniques in conjunction are shown using test cases involving both broadband noise and periodic noise.

  1. Cortical activity patterns predict robust speech discrimination ability in noise

    PubMed Central

    Shetake, Jai A.; Wolf, Jordan T.; Cheung, Ryan J.; Engineer, Crystal T.; Ram, Satyananda K.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support speech discrimination in noisy conditions are poorly understood. In quiet conditions, spike timing information appears to be used in the discrimination of speech sounds. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that spike timing is also used to distinguish between speech sounds in noisy conditions that significantly degrade neural responses to speech sounds. We tested speech sound discrimination in rats and recorded primary auditory cortex (A1) responses to speech sounds in background noise of different intensities and spectral compositions. Our behavioral results indicate that rats, like humans, are able to accurately discriminate consonant sounds even in the presence of background noise that is as loud as the speech signal. Our neural recordings confirm that speech sounds evoke degraded but detectable responses in noise. Finally, we developed a novel neural classifier that mimics behavioral discrimination. The classifier discriminates between speech sounds by comparing the A1 spatiotemporal activity patterns evoked on single trials with the average spatiotemporal patterns evoked by known sounds. Unlike classifiers in most previous studies, this classifier is not provided with the stimulus onset time. Neural activity analyzed with the use of relative spike timing was well correlated with behavioral speech discrimination in quiet and in noise. Spike timing information integrated over longer intervals was required to accurately predict rat behavioral speech discrimination in noisy conditions. The similarity of neural and behavioral discrimination of speech in noise suggests that humans and rats may employ similar brain mechanisms to solve this problem. PMID:22098331

  2. Head-mounted active noise control system with virtual sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Nobuhiro; Kajikawa, Yoshinobu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply a virtual sensing technique to a head-mounted active noise control (ANC) system we have already proposed. The proposed ANC system can reduce narrowband noise while improving the noise reduction ability at the desired locations. A head-mounted ANC system based on an adaptive feedback structure can reduce noise with periodicity or narrowband components. However, since quiet zones are formed only at the locations of error microphones, an adequate noise reduction cannot be achieved at the locations where error microphones cannot be placed such as near the eardrums. A solution to this problem is to apply a virtual sensing technique. A virtual sensing ANC system can achieve higher noise reduction at the desired locations by measuring the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors, which will be used in the online operation of the virtual sensing ANC algorithm. Hence, we attempt to achieve the maximum noise reduction near the eardrums by applying the virtual sensing technique to the head-mounted ANC system. However, it is impossible to place the microphone near the eardrums. Therefore, the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors are estimated using the Head And Torso Simulator (HATS) instead of human ears. Some simulation, experimental, and subjective assessment results demonstrate that the head-mounted ANC system with virtual sensing is superior to that without virtual sensing in terms of the noise reduction ability at the desired locations.

  3. First Test of Fan Active Noise Control (ANC) Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    With the advent of ultrahigh-bypass engines, the space available for passive acoustic treatment is becoming more limited, whereas noise regulations are becoming more stringent. Active noise control (ANC) holds promise as a solution to this problem. It uses secondary (added) noise sources to reduce or eliminate the offending noise radiation. The first active noise control test on the low-speed fan test bed was a General Electric Company system designed to control either the exhaust or inlet fan tone. This system consists of a "ring source," an induct array of error microphones, and a control computer. Fan tone noise propagates in a duct in the form of spinning waves. These waves are detected by the microphone array, and the computer identifies their spinning structure. The computer then controls the "ring source" to generate waves that have the same spinning structure and amplitude, but 180 out of phase with the fan noise. This computer generated tone cancels the fan tone before it radiates from the duct and is heard in the far field. The "ring source" used in these tests is a cylindrical array of 16 flat-plate acoustic radiators that are driven by thin piezoceramic sheets bonded to their back surfaces. The resulting source can produce spinning waves up to mode 7 at levels high enough to cancel the fan tone. The control software is flexible enough to work on spinning mode orders from -6 to 6. In this test, the fan was configured to produce a tone of order 6. The complete modal (spinning and radial) structure of the tones was measured with two builtin sets of rotating microphone rakes. These rakes provide a measurement of the system performance independent from the control system error microphones. In addition, the far-field noise was measured with a semicircular array of 28 microphones. This test represents the first in a series of tests that demonstrate different active noise control concepts, each on a progressively more complicated modal structure. The tests are

  4. Applications of active adaptive noise control to jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoureshi, Rahmat; Brackney, Larry

    1993-01-01

    During phase 2 research on the application of active noise control to jet engines, the development of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) active adaptive noise control algorithms and acoustic/controls models for turbofan engines were considered. Specific goals for this research phase included: (1) implementation of a MIMO adaptive minimum variance active noise controller; and (2) turbofan engine model development. A minimum variance control law for adaptive active noise control has been developed, simulated, and implemented for single-input/single-output (SISO) systems. Since acoustic systems tend to be distributed, multiple sensors, and actuators are more appropriate. As such, the SISO minimum variance controller was extended to the MIMO case. Simulation and experimental results are presented. A state-space model of a simplified gas turbine engine is developed using the bond graph technique. The model retains important system behavior, yet is of low enough order to be useful for controller design. Expansion of the model to include multiple stages and spools is also discussed.

  5. Regular Wave Propagation Out of Noise in Chemical Active Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, S.; Sendina-Nadal, I.; Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Sancho, J. M.; Sagues, F.

    2001-08-13

    A pacemaker, regularly emitting chemical waves, is created out of noise when an excitable photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky medium, strictly unable to autonomously initiate autowaves, is forced with a spatiotemporal patterned random illumination. These experimental observations are also reproduced numerically by using a set of reaction-diffusion equations for an activator-inhibitor model, and further analytically interpreted in terms of genuine coupling effects arising from parametric fluctuations. Within the same framework we also address situations of noise-sustained propagation in subexcitable media.

  6. Regular wave propagation out of noise in chemical active media.

    PubMed

    Alonso, S; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V; Sancho, J M; Sagués, F

    2001-08-13

    A pacemaker, regularly emitting chemical waves, is created out of noise when an excitable photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky medium, strictly unable to autonomously initiate autowaves, is forced with a spatiotemporal patterned random illumination. These experimental observations are also reproduced numerically by using a set of reaction-diffusion equations for an activator-inhibitor model, and further analytically interpreted in terms of genuine coupling effects arising from parametric fluctuations. Within the same framework we also address situations of noise-sustained propagation in subexcitable media.

  7. Bird's-eye view on noise-based logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Granqvist, Claes G.; Horvath, Tamas; Klappenecker, Andreas; Wen, He; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-09-01

    Noise-based logic is a practically deterministic logic scheme inspired by the randomness of neural spikes and uses a system of uncorrelated stochastic processes and their superposition to represent the logic state. We briefly discuss various questions such as (i) What does practical determinism mean? (ii) Is noise-based logic a Turing machine? (iii) Is there hope to beat (the dreams of) quantum computation by a classical physical noise-based processor, and what are the minimum hardware requirements for that? Finally, (iv) we address the problem of random number generators and show that the common belief that quantum number generators are superior to classical (thermal) noise-based generators is nothing but a myth.

  8. Thunderstorms and ground-based radio noise as observed by radio astronomy Explorer 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. A.; Herman, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) data were analyzed to determine the frequency dependence of HF terrestrial radio noise power. RAE observations of individual thunderstorms, mid-ocean areas, and specific geographic regions for which concommitant ground based measurements are available indicate that noise power is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency which conforms to expectations over the geographic locations and time periods investigated. In all cases investigated, active thunderstorm regions emit slightly higher power as contrasted to RAE observations of the region during meteorologically quiet periods. Noise levels are some 15 db higher than predicted values over mid-ocean, while in locations where ground based measurements are available a maximum deviation of 5 db occurs. Worldwide contour mapping of the noise power at 6000 km for five individual months and four observing frequencies, examples of which are given, indicate high noise levels over continental land masses with corresponding lower levels over ocean regions.

  9. Active vibrations and noise control for turboprop application research program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paonessa, A.; Concilio, A.; Lecce, Leonardo V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this work include the following: (1) development of active noise control techniques to alleviate inefficiencies and drawbacks of passive noise control approach especially at low frequencies; (2) reduction of structurally radiated noise applying external forces to the vibrating structure by means of force actuators made of piezoelectric material; and (3) reduction of fuselage vibration levels in propeller driven aircraft by means of distributed piezoelectric actuators that are actively controlled.

  10. Recent advances in active noise and vibration control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Silcox, Richard J.; Turner, Travis L.

    2002-11-01

    Over the past 15 years NASA has investigated the use of active control technology for aircraft interior noise. More recently this work has been supported through the Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program (1994-2001), High Speed Research Program (1994-1999), and through the Quiet Aircraft Technology Program (2000-present). The interior environment is recognized as an important element in flight safety, crew communications and fatigue, as well as passenger comfort. This presentation will overview research in active noise and vibration control relating to interior noise being investigated by NASA. The research to be presented includes: active control of aircraft fuselage sidewall transmission due to turbulent boundary layer or jet noise excitation, active control of interior tones due to propeller excitation of aircraft structures, and adaptive stiffening of structures for noise, vibration, and fatigue control. Work on actuator technology ranging from piezoelectrics, shape memory actuators, and fluidic actuators will be described including applications. Control system technology will be included that is experimentally based, real-time, and adaptive.

  11. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  12. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation.

  13. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 1; Flyover System Noise Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Robert E.; Janardan, B. A.; Kontos, G. C.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels are arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios from 1.3 to 1.75. The major conclusions that can be drawn are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC, and for a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness than passive treatment. Additionally, ANC appears to be more effective at sideline and cutback conditions than at approach. Overall EPNL suppressions due to tone removal range from about 1 to 3 dB at takeoff engine speeds and from 1 to 5 db at approach speeds. Studies of economic impact of the installation of an ANC system for the four engine cases indicate increases of DOC ranging from 1 to 2 percent, favoring the lower fan pressure ratio engines. Further study is needed to confirm the results by examining additional engine data, particularly at low fan pressure ratios, and studying the details of the current results to obtain a more complete understanding. Further studies should also include determining the effects of combining passive and active treatment.

  14. Active control of fan noise-feasibility study. Volume 1: Flyover system noise studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert E.; Janardan, B. A.; Kontos, G. C.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1994-10-01

    A study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels are arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios from 1.3 to 1.75. The major conclusions that can be drawn are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC, and for a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness than passive treatment. Additionally, ANC appears to be more effective at sideline and cutback conditions than at approach. Overall EPNL suppressions due to tone removal range from about 1 to 3 dB at takeoff engine speeds and from 1 to 5 db at approach speeds. Studies of economic impact of the installation of an ANC system for the four engine cases indicate increases of DOC ranging from 1 to 2 percent, favoring the lower fan pressure ratio engines. Further study is needed to confirm the results by examining additional engine data, particularly at low fan pressure ratios, and studying the details of the current results to obtain a more complete understanding. Further studies should also include determining the effects of combining passive and active treatment.

  15. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  16. Scope for active noise abatement in vehicle diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerauer, I.; Boesch, N.

    1984-04-01

    Noise reduction measures must be directed to the engine, the exhaust system, and the cooling system (fan) all of which contribute approximately 90% of the sound energy emitted from commercial diesel trucks. The noise generation processes were visualized and limiting conditions fixed by law were considered in establishing criteria for active solar noise abatement measures. A more effective silencer and better vibration damping on the surface of the silencer and exhaust pipes can reduce noise from the exhaust system. Acoustic emission generated by the fan and air flow can be reduced by decreasing flow velocity or by turning on the fan only when a full cooling output is required (10% of the time). Active measures are needed on the engine itself either at the point of the solid-borne sound transmission or at the point of the solid-borne vibrations. The predominant effect is on the engine casing; oil sump; air suction pipe or air charge line; the flywheel casing; and the clutch housing.

  17. Modeling, analysis, and validation of an active T-shaped noise barrier.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongping; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li

    2013-09-01

    With ever-increasing land traffic, abatement of traffic noise using noise barriers remains significant, yet it is a challenging task due to spatial competition with other infrastructure. In this study, a deep insight into the diffraction characteristics of acoustic fields near noise barriers of various geometries and surface conditions was achieved using numerical simulations. A T-shaped passive noise barrier with acoustically soft upper surfaces was demonstrated to outperform other candidates in a middle- or high-frequency range. Based on attributes of the acoustic field diffracted by T-shaped barriers, an active control strategy was developed to revamp the T-shaped barrier, in which a filtered minimax algorithm was established to drive the secondary sound sources. This algorithm resulted in more uniformly distributed residual sound fields than a filtered-X least mean square algorithm. Performance of the actively controlled barrier was evaluated at different positions and spacings of secondary sound sources and error sensors, leading to a series of optimal criteria for the design of active noise barriers. A prototype was fabricated and validated experimentally, manifesting particular effectiveness in insulating low-frequency noise, supplementing well the capacity of a passive T-shaped barrier which is effective in the middle- or high-frequency range.

  18. Pink noise: effect on complexity synchronization of brain activity and sleep consolidation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhong; Liu, Dongdong; Li, Xin; Ma, Jing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2012-08-07

    In this study, we hypothesized that steady pink noise is able to change the complexity of brain activities into a characteristic level and it might have significant effect on improving sleep stability. First, we carried out the brain synchronization test in which electroencephalogram (EEG) signals of 6 subjects were recorded. The whole experiment procedure was divided into 5 blocks in the alternative feeding process of 10-min quiet and 10-min noise. After the complexity analysis of fractal dimension, we found that the complexity of the EEG signals decreased with the introduction of the pink noise exposure, showing the brain waves tended to synchronize with the pink noise induction to reach a low level. For the sleep quality experiment, 40 subjects were recruited the group of nocturnal sleep experiment and 10 participants were chosen for nap test. Each subjects slept for two consecutive experimental periods, of which one is pink noise exposed and the other is quiet. For both nocturnal sleep and nap tests, the results in the noise exposure group showed significant enhancement in the percentage of stable sleep time compared to the control group based on the analysis of electrocardiography (ECG) signal with cardiopulmonary coupling approach. This study demonstrates that steady pink noise has significant effect on reducing brain wave complexity and inducing more stable sleep time to improve sleep quality of individuals.

  19. Discrete cosine transform-based local adaptive filtering of images corrupted by nonstationary noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir V.; Fevralev, Dmitriy V.; Ponomarenko, Nikolay N.; Abramov, Sergey K.; Pogrebnyak, Oleksiy; Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2010-04-01

    In many image-processing applications, observed images are contaminated by a nonstationary noise and no a priori information on noise dependence on local mean or about local properties of noise statistics is available. In order to remove such a noise, a locally adaptive filter has to be applied. We study a locally adaptive filter based on evaluation of image local activity in a ``blind'' manner and on discrete cosine transform computed in overlapping blocks. Two mechanisms of local adaptation are proposed and applied. The first mechanism takes into account local estimates of noise standard deviation while the second one exploits discrimination of homogeneous and heterogeneous image regions by adaptive threshold setting. The designed filter performance is tested for simulated data as well as for real-life remote-sensing and maritime radar images. Recommendations concerning filter parameter setting are provided. An area of applicability of the proposed filter is defined.

  20. Spontaneous emission noise in long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-09-19

    Spontaneous emission noise is an important limit to the performance of active plasmonic devices. Here, we investigate the spontaneous emission noise in the long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope. A theoretical model of the sensitivity is established to study the incoherent multi-beam interference of spontaneous emission in the gyroscope. Numerical results show that spontaneous emission produces a drift in the transmittance spectra and lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio of the gyroscope. It also strengthens the shot noise to be the main limit to the sensitivity of the gyroscope for high propagation loss. To reduce the negative effects of the spontaneous emission noise on the gyroscope, an external feedback loop is suggested to estimate the drift in the transmittance spectra and therefor enhance the sensitivity. Our work lays a foundation for the improvement of long-range surface plasmon-polariton gyroscope and paves the way to its practical application.

  1. Spontaneous emission noise in long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous emission noise is an important limit to the performance of active plasmonic devices. Here, we investigate the spontaneous emission noise in the long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope. A theoretical model of the sensitivity is established to study the incoherent multi-beam interference of spontaneous emission in the gyroscope. Numerical results show that spontaneous emission produces a drift in the transmittance spectra and lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio of the gyroscope. It also strengthens the shot noise to be the main limit to the sensitivity of the gyroscope for high propagation loss. To reduce the negative effects of the spontaneous emission noise on the gyroscope, an external feedback loop is suggested to estimate the drift in the transmittance spectra and therefor enhance the sensitivity. Our work lays a foundation for the improvement of long-range surface plasmon-polariton gyroscope and paves the way to its practical application. PMID:25234712

  2. The Timing of Noise-Sensitive Activities in Residential Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Data from a nationally representative survey of time use was analyzed to provide estimates of the percentage of the population which is engaged in noise sensitive activities during each hour of the day on weekdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Estimates are provided of the percentage engaged in aural communication activities at home, sleeping at home, or simply at home. The day can be roughly divided into four noise sensitivity periods consisting of two relatively steady state periods, night and day and the early morning and evening transition periods. Weekends differ from weekdays in that the morning transition period is one hour later and the numbers of people engaged in aural communication during the day at home are approximately one-half to three-quarters greater. The extent and timing of noise sensitive activities was found to be similiar for all parts of the United States, for different sizes of urban areas, and for the three seasons surveyed (September through May). The timing of activity periods does not differ greatly by sex or age even though women and people over 65 are much more likely to be at home during the daytime.

  3. Concurrent mechatronic design approach for active control of cavity noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, L. P. R.; da Silva, M. M.; Sas, P.; Van Brussel, H.; Desmet, W.

    2008-07-01

    Active control is a potential solution to many noise and vibration problems for improving the low-frequency performance. Cavity noise reduction as encountered for instance in aircraft cabins and vehicle interiors is a typical example. However, the conventional design of these active solutions may lead to suboptimal products, since the interaction between the vibro-acoustic plant dynamics and control dynamics is usually not considered. A proper way to design such active systems would be considering control and plant parameters concurrently. To cope with this approach, a methodology to derive a fully coupled mechatronic model that deals with both the vibro-acoustic plant dynamics as well as the control parameters is proposed. The inclusion of sensor and actuator models is investigated, since it contributes to the model accuracy as it can confer frequency, phase or amplitude limitations to the control performance. The proposed methodology provides a reduced state-space model derived from a fully coupled vibro-acoustic finite element model. Experimental data on a vibro-acoustic vehicle cabin mock-up are used to validate the model reduction procedure. Regarding noise reduction, optimization results are presented considering both vibro-acoustic plant features, such as thicknesses, and control parameters, such as sensor and actuator placement and control gains. A collocated sensor/actuator pair is considered in a velocity feedback control strategy. The benefits of a concurrent mechatronic design when dealing with active structural-acoustic control solutions are addressed, illustrated and experimentally validated.

  4. The timing of noise-sensitive activities in residential areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-07-01

    Data from a nationally representative survey of time use was analyzed to provide estimates of the percentage of the population which is engaged in noise sensitive activities during each hour of the day on weekdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Estimates are provided of the percentage engaged in aural communication activities at home, sleeping at home, or simply at home. The day can be roughly divided into four noise sensitivity periods consisting of two relatively steady state periods, night and day and the early morning and evening transition periods. Weekends differ from weekdays in that the morning transition period is one hour later and the numbers of people engaged in aural communication during the day at home are approximately one-half to three-quarters greater. The extent and timing of noise sensitive activities was found to be similiar for all parts of the United States, for different sizes of urban areas, and for the three seasons surveyed (September through May). The timing of activity periods does not differ greatly by sex or age even though women and people over 65 are much more likely to be at home during the daytime.

  5. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  6. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  7. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  8. Effects of activity interference on annoyance due to aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.; Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of aircraft flyover noise on annoyance were compared for face to face conversation, reverie, and television viewing. Eighteen 5 minute sessions, each composed of three flyovers, were presented on each of 2 days to subjects in a simulated living room. Twelve pairs of females and 12 pairs of males were tested, once before and once after work. Flyovers varied in peak noise level from 53 to 83 dB, A weighted. On each day, subjects engaged in 18 sessions, six of conversation, six of television viewing, and six of reverie. The subjects completed subjective ratings of annoyance and acceptability following every session. Annoyance and unacceptability rating scores were significantly higher for the activity of television viewing compared to conversation or reverie. There was no difference between judgments during the latter two activities. No differences were found in the judgments when compared on the basis of "fatigue" (before/after work) or sex of the subject.

  9. Active aerodynamic control of wake-airfoil interaction noise - Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Lavrich, P. L.; Sofrin, T. G.; Topol, D. A.

    A proof of concept experiment is conducted that shows the potential for active aerodynamic control of rotor wake/stator interaction noise in a simplified manner. A single airfoil model representing the stator was fitted with a moveable trailing edge flap controlled by a servo motor. The control system moves the motor driven flap in the correct angular displacement phase and rate to reduce the unsteady load on the airfoil during the wake interaction.

  10. Amplifier Noise Based Optical Steganography with Coherent Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ben; Chang, Matthew P.; Caldwell, Naomi R.; Caldwell, Myles E.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize the principle and experimental setup of optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. Using ASE noise as the signal carrier, optical steganography effectively hides a stealth channel in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Coherent detection is used at the receiver of the stealth channel. Because ASE noise has short coherence length and random phase, it only interferes with itself within a very short range. Coherent detection requires the stealth transmitter and stealth receiver to precisely match the optical delay,which generates a large key space for the stealth channel. Several methods to further improve optical steganography, signal to noise ratio, compatibility with the public channel, and applications of the stealth channel are also summarized in this review paper.

  11. Noise and its reduction in graphene based nanopore devices.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashvani; Park, Kyeong-Beom; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Ki-Bum

    2013-12-13

    Ionic current fluctuations in graphene nanopore devices are a ubiquitous phenomenon and are responsible for degraded spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we descriptively investigate the impact of different substrate materials (Si and quartz) and membrane thicknesses on noise characteristics of graphene nanopore devices. To mitigate the membrane fluctuations and pin-hole defects, a SiNx membrane is transferred onto the substrate and a pore of approximately 70 nm in diameter is perforated prior to the graphene transfer. Comprehensive noise study reveals that the few layer graphene transferred onto the quartz substrate possesses low noise level and higher signal to noise ratio as compared to single layer graphene, without deteriorating the spatial resolution. The findings here point to improvement of graphene based nanopore devices for exciting opportunities in future single-molecule genomic screening devices.

  12. Ultralow-phase-noise oscillators based on BAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingdong; Seok, Seonho; Rolland, Nathalie; Rolland, Paul; El Aabbaoui, Hassan; de Foucauld, Emeric; Vincent, Pierre; Giordano, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents two 2.1-GHz low-phase noise oscillators based on BAW resonators. Both a single-ended common base structure and a differential Colpitts structure have been implemented in a 0.25-μm BiCMOS process. The detailed design methods including the realization, optimization, and test are reported. The differential Colpitts structure exhibits a phase noise 6.5 dB lower than the single-ended structure because of its good performance of power noise immunity. Comparison between the two structures is also carried out. The differential Colpitts structure shows a phase noise level of -87 dBc/Hz at 1-kHz offset frequency and a phase noise floor of -162 dBc/Hz, with an output power close to -6.5 dBm and a core consumption of 21.6 mW. Furthermore, with the proposed optimization methods, both proposed devices have achieved promising phase noise performance compared with state-of-the-art oscillators described in the literature. Finally, we briefly present the application of the proposed BAW oscillator to a micro-atomic clock.

  13. Noise in brain activity engenders perception and influences discrimination sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; De Lucia, Marzia; Tzovara, Athina; Manuel, Aurelie L; Murray, Micah M; Spierer, Lucas

    2011-12-07

    Behavioral and brain responses to identical stimuli can vary with experimental and task parameters, including the context of stimulus presentation or attention. More surprisingly, computational models suggest that noise-related random fluctuations in brain responses to stimuli would alone be sufficient to engender perceptual differences between physically identical stimuli. In two experiments combining psychophysics and EEG in healthy humans, we investigated brain mechanisms whereby identical stimuli are (erroneously) perceived as different (higher vs lower in pitch or longer vs shorter in duration) in the absence of any change in the experimental context. Even though, as expected, participants' percepts to identical stimuli varied randomly, a classification algorithm based on a mixture of Gaussians model (GMM) showed that there was sufficient information in single-trial EEG to reliably predict participants' judgments of the stimulus dimension. By contrasting electrical neuroimaging analyses of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) to the identical stimuli as a function of participants' percepts, we identified the precise timing and neural correlates (strength vs topographic modulations) as well as intracranial sources of these erroneous perceptions. In both experiments, AEP differences first occurred ~100 ms after stimulus onset and were the result of topographic modulations following from changes in the configuration of active brain networks. Source estimations localized the origin of variations in perceived pitch of identical stimuli within right temporal and left frontal areas and of variations in perceived duration within right temporoparietal areas. We discuss our results in terms of providing neurophysiologic evidence for the contribution of random fluctuations in brain activity to conscious perception.

  14. Active Control of Fan Noise by Vane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Alan R. D.

    1999-01-01

    An active noise control system for ducted fan noise was built that uses actuators located in stator vanes. The actuators were piezoelectric benders manufactured using the THUNDER technology and were custom designed for the application. The active noise control system was installed in the NASA ANCF rig. Four actuator array with a total of 168 actuators in 28 stator vanes were used. Simultaneous reductions of acoustic power in both the inlet and exhaust duct were demonstrated for a fan disturbance that contained two radial mode orders in both inlet and exhaust. Total power levels in the target modes were reduced by up to 9 dB in the inlet and total tone levels by over 6 dB while exhaust power levels were reduced by up to 3 dB. Far field sound pressure level reductions of up to 17 dB were observed. A simpler control system, matched to the location of the disturbance with two radial actuator arrays, was demonstrated to control total acoustic power in four disturbance modes simultaneously in inlet and exhaust. The vane actuator met the requirements given for the ANCF, although in practice the performance of the system was limited by the constraints of the power amplifiers and the presence of control spillover. The vane actuators were robust. None of the 168 vane actuators failed during the tests.

  15. Adjoint based noise minimization of a round supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, J.; Sesterhenn, J.

    2011-12-01

    Jets with complex shock-cell structures appear in numerous technological applications. The shock/shear-layer interaction emanates a broadband noise component. This may trigger the thin shear layer at the nozzle exit, forming a feedback loop which results in a discrete noise component called screech. Both components are undesirable from structural and environmental (cabin noise) points of view. Screech tones produce sound pressure levels of 160 dB and beyond. The focus of the present research project lies in the minimization of supersonic jet-noise and in particular in the minimization of jet-screech. Since screech - a phenomenon which is not yet understood in all details - seems to be affected by the presence of the jet-nozzle, a porous material will be added to the nozzle exit to suppress the feedback mechanism. Thus, to minimize the emanated noise. It is by no means clear how the shape an characteristic properties of the porous material should be. To this end, an optimization technique, based on adjoint methods will be applied to optimize the material with respect to the emanated noise.

  16. A Lightweight Loudspeaker for Aircraft Communications and Active Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnaka, Glenn E.; Kleinle, Mark; Tsangaris, Parry; Oslac, Michael J.; Moskow, Harry J.

    1992-01-01

    A series of new, lightweight loudspeakers for use on commercial aircraft has been developed. The loudspeakers use NdFeB magnets and aluminum alloy frames to reduce the weight. The NdFeB magnet is virtually encapsulated by steel in the new speaker designs. Active noise reduction using internal loudspeakers was demonstrated to be effective in 1983. A weight, space, and cost efficient method for creating the active sound attenuating fields is to use the existing cabin loudspeakers for both communication and sound attenuation. This will require some additional loudspeaker design considerations.

  17. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 4; Flyover System Noise Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Janardan, B. A.; Gliebe, P. R.; Kontos, G. C.

    1996-01-01

    An extension of a prior study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct, at least to the extent that they no longer protrude above the surrounding broadband noise levels. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels am arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios of 1.3, 1.45, 1.6, and 1.75. This report is an extension of an effort reported previously. The major conclusions drawn from the prior study, which was restricted to fan pressure ratios of 1.45 and 1.75, are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC. For a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness from passive treatment. In the present study, the other two fan pressure ratios are included in a more detailed examination of the benefits of the ANC suppression levels. The key results of this extended study are the following observations: (1) The maximum overall benefit obtained from suppression of BPF alone was 2.5 EPNdB at high fan speeds. The suppression benefit increases with increase in fan pressure ratio (FPR), (2) The maximum overall benefit obtained from suppression of the first three harmonics was 3 EPNdB at high speeds. Suppression benefit increases with increase in FPR, (3) At low FPR, only about 1.0 EPNdB maximum reduction was obtained. Suppression is primarily from reduction of BPF at high FPR values and from the combination of tones at low FPR, (4) The benefit from ANC is about the same as the benefit from passive treatment at fan pressure

  18. Noise Reduction for a MEMS-Gyroscope-Based Head Mouse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiaying; Gerdtman, Christer; Lindén, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, four different signal processing algorithms which can be applied to reduce the noise from a MEMS-gyroscope-based computer head mouse are presented. MEMS-gyroscopes are small, light, cheap and widely used in many electrical products. MultiPos, a MEMS-gyroscope-based computer head mouse system was designed for persons with movement disorders. Noise such as physiological tremor and electrical noise is a common problem for the MultiPos system. In this study four different signal processing algorithms were applied and evaluated by simulation in MATLAB and implementation in a dsPIC, with aim to minimize the noise in MultiPos. The algorithms were low-pass filter, Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm, Kalman filter and Weighted Fourier Linear Combiner (WFLC) algorithm. Comparisons and system tests show that these signal processing algorithms can be used to improve the MultiPos system. The WFLC algorithm was found the best method for noise reduction in the application of a MEMS-gyroscope-based head mouse.

  19. Methodology of selecting the reference source for an active noise control system in a car.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Zbigniew; Stankiewicz, Bartosz

    2013-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, a significant development in digital technologies of signal processing made it possible to apply active noise control methods in new domains. A proper selection of the reference signal source is a main problem in implementing such systems. This paper presents an estimation method based on an indicator of the coherent power level. It also presents a simple system of active noise control in a car, operating according to the proposed method of optimising the positioning of reference sources. This system makes it possible to considerably increase the comfort of work of drivers in various kinds of road transport without a great increase in cost. This is especially significant in the case of trucks and vans. Passive barriers are considerably more expensive in them, which results in a higher level of noise than in passenger cars.

  20. Potential Subjective Effectiveness of Active Interior Noise Control in Propeller Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control technology offers the potential for weight-efficient aircraft interior noise reduction, particularly for propeller aircraft. However, there is little information on how passengers respond to this type of interior noise control. This paper presents results of two experiments that use sound quality engineering practices to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control (ANC) systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two experiments differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons based on preference in the first and numerical category scaling of noisiness in the second. Although the results of the two experiments were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference. The reductions in subjective response due to the ANC conditions were predicted with reasonable accuracy by reductions in measured loudness level. Inclusion of corrections for the sound quality characteristics of tonality and fluctuation strength in multiple regression models improved the prediction of the ANC effects.

  1. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  2. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Alagramam, Kumar N; Stepanyan, Ruben; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Chen, Daniel H-C; Davis, Rickie R

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control) or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  3. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    PubMed

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  4. Effects of background noise on audiometric thresholds during positron emission tomography: passive and active noise-reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Burkard, R F; Lockwood, A H; Salvi, R J

    2000-01-01

    Position emission tomography (PET) is used to assess the functional activity of the human auditory brain; however, the activity detected by PET could be affected by ambient acoustic noise from the PET equipment. To evaluate these effects, we compared behavioural thresholds in the PET camera with those measured in an audiometric sound booth. Thresholds were measured with: (i) ER2 earphones, (ii) ER2 earphones + Cabot earmuffs, (iii) ER2 earphones + Bose Series II Aviation Headset with active noise-reduction off, and (iv) ER2 earphones + Bose Series II Aviation Headset with active noise-reduction on. Overall ambient noise level in the camera was 73 dB SPL and the maximum octave-band SPL was 68 dB SPL at 250 Hz. Threshold elevations in the PET camera were greatest with ER2 (17 dB, 125 Hz) earphones and lowest with ER2 earphones + Bose Series II Aviation Headset (8 dB at 250 Hz) with active noise-reduction. Thus, PET scanner noise had little or no effect on threshold when stimuli were presented through ER2 earphones covered with an activated Bose Series II Aviation Headset.

  5. Stochastic speckle noise compensation in optical coherence tomography using non-stationary spline-based speckle noise modelling.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Andrew; Lui, Dorothy; Boroomand, Ameneh; Glaister, Jeffrey; Wong, Alexander; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for non-invasive 3D visualization of biological tissue at cellular level resolution. Often hindered by speckle noise, the visualization of important biological tissue details in OCT that can aid disease diagnosis can be improved by speckle noise compensation. A challenge with handling speckle noise is its inherent non-stationary nature, where the underlying noise characteristics vary with the spatial location. In this study, an innovative speckle noise compensation method is presented for handling the non-stationary traits of speckle noise in OCT imagery. The proposed approach centers on a non-stationary spline-based speckle noise modeling strategy to characterize the speckle noise. The novel method was applied to ultra high-resolution OCT (UHROCT) images of the human retina and corneo-scleral limbus acquired in-vivo that vary in tissue structure and optical properties. Test results showed improved performance of the proposed novel algorithm compared to a number of previously published speckle noise compensation approaches in terms of higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and better overall visual assessment.

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  7. An active noise control algorithm for controlling multiple sinusoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Lee, H J; Yoo, C H; Youn, D H; Cha, I W

    1998-07-01

    The filtered-x LMS algorithm and its modified versions have been successfully applied in suppressing acoustic noise such as single and multiple tones and broadband random noise. This paper presents an adaptive algorithm based on the filtered-x LMS algorithm which may be applied in attenuating tonal acoustic noise. In the proposed method, the weights of the adaptive filter and estimation of the phase shift due to the acoustic path from a loudspeaker to a microphone are computed simultaneously for optimal control. The algorithm possesses advantages over other filtered-x LMS approaches in three aspects: (1) each frequency component is processed separately using an adaptive filter with two coefficients, (2) the convergence parameter for each sinusoid can be selected independently, and (3) the computational load can be reduced by eliminating the convolution process required to obtain the filtered reference signal. Simulation results for a single-input/single-output (SISO) environment demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to the changes of the acoustic path between the actuator and the microphone and outperforms the filtered-x LMS algorithm in simplicity and convergence speed.

  8. On-line, adaptive state estimator for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic characteristics of airframe structures are expected to vary as aircraft flight conditions change. Accurate knowledge of the changing dynamic characteristics is crucial to enhancing the performance of the active noise control system using feedback control. This research investigates the development of an adaptive, on-line state estimator using a neural network concept to conduct active noise control. In this research, an algorithm has been developed that can be used to estimate displacement and velocity responses at any locations on the structure from a limited number of acceleration measurements and input force information. The algorithm employs band-pass filters to extract from the measurement signal the frequency contents corresponding to a desired mode. The filtered signal is then used to train a neural network which consists of a linear neuron with three weights. The structure of the neural network is designed as simple as possible to increase the sampling frequency as much as possible. The weights obtained through neural network training are then used to construct the transfer function of a mode in z-domain and to identify modal properties of each mode. By using the identified transfer function and interpolating the mode shape obtained at sensor locations, the displacement and velocity responses are estimated with reasonable accuracy at any locations on the structure. The accuracy of the response estimates depends on the number of modes incorporated in the estimates and the number of sensors employed to conduct mode shape interpolation. Computer simulation demonstrates that the algorithm is capable of adapting to the varying dynamic characteristics of structural properties. Experimental implementation of the algorithm on a DSP (digital signal processing) board for a plate structure is underway. The algorithm is expected to reach the sampling frequency range of about 10 kHz to 20 kHz which needs to be maintained for a typical active noise control

  9. Noise Reduction Effect of Multiple-Sampling-Based Signal-Readout Circuits for Ultra-Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kawahito, Shoji; Seo, Min-Woong

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the noise reduction effect of multiple-sampling-based signal readout circuits for implementing ultra-low-noise image sensors. The correlated multiple sampling (CMS) technique has recently become an important technology for high-gain column readout circuits in low-noise CMOS image sensors (CISs). This paper reveals how the column CMS circuits, together with a pixel having a high-conversion-gain charge detector and low-noise transistor, realizes deep sub-electron read noise levels based on the analysis of noise components in the signal readout chain from a pixel to the column analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The noise measurement results of experimental CISs are compared with the noise analysis and the effect of noise reduction to the sampling number is discussed at the deep sub-electron level. Images taken with three CMS gains of two, 16, and 128 show distinct advantage of image contrast for the gain of 128 (noise(median): 0.29 e−rms) when compared with the CMS gain of two (2.4 e−rms), or 16 (1.1 e−rms). PMID:27827972

  10. Noise Reduction Effect of Multiple-Sampling-Based Signal-Readout Circuits for Ultra-Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Shoji; Seo, Min-Woong

    2016-11-06

    This paper discusses the noise reduction effect of multiple-sampling-based signal readout circuits for implementing ultra-low-noise image sensors. The correlated multiple sampling (CMS) technique has recently become an important technology for high-gain column readout circuits in low-noise CMOS image sensors (CISs). This paper reveals how the column CMS circuits, together with a pixel having a high-conversion-gain charge detector and low-noise transistor, realizes deep sub-electron read noise levels based on the analysis of noise components in the signal readout chain from a pixel to the column analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The noise measurement results of experimental CISs are compared with the noise analysis and the effect of noise reduction to the sampling number is discussed at the deep sub-electron level. Images taken with three CMS gains of two, 16, and 128 show distinct advantage of image contrast for the gain of 128 (noise(median): 0.29 e(-)rms) when compared with the CMS gain of two (2.4 e(-)rms), or 16 (1.1 e(-)rms).

  11. Active Control of Fan Noise in Ducts Using Magnetic Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency...magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency as well...systems typically have fans that will move air from the heating or cooling system to any desired space. Fan noise is characterized first by tonal

  12. An improved affine projection algorithm for active noise cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congyan; Wang, Mingjiang; Han, Yufei; Sun, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-01

    Affine projection algorithm is a signal reuse algorithm, and it has a good convergence rate compared to other traditional adaptive filtering algorithm. There are two factors that affect the performance of the algorithm, which are step factor and the projection length. In the paper, we propose a new variable step size affine projection algorithm (VSS-APA). It dynamically changes the step size according to certain rules, so that it can get smaller steady-state error and faster convergence speed. Simulation results can prove that its performance is superior to the traditional affine projection algorithm and in the active noise control (ANC) applications, the new algorithm can get very good results.

  13. DALY-Based Health Risk Assessment of Construction Noise in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhihui

    2016-01-01

    Noise produced by construction activities has become the second most serious acoustic polluting element in China. To provide industry practitioners with a better understanding of the health risks of construction noise and to aid in creating environmentally friendly construction plans during early construction stages, we developed a quantitative model to assess the health impairment risks (HIA) associated with construction noise for individuals living adjacent to construction sites. This model classifies noise-induced health impairments into four categories: cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance, and annoyance, and uses disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) as an indicator of damage. Furthermore, the value of a statistical life (VSL) is used to transform DALYs into a monetary value based on the affected demographic characteristics, thereby offering policy makers a reliable theoretical foundation for establishing reasonable standards to compensate residents suffering from construction noise. A practical earthwork project in Beijing is used as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model. The results indicate that construction noise could bring significant health risks to the neighboring resident community, with an estimated 34.51 DALYs of health damage and 20.47 million yuan in social costs. In particular, people aged 45–54 are most vulnerable to construction noise, with the greatest health risks being caused by sleep disturbance. PMID:27792207

  14. DALY-Based Health Risk Assessment of Construction Noise in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhihui

    2016-10-26

    Noise produced by construction activities has become the second most serious acoustic polluting element in China. To provide industry practitioners with a better understanding of the health risks of construction noise and to aid in creating environmentally friendly construction plans during early construction stages, we developed a quantitative model to assess the health impairment risks (HIA) associated with construction noise for individuals living adjacent to construction sites. This model classifies noise-induced health impairments into four categories: cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance, and annoyance, and uses disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) as an indicator of damage. Furthermore, the value of a statistical life (VSL) is used to transform DALYs into a monetary value based on the affected demographic characteristics, thereby offering policy makers a reliable theoretical foundation for establishing reasonable standards to compensate residents suffering from construction noise. A practical earthwork project in Beijing is used as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model. The results indicate that construction noise could bring significant health risks to the neighboring resident community, with an estimated 34.51 DALYs of health damage and 20.47 million yuan in social costs. In particular, people aged 45-54 are most vulnerable to construction noise, with the greatest health risks being caused by sleep disturbance.

  15. WDM optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Tait, Alexander N; Chang, Matthew P; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-10-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) optical stealth transmission system carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. The stealth signal is hidden in both time and frequency domains by using ASE noise as the signal carrier. Each WDM channel uses part of the ASE spectrum, which provides more flexibility to apply stealth transmission in a public network and adds another layer of security to the stealth channel. Multi-channel transmission also increases the overall channel capacity, which is the major limitation of the single stealth channel transmission based on ASE noise. The relations between spectral bandwidth and coherence length of ASE carrier have been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated.

  16. Blue noise sampling method based on mixture distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Hongxing; Hong, XiaoYang; Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Shaoting; Wang, Guoyin

    2014-11-01

    Blue noise sampling is a core component for a large number of computer graphic applications such as imaging, modeling, animation, and rendering. However, most existing methods are concentrated on preserving spatial domain properties like density and anisotropy, while ignoring feature preserving. In order to solve the problem, we present a new distance metric called mixture distance for blue noise sampling, which is a combination of geodesic and feature distances. Based on mixture distance, the blue noise property and features can be preserved by controlling the ratio of the geodesic distance to the feature distance. With the intention of meeting different requirements from various applications, an adaptive adjustment for parameters is also proposed to achieve a balance between the preservation of features and spatial properties. Finally, implementation on a graphic processing unit is introduced to improve the efficiency of computation. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the results of image stippling, surface sampling, and remeshing.

  17. Annoyance and activity disturbance induced by high-speed railway and conventional railway noise: a contrastive case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-speed railway (HR, Electrified railway with service speed above 200 km/h.) noise and conventional railway (CR, Electrified railway with service speed under 200 km/h.) noise are different in both time and frequency domain. There is an urgent need to study the influence of HR noise and consequently, develop appropriate noise evaluation index and limits for the total railway noise including HR and CR noise. Methods Based on binaural recording of HR and CR noises in a approximate semi-free field, noise annoyance and activity disturbance induced by maximal train pass-by events in China were investigated through laboratory subjective evaluation. 80 students within recruited 102 students, 40 males and 40 females, 23.9 ± 2.1 years old, were finally selected as the subjects. After receiving noise stimulus via headphone of a binaural audio playback system, subjects were asked to express the annoyance or activity disturbance due to railway noise at a 0-100 numerical scale. Results The results show that with the same annoyance rating (A) or activity disturbance rating (D), the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq) of CR noise is approximately 7 dB higher than that of HR noise. Linear regression analysis between some acoustical parameters and A (or D) suggests that the coefficient of determination (R2) is higher with the instantaneous fast A-weighted sound pressure level (LAFmax) than that with LAeq. A combined acoustical parameter, LHC = 1.74LAFmax + 0.008LAFmax(Lp-LAeq), where Lp is the sound pressure level, was derived consequently, which could better evaluate the total railway noise, including HR and CR noise. More importantly, with a given LHC, the noise annoyance of HR and CR noise is the same. Conclusions Among various acoustical parameters including LHC and LAeq, A and D have the highest correlation with LHC. LHC has been proved to be an appropriate index to evaluate the total railway noise, including both HR and CR. However

  18. Annoyance and activity disturbance induced by high-speed railway and conventional railway noise: a contrastive case study.

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Lin, Qi-Li; Li, Zheng-Guang; Kang, Jian

    2014-03-07

    High-speed railway (HR, Electrified railway with service speed above 200 km/h.) noise and conventional railway (CR, Electrified railway with service speed under 200 km/h.) noise are different in both time and frequency domain. There is an urgent need to study the influence of HR noise and consequently, develop appropriate noise evaluation index and limits for the total railway noise including HR and CR noise. Based on binaural recording of HR and CR noises in a approximate semi-free field, noise annoyance and activity disturbance induced by maximal train pass-by events in China were investigated through laboratory subjective evaluation. 80 students within recruited 102 students, 40 males and 40 females, 23.9 ± 2.1 years old, were finally selected as the subjects. After receiving noise stimulus via headphone of a binaural audio playback system, subjects were asked to express the annoyance or activity disturbance due to railway noise at a 0-100 numerical scale. The results show that with the same annoyance rating (A) or activity disturbance rating (D), the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq) of CR noise is approximately 7 dB higher than that of HR noise. Linear regression analysis between some acoustical parameters and A (or D) suggests that the coefficient of determination (R2) is higher with the instantaneous fast A-weighted sound pressure level (LAFmax) than that with LAeq. A combined acoustical parameter, LHC = 1.74LAFmax + 0.008LAFmax(Lp-LAeq), where Lp is the sound pressure level, was derived consequently, which could better evaluate the total railway noise, including HR and CR noise. More importantly, with a given LHC, the noise annoyance of HR and CR noise is the same. Among various acoustical parameters including LHC and LAeq, A and D have the highest correlation with LHC. LHC has been proved to be an appropriate index to evaluate the total railway noise, including both HR and CR. However, it should be pointed out that this study provides

  19. A Kernel Machine-based fMRI Physiological Noise Removal Method

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei; Gaur, Pooja

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique with blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is a powerful tool for noninvasive mapping of brain function under task and resting states. The removal of cardiac- and respiration-induced physiological noise in fMRI data has been a significant challenge as fMRI studies seek to achieve higher spatial resolutions and characterize more subtle neuronal changes. The low temporal sampling rate of most multi-slice fMRI experiments often causes aliasing of physiological noise into the frequency range of BOLD activation signal. In addition, changes of heartbeat and respiration patterns also generate physiological fluctuations that have similar frequencies with BOLD activation. Most existing physiological noise-removal methods either place restrictive limitations on image acquisition or utilize filtering or regression based post-processing algorithms, which cannot distinguish the frequency-overlapping BOLD activation and the physiological noise. In this work, we address the challenge of physiological noise removal via the kernel machine technique, where a nonlinear kernel machine technique, kernel principal component analysis, is used with a specifically identified kernel function to differentiate BOLD signal from the physiological noise of the frequency. The proposed method was evaluated in human fMRI data acquired from multiple task-related and resting state fMRI experiments. A comparison study was also performed with an existing adaptive filtering method. The results indicate that the proposed method can effectively identify and reduce the physiological noise in fMRI data. The comparison study shows that the proposed method can provide comparable or better noise removal performance than the adaptive filtering approach. PMID:24321306

  20. A kernel machine-based fMRI physiological noise removal method.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei; Gaur, Pooja

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique with blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast is a powerful tool for noninvasive mapping of brain function under task and resting states. The removal of cardiac- and respiration-induced physiological noise in fMRI data has been a significant challenge as fMRI studies seek to achieve higher spatial resolutions and characterize more subtle neuronal changes. The low temporal sampling rate of most multi-slice fMRI experiments often causes aliasing of physiological noise into the frequency range of BOLD activation signal. In addition, changes of heartbeat and respiration patterns also generate physiological fluctuations that have similar frequencies with BOLD activation. Most existing physiological noise-removal methods either place restrictive limitations on image acquisition or utilize filtering or regression based post-processing algorithms, which cannot distinguish the frequency-overlapping BOLD activation and the physiological noise. In this work, we address the challenge of physiological noise removal via the kernel machine technique, where a nonlinear kernel machine technique, kernel principal component analysis, is used with a specifically identified kernel function to differentiate BOLD signal from the physiological noise of the frequency. The proposed method was evaluated in human fMRI data acquired from multiple task-related and resting state fMRI experiments. A comparison study was also performed with an existing adaptive filtering method. The results indicate that the proposed method can effectively identify and reduce the physiological noise in fMRI data. The comparison study shows that the proposed method can provide comparable or better noise removal performance than the adaptive filtering approach.

  1. Study of active noise control system for a commercial HVAC unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devineni, Naga

    Acoustic noise is a common problem in everyday life. If the appliances that are present in the work and living areas generate noise then it's a serious problem. One such appliance is the Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning system (HVAC) in which blower fan and compressor units are housed together. Operation of a HVAC system creates two kinds of noise. One is the noise due to the air flow and the other is the result of the compressor. Both of them exhibit different signal properties and need different strategies to control them. There has been previous efforts in designing noise control systems that can control noise from the HVAC system. These include passive methods which use sound absorption materials to attenuate noise and active methods which cancel noise by generating anti-noise. Passive methods are effective in limiting the high frequency noise, but are inefficient in controlling low frequency noise from the compressor. Compressor noise is one of the strong low frequency components that propagate through the walls, therefore there is need for deploying active signal processing methods that consider the signal properties into consideration to cancel the noise acoustically. The quasi periodic nature of the compressor noise is exploited in noise modeling which aids in implementing an adaptive linear prediction filter in estimating the anti noise [12]. In this thesis, a multi channel architecture has been studied for a specific HVAC system in order to improve noise cancellation by creating larger quiet zone. In addition to the multi-channel architecture, a real time narrow band Active Noise Control (ANC) was employed to cancel noise under practical conditions.

  2. An Active Noise Control (ACN) system for a commercially available HVAC using feedback architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbekar, Prashanth

    This thesis report discusses design of an Active Noise Control (ANC) system for a commercially available HVAC using Feedback architecture. Reducing noise in living environments is an important problem to create quieter residential and work places. The main contributions of this thesis include development of a real time, stable and fast single channel Feedback ANC prototype ANC using a FPGA to cancel the compressor noise. Based on observations from the real time implementation a multichannel Feedback ANC with novel delayless subband architecture has been developed to reduce computational complexity and to improve performance. This work represents an important step in developing an ANC system for the HVAC due to application of novel delayless subband multichannel Feedback ANC algorithm on real data collected from the HVAC system. It also discusses the practical issues involved in developing an ANC system prototype using a FPGA.

  3. What kind of noise is brain noise: anomalous scaling behavior of the resting brain activity fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Fraiman, Daniel; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2012-01-01

    The study of spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity, often referred as brain noise, is getting increasing attention in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Despite important efforts, much of the statistical properties of such fluctuations remain largely unknown. This work scrutinizes these fluctuations looking at specific statistical properties which are relevant to clarify its dynamical origins. Here, three statistical features which clearly differentiate brain data from naive expectations for random processes are uncovered: First, the variance of the fMRI mean signal as a function of the number of averaged voxels remains constant across a wide range of observed clusters sizes. Second, the anomalous behavior of the variance is originated by bursts of synchronized activity across regions, regardless of their widely different sizes. Finally, the correlation length (i.e., the length at which the correlation strength between two regions vanishes) as well as mutual information diverges with the cluster's size considered, such that arbitrarily large clusters exhibit the same collective dynamics than smaller ones. These three properties are known to be exclusive of complex systems exhibiting critical dynamics, where the spatio-temporal dynamics show these peculiar type of fluctuations. Thus, these findings are fully consistent with previous reports of brain critical dynamics, and are relevant for the interpretation of the role of fluctuations and variability in brain function in health and disease. PMID:22934058

  4. Development and Demonstration of Active Noise Control Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R.; Hu, Z.; Sommerfeldt, S.; Walker, B.; Hersh, A.; Luo, H.; Spencer, M.; Hallman, D.; Mitchell, C.; Sutliff, D.

    2000-01-01

    This report details design methods for and feasibility of an Active Noise Control (ANC) system using flush-wall-mounted sensors and actuators to reduce turbofan engine rotor-stator interaction noise. ANC concepts capable of suppressing discrete-tone spinning modes containing several cut-on radial mode were identified, developed analytically, and evaluated. Separate ANC systems that suppressed at least three radial modes in a cylindrical inlet duct and three radial modes in an exhaust annulus were developed. These designs resulted in inlet duct and exhaust duct tests that were performed at NASA on the 4-ft ANC Fan in the NASA Glenn AAPL facility. Effective suppression of 2-BPF spinning mode m = 2 tone noise was achieved over a range of fan speeds 1800 to 2450 rpm, where up to 4 radials were present. In the inlet duct, up to 12 dB reduction was obtained for 3 radial modes, and up to 4 dB was obtained with 4 radial modes. In the exhaust duct, up to 15 dB PWL reduction was obtained with either two or three radial modes present. Thus, the ability to suppress multiple radial modes for tones in both the inlet and exhaust ducts has been successfully demonstrated. Implications of ANC system design requirements on installation and system integration issues for ANC systems capable of suppressing higher order radial mode content when applied to a 767 using twin CF6 engines were evaluated analytically. The analytical results indicated an ANC system must be part of an integrated design to be effective.

  5. Robust active noise control in the loadmaster area of a military transport aircraft.

    PubMed

    Kochan, Kay; Sachau, Delf; Breitbach, Harald

    2011-05-01

    The active noise control (ANC) method is based on the superposition of a disturbance noise field with a second anti-noise field using loudspeakers and error microphones. This method can be used to reduce the noise level inside the cabin of a propeller aircraft. However, during the design process of the ANC system, extensive measurements of transfer functions are necessary to optimize the loudspeaker and microphone positions. Sometimes, the transducer positions have to be tailored according to the optimization results to achieve a sufficient noise reduction. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a controller design method for such narrow band ANC systems. The method can be seen as an extension of common transducer placement optimization procedures. In the presented method, individual weighting parameters for the loudspeakers and microphones are used. With this procedure, the tailoring of the transducer positions is replaced by adjustment of controller parameters. Moreover, the ANC system will be robust because of the fact that the uncertainties are considered during the optimization of the controller parameters. The paper describes the necessary theoretic background for the method and demonstrates the efficiency in an acoustical mock-up of a military transport aircraft.

  6. Active control of payload fairing noise using distributed active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Arnaud; Johnson, Marty E.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2003-04-01

    High sound pressure inside a launch vehicle fairing during lift-off can damage the payload. Interior levels of up to 140 dB between 60 and 250 Hz are mostly due to exhaust plume noise combined with the limited transmission loss of lightweight composite fairings and little acoustic damping in the fairing volume. Past work using passive and hybrid passive/reactive noise control devices has shown that their limitations are mostly due to packaging volume and weight penalty. The objective of this work is to design a lightweight, compact, and low electrical power active noise control system to reduce the fairing interior sound level. Hybrid active/passive actuators such as Smart Foam (Couche and Fuller, Proceedings of Active 1999, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, pp. 609-620) and Distributed Active Vibration Absorbers (Marcotte, Fuller, and Johnson, Proceedings of Active 2002, ISVR, Southampton, England, pp. 535-546) are optimized for fairing noise control. The latter have been used to increase the transmission loss of the fairing. Active noise control test results on a sub-scale, sandwich composite fairing are presented. The global interior acoustic response due to airborne exterior excitation is minimized using an adaptive multiple-input, multiple-output feedforward controller. [Work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate (AFRL).

  7. Noise sensitivity, rather than noise level, predicts the non-auditory effects of noise in community samples: a population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Park, Jangho; Chung, Seockhoon; Lee, Jiho; Sung, Joo Hyun; Cho, Seung Woo; Sim, Chang Sun

    2017-04-12

    Excessive noise affects human health and interferes with daily activities. Although environmental noise may not directly cause mental illness, it may accelerate and intensify the development of latent mental disorders. Noise sensitivity (NS) is considered a moderator of non-auditory noise effects. In the present study, we aimed to assess whether NS is associated with non-auditory effects. We recruited a community sample of 1836 residents residing in Ulsan and Seoul, South Korea. From July to November 2015, participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, medical history, and NS. The non-auditory effects of noise were assessed using the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression, Insomnia Severity index, State Trait Anxiety Inventory state subscale, and Stress Response Inventory-Modified Form. Individual noise levels were recorded from noise maps. A three-model multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that might affect psychiatric illnesses. Participants ranged in age from 19 to 91 years (mean: 47.0 ± 16.1 years), and 37.9% (n = 696) were male. Participants with high NS were more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes and hyperlipidemia and to use psychiatric medication. The multivariable analysis indicated that even after adjusting for noise-related variables, sociodemographic factors, medical illness, and duration of residence, subjects in the high NS group were more than 2 times more likely to experience depression and insomnia and 1.9 times more likely to have anxiety, compared with those in the low NS group. Noise exposure level was not identified as an explanatory value. NS increases the susceptibility and hence moderates there actions of individuals to noise. NS, rather than noise itself, is associated with an elevated susceptibility to non-auditory effects.

  8. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  9. Arecoline cannot alter testicular dysfunction and pineal activation caused by noise in wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Chatterji, Urmi; Maiti, B R

    2017-07-13

    Millions of people consume betel nut for increased capacity to work and for stress reduction. The nut contains arecoline, which has multiple side effects on endocrine functions. Objective of the work is to investigate pineal-testicular responses to noise and after arecoline treatment in noise in rats. Noise exposure (100 dB, 6 h daily, 10 days) caused pineal stimulation ultrastructurally and at indoleamines level. Leydig cell dysfunction with fall of testosterone level and suppression of sex accessories were noticed. In contrast, pineal activity was inhibited and reproductive functions were stimulated after arecoline administration, confirmed from reversed changes to those of noise. Arecoline treatment in noise exposure showed same results as in noise both in pineal and in reproductive functions. It is concluded that noise causes testicular dysfunction probably by gonadotropin suppression induced by pineal melatonin in noise. Furthermore, arecoline cannot prevent it in noise in rats.

  10. Evaluating the effectiveness of active noise reduction in flight helmets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, S. E.; Rylands, J. M.; Crabtree, R. B.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of high powered fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft and tracked armoured fighting vehicles has increased the level of noise to which crews are exposed. Active noise reduction (ANR) offers a means of increasing the attenuation at low and mid frequencies. It relies on sensing the sound inside a circumaural device and cancelling it by means of negative feedback through a miniature speaker inside the enclosed volume. This study was carried out to investigate laboratory procedures appropriate for measuring the effectiveness of ANR devices. The procedures were: ear-canal measurements using an acoustic test fixture (an objective procedure), and masked threshold and loudness balance tests (psycho-physical procedures). In addition, the effect of ANR on signal detection and speech reception was investigated. The results do not clearly permit one procedure to be recommended for the evaluation of ANR systems. Signal detection performance and speech intelligibility may be used, but the results are specific to the acoustic environment of the listener and the detection task or speech-system parameters of the evaluation. When the attenuation of the ANR system is measured objectively with a transducer inside the earmuff/ear-canal volume, the location of the transducer affects the observed ANR attenuations.

  11. Noise-activated diffusion in the egg-carton potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti, G.; Ferrando, R.; Spadacini, R.; Tommei, G. E.

    1996-11-01

    The noise-activated diffusion of a classical particle in spatially periodic two-dimensional (2D) systems is studied by solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. The particle is subjected to a periodic deterministic force, to a frictional force, and to a Gaussian white noise. The solution is obtained by extending to 2D the matrix-continued-fraction method for a quite general potential shape. The 2D diffusion coefficient is then numerically calculated for the square egg-carton potential; the analysis is performed over different friction and energy-barrier regimes. Several approximations are compared with the exact numerical results. In particular, the usual 1D diffusion-path approximation is discussed, showing that 2D effects are always present, becoming more and more relevant with decreasing friction. At high friction, a good analytical approximation is shown; on the contrary, none of the available approximations gives satisfactory results in intermediate- and low-damping regimes, which are typical in adatom diffusion on crystal surfaces.

  12. Broadband Noise Predictions Based on a New Aeroacoustic Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, J.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A new analytic result in acoustics called 'Formulation 1B,' proposed by Farassat, is used to compute the loading noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term. The formulation contains a far-field surface integral that depends on the time derivative and the surface gradient of the pressure on the airfoil, as well as a contour integral on the boundary of the airfoil surface. As a first test case, the new formulation is used to compute the noise radiated from a flat plate, moving through a sinusoidal gust of constant frequency. The unsteady surface pressure for this test case is specified analytically from a result that is based on linear airfoil theory. This test case is used to examine the velocity scaling properties of Formulation 1B, and to demonstrate its equivalence to Formulation 1A, of Farassat. The new acoustic formulation, again with an analytic surface pressure, is then used to predict broadband noise radiated from an airfoil immersed in homogeneous turbulence. The results are compared with experimental data previously reported by Paterson and Amiet. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained. The predicted results also agree very well with those of Paterson and Amiet, who used a frequency-domain approach. Finally, an alternative form of Formulation 1B is described for statistical analysis of broadband noise.

  13. Active control of propeller induced noise fields inside a flexible cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, H. C.; Fuller, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    An active noise control model has been evaluated for reducing aircraft interior noise. The structural noise transmission properties of an aircraft fuselage were modelled as a flexible cylinder excited by external acoustic dipoles simulating the noise produced by twin propellers. The amplitudes of an internal distribution of monopole control sources were determined such that the area-weighted mean square acoustic pressure was minimized in the propeller plane. The noise control model was evaluated at low frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency and first few harmonics of a typical turbo-prop aircraft. Interior noise reductions of 20 25 dB were achieved, over a substantial region of the cylindrical cross-section, with just a few monopole control sources. The most favorable interior noise reductions were achieved when the active noise control model was used in combination with propeller source phasing.

  14. Signal/Noise Analysis of FRET-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Woehler, Andrew; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Neher, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Molecular sensors based on intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have become versatile tools to monitor regulatory molecules in living tissue. However, their use is often compromised by low signal strength and excessive noise. We analyzed signal/noise (SNR) aspects of spectral FRET analysis methods, with the following conclusions: The most commonly used method (measurement of the emission ratio after a single short wavelength excitation) is optimal in terms of signal/noise, if only relative changes of this uncalibrated ratio are of interest. In the case that quantitative data on FRET efficiencies are required, these can be calculated from the emission ratio and some calibration parameters, but at reduced SNR. Lux-FRET, a recently described method for spectral analysis of FRET data, allows one to do so in three different ways, each based on a ratio of two out of three measured fluorescence signals (the donor and acceptor signal during a short-wavelength excitation and the acceptor signal during long wavelength excitation). Lux-FRET also allows for calculation of the total abundance of donor and acceptor fluorophores. The SNR for all these quantities is lower than that of the plain emission ratio due to unfavorable error propagation. However, if ligand concentration is calculated either from lux-FRET values or else, after its calibration, from the emission ratio, SNR for both analysis modes is very similar. Likewise, SNR values are similar, if the noise of these quantities is related to the expected dynamic range. We demonstrate these relationships based on data from an Epac-based cAMP sensor and discuss how the SNR changes with the FRET efficiency and the number of photons collected. PMID:20923670

  15. A Set-Based Methodology for White Noise Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 A. Set-Based Methodology for White Noise Modeling Fernando Paganini Electrical Engineering. MIS 116-81 California Ins t i tu...worst-case, statistics consistent with the stochastic point of view, and simple descriptions tha t allow for tractable worst-case analysis. The...Essentially two approaches are available t o assess the consequences of this error: one is to model the uncertainty in terms of a set of allowable

  16. Low frequency noise investigation of 2-3 μm GaSb-based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glemža, Justinas; Pralgauskaitė, Sandra; Palenskis, Vilius; Matukas, Jonas

    2017-07-01

    A detailed noise study of mid-infrared 2-3 μm wavelenght GaSb-based type-I ridge-waveguide laser diodes (LDs) has been carried out using the low frequency noise spectroscopy. Different samples having slightly different heterostructures, differently packaged, with and without facet passivation have been investigated. The activation energies of trap levels, associated with additional generation-recombination (g-r) noise components in noise spectra at small current region before the threshold, have been determined. It was shown that at particular forward currents the mode-hopping effect dominates during LD lasing operation. It was demonstrated that small differences in LD heterostructure and waveguide layers have got the largest influence to LD noise characteristics while influence of the absence of facet passivation, linking to noise generation centers at the cleaved semiconductor interface, and package type is much weaker.

  17. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) based spin torque oscillator (STO) is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. Here, we find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. Lastly, these results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  18. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  19. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  20. Active control of flow-induced noise transmitted through aircraft sidewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Cedric; Gardonio, Paolo; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, the theory and the results are presented of a study concerned with the active control of sound transmitted through aircraft sidewalls when excited by a Turbulent Boundary Layer. The motivation for this study is the control within an aircraft cabin of the flow-induced noise due to wall-pressure fluctuations over the fuselage. First, a theoretical model accounting for the effect of elastic stiffeners is obtained to calculate the boundary layer noise transmitted through tensioned aircraft sidewalls. Parametric studies including comparisons between different models of aircraft fuselage panels valid over different frequency ranges are analyzed. Second, the best possible noise levels reduction that can be achieved are determined using idealized feedback control of the boundary layer noise transmitted through tensioned and stiffened double-panel partitions. It is shown that it is the strategy based on the active suppression of the skin panel structural modes that is the most efficient in terms of the broadband attenuation of the total sound power inwardly radiated. However, it may be more feasible to control the vibration of the trim panel or the pressure in the cavity, and the simulations suggest that the inwardly radiated sound power can still be reduced by a significant amount.

  1. Optimal periodic disturbance reduction for active noise cancelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, C. E.; de Callafon, R. A.; Dunens, E.; Bargerhuff, R.; Bash, C. E.

    2007-08-01

    The design of an optimal internal model-based (IMB) controller by extending standard discrete time optimal control theory for IMB controllers is described. The optimal observer and state feedback gains of the IMB controller are given via the solution of discrete time algebraic Riccati equations. The design method is applied to an acoustic system that is subjected to disturbances from a server fan. Periodic disturbances from the server fan appear as harmonics of the fundamental frequency of the fan. Parametric models for the plant and non-periodic part of the disturbance are identified from experimental data. An internal model is designed in discrete time and the internal model principle is used to design a feedback controller that rejects periodic disturbances in the acoustic system. The controller is implemented in real-time and successfully attenuates the first four harmonics of the fan noise.

  2. Filter for speckle noise reduction based on compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leportier, Thibault; Park, Min-Chul

    2016-12-01

    In holographic reconstruction, speckle noise is a serious factor that may degrade the image quality greatly. Several methods have been proposed, so far, to filter speckle from hologram reconstruction. The first approach is based on averaging several speckle patterns. The second solution is to apply a filter on the reconstructed image. In the first case, several holograms should be acquired, while compromise between speckle reduction and edge preservation is usually a challenge in the case of digital filtering. We propose a method to filter speckle noise based on compressive sensing (CS). CS is a method that has been demonstrated recently to reconstruct images with a sampling inferior to the Nyquist rate. By applying several times the CS algorithm on the hologram reconstruction with different initial downsampling, several versions of the same images can be reconstructed with slightly different speckle patterns. Then, speckle noise can be greatly decreased while preserving sharpness of the image. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method with simulations as well as with holograms acquired by phase-shifting method.

  3. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  4. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  5. Active control of aircraft cabin noise and vibration using a physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Desheng

    In this thesis, active noise and vibration control of aircraft cabins is investigated, in which aircraft cabins are modeled as a cylindrical shell with a floor partition. As the first step toward a successful control strategy, a structural acoustic coupling analysis of the investigated structure is carried out. A new method called "Radiation Efficiency Analysis of Structural Modes (REASM)", suitable for enclosures with irregular shapes, is proposed and applied in the current analysis. Then, the optimal design of control systems consisting of PZT actuators and PVDF error sensors is discussed. A novel design method for PVDF error sensors called "GA-based method" is introduced and shown to be very effective when complex structures are involved. Finally, an active control system is implemented on a scaled laboratory aircraft-cabin model. Both the simulation and experimental results show the great potential of using piezoelectric transducers in noise control and the significant performance improvement achieved through optimal design.

  6. De-noising of digital image correlation based on stationary wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiang; Li, Yulong; Suo, Tao; Liang, Jin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a stationary wavelet transform (SWT) based method is proposed to de-noise the digital image with the light noise, and the SWT de-noise algorithm is presented after the analyzing of the light noise. By using the de-noise algorithm, the method was demonstrated to be capable of providing accurate DIC measurements in the light noise environment. The verification, comparative and realistic experiments were conducted using this method. The result indicate that the de-noise method can be applied to the full-field strain measurement under the light interference with a high accuracy and stability.

  7. Smartphone-based noise mapping: Integrating sound level meter app data into the strategic noise mapping process.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Enda; King, Eoin A

    2016-08-15

    The strategic noise mapping process of the EU has now been ongoing for more than ten years. However, despite the fact that a significant volume of research has been conducted on the process and related issues there has been little change or innovation in how relevant authorities and policymakers are conducting the process since its inception. This paper reports on research undertaken to assess the possibility for smartphone-based noise mapping data to be integrated into the traditional strategic noise mapping process. We compare maps generated using the traditional approach with those generated using smartphone-based measurement data. The advantage of the latter approach is that it has the potential to remove the need for exhaustive input data into the source calculation model for noise prediction. In addition, the study also tests the accuracy of smartphone-based measurements against simultaneous measurements taken using traditional sound level meters in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  9. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  10. Comparison of speech intelligibility in cockpit noise using SPH-4 flight helmet with and without active noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Jeffrey W.; Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) is a new technology which can reduce the level of aircraft cockpit noise that reaches the pilot's ear while simultaneously improving the signal to noise ratio for voice communications and other information bearing sound signals in the cockpit. A miniature, ear-cup mounted ANR system was tested to determine whether speech intelligibility is better for helicopter pilots using ANR compared to a control condition of ANR turned off. Two signal to noise ratios (S/N), representative of actual cockpit conditions, were used for the ratio of the speech to cockpit noise sound pressure levels. Speech intelligibility was significantly better with ANR compared to no ANR for both S/N conditions. Variability of speech intelligibility among pilots was also significantly less with ANR. When the stock helmet was used with ANR turned off, the average PB Word speech intelligibility score was below the Normally Acceptable level. In comparison, it was above that level with ANR on in both S/N levels.

  11. A Wiener-Wavelet-Based filter for de-noising satellite soil moisture retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Ciabatta, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Su, Chun-Hsu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of noise in microwave satellite soil moisture (SM) retrievals is of paramount importance for practical applications especially for those associated with the study of climate changes, droughts, floods and other related hydrological processes. So far, Fourier based methods have been used for de-noising satellite SM retrievals by filtering either the observed emissivity time series (Du, 2012) or the retrieved SM observations (Su et al. 2013). This contribution introduces an alternative approach based on a Wiener-Wavelet-Based filtering (WWB) technique, which uses the Entropy-Based Wavelet de-noising method developed by Sang et al. (2009) to design both a causal and a non-causal version of the filter. WWB is used as a post-retrieval processing tool to enhance the quality of observations derived from the i) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth observing system (AMSR-E), ii) the Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT), and iii) the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The method is tested on three pilot sites located in Spain (Remedhus Network), in Greece (Hydrological Observatory of Athens) and in Australia (Oznet network), respectively. Different quantitative criteria are used to judge the goodness of the de-noising technique. Results show that WWB i) is able to improve both the correlation and the root mean squared differences between satellite retrievals and in situ soil moisture observations, and ii) effectively separates random noise from deterministic components of the retrieved signals. Moreover, the use of WWB de-noised data in place of raw observations within a hydrological application confirms the usefulness of the proposed filtering technique. Du, J. (2012), A method to improve satellite soil moisture retrievals based on Fourier analysis, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L15404, doi:10.1029/ 2012GL052435 Su,C.-H.,D.Ryu, A. W. Western, and W. Wagner (2013), De-noising of passive and active microwave satellite soil moisture time

  12. On the stability of adaptation process in active noise control systems.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Iman Tabatabaei; Abdulla, Waleed H

    2011-01-01

    The stability analysis of the adaptation process, performed by the filtered-x least mean square algorithm on weights of active noise controllers, has not been fully investigated. The main contribution of this paper is conducting a theoretical stability analysis for this process without utilizing commonly used simplifying assumptions regarding the secondary electro-acoustic channel. The core of this analysis is based on the root locus theory. The general rules for constructing the root locus plot of the adaptation process are derived by obtaining root locus parameters, including start points, end points, asymptote lines, and breakaway points. The conducted analysis leads to the derivation of a general upper-bound for the adaptation step-size beyond which the mean weight vector of the active noise controller becomes unstable. Also, this analysis yields the optimum step-size for which the adaptive active noise controller has its fastest dynamic performance. The proposed upper-bound and optimum values apply to general secondary electro-acoustic channels, unlike the commonly used ones which apply to only pure delay channels. The results are found to agree very well with those obtained from numerical analyses and computer simulation experiments.

  13. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  14. Microscopic origin of read current noise in TaOx-based resistive switching memory by ultra-low temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue; Cai, Yimao; Liu, Yefan; Fang, Yichen; Yu, Muxi; Tan, Shenghu; Huang, Ru

    2016-04-01

    TaOx-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) attracts considerable attention for the development of next generation nonvolatile memories. However, read current noise in RRAM is one of the critical concerns for storage application, and its microscopic origin is still under debate. In this work, the read current noise in TaOx-based RRAM was studied thoroughly. Based on a noise power spectral density analysis at room temperature and at ultra-low temperature of 25 K, discrete random telegraph noise (RTN) and continuous average current fluctuation (ACF) are identified and decoupled from the total read current noise in TaOx RRAM devices. A statistical comparison of noise amplitude further reveals that ACF depends strongly on the temperature, whereas RTN is independent of the temperature. Measurement results combined with conduction mechanism analysis show that RTN in TaOx RRAM devices arises from electron trapping/detrapping process in the hopping conduction, and ACF is originated from the thermal activation of conduction centers that form the percolation network. At last, a unified model in the framework of hopping conduction is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of both RTN and ACF noise, which can provide meaningful guidelines for designing noise-immune RRAM devices.

  15. Single walled carbon nanotube-based stochastic resonance device with molecular self-noise source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hayato; Setiadi, Agung; Kuwahara, Yuji; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi

    2017-09-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an intrinsic noise usage system for small-signal sensing found in various living creatures. The noise-enhanced signal transmission and detection system, which is probabilistic but consumes low power, has not been used in modern electronics. We demonstrated SR in a summing network based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device that detects small subthreshold signals with very low current flow. The nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of this SWNT device, which incorporated Cr electrodes, were used as the threshold level of signal detection. The adsorption of redox-active polyoxometalate molecules on SWNTs generated additional noise, which was utilized as a self-noise source. To form a summing network SR device, a large number of SWNTs were aligned parallel to each other between the electrodes, which increased the signal detection ability. The functional capabilities of the present small-size summing network SR device, which rely on dense nanomaterials and exploit intrinsic spontaneous noise at room temperature, offer a glimpse of future bio-inspired electronic devices.

  16. Expectation-Based Control of Noise and Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A proposed approach to control of noise and chaos in dynamic systems would supplement conventional methods. The approach is based on fictitious forces composed of expectations governed by Fokker-Planck or Liouville equations that describe the evolution of the probability densities of the controlled parameters. These forces would be utilized as feedback control forces that would suppress the undesired diffusion of the controlled parameters. Examples of dynamic systems in which the approach is expected to prove beneficial include spacecraft, electronic systems, and coupled lasers.

  17. Random visual noise impairs object-based attention.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Richard A; Law, Mark B

    2002-02-01

    Object-based visual attention is observed when the benefit of attending to one element in a display extends to other elements that are part of the same perceptual object. Apperceptive agnosia is an object identification deficit in which spatial attention is preserved but object-based attention is impaired. Some debate exists regarding the extent to which the object-based impairment can be attributed to perceptual mechanisms that are specifically involved in grouping and segmentation of a scene, as opposed to early sensory processes. In the present paper we show that random visual noise is sufficient to eliminate the object benefit, a result inconsistent with the view that grouping mechanisms are responsible for the effect. The results have implications for an understanding of apperceptive agnosia, and for an understanding of object-based attention more generally.

  18. Brain Activation during Addition and Subtraction Tasks In-Noise and In-Quiet

    PubMed Central

    Abd Hamid, Aini Ismafairus; Yusoff, Ahmad Nazlim; Mukari, Siti Zamratol-Mai Sarah; Mohamad, Mazlyfarina

    2011-01-01

    Background: In spite of extensive research conducted to study how human brain works, little is known about a special function of the brain that stores and manipulates information—the working memory—and how noise influences this special ability. In this study, Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate brain responses to arithmetic problems solved in noisy and quiet backgrounds. Methods: Eighteen healthy young males performed simple arithmetic operations of addition and subtraction with in-quiet and in-noise backgrounds. The MATLAB-based Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM8) was implemented on the fMRI datasets to generate and analyse the activated brain regions. Results: Group results showed that addition and subtraction operations evoked extended activation in the left inferior parietal lobe, left precentral gyrus, left superior parietal lobe, left supramarginal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus. This supported the hypothesis that the human brain relatively activates its left hemisphere more compared with the right hemisphere when solving arithmetic problems. The insula, middle cingulate cortex, and middle frontal gyrus, however, showed more extended right hemispheric activation, potentially due to the involvement of attention, executive processes, and working memory. For addition operations, there was extensive left hemispheric activation in the superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and thalamus. In contrast, subtraction tasks evoked a greater activation of similar brain structures in the right hemisphere. For both addition and subtraction operations, the total number of activated voxels was higher for in-noise than in-quiet conditions. Conclusion: These findings suggest that when arithmetic operations were delivered auditorily, the auditory, attention, and working memory functions were required to accomplish the executive processing of the mathematical calculation. The respective brain activation patterns appear to be

  19. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine in order to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and high pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provides blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. In order to minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three channel controller by up to 16 dB over a 60 deg angle about the engine axis. A single channel controller could produce reduction over a 30 deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Simultaneous control of two tones is done with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 dBA and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  20. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1994-01-01

    A three-channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and the high-pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provide blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. To minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three-channel controller by up to 16 dB over a +/- 30-deg angle about the engine axis. A single-channel controller could produce reduction over a +/- 15-deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Outside of the areas contolled, the levels of the tone actually increased due to the generation of radial modes by the control sources. Simultaneous control of two tones is achieved with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high-pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  1. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine in order to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and high pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provides blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. In order to minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three channel controller by up to 16 dB over a 60 deg angle about the engine axis. A single channel controller could produce reduction over a 30 deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Simultaneous control of two tones is done with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 dBA and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  2. Implementation of Active Noise Control in a Closed-Circuit Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew; White, Edward

    2010-11-01

    Closed return wind tunnels, such as the Klebanoff--Saric Wind Tunnel (KSWT) at Texas A&M University, can provide relatively low freestream turbulence levels but include noise sources that do not exist in flight. This background noise, such as fan and motor noise, can adversely affect boundary-layer transition experiments if the frequencies are in the range of unstable Tollmien-- Schlicting waves. Passive acoustic treatments eliminate most noise propagating downstream from the fan to test section in the KSWT, but measurements showed upstream-traveling tonal noise propagating from the fan into the test section. To eliminate this, an active noise control system utilizing an adaptive filter algorithm was implemented targeting frequencies in the TS band below the planar duct mode cut off. Multiple microphones are used to detect and cancel upstream traveling sound without affecting downstream traveling sound. Microphone measurements are used to document the noise reduction at multiple locations in the test section.

  3. Conformational and dynamical properties of semiflexible polymers in the presence of active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstecken, Thomas; Ghavami, Ali; Mair, Alexander; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G.

    2017-08-01

    In the presence of active noise, flexible and semiflexible polymers exhibit drastically different conformational and dy-namical features compared to the case of thermal (white) noise only. For a non-Markovian exponentially correlated temporal noise (colored noise), flexible polymers swell with increasing noise strength, whereas semiflexible polymers shrink first and, for larger noise strengths, swell similar to flexible polymers. Thereby, a suitable treatment of the finite polymer contour length is essential. The finite contour length implies a strong dependence of the polymer relaxation times on the noise strengths. We discuss the conformational and dynamical aspects in terms of an analytical model, adopting the continuous Gaussian semiflexible polymer description. Moreover, results of computer simulations are shown and compared with analytical results.

  4. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  5. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  6. Noise annoyance and activity disturbance before and after the erection of a roadside noise barrier.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mats E; Berglund, Birgitta

    2006-04-01

    Questionnaire studies were conducted in a residential area before and after the erection of a 2.25 m high noise barrier of conventional type along a heavily traveled road (19,600 vehicles/24 h). The interval between studies was two years. Houses closest to the barrier received a sound-level reduction from -70.0 to 62.5 dB Lden at the most exposed facade. The sound-level reduction decreased with distance to the road, and was negligible for houses at more than 100 m distance. Up to this distance, the noise barrier reduced residents' noise annoyance outdoors and indoors as well as improved speech communication outdoors. Indoors, speech communication and sleep disturbance were slightly but nonsignificantly improved. Predictions of the number of annoyed persons from published exposure-response curves (in Lden) agreed with the percentage of residents being annoyed when indoors, before and after the barrier. Conversely, the percentage of residents being annoyed when outdoors clearly exceeded the predictions. These results suggest that these exposure-response curves may be used in predicting indoor situations, but they should not be applied in situations where outdoor annoyance is at focus.

  7. The effects of spontaneous activity, background noise, and the stimulus ensemble on information transfer in neurons.

    PubMed

    Chacron, Maurice J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2003-11-01

    Information theory is playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of neural data as it can precisely quantify the reliability of stimulus-response functions. Estimating the mutual information between a neural spike train and a time varying stimulus is, however, not trivial in practice and requires assumptions about the specific computations being performed by the neuron under study. Consequently, estimates of the mutual information depend on these assumptions and their validity must be ascertained in the particular physiological context in which experiments are carried out. Here we compare results obtained using different information measures that make different assumptions about the neural code (i.e. the way information is being encoded and decoded) and the stimulus ensemble (i.e. the set of stimuli that the animal can encounter in nature). Our comparisons are carried out in the context of spontaneously active neurons. However, some of our results are also applicable to neurons that are not spontaneously active. We first show conditions under which a single stimulus provides a good sample of the entire stimulus ensemble. Furthermore, we use a recently introduced information measure that is based on the spontaneous activity of the neuron rather than on the stimulus ensemble. This measure is compared to the Shannon information and it is shown that the two differ only by a constant. This constant is shown to represent the information that the neuron's spontaneous activity transmits about the fact that no stimulus is present in the animal's environment. As a consequence, the mutual information measure based on spontaneous activity is easily applied to stimuli that mimic those seen in nature, as it does not require a priori knowledge of the stimulus ensemble. Finally, we consider the effect of noise in the animal's environment on information transmission about sensory stimuli. Our results show that, as expected, such 'background' noise will increase the

  8. Active-passive gradient shielding for MRI acoustic noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, William A; Kidane, Tesfaye K; Taracila, Victor; Baig, Tanvir N; Eagan, Timothy P; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Brown, Robert W; Mallick, John A

    2005-05-01

    An important source of MRI acoustic noise-magnet cryostat warm-bore vibrations caused by eddy-current-induced forces-can be mitigated by a passive metal shield mounted on the outside of a vibration-isolated, vacuum-enclosed shielded gradient set. Finite-element (FE) calculations for a z-gradient indicate that a 2-mm-thick Cu layer wrapped on the gradient assembly can decrease mechanical power deposition in the warm bore and reduce warm-bore acoustic noise production by about 25 dB. Eliminating the conducting warm bore and other magnet parts as significant acoustic noise sources could lead to the development of truly quiet, fully functioning MRI systems with noise levels below 70 dB.

  9. Through-wall imaging and characterization of human activity using ultrawideband (UWB) random noise radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chieh-Ping; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2005-05-01

    Recent terrorist activities and law-enforcement situations involving hostage situations underscore the need for effective through-wall imaging. Current building interior imaging systems are based on short-pulse waveforms, which require specially designed antennas to subdue unwanted ringing. In addition, periodically transmitted pulses of energy are easily recognizable by the intelligent adversary who may employ appropriate countermeasures to confound detection. A coherent polarimetric random noise radar architecture is being developed based on UWB technology and software defined radio, which has great promise in its ability to covertly image obscured targets. The main advantages of the random noise radar lie in two aspects: first, random noise waveform has an ideal "thumbtack" ambiguity function, i.e., its down range and cross range resolution can be separately controlled, thus providing unambiguous high resolution imaging at any distance; second, random noise waveform is inherently low probability of intercept (LPI) and low probability of detection (LPD), i.e., it is immune from detection, jamming, and interference. Thus, it is an ideal candidate sensor for covert imaging of obscured regions in hostile environments. The coherency in the system can be exploited to field a fully-polarimetric system that can take advantage of polarization features in target recognition. Moving personnel can also be detected using Doppler processing. Simulation studies are used to analyze backscattered signals from the walls, and humans and other targets behind the walls. Real-time data processing shows human activity behind the wall and human target tracking. The high resolution provides excellent multipath and clutter rejection.

  10. A combined method to estimate parameters of neuron from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of active potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Wang, Jiang; Che, Yenqiu

    2009-03-01

    A method that combines the means of unscented Kalman filter (UKF) with the technique of synchronization-based parameter estimation is introduced for estimating unknown parameters of neuron when only a heavily noise-corrupted time series of active potential is given. Compared with other synchronization-based methods, this approach uses the state variables estimated by UKF instead of the measured data to drive the auxiliary system. The synchronization-based approach supplies a systematic and analytical procedure for estimating parameters from time series; however, it is only robust against weak noise of measurement, so the UKF is employed to estimate state variables which are used by the synchronization-based method to estimate all unknown parameters of neuron model. It is found out that the estimation accuracy of this combined method is much higher than only using UKF or synchronization-based method when the data of measurement were heavily noise corrupted.

  11. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  12. Impacts of chronic anthropogenic noise from energy-sector activity on abundance of songbirds in the boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Erin M; Habib, Lucas; Boutin, Stan

    2008-10-01

    The effects of human activities in forests are often examined in the context of habitat conversion. Changes in habitat structure and composition are also associated with increases in the activity of people with vehicles and equipment, which results in increases in anthropogenic noise. Anthropogenic noise may reduce habitat quality for many species, particularly those that rely on acoustic signals for communication. We compared the density and occupancy rate of forest passerines close to versus far from noise-generating compressor stations and noiseless well pads in the boreal forest of Alberta, Canada. Using distance-based sampling, we found that areas near noiseless energy facilities had a total passerine density 1.5 times higher than areas near noise-producing energy sites. The White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis), Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata), and Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) were less dense in noisy areas. We used repeat sampling to estimate occupancy rate for 23 additional species. Seven had lower conditional or unconditional occupancy rates near noise-generating facilities. One-third of the species examined showed patterns that supported the hypothesis that abundance is influenced by anthropogenic noise. An additional 4 species responded negatively to edge effects. To mitigate existing noise impacts on birds would require approximately $175 million. The merits of such an effort relative to other reclamation actions are discussed. Nevertheless, given the $100 billion energy-sector investment planned for the boreal forest in the next 10 years, including noise suppression technology at the outset of construction, makes noise mitigation a cost-effective best-management practice that might help conserve high-quality habitat for boreal birds.

  13. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  14. Contralateral white noise selectively changes left human auditory cortex activity in a lexical decision task.

    PubMed

    Behne, Nicole; Wendt, Beate; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2006-04-01

    In a previous study, we hypothesized that the approach of presenting information-bearing stimuli to one ear and noise to the other ear may be a general strategy to determine hemispheric specialization in auditory cortex (AC). In that study, we confirmed the dominant role of the right AC in directional categorization of frequency modulations by showing that fMRI activation of right but not left AC was sharply emphasized when masking noise was presented to the contralateral ear. Here, we tested this hypothesis using a lexical decision task supposed to be mainly processed in the left hemisphere. Subjects had to distinguish between pseudowords and natural words presented monaurally to the left or right ear either with or without white noise to the other ear. According to our hypothesis, we expected a strong effect of contralateral noise on fMRI activity in left AC. For the control conditions without noise, we found that activation in both auditory cortices was stronger on contralateral than on ipsilateral word stimulation consistent with a more influential contralateral than ipsilateral auditory pathway. Additional presentation of contralateral noise did not significantly change activation in right AC, whereas it led to a significant increase of activation in left AC compared with the condition without noise. This is consistent with a left hemispheric specialization for lexical decisions. Thus our results support the hypothesis that activation by ipsilateral information-bearing stimuli is upregulated mainly in the hemisphere specialized for a given task when noise is presented to the more influential contralateral ear.

  15. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenchen

    Optical frequency combs are coherent light sources consist of thousands of equally spaced frequency lines. Frequency combs have achieved success in applications of metrology, spectroscopy and precise pulse manipulation and control. The most common way to generate frequency combs is based on mode-locked lasers which has the output spectrum of comb structures. To generate stable frequency combs, the output from mode-locked lasers need to be phase stabilized. The whole comb lines will be stabilized if the pulse train repetition rate corresponding to comb spacing and the pulse carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency are both stabilized. The output from a laser always has fluctuations in parameters known as noise. In laser applications, noise is an important factor to limit the performance and often need to be well controlled. For example in precision measurement such as frequency metrology and precise spectroscopy, low laser intensity and phase noise is required. In mode-locked lasers there are different types of noise like intensity noise, pulse temporal position noise also known as timing jitter, optical phase noise. In term for frequency combs, these noise dynamics is more complex and often related. Understanding the noise behavior is not only of great interest in practical applications but also help understand fundamental laser physics. In this dissertation, the noise of frequency combs and mode-locked lasers will be studied in two projects. First, the CEO frequency phase noise of a synchronously pumped doubly resonant optical parametric oscillators (OPO) will be explored. This is very important for applications of the OPO as a coherent frequency comb source. Another project will focus on the intensity noise coupling in a soliton fiber oscillator, the finding of different noise coupling in soliton pulses and the dispersive waves generated from soliton perturbation can provide very practical guidance for low noise soliton laser design. OPOs are used to generate

  16. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. The Effect of Noise on CaMKII Activation in a Dendritic Spine During LTP Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shangyou

    2010-01-01

    Activation of calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is a series of complicated stochastic processes that are affected by noise. There are two main sources of noise affecting CaMKII activation within a dendritic spine. One is the noise associated with stochastic opening of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels and the other is the noise associated with the stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics leading to CaMKII activation. Many models have been developed to simulate CaMKII activation, but there is no fully stochastic model that studies the effect of noise on CaMKII activation. Here we construct a fully stochastic model to study these effects. Our results show that noise has important effects on CaMKII activation variability, with the effect from stochastic opening of NMDA receptor channels being 5–10 times more significant than that from stochastic reactions involving CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII activation levels and the variability of activation are greatly affected by small changes in NMDA receptor channel number at the synapse. One reason LTP induction protocols may require tetanic or repeated burst stimulation is that there is a need to overcome inherent variability to provide sufficiently large calcium signals through NMDA receptor channels; with meaningful physiological stimuli, noise may allow the calcium signal to exceed threshold for CaMKII activation when it might not do so otherwise. PMID:20107130

  18. Fault diagnosis using noise modeling and a new artificial immune system based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Farshid; Mojtahedi, Alireza; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    A new fault classification/diagnosis method based on artificial immune system (AIS) algorithms for the structural systems is proposed. In order to improve the accuracy of the proposed method, i.e., higher success rate, Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise generating models are applied to simulate environmental noise. The identification of noise model, known as training process, is based on the estimation of the noise model parameters by genetic algorithms (GA) utilizing real experimental features. The proposed fault classification/diagnosis algorithm is applied to the noise contaminated features. Then, the results are compared to that obtained without noise modeling. The performance of the proposed method is examined using three laboratory case studies in two healthy and damaged conditions. Finally three different types of noise models are studied and it is shown experimentally that the proposed algorithm with non-Gaussian noise modeling leads to more accurate clustering of memory cells as the major part of the fault classification procedure.

  19. 4-D noise-based seismology at volcanoes: Ongoing efforts and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, Florent; Rivet, Diane; Obermann, Anne; Nakata, Nori; Boué, Pierre; Lecocq, Thomas; Campillo, Michel; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring magma pressure buildup at depth and transport to surface is a key point for improving volcanic eruption prediction. Seismic waves, through their velocity dependence to stress perturbations, can provide crucial information on the temporal evolution of the mechanical properties of volcanic edifices. In this article, we review past and ongoing efforts for extracting accurate information of temporal changes of seismic velocities at volcanoes continuously in time using records of ambient seismic noise. We will first introduce the general methodology for retrieving accurate seismic velocity changes from seismic noise records and discuss the origin of seismic velocity temporal changes in rocks. We will then discuss in a second part how noise-based monitoring can improve our knowledge about magmatic activity at a long (years) to a short (days) time scale taking example from Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion). We will also mention ongoing efforts for operational noise-based seismic monitoring on volcanoes. Further, we will discuss perspectives for improving the spatial localization of detected velocity changes at depth with a special focus on the use of dense seismic arrays. In the last part, we will finally explore the complex response of volcanic regions to seismic shaking with an example from Japan and show how imaging seismic velocity susceptibility allows characterizing the state of pressurized fluids in volcanic regions.

  20. Low Noise, High Detectivity Photodetectors based on Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fawen

    Organic photodetectors (OPDs) are potentially useful in many applications because of their light weight, flexibility and good form factors. Despite the high detectivities that have been frequently reported for OPDs recently, the application of these OPDs for weak light detection has been rarely demonstrated. In this thesis, low noise, high gain photodetectors based on organic and ZnO nanoparticles were proposed and demonstrated for highly sensitive UV light detection. The nanocomposite photodetector works in a hybrid mode of photodiode and photoconductor with the transition controlled by the UV light illumination. The nanocomposite detector shows two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than silicon detectors in the UV range, which is the first time an organic, solution-processed detector has been shown to significantly outperform the inorganic photonic devices. In the fullerene-based photodetector, the dark-current has been successfully reduced by a cross-linked TPD (C-TPD) buffer layer. The high detectivity of 3.6 x 1011 cm Hz½ W-1 (Jones) at 370 nm and the wide Linear dynamic range (LDR) of 90 dB, along with a response speed faster than 20 kHz, suggests that the fullerene-based organic photodetectors proposed here can open the way for many potential applications. The ZnO nanoparticles have been introduced into the C-TPD buffer layer of the fullerene-based photodetector to increase the photoconductive gain and reduce the noise current. The peak external quantum efficiency (EQE) value of approximately 400% and the peak specific detectivity of 6.5 x 10 12 Jones at the wavelength of 390 nm, along with the record high LDR of 120 dB, enable the photodetector to be used in wide range of applications such as imaging, communication, and defense. The extremely high sensitivity of the photodetector also makes it particularly attractive for very weak light detection.

  1. Energy-Based Wavelet De-Noising of Hydrologic Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Changming; Wang, Zhonggen; Wen, Jun; Shang, Lunyu

    2014-01-01

    De-noising is a substantial issue in hydrologic time series analysis, but it is a difficult task due to the defect of methods. In this paper an energy-based wavelet de-noising method was proposed. It is to remove noise by comparing energy distribution of series with the background energy distribution, which is established from Monte-Carlo test. Differing from wavelet threshold de-noising (WTD) method with the basis of wavelet coefficient thresholding, the proposed method is based on energy distribution of series. It can distinguish noise from deterministic components in series, and uncertainty of de-noising result can be quantitatively estimated using proper confidence interval, but WTD method cannot do this. Analysis of both synthetic and observed series verified the comparable power of the proposed method and WTD, but de-noising process by the former is more easily operable. The results also indicate the influences of three key factors (wavelet choice, decomposition level choice and noise content) on wavelet de-noising. Wavelet should be carefully chosen when using the proposed method. The suitable decomposition level for wavelet de-noising should correspond to series' deterministic sub-signal which has the smallest temporal scale. If too much noise is included in a series, accurate de-noising result cannot be obtained by the proposed method or WTD, but the series would show pure random but not autocorrelation characters, so de-noising is no longer needed. PMID:25360533

  2. Energy-based wavelet de-noising of hydrologic time series.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Changming; Wang, Zhonggen; Wen, Jun; Shang, Lunyu

    2014-01-01

    De-noising is a substantial issue in hydrologic time series analysis, but it is a difficult task due to the defect of methods. In this paper an energy-based wavelet de-noising method was proposed. It is to remove noise by comparing energy distribution of series with the background energy distribution, which is established from Monte-Carlo test. Differing from wavelet threshold de-noising (WTD) method with the basis of wavelet coefficient thresholding, the proposed method is based on energy distribution of series. It can distinguish noise from deterministic components in series, and uncertainty of de-noising result can be quantitatively estimated using proper confidence interval, but WTD method cannot do this. Analysis of both synthetic and observed series verified the comparable power of the proposed method and WTD, but de-noising process by the former is more easily operable. The results also indicate the influences of three key factors (wavelet choice, decomposition level choice and noise content) on wavelet de-noising. Wavelet should be carefully chosen when using the proposed method. The suitable decomposition level for wavelet de-noising should correspond to series' deterministic sub-signal which has the smallest temporal scale. If too much noise is included in a series, accurate de-noising result cannot be obtained by the proposed method or WTD, but the series would show pure random but not autocorrelation characters, so de-noising is no longer needed.

  3. Accurate tempo estimation based on harmonic + noise decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Miguel; Richard, Gael; David, Bertrand

    2006-12-01

    We present an innovative tempo estimation system that processes acoustic audio signals and does not use any high-level musical knowledge. Our proposal relies on a harmonic + noise decomposition of the audio signal by means of a subspace analysis method. Then, a technique to measure the degree of musical accentuation as a function of time is developed and separately applied to the harmonic and noise parts of the input signal. This is followed by a periodicity estimation block that calculates the salience of musical accents for a large number of potential periods. Next, a multipath dynamic programming searches among all the potential periodicities for the most consistent prospects through time, and finally the most energetic candidate is selected as tempo. Our proposal is validated using a manually annotated test-base containing 961 music signals from various musical genres. In addition, the performance of the algorithm under different configurations is compared. The robustness of the algorithm when processing signals of degraded quality is also measured.

  4. Classification Under Label Noise Based on Outdated Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, A.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2017-05-01

    Supervised classification of remotely sensed images is a classical method for change detection. The task requires training data in the form of image data with known class labels, whose manually generation is time-consuming. If the labels are acquired from the outdated map, the classifier must cope with errors in the training data. These errors, referred to as label noise, typically occur in clusters in object space, because they are caused by land cover changes over time. In this paper we adapt a label noise tolerant training technique for classification, so that the fact that changes affect larger clusters of pixels is considered. We also integrate the existing map into an iterative classification procedure to act as a prior in regions which are likely to contain changes. Our experiments are based on three test areas, using real images with simulated existing databases. Our results show that this method helps to distinguish between real changes over time and false detections caused by misclassification and thus improves the accuracy of the classification results.

  5. Long-term transportation noise annoyance is associated with subsequent lower levels of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Foraster, Maria; Eze, Ikenna C; Vienneau, Danielle; Brink, Mark; Cajochen, Christian; Caviezel, Seraina; Héritier, Harris; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Schindler, Christian; Wanner, Miriam; Wunderli, Jean-Marc; Röösli, Martin; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Noise annoyance (NA) might lead to behavioral patterns not captured by noise levels, which could reduce physical activity (PA) either directly or through impaired sleep and constitute a noise pathway towards cardiometabolic diseases. We investigated the association of long-term transportation NA and its main sources (aircraft, road, and railway) at home with PA levels. We assessed 3842 participants (aged 37-81) that attended the three examinations (SAP 1, 2, and 3 in years 1991, 2001 and 2011, respectively) of the population-based Swiss cohort on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA). Participants reported general 24-h transportation NA (in all examinations) and source-specific NA at night (only SAP 3) on an ICBEN-type 11-point scale. We assessed moderate, vigorous, and total PA from a short-questionnaire (SAP 3). The main outcome was moderate PA (active/inactive: cut-off≥150min/week). We used logistic regression including random effects by area and adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and lifestyles (main model) and evaluated potential effect modifiers. We analyzed associations with PA at SAP 3 a) cross-sectionally: for source-specific and transportation NA in the last year (SAP 3), and b) longitudinally: for 10-y transportation NA (mean of SAP 1+2), adjusting for prior PA (SAP 2) and changes in NA (SAP 3-2). Reported NA (score≥5) was 16.4%, 7.5%, 3%, and 1.1% for 1-year transportation, road, aircraft, and railway at SAP 3, respectively. NA was greater in the past, reaching 28.5% for 10-y transportation NA (SAP 1+2). The 10-y transportation NA was associated with a 3.2% (95% CI: 6%-0.2%) decrease in moderate PA per 1-NA rating point and was related to road and aircraft NA at night in cross-sectional analyses. The longitudinal association was stronger for women, reported daytime sleepiness or chronic diseases and it was not explained by objectively modeled levels of road traffic noise at SAP 3. In conclusion, long-term NA

  6. Study of active rotor control for in-plane rotor noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianxiao

    This research consists of two parts: the main part of this research is the study of active rotor control for in-plane rotor noise reduction. The objective of this part of the research is to develop a methodology to find a loading solution that results in noise reduction at a single observer or over an area (at multiple observers), and propose potential active devices that may realize the loading solution to reduce in-plane noise. Another part of the research is the study of thickness noise prediction method, which aims to develop a new thickness noise prediction method able to provide fast and relatively accurate thickness noise prediction. In this research, a new thickness noise prediction method, called dual compact thickness noise model is developed. In this dual compact model, at each radial location, the airfoil is divided into two parts and the uniform pressure distribution is integrated on the front and rear part respectively. This generates two loading lines acting at different chordwise locations, and the loading noise generated by these two loading lines reproduces the acoustic signal of the normal thickness noise. The positions of the two loading lines are determined to be .... = 0.133 and .... = 0.867 in a baseline case by matching normal thickness noise and the dual compact result at an in-plane observer directly ahead of the rotor. The dual compact thickness noise model is validated through thickness noise computation for a wide variety of cases, in which different airfoils, blade planforms, and tip Mach numbers, are considered. The dual compact thickness noise result is in good agreement with normal thickness noise for each case. Additionally, the locations of the two loading lines are kept unchanged for all the cases. The computation time is significantly reduced by using the dual compact thickness noise model as compared to the normal thickness noise computation (typically 25 times faster). Finally, the accuracy of dual compact thickness noise

  7. Method and System for Active Noise Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betzina, Mark D. (Inventor); Nguyen, Khanh Q. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Methods and systems for reducing noise generated by rotating blades of a tiltrotor aircraft. A rotor-blade pitch angle associated with the tiltrotor aircraft can be controlled utilizing a swashplate connected to rotating blades of the tiltrotor aircraft. One or more Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) signals can be transmitted and input to a swashplate control actuator associated with the swashplate. A particular blade pitch oscillation (e.g., four cycles per revolution) is there-after produced in a rotating frame of reference associated with the rotating blades in response to input of an HHC signal to the swashplate control actuator associated with the swashplate to thereby reduce noise associated with the rotating blades of the tiltrotor aircraft. The HHC signal can be transmitted and input to the swashplate control actuator to reduce noise of the tiltrotor aircraft in response to a user input utilizing an open-loop configuration.

  8. A component based noise correction method (CompCor) for BOLD and perfusion based fMRI.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Yashar; Restom, Khaled; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T

    2007-08-01

    A component based method (CompCor) for the reduction of noise in both blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and perfusion-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is presented. In the proposed method, significant principal components are derived from noise regions-of-interest (ROI) in which the time series data are unlikely to be modulated by neural activity. These components are then included as nuisance parameters within general linear models for BOLD and perfusion-based fMRI time series data. Two approaches for the determination of the noise ROI are considered. The first method uses high-resolution anatomical data to define a region of interest composed primarily of white matter and cerebrospinal fluid, while the second method defines a region based upon the temporal standard deviation of the time series data. With the application of CompCor, the temporal standard deviation of resting-state perfusion and BOLD data in gray matter regions was significantly reduced as compared to either no correction or the application of a previously described retrospective image based correction scheme (RETROICOR). For both functional perfusion and BOLD data, the application of CompCor significantly increased the number of activated voxels as compared to no correction. In addition, for functional BOLD data, there were significantly more activated voxels detected with CompCor as compared to RETROICOR. In comparison to RETROICOR, CompCor has the advantage of not requiring external monitoring of physiological fluctuations.

  9. SVD-based optimal filtering for noise reduction in dual microphone hearing aids: a real time implementation and perceptual evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maj, Jean-Baptiste; Royackers, Liesbeth; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, the first real-time implementation and perceptual evaluation of a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based optimal filtering technique for noise reduction in a dual microphone behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid is presented. This evaluation was carried out for a speech weighted noise and multitalker babble, for single and multiple jammer sound source scenarios. Two basic microphone configurations in the hearing aid were used. The SVD-based optimal filtering technique was compared against an adaptive beamformer, which is known to give significant improvements in speech intelligibility in noisy environment. The optimal filtering technique works without assumptions about a speaker position, unlike the two-stage adaptive beamformer. However this strategy needs a robust voice activity detector (VAD). A method to improve the performance of the VAD was presented and evaluated physically. By connecting the VAD to the output of the noise reduction algorithms, a good discrimination between the speech-and-noise periods and the noise-only periods of the signals was obtained. The perceptual experiments demonstrated that the SVD-based optimal filtering technique could perform as well as the adaptive beamformer in a single noise source scenario, i.e., the ideal scenario for the latter technique, and could outperform the adaptive beamformer in multiple noise source scenarios.

  10. The spatial structure of underwater noise due to shipping activities in the Celtic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Underwater noise is now classed as pollution alongside chemical pollution and marine litter (MSFD, 2012). Underwater noise from man-made sources arises from a number of sources including shipping activities. There are numerous examples of sound-induced effects recorded for various marine mammals, either in controlled situations, or opportunistically (MSFD-GES, 2012). Broad or narrow band continuous sounds, as well as pulses, have been documented to cause effects ranging from slight behaviour change, to activity disruption, avoidance or abandonment of preferred habitat (see Clark et al., 2009). Underwater ambient noise generated by shipping activities has increased significantly over the past decades (e.g. Mcdonald et al., 2006). Noise from shipping is a major contributor to the ambient noise levels in ocean, particularly at low (

  11. Simulation Study on Active Noise Control for a 4 Tesla MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C.; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study computationally the possibility of the application of a hybrid active noise control technique for MRI acoustic noise reduction. A hybrid control system combined with both feedforward and feedback loops embedded is proposed for potential application on active MRI noise reduction. A set of computational simulation studies were performed. Sets of MRI acoustic noise emissions measured at the patient's left ear location were recorded and used in the simulation study. By comparing three different control systems, namely the feedback, the feedforward and the hybrid control, our results revealed that the hybrid control system is the most effective. The hybrid control system achieved approximately a 20 dB reduction at the principal frequency component. We concluded that the proposed hybrid active control scheme could have a potential application for MRI scanner noise reduction. PMID:18060719

  12. Simulation study on active noise control for a 4-T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study computationally the possibility of the application of a hybrid active noise control technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acoustic noise reduction. A hybrid control system combined with both feedforward and feedback loops embedded is proposed for potential application on active MRI noise reduction. A set of computational simulation studies were performed. Sets of MRI acoustic noise emissions measured at the patient's left ear location were recorded and used in the simulation study. By comparing three different control systems, namely, the feedback, the feedforward and the hybrid control, our results revealed that the hybrid control system is the most effective. The hybrid control system achieved approximately a 20-dB reduction at the principal frequency component. We concluded that the proposed hybrid active control scheme could have a potential application for MRI scanner noise reduction.

  13. Noise Equivalent Power of Graphene-Superconductor-Based Optical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghda, B. Afkhami; Moftakharzadeh, A.; Hosseini, M.

    In this paper, the noise equivalent power (NEP) of optical sensors based on graphene-superconductor junctions in the voltage bias operation mode has been calculated. The effects of device parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and device resistance on the NEP of these detectors have been thoroughly investigated. By solving the related equations, graphene specific heat, thermal conductivity, electron-phonon interaction and responsivity of the detector have been obtained. Using the calculated parameters, the NEP of the device was obtained. The results show that at constant magnetic field the NEP will increase linearly by increasing device temperature. On the other hand, at constant temperature the behavior of NEP versus magnetic field is first increasing and then decreasing. Our calculations show that the optimal resistance of the device has a direct relation with respect to the device temperature, while in the investigated operating range the optimal resistance of device is almost independent of the magnetic field.

  14. Reducing Centroid Error Through Model-Based Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shinhak

    2006-01-01

    A method of processing the digitized output of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image detector has been devised to enable reduction of the error in computed centroid of the image of a point source of light. The method involves model-based estimation of, and correction for, the contributions of bias and noise to the image data. The method could be used to advantage in any of a variety of applications in which there are requirements for measuring precise locations of, and/or precisely aiming optical instruments toward, point light sources. In the present method, prior to normal operations of the CCD, one measures the point-spread function (PSF) of the telescope or other optical system used to project images on the CCD. The PSF is used to construct a database of spot models representing the nominal CCD pixel outputs for a point light source projected onto the CCD at various positions incremented by small fractions of a pixel.

  15. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Adapted Noise Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheau-Fang; Tung, Ying-Kai

    Spectral subtraction is commonly used for speech enhancement in a single channel system because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, this algorithm introduces perceptually musical noise while suppressing the background noise. We propose a wavelet-based approach in this paper for suppressing the background noise for speech enhancement in a single channel system. The wavelet packet transform, which emulates the human auditory system, is used to decompose the noisy signal into critical bands. Wavelet thresholding is then temporally adjusted with the noise power by time-adapted noise estimation. The proposed algorithm can efficiently suppress the noise while reducing speech distortion. Experimental results, including several objective measurements, show that the proposed wavelet-based algorithm outperforms spectral subtraction and other wavelet-based denoising approaches for speech enhancement for nonstationary noise environments.

  16. Development of a cryogenic DC-low noise amplifier for SQuID-based readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Torrioli, G.; Di Giorgio, A.; Spinoglio, L.; Piro, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    We present the preliminary results of the design and test activities for a DC cryogenic low noise amplifier for the SAFARI imaging spectrometer, planned to be onboard the SPICA mission, necessary not only to drive, as usual, the voltage signal produced by the SQuID but also to boost such signals over about 7 meter of path towards the warm feedback electronics. This development has been done in the framework of the mission preparation studies, within the European Consortium for the development of the SAFARI instrument. The actual configuration of the SAFARI focal plane assembly (FPA), indeed, foresees a long distance to the warm back end electronics. It is therefore mandatory to boost the faint electric signal coming from the SQuID device by keeping under control both power dissipation and noise: this is the main role of the designed Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA). Working at 136K, it has a differential input gain-stage, and a differential balanced voltage buffer output stage, running at few mW target overall power. At present the design is based on the use of Heterojunction Si:Ge transistors, the required bandwidth is DC-4MHz and the required noise lower than 1 nV/rtHz.

  17. [Summary of ongoing activities on environmental noise and health at the WHO regional office for Europe].

    PubMed

    Héroux, M E; Braubach, M; Dramac, D; Korol, N; Paunovic, E; Zastenskaya, I

    2014-01-01

    The environmental noise is an important public health issue, according to recent assessment of the burden of diseases among environmental health risk factors in order of importance the environmental noise occupies the second place after air pollution. The World Health Organization (WHO) for the first time published its public health recommendations for the environmental noise in 1999 in the "WHO Guidelines for Community Noise (1999)". These recommendations found their development in WHO Night Noise Guidelines for Europe" (2009). From then onward there have been published new important data on the impact of the environmental noise on the health, that stipulated the revision of existing guidelines. Furthermore, both in the European Union (EU) Directive 2002/49/ EC and the Parma Declaration from 2010 there was pointed out the importance of renewal environmental noise recommendations. Responding to appearing interrogation, WHO Regional Office for Europe has recently initiated the process of the elaboration of new guiding principles known as "WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region". The Guidelines will include a systematic review of most critical or important health consequences and also concentrate on health benefits of measures for the reducing noise levels. The Guidelines will consider noise coming from various noise sources such as aircraft, railroad, personal electronic devices and wind turbines. The Guidelines will also consider the particularity of such accommodations as residences, hospitals, and educational facilities. The work in the mentioned spheres is ongoing and the revised Guidelines are expected to be published in mid-2015. The Guidelines will provide up-to-date information on the health risks related to the environmental noise and evidence-based recommendations in order to support for WHO Member States in their efforts to prevent of the excessive noise and the struggle with their negative impact.

  18. Extracting Coherent Information from Noise Based Correlation Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of this research is to establish methodologies to utilize ambient noise in the ocean and to determine what scenarios...is a spinoff from a fish tank experiment in which our noise correlation methods were applied to the buildings ambient vibrations in which the...tank was located. We showed that we were able to determind the acoustical properties of tank from this ambient noise. This work has been reported in

  19. Evaluations of indoor noise criteria systems based on human response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this research is to examine human response to background noise, and relate results to indoor noise criteria. In previous work by the authors, subjects completed perception surveys, typing tasks, and proofreading tasks under typical heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) noise conditions. Results were correlated with commonly used indoor noise criteria systems including noise criteria (NC), room criteria (RC) and others. The findings suggested that the types of tasks used and the length of exposure can impact the results. To examine these two issues, the authors conducted a new study in which each test subject completed 38 total hours of testing over multiple days. Subjects were exposed to several background noise exposures over 20, 40, 80, and 240 minute trials. During the trials, subjects completed a variety of performance tasks and answered questions about their perception of the noise, the thermal environment, and various other factors. Findings from this study were used to determine optimum testing conditions for on-going research examining the effects of tonal or fluctuating background noise on performance, annoyance, and spectral perception. Results are being used to evaluate the effectiveness of commonly used indoor noise criteria systems. [Work supported by INCE and ASHRAE.

  20. Environmental noise levels affect the activity budget of the Florida manatee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Donaghay, Percy L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-09-01

    Manatees inhabit coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries because they are dependent on the aquatic vegetation that grows in shallow waters. Food requirements force manatees to occupy the same areas in which human activities are the greatest. Noise produced from human activities has the potential to affect these animals by eliciting responses ranging from mild behavioral changes to extreme aversion. This study quantifies the behavioral responses of manatees to both changing levels of ambient noise and transient noise sources. Results indicate that elevated environmental noise levels do affect the overall activity budget of this species. The proportion of time manatees spend feeding, milling, and traveling in critical habitats changed as a function of noise level. More time was spent in the directed, goal-oriented behaviors of feeding and traveling, while less time was spent milling when noise levels were highest. The animals also responded to the transient noise of approaching vessels with changes in behavioral state and movements out of the geographical area. This suggests that manatees detect and respond to changes in environmental noise levels. Whether these changes legally constitute harassment and produce biologically significant effects need to be addressed with hypothesis-driven experiments and long-term monitoring. [For Animal Bioacoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  1. Health-Based Audible Noise Guidelines Account for Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise Produced by Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Robert G.; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A.; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C.; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN. PMID:25759808

  2. Health-based audible noise guidelines account for infrasound and low-frequency noise produced by wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Berger, Robert G; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN.

  3. Ambient noise and temporal patterns of boat activity in the US Virgin Islands National Park.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Maxwell B; Mooney, T Aran

    2015-09-15

    Human activity is contributing increasing noise to marine ecosystems. Recent studies have examined the effects of boat noise on marine fishes, but there is limited understanding of the prevalence of this type of sound source. This investigation tracks vessel noise on three reefs in the US Virgin Islands National Park over four months in 2013. Ambient noise levels ranged from 106 to 129dBrms re 1μPa (100Hz-20kHz). Boat noise occurred in 6-12% of samples. In the presence of boat noise, ambient noise in a low-frequency band (100-1000Hz) increased by >7dB above baseline levels and sound levels were significantly higher. The frequency with the most acoustic energy shifted to a significantly lower frequency when boat noise was present during the day. These results indicate the abundance of boat noise and its overlap with reef organism sound production, raising concern for the communication abilities of these animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Speech intelligibility and protective effectiveness of selected active noise reduction and conventional communications headsets.

    PubMed

    Gower, D W; Casali, J G

    1994-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare both speech intelligibility and noise attenuation of a conventional passive headset (David Clark H10-76) and an electronic Active Noise Reduction (ANR) headset (Bose Aviation) operated with and without its ANR feature. Modified Rhyme Tests were conducted in pink and tank noise, and with and without bilateral phase reversal between earphones. The Bose ANR unit required a significantly higher speech-to-noise (S/N) ratio in both noise environments than the two passive headset systems to maintain equal intelligibility, in part because of its stronger noise reduction and higher required signal level. Articulation Index calculations corroborated the empirical result that the David Clark afforded comparable intelligibility to the Bose ANR device. Bilateral phase reversal proved to be of no benefit, and pink noise proved to be the harsher environment for speech intelligibility. On a speech intelligibility basis alone, the results do not justify the additional cost of the ANR headset; however, when severe noise exposure is at issue, a properly functioning ANR unit may afford more protection than a similar passive headset without electronics, especially in low-frequency noise spectra.

  5. Improved 3D wavelet-based de-noising of fMRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khullar, Siddharth; Michael, Andrew M.; Correa, Nicolle; Adali, Tulay; Baum, Stefi A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) data analysis deals with the problem of detecting very weak signals in very noisy data. Smoothing with a Gaussian kernel is often used to decrease noise at the cost of losing spatial specificity. We present a novel wavelet-based 3-D technique to remove noise in fMRI data while preserving the spatial features in the component maps obtained through group independent component analysis (ICA). Each volume is decomposed into eight volumetric sub-bands using a separable 3-D stationary wavelet transform. Each of the detail sub-bands are then treated through the main denoising module. This module facilitates computation of shrinkage factors through a hierarchical framework. It utilizes information iteratively from the sub-band at next higher level to estimate denoised coefficients at the current level. These de-noised sub-bands are then reconstructed back to the spatial domain using an inverse wavelet transform. Finally, the denoised group fMRI data is analyzed using ICA where the data is decomposed in to clusters of functionally correlated voxels (spatial maps) as indicators of task-related neural activity. The proposed method enables the preservation of shape of the actual activation regions associated with the BOLD activity. In addition it is able to achieve high specificity as compared to the conventionally used FWHM (full width half maximum) Gaussian kernels for smoothing fMRI data.

  6. The method of narrow-band audio classification based on universal noise background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Rui; Bao, Chang-chun

    2013-03-01

    Audio classification is the basis of content-based audio analysis and retrieval. The conventional classification methods mainly depend on feature extraction of audio clip, which certainly increase the time requirement for classification. An approach for classifying the narrow-band audio stream based on feature extraction of audio frame-level is presented in this paper. The audio signals are divided into speech, instrumental music, song with accompaniment and noise using the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In order to satisfy the demand of actual environment changing, a universal noise background model (UNBM) for white noise, street noise, factory noise and car interior noise is built. In addition, three feature schemes are considered to optimize feature selection. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves a high accuracy for audio classification, especially under each noise background we used and keep the classification time less than one second.

  7. Noise-induced effects on multicellular biopacemaker spontaneous activity: Differences between weak and strong pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghighi, Alireza; Comtois, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Self-organization of spontaneous activity of a network of active elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for pacemaking activity to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, consisting of resting and pacemaker cells, exhibit spontaneous activation of their electrical activity. Similarly, one proposed approach to the development of biopacemakers as an alternative to electronic pacemakers for cardiac therapy is based on heterogeneous cardiac cells with resting and spontaneously beating phenotypes. However, the combined effect of pacemaker characteristics, density, and spatial distribution of the pacemaker cells on spontaneous activity is unknown. Using a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm, we previously showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of pacemaker cells. In this study, we show that this behavior is dependent on the pacemaker cell characteristics, with weaker pacemaker cells requiring higher density and larger clusters to sustain multicellular activity. These multicellular structures also demonstrated an increased sensitivity to voltage noise that favored spontaneous activity at lower density while increasing temporal variation in the period of activity. This information will help researchers overcome the current limitations of biopacemakers.

  8. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-15

    Analysis Time resolved data using the Hybrid RANS/LES CFD simulations have been compiled for two jet conditions consistent with the experimental...vertical extent on the measured jet axis, and the entire data set was saved into Plot3D format. Figure 14 shows a comparison of the experimental and CFD ...CONTROL OF NOISE FROM HOT SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 6 Appendix A: FORTRAN Code for Computing Derivatives from CFD Data APPENDIX A - PAGE A-l

  9. Calcium-activated potassium conductance noise in snail neurons.

    PubMed

    Westerfield, M; Lux, H D

    1982-11-01

    Current fluctuations were measured in small, 3-6 micrometers-diameter patches of soma membrane in bursting neurons of the snail, Helix pomatia. The fluctuations dramatically increased in magnitude with depolarization of the membrane potential under voltage clamp conditions. Two components of conductance noise were identified in the power spectra calculated from the membrane currents. One component had a corner frequency which increased with depolarization. This component was blocked by intracellular injection of TEA and was relatively insensitive to extracellular calcium levels (as long as the total number of effective divalent cations remained constant). It was identified as fluctuations of the voltage-dependent component of delayed outward current. The second component of conductance noise had a corner frequency which decreased with depolarization. It was relatively unaffected by TEA injection and was reversibly blocked by substitution of extracellular calcium with magnesium, cobalt, or nickel. This second component of noise was identified as fluctuations of the calcium-dependent potassium current. The results suggest that the two components of delayed outward current are conducted through physically distinct channels.

  10. Research on infrared-image denoising algorithm based on the noise analysis of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songtao; Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Tongsheng; Han, Yanli

    2005-01-01

    Since the conventional denoising algorithms have not considered the influence of certain concrete detector, they are not very effective to remove various noises contained in the low signal-to-noise ration infrared image. In this paper, a new thinking for infrared image denoising is proposed, which is based on the noise analyses of detector with an example of L model infrared multi-element detector. According to the noise analyses of this detector, the emphasis is placed on how to filter white noise and fractal noise in the preprocessing phase. Wavelet analysis is a good tool for analyzing 1/f process. 1/f process can be viewed as white noise approximately since its wavelet coefficients are stationary and uncorrelated. So if wavelet transform is adopted, the problem of removing white noise and fraction noise is simplified as the only one problem, i.e., removing white noise. To address this problem, a new wavelet domain adaptive wiener filtering algorithm is presented. From the viewpoint of quantitative and qualitative analyses, the filtering effect of our method is compared with those of traditional median filter, mean filter and wavelet thresholding algorithm in detail. The results show that our method can reduce various noises effectively and raise the ratio of signal-to-noise evidently.

  11. The Effect of Human Activities and Their Associated Noise on Ungulate Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Casey L.; Hardy, Amanda R.; Barber, Jesse R.; Fristrup, Kurt M.; Crooks, Kevin R.; Angeloni, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The effect of anthropogenic noise on terrestrial wildlife is a relatively new area of study with broad ranging management implications. Noise has been identified as a disturbance that has the potential to induce behavioral responses in animals similar to those associated with predation risk. This study investigated potential impacts of a variety of human activities and their associated noise on the behavior of elk (Cervus elaphus) and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) along a transportation corridor in Grand Teton National Park. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted roadside scan surveys and focal observations of ungulate behavior while concurrently recording human activity and anthropogenic noise. Although we expected ungulates to be more responsive with greater human activity and noise, as predicted by the risk disturbance hypothesis, they were actually less responsive (less likely to perform vigilant, flight, traveling and defensive behaviors) with increasing levels of vehicle traffic, the human activity most closely associated with noise. Noise levels themselves had relatively little effect on ungulate behavior, although there was a weak negative relationship between noise and responsiveness in our scan samples. In contrast, ungulates did increase their responsiveness with other forms of anthropogenic disturbance; they reacted to the presence of pedestrians (in our scan samples) and to passing motorcycles (in our focal observations). Conclusions These findings suggest that ungulates did not consistently associate noise and human activity with an increase in predation risk or that they could not afford to maintain responsiveness to the most frequent human stimuli. Although reduced responsiveness to certain disturbances may allow for greater investment in fitness-enhancing activities, it may also decrease detections of predators and other environmental cues and increase conflict with humans. PMID:22808175

  12. A Landing Gear Noise Reduction Study Based on Computational Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockard, David P.

    2006-01-01

    Landing gear is one of the more prominent airframe noise sources. Techniques that diminish gear noise and suppress its radiation to the ground are highly desirable. Using a hybrid computational approach, this paper investigates the noise reduction potential of devices added to a simplified main landing gear model without small scale geometric details. The Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is used to predict the noise at far-field observer locations from surface pressure data provided by unsteady CFD calculations. Because of the simplified nature of the model, most of the flow unsteadiness is restricted to low frequencies. The wheels, gear boxes, and oleo appear to be the primary sources of unsteadiness at these frequencies. The addition of fairings around the gear boxes and wheels, and the attachment of a splitter plate on the downstream side of the oleo significantly reduces the noise over a wide range of frequencies, but a dramatic increase in noise is observed at one frequency. The increased flow velocities, a consequence of the more streamlined bodies, appear to generate extra unsteadiness around other parts giving rise to the additional noise. Nonetheless, the calculations demonstrate the capability of the devices to improve overall landing gear noise.

  13. Temporal pattern of acoustic imaging noise asymmetrically modulates activation in the auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Ruwan D.; Kwon, Minseok; Hu, Shuowen; Tamer, Gregory G.; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the hemisphere-specific effects of the temporal pattern of imaging related acoustic noise on auditory cortex activation. Hemodynamic responses (HDRs) to five temporal patterns of imaging noise corresponding to noise generated by unique combinations of imaging volume and effective repetition time (TR), were obtained using a stroboscopic event-related paradigm with extra-long (≥27.5s) TR to minimize inter-acquisition effects. In addition to confirmation that fMRI responses in auditory cortex do not behave in a linear manner, temporal patterns of imaging noise were found to modulate both the shape and spatial extent of hemodynamic responses, with classically non-auditory areas exhibiting responses to longer duration noise conditions. Hemispheric analysis revealed the right primary auditory cortex to be more sensitive than the left to the presence of imaging related acoustic noise. Right primary auditory cortex responses were significantly larger during all the conditions. This asymmetry of response to imaging related acoustic noise could lead to different baseline activation levels during acquisition schemes using short TR, inducing an observed asymmetry in the responses to an intended acoustic stimulus through limitations of dynamic range, rather than due to differences in neuronal processing of the stimulus. These results emphasize the importance of accounting for the temporal pattern of the acoustic noise when comparing findings across different fMRI studies, especially those involving acoustic stimulation. PMID:26519093

  14. Temporal pattern of acoustic imaging noise asymmetrically modulates activation in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Ruwan D; Kwon, Minseok; Hu, Shuowen; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the hemisphere-specific effects of the temporal pattern of imaging related acoustic noise on auditory cortex activation. Hemodynamic responses (HDRs) to five temporal patterns of imaging noise corresponding to noise generated by unique combinations of imaging volume and effective repetition time (TR), were obtained using a stroboscopic event-related paradigm with extra-long (≥27.5 s) TR to minimize inter-acquisition effects. In addition to confirmation that fMRI responses in auditory cortex do not behave in a linear manner, temporal patterns of imaging noise were found to modulate both the shape and spatial extent of hemodynamic responses, with classically non-auditory areas exhibiting responses to longer duration noise conditions. Hemispheric analysis revealed the right primary auditory cortex to be more sensitive than the left to the presence of imaging related acoustic noise. Right primary auditory cortex responses were significantly larger during all the conditions. This asymmetry of response to imaging related acoustic noise could lead to different baseline activation levels during acquisition schemes using short TR, inducing an observed asymmetry in the responses to an intended acoustic stimulus through limitations of dynamic range, rather than due to differences in neuronal processing of the stimulus. These results emphasize the importance of accounting for the temporal pattern of the acoustic noise when comparing findings across different fMRI studies, especially those involving acoustic stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging.

  16. Quantum Dialogue Based on Hypertanglement Against Collective Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-jin; Li, Dong-fen; Zhang, Feng-li; Qin, Zhiguang; Baaguere, Edward; Zhan, Huayi

    2016-08-01

    The major problem faced by photons propagating through a physical channel is that of collective noise. This collective noise has the ability to reduce the number of quantum bits that are transmitted, thereby reduces the message fidelity. The traditional method of noise immunity is the use of entanglement purification, which consumes a lot of quantum resources in accomplishing the joint probability of noise immunity but does not guarantee accurate quantum dialog. In this paper, we investigate a new approach to quantum dialogue in which quantum information can be faithfully transmitted via a noisy channel. we constructs corresponding Decoherence Free Subspace(DFS), the quantum state after the change is in the maximally entangled state, so as to realize the fidelity of quantum dialogue model that can ensure the accuracy and noise resistance, and secret information exchange.

  17. Active noise and vibration control for vehicular applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.; Ellis, S.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project investigated semi-active suspension systems based on real time nonlinear control of magneto-rheological (MR) shock absorbers. This effort was motivated by Laboratory interactions with the automobile industry and with the Defense Department. Background research and a literature search on semi-active suspensions was carried out. Numerical simulations of alternative nonlinear control algorithms were developed and adapted for use with an MR shock absorber. A benchtop demonstration system was designed, including control electronics and a mechanical demonstration fixture to hold the damper/spring assembly. A custom-made MR shock was specified and procured. Measurements were carried out at Los Alamos to characterize the performance of the device.

  18. Noise Pollution Filters Bird Communities Based on Vocal Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Clinton D.; Ortega, Catherine P.; Cruz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Background Human-generated noise pollution now permeates natural habitats worldwide, presenting evolutionarily novel acoustic conditions unprecedented to most landscapes. These acoustics not only harm humans, but threaten wildlife, and especially birds, via changes to species densities, foraging behavior, reproductive success, and predator-prey interactions. Explanations for negative effects of noise on birds include disruption of acoustic communication through energetic masking, potentially forcing species that rely upon acoustic communication to abandon otherwise suitable areas. However, this hypothesis has not been adequately tested because confounding stimuli often co-vary with noise and are difficult to separate from noise exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a natural experiment that controls for confounding stimuli, we evaluate whether species vocal features or urban-tolerance classifications explain their responses to noise measured through habitat use. Two data sets representing nesting and abundance responses reveal that noise filters bird communities nonrandomly. Signal duration and urban tolerance failed to explain species-specific responses, but birds with low-frequency signals that are more susceptible to masking from noise avoided noisy areas and birds with higher frequency vocalizations remained. Signal frequency was also negatively correlated with body mass, suggesting that larger birds may be more sensitive to noise due to the link between body size and vocal frequency. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that acoustic masking by noise may be a strong selective force shaping the ecology of birds worldwide. Larger birds with lower frequency signals may be excluded from noisy areas, whereas smaller species persist via transmission of higher frequency signals. We discuss our findings as they relate to interspecific relationships among body size, vocal amplitude and frequency and suggest that they are immediately relevant to the

  19. Active control of the volume acquisition noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Method and psychoacoustical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John; Akeroyd, Michael A.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Palmer, Alan R.

    2001-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive tool for observing correlates of neural activity in the brain while a subject listens to sound. However, intense acoustic noise is generated in the process of capturing MR images. This noise stimulates the auditory nervous system, limiting the dynamic range available for displaying stimulus-driven activity. The noise is potentially damaging to hearing and is distracting for the subject. In an active noise control (ANC) system, a reference sample of a noise is processed to form a sound which adds destructively with the noise at the listener's ear. We describe an implementation of ANC in the electromagnetically hostile and physically compact MRI scanning environment. First, a prototype system was evaluated psychoacoustically in the laboratory, using the electrical drive to a noise-generating loudspeaker as the reference. This system produced 10-20 dB of subjective noise-reduction between 250 Hz and 1 kHz, and smaller amounts at higher frequencies. The system was modified to operate in a real MR scanner where the reference was obtained by recording the acoustic scanner noise. Objective reduction by 30-40 dB of the most intense component in scanner noises was realized between 500 Hz and 3500 Hz, and subjective reduction of 12 dB and 5 dB in tests at frequencies of 600 Hz and at 1.9 kHz, respectively. Although the benefit of ANC is limited by transmission paths to the cochlea other than air-conduction routes from the auditory meatus, ANC achieves worthwhile attenuation even in the frequency range of maximum bone conduction (1.5-2 kHz). ANC should, therefore, be generally useful during auditory fMRI.

  20. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition at advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules...that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, generating counter-acting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative...by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition at advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active

  1. Erratum to "Noise-induced changes of neuronal spontaneous activity in mice inferior colliculus brain slices".

    PubMed

    Basta, Dietmar; Ernst, Arne

    2005-02-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in vivo is reportedly subject to a noise-induced decrease of GABA-related inhibitory synaptic transmission accompanied by an amplitude increase of auditory evoked responses, a widening of tuning curves and a higher neuronal discharge rate at suprathreshold levels. However, other in vivo experiments which demonstrated constant neuronal auditory thresholds or unchanged spontaneous activity in the IC after noise exposure did not confirm those findings. Perhaps this can be the result of complex noise-induced interactions between different central auditory structures. It was, therefore, the aim of the present study to investigate the effects of noise exposure on the spontaneous electrical activity of single neurons in a slice preparation of the isolated mouse IC. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun 10:1). After one week, auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings and extracellular single-unit recordings from spontaneously active neurons within the IC slice were performed in noise-exposed and in normal hearing control mice. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift in the whole tested frequency range and a significant lower neuronal spontaneous activity in all investigated isofrequency laminae compared to controls. In both groups, the firing rate of 80% of IC neurons (approximately) increased significantly during the application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist Bicucullin (10 microM). The present findings demonstrate a noise-related modulation of spontaneous activity in the IC, which possibly contribute to the generation of noise-induced tinnitus and hearing loss.

  2. Noise-induced changes of neuronal spontaneous activity in mice inferior colliculus brain slices.

    PubMed

    Basta, Dietmar; Ernest, Arne

    2004-09-30

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in vivo is reportedly subject to a noise-induced decrease of GABA-related inhibitory synaptic transmission accompanied by an amplitude increase of auditory evoked responses, a widening of tuning curves and a higher neuronal discharge rate at suprathreshold levels. However, other in vivo experiments which demonstrated constant neuronal auditory thresholds or unchanged spontaneous activity in the IC after noise exposure did not confirm those findings. Perhaps this can be the result of complex noise-induced interactions between different central auditory structures. It was, therefore, the aim of the present study to investigate the effects of noise exposure on the spontaneous electrical activity of single neurons in a slice preparation of the isolated mouse IC. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun 10:1). After one week, auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings and extracellular single-unit recordings from spontaneously active neurons within the IC slice were performed in noise-exposed and in normal hearing control mice. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift in the whole tested frequency range and a significant lower neuronal spontaneous activity in all investigated isofrequency laminae compared to controls. In both groups, the firing rate of 80% of IC neurons (approximately) increased significantly during the application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist Bicucullin (10 microM). The present findings demonstrate a noise-related modulation of spontaneous activity in the IC, which possibly contribute to the generation of noise-induced tinnitus and hearing loss.

  3. Temporal Correlation-Based Spatial Filtering of Rician Noise for Functional MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir., A. Khaliq; M. Qureshi, I.; Jawad., A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    A novel correlation-based filter is presented for de-noising functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Temporal correlation-based exponential weights are defined for spatial smoothing of the data, with bias reduction using estimated noise variance. The proposed scheme is tested on simulated and real fMRI data. Finally, the results are compared with conventional filters. The method is found to be effectively suppressing the Rician noise in fMRI data, while improving the SNR.

  4. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  5. Estimation and prediction of noise power based on variational Bayesian and adaptive ARMA time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Li, Yonggui; Zhu, Yonggang; Li, Binwu

    2014-04-01

    Estimation and prediction of noise power are very important for communication anti-jamming and efficient allocation of spectrum resources in adaptive wireless communication and cognitive radio. In order to estimate and predict the time-varying noise power caused by natural factors and jamming in the high frequency channel, Variational Bayesian algorithm and adaptive ARMA time series are proposed. Through establishing the time-varying noise power model, which controlled by the noise variance rate, the noise power can be estimated with Variational Bayesian algorithm, and the results show that the estimation error is related to observation interval. What's more, through the analysis of the correlation characteristics of the estimation power, noise power can be predicted based on adaptive ARMA time series, and the results show that it will be available to predict the noise power in next 5 intervals with the proportional error less than 0.2.

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement based on wavelet filtering in ultrasonic testing.

    PubMed

    Matz, Vaclav; Smid, Radislav; Starman, Stanislav; Kreidl, Marcel

    2009-12-01

    In ultrasonic non-destructive testing of materials with a coarse-grained structure the scattering from the grains causes backscattering noise, which masks flaw echoes in the measured signal. Several filtering methods have been proposed for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we present a comparative study of methods based on the wavelet transform. Experiments with stationary, discrete and wavelet packet de-noising are evaluated by means of signal-to-noise ratio enhancement. Measured and simulated ultrasonic signals are used to verify the proposed de-noising methods. For comparison, we use signal-to-noise ratio enhancement related to fault echo amplitudes and filtering efficiency specific for ultrasonic signals. The best results in our setup were achieved with the wavelet packet de-noising method.

  7. Low-Frequency Noise Characteristics of Zinc-Oxide-Film-Based Photoconductive Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Meng, Yang; Zhang, Peijian; Liu, Ziyu; Zhao, Hongwu

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency current noise measurements were performed on ZnO-based photoconductive detectors, and 1/f noise characteristics were observed both in the dark and under ultraviolet illumination. The noise measured under illumination is approximately one order of magnitude higher than the dark noise. In the higher voltage range, a knee-like voltage dependence of the photocurrent noise was observed. The enhanced photocurrent noise is attributed to the random trapping-detrapping processes of the oxygen-related hole-trap states at the grain boundary interface. The anomalous voltage dependence of the photocurrent noise in the higher voltage range indicated the presence of the inhomogeneous distribution of the oxygen-related hole-trap states.

  8. Effects of secondary loudspeaker properties on broadband feedforward active duct noise control.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yum-Ji; Huang, Lixi; Lam, James

    2013-07-01

    Dependence of the performance of feedforward active duct noise control on secondary loudspeaker parameters is investigated. Noise reduction performance can be improved if the force factor of the secondary loudspeaker is higher. For example, broadband noise reduction improvement up to 1.6 dB is predicted by increasing the force factor by 50%. In addition, a secondary loudspeaker with a larger force factor was found to have quicker convergence in the adaptive algorithm in experiment. In simulations, noise reduction is improved in using an adaptive algorithm by using a secondary loudspeaker with a heavier moving mass. It is predicted that an extra broadband noise reduction of more than 7 dB can be gained using an adaptive filter if the force factor, moving mass and coil inductance of a commercially available loudspeaker are doubled. Methods to increase the force factor beyond those of commercially available loudspeakers are proposed.

  9. Lévy noise improves the electrical activity in a neuron under electromagnetic radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juan; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    As the fluctuations of the internal bioelectricity of nervous system is various and complex, the external electromagnetic radiation induced by magnet flux on membrane can be described by the non-Gaussian type distribution of Lévy noise. Thus, the electrical activities in an improved Hindmarsh-Rose model excited by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise are investigated and some interesting modes of the electrical activities are exhibited. The external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise leads to the mode transition of the electrical activities and spatial phase, such as from the rest state to the firing state, from the spiking state to the spiking state with more spikes, and from the spiking state to the bursting state. Then the time points of the firing state versus Lévy noise intensity are depicted. The increasing of Lévy noise intensity heightens the neuron firing. Also the stationary probability distribution functions of the membrane potential of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise with different intensity, stability index and skewness papremeters are analyzed. Moreover, through the positive largest Lyapunov exponent, the parameter regions of chaotic electrical mode of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise distribution are detected. PMID:28358824

  10. Lévy noise improves the electrical activity in a neuron under electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Xu, Yong; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    As the fluctuations of the internal bioelectricity of nervous system is various and complex, the external electromagnetic radiation induced by magnet flux on membrane can be described by the non-Gaussian type distribution of Lévy noise. Thus, the electrical activities in an improved Hindmarsh-Rose model excited by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise are investigated and some interesting modes of the electrical activities are exhibited. The external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise leads to the mode transition of the electrical activities and spatial phase, such as from the rest state to the firing state, from the spiking state to the spiking state with more spikes, and from the spiking state to the bursting state. Then the time points of the firing state versus Lévy noise intensity are depicted. The increasing of Lévy noise intensity heightens the neuron firing. Also the stationary probability distribution functions of the membrane potential of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise with different intensity, stability index and skewness papremeters are analyzed. Moreover, through the positive largest Lyapunov exponent, the parameter regions of chaotic electrical mode of the neuron induced by the external electromagnetic radiation of Lévy noise distribution are detected.

  11. Bottom Parameters Inversion Research based Tow-Ship Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuchen; Zhou, Shihong

    2010-09-01

    This paper discusses geoacoustic inversion from tow-ship noise data acquired via a horizontal towed array. Self-noise geoacoustic inversion involves the estimation of bottom parameters such as sound speeds, densities and attenuation. This bottom parameter method is designed using a Line-spectrum of tow-ship noise through near-field propagation mode and genetic arithmetic. A global search algorithm, i.e., GA is applied to the optimization problem. The experimental results are particularly encouraging in view of the high level of interference shown to be tolerated from nearby shipping.

  12. Large bandwidth op-amp based white noise current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusi, Gino; Scandurra, Graziella; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-02-01

    Electrical noise sources are basic building blocks in many measurement and instrumentation applications and in communication systems. In this paper, we propose a quite simple topology for the realization of a programmable, wide bandwidth, white noise current source that requires only two resistors and one operational amplifier. We validate the proposed approach by means of SPICE simulations and demonstrate, by means of proper measurements, the capability of generating a flat current noise spectrum in a frequency range up to four decades from a few Hz up to 100 kHz.

  13. Numerical modeling of multi-mode active control of turbofan tonal noise using a boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Laralee Gordon

    A numerical model was developed to investigate the possibility of implementing active control (ANC) to minimize noise radiation from high-bypass turbofan engines. Previous experimental work on the NASA Glenn Research Center active noise control fan (ANCF) was encouraging, but the question remained whether the modal approach investigated could be effective on real engines. The engine model developed for this research project uses an indirect boundary element method, implemented with Sysnoise, and a multi-mode Newton's algorithm, implemented with MATLAB(TM), to simulate the active control. Noise from the inlet was targeted. Both the experimental and numerical results based on the NASA ANCF simplified cylindrical engine geometry indicate overall reductions in the m = 2 component of the noise. Reductions obtained at the numerical sensor rings range from 17 dB to 63 dB and at a plane in the duct inlet, -8 dB to 33 dB. Rings mounted on the inlet duct are unable to accurately predict the total reduction of the inlet field, but the controller is still able to effectively reduce the total acoustic field. Generally, one sensor ring and one actuator ring per propagating mode were necessary to control the inlet field. At frequencies close to the cut-off frequency of a mode, an additional sensor and actuator ring were needed to adequately control the inlet field due to the evanescent mode. A more realistic, but still axisymmetric, engine geometry based on the GE CF6-80C engine was developed and the same algorithm used. Reductions obtained at the sensor rings range from 4 dB to 56 dB and at the duct inlet plane, from 12 dB to 26 dB. The overall far field noise radiation from the engine remained unchanged (0.4 dB) or decreased slightly (3.6 dB). The inlet noise was controlled at all frequencies but the noise from the exhaust was increased. The effect of inlet control on the exhaust radiation suggests the need for a controller that targets both the inlet and exhaust noise

  14. PDE-based random-valued impulse noise removal based on new class of controlling functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Tang, Chen

    2011-09-01

    This paper is concerned with partial differential equation (PDE)-based image denoising for random-valued impulse noise. We introduce the notion of ENI (the abbreviation for "edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels") that denotes the number of homogeneous pixels in a local neighborhood and is significantly different for edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels. We redefine the controlling speed function and the controlling fidelity function to depend on ENI. According to our two controlling functions, the diffusion and fidelity process at edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels can be selectively carried out. Furthermore, a class of second-order improved and edge-preserving PDE denoising models is proposed based on the two new controlling functions in order to deal with random-valued impulse noise reliably. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed PDEs via application to five standard test images, corrupted by random-valued impulse noise with various noise levels and comparison with the related second-order PDE models and the other special filtering methods for random-valued impulse noise. Our two controlling functions are extended to automatically other PDE models.

  15. Relationship of Transportation Noise and Annoyance for Two Metropolitan Cities in Korea: Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jiho; Park, Sang Jin; Sim, Chang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Transportation noise is known to have negative impact on both public health and life quality. This study evaluated the relationship between transportation noise and annoyance levels, and also the difference of annoyance levels in two metropolitan cities based on epidemiologic surveys. Two thousand adult subjects living in Seoul and Ulsan were enrolled by stratified random sampling on the basis of noise maps from July 2015 to January 2016. Individual annoyance in accordance with transportation noise levels in two metropolitan cities were surveyed using an 11-point visual analog scale questionnaire. The results show that transportation noise level was significantly correlated with annoyance in both cities. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of being 'highly annoyed' increased with noise level (Ldn, day-night average sound level) in both cities. After adjusting for age, residence period, sociodemographic factors (sex, education, marriage, income, alcohol, smoking, and exercise) and noise sensitivity, the risk of being 'highly annoyed' was increased with noise levels in both cities. In comparison to those of areas with noise levels below 55 dBA, the adjusted odds ratios of 'highly annoyed' for areas with 55-65 dBA and over 65 dBA were 2.056 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.225-3.450), 3.519 (95% CI 1.982-6.246) in Seoul and 1.022 (95% CI 0.585-1.785), 1.704 (95% CI 1.005-2.889) in Ulsan, respectively. Based on the results of a population study, we showed that transportation noise levels were significantly associated with annoyance in adults. However, there were some differences between the two cities. In this study, there were differences in transportation noise between the two cities. Seoul has complex noise (traffic and aircraft), compared to single road traffic noise in Ulsan. Therefore, single and complex transportation noise may have different effects on annoyance levels.

  16. Diffusion of active particles with stochastic torques modeled as α-stable noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nötel, Jörg; Sokolov, Igor M.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the stochastic dynamics of an active particle moving at a constant speed under the influence of a fluctuating torque. In our model the angular velocity is generated by a constant torque and random fluctuations described as a Lévy-stable noise. Two situations are investigated. First, we study white Lévy noise where the constant speed and the angular noise generate a persistent motion characterized by the persistence time {τ }D. At this time scale the crossover from ballistic to normal diffusive behavior is observed. The corresponding diffusion coefficient can be obtained analytically for the whole class of symmetric α-stable noises. As typical for models with noise-driven angular dynamics, the diffusion coefficient depends non-monotonously on the angular noise intensity. As second example, we study angular noise as described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with correlation time {τ }c driven by the Cauchy white noise. We discuss the asymptotic diffusive properties of this model and obtain the same analytical expression for the diffusion coefficient as in the first case which is thus independent on {τ }c. Remarkably, for {τ }c\\gt {τ }D the crossover from a non-Gaussian to a Gaussian distribution of displacements takes place at a time {τ }G which can be considerably larger than the persistence time {τ }D.

  17. Actuator Feasibility Study for Active Control of Ducted Axial Fan Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, John C.

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study was performed to investigate actuator technology which is relevant for a particular application of active noise control for gas turbine stator vanes. This study investigated many different classes of actuators and ranked them on the order of applicability. The most difficult requirements the actuators had to meet were high frequency response, large amplitude deflections, and a thin profile. Based on this assessment, piezoelectric type actuators were selected as the most appropriate actuator class. Specifically, Rainbows (a new class of high performance piezoelectric actuators), and unimorphs (a ceramic/metal composite) appeared best suited to the requirements. A benchtop experimental study was conducted. The performance of a variety of different actuators was examined, including high polymer films, flextensional actuators, miniature speakers, unimorphs, and Rainbows. The displacement/frequency response and phase characteristics of the actuators were measured. Physical limitations of actuator operation were also examined. This report includes the first known, high displacement, dynamic data obtained for Rainbow actuators. A new "hard" ceramic Rainbow actuator which does not appear to be limited in operation by self heating as "soft" ceramic Rainbows was designed, constructed and tested. The study concludes that a suitable actuator for active noise control in gas turbine engines can be achieved with state of the art materials and processing.

  18. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; ...

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) based spin torque oscillator (STO) is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. Here, we find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layermore » is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. Lastly, these results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.« less

  19. Influence of perturbative phase noise on active coherent polarization beam combining system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Su, Rongtao; Liu, Zejin

    2013-12-02

    In this manuscript, the influence of perturbative phase noise on active coherent polarization beam combining (CPBC) system is studied theoretically and experimentally. By employing a photo-detector to obtain phase error signal for feedback loop, actively coherent polarization beam combining of two 20 W-level single mode polarization-maintained (PM) fiber amplifiers are demonstrated with more than 94% combining efficiency. Then the influence of perturbative phase noise on active CPBC system is illustrated by incorporating a simulated phase noise signal in one of the two amplifiers. Experimental results show that the combining efficiency of the CPBC system is susceptible to the frequency or amplitude of the perturbative phase noise. In order to ensure the combining efficiency of the unit of CPBC system higher than 90%, the competence of our active phase control module for high power operation is discussed, which suggests that it could be worked at 100s W power level. The relationship between residual phase noise of the active controller and the normalized voltage signal of the photo-detector is developed and validated experimentally. Experimental results correspond exactly with the theoretically analyzed combining efficiency. Our method offers a useful approach to estimate the influence of phase noise on CPBC system.

  20. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  1. Trailing Edge Noise Prediction Based on a New Acoustic Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, J.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A new analytic result in acoustics called 'Formulation 1B,' proposed by Farassat, is used to compute broadband trailing edge noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term, and has been shown in previous research to provide time domain predictions of broadband noise that are in excellent agreement with experiment. Furthermore, this formulation lends itself readily to rotating reference frames and statistical analysis of broadband trailing edge noise. Formulation 1B is used to calculate the far field noise radiated from the trailing edge of a NACA 0012 airfoil in low Mach number flows, using both analytical and experimental data on the airfoil surface. The results are compared to analytical results and experimental measurements that are available in the literature. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained.

  2. Ultra-wideband noise radar based on optical waveform generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodensky, Daniel; Kravitz, Daniel; Zadok, Avi

    2012-06-01

    A microwave-photonic, ultra-wideband (UWB) noise radar system is proposed and demonstrated. The system brings together photonic generation of UWB waveforms and fiber-optic distribution. The use of UWB noise provides high ranging resolution and better immunity to interception and jamming. Distribution over fibers allows for the separation the radar-operating personnel and equipment from the location of the front-end. The noise waveforms are generated using the amplified spontaneous emission that is associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering in a standard optical fiber, or with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Our experiments demonstrate a proof of concept for an integrated radar system, driven by optically generated UWB noise waveforms of more than 1 GHz bandwidth that are distributed over 10 km distance. The detection of concealed metallic object and the resolving of two targets with the anticipated ranging resolution are reported.

  3. Controlling kilometre-scale interferometric detectors for gravitational wave astronomy: Active phase noise cancellation using EOMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N.; Balembois, L.; Bizouard, M. A.; Brisson, V.; Casanueva, J.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Frey, V.; Hello, P.; Huet, D.; Leroy, N.; Loriette, V.; Maksimovic, I.; Robinet, F.

    2017-02-01

    The second generation of Gravitational waves detectors are kilometric Michelson interferometers with additional recycling Fabry-Perot cavities on the arms and ​the addition of two more recycling cavities to enhance their sensitivity, with the particularity that all the mirrors are suspended. In order to control them a new technique, based on the use of auxiliary lasers, has been developed to bring the interferometer to its working point, with all the cavities on their resonance, in an adiabatic way. The implementation of this technique in Advanced Virgo is under preparation and the propagation of a stable laser through a 3-km optical fibre is one of the most problematic issues. A new technique of active phase noise cancellation based on the use of Electro Optical Modulators has been developed, and a first prototype has been successfully tested.

  4. A Boltzmann constant determination based on Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers-Jacobs, N. E.; Pollarolo, A.; Coakley, K. J.; Fox, A. E.; Rogalla, H.; Tew, W. L.; Benz, S. P.

    2017-10-01

    A value for the Boltzmann constant was measured electronically using an improved version of the Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) system at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA. This system is different from prior ones, including those from the 2011 determination at NIST and both 2015 and 2017 determinations at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. As in all three previous determinations, the main contribution to the combined uncertainty is the statistical uncertainty in the noise measurement, which is mitigated by accumulating and integrating many weeks of cross-correlated measured data. The second major uncertainty contribution also still results from variations in the frequency response of the ratio of the measured spectral noise of the two noise sources, the sense resistor at the triple-point of water and the superconducting quantum voltage noise source. In this paper, we briefly describe the major differences between our JNT system and previous systems, in particular the input circuit and approach we used to match the frequency responses of the two noise sources. After analyzing and integrating 50 d of accumulated data, we determined a value: k~=1.380 642 9(69)× {{10}-23} J K-1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.0× {{10}-6} and relative offset -4.05× {{10}-6} from the CODATA 2014 recommended value.

  5. Simultaneous Measurement of Noise-Activated Middle-Ear Muscle Reflex and Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions serve as a noninvasive probe of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) elicited by a low-level probe tone may be the optimal type of emission for studying MOC effects because at low levels, the probe itself does not elicit the MOC reflex [Guinan et al. (2003) J. Assoc. Res. Otolaryngol. 4:521]. Based on anatomical considerations, the MOC reflex activated by ipsilateral acoustic stimulation (mediated by the crossed olivocochlear bundle) is predicted to be stronger than the reflex to contralateral stimulation. Broadband noise is an effective activator of the MOC reflex; however, it is also an effective activator of the middle-ear muscle (MEM) reflex, which can make results difficult to interpret. The MEM reflex may be activated at lower levels than measured clinically, and most previous human studies have not explicitly included measurements to rule out MEM reflex contamination. The current study addressed these issues using a higher-frequency SFOAE probe tone to test for cochlear changes mediated by the MOC reflex, while simultaneously monitoring the MEM reflex using a low-frequency probe tone. Broadband notched noise was presented ipsilaterally at various levels to elicit probe-tone shifts. Measurements are reported for 15 normal-hearing subjects. With the higher-frequency probe near 1.5 kHz, only 20% of subjects showed shifts consistent with an MOC reflex in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. With the higher-frequency probe near 3.5 kHz, up to 40% of subjects showed shifts in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. However, these responses had longer time courses than expected for MOC-induced shifts, and may have been dominated by other cochlear processes, rather than MOC reflex. These results suggest caution in the interpretation of effects observed using ipsilaterally presented acoustic activators intended to excite the MOC reflex. PMID:16568366

  6. Simultaneous measurement of noise-activated middle-ear muscle reflex and stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Shawn S; Keefe, Douglas H

    2006-06-01

    Otoacoustic emissions serve as a noninvasive probe of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) elicited by a low-level probe tone may be the optimal type of emission for studying MOC effects because at low levels, the probe itself does not elicit the MOC reflex [Guinan et al. (2003) J. Assoc. Res. Otolaryngol. 4:521]. Based on anatomical considerations, the MOC reflex activated by ipsilateral acoustic stimulation (mediated by the crossed olivocochlear bundle) is predicted to be stronger than the reflex to contralateral stimulation. Broadband noise is an effective activator of the MOC reflex; however, it is also an effective activator of the middle-ear muscle (MEM) reflex, which can make results difficult to interpret. The MEM reflex may be activated at lower levels than measured clinically, and most previous human studies have not explicitly included measurements to rule out MEM reflex contamination. The current study addressed these issues using a higher-frequency SFOAE probe tone to test for cochlear changes mediated by the MOC reflex, while simultaneously monitoring the MEM reflex using a low-frequency probe tone. Broadband notched noise was presented ipsilaterally at various levels to elicit probe-tone shifts. Measurements are reported for 15 normal-hearing subjects. With the higher-frequency probe near 1.5 kHz, only 20% of subjects showed shifts consistent with an MOC reflex in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. With the higher-frequency probe near 3.5 kHz, up to 40% of subjects showed shifts in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. However, these responses had longer time courses than expected for MOC-induced shifts, and may have been dominated by other cochlear processes, rather than MOC reflex. These results suggest caution in the interpretation of effects observed using ipsilaterally presented acoustic activators intended to excite the MOC reflex.

  7. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  8. Phase noise estimation and mitigation for DCT-based coherent optical OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuanchuan; Yang, Feng; Wang, Ziyu

    2009-09-14

    In this paper, as an attractive alternative to the conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), discrete cosine transform (DCT) based OFDM which has certain advantages over its counterpart is studied for optical fiber communications. As is known, laser phase noise is a major impairment to the performance of coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) systems. However, to our knowledge, detailed analysis of phase noise and the corresponding mitigation methods for DCT-based CO-OFDM systems have not been reported yet. To address these issues, we analyze the laser phase noise in the DCT-based CO-OFDM systems, and propose phase noise estimation and mitigation schemes. Numerical results show that the proposal is very effective in suppressing phase noise and could significantly improve the performance of DCT-based CO-OFDM systems.

  9. Reduction of Return Current Noise by Energy-Compensating Active Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Satoshi; Yamasakit, Hisanori; Itoh, Daisuke; Maruyama, Takafumi

    A newly proposed Energy-Compensating Active Control is implemented to reduce the return current noise which is caused by inverter-driven electric car systems. The Energy-Compensating Active Control detects the energy charged at the filter capacitor, reduces the energy and current of the noise frequency component by simple feedback loop incorporated with the conventional motor torque controller. No additional sensors or circuit arrangements are necessary, therefore the return current can be attenuated effectively without any further cost. The return current with an inverter system is measured using a current probe and a FFT analyzer, and it is shown that the 25Hz noise current is reduced by up to 10dB with the control. The results explain that the low frequency return current noise can be attenuated with the simple control scheme, which would expectedly reduce the size of filter reactors and capacitors to meet with the current limit level of signaling system's track relays.

  10. The recurrent nature of type 1 noise active regions during 1965 through 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The recurrent tendency of type I noise sources in metric frequencies is studied during the period from 1965 to 1969. It is shown that their recurrent period is slightly longer than 27.0 days and that the number of such recurrent trends for those noise sources is generally four. Discussion is given on the close relationship between those sources and the active regions where proton flares occur.

  11. Extracirculatory effects of noise of various frequency spectra in humans--effect of pink and blue noise on gastric myoelectrical activity and gastrointestinal passage of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Kasicka-Jonderko, Anna; Jonderko, Krzysztof; Dolinski, Kamil; Dolinski, Miroslaw; Kaminska, Magdalena; Szymszal, Malgorzata; Dzielicki, Marek; Blonska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    Recent investigations in humans point out to a disturbing effect of auditory stimuli on the functional integrity of the brain-gut axis. The study was devoted to a systematic comparative evaluation of the effect of noises of different frequency spectra on the postprandial electrical and transport functions of the digestive tract in humans. Twenty six healthy subjects attended a cross-over study, which aimed at comparison of the effect of pink contrasted to blue noise within a given category (band or tonal) and a meal stimulus type (semi-liquid or solid test meal). A panel of noninvasive measurement methods was applied: heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, surface electrogastrography, (13)CO(2) breath tests for gastric emptying (GE), lactulose hydrogen breath test for orocecal transit time (OCTT). The blue tonal noise was rated the most annoying one, whereas solely the pink noises exerted discernible cardiovascular effects. No one of the four noises was capable of overriding the meal-induced preponderance of the sympathetic tone. The postprandial gastric myoelectrical activity and the GE of either the semiliquid or the solid test meal appeared to be ;resistant' to the noise exposure, irrespective of the noise type. Similar was the finding in the case of the OCTT, with the exception of a statistically significant retardation of the OCTT with the blue band noise. Ingestion of mixed caloric meals seems to elicit a protective influence against noise-elicited derangements of the functional integrity of the digestive tract proven formerly to occur during the fasting period.

  12. Ground-based observations of MF/HF radio noise in the auroral zone

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherwax, A.T.; LaBelle, J.; Trimpi, M.L.; Brittain, R.; Treumann, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    Broadband noise enhancements in the frequency range of {approximately} 1.4-4.8 MHz have been observed with a ground-based receiver located at Two Rivers, Alaska (near Fairbanks). During the 5-month period from November 1991 to March 1992, eight broadband noise enhancements were recorded. A correlation is observed between the radio noise enhancements and magnetic activity recorded with the magnetometer in College, Alaska (45 km away). Initial examination of college ionosonde data also suggest that sporadic E is associated with the termination of some of the events. The enhancements are characterized by a low-frequency cutoff at {approximately} 1.4 MHz and a decrease in intensity near {approximately} 2.8 MHz, which roughly correspond to 1 and 2 times the ionospheric electron cyclotron frequency, respectively. Although some discrete man-made signals are observed to be enhanced during the events, the bulk of the broadband enhancements may be composed of natural signals. If natural, the observed spectral shape is consistent with calculations of synchrotron radiation combined with cyclotron absorption; in this case, these signals would be diagnostic of the hardness of the auroral electron energy spectrum. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  13. A Computational Study of BVI Noise Reduction Using Active Twist Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise using the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. The primary goal of this activity is to reduce BVI noise during a low-speed descent flight condition using active-twist control. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The accuracy of the analysis was validated through comparisons with experimental acoustic data for the first generation Active Twist Rotor at an advance ratio of mu=0.14. The application of active-twist to the main rotor blade system consisted of harmonic actuation frequencies ranging from 2P to 5P, control phase angles from 0' to 360 , and tip-twist amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 . The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio =0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, c^=+6 , with BVI noise levels predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicated reductions of up to 11dB in BVI noise using 1.25 tip-twist amplitude with negligible effects on 4P vertical hub shear.

  14. A Computational Study of BVI Noise Reduction Using Active Twist Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise using the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. The primary goal of this activity is to reduce BVI noise during a low-speed descent flight condition using active-twist control. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The accuracy of the analysis was validated through comparisons with experimental acoustic data for the first generation Active Twist Rotor at an advance ratio of mu=0.14. The application of active-twist to the main rotor blade system consisted of harmonic actuation frequencies ranging from 2P to 5P, control phase angles from 0' to 360 , and tip-twist amplitudes ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 . The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio =0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, c^=+6 , with BVI noise levels predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicated reductions of up to 11dB in BVI noise using 1.25 tip-twist amplitude with negligible effects on 4P vertical hub shear.

  15. Noise-aware dictionary-learning-based sparse representation framework for detection and removal of single and combined noises from ECG signal

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Barathram; Sabarimalai Manikandan, M.

    2017-01-01

    Automatic electrocardiogram (ECG) signal enhancement has become a crucial pre-processing step in most ECG signal analysis applications. In this Letter, the authors propose an automated noise-aware dictionary learning-based generalised ECG signal enhancement framework which can automatically learn the dictionaries based on the ECG noise type for effective representation of ECG signal and noises, and can reduce the computational load of sparse representation-based ECG enhancement system. The proposed framework consists of noise detection and identification, noise-aware dictionary learning, sparse signal decomposition and reconstruction. The noise detection and identification is performed based on the moving average filter, first-order difference, and temporal features such as number of turning points, maximum absolute amplitude, zerocrossings, and autocorrelation features. The representation dictionary is learned based on the type of noise identified in the previous stage. The proposed framework is evaluated using noise-free and noisy ECG signals. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly reduce computational load as compared with conventional dictionary learning-based ECG denoising approaches. Further, comparative results show that the method outperforms existing methods in automatically removing noises such as baseline wanders, power-line interference, muscle artefacts and their combinations without distorting the morphological content of local waves of ECG signal. PMID:28529758

  16. Noise-aware dictionary-learning-based sparse representation framework for detection and removal of single and combined noises from ECG signal.

    PubMed

    Satija, Udit; Ramkumar, Barathram; Sabarimalai Manikandan, M

    2017-02-01

    Automatic electrocardiogram (ECG) signal enhancement has become a crucial pre-processing step in most ECG signal analysis applications. In this Letter, the authors propose an automated noise-aware dictionary learning-based generalised ECG signal enhancement framework which can automatically learn the dictionaries based on the ECG noise type for effective representation of ECG signal and noises, and can reduce the computational load of sparse representation-based ECG enhancement system. The proposed framework consists of noise detection and identification, noise-aware dictionary learning, sparse signal decomposition and reconstruction. The noise detection and identification is performed based on the moving average filter, first-order difference, and temporal features such as number of turning points, maximum absolute amplitude, zerocrossings, and autocorrelation features. The representation dictionary is learned based on the type of noise identified in the previous stage. The proposed framework is evaluated using noise-free and noisy ECG signals. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly reduce computational load as compared with conventional dictionary learning-based ECG denoising approaches. Further, comparative results show that the method outperforms existing methods in automatically removing noises such as baseline wanders, power-line interference, muscle artefacts and their combinations without distorting the morphological content of local waves of ECG signal.

  17. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  18. Performance of Optimized Actuator and Sensor Arrays in an Active Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Padula, S. L.; Lyle, K. H.; Cline, J. H.; Cabell, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in NASA Langley's Acoustics and Dynamics Laboratory to determine the effectiveness of optimized actuator/sensor architectures and controller algorithms for active control of harmonic interior noise. Tests were conducted in a large scale fuselage model - a composite cylinder which simulates a commuter class aircraft fuselage with three sections of trim panel and a floor. Using an optimization technique based on the component transfer functions, combinations of 4 out of 8 piezoceramic actuators and 8 out of 462 microphone locations were evaluated against predicted performance. A combinatorial optimization technique called tabu search was employed to select the optimum transducer arrays. Three test frequencies represent the cases of a strong acoustic and strong structural response, a weak acoustic and strong structural response and a strong acoustic and weak structural response. Noise reduction was obtained using a Time Averaged/Gradient Descent (TAGD) controller. Results indicate that the optimization technique successfully predicted best and worst case performance. An enhancement of the TAGD control algorithm was also evaluated. The principal components of the actuator/sensor transfer functions were used in the PC-TAGD controller. The principal components are shown to be independent of each other while providing control as effective as the standard TAGD.

  19. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  20. A Wavelet-Based Noise Reduction Algorithm and Its Clinical Evaluation in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hua; Deng, Guang; Mauger, Stefan J.; Hersbach, Adam A.; Dawson, Pam W.; Heasman, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Noise reduction is often essential for cochlear implant (CI) recipients to achieve acceptable speech perception in noisy environments. Most noise reduction algorithms applied to audio signals are based on time-frequency representations of the input, such as the Fourier transform. Algorithms based on other representations may also be able to provide comparable or improved speech perception and listening quality improvements. In this paper, a noise reduction algorithm for CI sound processing is proposed based on the wavelet transform. The algorithm uses a dual-tree complex discrete wavelet transform followed by shrinkage of the wavelet coefficients based on a statistical estimation of the variance of the noise. The proposed noise reduction algorithm was evaluated by comparing its performance to those of many existing wavelet-based algorithms. The speech transmission index (STI) of the proposed algorithm is significantly better than other tested algorithms for the speech-weighted noise of different levels of signal to noise ratio. The effectiveness of the proposed system was clinically evaluated with CI recipients. A significant improvement in speech perception of 1.9 dB was found on average in speech weighted noise. PMID:24086605

  1. Optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Tian, Yue; Fok, Mable P; Shastri, Bhavin J; Kanoff, Daniel R; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-01-28

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical steganography method in which a data signal is transmitted using amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise as a carrier. The ASE serving as a carrier for the private signal has an identical frequency spectrum to the existing noise generated by the Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) in the transmission system. The system also carries a conventional data channel that is not private. The so-called "stealth" or private channel is well-hidden within the noise of the system. Phase modulation is used for both the stealth channel and the public channel. Using homodyne detection, the short coherence length of the ASE ensures that the stealth signal can only be recovered if the receiver closely matches the delay-length difference, which is deliberately changed in a dynamic fashion that is only known to the transmitter and its intended receiver.

  2. A battery-based, low-noise voltage source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Anke; Sturm, Sven; Schabinger, Birgit; Blaum, Klaus; Quint, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    A highly stable, low-noise voltage source was designed to improve the stability of the electrode bias voltages of a Penning trap. To avoid excess noise and ground loops, the voltage source is completely independent of the public electric network and uses a 12 V car battery to generate output voltages of ±15 and ±5 V. First, the dc supply voltage is converted into ac-voltage and gets amplified. Afterwards, the signal is rectified, filtered, and regulated to the desired output value. Each channel can deliver up to 1.5 A. The current as well as the battery voltage and the output voltages can be read out via a universal serial bus (USB) connection for monitoring purposes. With the presented design, a relative voltage stability of 7×10-7 over 6.5 h and a noise level equal or smaller than 30 nV/√Hz is achieved.

  3. A Primary Thermometer Based on Thermal-shot Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spietz, Lafe; Lehnert, K. W.; Siddiqi, Irfan; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2002-03-01

    The wide range of thermometers used in cryogenic systems today all suffer from some combination of lack of absolute accuracy, complexity, and sensitivity to magnetic fields. We describe a primary thermometer that is fast, compact, insensitive to magnetic fields, and operates over a range from millikelvin temperatures to tens of Kelvins. The thermometer consists of a 50 Ohm tunnel junction whose noise power is measured by standard techniques of microwave radiometry. In such a junction, the thermal-shot noise is an elementary function of the applied bias voltage, the electron's charge, the Boltzmann constant, and the temperature. In contrast to Johnson noise thermometry, this method is self-calibrating and depends only on applied DC voltage, temperature, and fundamental constants. Hence this system may have metrological applications. We report progress toward a proof-of-concept demonstration of this thermometer.

  4. An Electronic Primary Thermometer Based on Quantum Shot Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spietz, Lafe; Lehnert, K. W.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2001-03-01

    The wide range of thermometers used in cryogenic systems today all suffer from some combination of lack of absolute accuracy, complexity, and sensitivity to magnetic fields. We describe a primary thermometer that is fast, compact, insensitive to magnetic fields, and operates over a range from millikelvin temperatures to tens of Kelvins. The thermometer consists of a 50 Ohm tunnel junction whose noise power is measured by standard techniques of microwave radiometry. In such a junction, the quantum shot noise is an elementary function of the applied bias voltage, the electron’s charge, the Boltzmann constant, and the temperature. In contrast to Johnson noise thermometry, this method is self-calibrating and depends only on applied DC voltage, temperature, and fundamental constants. Hence this system may have metrological applications. We report progress toward a proof-of-concept demonstration of this thermometer.

  5. A battery-based, low-noise voltage source.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Sturm, Sven; Schabinger, Birgit; Blaum, Klaus; Quint, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    A highly stable, low-noise voltage source was designed to improve the stability of the electrode bias voltages of a Penning trap. To avoid excess noise and ground loops, the voltage source is completely independent of the public electric network and uses a 12 V car battery to generate output voltages of +/-15 and +/-5 V. First, the dc supply voltage is converted into ac-voltage and gets amplified. Afterwards, the signal is rectified, filtered, and regulated to the desired output value. Each channel can deliver up to 1.5 A. The current as well as the battery voltage and the output voltages can be read out via a universal serial bus (USB) connection for monitoring purposes. With the presented design, a relative voltage stability of 7 x 10(-7) over 6.5 h and a noise level equal or smaller than 30 nV/square root(Hz) is achieved.

  6. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh-Rose small-world neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural networks.

  7. Interplay of subthreshold activity, time-delayed feedback, and noise on neuronal firing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoller, Cristina; Torrent, M. C.; García-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2008-10-01

    Feedback connections and noise are ubiquitous features of neuronal networks and affect in a determinant way the patterns of neural activity. Here we study how the subthreshold dynamics of a neuron interacts with time-delayed feedback and noise. We use a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of a thermoreceptor neuron and assume the feedback to be linear, corresponding effectively to a recurrent electrical connection via gap junctions. This type of feedback can model electrical autapses, which connect the terminal fibers of a neuron’s axon with dendrites from the same neuron. Thus the delay in the feedback loop is due basically to the axonal propagation time. We chose model parameters for which the neuron displays, in the absence of feedback and noise, only subthreshold oscillations. These oscillations, however, take the neuron close to the firing threshold, such that small perturbations can drive it above the level for generation of action potentials. The resulting interplay between weak delayed feedback, noise, and the subthreshold intrinsic activity is nontrivial. For negative feedback, depending on the delay, the firing rate can be lower than in the noise-free situation. This is due to the fact that noise inhibits feedback-induced spikes by driving the neuronal oscillations away from the firing threshold. For positive feedback, there are regions of delay values where the noise-induced spikes are inhibited by the feedback; in this case, it is the feedback that drives the neuronal oscillations away from the threshold. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the role of electrical self-connections in the presence of noise and subthreshold activity.

  8. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  9. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yong; Zou Hongxin; Tian Liang

    2010-06-15

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise can be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.

  10. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong; Tian, Liang; Zou, Hongxin

    2010-06-01

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise can be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.

  11. Method of recognizing the high-speed railway noise barriers based on the distance image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Le; Shao, Shuangyun; Feng, Qibo; Liu, Bingqian; Kim, Chol Ryong

    2016-10-01

    The damage or lack of the noise barriers is one of the important hidden troubles endangering the safety of high-speed railway. In order to obtain the vibration information of the noise barriers, the online detection systems based on laser vision were proposed. The systems capture images of the laser stripe on the noise barriers and export data files containing distance information between the detection systems on the train and the noise barriers. The vibration status or damage of the noise barriers can be estimated depending on the distance information. In this paper, we focused on the method of separating the area of noise barrier from the background automatically. The test results showed that the proposed method is in good efficiency and accuracy.

  12. Effective amplifier noise for an optical receiver based on linear mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1989-01-01

    The rms noise charge induced by the amplifier for an optical receiver based on the linear-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) was analyzed. It is shown that for an amplifier with a 1-pF capacitor and a noise temperature of 100 K, the rms noise charge due to the amplifier is about 300. Since the noise charge must be small compared to the signal gain, APD gains on the order of 1000 will be required to operate the receiver in the linear mode.

  13. Alleviation of additional phase noise in fiber optical parametric amplifier based signal regenerator.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Xu, Bo; Yamashita, Shinji

    2012-11-19

    We theoretically and numerically explain the power saturation and the additional phase noise brought by the fiber optical parametric amplifier (FOPA). An equation to calculate an approximation to the saturated signal output power is presented. We also propose a scheme for alleviating the phase noise brought by the FOPA at the saturated state. In simulation, by controlling the decisive factor dispersion difference term Δk of the FOPA, amplitude-noise and additional phase noise reduction of quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) based on the saturated FOPA is studied, which can provide promising performance to deal with PSK signals.

  14. [Research on electrocardiogram de-noising algorithm based on wavelet neural networks].

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiangkui; Zhang, Jun

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the ECG de-noising technology based on wavelet neural networks (WNN) is used to deal with the noises in Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. The structure of WNN, which has the outstanding nonlinear mapping capability, is designed as a nonlinear filter used for ECG to cancel the baseline wander, electromyo-graphical interference and powerline interference. The network training algorithm and de-noising experiments results are presented, and some key points of the WNN filter using ECG de-noising are discussed.

  15. Direction operator-based switching filters for removing the impulse noise from the corrupted image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang Cheng; Qiu, Hong Tong; He, Guang Jin

    2011-12-01

    A novel switching-based filter is proposed in this work to remove the impulse noise from the corrupted image. First, samples in 5×5 filter window are fully considered to detect whether the center is corrupted by impulse noise or not. Then, the detected noise free samples in the 5×5 filter window, aligned in the main direction, are weighted more heavily than those that are not on the main direction when using the median operation to suppress the impulse noise. At last, simulation results demonstrated that this algorithm outperforms many other methods in terms of both quantitative and qualitative aspects.

  16. A Novel Non-linear Transform Based Image Restoration for Removing Three Kinds of Noises in Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, T.; Sasikumar, M.

    2015-03-01

    Image denoising and enhancing the quality of image by means of spatial and transform domain filtering approaches has been an active research topic for many years. There are various types of spatial and transform based approaches in removing image noises. The method investigated in this paper is the non-linear transform domain filtering which uses multiresolution median transform. The technique is applied to images with different types of noises such as salt and pepper noise, speckle noise and Gaussian noise. Simulation is done using active-HDL and program code is synthesized using xilinx Spartan-II FPGA. Simulation and synthesis results show that the proposed method outperforms various spatial filters such as median filter and adaptive filter and other transform based filtering such as wavelet transform. This is mainly due to the non-linearity of the median filtering operation in the multiresolution median transform. The VLSI implementation of the method yields many advantages such as it takes only few seconds for process time, minimum delay, lesser resources and maximum operating frequency up to 200 MHz.

  17. Night-Time Noise Index Based on the Integration of Awakening Potential.

    PubMed

    Tagusari, Junta; Takashima, Tomoya; Furukawa, Satoshi; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-03-01

    Sleep disturbance induced by night-time noise is a serious environmental problem that can cause adverse health effects, such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Night-time noise indices are used to facilitate the enforcement of permitted noise levels during night-time. However, existing night-time noise indices, such as sound exposure level (SEL), maximum sound level (LA max) and night equivalent level (L night) are selected mainly because of practical reasons. Therefore, this study proposes a noise index based on neurophysiological determinants of the awakening process. These determinants have revealed that the potential on awakening is likely integrated into the brainstem that dominates wakefulness and sleep. From this evidence, a night-time noise index, N awake,year, was redefined based on the integration of the awakening potential unit (p unit) estimated from the existing dose-response relationships of awakening. The newly-defined index considers the total number of awakenings and covers a wide-range and number of noise events. We also presented examples of its applicability to traffic noise. Although further studies are needed, it may reveal a reasonable dose-response relationship between sleep disturbance and adverse health effects and provide a consistent explanation for the risks of different sound sources where the characteristics of noise exposure are quite different.

  18. Biologically-based signal processing system applied to noise removal for signal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    2004-07-13

    The method and system described herein use a biologically-based signal processing system for noise removal for signal extraction. A wavelet transform may be used in conjunction with a neural network to imitate a biological system. The neural network may be trained using ideal data derived from physical principles or noiseless signals to determine to remove noise from the signal.

  19. Resonant activation in a colored multiplicative thermal noise driven closed system

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Mondal, Debasish

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we have demonstrated that resonant activation (RA) is possible even in a thermodynamically closed system where the particle experiences a random force and a spatio-temporal frictional coefficient from the thermal bath. For this stochastic process, we have observed a hallmark of RA phenomena in terms of a turnover behavior of the barrier-crossing rate as a function of noise correlation time at a fixed noise variance. Variance can be fixed either by changing temperature or damping strength as a function of noise correlation time. Our another observation is that the barrier crossing rate passes through a maximum with increase in coupling strength of the multiplicative noise. If the damping strength is appreciably large, then the maximum may disappear. Finally, we compare simulation results with the analytical calculation. It shows that there is a good agreement between analytical and numerical results.

  20. The Electrical Activity of Neurons Subject to Electromagnetic Induction and Gaussian White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Ma, Jun; Xu, Ying; Wu, Fuqiang; Zhou, Ping

    Neurons can give appropriate response to external electrical stimuli and the modes in electrical activities can be carefully selected. Most of the neuron models mainly emphasize on the ion channel currents embedded into the membrane and the properties in electrical activities can be produced in the theoretical models. Indeed, some physical effect should be considered during the model setting for neuronal activities. In fact, induced current and the electrical field will cause the membrane potential to change and an exchange of charged ions during the fluctuation of ion concentration in cell. As a result, the effect of electromagnetic induction should be seriously considered. In this paper, magnetic flux is proposed to describe the effect of electromagnetic field, and the memristor is used to realize coupling on membrane by inputting induced current based on consensus of physical unit. Noise is also considered to detect the dynamical response in electrical activities and stochastic resonance, it is found that multiple modes can be selected in the electrical activities and it could be associated with memory effect and self-adaption in neurons.

  1. Noise-induced ectopic activity in a simple cardiac cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Harold

    2005-03-01

    Ectopic activity in the form of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) is relatively common in the normal heart. Although PVCs are normally harmless, sometimes but rarely PVCs can generate spiral waves of activation through interaction with other waves of activation, potentially progressing to ventricular tachycardia, followed by ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Clusters of PVCs have been found to be significantly more dangerous than isolated PVCs. We model PVC generation by applying triggers (noise) to the generic FitzHugh-Nagumo model as substrate, and study the effects the noise level and excitability. We find: exponential waiting time behavior at fixed parameter levels; no evidence of clustering at fixed parameter levels; and a sharp increase in PVCs as excitability approaches the auto-oscillatory threshold or noise increases beyond a similar threshold. This produces sharp increases in theoretical rates of PVC-induced fibrillation, consistent with results of A Gelzer et al. in animal models. Partially supported by the NSF and NIH.

  2. Noise-induced bias for convolution-based interpolation in digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Su, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Zeren; Xu, Xiaohai

    2016-01-25

    In digital image correlation (DIC), the noise-induced bias is significant if the noise level is high or the contrast of the image is low. However, existing methods for the estimation of the noise-induced bias are merely applicable to traditional interpolation methods such as linear and cubic interpolation, but are not applicable to generalized interpolation methods such as BSpline and OMOMS. Both traditional interpolation and generalized interpolation belong to convolution-based interpolation. Considering the widely use of generalized interpolation, this paper presents a theoretical analysis of noise-induced bias for convolution-based interpolation. A sinusoidal approximate formula for noise-induced bias is derived; this formula motivates an estimating strategy which is with speed, ease, and accuracy; furthermore, based on this formula, the mechanism of sophisticated interpolation methods generally reducing noise-induced bias is revealed. The validity of the theoretical analysis is established by both numerical simulations and actual subpixel translation experiment. Compared to existing methods, formulae provided by this paper are simpler, briefer, and more general. In addition, a more intuitionistic explanation of the cause of noise-induced bias is provided by quantitatively characterized the position-dependence of noise variability in the spatial domain.

  3. Noise Annoyance in Urban Children: A Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Grelat, Natacha; Houot, Hélène; Pujol, Sophie; Levain, Jean-Pierre; Defrance, Jérôme; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Mauny, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Acoustical and non-acoustical factors influencing noise annoyance in adults have been well-documented in recent years; however, similar knowledge is lacking in children. The aim of this study was to quantify the annoyance caused by chronic ambient noise at home in children and to assess the relationship between these children′s noise annoyance level and individual and contextual factors in the surrounding urban area. A cross sectional population-based study was conducted including 517 children attending primary school in a European city. Noise annoyance was measured using a self-report questionnaire adapted for children. Six noise exposure level indicators were built at different locations at increasing distances from the child′s bedroom window using a validated strategic noise map. Multilevel logistic models were constructed to investigate factors associated with noise annoyance in children. Noise indicators in front of the child′s bedroom (p ≤ 0.01), family residential satisfaction (p ≤ 0.03) and socioeconomic characteristics of the individuals and their neighbourhood (p ≤ 0.05) remained associated with child annoyance. These findings illustrate the complex relationships between our environment, how we may perceive it, social factors and health. Better understanding of these relationships will undoubtedly allow us to more effectively quantify the actual effect of noise on human health. PMID:27801858

  4. A Decision-Based Modified Total Variation Diffusion Method for Impulse Noise Removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qingxin; Song, Xiuli; Tao, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Impulsive noise removal usually employs median filtering, switching median filtering, the total variation L1 method, and variants. These approaches however often introduce excessive smoothing and can result in extensive visual feature blurring and thus are suitable only for images with low density noise. A new method to remove noise is proposed in this paper to overcome this limitation, which divides pixels into different categories based on different noise characteristics. If an image is corrupted by salt-and-pepper noise, the pixels are divided into corrupted and noise-free; if the image is corrupted by random valued impulses, the pixels are divided into corrupted, noise-free, and possibly corrupted. Pixels falling into different categories are processed differently. If a pixel is corrupted, modified total variation diffusion is applied; if the pixel is possibly corrupted, weighted total variation diffusion is applied; otherwise, the pixel is left unchanged. Experimental results show that the proposed method is robust to different noise strengths and suitable for different images, with strong noise removal capability as shown by PSNR/SSIM results as well as the visual quality of restored images. PMID:28536602

  5. Noise Annoyance in Urban Children: A Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Grelat, Natacha; Houot, Hélène; Pujol, Sophie; Levain, Jean-Pierre; Defrance, Jérôme; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Mauny, Frédéric

    2016-10-28

    Acoustical and non-acoustical factors influencing noise annoyance in adults have been well-documented in recent years; however, similar knowledge is lacking in children. The aim of this study was to quantify the annoyance caused by chronic ambient noise at home in children and to assess the relationship between these children's noise annoyance level and individual and contextual factors in the surrounding urban area. A cross sectional population-based study was conducted including 517 children attending primary school in a European city. Noise annoyance was measured using a self-report questionnaire adapted for children. Six noise exposure level indicators were built at different locations at increasing distances from the child's bedroom window using a validated strategic noise map. Multilevel logistic models were constructed to investigate factors associated with noise annoyance in children. Noise indicators in front of the child's bedroom (p ≤ 0.01), family residential satisfaction (p ≤ 0.03) and socioeconomic characteristics of the individuals and their neighbourhood (p ≤ 0.05) remained associated with child annoyance. These findings illustrate the complex relationships between our environment, how we may perceive it, social factors and health. Better understanding of these relationships will undoubtedly allow us to more effectively quantify the actual effect of noise on human health.

  6. SVD-Based Optimal Filtering Technique for Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids Using Two Microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, Jean-Baptiste; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan

    2002-12-01

    We introduce a new SVD-based (Singular value decomposition) strategy for noise reduction in hearing aids. This technique is evaluated for noise reduction in a behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid where two omnidirectional microphones are mounted in an endfire configuration. The behaviour of the SVD-based technique is compared to a two-stage adaptive beamformer for hearing aids developed by Vanden Berghe and Wouters (1998). The evaluation and comparison is done with a performance metric based on the speech intelligibility index (SII). The speech and noise signals are recorded in reverberant conditions with a signal-to-noise ratio of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] and the spectrum of the noise signals is similar to the spectrum of the speech signal. The SVD-based technique works without initialization nor assumptions about a look direction, unlike the two-stage adaptive beamformer. Still, for different noise scenarios, the SVD-based technique performs as well as the two-stage adaptive beamformer, for a similar filter length and adaptation time for the filter coefficients. In a diffuse noise scenario, the SVD-based technique performs better than the two-stage adaptive beamformer and hence provides a more flexible and robust solution under speaker position variations and reverberant conditions.

  7. Modified-filtered-u LMS algorithm for active noise control and its application to a short acoustic duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Wuk; Park, Hong-Sug; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Shin, Kihong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive algorithm for active noise control (ANC) that can be effectively applicable to a short acoustic duct, such as the intake system of an automobile engine, where the stability and fast convergence of the ANC system is particularly important. The new algorithm, called the modified-filtered-u LMS algorithm (MFU-LMS), is developed based on the recursive filtered-u LMS algorithm (FU-LMS) incorporating the simple hyper-stable adaptive recursive filter (SHARF) to ensure the control stability and the variable step size to enhance the convergence rate. The MFU-LMS algorithm is implemented by purely experimental ways, and is applied to active control of noise in a short acoustic duct, and is validated using two experimental cases of which the primary noise sources are a sinusoidal signal embedded in white noise and a chirp signal. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MFU-LMS algorithm gives a considerably better performance than other conventional algorithms, such as the filtered-x LMS (FX-LMS) and the FU-LMS algorithms.

  8. Adaptive Volterra filter with continuous lp-norm using a logarithmic cost for nonlinear active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Haiquan

    2016-03-01

    The filtered-x least mean lp-norm (FxLMP) algorithm is proven to be useful for nonlinear active noise control (NANC) systems. However, its performance deteriorates when the impulsive noises are presented in NANC systems. To surmount this shortcoming, a new nonlinear adaptive algorithm based on Volterra expansion model (VFxlogLMP) is developed in this paper, which is derived by minimizing the lp-norm of logarithmic cost. It is found that the FxLMP and VFxlogLMP require to select an appropriate value of p according to the prior information on noise characteristics, which prohibit their practical applications. Based on VFxlogLMP algorithm, we proposed a continuous lp-norm algorithm with logarithmic cost (VFxlogCLMP), which does not need the parameter selection and thresholds estimation. Benefiting from the various error norms for 1≤p≤2, it remains the robustness of VFxlogLMP. Moreover, the convergence behavior of VFxlogCLMP for moving average secondary paths and stochastic input signals is performed. Compared to the existing algorithms, two versions of the proposed algorithms have much better convergence and stability in impulsive noise environments.

  9. Anticipated Effectiveness of Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft Interiors as Determined by Sound Quality Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, using sound quality engineering practices, to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two tests differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons in the first test and numerical category scaling in the second. Although the results of the two tests were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference.

  10. Anticipated Effectiveness of Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft Interiors as Determined by Sound Quality Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, using sound quality engineering practices, to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two tests differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons in the first test and numerical category scaling in the second. Although the results of the two tests were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference.

  11. Preliminary experiments on active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.; Burdisso, R. A.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    In the preliminary experiments reported here, active acoustic sources positioned around the circumference of a turbofan engine were used to control the fan noise radiated forward through the inlet. The main objective was to demonstrate the potential of active techniques to alleviate the noise pollution that will be produced by the next generation of larger engines. A reduction of up to 19 dB in the radiation directivity was demonstrated in a zone that encompasses a 30-deg angle, near the error sensor, while spillover effects were observed toward the lateral direction. The simultaneous control of two tones was also demonstrated using two identical controllers in a parallel control configuration.

  12. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  13. Restoration of images degraded by signal-dependent noise based on energy minimization: an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajić, Buda; Lindblad, Joakim; Sladoje, Nataša

    2016-07-01

    Most energy minimization-based restoration methods are developed for signal-independent Gaussian noise. The assumption of Gaussian noise distribution leads to a quadratic data fidelity term, which is appealing in optimization. When an image is acquired with a photon counting device, it contains signal-dependent Poisson or mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise. We quantify the loss in performance that occurs when a restoration method suited for Gaussian noise is utilized for mixed noise. Signal-dependent noise can be treated by methods based on either classical maximum a posteriori (MAP) probability approach or on a variance stabilization approach (VST). We compare performances of these approaches on a large image material and observe that VST-based methods outperform those based on MAP in both quality of restoration and in computational efficiency. We quantify improvement achieved by utilizing Huber regularization instead of classical total variation regularization. The conclusion from our study is a recommendation to utilize a VST-based approach combined with regularization by Huber potential for restoration of images degraded by blur and signal-dependent noise. This combination provides a robust and flexible method with good performance and high speed.

  14. Hybrid feedforward-feedback active noise reduction for hearing protection and communication.

    PubMed

    Ray, Laura R; Solbeck, Jason A; Streeter, Alexander D; Collier, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    A hybrid active noise reduction (ANR) architecture is presented and validated for a circumaural earcup and a communication earplug. The hybrid system combines source-independent feedback ANR with a Lyapunov-tuned leaky LMS filter (LyLMS) improving gain stability margins over feedforward ANR alone. In flat plate testing, the earcup demonstrates an overall C-weighted total noise reduction of 40 dB and 30-32 dB, respectively, for 50-800 Hz sum-of-tones noise and for aircraft or helicopter cockpit noise, improving low frequency (<100 Hz) performance by up to 15 dB over either control component acting individually. For the earplug, a filtered-X implementation of the LyLMS accommodates its nonconstant cancellation path gain. A fast time-domain identification method provides a high-fidelity, computationally efficient, infinite impulse response cancellation path model, which is used for both the filtered-X implementation and communication feedthrough. Insertion loss measurements made with a manikin show overall C-weighted total noise reduction provided by the ANR earplug of 46-48 dB for sum-of-tones 80-2000 Hz and 40-41 dB from 63 to 3000 Hz for UH-60 helicopter noise, with negligible degradation in attenuation during speech communication. For both hearing protectors, a stability metric improves by a factor of 2 to several orders of magnitude through hybrid ANR.

  15. Hybrid Active-Passive Systems for Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the large potential for hybrid active-passive systems for attenuating interior noise in aircraft fuselages. The main advantage of an active-passive system is, by utilizing the natural dynamics of the actuator system, the control actuator power and weight is markedly reduced and stability/robustness is enhanced. Three different active-passive approaches were studied in the past year. The first technique utilizes multiple tunable vibration absorbers (ATVA) for reducing narrow band sound radiated from panels and transmitted through fuselage structures. The focus is on reducing interior noise due to propeller or turbo fan harmonic excitation. Two types of tunable vibration absorbers were investigated; a solid state system based upon a piezoelectric mechanical exciter and an electromechanical system based upon a Motran shaker. Both of these systems utilize a mass-spring dynamic effect to maximize tile output force near resonance of the shaker system and so can also be used as vibration absorbers. The dynamic properties of the absorbers (i.e. resonance frequency) were modified using a feedback signal from an accelerometer mounted on the active mass, passed through a compensator and fed into the drive component of the shaker system (piezoelectric element or voice coil respectively). The feedback loop consisted of a two coefficient FIR filter, implemented on a DSP, where the input is acceleration of tile ATVA mass and the output is a force acting in parallel with the stiffness of the absorber. By separating the feedback signal into real and imaginary components, the effective natural frequency and damping of the ATVA can be altered independently. This approach gave control of the resonance frequencies while also allowing the simultaneous removal of damping from the ATVA, thus increasing the ease of controllability and effectiveness. In order to obtain a "tuned" vibration absorber the chosen resonant frequency was set to the excitation

  16. Nonequilibrium dynamics of active matter with correlated noise: A dynamical renormalization group study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2014-03-01

    Biology is rife with examples of active materials - soft matter systems driven into nonequilibrium steady states by energy input at the micro scale. For example, solutions of active micron scale swimmers produce active fluids showing phenomena reminiscent of turbulent convection at low Reynolds number; cytoskeletal networks driven by endogenous molecular motors produce active solids whose mechanics and low frequency strain fluctuations depend sensitively on motor activity. One hallmark of these systems is that they are driven at the micro scale by temporally correlated forces. In this talk, we study how correlated noise at the micro scale leads to novel long wavelength and long time scale dynamics at the macro scale in a simple model system. Specifically, we study the fluctuations of a ϕ4 scalar field obeying model A dynamics and driven by noise with a finite correlation time τ. We show that the effective dynamical system at long length and time scales is driven by white noise with a renormalized amplitude and renormalized transport coefficients. We discuss the implications of this result for a broad class of active matter systems driven at the micro scale by colored noise.

  17. Extracting Coherent Information from Noise Based Correlation Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    correlations [1]. 3 CTBT result: The acoustic data is from the 2004 Great Sumatra earthquake as monitored on the IMS triad array in the Indian Ocean ...opportunity was selected from the Diego-Garcia CTBT IMS hydroiacoustic triad in the Indian Ocean and converted to vector quantities and then favorably compared...GOALS The goal of this research is to establish methodologies to utilize ambient noise in the ocean and to determine what scenarios are best suited

  18. Noise-based switches and amplifiers for gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, Jeff; Pradines, Joel; Dolnik, Milos; Collins, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of cellular function is often controlled at the level of gene transcription. Such genetic regulation usually consists of interacting networks, whereby gene products from a single network can act to control their own expression or the production of protein in another network. Engineered control of cellular function through the design and manipulation of such networks lies within the constraints of current technology. Here we develop a model describing the regulation of gene expression and elucidate the effects of noise on the formulation. We consider a single network derived from bacteriophage λ and construct a two-parameter deterministic model describing the temporal evolution of the concentration of λ repressor protein. Bistability in the steady-state protein concentration arises naturally, and we show how the bistable regime is enhanced with the addition of the first operator site in the promotor region. We then show how additive and multiplicative external noise can be used to regulate expression. In the additive case, we demonstrate the utility of such control through the construction of a protein switch, whereby protein production is turned “on” and “off” by using short noise pulses. In the multiplicative case, we show that small deviations in the transcription rate can lead to large fluctuations in the production of protein, and we describe how these fluctuations can be used to amplify protein production significantly. These results suggest that an external noise source could be used as a switch and/or amplifier for gene expression. Such a development could have important implications for gene therapy. PMID:10681449

  19. Residential exposure to traffic noise and leisure-time sports - A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Roswall, Nina; Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Christensen, Jeppe Schultz; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Tjønneland, Anne; Sørensen, Mette

    2017-08-01

    Traffic levels have been found a significant environmental predictor for physical inactivity. A recent study suggested that traffic noise annoyance was associated with lower physical activity. We investigated associations between modelled residential traffic noise and leisure-time sports. In the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort, we performed cross-sectional analyses using data from the baseline questionnaire (1993-97), and longitudinal analyses of change between baseline and follow-up (2000-02). People reported participation (yes/no) and hours of leisure-time sport, from which we calculated MET hrs/week. Present and historical addresses from 1987 to 2002 were found in national registries, and traffic noise was modelled 1 and 5 years before enrolment, and from baseline to follow-up. Analyses were performed using logistic and linear regression. Traffic noise exposure 5 years before baseline was associated with higher prevalence odds ratio of non-participation in leisure-time sports; significantly for road traffic noise (odds ratio (OR): 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-1.13) and borderline for railway noise (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99-1.07), per 10dB. In longitudinal analyses, a 10dB higher road traffic noise was associated with a higher prevalence odds ratio of ceasing (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.07-1.18) and a lower prevalence odds ratio of initiating (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87-0.96) leisure-time sports. Exposure to railway noise was negatively associated with baseline MET hrs/week, whereas no association was found in longitudinal analyses, or for road traffic noise. The study suggests that long-term exposure to residential road traffic noise is negatively associated with leisure-time sports. Results for railway noise were less consistent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Global Mode-Based Control of Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Mahesh; Freund, Jonathan; Bodony, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The loudest source of high-speed jet noise appears to be describable by unsteady wavepackets that resemble instabilities. We seek to reduce their acoustic impact by developing a novel control strategy that uses global modes to model their dynamics and structural sensitivity of the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes operator to determine effective linear feedback control. Using co-located actuators and sensors we demonstrate the method on an axisymmetric Mach 1.5 fitted with a nozzle. Direct numerical simulations using this control show significant noise reduction, with additional reduction with increase in control gain. Eigenanalysis of the uncontrolled and controlled mean flows reveal fundamental changes in the spectrum at frequencies lower than that used by the control. The non-normality of the global modes is shown to enable this control to affect a wide range of frequencies. The low-frequency wavepacket components are made less acoustically efficient, which is reflected in the far-field noise spectrum. Mean flow alterations are minor near the nozzle and only become apparent further downstream. Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation.

  1. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    The industrial and scientific communities have shown genuine interest in electronic systems which can operate at high temperatures, among which are sensors to monitor noise, vibration, and acoustic emissions. Acoustic sensing can be accomplished by a wide variety of commercially available devices, including: simple piezoelectric sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges, proximity sensors, and fiber optics. Of the several sensing mechanisms investigated, piezoelectrics were found to be the most prevalent, because of their simplicity of design and application and, because of their high sensitivity over broad ranges of frequencies and temperature. Numerous piezoelectric materials are used in acoustic sensors today; but maximum use temperatures are imposed by their transition temperatures (T(sub c)) and by their resistivity. Lithium niobate, in single crystal form, has the highest operating temperature of any commercially available material, 650 C; but that is not high enough for future requirements. Only two piezoelectric materials show potential for use at 1000 C; AlN thin film reported to be piezoactive at 1150 C, and perovskite layer structure (PLS) materials, which possess among the highest T(sub c) (greater than 1500 C) reported for ferroelectrics. A ceramic PLS composition was chosen. The solid solution composition, 80% strontium niobate (SN) and 20% strontium tantalate (STa), with a T(sub c) approximately 1160 C, was hot forged, a process which concurrently sinters and renders the plate-like grains into a highly oriented configuration to enhance piezo properties. Poled samples of this composition showed coupling (k33) approximately 6 and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) approximately 3. Piezoactivity was seen at 1125 C, the highest temperature measurement reported for a ferroelectric ceramic. The high temperature piezoelectric responses of this, and similar PLS materials, opens the possibility of their use in electronic devices operating at temperatures up to

  2. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    The industrial and scientific communities have shown genuine interest in electronic systems which can operate at high temperatures, among which are sensors to monitor noise, vibration, and acoustic emissions. Acoustic sensing can be accomplished by a wide variety of commercially available devices, including: simple piezoelectric sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges, proximity sensors, and fiber optics. Of the several sensing mechanisms investigated, piezoelectrics were found to be the most prevalent, because of their simplicity of design and application and, because of their high sensitivity over broad ranges of frequencies and temperature. Numerous piezoelectric materials are used in acoustic sensors today; but maximum use temperatures are imposed by their transition temperatures (T(sub c)) and by their resistivity. Lithium niobate, in single crystal form, has the highest operating temperature of any commercially available material, 650 C; but that is not high enough for future requirements. Only two piezoelectric materials show potential for use at 1000 C; AlN thin film reported to be piezoactive at 1150 C, and perovskite layer structure (PLS) materials, which possess among the highest T(sub c) (greater than 1500 C) reported for ferroelectrics. A ceramic PLS composition was chosen. The solid solution composition, 80% strontium niobate (SN) and 20% strontium tantalate (STa), with a T(sub c) approximately 1160 C, was hot forged, a process which concurrently sinters and renders the plate-like grains into a highly oriented configuration to enhance piezo properties. Poled samples of this composition showed coupling (k33) approximately 6 and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) approximately 3. Piezoactivity was seen at 1125 C, the highest temperature measurement reported for a ferroelectric ceramic. The high temperature piezoelectric responses of this, and similar PLS materials, opens the possibility of their use in electronic devices operating at temperatures up to

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss induces loudness intolerance in a rat Active Sound Avoidance Paradigm (ASAP).

    PubMed

    Manohar, Senthilvelan; Spoth, Jaclyn; Radziwon, Kelly; Auerbach, Benjamin D; Salvi, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Hyperacusis is a loudness hypersensitivity disorder in which moderate-intensity sounds are perceived as extremely loud, aversive and/or painful. To assess the aversive nature of sounds, we developed an Active Sound Avoidance Paradigm (ASAP) in which rats altered their place preference in a Light/Dark shuttle box in response to sound. When no sound (NS) was present, rats spent more than 95% of the time in the Dark Box versus the transparent Light Box. However, when a 60 or 90 dB SPL noise (2-20 kHz, 2-8 kHz, or 16-20 kHz bandwidth) was presented in the Dark Box, the rats'' preference for the Dark Box significantly decreased. Percent time in the dark decreased as sound intensity in the Dark Box increased from 60 dB to 90 dB SPL. Interestingly, the magnitude of the decrease was not a monotonic function of intensity for the 16-20 kHz noise and not related to the bandwidth of the 2-20 kHz and 2-8 kHz noise bands, suggesting that sound avoidance is not solely dependent on loudness but the aversive quality of the noise as well. Afterwards, we exposed the rats for 28 days to a 16-20 kHz noise at 102 dB SPL; this exposure produced a 30-40 dB permanent threshold shift at 16 and 32 kHz. Following the noise exposure, the rats were then retested on the ASAP paradigm. High-frequency hearing loss did not alter Dark Box preference in the no-sound condition. However, when the 2-20 kHz or 2-8 kHz noise was presented at 60 or 90 dB SPL, the rats avoided the Dark Box significantly more than they did before the exposure, indicating these two noise bands with energy below the region of hearing loss were perceived as more aversive. In contrast, when the 16-20 kHz noise was presented at 60 or 90 dB SPL, the rats remained in the Dark Box presumably because the high-frequency hearing loss made 16-20 kHz noise less audible and less aversive. These results indicate that when rats develop a high-frequency hearing loss, they become less tolerant of low frequency noise, i

  4. Noise-robust unsupervised spike sorting based on discriminative subspace learning with outlier handling.

    PubMed

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Zhi

    2017-06-01

    Spike sorting is a fundamental preprocessing step for many neuroscience studies which rely on the analysis of spike trains. Most of the feature extraction and dimensionality reduction techniques that have been used for spike sorting give a projection subspace which is not necessarily the most discriminative one. Therefore, the clusters which appear inherently separable in some discriminative subspace may overlap if projected using conventional feature extraction approaches leading to a poor sorting accuracy especially when the noise level is high. In this paper, we propose a noise-robust and unsupervised spike sorting algorithm based on learning discriminative spike features for clustering. The proposed algorithm uses discriminative subspace learning to extract low dimensional and most discriminative features from the spike waveforms and perform clustering with automatic detection of the number of the clusters. The core part of the algorithm involves iterative subspace selection using linear discriminant analysis and clustering using Gaussian mixture model with outlier detection. A statistical test in the discriminative subspace is proposed to automatically detect the number of the clusters. Comparative results on publicly available simulated and real in vivo datasets demonstrate that our algorithm achieves substantially improved cluster distinction leading to higher sorting accuracy and more reliable detection of clusters which are highly overlapping and not detectable using conventional feature extraction techniques such as principal component analysis or wavelets. By providing more accurate information about the activity of more number of individual neurons with high robustness to neural noise and outliers, the proposed unsupervised spike sorting algorithm facilitates more detailed and accurate analysis of single- and multi-unit activities in neuroscience and brain machine interface studies.

  5. Noise-robust unsupervised spike sorting based on discriminative subspace learning with outlier handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Zhi

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Spike sorting is a fundamental preprocessing step for many neuroscience studies which rely on the analysis of spike trains. Most of the feature extraction and dimensionality reduction techniques that have been used for spike sorting give a projection subspace which is not necessarily the most discriminative one. Therefore, the clusters which appear inherently separable in some discriminative subspace may overlap if projected using conventional feature extraction approaches leading to a poor sorting accuracy especially when the noise level is high. In this paper, we propose a noise-robust and unsupervised spike sorting algorithm based on learning discriminative spike features for clustering. Approach. The proposed algorithm uses discriminative subspace learning to extract low dimensional and most discriminative features from the spike waveforms and perform clustering with automatic detection of the number of the clusters. The core part of the algorithm involves iterative subspace selection using linear discriminant analysis and clustering using Gaussian mixture model with outlier detection. A statistical test in the discriminative subspace is proposed to automatically detect the number of the clusters. Main results. Comparative results on publicly available simulated and real in vivo datasets demonstrate that our algorithm achieves substantially improved cluster distinction leading to higher sorting accuracy and more reliable detection of clusters which are highly overlapping and not detectable using conventional feature extraction techniques such as principal component analysis or wavelets. Significance. By providing more accurate information about the activity of more number of individual neurons with high robustness to neural noise and outliers, the proposed unsupervised spike sorting algorithm facilitates more detailed and accurate analysis of single- and multi-unit activities in neuroscience and brain machine interface studies.

  6. Evaluation of a Low-cost and Low-noise Active Dry Electrode for Long-term Biopotential Recording.

    PubMed

    Pourahmad, Ali; Mahnam, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Wet Ag/AgCl electrodes, although very popular in clinical diagnosis, are not appropriate for expanding applications of wearable biopotential recording systems which are used repetitively and for a long time. Here, the development of a low-cost and low-noise active dry electrode is presented. The performance of the new electrodes was assessed for recording electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) in comparison with that of typical gel-based electrodes in a series of long-term recording experiments. The ECG signal recorded by these electrodes was well comparable with usual Ag/AgCl electrodes with a correlation up to 99.5% and mean power line noise below 6.0 μVRMS. The active electrodes were also used to measure alpha wave and steady state visual evoked potential by recording EEG. The recorded signals were comparable in quality with signals recorded by standard gel electrodes, suggesting that the designed electrodes can be employed in EEG-based rehabilitation systems and brain-computer interface applications. The mean power line noise in EEG signals recorded by the active electrodes (1.3 μVRMS) was statistically lower than when conventional gold cup electrodes were used (2.0 μVRMS) with a significant level of 0.05, and the new electrodes appeared to be more resistant to the electromagnetic interferences. These results suggest that the developed low-cost electrodes can be used to develop wearable monitoring systems for long-term biopotential recording.

  7. The Effect of Background Noise on the Word Activation Process in Nonnative Spoken-Word Recognition.

    PubMed

    Scharenborg, Odette; Coumans, Juul M J; van Hout, Roeland

    2017-08-07

    This article investigates 2 questions: (1) does the presence of background noise lead to a differential increase in the number of simultaneously activated candidate words in native and nonnative listening? And (2) do individual differences in listeners' cognitive and linguistic abilities explain the differential effect of background noise on (non-)native speech recognition? English and Dutch students participated in an English word recognition experiment, in which either a word's onset or offset was masked by noise. The native listeners outperformed the nonnative listeners in all listening conditions. Importantly, however, the effect of noise on the multiple activation process was found to be remarkably similar in native and nonnative listening. The presence of noise increased the set of candidate words considered for recognition in both native and nonnative listening. The results indicate that the observed performance differences between the English and Dutch listeners should not be primarily attributed to a differential effect of noise, but rather to the difference between native and nonnative listening. Additional analyses showed that word-initial information was found to be more important than word-final information during spoken-word recognition. When word-initial information was no longer reliably available word recognition accuracy dropped and word frequency information could no longer be used suggesting that word frequency information is strongly tied to the onset of words and the earliest moments of lexical access. Proficiency and inhibition ability were found to influence nonnative spoken-word recognition in noise, with a higher proficiency in the nonnative language and worse inhibition ability leading to improved recognition performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Low-noise correlation measurements based on software-defined-radio receivers and cooled microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Tan, Zhenbing; Cox, Daniel; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2016-11-01

    We present a microwave correlation measurement system based on two low-cost USB-connected software defined radio dongles modified to operate as coherent receivers by using a common local oscillator. Existing software is used to obtain I/Q samples from both dongles simultaneously at a software tunable frequency. To achieve low noise, we introduce an easy low-noise solution for cryogenic amplification at 600-900 MHz based on single discrete HEMT with 21 dB gain and 7 K noise temperature. In addition, we discuss the quantization effects in a digital correlation measurement and determination of optimal integration time by applying Allan deviation analysis.

  9. Low-noise correlation measurements based on software-defined-radio receivers and cooled microwave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Tan, Zhenbing; Cox, Daniel; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a microwave correlation measurement system based on two low-cost USB-connected software defined radio dongles modified to operate as coherent receivers by using a common local oscillator. Existing software is used to obtain I/Q samples from both dongles simultaneously at a software tunable frequency. To achieve low noise, we introduce an easy low-noise solution for cryogenic amplification at 600-900 MHz based on single discrete HEMT with 21 dB gain and 7 K noise temperature. In addition, we discuss the quantization effects in a digital correlation measurement and determination of optimal integration time by applying Allan deviation analysis.

  10. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Neale A W; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-07-20

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed.

  11. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  12. Exposure to environmental noise and risk for male infertility: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung-Bok; Min, Jin-Young

    2017-07-01

    Noise is associated with poor reproductive health. A number of animal studies have suggested the possible effects of exposure to high noise levels on fertility; to date, a little such research has been performed on humans. We examined an association between daytime and nocturnal noise exposures over four years (2002-2005) and subsequent male infertility. We used the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (2002-2013), a population-wide health insurance claims dataset. A total of 206,492 males of reproductive age (20-59 years) with no history of congenital malformations were followed up for an 8-year period (2006-2013). Male infertility was defined as per ICD-10 code N46. Data on noise exposure was obtained from the National Noise Information System. Exposure levels of daytime and night time noise were extrapolated using geographic information systems and collated with the subjects' administrative district code, and individual exposure levels assigned. During the study period, 3293 (1.6%) had a diagnosis of infertility. Although there was no association of infertility with 1-dB increments in noise exposure, a non-linear dose-response relationship was observed between infertility and quartiles of daytime and night time noise after adjustment for confounding variables (i.e., age, income, residential area, exercise, smoking, alcohol drinking, blood sugar, body mass index, medical histories, and particulate pollution). Based on WHO criteria, adjusted odds for infertility were significantly increased (OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05-1.23) in males exposed to night time noise ≥ 55 dB. We found a significant association between exposure to environmental noise for four years and the subsequent incidence of male infertility, suggesting long-term exposure to noise has a role in pathogenesis of male infertility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Speech enhancement based on neural networks improves speech intelligibility in noise for cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Tobias; Bolner, Federico; Monaghan, Jessica J M; van Dijk, Bas; Zarowski, Andrzej; Bleeck, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Speech understanding in noisy environments is still one of the major challenges for cochlear implant (CI) users in everyday life. We evaluated a speech enhancement algorithm based on neural networks (NNSE) for improving speech intelligibility in noise for CI users. The algorithm decomposes the noisy speech signal into time-frequency units, extracts a set of auditory-inspired features and feeds them to the neural network to produce an estimation of which frequency channels contain more perceptually important information (higher signal-to-noise ratio, SNR). This estimate is used to attenuate noise-dominated and retain speech-dominated CI channels for electrical stimulation, as in traditional n-of-m CI coding strategies. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by measuring the speech-in-noise performance of 14 CI users using three types of background noise. Two NNSE algorithms were compared: a speaker-dependent algorithm, that was trained on the target speaker used for testing, and a speaker-independent algorithm, that was trained on different speakers. Significant improvements in the intelligibility of speech in stationary and fluctuating noises were found relative to the unprocessed condition for the speaker-dependent algorithm in all noise types and for the speaker-independent algorithm in 2 out of 3 noise types. The NNSE algorithms used noise-specific neural networks that generalized to novel segments of the same noise type and worked over a range of SNRs. The proposed algorithm has the potential to improve the intelligibility of speech in noise for CI users while meeting the requirements of low computational complexity and processing delay for application in CI devices.

  14. EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator and its phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator (COEO), an integrated optical and microwave oscillator that can generate picosecond optical pulses, is presented. the phase noise measurements of COEO show better performance than synthesizer-driven mode-locked laser.

  15. EEG gamma-band activity during audiovisual speech comprehension in different noise environments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanfei; Liu, Baolin; Liu, Zhiwen; Gao, Xiaorong

    2015-08-01

    The presence of cross-modal stochastic resonance in different noise environments has been proved in previous behavioral and event-related potential studies, while it was still unclear whether the gamma-band oscillation study was another evidence of cross-modal stochastic resonance. The multisensory gain of gamma-band activity between the audiovisual (AV) and auditory-only conditions in different noise environments was analyzed. Videos of face motion articulating words concordant with different levels of pink noise were used as stimuli. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 0, -4, -8, -12 and -16 dB were selected to measure the speech recognition accuracy and EEG activity for 20 healthy subjects. The power and phase of EEG gamma-band oscillations increased in a time window of 50-90 ms. The multisensory gains of evoked and total activity, as well as phase-locking factor, were greatest at the -12 dB SNR, which were consistent with the behavioral result. The multisensory gain of gamma-band activity showed an inverted U-shaped curve as a function of SNR. This finding confirmed the presence of cross-modal stochastic resonance. In addition, there was a significant correlation between evoked activity and phase-locking factor of gamma-band at five different SNRs. Gamma-band oscillation was believed to play a role in the rapid processing and information linkage strengthening of AV modalities in the early stage of cognitive processes.

  16. Active Noise and Vibration Control Literature Survey: Sensors and Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    duire leur detectabilite done leur vulnerabilite a l’attaque ennemie. Le present rapport contient une etude approfondie des technologies des capteurs ...concentree sur une vaste gamme de materiaux de capteur et d’actionneur, tels que les materiaux piezoelectriques et electrostrictifs, les materiaux...l’air. On a etudie les technologies des capteurs et des actionneurs convenant a la limitation active du bruit se propageant par ces trajets (ou des

  17. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7–36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs. PMID:24828128

  18. Cascade window-based procedure for impulse noise removal in heavily corrupted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ali S.; Man, Hong; Khashanah, Khaldoun

    2010-01-01

    A cascade of filtering windows is implemented iteratively for removing random-valued impulse noise in heavily corrupted images. This method is based on the peer group concept (PGC), so a pixel is considered as noise-free if and only if for each window size, there exists a peer group of certain threshold cardinality for it. Otherwise, the pixel is considered as noisy. In the restoration process, the corrupted pixels are restored by taking the mean value of the remaining good pixels in the filtering window. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the proposed method produces competitive results at low noise rates, but at high noise rates, it outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. This approach efficiently suppresses the impulse noise, shows a low computational complexity, and has an equal effect on both color and gray-level images.

  19. [Actual and perspective activities of the European Union concerning protection against noise].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, S; Sułkowski, W

    1997-01-01

    In most industrialised countries exposure to noise is one of major health problems which, because of its social and economic dimension has been given priority in the area of preventive activities. It is estimated that only in Europe about 25-30 million people are employed in conditions under exposure to noise at excessive levels, harmful to the hearing organ, generating the risk of hearing loss (disability), and in consequence limiting the possibility of active life. Acknowledging the significance of the problem and its consequences the World Health Organization (WHO) in cooperation with the International (ISA) and European Federation of Audiological Society (EFAS) has developed the programme for the protection against noise. The prime aims of the programme are to establish the cooperation between scientists, health services and technicians in order to promote knowledge and exchange of experience, to improve workers' health, and to identify the biological, neuropsychological and psycho-social effect of noise exposure on the hearing ability. The authors discuss basic objectives and adopted strategies of experimental and clinical studies carried out in countries of the European Union, participating in the implementation of the programme. The WHO guidelines for the reduction in noise exposure in the working, municipal and recreation environments are also presented.

  20. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  1. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  2. Diesel engine noise source identification based on EEMD, coherent power spectrum analysis and improved AHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Jian; Lin, Jiewei; Bi, Fengrong; Guo, Qian; Chen, Kongwu; Ma, Liang

    2015-09-01

    As the essential foundation of noise reduction, many noise source identification methods have been developed and applied to engineering practice. To identify the noise source in the board-band frequency of different engine parts at various typical speeds, this paper presents an integrated noise source identification method based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), the coherent power spectrum analysis, and the improved analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The measured noise is decomposed into several IMFs with physical meaning, which ensures the coherence analysis of the IMFs and the vibration signals are meaningful. An improved AHP is developed by introducing an objective weighting function to replace the traditional subjective evaluation, which makes the results no longer dependent on the subject performances and provides a better consistency in the meantime. The proposed noise identification model is applied to identifying a diesel engine surface radiated noise. As a result, the frequency-dependent contributions of different engine parts to different test points at different speeds are obtained, and an overall weight order is obtained as oil pan  >  left body  >  valve chamber cover  >  gear chamber casing  >  right body  >  flywheel housing, which provides an effectual guidance for the noise reduction.

  3. Low-Rank Decomposition Based Restoration of Compressed Images via Adaptive Noise Estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinfeng; Lin, Weisi; Xiong, Ruiqin; Liu, Xianming; Ma, Siwei; Gao, Wen

    2016-07-07

    Images coded at low bit rates in real-world applications usually suffer from significant compression noise, which significantly degrades the visual quality. Traditional denoising methods are not suitable for the content-dependent compression noise, which usually assume that noise is independent and with identical distribution. In this paper, we propose a unified framework of content-adaptive estimation and reduction for compression noise via low-rank decomposition of similar image patches. We first formulate the framework of compression noise reduction based upon low-rank decomposition. Compression noises are removed by soft-thresholding the singular values in singular value decomposition (SVD) of every group of similar image patches. For each group of similar patches, the thresholds are adaptively determined according to compression noise levels and singular values. We analyze the relationship of image statistical characteristics in spatial and transform domains, and estimate compression noise level for every group of similar patches from statistics in both domains jointly with quantization steps. Finally, quantization constraint is applied to estimated images to avoid over-smoothing. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed method not only improves the quality of compressed images obviously for post-processing, but are also helpful for computer vision tasks as a pre-processing method.

  4. Low-light level image de-noising algorithm based on PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhuang; Wang, Xiuqin; Yin, Panqiang; Lu, Dongming

    2014-11-01

    A de-noising method based on PCA (Principal Component Analysis) is proposed to suppress the noise of LLL (Low-Light Level) image. At first, the feasibility of de-noising with the algorithm of PCA is analyzed in detail. Since the image data is correlated in time and space, it is retained as principal component, while the noise is considered to be uncorrelated in both time and space and be removed as minor component. Then some LLL images is used in the experiment to confirm the proposed method. The sampling number of LLL image which can lead to the best de-noising effects is given. Some performance parameters are calculated and the results are analyzed in detail. To compare with the proposed method, some traditional de-noising algorithm are utilized to suppress noise of LLL images. Judging from the results, the proposed method has more significant effects of de-noising than the traditional algorithm. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed method is reasonable and efficient.

  5. An efficient technique for the reduction of wavelength noise in resonance-based integrated photonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Farshid; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Eftekhar, Ali A; Adibi, Ali

    2014-11-21

    A systematic study of the limit of detection (LOD) in resonance-based silicon photonic lab-on-chip sensors is presented. The effects of the noise, temperature fluctuations, and the fundamental thermodynamic limit of the resonator are studied. Wavelength noise is identified as the dominant source of noise, and an efficient technique for suppressing this noise is presented. A large ensemble of statistical data from the transmission measurements in a laser-scanning configuration on five silicon nitride (SiN) microrings is collected to discuss and identify the sources of noise. The experimental results show that the LOD is limited by a 3σ wavelength noise of ∼1.8 pm. We present a sub-periodic interferometric technique, relying on an inverse algorithm, to suppress this noise. Our technique reduces the wavelength noise by more than one order of magnitude to an ensemble average of 3σ = 120 fm, for a resonator quality factor (Q) of about 5 × 10(4) without any temperature stabilization or cooling. This technique is readily amenable to on-chip integration to realize highly accurate and low-cost lab-on-chip sensors.

  6. Time-domain noise reduction based on an orthogonal decomposition for desired signal extraction.

    PubMed

    Benesty, Jacob; Chen, Jingdong; Arden Huang, Yiteng; Gaensler, Tomas

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of noise reduction in the time domain where the clean speech sample at every time instant is estimated by filtering a vector of the noisy speech signal. Such a clean speech estimate consists of both the filtered speech and residual noise (filtered noise) as the noisy vector is the sum of the clean speech and noise vectors. Traditionally, the filtered speech is treated as the desired signal after noise reduction. This paper proposes to decompose the clean speech vector into two orthogonal components: one is correlated and the other is uncorrelated with the current clean speech sample. While the correlated component helps estimate the clean speech, it is shown that the uncorrelated component interferes with the estimation, just as the additive noise. Based on this orthogonal decomposition, the paper presents a way to define the error signal and cost functions and addresses the issue of how to design different optimal noise reduction filters by optimizing these cost functions. Specifically, it discusses how to design the maximum SNR filter, the Wiener filter, the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) filter, the tradeoff filter, and the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) filter. It demonstrates that the maximum SNR, Wiener, MVDR, and tradeoff filters are identical up to a scaling factor. It also shows from the orthogonal decomposition that many performance measures can be defined, which seem to be more appropriate than the traditional ones for the evaluation of the noise reduction filters.

  7. Random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating based on SVD method for ground penetrating radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cai; Song, Chao; Lu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method using singular value decomposition (SVD) which aims at eliminating the random noise and direct wave from ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals. To demonstrate the validity and high efficiency of the SVD method in eliminating random noise, we compare the SVD de-noising method with wavelet threshold de-noising method and bandpass filtering method on both noisy synthetic data and field data. After that, we compare the SVD method with the mean trace deleting in eliminating direct wave on synthetic data and field data. We set general and quantitative criteria on choosing singular values to carry out the random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating process. We find that by choosing appropriate singular values, SVD method can eliminate the random noise and direct wave in the GPR data validly and efficiently to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the GPR profiles and make effective reflection signals clearer.

  8. Designing a Sustainable Noise Mapping System Based on Citizen Scientists Smartphone Sensor Data

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Eunyoung; Kim, Dohyeong; Woo, Hyekyung; Cho, Youngtae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to assess the feasibility of collecting population health data via mobile devices. Specifically, we constructed noise maps based on sound information monitored by individuals’ smartphones. We designed a sustainable way of creating noise maps that can overcome the shortcomings of existing station-based noise-monitoring systems. Three hundred and nine Seoul residents aged 20–49 years who used Android-based smartphones were recruited, and the subjects installed a special application that we developed for this study. This application collected information on sound and geographical location every 10 min for 7 days. Using GIS, we were able to construct various types of noise maps of Seoul (e.g., daytime/nighttime and weekdays/weekends) using the information on sound and geographical location obtained via the users’ smartphones. Despite the public health importance of noise management, a number of countries and cities lack a sustainable system to monitor noise. This pilot study showed the possibility of using the smartphones of citizen scientists as an economical and sustainable way of monitoring noise, particularly in an urban context in developing countries. PMID:27626273

  9. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  10. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2016-11-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the dataset, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modeling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modeling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal to noise ratio in the data by 10%. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multi-layered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  11. Designing a Sustainable Noise Mapping System Based on Citizen Scientists Smartphone Sensor Data.

    PubMed

    Shim, Eunyoung; Kim, Dohyeong; Woo, Hyekyung; Cho, Youngtae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to assess the feasibility of collecting population health data via mobile devices. Specifically, we constructed noise maps based on sound information monitored by individuals' smartphones. We designed a sustainable way of creating noise maps that can overcome the shortcomings of existing station-based noise-monitoring systems. Three hundred and nine Seoul residents aged 20-49 years who used Android-based smartphones were recruited, and the subjects installed a special application that we developed for this study. This application collected information on sound and geographical location every 10 min for 7 days. Using GIS, we were able to construct various types of noise maps of Seoul (e.g., daytime/nighttime and weekdays/weekends) using the information on sound and geographical location obtained via the users' smartphones. Despite the public health importance of noise management, a number of countries and cities lack a sustainable system to monitor noise. This pilot study showed the possibility of using the smartphones of citizen scientists as an economical and sustainable way of monitoring noise, particularly in an urban context in developing countries.

  12. Denoising of polychromatic CT images based on their own noise properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Hye; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Because of high diagnostic accuracy and fast scan time, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in various clinical applications. Since the CT scan introduces radiation exposure to patients, however, dose reduction has recently been recognized as an important issue in CT imaging. However, low-dose CT causes an increase of noise in the image and thereby deteriorates the accuracy of diagnosis. In this paper, the authors develop an efficient denoising algorithm for low-dose CT images obtained using a polychromatic x-ray source. The algorithm is based on two steps: (i) estimation of space variant noise statistics, which are uniquely determined according to the system geometry and scanned object, and (ii) subsequent novel conversion of the estimated noise to Gaussian noise so that an existing high performance Gaussian noise filtering algorithm can be directly applied to CT images with non-Gaussian noise. Methods: For efficient polychromatic CT image denoising, the authors first reconstruct an image with the iterative maximum-likelihood polychromatic algorithm for CT to alleviate the beam-hardening problem. We then estimate the space-variant noise variance distribution on the image domain. Since there are many high performance denoising algorithms available for the Gaussian noise, image denoising can become much more efficient if they can be used. Hence, the authors propose a novel conversion scheme to transform the estimated space-variant noise to near Gaussian noise. In the suggested scheme, the authors first convert the image so that its mean and variance can have a linear relationship, and then produce a Gaussian image via variance stabilizing transform. The authors then apply a block matching 4D algorithm that is optimized for noise reduction of the Gaussian image, and reconvert the result to obtain a final denoised image. To examine the performance of the proposed method, an XCAT phantom simulation and a physical phantom experiment were conducted

  13. Denoising of polychromatic CT images based on their own noise properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom

    2016-05-01

    Because of high diagnostic accuracy and fast scan time, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in various clinical applications. Since the CT scan introduces radiation exposure to patients, however, dose reduction has recently been recognized as an important issue in CT imaging. However, low-dose CT causes an increase of noise in the image and thereby deteriorates the accuracy of diagnosis. In this paper, the authors develop an efficient denoising algorithm for low-dose CT images obtained using a polychromatic x-ray source. The algorithm is based on two steps: (i) estimation of space variant noise statistics, which are uniquely determined according to the system geometry and scanned object, and (ii) subsequent novel conversion of the estimated noise to Gaussian noise so that an existing high performance Gaussian noise filtering algorithm can be directly applied to CT images with non-Gaussian noise. For efficient polychromatic CT image denoising, the authors first reconstruct an image with the iterative maximum-likelihood polychromatic algorithm for CT to alleviate the beam-hardening problem. We then estimate the space-variant noise variance distribution on the image domain. Since there are many high performance denoising algorithms available for the Gaussian noise, image denoising can become much more efficient if they can be used. Hence, the authors propose a novel conversion scheme to transform the estimated space-variant noise to near Gaussian noise. In the suggested scheme, the authors first convert the image so that its mean and variance can have a linear relationship, and then produce a Gaussian image via variance stabilizing transform. The authors then apply a block matching 4D algorithm that is optimized for noise reduction of the Gaussian image, and reconvert the result to obtain a final denoised image. To examine the performance of the proposed method, an XCAT phantom simulation and a physical phantom experiment were conducted. Both simulation and

  14. Relationship of Transportation Noise and Annoyance for Two Metropolitan Cities in Korea: Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jiho; Park, Sang Jin; Sim, Chang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Transportation noise is known to have negative impact on both public health and life quality. This study evaluated the relationship between transportation noise and annoyance levels, and also the difference of annoyance levels in two metropolitan cities based on epidemiologic surveys. Two thousand adult subjects living in Seoul and Ulsan were enrolled by stratified random sampling on the basis of noise maps from July 2015 to January 2016. Individual annoyance in accordance with transportation noise levels in two metropolitan cities were surveyed using an 11-point visual analog scale questionnaire. The results show that transportation noise level was significantly correlated with annoyance in both cities. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of being ‘highly annoyed’ increased with noise level (Ldn, day-night average sound level) in both cities. After adjusting for age, residence period, sociodemographic factors (sex, education, marriage, income, alcohol, smoking, and exercise) and noise sensitivity, the risk of being ‘highly annoyed’ was increased with noise levels in both cities. In comparison to those of areas with noise levels below 55 dBA, the adjusted odds ratios of ‘highly annoyed’ for areas with 55–65 dBA and over 65 dBA were 2.056 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.225–3.450), 3.519 (95% CI 1.982–6.246) in Seoul and 1.022 (95% CI 0.585–1.785), 1.704 (95% CI 1.005–2.889) in Ulsan, respectively. Based on the results of a population study, we showed that transportation noise levels were significantly associated with annoyance in adults. However, there were some differences between the two cities. In this study, there were differences in transportation noise between the two cities. Seoul has complex noise (traffic and aircraft), compared to single road traffic noise in Ulsan. Therefore, single and complex transportation noise may have different effects on annoyance levels. PMID:28005976

  15. Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shan

    This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of

  16. Signals and noise in the octavolateralis systems: what is the impact of human activities on fish sensory function?

    PubMed

    Braun, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    The octavolateralis systems of fishes include the vestibular, auditory, lateral line and electrosensory systems. They are united by common developmental and neuro-computational features, including hair cell sensors and computations based on cross-neuron analyses of differential hair cell stimulation patterns. These systems also all use both spectral and temporal filters to separate signals from each other and from noise, and the distributed senses (lateral line and electroreception) add spatial filters as well. Like all sensory systems, these sensors must provide the animal with guidance for adaptive behavior within a sensory scene composed of multiple stimuli and varying levels of ambient noise, including that created by human activities. In the extreme, anthropogenic activities impact the octavolateralis systems by destroying or degrading the habitats that provide ecological resources and sensory inputs. At slightly lesser levels of effect, anthropogenic pollutants can be damaging to fish tissues, with sensory organs often the most vulnerable. The exposed sensory cells of the lateral line and electrosensory systems are especially sensitive to aquatic pollution. At still lesser levels of impact, anthropogenic activities can act as both acute and chronic stressors, activating hormonal changes that may affect behavioral and sensory function. Finally, human activities are now a nearly ubiquitous presence in aquatic habitats, often with no obvious effects on the animals exposed to them. Ship noise, indigenous and industrial fishing techniques, and all the ancillary noises of human civilization form a major part of the soundscape of fishes. How fish use these new sources of information about their habitat is a new and burgeoning field of study.

  17. Noise reduction in urban LRT networks by combining track based solutions.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Vanhonacker, Patrick

    2016-10-15

    The overall objective of the Quiet-Track project is to provide step-changing track based noise mitigation and maintenance schemes for railway rolling noise in LRT (Light Rail Transit) networks. WP 4 in particular focuses on the combination of existing track based solutions to yield a global performance of at least 6dB(A). The validation was carried out using a track section in the network of Athens Metro Line 1 with an existing outside concrete slab track (RHEDA track) where high airborne rolling noise was observed. The procedure for the selection of mitigation measures is based on numerical simulations, combining WRNOISE and IMMI software tools for noise prediction with experimental determination of the required track and vehicle parameters (e.g., rail and wheel roughness). The availability of a detailed rolling noise calculation procedure allows for detailed designing of measures and of ranking individual measures. It achieves this by including the modelling of the wheel/rail source intensity and of the noise propagation with the ability to evaluate the effect of modifications at source level (e.g., grinding, rail dampers, wheel dampers, change in resiliency of wheels and/or rail fixation) and of modifications in the propagation path (absorption at the track base, noise barriers, screening). A relevant combination of existing solutions was selected in the function of the simulation results. Three distinct existing solutions were designed in detail aiming at a high rolling noise attenuation and not affecting the normal operation of the metro system: Action 1: implementation of sound absorbing precast elements (panel type) on the track bed, Action 2: implementation of an absorbing noise barrier with a height of 1.10-1.20m above rail level, and Action 3: installation of rail dampers. The selected solutions were implemented on site and the global performance was measured step by step for comparison with simulations.

  18. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  19. Noise Certification Considerations for Helicopters Based on Laboratory Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    c*.9lpfet peg . e..’o.4,.d pI ,s.tI I. S - - I I I IL I 3 i 3I IHI Ii a -I £ a 0 I a IU - !h **’ 1t P- a hEEL b. U -o 0. C C. I .2. U...4rn; the other is a ten-second portion of a hover at .•. ,-r’t hiijntal distance. The latter two noises were chosen as rvLati" ei a*,. ady -state

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE BASED CORROSION MONITORING HANFORD SITE PROGRAM STATUS

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    2005-03-21

    The Hanford Site near Richland, Washington has 177 underground waste tanks that store approximately 253 million liters of radioactive waste from 50 years of plutonium production. Prior to 1995 no online corrosion monitoring systems were in place at Hanford to facilitate the early detection of the onset of localized corrosion should it occur in a waste tank. Because of this, a program was started in 1995 to develop an electrochemical noise (EN) corrosion monitoring system to improve Hanford's corrosion monitoring strategy. Three systems are now installed and operating at Hanford. System design, performance history, data and the results of a recent analysis of tank vapor space data are presented.

  1. Speech recognition in noise with active and passive hearing protectors: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bockstael, Annelies; De Coensel, Bert; Botteldooren, Dick; D'Haenens, Wendy; Keppler, Hannah; Maes, Leen; Philips, Birgit; Swinnen, Freya; Bart, Vinck

    2011-06-01

    The perceived negative influence of standard hearing protectors on communication is a common argument for not wearing them. Thus, "augmented" protectors have been developed to improve speech intelligibility. Nevertheless, their actual benefit remains a point of concern. In this paper, speech perception with active earplugs is compared to standard passive custom-made earplugs. The two types of active protectors included amplify the incoming sound with a fixed level or to a user selected fraction of the maximum safe level. For the latter type, minimal and maximal amplification are selected. To compare speech intelligibility, 20 different speech-in-noise fragments are presented to 60 normal-hearing subjects and speech recognition is scored. The background noise is selected from realistic industrial noise samples with different intensity, frequency, and temporal characteristics. Statistical analyses suggest that the protectors' performance strongly depends on the noise condition. The active protectors with minimal amplification outclass the others for the most difficult and the easiest situations, but they also limit binaural listening. In other conditions, the passive protectors clearly surpass their active counterparts. Subsequently, test fragments are analyzed acoustically to clarify the results. This provides useful information for developing prototypes, but also indicates that tests with human subjects remain essential. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  2. Subjective Listening Effort and Electrodermal Activity in Listening Situations with Reverberation and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Haeder, Kristina; Imbery, Christina; Weber, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Disturbing factors like reverberation or ambient noise can impair speech recognition and raise the listening effort needed for successful communication in daily life. Situations with high listening effort are thought to result in increased stress for the listener. The aim of this study was to explore possible measures to determine listening effort in situations with varying background noise and reverberation. For this purpose, subjective ratings of listening effort, speech recognition, and stress level, together with the electrodermal activity as a measure of the autonomic stress reaction, were investigated. It was expected that the electrodermal activity would show different stress levels in different acoustic situations and might serve as an alternative to subjective ratings. Ten young normal-hearing and 17 elderly hearing-impaired subjects listened to sentences from the Oldenburg sentence test either with stationary background noise or with reverberation. Four listening situations were generated, an easy and a hard one for each of the two disturbing factors, which were related to each other by the Speech Transmission Index. The easy situation resulted in 100% and the hard situation resulted in 30 to 80% speech recognition. The results of the subjective ratings showed significant differences between the easy and the hard listening situations in both subject groups. Two methods of analyzing the electrodermal activity values revealed similar, but nonsignificant trends. Significant correlations between subjective ratings and physiological electrodermal activity data were observed for normal-hearing subjects in the noise situation. PMID:27698257

  3. Experimental investigation of different active noise control concepts applied to a passenger car equipped with an active windshield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misol, M.; Algermissen, S.; Monner, H. P.

    2012-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is the implementation and experimental investigation of different active structural acoustic control (ASAC) concepts for the reduction of interior noise in an automobile passenger compartment. For the control experiments, a medium-class test car was used, which had been equipped with an active windshield. The active windshield consists of the serial-production laminated glass pane augmented with piezoceramic patch-transducers applied to the blackened rim of the windshield. A multi-reference test provided measurement data for the identification of a local discrete-time state-space model (SSM). The subsequent acquisition of frequency response functions (FRF) by way of using the same actuators but measuring on a much finer grid provided the database for the formulation of a least-squares problem to derive a global system model. Based on the local and global discrete-time SSMs, different controllers were designed and experimentally realized. The comparison of the vibration levels in open- and closed-loop showed a global reduction of 5-7 dB in the acoustically relevant frequency band containing the second and third structural resonance of the windshield system. The occurrence of complex operational deflection shapes (ODS) was identified as the main limitation concerning the disturbance rejection of the active system. The acoustic performance of the ASAC system is reflected in a reduction up to 15 dB in sound pressure level (SPL).

  4. Microscopic origin of read current noise in TaO{sub x}-based resistive switching memory by ultra-low temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yue; Cai, Yimao Liu, Yefan; Fang, Yichen; Yu, Muxi; Tan, Shenghu; Huang, Ru

    2016-04-11

    TaO{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) attracts considerable attention for the development of next generation nonvolatile memories. However, read current noise in RRAM is one of the critical concerns for storage application, and its microscopic origin is still under debate. In this work, the read current noise in TaO{sub x}-based RRAM was studied thoroughly. Based on a noise power spectral density analysis at room temperature and at ultra-low temperature of 25 K, discrete random telegraph noise (RTN) and continuous average current fluctuation (ACF) are identified and decoupled from the total read current noise in TaO{sub x} RRAM devices. A statistical comparison of noise amplitude further reveals that ACF depends strongly on the temperature, whereas RTN is independent of the temperature. Measurement results combined with conduction mechanism analysis show that RTN in TaO{sub x} RRAM devices arises from electron trapping/detrapping process in the hopping conduction, and ACF is originated from the thermal activation of conduction centers that form the percolation network. At last, a unified model in the framework of hopping conduction is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of both RTN and ACF noise, which can provide meaningful guidelines for designing noise-immune RRAM devices.

  5. Noise filtering algorithm for the MFTF-B computer based control system

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, E.G.

    1983-11-30

    An algorithm to reduce the message traffic in the MFTF-B computer based control system is described. The algorithm filters analog inputs to the control system. Its purpose is to distinguish between changes in the inputs due to noise and changes due to significant variations in the quantity being monitored. Noise is rejected while significant changes are reported to the control system data base, thus keeping the data base updated with a minimum number of messages. The algorithm is memory efficient, requiring only four bytes of storage per analog channel, and computationally simple, requiring only subtraction and comparison. Quantitative analysis of the algorithm is presented for the case of additive Gaussian noise. It is shown that the algorithm is stable and tends toward the mean value of the monitored variable over a wide variety of additive noise distributions.

  6. Experiments on reduction of propeller induced interior noise by active control of cylinder vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Jones, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing interior noise caused by advanced turbo propellers by controlling the vibration of aircraft fuselages was investigated by performing experiments in an anechoic chamber with an aircraft model test rig and apparatus. It was found that active vibration control provides reasonable global attenuation of interior noise levels for the cases of resonant (at 576 Hz) and forced (at 708 Hz) system response. The controlling mechanism behind the effect is structural-acoustic coupling between the shell and the contained field, termed interface modal filtering.

  7. Adaptive noise cancellation based on beehive pattern evolutionary digital filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Shao, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary digital filtering (EDF) exhibits the advantage of avoiding the local optimum problem by using cloning and mating searching rules in an adaptive noise cancellation system. However, convergence performance is restricted by the large population of individuals and the low level of information communication among them. The special beehive structure enables the individuals on neighbour beehive nodes to communicate with each other and thus enhance the information spread and random search ability of the algorithm. By introducing the beehive pattern evolutionary rules into the original EDF, this paper proposes an improved beehive pattern evolutionary digital filter (BP-EDF) to overcome the defects of the original EDF. In the proposed algorithm, a new evolutionary rule which combines competing cloning, complete cloning and assistance mating methods is constructed to enable the individuals distributed on the beehive to communicate with their neighbours. Simulation results are used to demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of convergence speed to the global optimum compared with the original methods. Experimental results also verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in extracting feature signals that are contaminated by significant amounts of noise during the fault diagnosis task.

  8. Wavelet-based pavement image compression and noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Peisen S.; Chiang, Fu-Pen

    2005-08-01

    For any automated distress inspection system, typically a huge number of pavement images are collected. Use of an appropriate image compression algorithm can save disk space, reduce the saving time, increase the inspection distance, and increase the processing speed. In this research, a modified EZW (Embedded Zero-tree Wavelet) coding method, which is an improved version of the widely used EZW coding method, is proposed. This method, unlike the two-pass approach used in the original EZW method, uses only one pass to encode both the coordinates and magnitudes of wavelet coefficients. An adaptive arithmetic encoding method is also implemented to encode four symbols assigned by the modified EZW into binary bits. By applying a thresholding technique to terminate the coding process, the modified EZW coding method can compress the image and reduce noise simultaneously. The new method is much simpler and faster. Experimental results also show that the compression ratio was increased one and one-half times compared to the EZW coding method. The compressed and de-noised data can be used to reconstruct wavelet coefficients for off-line pavement image processing such as distress classification and quantification.

  9. Monte Carlo-based noise compensation in coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI.

    PubMed

    Lui, Dorothy; Modhafar, Amen; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-10-12

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer found in males making early diagnosis important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been useful in visualizing and localizing tumor candidates and with the use of endorectal coils (ERC), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be improved. The coils introduce intensity inhomogeneities and the surface coil intensity correction built into MRI scanners is used to reduce these inhomogeneities. However, the correction typically performed at the MRI scanner level leads to noise amplification and noise level variations. In this study, we introduce a new Monte Carlo-based noise compensation approach for coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI which allows for effective noise compensation and preservation of details within the prostate. The approach accounts for the ERC SNR profile via a spatially-adaptive noise model for correcting non-stationary noise variations. Such a method is useful particularly for improving the image quality of coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI data performed at the MRI scanner level and when the original raw data is not available. SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) analysis in patient experiments demonstrate an average improvement of 11.7 and 11.2 dB respectively over uncorrected endorectal MRI, and provides strong performance when compared to existing approaches. Experimental results using both phantom and patient data showed that ACER provided strong performance in terms of SNR, CNR, edge preservation, subjective scoring when compared to a number of existing approaches. A new noise compensation method was developed for the purpose of improving the quality of coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI data performed at the MRI scanner level. We illustrate that promising noise compensation performance can be achieved for the proposed approach, which is particularly important for processing coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI data performed at the MRI scanner level and when the

  10. Active self-testing noise measurement sensors for large-scale environmental sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-12-13

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  11. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10. PMID:24351634

  12. A method for determining internal noise criteria based on practical speech communication applied to helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Doyle, L. B.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the internal noise environment of helicopters and the ability of personnel to understand commands and instructions was studied. A test program was conducted to relate speech intelligibility to a standard measurement called Articulation Index. An acoustical simulator was used to provide noise environments typical of Army helicopters. Speech material (command sentences and phonetically balanced word lists) were presented at several voice levels in each helicopter environment. Recommended helicopter internal noise criteria, based on speech communication, were derived and the effectiveness of hearing protection devices were evaluated.

  13. Improved Radiometric Based Method for Suppressing Impulse Noise from Corrupted Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Changcheng; Zhao, Chunyu; Chen, Dayue

    A novel filter is introduced in this paper to improve the ability of radiometric based method on suppressing impulse noise. Firstly, a new method is introduced to design the impulsive weight by measuring how impulsive a pixel is. Then, the impulsive weight is combined with the radiometric weight to obtain the evaluated values on each pixel in the whole corrupted image. The impulsive weight is mainly designed to suppress the impulse noise, while the radiometric weight is mainly designed to protect the noise-free pixel. Extensive experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can perform much better than other filters in terms of the quantitative and qualitative aspects.

  14. The Effect of Non-Harmonic Active Twist Actuation on BVI Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2011-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of non-harmonic active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise for the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The application of non-harmonic active-twist inputs to the main rotor blade system comprised three parameters: azimuthal location to start actuation, azimuthal duration of actuation, and magnitude of actuation. The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio mu=0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, a(sub s)=+6deg. BVI noise levels were predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicate significant reductions of up to 10dB in BVI noise using a starting azimuthal location for actuation of 90?, an azimuthal duration of actuation of 90deg, and an actuation magnitude of +1.5 ft-lb.

  15. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: One and two interacting units.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Todorović, Kristina; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We consider the coaction of two distinct noise sources on the activation process of a single excitable unit and two interacting excitable units, which are mathematically described by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. We determine the most probable activation paths around which the corresponding stochastic trajectories are clustered. The key point lies in introducing appropriate boundary conditions that are relevant for a class II excitable unit, which can be immediately generalized also to scenarios involving two coupled units. We analyze the effects of the two noise sources on the statistical features of the activation process, in particular demonstrating how these are modified due to the linear or nonlinear form of interactions. Universal properties of the activation process are qualitatively discussed in the light of a stochastic bifurcation that underlies the transition from a stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations.

  16. Recovery of mechanical pressure in a gas of underdamped active dumbbells with Brownian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyeux, Marc

    2017-05-01

    In contrast with a gas at thermodynamic equilibrium, the mean force exerted on a wall by a gas of active particles usually depends on the confining potential, thereby preventing a proper definition of mechanical pressure. In this paper, we investigate numerically the properties of a gas of underdamped self-propelled dumbbells subject to Brownian noise of increasing intensity, in order to understand how the notion of pressure is recovered as noise progressively masks the effects of self-propulsion and the system approaches thermodynamic equilibrium. The simulations performed for a mobile asymmetric wall separating two chambers containing an equal number of active dumbbells highlight some subtle and unexpected properties of the system. First, Brownian noise of moderate intensity is sufficient to let mean forces equilibrate for small values of the damping coefficient, while much stronger noise is required for larger values of the damping coefficient. Moreover, the displacement of the mean position of the wall upon increase of the intensity of the noise is not necessarily monotonous and may instead display changes of direction. Both facts actually reflect the existence of several mechanisms leading to the rupture of force balance, which tend to displace the mean position of the wall towards different directions and display different robustness against an increase of the intensity of Brownian noise. This work therefore provides a clear illustration of the fact that driving an autonomous system towards (or away from) thermodynamic equilibrium may not be a straightforward process, but may instead proceed through the variations of the relative weights of several conflicting mechanisms.

  17. Recovery of mechanical pressure in a gas of underdamped active dumbbells with Brownian noise.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Marc

    2017-05-01

    In contrast with a gas at thermodynamic equilibrium, the mean force exerted on a wall by a gas of active particles usually depends on the confining potential, thereby preventing a proper definition of mechanical pressure. In this paper, we investigate numerically the properties of a gas of underdamped self-propelled dumbbells subject to Brownian noise of increasing intensity, in order to understand how the notion of pressure is recovered as noise progressively masks the effects of self-propulsion and the system approaches thermodynamic equilibrium. The simulations performed for a mobile asymmetric wall separating two chambers containing an equal number of active dumbbells highlight some subtle and unexpected properties of the system. First, Brownian noise of moderate intensity is sufficient to let mean forces equilibrate for small values of the damping coefficient, while much stronger noise is required for larger values of the damping coefficient. Moreover, the displacement of the mean position of the wall upon increase of the intensity of the noise is not necessarily monotonous and may instead display changes of direction. Both facts actually reflect the existence of several mechanisms leading to the rupture of force balance, which tend to displace the mean position of the wall towards different directions and display different robustness against an increase of the intensity of Brownian noise. This work therefore provides a clear illustration of the fact that driving an autonomous system towards (or away from) thermodynamic equilibrium may not be a straightforward process, but may instead proceed through the variations of the relative weights of several conflicting mechanisms.

  18. Analysis of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise with application to adaptive-passive and active alleviation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauszig, Lionel Christian

    This study focuses on detection and analysis methods of helicopter blade-vortex interactions (BVI) and applies these methods to two different BVI noise alleviation schemes---an adaptive-passive and an active scheme. A standard free-wake analysis based on relaxation methods is extended in this study to compute high-resolution blade loading, to account for blade-to-blade dissimilarities, and dual vortices when there is negative loading at the blade tips. The free-wake geometry is still calculated on a coarse azimuthal grid and then interpolated to a high-resolution grid to calculate the BVI induced impulsive loading. Blade-to-blade dissimilarities are accounted by allowing the different blades to release their own vortices. A number of BVI detection criteria, including the spherical method (a geometric criterion developed in this thesis) are critically examined. It was determined that high-resolution azimuthal discretization is required in virtually all detection methods except the spherical method which detected the occurrence of parallel BVI even while using a low-resolution azimuthal mesh. Detection methods based on inflow and blade loads were, in addition, found to be sensitive to vortex core size. While most BVI studies use the high-resolution airloads to compute BVI noise, the total noise can often be due to multiple dominant interactions on the advancing and retreating sides. A methodology is developed to evaluate the contribution of an individual interaction to the total BVI noise, based on using the loading due to an individual vortex as an input to the acoustic code WOPWOP. The adaptive-passive BVI alleviation method considered in this study comprises of reducing the length of one set of opposite blades (of a 4-bladed rotor) in low-speed descent. Results showed that differential coning resulting from the blade dissimilarity increases the blade-vortex miss-distances and reduces the BVI noise by 4 dB. The Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART

  19. Receiver design for SPAD-based VLC systems under Poisson-Gaussian mixed noise model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Tianqi; Wang, Zhaocheng; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-23

    Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) is a promising photosensor because of its high sensitivity to optical signals in weak illuminance environment. Recently, it has drawn much attention from researchers in visible light communications (VLC). However, existing literature only deals with the simplified channel model, which only considers the effects of Poisson noise introduced by SPAD, but neglects other noise sources. Specifically, when an analog SPAD detector is applied, there exists Gaussian thermal noise generated by the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and the digital-to-analog converter (D/A). Therefore, in this paper, we propose an SPAD-based VLC system with pulse-amplitude-modulation (PAM) under Poisson-Gaussian mixed noise model, where Gaussian-distributed thermal noise at the receiver is also investigated. The closed-form conditional likelihood of received signals is derived using the Laplace transform and the saddle-point approximation method, and the corresponding quasi-maximum-likelihood (quasi-ML) detector is proposed. Furthermore, the Poisson-Gaussian-distributed signals are converted to Gaussian variables with the aid of the generalized Anscombe transform (GAT), leading to an equivalent additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel, and a hard-decision-based detector is invoked. Simulation results demonstrate that, the proposed GAT-based detector can reduce the computational complexity with marginal performance loss compared with the proposed quasi-ML detector, and both detectors are capable of accurately demodulating the SPAD-based PAM signals.

  20. A hybrid predictive model for acoustic noise in urban areas based on time series analysis and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnaccia, Claudio; Quartieri, Joseph; Tepedino, Carmine

    2017-06-01

    The dangerous effect of noise on human health is well known. Both the auditory and non-auditory effects are largely documented in literature, and represent an important hazard in human activities. Particular care is devoted to road traffic noise, since it is growing according to the growth of residential, industrial and commercial areas. For these reasons, it is important to develop effective models able to predict the noise in a certain area. In this paper, a hybrid predictive model is presented. The model is based on the mixing of two different approach: the Time Series Analysis (TSA) and the Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The TSA model is based on the evaluation of trend and seasonality in the data, while the ANN model is based on the capacity of the network to "learn" the behavior of the data. The mixed approach will consist in the evaluation of noise levels by means of TSA and, once the differences (residuals) between TSA estimations and observed data have been calculated, in the training of a ANN on the residuals. This hybrid model will exploit interesting features and results, with a significant variation related to the number of steps forward in the prediction. It will be shown that the best results, in terms of prediction, are achieved predicting one step ahead in the future. Anyway, a 7 days prediction can be performed, with a slightly greater error, but offering a larger range of prediction, with respect to the single day ahead predictive model.

  1. A Statistical Model-Based Speech Enhancement Using Acoustic Noise Classification for Robust Speech Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hun; Chang, Joon-Hyuk

    In this paper, we present a speech enhancement technique based on the ambient noise classification that incorporates the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The principal parameters of the statistical model-based speech enhancement algorithm such as the weighting parameter in the decision-directed (DD) method and the long-term smoothing parameter of the noise estimation, are set according to the classified context to ensure best performance under each noise. For real-time context awareness, the noise classification is performed on a frame-by-frame basis using the GMM with the soft decision framework. The speech absence probability (SAP) is used in detecting the speech absence periods and updating the likelihood of the GMM.

  2. Network-based estimation of time-dependent noise in GPS position time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, Ksenia; Segall, Paul; DeMets, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Some estimates of GPS velocity uncertainties are very low, 0.1 mm/year with 10 years of data. Yet, residual velocities relative to rigid plate models in nominally stable plate interiors can be an order of magnitude larger. This discrepancy could be caused by underestimating low-frequency time-dependent noise in position time series, such as random walk. We show that traditional estimators, based on individual time series, are insensitive to low-amplitude random walk, yet such noise significantly increases GPS velocity uncertainties. Here, we develop a method for determining representative noise parameters in GPS position time series, by analyzing an entire network simultaneously, which we refer to as the network noise estimator (NNE). We analyze data from the aseismic central-eastern USA, assuming that residual motions relative to North America, corrected for glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), represent noise. The position time series are decomposed into signal (plate rotation and GIA) and noise components. NNE simultaneously processes multiple stations with a Kalman filter and solves for average noise components for the network by maximum likelihood estimation. Synthetic tests show that NNE correctly estimates even low-level random walk, thus providing better estimates of velocity uncertainties than conventional, single station methods. To test NNE on actual data, we analyze a heterogeneous 15 station GPS network from the central-eastern USA, assuming the noise is a sum of random walk, flicker and white noise. For the horizontal time series, NNE finds higher average random walk than the standard individual station-based method, leading to velocity uncertainties a factor of 2 higher than traditional methods.

  3. Filtering noise for synchronised activity in multi-trial electrophysiology data using Wiener and Kalman filters.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yang; Guo, Shuixia; Kendrick, Keith M; Feng, Jianfeng

    2009-04-01

    Novel approaches to effectively reduce noise in data recorded from multi-trial physiology experiments have been investigated using two-dimensional filtering methods, adaptive Wiener filtering and reduced update Kalman filtering. Test data based on signal and noise model consisting of different conditions of signal components mixed with noise have been considered with filtering effects evaluated using analysis of frequency coherence and of time-dependent coherence. Various situations that may affect the filtering results have been explored and reveal that Wiener and Kalman filtering can considerably improve the coherence values between two channels of multi-trial data and suppress uncorrelated components. We have extended our approach to experimental data: multi-electrode array (MEA) local field potential (LFPs) recordings from the inferotemporal cortex of sheep and LFP vs. electromyogram (LFP-EMG) recording data during resting tremor in Parkinson's disease patients. Finally general procedures for implementation of these filtering techniques are described.

  4. Noise-Induced Loss of Hair Cells and Cochlear Synaptopathy Are Mediated by the Activation of AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kayla; Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major unresolved public health problem. Here, we investigate pathomechanisms of sensory hair cell death and suggest a novel target for protective intervention. Cellular survival depends upon maintenance of energy homeostasis, largely by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In response to a noise exposure in CBA/J mice, the levels of phosphorylated AMPKα increased in hair cells in a noise intensity-dependent manner. Inhibition of AMPK via siRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor compound C attenuated noise-induced loss of outer hair cells (OHCs) and synaptic ribbons, and preserved auditory function. Additionally, noise exposure increased the activity of the upstream AMPK kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in cochlear tissues. The inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated the noise-increased phosphorylation of AMPKα in OHCs, reduced the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and OHCs, and protected against NIHL. These results indicate that noise exposure induces hair cell death and synaptopathy by activating AMPK via LKB1-mediated pathways. Targeting these pathways may provide a novel route to prevent NIHL. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our results demonstrate for the first time that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α in sensory hair cells is noise intensity dependent and contributes to noise-induced hearing loss by mediating the loss of inner hair cell synaptic ribbons and outer hair cells. Noise induces the phosphorylation of AMPKα1 by liver kinase B1 (LKB1), triggered by changes in intracellular ATP levels. The inhibition of AMPK activation by silencing AMPK or LKB1, or with the pharmacological inhibitor compound C, reduced outer hair cell and synaptic ribbon loss as well as noise-induced hearing loss. This study provides new insights into mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss and suggests novel interventions for the prevention of the loss of sensory hair cells and cochlear synaptopathy. PMID:27413159

  5. Human decision making based on variations in internal noise: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Amitay, Sygal; Guiraud, Jeanne; Sohoglu, Ediz; Zobay, Oliver; Edmonds, Barrie A; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Moore, David R

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual decision making is prone to errors, especially near threshold. Physiological, behavioural and modeling studies suggest this is due to the intrinsic or 'internal' noise in neural systems, which derives from a mixture of bottom-up and top-down sources. We show here that internal noise can form the basis of perceptual decision making when the external signal lacks the required information for the decision. We recorded electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in listeners attempting to discriminate between identical tones. Since the acoustic signal was constant, bottom-up and top-down influences were under experimental control. We found that early cortical responses to the identical stimuli varied in global field power and topography according to the perceptual decision made, and activity preceding stimulus presentation could predict both later activity and behavioural decision. Our results suggest that activity variations induced by internal noise of both sensory and cognitive origin are sufficient to drive discrimination judgments.

  6. Development and experimental verification of a robust active noise control system for a diesel engine in submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, D.; Jukkert, S.; Hövelmann, N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental validation of an ANC (active noise control)-system designed for a particular application in the exhaust line of a submarine. Thereby, tonal components of the exhaust noise in the frequency band from 75 Hz to 120 Hz are reduced by more than 30 dB. The ANC-system is based on the feedforward leaky FxLMS-algorithm. The observability of the sound pressure in standing wave field is ensured by using two error microphones. The noninvasive online plant identification method is used to increase the robustness of the controller. Online plant identification is extended by a time-varying convergence gain to improve the performance in the presence of slight error in the frequency of the reference signal.

  7. Object reconstruction from thermal and shot noises corrupted block-based compressive ultra-low-light-level imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Sen; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, block-based compressive ultra low-light-level imaging (BCU-imaging) is studied. Objects are divided into blocks. Features, or linear combinations of block pixels, instead of pixels, are measured for each block to improve system measurement SNR and thus object reconstructions. Thermal noise and shot noise are discussed for object reconstruction. The former is modeled as Gaussian noise. The latter is modeled as Poisson noise. Linear Wiener operator and linearized iterative Bregman algorithm are used to reconstruct objects from measurements corrupted by thermal noise. SPIRAL algorithm is used to reconstruct object from measurements with shot noise. Linear Wiener operator is also studied for measurements with shot noise, because Poisson noise is similar to Gaussian noise at large signal level and feature values are large enough to make this assumption feasible. Root mean square error (RMSE) is used to quantify system reconstruction quality.

  8. Component-based model to predict aerodynamic noise from high-speed train pantographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Smith, M. G.

    2017-04-01

    At typical speeds of modern high-speed trains the aerodynamic noise produced by the airflow over the pantograph is a significant source of noise. Although numerical models can be used to predict this they are still very computationally intensive. A semi-empirical component-based prediction model is proposed to predict the aerodynamic noise from train pantographs. The pantograph is approximated as an assembly of cylinders and bars with particular cross-sections. An empirical database is used to obtain the coefficients of the model to account for various factors: incident flow speed, diameter, cross-sectional shape, yaw angle, rounded edges, length-to-width ratio, incoming turbulence and directivity. The overall noise from the pantograph is obtained as the incoherent sum of the predicted noise from the different pantograph struts. The model is validated using available wind tunnel noise measurements of two full-size pantographs. The results show the potential of the semi-empirical model to be used as a rapid tool to predict aerodynamic noise from train pantographs.

  9. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the

  10. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate an image-domain noise reduction method based on a modified nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm that is adaptive to local noise level of CT images and to implement this method in a time frame consistent with clinical workflow. Methods: A computationally efficient technique for local noise estimation directly from CT images was developed. A forward projection, based on a 2D fan-beam approximation, was used to generate the projection data, with a noise model incorporating the effects of the bowtie filter and automatic exposure control. The noise propagation from projection data to images was analytically derived. The analytical noise map was validated using repeated scans of a phantom. A 3D NLM denoising algorithm was modified to adapt its denoising strength locally based on this noise map. The performance of this adaptive NLM filter was evaluated in phantom studies in terms of in-plane and cross-plane high-contrast spatial resolution, noise power spectrum (NPS), subjective low-contrast spatial resolution using the American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom, and objective low-contrast spatial resolution using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO). Graphical processing units (GPU) implementation of this noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering were developed to meet demands of clinical workflow. Adaptive NLM was piloted on lower dose scans in clinical practice. Results: The local noise level estimation matches the noise distribution determined from multiple repetitive scans of a phantom, demonstrated by small variations in the ratio map between the analytical noise map and the one calculated from repeated scans. The phantom studies demonstrated that the adaptive NLM filter can reduce noise substantially without degrading the high-contrast spatial resolution, as illustrated by modulation transfer function and slice sensitivity profile results. The NPS results show that adaptive NLM denoising preserves the

  11. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (σ) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of σ ∝ (dose){sup −β} with the component β ≈ 0.25, which violated the classical σ ∝ (dose){sup −0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial

  12. Measurement of Noise Produced by a Plasma Contactor Operating in Ground Based Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Steve

    1996-01-01

    Methods to measure electric field fluctuations accurately in a plasma with an active monopole antenna are described. It is shown that the conductive surfaces of the antenna must be adequately isolated from the ambient plasma and that the monopole must be sufficiently short to avoid antenna amplifier saturation. Experimental results illustrate that the noise produced by plasma contactor operation and sensed by the antenna is due to plasma phenomena and is not induced by laboratory power supplies. A good correlation is shown between the current fluctuations in the contactor electrical circuit and the noise detected by the antenna. A large body of experimental data support the conclusion that the majority of noise sensed by the antenna at frequencies less than 1 MHz is due to current fluctuations (electrostatic waves) in the plasma adjacent to the antenna and not to electromagnetic wave radiation. Caution is suggested when comparing antenna noise measurements to conventional specifications for radiated emissions.

  13. Sample entropy-based adaptive wavelet de-noising approach for meteorologic and hydrologic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Singh, Vijay P.; Shang, Xiaosan; Ding, Hao; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Lachun; Zou, Xinqing; Chen, Yuanfang; Chen, Xi; Wang, Shicheng; Wang, Zhenlong

    2014-07-01

    De-noising meteorologic and hydrologic time series is important to improve the accuracy and reliability of extraction, analysis, simulation, and forecasting. A hybrid approach, combining sample entropy and wavelet de-noising method, is developed to separate noise from original series and is named as AWDA-SE (adaptive wavelet de-noising approach using sample entropy). The AWDA-SE approach adaptively determines the threshold for wavelet analysis. Two kinds of meteorologic and hydrologic data sets, synthetic data set and 3 representative field measured data sets (one is the annual rainfall data of Jinan station and the other two are annual streamflow series from two typical stations in China, Yingluoxia station on the Heihe River, which is little affected by human activities, and Lijin station on the Yellow River, which is greatly affected by human activities), are used to illustrate the approach. The AWDA-SE approach is compared with three conventional de-noising methods, including fixed-form threshold algorithm, Stein unbiased risk estimation algorithm, and minimax algorithm. Results show that the AWDA-SE approach separates effectively the signal and noise of the data sets and is found to be better than the conventional methods. Measures of assessment standards show that the developed approach can be employed to investigate noisy and short time series and can also be applied to other areas.

  14. Improper activation of D1 and D2 receptors leads to excess noise in prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Michael C.; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic system has been shown to control the amount of noise in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and likely plays an important role in working memory and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We developed a model that takes into account the known receptor distributions of D1 and D2 receptors, the changes these receptors have on neuron response properties, as well as identified circuitry involved in working memory. Our model suggests that D1 receptor under-stimulation in supragranular layers gates internal noise into the PFC leading to cognitive symptoms as has been proposed in attention disorders, while D2 over-stimulation gates noise into the PFC by over-activation of cortico-striatal projecting neurons in infragranular layers. We apply this model in the context of a memory-guided saccade paradigm and show deficits similar to those observed in schizophrenic patients. We also show set-shifting impairments similar to those observed in rodents with D1 and D2 receptor manipulations. We discuss how the introduction of noise through changes in D1 and D2 receptor activation may account for many of the symptoms of schizophrenia depending on where this dysfunction occurs in the PFC. PMID:25814948

  15. Variation in harbour porpoise activity in response to seismic survey noise

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Brookes, Kate L.; Graham, Isla M.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Animals exposed to anthropogenic disturbance make trade-offs between perceived risk and the cost of leaving disturbed areas. Impact assessments tend to focus on overt behavioural responses leading to displacement, but trade-offs may also impact individual energy budgets through reduced foraging performance. Previous studies found no evidence for broad-scale displacement of harbour porpoises exposed to impulse noise from a 10 day two-dimensional seismic survey. Here, we used an array of passive acoustic loggers coupled with calibrated noise measurements to test whether the seismic survey influenced the activity patterns of porpoises remaining in the area. We showed that the probability of recording a buzz declined by 15% in the ensonified area and was positively related to distance from the source vessel. We also estimated received levels at the hydrophones and characterized the noise response curve. Our results demonstrate how environmental impact assessments can be developed to assess more subtle effects of noise disturbance on activity patterns and foraging efficiency. PMID:24850891

  16. Predicting the effect of urban noise on the active space of avian vocal signals.

    PubMed

    Parris, Kirsten M; McCarthy, Michael A

    2013-10-01

    Urbanization changes the physical environment of nonhuman species but also markedly changes their acoustic environment. Urban noise interferes with acoustic communication in a range of animals, including birds, with potentially profound impacts on fitness. However, a mechanistic theory to predict which species of birds will be most affected by urban noise is lacking. We develop a mathematical model to predict the decrease in the active space of avian vocal signals after moving from quiet forest habitats to noisy urban habitats. We find that the magnitude of the decrease is largely a function of signal frequency. However, this relationship is not monotonic. A metaregression of observed increases in the frequency of birdsong in urban noise supports the model's predictions for signals with frequencies between 1.5 and 4 kHz. Using results of the metaregression and the model described above, we show that the expected gain in active space following observed frequency shifts is up to 12% and greatest for birds with signals at the lower end of this frequency range. Our generally applicable model, along with three predictions regarding the behavioral and population-level responses of birds to urban noise, represents an important step toward a theory of acoustic communication in urban habitats.

  17. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  18. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  19. Antifouling Surface Layers for Improved Signal-to-Noise of Particle-Based Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Annie; Kozak, Darby; Battersby, Bronwyn J.; Forrest, Robin M.; Scholler, Nathalie; Urban, Nicole; Trau, Matt

    2010-01-01

    A ten fold improvement in the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of an optically encoded silica particle-based immunoassay was achieved through incorporating a protein resistant poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) surface layer and optimizing antibody immobilization conditions. PEG was activated using 2,2,2-trifluoroethanesulfonyl chloride (tresyl) and required a minimum reaction time of 1.5 hrs. The activated PEG had a reactive half life of approximately 5 hrs when stored in acidified dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). By increasing the protein incubation time and concentration, a maximum antibody loading on the particle surface of 1.6×10−2 molecules per nm2 was achieved. The assay S/N ratio was assessed using a multiplexed multicomponent optically encoded species-specific immunoassay. Encoded particles were covalently grafted or nonspecifically coated with either bovine or mouse IgG for the simultaneous detection of complimentary anti-IgG `target' or uncomplimentary anti-IgG `noise'. The versatility and potential as a serum-based assay platform was demonstrated by immobilizing either a polyclonal antibody or an engineered single-chain variable fragment (scFv) capture probe on particles for the detection of the ovarian cancer biomarker, mesothelin (MSLN). The MLSN antigen was spiked into PBS buffer or 50% human serum. Both capture probe orientations and media conditions showed similar low level detection limits of 5 ng/mL; however, a 40% decrease in maximum signal intensity was observed for assays run in 50% serum. PMID:19928944

  20. Comparison of cryogenic W band low noise amplifier based on different III-V HEMT foundry process and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenziano, L.; Zannoni, M.; Mariotti, S.; Cremonini, A.; De Rosa, A.; Banfi, S.; Baó, A.; Gervasi, M.; Limiti, E.; Passerini, A.; Schiavone, F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a development activity for cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers based on HEMT technology for ground based and space-borne application. We have developed and realized two LNA design in W band, based on m-HEMT technology. MMIC chips have been manufactured by European laboratories and companies and assembled in test modules by our team. We compare performances with other technologies and manufacturers. LNA RF properties (noise figures, S-parameters) have been measured at room and cryogenic temperature and test results are reported in this paper. Performance are compared with those of state-of-the-art devices, as available in the literature. Strengths and improvements of this project are also discussed.

  1. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  2. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  3. Active Control of a Moving Noise SOURCE—EFFECT of Off-Axis Source Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, J.; PAN, J.; HODGSON, M.

    2002-03-01

    An optimally arranged multiple-channel active-control system is known to be able to create a large quiet zone in free space for a stationary primary noise source. When the primary noise source moves, the active control of the noise becomes much more difficult, as the primary noise field changes with time in space. In this case, the controller of the control system must respond fast enough to compensate for the change; much research has been focused on this issue. In this paper, it is shown that a moving source also causes difficulties from an acoustical perspective. A moving source not only changes continuously the strengths and phases of the sound field in the space, but also changes the wavefront of the primary sound field continuously. It is known that the efficiency of active noise control is determined mainly by the wavefront matching between the primary and control fields. To keep the control system effective in the case of a moving source, the wavefront of the control field needs to change, in order to continuously match the primary-wavefront change. This paper shows that there are limitations to the control-wavefront change. An optimally pre-arranged, multiple-channel control system is not able to construct a matching wavefront when the primary source moves outside a certain range. In other words, the control system is still able to create a large quiet zone only when the primary source moves within a range around the central axis of the control system. Both the location and the size of the quiet zone change with the location of the primary source.

  4. Mixed Mode Oscillations and Synchronous Activity in Noise Induced Modified Morris-Lecar Neural System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Mondal, Argha; Teka, Wondimu W.

    The modified three-dimensional (3D) Morris-Lecar (M-L) model is very useful to understand the spiking activities of neurons. The present article addresses the random dynamical behavior of a modified M-L model driven by a white Gaussian noise with mean zero and unit spectral density. The applied stimulus can be expressed as a random term. Such random perturbations are represented by a white Gaussian noise current added through the electrical potential of membrane of the excitatory principal cells. The properties of the stochastic system (perturbed one) and noise induced mixed mode oscillation are analyzed. The Lyapunov spectrum is computed to present the nature of the system dynamics. The noise intensity is varied while keeping fixed the predominant parameters of the model in their ranges and also observed the changes in the dynamical behavior of the system. The dynamical synchronization is studied in the coupled M-L systems interconnected by excitatory and inhibitory neurons with noisy electrical coupling and verified with similarity functions. This result suggests the potential benefits of noise and noise induced oscillations which have been observed in real neurons and how that affects the dynamics of the neural model as well as the coupled systems. The analysis reports that the modified M-L system which has the limit cycle behavior can show a type of phase locking behavior which follows either period adding (i.e. 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1) sequences or Farey sequences. For the coupled neural systems, complete synchronization is shown for sufficient noisy coupling strength.

  5. Lossy cardiac x-ray image compression based on acquisition noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijn, Frederik J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    1997-05-01

    In lossy medical image compression, the requirements for the preservation of diagnostic integrity cannot be easily formulated in terms of a perceptual model. Especially since, in reality, human visual perception is dependent on numerous factors such as the viewing conditions and psycho-visual factors. Therefore, we investigate the possibility to develop alternative measures for data loss, based on the characteristics of the acquisition system, in our case, a digital cardiac imaging system. In general, due to the low exposure, cardiac x-ray images tend to be relatively noisy. The main noise contributions are quantum noise and electrical noise. The electrical noise is not correlated with the signal. In addition, the signal can be transformed such that the correlated Poisson-distributed quantum noise is transformed into an additional zero-mean Gaussian noise source which is uncorrelated with the signal. Furthermore, the systems modulation transfer function imposes a known spatial-frequency limitation to the output signal. In the assumption that noise which is not correlated with the signal contains no diagnostic information, we have derived a compression measure based on the acquisition parameters of a digital cardiac imaging system. The measure is used for bit- assignment and quantization of transform coefficients. We present a blockwise-DCT compression algorithm which is based on the conventional JPEG-standard. However, the bit- assignment to the transform coefficients is now determined by an assumed noise variance for each coefficient, for a given set of acquisition parameters. Experiments with the algorithm indicate that a bit rate of 0.6 bit/pixel is feasible, without apparent loss of clinical information.

  6. A Population-Based Study on Nighttime Road Traffic Noise and Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Evandt, Jorunn; Oftedal, Bente; Hjertager Krog, Norun; Nafstad, Per; Schwarze, Per E; Marit Aasvang, Gunn

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate how nighttime road traffic noise relates to self-reported symptoms of insomnia and sleep medication use. We used questionnaire data from the population-based study Health and Environment in Oslo (HELMILO) (2009-2010; n = 13019). The insomnia symptoms difficulties falling asleep, awakenings during the night, and waking up too early in the morning as well as self-reported sleep medication use were included as outcomes. Modeled noise levels (Lnight) were assigned to each participant's home address. For selecting covariates to the statistical model, we used a directed acyclic graph. The associations between noise and sleep were analyzed using logistic regression models. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found an odds ratio (OR) of 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.09) for the association between traffic noise and difficulties falling asleep, in the total study population. For the association between traffic noise and awakenings during the night, the OR was 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00-1.08) and for waking up too early, the OR was 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11). The effect estimates are given per 5-dB increase in traffic noise level (Lnight). Self-reported sleep medication use was not statistically significantly associated with traffic noise exposure. In an adult population from Oslo, traffic noise was associated with difficulties falling asleep and waking up too early. These findings indicate that sleep quantity may be compromised for individuals living in areas highly exposed to nighttime traffic noise.

  7. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R; Seemungal, Barry M

    2016-09-07

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex. We show specifically

  8. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  9. Applications of Response Surface-Based Methods to Noise Analysis in the Conceptual Design of Revolutionary Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Geoffrey A.; Olson, Erik D.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of noise in today's air transportation system, there have arisen needs to incorporate noise considerations in the conceptual design of revolutionary aircraft. Through the use of response surfaces, complex noise models may be converted into polynomial equations for rapid and simplified evaluation. This conversion allows many of the commonly used response surface-based trade space exploration methods to be applied to noise analysis. This methodology is demonstrated using a noise model of a notional 300 passenger Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) transport. Response surfaces are created relating source noise levels of the BWB vehicle to its corresponding FAR-36 certification noise levels and the resulting trade space is explored. Methods demonstrated include: single point analysis, parametric study, an optimization technique for inverse analysis, sensitivity studies, and probabilistic analysis. Extended applications of response surface-based methods in noise analysis are also discussed.

  10. Reset noise suppression in two-dimensional CMOS photodiode pixels through column-based feedback-reset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, B.; Cunningham, T. J.; Hancock, B.; Yang, G.; Seshadri, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2002-01-01

    We present new CMOS photodiode imager pixel with ultra-low read noise through on-chip suppression of reset noise via column-based feedback circuitry. The noise reduction is achieved without introducing any image lag, and with insignificant reduction in quantum efficiency and full well.

  11. Noise generator for tinnitus treatment based on look-up tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uriz, Alejandro J.; Agüero, Pablo; Tulli, Juan C.; Castiñeira Moreira, Jorge; González, Esteban; Hidalgo, Roberto; Casadei, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of tinnitus by means of masking sounds allows to obtain a significant improve of the quality of life of the individual that suffer that condition. In view of that, it is possible to develop noise synthesizers based on random number generators in digital signal processors (DSP), which are used in almost any digital hearing aid devices. DSP architecture have limitations to implement a pseudo random number generator, due to it, the noise statistics can be not as good as expectations. In this paper, a technique to generate additive white gaussian noise (AWGN) or other types of filtered noise using coefficients stored in program memory of the DSP is proposed. Also, an implementation of the technique is carried out on a dsPIC from Microchip®. Objective experiments and experimental measurements are performed to analyze the proposed technique.

  12. GIS-Based Noise Simulation Open Source Software: N-GNOIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Sharma, A.; Kumar, M.; Shende, V.; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Geographical information system (GIS)-based noise simulation software (N-GNOIS) has been developed to simulate the noise scenario due to point and mobile sources considering the impact of geographical features and meteorological parameters. These have been addressed in the software through attenuation modules of atmosphere, vegetation and barrier. N-GNOIS is a user friendly, platform-independent and open geospatial consortia (OGC) compliant software. It has been developed using open source technology (QGIS) and open source language (Python). N-GNOIS has unique features like cumulative impact of point and mobile sources, building structure and honking due to traffic. Honking is the most common phenomenon in developing countries and is frequently observed on any type of roads. N-GNOIS also helps in designing physical barrier and vegetation cover to check the propagation of noise and acts as a decision making tool for planning and management of noise component in environmental impact assessment (EIA) studies.

  13. [The noise filtering and baseline correction for harmonic spectrum based on wavelet transform].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Zhao, Xue-Hong; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Ya-Jun; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    The problem of noise and baseline drift is a hot topic in infrared spectral harmonic detection system. This paper presents a new algorithm based on wavelet transform Mallet decomposition to solve the problem of eliminating a variety of complex noise and baseline drift in the harmonic detection. In the algorithm, the appropriate wavelet function and decomposition level were selected to decomposed the noise, baseline drift and useful signal in the harmonic curve into different frequency bands. the bands' information was analysed and a detecting band was set, then the information in useful frequency was reserved by zeroing method of treatment and the coefficient of the threshold. We can just use once transform and reconstruction to remove interference noise and baseline from double-harmonic signal by applying the wavelet transform technique to the harmonic detection spectrum pretreatment. Experiments show that the wavelet transform method can be used to different harmonic detection systems and has universal applicability.

  14. Vibration isolation analysis of clutches based on trouble shooting of vehicle accelerating noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Lai; Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Jing, Xingjian; Ahmed, Waizuddin

    2016-11-01

    Vehicle accelerating noise is a troublesome issue commonly existing in automobiles, leading to negative passenger experience. Considering real experimental results and practical issues, a nonlinear 3-degree of freedom (DOF) torsional model of the clutch system is developed for reducing abnormal noise during vehicle accelerating. In this model, the nonlinear characteristics of the multi-staged clutch damper and the gear backlash are carefully studied. This greatly facilitates the analysis of the vibration transmission characteristics of the clutch and helps understanding of the influence of each critical physical parameter on noise generation. To reduce the accelerating noise, an optimization method for the clutch dynamics is proposed, based on the parameter analysis results, and the effectiveness is validated both in simulations and experiments.

  15. Ground runup noise suppression program. Part 3: Dry suppressor technology base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, R.; Lepor, M.

    1982-06-01

    The Ground Runup Noise Suppression Final Report consists of three documents. The first document, Part 1, is an executive summary which provides a brief, technical description and overview of the program conducted at the Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC). The second document, Part 2, provides a documented history of NOSC's participation in the Dry Jet Noise Suppression Program. This document, Part 3, is a technical summary of the information and data developed during the program. This report integrates predictive techniques, scale-model test results, and full-scale test results for the new air-cooled noise suppressor technology. All program data are summarized to assist the architect/engineer in the design of air-cooled noise suppressors. Included are aerothermal, aeroacoustic, and pressure data in addition to acoustic material life cycle information. Cost/benefit techniques are included to aid in the selection of air-cooled or water-cooled facilities based on operational requirements.

  16. Roughness modelling based on human auditory perception for sound quality evaluation of vehicle interior noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Shen, G. Q.; Guo, H.; Tang, X. L.; Hamade, T.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a roughness model, which is based on human auditory perception (HAP) and known as HAP-RM, is developed for the sound quality evaluation (SQE) of vehicle noise. First, the interior noise signals are measured for a sample vehicle and prepared for roughness modelling. The HAP-RM model is based on the process of sound transfer and perception in the human auditory system by combining the structural filtering function and nonlinear perception characteristics of the ear. The HAP-RM model is applied to the measured vehicle interior noise signals by considering the factors that affect hearing, such as the modulation and carrier frequencies, the time and frequency maskings and the correlations of the critical bands. The HAP-RM model is validated by jury tests. An anchor-scaled scoring method (ASM) is used for subjective evaluations in the jury tests. The verification results show that the novel developed model can accurately calculate vehicle noise roughness below 0.6 asper. Further investigation shows that the total roughness of the vehicle interior noise can mainly be attributed to frequency components below 12 Bark. The time masking effects of the modelling procedure enable the application of the HAP-RM model to stationary and nonstationary vehicle noise signals and the SQE of other sound-related signals in engineering problems.

  17. Noise-based logic: Binary, multi-valued, or fuzzy, with optional superposition of logic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.

    2009-03-01

    A new type of deterministic (non-probabilistic) computer logic system inspired by the stochasticity of brain signals is shown. The distinct values are represented by independent stochastic processes: independent voltage (or current) noises. The orthogonality of these processes provides a natural way to construct binary or multi-valued logic circuitry with arbitrary number N of logic values by using analog circuitry. Moreover, the logic values on a single wire can be made a (weighted) superposition of the N distinct logic values. Fuzzy logic is also naturally represented by a two-component superposition within the binary case ( N=2). Error propagation and accumulation are suppressed. Other relevant advantages are reduced energy dissipation and leakage current problems, and robustness against circuit noise and background noises such as 1/f, Johnson, shot and crosstalk noise. Variability problems are also non-existent because the logic value is an AC signal. A similar logic system can be built with orthogonal sinusoidal signals (different frequency or orthogonal phase) however that has an extra 1/N type slowdown compared to the noise-based logic system with increasing number of N furthermore it is less robust against time delay effects than the noise-based counterpart.

  18. An ultralow noise current amplifier based on superconducting quantum interference device for high sensitivity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Russo, M.

    2011-01-01

    An integrated ultrahigh sensitive current amplifier based on a niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed. The sensor design is based on a multiturn signal coil coupled to a suitable SQUID magnetometer. The signal coil consists of 60 square niobium turns tightly coupled to a superconducting flux transformer of a SQUID magnetometer. The primary coil (pick-up coil) of the flux transformer has been suitably designed in order to accommodate the multiturn input coil. It has a side length of 10 mm and a width of 2.4 mm. In such a way we have obtained a signal current to magnetic flux transfer coefficient (current sensitivity) as low as 62 nA/Φ0. The sensor has been characterized in liquid helium by using a direct coupling low noise readout electronic and a standard modulated electronic in flux locked loop configuration for the noise measurements. Beside the circuit complexity, the sensor has exhibited a smooth and free resonance voltage-flux characteristic guaranteeing a reliable and a stable working operation. Considering a SQUID magnetic flux noise of SΦ1/2 = 1.8 μΦ0/Hz1/2 at T = 4.2 K, a current noise as low as 110 fA/Hz1/2 is obtained. Such a value is about a factor two less than the noise of other SQUIDs of the same category. As an application, Nyquist noise measurements of integrated test resistors using the current sensing noise thermometer technique are reported. Due to its high performance such a sensor can be employed in all applications requiring an extremely current sensitivity like the readout of the gravitational wave detectors and the current sensing noise thermometry.

  19. An ultralow noise current amplifier based on superconducting quantum interference device for high sensitivity applications.

    PubMed

    Granata, C; Vettoliere, A; Russo, M

    2011-01-01

    An integrated ultrahigh sensitive current amplifier based on a niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed. The sensor design is based on a multiturn signal coil coupled to a suitable SQUID magnetometer. The signal coil consists of 60 square niobium turns tightly coupled to a superconducting flux transformer of a SQUID magnetometer. The primary coil (pick-up coil) of the flux transformer has been suitably designed in order to accommodate the multiturn input coil. It has a side length of 10 mm and a width of 2.4 mm. In such a way we have obtained a signal current to magnetic flux transfer coefficient (current sensitivity) as low as 62 nA∕Φ(0). The sensor has been characterized in liquid helium by using a direct coupling low noise readout electronic and a standard modulated electronic in flux locked loop configuration for the noise measurements. Beside the circuit complexity, the sensor has exhibited a smooth and free resonance voltage-flux characteristic guaranteeing a reliable and a stable working operation. Considering a SQUID magnetic flux noise of S(Φ)(1∕2) = 1.8 μΦ(0)∕Hz(1∕2) at T = 4.2 K, a current noise as low as 110 fA∕Hz(1∕2) is obtained. Such a value is about a factor two less than the noise of other SQUIDs of the same category. As an application, Nyquist noise measurements of integrated test resistors using the current sensing noise thermometer technique are reported. Due to its high performance such a sensor can be employed in all applications requiring an extremely current sensitivity like the readout of the gravitational wave detectors and the current sensing noise thermometry.

  20. Experimental Study of Active Techniques for Blade/Vortex Interaction Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiki, Noboru; Murashige, Atsushi; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi

    This paper presents the experimental results of the effect of Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Active Flap on the Blade/Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Wind tunnel tests were performed with a 1-bladed rotor system to evaluate the simplified BVI phenomenon avoiding the complicated aerodynamic interference which is characteristically and inevitably caused by a multi-bladed rotor. Another merit to use this 1-bladed rotor system is that the several objective active techniques can be evaluated under the same condition installed in the same rotor system. The effects of the active techniques on the BVI noise reduction were evaluated comprehensively by the sound pressure, the blade/vortex miss distance obtained by Laser light Sheet (LLS), the blade surface pressure distribution and the tip vortex structure by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The correlation among these quantities to describe the effect of the active techniques on the BVI conditions is well obtained. The experiments show that the blade/vortex miss distance is more dominant for BVI noise than the other two BVI governing factors, such as blade lift and vortex strength at the moment of BVI.

  1. Cross-correlation-based earthquake relocation and ambient noise imaging at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. J.; Waldhauser, F.; Tolstoy, M.; Wilcock, W. S. D.

    2016-12-01

    The seismic network that was installed on Axial Seamount as part of the Ocean Observatory Initiative's Cabled Array has been streaming live data since November 2014, encompassing an eruption in April-May of 2015. The network includes two broadband and five short-period seismometers spanning the southern half of the caldera. Almost 200,000 local earthquakes were detected in the first year of operation. Earthquake locations based on phase picks delineate outward dipping ring faults inferred to have accommodated deflation and guided dike propagation during the eruption (Wilcock et al., submitted). We will present results from our current effort of computing cross-correlation-based double-difference hypocenter locations to derive a more detailed image of the structures that provide insight into the active processes leading up to, during, and after the volcano's eruption. The new high-resolution hypocenters will form the base catalog for real-time double-difference monitoring of the seismicity recorded by the Cabled Array, allowing for high-precision evaluation of variation in seismogenic properties. We will also present results of measurements of temporal velocity changes associated with the eruption using seismic noise cross-correlations. This method has the potential to reveal areas of dike injection and magma withdrawal, as well as for real-time monitoring of temporal velocity variations associated with active volcanic processes.

  2. Root locus analysis and design of the adaptation process in active noise control.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H

    2012-10-01

    This paper applies root locus theory to develop a graphical tool for the analysis and design of adaptive active noise control systems. It is shown that the poles of the adaptation process performed in these systems move on typical trajectories in the z-plane as the adaptation step-size varies. Based on this finding, the dominant root of the adaptation process and its trajectory can be determined. The first contribution of this paper is formulating parameters of the adaptation process root locus. The next contribution is introducing a mechanism for modifying the trajectory of the dominant root in the root locus. This mechanism creates a single open loop zero in the original root locus. It is shown that appropriate localization of this zero can cause the dominant root of the locus to be pushed toward the origin, and thereby the adaptation process becomes faster. The validity of the theoretical findings is confirmed in an experimental setup which is implemented using real-time multi-threading and multi-core processing techniques.

  3. Insights into seasonal active layer dynamics by monitoring relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Cole, C. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Screaton, E.

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal freeze and thaw of the active layer above permafrost results in dramatic changes in seismic velocity. We used daily cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at Poker Flat Research Range in central Alaska to create a nearly continuous 2-year record of relative velocity changes. This analysis required that we modify the Moving Window Cross-spectral Analysis technique used in the Python package MSNoise to reduce the occurrence of cycle skipping. Results show relative velocity variations follow a seasonal pattern, where velocities decrease in late spring through the summer months and increase through the fall and winter months. This timing is consistent with active layer freeze and thaw in this region. These results were compared to a suite of ground- and satellite-based measurements to identify relationships. A decrease in relative velocities in late spring closely follows the timing of snow melt recorded in nearby ground temperatures and snow-depth logs. This transition also aligns with a decrease in the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) derived from multi-temporal Landsat 8 satellite imagery collected over the study site. A gradual increase in relative velocity through the fall months occurs when temperatures below ground surface remain near zero. We suggest this is due to latent heat feedbacks that keep temperatures constant while active layer velocities increase from continued ice formation. This highlights the value in velocity variations for capturing details on the freezing process. In addition, spatial variations in the magnitude of velocity changes are consistent with thaw probe surveys. Exploring relationships with remote sensing may allow indirect measurements of thaw over larger areas and further surface wave analysis may allow for thickness evolution measurements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for

  4. Performance Evaluation of Multichannel Adaptive Algorithms for Local Active Noise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DE DIEGO, M.; GONZALEZ, A.

    2001-07-01

    This paper deals with the development of a multichannel active noise control (ANC) system inside an enclosed space. The purpose is to design a real practical system which works well in local ANC applications. Moreover, the algorithm implemented in the adaptive controller should be robust, of low computational complexity and it should manage to generate a uniform useful-size zone of quite in order to allow the head motion of a person seated on a seat inside a car. Experiments were carried out under semi-anechoic and listening room conditions to verify the successful implementation of the multichannel system. The developed prototype consists of an array of up to four microphones used as error sensors mounted on the headrest of a seat place inside the enclosure. One loudspeaker was used as single primary source and two secondary sources were placed facing the seat. The aim of this multichannel system is to reduce the sound pressure levels in an area around the error sensors, following a local control strategy. When using this technique, the cancellation points are not only the error sensor positions but an area around them, which is measured by using a monitoring microphone. Different multichannel adaptive algorithms for ANC have been analyzed and their performance verified. Multiple error algorithms are used in order to cancel out different types of primary noise (engine noise and random noise) with several configurations (up to four channels system). As an alternative to the multiple error LMS algorithm (multichannel version of the filtered-X LMS algorithm, MELMS), the least maximum mean squares (LMMS) and the scanning error-LMS algorithm have been developed in this work in order to reduce computational complexity and achieve a more uniform residual field. The ANC algorithms were programmed on a digital signal processing board equipped with a TMS320C40 floating point DSP processor. Measurements concerning real-time experiments on local noise reduction in two

  5. In Situ Active Control of Noise in a 4-Tesla MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfeng; Rudd, Brent; Lim, Teik C.; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed active noise control (ANC) system for the reduction of the acoustic noise emission generated by a 4 T MRI scanner during operation and to assess the feasibility of developing an ANC device that can be deployed in situ. Materials and Methods Three typical scanning sequences, namely EPI (echo planar imaging), GEMS (gradient echo multi-slice) and MDEFT (Modified Driven Equilibrium Fourier Transform), were used for evaluating the performance of the ANC system, which was composed of a magnetic compatible headset and a multiple reference feedforward filtered-x least mean square controller. Results The greatest reduction, about 55 dB, was achieved at the harmonic at a frequency of 1.3 kHz in the GEMS case. Approximately 21 dB and 30 dBA overall reduction was achieved for GEMS noise across the entire audible frequency range. For the MDEFT sequence, the control system achieved 14 dB and 14 dBA overall reduction in the audible frequency range, while 13 dB and 14 dBA reduction was obtained for the EPI case. Conclusion The result is highly encouraging because it shows great potential for treating MRI noise with an ANC application during real time scanning. PMID:21751284

  6. Effects of three activities on annoyance responses to recorded flyovers. [human tolerance of jet aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.; Shepherd, W. T.; Fletcher, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Human subjects participated in an experiment in which they were engaged in TV viewing, telephone listening, or reverie (no activity) for a 1/2-hour session. During the session, they were exposed to a series of recorded aircraft sounds at the rate of one flight every 2 minutes. At each session, four levels of flyover noise, separated by 5 db increments were presented several times in a Latin Square balanced sequence. The peak levels of the noisiest flyover in any session was fixed at 95, 90, 85, 75, or 70 db. At the end of the test session, subjects recorded their responses to the aircraft sounds, using a bipolar scale which covered the range from very pleasant to extremely annoying. Responses to aircraft noises are found to be significantly affected by the particular activity in which the subjects are engaged.

  7. Active noise cancellation using MEMS accelerometers for motion-tolerant wearable bio-sensors.

    PubMed

    Harry Asada, H; Jiang, Hong-Hui; Gibbs, Peter

    2004-01-01

    An active noise cancellation method using a MEMS accelerometer is developed for recovering corrupted wearable sensor signals due to body motion. The method is developed for a finger ring PPG sensor, the signal of which is susceptive to the hand motion of the wearer. A MEMS accelerometer (ACC) imbedded in the PPG sensor detects the hand acceleration, and is used for recovering the corrupted PPG signal. The correlation between the acceleration and the distorted PPG signal is analyzed, and a low-order FIR model relating the signal distortion to the hand acceleration is obtained. The model parameters are identified in real time with a recursive least square method. Experiments show that the active noise cancellation method can recover ring PPG sensor signals corrupted with 2G of acceleration in the longitudinal direction of the digital artery.

  8. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  9. A Parameter Identification Method for Helicopter Noise Source Identification and Physics-Based Semi-Empirical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric, II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    A new physics-based parameter identification method for rotor harmonic noise sources is developed using an acoustic inverse simulation technique. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. This new method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, allowing accurate estimates of BVI noise to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions.

  10. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  11. Activation barrier scaling and crossover for noise-induced switching in micromechanical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Chan, H B; Stambaugh, C

    2007-08-10

    We explore fluctuation-induced switching in parametrically driven micromechanical torsional oscillators. The oscillators possess one, two, or three stable attractors depending on the modulation frequency. Noise induces transitions between the coexisting attractors. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barriers are found to have a power law dependence on frequency detuning with critical exponents that are in agreement with predicted universal scaling relationships. At large detuning, we observe a crossover to a different power law dependence with an exponent that is device specific.

  12. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  13. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  14. Research on strategy marine noise map based on i4ocean platform: Constructing flow and key approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Baoxiang; Chen, Ge; Han, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Noise level in a marine environment has raised extensive concern in the scientific community. The research is carried out on i4Ocean platform following the process of ocean noise model integrating, noise data extracting, processing, visualizing, and interpreting, ocean noise map constructing and publishing. For the convenience of numerical computation, based on the characteristics of ocean noise field, a hybrid model related to spatial locations is suggested in the propagation model. The normal mode method K/I model is used for far field and ray method CANARY model is used for near field. Visualizing marine ambient noise data is critical to understanding and predicting marine noise for relevant decision making. Marine noise map can be constructed on virtual ocean scene. The systematic marine noise visualization framework includes preprocessing, coordinate transformation interpolation, and rendering. The simulation of ocean noise depends on realistic surface. Then the dynamic water simulation gird was improved with GPU fusion to achieve seamless combination with the visualization result of ocean noise. At the same time, the profile and spherical visualization include space, and time dimensionality were also provided for the vertical field characteristics of ocean ambient noise. Finally, marine noise map can be published with grid pre-processing and multistage cache technology to better serve the public.

  15. Adaptive modulation of bilateral filtering based on a practical noise model for streaking and noise reduction in multi-slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Jacobsen, Megan; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Fletcher, Joel G.; DeLone, David R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2010-04-01

    We have recently developed a locally-adaptive method for noise control in CT based upon bilateral filtering. Different from the previous adaptive filters, which were locally adaptive by adjusting the filter strength according to local photon statistics, our use of bilateral filtering in projection data incorporates a practical CT noise model and takes into account the local structural characteristics, and thus can preserve edge information in the projection data and maintain the spatial resolution. Despite the incorporation of the CT noise model and local structural characteristics in the bilateral filtering, the noise-resolution properties of the filtered image are still highly dependent on predefined parameters that control the weighting factors in the bilateral filtering. An inappropriate selection of these parameters may result in a loss of spatial resolution or an insufficient reduction of noise. In this work, we employed an adaptive strategy to modulate the bilateral filtering strength according to the noise-equivalent photon numbers determined from each projection measurement. We applied the proposed technique to head/neck angiographic CT exams, which had highly non-uniform attenuation levels during the scan. The results demonstrated that the technique can effectively reduce the noise and streaking artifacts caused by high attenuation, while maintaining the reconstruction accuracy in less attenuating regions.

  16. A Noise Level Prediction Method Based on Electro-Mechanical Frequency Response Function for Capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective. PMID:24349105

  17. Receptance based structural modification in a simple brake-clutch model for squeal noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarraga, Ondiz; Ulacia, Ibai; Abete, José Manuel; Ouyang, Huajiang

    2017-06-01

    Unlike brake squeal, brake-clutch squeal has rarely been studied, even though the cause of squeal noise is identical - dry friction acting at the contact interface. In this paper, a combined theoretical and experimental study is reported on squeal noise of a brake-clutch. On the theoretical side, a receptance-based inverse dynamic method is adopted to identify the mass or stiffness required to split the coupled modes of a brake-clutch model to achieve noise suppression. On the experimental side, the theoretically identified stiffness is implemented on the brake-clutch test rig in the form of a grounded spring and it is thus shown that the actual structural modification has removed the squeal noise. This is the first time that a theoretically derived structural modification is made on a brake-clutch model and shown to be able of completely suppressing actual squeal noise. This study establishes a way of suppressing friction-induced high-frequency noise through structural modification.

  18. Cross-correlations of diffuse noise in an ocean environment using eigenvalue based statistical inference.

    PubMed

    Menon, Ravishankar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2012-11-01

    Cross-correlations of diffuse noise fields can be used to extract environmental information. The influence of directional sources (usually ships) often results in a bias of the travel time estimates obtained from the cross-correlations. Using an array of sensors, insights from random matrix theory on the behavior of the eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix (SCM) in an isotropic noise field are used to isolate the diffuse noise component from the directional sources. A sequential hypothesis testing of the eigenvalues of the SCM reveals eigenvalues dominated by loud sources that are statistical outliers for the assumed diffuse noise model. Travel times obtained from cross-correlations using only the diffuse noise component (i.e., by discarding or attenuating the outliers) converge to the predicted travel times based on the known array sensor spacing and measured sound speed at the site and are stable temporally (i.e., unbiased estimates). Data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach and that the signal-to-noise ratio builds up as the square root of time, as predicted by theory.

  19. The design of synthesized structural acoustic sensors for active control of interior noise with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. S.; Cheng, L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using synthesized structural acoustic sensors (SSAS) for active noise control inside irregularly shaped enclosures is investigated. A SSAS consists of a cluster of inter-connected discrete PVDF elements, located on the surface of a vibrating structure enclosing a sound field. An optimal design ensures the sensor output to be directly related to the acoustical potential energy inside the enclosure. Hence, synthesized structural acoustic sensors can provide error signals for an active noise control system, and the use of microphones inside the enclosure can be avoided. A cylindrical shell with a floor partition, which can be used to model an aircraft cabin, is used as a test case. PZT actuators are used as control actuators. Both SISO (single input and single output) and MIMO (multi-input and multi-output) control systems are optimally designed using Genetic Algorithms and implemented with a Filtered-X Feedforward LMS (least-mean-square) controller. Their control performances are evaluated with different types of disturbances. To show the effectiveness of the optimal design approach, some non-optimal control systems are also tested and compared with the optimal one. It is shown that with optimally designed SSAS, an active structural acoustic control system can effectively reduce noise inside the enclosures without using any acoustic transducers.

  20. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavali, Arvind K.; Wong, Victor C.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-12-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a ‘molecular switch’ controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance.

  1. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Arvind K.; Wong, Victor C.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a ‘molecular switch’ controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance. PMID:26666681

  2. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thomas; Juergen Engel, Klaus; Roessl, Ewald

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  3. Noise suppression for energy-resolved CT using similarity-based non-local filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Joe; Wang, Tonghe; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2016-03-01

    In energy-resolved CT, images are reconstructed independently at different energy levels, resulting in images with different qualities but the same structures. We propose a similarity-based non-local filtration method to extract structural information from these images for noise suppression. For each pixel, we calculate its similarity to other pixels based on CT number. The calculation is repeated on each image at different energy levels and similarity values are averaged to generate a similarity matrix. Noise suppression is achieved by multiplying the image vector by the similarity matrix. Multiple scans on a tabletop CT system are used to simulate 6-channel energy-resolved CT, with energies ranging from 75 to 125 kVp. Phantom studies show that the proposed method improves average contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of seven materials on the 75 kVp image by a factor of 22. Compared with averaging CT images for noise suppression, our method achieves a higher CNR and reduces the CT number error of iodine solutions from 16.5% to 3.5% and the overall image root of mean-square error (RMSE) from 3.58% to 0.93%. On the phantom with line-pair structures, our algorithm reduces noise standard deviation (STD) by a factor of 23 while maintaining 7 lp/cm spatial resolution. Additionally, anthropomorphic head phantom studies show noise STD reduction by a factor or 26 with no loss of spatial resolution. The noise suppression achieved by the similarity-based method is clinically attractive, especially for CNRs of iodine in contrast-enhanced CT.

  4. Object discrimination through active electrolocation: Shape recognition and the influence of electrical noise.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Burt de Perera, Theresa; von der Emde, Gerhard

    2016-12-12

    The weakly electric fish Gnathonemus petersii can recognise objects using active electrolocation. Here, we tested two aspects of object recognition; first whether shape recognition might be influenced by movement of the fish, and second whether object discrimination is affected by the presence of electrical noise from conspecifics. (i) Unlike other object features, such as size or volume, no parameter within a single electrical image has been found that encodes object shape. We investigated whether shape recognition might be facilitated by movement-induced modulations (MIM) of the set of electrical images that are created as a fish swims past an object. Fish were trained to discriminate between pairs of objects that either created similar or dissimilar levels of MIM of the electrical images. As predicted, the fish were able to discriminate between objects up to a longer distance if there was a large difference in MIM between the objects than if there was a small difference. This supports an involvement of MIMs in shape recognition but the use of other cues cannot be excluded. (ii) Electrical noise might impair object recognition if the noise signals overlap with the EODs of an electrolocating fish. To avoid jamming, we predicted that fish might employ pulsing strategies to prevent overlaps. To investigate the influence of electrical noise on discrimination performance, two fish were tested either in the presence of a conspecific or of playback signals and the electric signals were recorded during the experiments. The fish were surprisingly immune to jamming by conspecifics: While the discrimination performance of one fish dropped to chance level when more than 22% of its EODs overlapped with the noise signals, the performance of the other fish was not impaired even when all its EODs overlapped. Neither of the fish changed their pulsing behaviour, suggesting that they did not use any kind of jamming avoidance strategy.

  5. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using a discrete wavelet transform-based image fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Sung Yun

    2015-01-01

    Here, the speckle noise in ultrasonic images is removed using an image fusion-based denoising method. To optimize the denoising performance, each discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and filtering technique was analyzed and compared. In addition, the performances were compared in order to derive the optimal input conditions. To evaluate the speckle noise removal performance, an image fusion algorithm was applied to the ultrasound images, and comparatively analyzed with the original image without the algorithm. As a result, applying DWT and filtering techniques caused information loss and noise characteristics, and did not represent the most significant noise reduction performance. Conversely, an image fusion method applying SRAD-original conditions preserved the key information in the original image, and the speckle noise was removed. Based on such characteristics, the input conditions of SRAD-original had the best denoising performance with the ultrasound images. From this study, the best denoising technique proposed based on the results was confirmed to have a high potential for clinical application.

  6. QR code based noise-free optical encryption and decryption of a gray scale image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shuming; Zou, Wenbin; Li, Xia

    2017-03-01

    In optical encryption systems, speckle noise is one major challenge in obtaining high quality decrypted images. This problem can be addressed by employing a QR code based noise-free scheme. Previous works have been conducted for optically encrypting a few characters or a short expression employing QR codes. This paper proposes a practical scheme for optically encrypting and decrypting a gray-scale image based on QR codes for the first time. The proposed scheme is compatible with common QR code generators and readers. Numerical simulation results reveal the proposed method can encrypt and decrypt an input image correctly.

  7. Cortical activity predicts which older adults recognize speech in noise and when.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Kenneth I; Kuchinsky, Stefanie E; Ahlstrom, Jayne B; Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A

    2015-03-04

    Speech recognition in noise can be challenging for older adults and elicits elevated activity throughout a cingulo-opercular network that is hypothesized to monitor and modify behaviors to optimize performance. A word recognition in noise experiment was used to test the hypothesis that cingulo-opercular engagement provides performance benefit for older adults. Healthy older adults (N = 31; 50-81 years of age; mean pure tone thresholds <32 dB HL from 0.25 to 8 kHz, best ear; species: human) performed word recognition in multitalker babble at 2 signal-to-noise ratios (SNR = +3 or +10 dB) during a sparse sampling fMRI experiment. Elevated cingulo-opercular activity was associated with an increased likelihood of correct recognition on the following trial independently of SNR and performance on the preceding trial. The cingulo-opercular effect increased for participants with the best overall performance. These effects were lower for older adults compared with a younger, normal-hearing adult sample (N = 18). Visual cortex activity also predicted trial-level recognition for the older adults, which resulted from discrete decreases in activity before errors and occurred for the oldest adults with the poorest recognition. Participants demonstrating larger visual cortex effects also had reduced fractional anisotropy in an anterior portion of the left inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus, which projects between frontal and occipital regions where activity predicted word recognition. Together, the results indicate that older adults experience performance benefit from elevated cingulo-opercular activity, but not to the same extent as younger adults, and that declines in attentional control can limit word recognition.

  8. Gabor-based anisotropic diffusion for speckle noise reduction in medical ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Han, Hong; Ji, Chunhong; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenping

    2014-06-01

    In ultrasound (US), optical coherence tomography, synthetic aperture radar, and other coherent imaging systems, images are corrupted by multiplicative speckle noise that obscures image interpretation. An anisotropic diffusion (AD) method based on the Gabor transform, named Gabor-based anisotropic diffusion (GAD), is presented to suppress speckle in medical ultrasonography. First, an edge detector using the Gabor transform is proposed to capture directionality of tissue edges and discriminate edges from noise. Then the edge detector is embedded into the partial differential equation of AD to guide the diffusion process and iteratively denoise images. To enhance GAD's adaptability, parameters controlling diffusion are determined from a fully formed speckle region that is automatically detected. We evaluate the GAD on synthetic US images simulated with three models and clinical images acquired in vivo. Compared with seven existing speckle reduction methods, the GAD is superior to other methods in terms of noise reduction and detail preservation.

  9. Performance of an Active Noise Control System for Fan Tones Using Vane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Curtis, Alan R. D.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Remington, Paul J.

    2000-01-01

    An Active Noise Control (ANC) system for ducted fan noise was built that uses actuators located in stator vanes. The custom designed actuators A,ere piezoelectric benders manufactured using THUNDER technology. The ANC system was tested in the NASA Active Noise Control Fan rig. A total of 168 actuators in 28 stator vanes were used (six per vane). Simultaneous inlet and exhaust acoustic power level reductions were demonstrated for a fan modal structure that contained two radial modes in each direction. Total circumferential mode power levels were reduced by up to 9 dB in the inlet and 3 dB in the exhaust. The corresponding total 2BPF tone level reductions were by 6 dB in the inlet and 2 dB in the exhaust. Farfield sound pressure level reductions of up to 17 dB were achieved at the peak mode lobe angle. The performance of the system was limited by the constraints of the power amplifiers and the presence of control spillover. Simpler control/actuator systems using carefully selected subsets of the full system and random simulated failures of up to 7% of the actuators were investigated. (The actuators were robust and none failed during the test). Useful reductions still occurred under these conditions.

  10. Hearing an illusory vowel in noise: suppression of auditory cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Lars; Vanbussel, Mieke; Hausfeld, Lars; Başkent, Deniz; Formisano, Elia; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2012-06-06

    Human hearing is constructive. For example, when a voice is partially replaced by an extraneous sound (e.g., on the telephone due to a transmission problem), the auditory system may restore the missing portion so that the voice can be perceived as continuous (Miller and Licklider, 1950; for review, see Bregman, 1990; Warren, 1999). The neural mechanisms underlying this continuity illusion have been studied mostly with schematic stimuli (e.g., simple tones) and are still a matter of debate (for review, see Petkov and Sutter, 2011). The goal of the present study was to elucidate how these mechanisms operate under more natural conditions. Using psychophysics and electroencephalography (EEG), we assessed simultaneously the perceived continuity of a human vowel sound through interrupting noise and the concurrent neural activity. We found that vowel continuity illusions were accompanied by a suppression of the 4 Hz EEG power in auditory cortex (AC) that was evoked by the vowel interruption. This suppression was stronger than the suppression accompanying continuity illusions of a simple tone. Finally, continuity perception and 4 Hz power depended on the intactness of the sound that preceded the vowel (i.e., the auditory context). These findings show that a natural sound may be restored during noise due to the suppression of 4 Hz AC activity evoked early during the noise. This mechanism may attenuate sudden pitch changes, adapt the resistance of the auditory system to extraneous sounds across auditory scenes, and provide a useful model for assisted hearing devices.

  11. Compact, Lightweight, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Based Acoustic Liners for Reducing Subsonic Jet Aircraft Engine Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Grady, Joseph E.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments have reduced fan and jet noise contributions to overall subsonic aircraft jet-engine noise. Now, aircraft designers are turning their attention toward reducing engine core noise. The NASA Glenn Research Center and NASA Langley Research Center have teamed to investigate the development of a compact, lightweight acoustic liner based on oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials. The NASA team has built upon an existing oxide/oxide CMC sandwich structure concept that provides monotonal noise reduction. Oxide/oxide composites have good high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, which could allow them to perform as core liners at temperatures up to 1000C (1832F), and even higher depending on the selection of the composite constituents. NASA has initiated the evaluation of CMC-based liners that use cells of different lengths (variable-depth channels) or effective lengths to achieve broadband noise reduction. Reducing the overall liner thickness is also a major goal, to minimize the volume occupied by the liner. As a first step toward demonstrating the feasibility of our concepts, an oxide/oxide CMC acoustic testing article with different channel lengths was tested. Our approach, summary of test results, current status, and goals for the future are reported.

  12. Association between aircraft, road and railway traffic noise and depression in a large case-control study based on secondary data.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Andreas; Hegewald, Janice; Seidler, Anna Lene; Schubert, Melanie; Wagner, Mandy; Dröge, Patrik; Haufe, Eva; Schmitt, Jochen; Swart, Enno; Zeeb, Hajo

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between traffic noise and depression providing inconclusive results. This large case-control study is the first to assess and directly compare depression risks by aircraft, road traffic and railway noise. The study population included individuals aged ≥40 years that were insured by three large statutory health insurance funds and were living in the region of Frankfurt international airport. Address-specific exposure to aircraft, road and railway traffic noise in 2005 was estimated. Based on insurance claims and prescription data, 77,295 cases with a new clinical depression diagnosis between 2006 and 2010 were compared with 578,246 control subjects. For road traffic noise, a linear exposure-risk relationship was found with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.17 (95% CI=1.10-1.25) for 24-h continuous sound levels ≥70dB. For aircraft noise, the risk estimates reached a maximum OR of 1.23 (95% CI=1.19-1.28) at 50-55dB and decreased at higher exposure categories. For railway noise, risk estimates peaked at 60-65dB (OR=1.15, 95% CI=1.08-1.22). The highest OR of 1.42 (95% CI=1.33-1.52) was found for a combined exposure to noise above 50dB from all three sources. This study indicates that traffic noise exposure might lead to depression. As a potential explanation for the decreasing risks at high traffic noise levels, vulnerable people might actively cope with noise (e.g. insulate or move away). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Noise suppression of the reconstruction of infrared digital holography based on pyramid-based bilateral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Yang, Chao; Cao, Haijie

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a new technique of speckle noise suppressing of infrared digital hologram. This technique uses the Laplacian pyramid to separate the original reconstructed hologram into different layers, and conducts the bilateral filter onto each layer to discriminate the noise and the detail information. Because not all noise can be discriminated by the bilateral filter, we design an improved median filter to filter the leftover noise. The detail information of each pyramid layer can then be enhanced without too much noise. We retrieve the separated layer back to a reconstructed image using the reverse Laplacian pyramid method. This technique works effectively on the infrared digital holograms in noise suppressing. No multiple holograms or specific mechanical equipment are needed for doing so, which makes this technique easy to calculate and realize. Figures and numerical results are shown in this paper to demonstrate the performance of this technique.

  14. Sensitivity and noise of micro-Hall magnetic sensors based on InGaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenaud, B.; Segovia-Mera, A.; Delgard, A.; Feltin, N.; Hoffmann, A.; Pascal, F.; Zawadzki, W.; Mailly, D.; Chaubet, C.

    2016-01-01

    We study the room-temperature performance of micro-Hall magnetic sensors based on pseudomorphic InGaAs quantum wells. Active areas of our sensors range from 1 to 80 μm. We focus on the smallest detectable magnetic fields in small sensors and perform a systematic study of noise at room temperature in the frequency range between 1 Hz and 100 kHz. Our data are interpreted by the mobility fluctuation model. The Hooge parameter is determined for the applied technology. We show that, independently of the experimental frequency, the ratio of sensitivity to noise is proportional to characteristic length of the sensor. The resolution of 1 mG/√{Hz } is achievable in a 3 μm sensor at room temperature.

  15. Effects of high temperature and noise on erythrocyte membrane ATPase activity in pilots during flight.

    PubMed

    Qin, S Z; Yu, Q F; Ma, G X; Hao, W W; Li, M G; Zhao, H

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of heat and noise on erythrocyte membrane ATPase activities in pilots during flying. Method. Twenty-four pilots performing bombing for 3 h (45-53 degrees C, 122-97 dB in the cabin) served as the subjects. 21 ground personnel served as control (27 degrees C in the room). Blood samples were taken from both groups before flying (6:00 a.m.), and immediately (12:00 a.m.) and 8 h (8:00 p.m.) after flying. Na(+)-K+ ATPase, and Ca2(+)-Mg2+ ATPase activities in erythrocyte membrane were determined with colorimetry. Result. The Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity in erythrocyte membrane at 6:00 a.m. in pilots was higher than that in control group at the same time (P<0.01). The Ca2(+)-Mg2+ ATPase activities in erythrocyte membrane at 12:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. in pilots were significantly higher, compared with those in control group at the same time (P<0.01). Conclusion. The ATPase values obtained in our study were all within normal range, and the daytime variation of both groups are the same. Exposure of human body to heat and noise for long time may be harmful, the higher ATPase activity is, the more catabolism of ATP will be. ATP exhaustion will lead to Ca2+ overload in erythrocyte thus stiffen the red cell membrane.

  16. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (<1000 Hz) noise transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (<200 Hz). The device was applied to control noise transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  17. Design method of automotive powertrain mounting system based on vibration and noise limitations of vehicle level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Wen-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Ang; Lv, Zhao-Ping; Rakheja, Subhash

    2016-08-01

    The design logic and calculation method for determining mount stiffness and damping for a Powertrain Mounting System (PMS) based on reductions of vehicle vibration and noise contributed by mounts is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the design target for a PMS with regard to vibration and noise limitations of vehicle level contributed form mounts is described. Then a vehicle model with 13 Degree of Freedoms (DOFs) is proposed, which includes 6DOFs for the pow